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1

nature biotechnology volume 27 number 12 december 2009 1 half-life for indications when an extended residence time in the cir-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and can complicate tight control over plasma Focus on synthetic biology This issue of Nature Biotechnology

Cai, Long

2

Half-Life of Pa232  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The half-life of Pa232 from two methods of preparation (Pa231+n, and Th232+d) has been measured and found to be 1.32 days.

Arthur H. Jaffey and Earl K. Hyde

1950-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Half life for spontaneous fission of curium-245  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sample of curium-245 of extremely high enrichment was obtained with an electromagnetic separator. The half-life for spontaneous fission was determined by measuring the rate of alpha decay. (AIP)

Druzhinin, A.A.; Polynov, V.N.; Vesnovskii, S.P.; Korochkin, A.M.; Lbov, A.A.; Nikitin, E.A.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Determination of the half-life of /sup 243/ Cm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors determine the half life of Cm 243 (T/sub alpha 243/) relative to the half-life of Cm 244 (whose value is known with high accuracy) from the molar ratios of the mixture of the nuclide studied with Cm 244 and the nuclides of plutonium, forming as a result of the alpha decay of curium nuclides. The results of the calculations of T/sub alpha 243/ based on the formula presented are shown. The random error for the average value of T/sub alpha 243/ is presented with a confidence probability of 0.95.

Timofeev, G.A.; Kalygin, V.V.; Privalova, P.A.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Half-Life of 7Be in Beryllium Metal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......S., eds. Table of Isotopes (1996) John Wiley...peaks do not impair the determination of the half-life of...53.107 0.022 11) Boron nitride 53.174 0...materials (aluminum, boron nitride etc.) has...897. 5) Table of Isotopes, 8th Ed. Vol. I......

Tsutomu Ohtsuki; Hideyuki Yuki; Jirohta Kasagi; Masakatsu Muto

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Half-life for spontaneous fission of /sup 243/Cm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is proposed for measuring the half-life for spontaneous fission of curium 243. Isotope separation and purification techniques are described and the isotope ratio of the purified target is given. The efficiency of fission fragment detection for solid state mica detectors was measured with a curium 244 standard. Results for the rate of spontaneous fission are tabulated.

Polynov, V.N.; Druzhinin, A.A.; Korochkin, A.M.; Nikitin, E.A.; Bochkarev, V.A.; Vyachin, V.N.; Lapin, V.G.; Maksimov, M.Yu.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Dependence of the half-life of {sup 221}Fr on the implantation environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possible dependence of the half-life of {sup 221}Fr on the solid-state environment has been investigated by the simultaneous measurement of implanted {sup 221}Fr ions in an insulator (Si) and a metallic substrate (Au) at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. Our results indicate that, if existing, the difference in half-life does not follow a systematic trend and it is well below 1%.

Olaizola, B. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fraile, L. M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); ISOLDE, PH Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Riisager, K.; Jeppesen, H.; Skovbo, K.; Thomsen, L. A. [ISOLDE, PH Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Institut for Fysik og Astronomi, Aarhus Universitet, Ny Munkegade 120, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Correia, J. G.; Johnston, K. [ISOLDE, PH Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Fynbo, H. O. U.; Kirsebom, O. [Institut for Fysik og Astronomi, Aarhus Universitet, Ny Munkegade 120, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

8

Frostbite Theater - The Half-life of Barium-137m - Collect the Data!  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

five in our experiment to measure the half-life of five in our experiment to measure the half-life of barium-137m. Choose your detector and start collecting data! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: This is data run number five in our experiment to measure the half-life of metastable barium-137. If you want to know more about the equipment and materials we're using, please see the first video in this series. Steve: Joanna and I have already measured the background rate in this room. If you're using the Geiger-Müeller tube, the average background rate is 46.1 counts per minute. If you're using the scintillator with the photomultiplier tube, the average background rate is 3,454.4 counts per

9

Frostbite Theater - The Half-life of Barium-137m - Collect the Data!  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

three in our experiment to measure the half-life of three in our experiment to measure the half-life of barium-137m. Choose your detector and start collecting data! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: This is data run number three in our experiment to measure the half-life of metastable barium-137. If you want to know more about the equipment and materials we're using, please see the first video in this series. Steve: Joanna and I have already measured the background rate in this room. If you're using the Geiger-Müeller tube, the average background rate is 46.1 counts per minute. If you're using the scintillator with the photomultiplier tube, the average background rate is 3,454.4 counts per

10

Frostbite Theater - The Half-life of Barium-137m - Equipment Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Should a Person Touch 200,000 Volts? Should a Person Touch 200,000 Volts? Previous Video (Should a Person Touch 200,000 Volts?) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Collect the Data!) Collect the Data! Equipment Overview Use our equipment to measure the half-life of a radioactive isotope, barium-137m! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: Today, you're going to measure the half-life of a radioactive isotope, metastable barium-137! This is an actual experiment that you're going to do using our equipment! Steve: The half-life of a radioactive substance is the amount of time it takes for half of that substance to undergo decay. Now, half-lives can range from billions of years to a tiny fraction of a second. Happily, the

11

Precise half-life measurements for the superallowed beta(+) emitters Ar-34 and Cl-34  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the half-life of the superallowed emitter Ar-34 to be 843.8(4)ms...the quoted precision, 0.05%, is a factor of five improvement on the best previous measurement and meets this demanding requirement. Our measurement employed a high-efficiency gas counter, which was sensitive to positrons from both Ar-34 and its daughter Cl-34. We achieved the required precision on Ar-34 by analyzing the parent-daughter composite decay with a new fitting technique. We also obtained an improved half-life for Cl-34 of 1.5268(5) s, which has 0.03% precision and is a factor of two improvement on previous results. As a by-product of these measurements, we determined the half-life of Ar-35 to be 1.7754(11) s....

Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.; Brinkley, J. F.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Mayes, V. E.; Nica, N.; Sanchez-Vega, M.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Determination of the half-life of 213Fr with high precision  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-precision measurement of half-life and Q? value of neutral and highly charged ? emitters is a major subject of investigation currently. In this framework, we recently pushed half-life measurements of neutral emitters to a precision of a few per mil. This result was achieved by using different techniques and apparatuses at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS) and GSI Darmstadt. Here we report on 213Fr half-life determination [T1/2(213Fr)?=?34.140.06 s] at INFN-LNS, detailing the measurement protocol used. Direct comparison with the accepted value in the literature shows a discrepancy of more than three sigma. We propose this new value as a reference, discussing previous experiments.

M. Fisichella; A. Musumarra; F. Farinon; C. Nociforo; A. Del Zoppo; P. Figuera; M. La Cognata; M. G. Pellegriti; V. Scuderi; D. Torresi; E. Strano

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

13

Frostbite Theater - The Half-life of Barium-137m - Collect the Data!  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

two in our experiment to measure the half-life of two in our experiment to measure the half-life of barium-137m. Choose your detector and start collecting data! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: This is data run number two in our experiment to measure the half-life of metastable barium-137. If you want to know more about the equipment and materials we're using, please see the first video in this series. Steve: Joanna and I have already measured the background rate in this room. If you're using the Geiger-Müeller tube, the average background rate is 46.1 counts per minute. If you're using the scintillator with the photomultiplier tube, the average background rate is 3,454.4 counts per

14

Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed beta(+) emitter (26)Si  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measured the half-life of the superallowed 0(+) -> 0(+) beta(+) emitter (26)Si to be 2245.3(7) ms. We used pure sources of (26)Si and employed a high-efficiency gas counter, whichwas sensitive to positrons from both this nuclide and its daughter...

Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.; Banu, A.; Chen, L.; Golovko, V. V.; Goodwin, J.; Horvat, V.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Can Environmental Factors Affect Half-Life in Beta-Decay? An Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the advent of the 21st century, at which time certain results began to issue forth from certain research groups, especially the Rolfs? group in Bochum, Germany [2, 3, 4, 5], that observations were being made of half-life changes which were caused...

Goodwin, John 1953-

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

16

Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed beta(+) emitter (10)C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The half-life of (10)C has been measured to be 19.310(4) s, a result with 0.02% precision, which is a factor of three improvement over the best previous result. Since (10)C is the lightest superallowed 0(+)-> 0(+) beta(+) emitter, its ft value has...

Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.; Golovko, V.; Goodwin, J.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Half-Life Measurement for the rp-Process Waiting Point Nuclide Z80r  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

X-ray bursts have been suggested as a possible site for the astrophysical rp-process. The time scale for the process is governed by ?-decay half-lives of several even-even N=Z waiting point nuclei, in particular, N=Z=40 80Zr. A 4.1({+0.8}{-0.6})-s ?+/EC half-life for 80Zr was determined by observing delayed 84-keV ? rays depopulating a T1/2=4-?s isomer at 312 keV in the daughter 80Y. As this half-life is lower than many previously predicted values, the calculated excessive production of A=80 nuclides in astrophysical x-ray burst scenarios is reduced, and less extreme conditions are necessary for the production of heavier nuclides.

J. J. Ressler; A. Piechaczek; W. B. Walters; A. Aprahamian; M. Wiescher; J. C. Batchelder; C. R. Bingham; D. S. Brenner; T. N. Ginter; C. J. Gross; R. Grzywacz; D. Kulp; B. MacDonald; W. Reviol; J. Rikovska; K. Rykaczewski; J. A. Winger; E. F. Zganjar

2000-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

18

Frostbite Theater - The Half-life of Barium-137m - Calculations and Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collect the Data! Collect the Data! Previous Video (Collect the Data!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (How to Make a Cloud Chamber!) How to Make a Cloud Chamber! Calculations and Results Now that you have your data, it's time to calculate the half-life of barium-137m! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: We're finally ready to calculate the half-life of metastable barium-137 using the data that you collected earlier. If you haven't collected any data, you may want to watch the first two videos in this series. Steve: We're going to start with an equation. Don't panic. As far as equations go in physics, this one isn't too bad. Joanna: This equation tells us that the activity of a radioactive substance

19

Half-life of Fr221 in Si and Au at 4 K and at millikelvin temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The half-life of the ?-decaying nucleus Fr221 was determined in different environments, that is, embedded in Si at 4 K, and embedded in Au at 4 K and about 20 mK. No differences in half-life for these different conditions were observed within 0.1%. Furthermore, we quote a value for the absolute half-life of Fr221 of t1/2=286.1(10)s that is of comparable precision to the most precise value available in the literature.

F. Wauters; B. Verstichel; M. Breitenfeldt; V. De Leebeeck; V. Yu. Kozlov; I. Kraev; S. Roccia; G. Soti; M. Tandecki; E. Traykov; S. Van Gorp; D. Zkouck; N. Severijns

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

20

Lignin dynamics in arable soils as determined by 13C natural abundance.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Lignin is the second most abundant polymer in nature after the polysaccharides cellulose and hemicellulose. It is a main component in plant cell walls, where (more)

Hofmann, A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Calculation of the Aluminosilicate Half-Life Formation Time in the 2H Evaporator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2H Evaporator contains large quantities of aluminosilicate solids deposited on internal fixtures. The proposed cleaning operations will dissolve the solids in nitric acid. Operations will then neutralize the waste prior to transfer to a waste tank. Combining recent calculations of heat transfer for the 2H Evaporator cleaning operations and laboratory experiments for dissolution of solid samples from the pot, the authors estimated the re-formation rate for aluminosilicates during cooling. The results indicate a half-life formation of 17 hours when evaporator solution cools from 60 degrees C and 9 hours when cooled from 90 degrees C.

Fondeur, F.F.

2000-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

22

Research on the Natural Abundance of Deuterium and Other Isotopes in Nature. Final Report for Period Ending September 30, 1958  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

[Research from September 1957 to 1958 plus a] bibliography, containing about 78 references, on the natural abundance of deuterium and other isotopes in nature is presented. (W.L.H.)

Urey, H. C.

1959-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Half Life of {sup 101}Mo and {sup 101}Tc beta{sup -}-decay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the half-life of the {sup 155}Sm beta{sup -} decay was determined using enriched {sup 154}Sm samples submitted to irradiation in the IEA-R1 reactor of IPEN; the activity of the samples were followed for 4-5 consecutive half lives using a 198 cm{sup 3} HPGe detector. The data was corrected using a non paralizable dead time correction and fitted to an exponential decay function using a non linear fitting procedure developed on the MatLab platform. The resulting value--T{sub 1/2} = 22.180(26) min--was compatible to the one found in the literature, with a lower uncertainty.

Genezini, Frederico A.; Zahn, Guilherme S.; Zamboni, Cibele B. [Centro do Reator de Pesquisas (CRPq)-Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP). Av. Linneu Prestes, 2242-Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo, SP, 05507-000 (Brazil)

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

24

Average and recommended half-life values for two neutrino double beta decay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All existing positive results on two neutrino double beta decay in different nuclei were analyzed. Using the procedure recommended by the Particle Data Group, weighted average values for half-lives of $^{48}$Ca, $^{76}$Ge, $^{82}$Se, $^{96}$Zr, $^{100}$Mo, $^{100}$Mo - $^{100}$Ru ($0^+_1$), $^{116}$Cd, $^{130}$Te, $^{136}$Xe, $^{150}$Nd, $^{150}$Nd - $^{150}$Sm ($0^+_1$) and $^{238}$U were obtained. Existing geochemical data were analyzed and recommended values for half-lives of $^{128}$Te, and $^{130}$Ba are proposed. Given the measured half-life values, nuclear matrix elements were calculated using latest (more reliable and precise) values for phase space factor. Finally, previous results (PRC 81 (2010) 035501) were up-dated and results for $^{136}$Xe were added.

A. S. Barabash

2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

25

In vivo recovery and half-life time of a steam-treated factor IX concentrate in hemophilia B patients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Factor IX (FIX) recovery and half-life was measured in ten hemophilia B patients under standardized conditions. Each patient received a steam-treated high-purity factor IX concentrate at a dose of 1939 U/kg b...

M. Khler; E. Seifried; P. Hellstern; G. Pindur; C. Miyashita; S. Mrsdorf

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

EFFECTIVE HALF-LIFE OF CESIUM-137 IN VARIOUS ENVIRONMENTAL MEDIA AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the operational history of the Savannah River Site (SRS), many different radionuclides have been released from site facilities into the SRS environment. However, only a relatively small number of pathways, most importantly {sup 137}Cs in fish and deer, have contributed significantly to doses and risks to the public. The effective half-lives (T{sub e}) of {sup 137}Cs (which include both physical decay and environmental dispersion) in Savannah River floodplain soil and vegetation and in fish and white-tailed deer from the SRS were estimated using long-term monitoring data. For 19742011, the T{sub e}s of {sup 137}Cs in Savannah River floodplain soil and vegetation were 17.0 years (95% CI = 14.219.9) and 13.4 years (95% CI = 10.816.0), respectively. These T{sub e}s were greater than in a previous study that used data collected only through 2005 as a likely result of changes in the flood regime of the Savannah River. Field analyses of {sup 137}Cs concentrations in deer collected during yearly controlled hunts at the SRS indicated an overall T{sub e} of 15.9 years (95% CI = 12.319.6) for 19652011; however, the T{sub e} for 19902011 was significantly shorter (11.8 years, 95% CI = 4.818.8) due to an increase in the rate of {sup 137}Cs removal. The shortest T{sub e}s were for fish in SRS streams and the Savannah River (3.59.0 years), where dilution and dispersal resulted in rapid {sup 137}Cs removal. Long-term data show that T{sub e}s are significantly shorter than the physical half-life of {sup 137}Cs in the SRS environment but that they can change over time. Therefore, it is desirable have a long period of record for calculating Tes and risky to extrapolate T{sub e}s beyond this period unless the processes governing {sup 137}Cs removal are clearly understood.

Jannik, T.; Paller, M.; Baker, R.

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

27

Near-optimum procedure for half-life measurement by high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A near-optimum procedure for using high-resolution /gamma/-ray spectrometry to measure the half-lives of appropriate /gamma/-ray- emitting-nuclides is presented. Among the important points of the procedure are the employment of the reference source method for implicit correction of pileup and deadtime losses; the use of full-energy peak-area ratios as the fundamental measured quantities; and continuous, high-rate data acquisition to obtain good results in a fraction of a half-life if desired. Equations are given for estimating the precision of the computed half-lives in terms of total measurement time, number of spectral acquisitions, and the precision of peak-area ratios. Results of /sup 169/Yb half-life measurements are given as an example of the procedure's application. 3 refs., 2 tabs.

Parker, J.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

High-precision optical measurements of 13C/12C isotope ratios in organic compounds at natural abundance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-precision...compounds at natural abundance...catalytic combustor, and an isotopic...challenge to the high-cost and...carbon dioxide gas, using...temperature and pressure from which...of carbon gases . Spectrochim...2008 ) High precision...compounds at natural abundance...catalytic combustor, and...

Richard N. Zare; Douglas S. Kuramoto; Christa Haase; Sze M. Tan; Eric R. Crosson; Nabil M. R. Saad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

The significance of using the Newcomb-Benford law as a test of nuclear half-life calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Half-life number sequences collected from nuclear data charts are found to obey the Newcomb-Benford law. Based on this fact, it has been suggested recently, that this law should be used to test the quality of nuclear decay models. In this paper we briefly recall how, when and why the Newcomb-Benford law can be observed in a set of numbers with a given probability distribution. We investigate the special case of nuclear half-lives, and show that the law provides no additional clue in understanding decay half-lives. Thus, it can play no significant role in testing nuclear decay theories.

Janos Farkas; Gyorgy Gyurky

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

30

Relationship between isotope half-life and prostatic edema for optimal prostate dose coverage in permanent seed implants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The robustness of treatment planning to prostatic edema for three different isotopes ({sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 131}Cs) is explored using dynamical dose calculations on 25 different clinical prostate cases. The treatment plans were made using the inverse planning by simulated annealing (IPSA) algorithm. The prescription was 144, 127, and 125 Gy for {sup 125}I, {sup 131}Cs, and {sup 103}Pd, respectively. For each isotope, three dose distribution schemes were used to impose different protection levels to the urethra: V{sub 120}=0%, V{sub 150}=0%, and V{sub 150}=30%. Eleven initial edema values were considered ranging from 1.0 (no edema) to 2.0 (100%). The edema was assumed to resolve exponentially with time. The prostate volume, seed positions, and seed activity were dynamically tracked to produce the final dose distribution. Edema decay half-lives of 10, 30, and 50 days were used. A total of 675 dynamical calculations were performed for each initial edema value. For the {sup 125}I isotope, limiting the urethra V{sub 120} to 0% leads to a prostate D{sub 90} under 140 Gy for initial edema values above 1.5. Planning with urethra V{sub 150} at 0% provides a good response to the edema; the prostate D{sub 90} remains higher than 140 Gy for edema values up to 1.8 and a half-life of 30 days or less. For {sup 103}Pd, the prostate D{sub 90} is under 97% of the prescription dose for approximately 66%, 40%, and 30% of edema values for urethra V{sub 120}=0%, V{sub 150}=0%, and V{sub 150}=30%, respectively. Similar behavior is seen for {sup 131}Cs and the center of the prostate becomes 'cold' for almost all edema scenarios. The magnitude of the edema following prostate brachytherapy, as well as the half-life of the isotope used and that of the edema resorption, all have important impacts on the dose distribution. The {sup 125}I isotope with its longer half-life is more robust to prostatic edema. Setting up good planning objectives can provide an adequate compromise between organ doses and robustness. This is even more important since seed misplacements will contribute to further degrade dose coverage.

Villeneuve, Maxime; Leclerc, Ghyslain; Lessard, Etienne; Pouliot, Jean; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Hotel-dieu de Quebec, CHUQ, 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec J1H 5N4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94713-1708 (United States); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Hotel-dieu de Quebec, CHUQ, 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de physique, de genie physique et d'optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Improved half-life measurement of 224Pa and its 209Bi(18O,3n)224Pa production cross section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

224Pa was produced via the 209Bi(18O,3n) reaction at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron and the half-life was determined to be 85020 ms by measuring its alpha decay using our rotating wheel system. Our value is consistent with a previously reported half-life of 950150 ms for 224Pa produced via the 205Tl(22Ne,3n) reaction, but its much more precise. The cross section for the 209Bi(18O,3n)224Pa reaction was measured to be 0.50.1 mb for 8789 MeV 18O5+ projectiles incident on the target.

P. A. Wilk; K. E. Gregorich; M. B. Hendricks; M. R. Lane; D. M. Lee; C. A. McGrath; D. A. Shaughnessy; D. A. Strellis; E. R. Sylwester; D. C. Hoffman

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

On the properties of the negatively charged lithium ions and evaluation of the half-life of the ${}^{7}$Be atom(s)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bound state properties of the ground $2^1S-$state in the four-electron lithium ion Li$^{-}$ (or ${}^{7}$Li$^{-}$ ion) are determined from the results of accurate, variational computations. We also determine such properties for the ground $2^1S-$state(s) in the ${}^{6}$Li$^{-}$ and ${}^{7}$Li$^{-}$ ions with the finite nuclear masses. Another closely related problem discussed in this study is accurate numerical evaluation of the half-life of the beryllium-7 isotope.

Frolov, Alexei M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Measurement of the half-life of the T=$\\frac{1}{2}$ mirror decay of $^{19}$Ne and its implication on physics beyond the standard model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The $\\frac{1}{2}^+ \\rightarrow \\frac{1}{2}^+$ superallowed mixed mirror decay of $^{19}$Ne to $^{19}$F is excellently suited for high precision studies of the weak interaction. However, there is some disagreement on the value of the half-life. In a new measurement we have determined this quantity to be $T_{1/2}$ = $17.2832 \\pm 0.0051_{(stat)}$ $\\pm 0.0066_{(sys)}$ s, which differs from the previous world average by 3 standard deviations. The impact of this measurement on limits for physics beyond the standard model such as the presence of tensor currents is discussed.

L. J. Broussard; H. O. Back; M. S. Boswell; A. S. Crowell; P. Dendooven; G. S. Giri; C. R. Howell; M. F. Kidd; K. Jungmann; W. L. Kruithof; A. Mol; C. J. G. Onderwater; R. W. Pattie Jr.; P. D. Shidling; M. Sohani; D. J. van der Hoek; A. Rogachevskiy; E. Traykov; O. O. Versolato; L. Willmann; H. W. Wilschut; A. R. Young

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

34

Natural Gas: From Shortages to Abundance in the U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent dramatic and largely unanticipated growth in the current and expected future production of shale gas, and the related developments in the production of shale oil, have dramatically changed the energy future of the U.S. and potentially of the world compared to what experts were forecasting only a few years ago. These changes would not have been realized as quickly and efficiently absent deregulation of the wellhead price of natural gas, unbundling of gas supplies from pipeline transportation services, the associated development of efficient liquid markets for natural gas, and reforms to the licensing and regulation of prices for gas pipelines charge to move gas from where it is produced to where it is consumed. This economic platform supported the integration of technological advances in vertical drilling, downhole telemetry, horizontal drilling, monitoring and control of deep drilling equipment, and hydraulic fracturing to exploit economically shale gas deposits that were identified long ago, but considered to be uneconomical until recently. I. Natural Gas Wellhead Price and Pipeline Regulation Federal regulation of the natural gas industry began with the Natural Gas Act of 1938 (NGA). The NGA gave the Federal Power Commission (FPC), later the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the authority to license the construction and expansion of new interstate natural gas pipelines, to ensure that they are operated safely, and to regulate the prices 1

Paul L. Joskow

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Purification, Recovery, and Laser-Driven Fluorination of Silicon from Dissolved and Particulate Silica for the Measurement of Natural Stable Isotope Abundances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purification, Recovery, and Laser-Driven Fluorination of Silicon from Dissolved and Particulate Silica for the Measurement of Natural Stable Isotope Abundances ... At least three simple techniques exist for this:? fusion of SiO2 with Na2CO3 to form water-soluble sodium silicate, dissolution in HF, or dissolution in NaOH. ...

Christina L. De La Rocha; Mark A. Brzezinski; Michael J. DeNiro

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS ?N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by ?N NMR. Liquid state ?N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (H?N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

37

Natural Gas Development and Grassland Songbird Abundance in Southwestern Saskatchewan: The Impact of Gas Wells and Cumulative Disturbance .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The quantity and quality of remaining grasslands in southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada, are threatened by expansion of natural gas development. The number of natural gas wells (more)

Bogard, Holly Jayne Kalyn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Metrological Determination of Natural Radioactive Isotopes {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 210}Pb by Means of Ge Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A metrological method to determine the activity per mass unity (activity concentration) of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb ({sup 238}U decay series) and {sup 228}Ra ({sup 232}Th series) by gamma-ray spectrometers based on hyper-pure coaxial germanium detector was developed. In the soil the {sup 22}Ra (half-life = 1600 years) exhibits the same level of radioactivity as {sup 238}U (half-life 4.5x10{sup 9} years) because of a natural phenomenon called secular equilibrium. {sup 226}Ra decays into {sup 222}Rn (half-life = 3.8 days), a radioactive inert gas. After several days, the {sup 222}Rn naturally decays to {sup 218}Po (half-life = 3 minutes), where finally {sup 210}Pb (half-life = 22 years) is produced. The metrological capability of high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry for naturally occurring radionuclides at environmental levels is showed, with emphasis on the use of 2 mL standard sources volume in a glass ampoule. Source preparation and calibration procedures are described. Radionuclide standards in an activity range of 10 to 250 Bq/g were produced which can be applied in a variety of environmental sample analysis (water, plant material, sediment, etc.). Uncertainties for {sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb around 3% (k = 1) were obtained.

Almeida, Maria Candida M. de; Delgado, Jose U.; Poledna, Roberto; Oliveira, Estela Maria de; Silva, Ronaldo L. da [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes, Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear(SEMRA/LNMRI/IRD/CNEN) Av. Salvador Allende s/n, Recreio, Rio de Janeiro, CEP 22780-160, RJ (Brazil)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

39

The Solar Argon Abundance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The solar argon abundance cannot be directly derived by spectroscopic observations of the solar photosphere. The solar Ar abundance is evaluated from solar wind measurements, nucleosynthetic arguments, observations of B stars, HII regions, planetary nebulae, and noble gas abundances measured in Jupiter's atmosphere. These data lead to a recommended argon abundance of N(Ar) = 91,200(+/-)23,700 (on a scale where Si = 10^6 atoms). The recommended abundance for the solar photosphere (on a scale where log N(H) = 12) is A(Ar)photo = 6.50(+/-)0.10, and taking element settling into account, the solar system (protosolar) abundance is A(Ar)solsys = 6.57(+/-)0.10.

Katharina Lodders

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

40

Natural  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Imports Volume (million cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 2,094,387 2,266,751 2,566,049 2,816,408 2,883,277 Mexico .............................. 0 1,678 7,013 6,722 13,862 Total Pipeline Imports....... 2,094,387 2,268,429 2,573,061 2,823,130 2,897,138 LNG Algeria .............................. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 35,325 United Arab Emirates ....... 0 0 0 0 4,949 Total LNG Imports............. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 40,274 Total Imports......................... 2,137,504 2,350,115 2,623,839 2,841,048 2,937,413 Average Price (dollars per thousand cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 1.84 2.02 1.86 1.48 1.96 Mexico .............................. - 1.94 1.99 1.53 2.25 Total Pipeline Imports.......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Earth-Abundant Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE funds research into Earth-abundant materials for thin-film solar applications in response to the issue of materials scarcity surrounding other photovoltaic (PV) technologies. Below are a list...

42

OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M. [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-7215 (United States); Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V., E-mail: luck@fafnir.astr.cwru.edu, E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua, E-mail: val@deneb1.odessa.ua, E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua [Department of Astronomy and Astronomical Observatory, Odessa National University, Isaac Newton Institute of Chile, Odessa Branch, Shevchenko Park, 65014 Odessa (Ukraine)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Solar abundance problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The chemical composition of the Sun is among the most important quantities in astrophysics. Solar abundances are needed for modelling stellar atmospheres, stellar structure and evolution, population synthesis, and galaxies as a whole. The solar abundance problem refers to the conflict of observed data from helioseismology and the predictions made by stellar interior models for the Sun, if these models use the newest solar chemical composition obtained with 3D and NLTE models of radiative transfer. Here we take a close look at the problem from observational and theoretical perspective. We also provide a list of possible solutions, which have yet to be tested.

Bergemann, Maria

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Measuring solar abundances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the rapporteur paper of Working Group 2 on Measuring Solar Abundances. The working group presented and discussed the different observations and methods for obtaining the elemental and isotopic composition of the Sun, and critically reviewed their results and the accuracies thereof. Furthermore, a few important yet unanswered questions were identified, and the potential of future missions to provide answers was assessed.

Reisenfeld, D. B. (Daniel B.); Von Steiger, R. (Rudolf); Vial, J.-C. (Jean-Claude); Bochsler, P.; Chaussidon, M.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Fleck, B.; Heber, V. S.; Wiens, R. C. (Roger C.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Nebular Abundance Errors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The errors inherent to the use of the standard "ionization correction factor" ("i_CF") method of calculating nebular conditions and relative abundances of H, He, N, O, Ne, S, and Ar in emission line nebulae have been investigated under conditions typical for planetary nebulae. The photoionization code CLOUDY was used to construct a series of model nebulae with properties spanning the range typical of PNe. Its radial "profiles" of bright, frequently observed optical emission lines were then summed over a variety of "apertures" to generate sets of emission line measurements. These resulting line ratios were processed using the i_CF method to "derive" nebular conditions and abundances. We find that for lines which are summed over the entire nebula the i_CF-derived abundances differ from the input abundances by less than 5% for He and O up to 25% or more for Ne, S, and Ar. For resolved observations, however, the discrepancies are often much larger and are systematically variable with radius. This effect is especially pronounced in low-ionization zones where nitrogen and oxygen are neutral or once-ionized such as in FLIERs, ansae and ionization fronts. We argue that the reports of stellar-enriched N in the FLIERs of several PNe are probably specious.

J. Alexander; B. Balick

1997-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

Constraining solar abundances using helioseismology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent analyses of solar photospheric abundances suggest that the oxygen abundance in the solar atmosphere needs to be revised downwards. In this study we investigate the consequence of this revision on helioseismic analyses of the depth of the solar convection zone and the helium abundance in the solar envelope and find no significant effect. We also find that the revised abundances along with the current OPAL opacity tables are not consistent with seismic data. A significant upward revision of the opacity tables is required to make solar models with lower oxygen abundance consistent with seismic observations.

Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

2004-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

47

Nucleosynthesis: Stellar and Solar Abundances and Atomic Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abundance observations indicate the presence of often surprisingly large amounts of neutron capture (i.e., s- and r-process) elements in old Galactic halo and globular cluster stars. These observations provide insight into the nature of the earliest generations of stars in the Galaxy -- the progenitors of the halo stars -- responsible for neutron-capture synthesis. Comparisons of abundance trends can be used to understand the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the nature of heavy element nucleosynthesis. In addition age determinations, based upon long-lived radioactive nuclei abundances, can now be obtained. These stellar abundance determinations depend critically upon atomic data. Improved laboratory transition probabilities have been recently obtained for a number of elements. These new gf values have been used to greatly refine the abundances of neutron-capture elemental abundances in the solar photosphere and in very metal-poor Galactic halo stars. The newly determined stellar abundances are surprisingly consistent with a (relative) Solar System r-process pattern, and are also consistent with abundance predictions expected from such neutron-capture nucleosynthesis.

John J. Cowan; James E. Lawler; Christopher Sneden; E. A. Den Hartog; Jason Collier

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

48

Solar abundance of {sup 176}Lu and s-process nucleosynthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The isotopic composition of lutetium has been measured with high precision using a thermal ionization mass spectrometer whose linearity was verified by measuring an isotopically certified reference material for potassium prepared by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST 985). The abundance sensitivity of the mass spectrometer for the measured ion beams of Lu{sup +} was examined to ensure the absence of tailing effects and interfering ion beams. The isotope fractionation of the measured {sup 176}Lu/{sup 175}Lu ratio was estimated with reference to the isotope fractionation of ytterbium (whose isotopes are in the same mass region as lutetium), which was recently measured in this laboratory using gravimetrically prepared solutions of the enriched isotopes {sup 171}Yb and {sup 176}Yb. This is the first reported publication in which the measured isotope ratio of Lu has been corrected for isotope fractionation. An accurate determination of the abundance of {sup 176}Lu is required because of the importance of this isotope in cosmochronometry, cosmothermometry, and s-process branching studies. An accurate abundance of {sup 176}Lu is also required as it is the parent nuclide of the {sup 176}Lu/{sup 176}Hf geochronometer. The measured isotopic composition of Lu, corrected for isotope fractionation, is {sup 176}Lu/{sup 175}Lu = 0.026680 {+-} 0.000013, which gives isotope abundances for {sup 175}Lu of 97.4013 {+-} 0.0012% and of {sup 176}Lu of 2.5987 {+-} 0.0012%. The isotope abundances and relative atomic masses of the two isotopes give an atomic weight of 174.9668 {+-} 0.0001, which is in good agreement with the present Standard Atomic Weight A{sub r}(Lu) = 174.967 {+-} 0.001, but with improved accuracy. An accurate assessment of the {sup 176}Lu/{sup 175}Lu ratio is important in order to calculate the Solar System abundances of {sup 175}Lu and {sup 176}Lu for astrophysical evaluations. The experimentally determined Solar System abundances for {sup 175}Lu and {sup 176}Lu of 0.0347918 {+-} 0.0000004 and 0.0009282 {+-} 0.0000004, respectively (as compared to silicon equals 10{sup 6} atoms), should now be used for these purposes. This determination of the isotopic composition of Lu also demonstrates that the presently accepted half-life of {sup 176}Lu needs to be reevaluated.

Laeter, J.R. de; Bukilic, N. [Department of Applied Physics, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia, 6845 (Australia)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Measuring Solar Abundances with Seismology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The revision of the photospheric abundances proferred by Asplund et al has rendered opacity theory inconsistent with the seismologically determined opacity through the Sun. This highlights the need for a direct seismological measurement of solar abundances. Here we describe the technique used to measure abundances with seismology, examine our ability to detect differences between solar models using this technique, and discuss its application in the Sun.

Katie Mussack; Douglas Gough

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Abundance of Interstellar Nitrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the HST Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS), we have obtained high S/N echelle observations of the weak interstellar N I 1160, 1161 A absorption doublet toward the stars Gamma Cas, Lambda Ori, Iota Ori, Kappa Ori, Delta Sco, and Kappa Sco. In combination with a previous GHRS measurement of N I toward Zeta Oph, these new observations yield a mean interstellar gas phase nitrogen abundance (per 10$^6$ H atoms) of 10$^6$ N/H = 75 +/- 4. There are no statistically significant variations in the measured N abundances from sightline to sightline and no evidence of density-dependent depletion from the gas-phase. Since N is not expected to be depleted much into dust grains in these diffuse sightlines, its gas-phase abundance should reflect the total interstellar abundance. Consequently, the GHRS observations imply that the abundance of interstellar nitrogen (gas plus grains) in the local Milky Way is about 80% of the solar system value of 10$^6$ N/H = 93 +/- 16. Although this interstellar abundance deficit is somewhat less than that recently found for oxygen and krypton with GHRS, the solar N abundance and the N I oscillator strengths are too uncertain to definitively rule out either a solar ISM N abundance or a 2/3 solar ISM N abundance similar to that of O and Kr.

David M. Meyer; Jason A. Cardelli; Ulysses J. Sofia

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Determining solar abundances using helioseismology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent downward revision of solar photospheric abundances of Oxygen and other heavy elements has resulted in serious discrepancies between solar models and solar structure as determined through helioseismology. In this work we investigate the possibility of determining the solar heavy-element abundance without reference to spectroscopy by using helioseismic data. Using the dimensionless sound-speed derivative in the solar convection zone, we find that the heavy element abundance, Z, of 0.0172 +/- 0.002, which is closer to the older, higher value of the abundances.

H. M. Antia; Sarbani Basu

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

52

Literature survey of isotopic abundance data for 1987-1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I have compiled all of the data on isotopic abundance measurements and their variation in nature for the time period since the last General Assembly. Most of the data deals with the variations in the abundances as given by per mil deviations from some standard. As such, they are not of major interest to the Atomic Weights Commission. However, there were some measurements which are of general interest in this list.

Holden, N.E. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

1989-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

53

Adding more value to natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adding more value to natural gas ... Calif, has developed a catalyst that could convert natural gas. ... Natural gas is abundant in many countries but not used widely as a feedstock because transporting it is very expensive. ...

MAUREEN ROUBI

1998-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

54

Kinetics simulation for natural gas conversion to unsaturated C? hydrocarbons.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Natural gas resource is abundant and can be found throughout the world. But most natural gas reserves are at remote sites and considered stranded because (more)

Yang, Li

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Technology Key to Harnessing Natural Gas Potential | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

- for a total of 30 million - that will pursue innovations in natural gas storage tanks and fueling stations, helping to harness our abundant supplies of domestic natural gas...

56

Non-Lte Effects on be and B Abundance Determinations in Cool Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the nature of non-LTE effects affecting abundance analysis of cool stars. The departures from LTE of importance for the B I lines in solar-type stars are described and some new results are presented. Boron abundances derived under the LTE assumption have significant systematic errors, especially for metal-poor stars. For beryllium, current results suggest that departures from LTE will not affect abundance analysis significantly.

Dan Kiselman; Mats Carlsson

1994-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

57

LITERATURE SURVEY ON ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO MEASUREMENTS - 2001-2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Along with my usual weekly review of the published literature for new nuclear data, I also search for new candidates for best measurements of isotopic abundances from a single source. Most of the published articles, that I previously had found in the Research Library at the Brookhaven Lab, have already been sent to the members of the Atomic Weights Commission, by either Michael Berglund or Thomas Walczyk. In the last few days, I checked the published literature for any other articles in the areas of natural variations in isotopic abundance ratios, measurements of isotopic abundance ratios on samples of extra-terrestrial material and isotopic abundance ratio measurements performed using ICPMS instruments. Hopefully this information will be of interest to members of the Commission, the sub-committee on isotopic abundance measurements (SIAM), members of the former sub-committee on natural isotopic fractionation (SNIF), the sub-committee on extra-terrestrial isotope ratios (SETIR), the RTCE Task Group and the Guidelines Task Group, who are dealing with ICPMS and TIMS comparisons. In the following report, I categorize the publications in one of four areas. Measurements performed using either positive or negative ions with Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer, TIMS, instruments; measurements performed on Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer, ICPMS, instruments; measurements of natural variations of the isotopic abundance ratios; and finally measurements on extra-terrestrial samples with instrumentation of either type. There is overlap in these areas. I selected out variations and ET results first and then categorized the rest of the papers by TIMS and ICPMS.

HOLDEN, N.E.

2005-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

58

Abundant Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abundant Power Abundant Power Place Charlotte, North Carolina Zip 28204 Sector Renewable Energy Product North Carolina-based firm focused on capital formation, financing and project development for renewable energy projects. Coordinates 35.2225°, -80.837539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2225,"lon":-80.837539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

59

Abundant Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Abundant Biofuels Place Monterey, California Sector Biofuels Product Abundant Biofuels plans to develop biodiesel feedstock plantations, refineries, and distribution channels in one or more Caribbean, Central American, or South American countries. Coordinates 38.413256°, -79.582974° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.413256,"lon":-79.582974,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

60

THE FATE OF THE EPSILON PHASE IN UO2 OF THE OKLO NATURAL FISSON REACTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In spent nuclear fuel (SNF), the micron- to nano-sized epsilon phase (Mo-Ru-Pd-Tc-Rh) is an important host of {sup 99}Tc which has a long half life (2.13 x 10{sup 5} years) and can be an important contributor to dose in safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories. In order to examine the occurrence and the fate of the epsilon phase during the corrosion of SNF over long time periods, samples of uraninite from the Oklo natural reactors ({approx}2.0 Ga) have been investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Because essentially all of the {sup 99}Tc has decayed to {sup 99}Ru, this study focuses on 4d-elements of the epsilon phase. Samples were obtained from the research collection at University of Michigan representing reactor zone (RZ) 10 (836, 819,687) and from RZ 13 (864,910). Several phases with 4d-metals have been identified within UO{sub 2} matrix at the scale of 50-700 nm; fioodite, PdBi{sub 2}, with trace amounts of As, Fe, and Te, and palladodymite or rhodarsenide, (Pd,Rh){sub 2}As. The most abundant 4d-metal phase is ruthenarsinite, (Ru,Ni)As, which has a representative composition: As, 59.9; Coy 2.5; Ni, 5.2; Ru, 18.6; Rh, 8.4; Pd, 3.1; Sb, 2.4 in atomic%. Ruthenarsenite nanoparticles are typically surrounded by Pb-rich domains, galena in most cases; whereas, some particles reveal a complexly zoned composition within the grain, such as a Pb-rich domain at the core and enrichment of Ni, Co, and As at the rim. Some ruthenarsenites and Rh-Bi-particles are embedded in surrounding alteration products, e.g., chlorite, adjacent to uraninite (no further than {approx}5 {micro}m). A few of those particles are still coated by a Pb-rich layer. Based on these results, the history that epsilon phases have experienced can be described as follows: (1) The original epsilon phase was changed to, in most cases, ruthenarsenite, by As-rich fluids with other trace metals. Dissolution and a simultaneous precipitation may be responsible for the phase change. (2) All Mo and most of the Tc were released from the epsilon phase. Galena precipitated surrounding the 4d-metal phases. (3) Once the uraninite matrix has dissolved, the epsilon nanoparticles were released and ''captured'' within alteration phases that are immediately adjacent to the uraninite.

S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

H II region abundances in Seyfert galaxies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theoretical H II region abundance sequence calibration reported by Dopita and Evans in 1986 has been applied to optical spectrophotometry of 23 H II regions located in the inner disk regions of two Seyfert 1 and two Seyfert 2 galaxies, including the prototype Seyfert 2, NGC 1068, in order to determine oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur abundances. The mean oxygen abundance derived for each galaxy ranges between solar abundance and twice solar abundance. There is no evidence for abnormal N/O or S/O abundance ratios in any of the H II regions observed. The observations suggest that the abundances derived for the H II regions may be adopted as nuclear abundances and employed to constrain theoretical models of the Seyfert nucleus. The observations then place limits on the influence which the active nucleus can have on chemical enrichment of the local interstellar medium. 47 references.

Evans, I.N.; Dopita, M.A.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Abundance measurements in stellar environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

Leone, F. [Universit di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sezione Astrofisica, Via S. Sofia 78, 95123 Catania (Italy)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

63

Abundance Ratios in Early-Type Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although evidence is accumulating that abundance ratios in galaxies are often non-solar, they are far from understood. I resume the current evidence for non-solar abundance ratios, supplementing the recent review by Worthey (1998) with some new results. It appears that the Mg/Fe abundance ratio only depends on the mass of the galaxy, not on the formation time-scale. For massive galaxies [Mg/Fe] > 0, while small galaxies show solar abundance ratios. Information about abundances of other element is scarce, but new evidence is given that [Ca/Fe] is solar, or slightly lower than solar, contrary to what is expected for an alpha-element.

Reynier Peletier

1999-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

64

Abundance and evolution of gas around Beta Pictoris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas produc- tion of solar abundance are preferred to producewith respect to the solar abundance. 5. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Xietop panel) and solar abundance (bottom). Green squares are

Xie, Jiwei; Brandeker, Alexis; Wu, Yanqin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Stellar abundances of beryllium and CUBES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stellar abundances of beryllium are useful in different areas of astrophysics, including studies of the Galactic chemical evolution, of stellar evolution, and of the formation of globular clusters. Determining Be abundances in stars is, however, a challenging endeavor. The two Be II resonance lines useful for abundance analyses are in the near UV, a region strongly affected by atmospheric extinction. CUBES is a new spectrograph planned for the VLT that will be more sensitive than current instruments in the near UV spectral region. It will allow the observation of fainter stars, expanding the number of targets where Be abundances can be determined. Here, a brief review of stellar abundances of Be is presented together with a discussion of science cases for CUBES. In particular, preliminary simulations of CUBES spectra are presented, highlighting its possible impact in investigations of Be abundances of extremely metal-poor stars and of stars in globular clusters.

Smiljanic, R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The discrepancy between solar abundances and helioseismology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There have been recent downward revisions of the solar photospheric abundances of Oxygen and other heavy elements. These revised abundances along with OPAL opacities are not consistent with seismic constraints. In this work we show that the recently released OP opacity tables cannot resolve this discrepancy either. While the revision in opacities does not seem to resolve this conflict, an upward revision of Neon abundance in solar photosphere offers a possible solution to this problem.

H. M. Antia; Sarbani Basu

2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

67

Earth-abundant semiconductors for photovoltaic applications ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Earth-abundant semiconductors for photovoltaic applications Thin film photovoltaics (solar cells) has the potential to revolutionize our energy landscape by producing clean,...

68

Helioseismic limit on heavy element abundance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Primary inversions of accurately measured solar oscillation frequencies coupled with the equations of thermal equilibrium and other input physics, enable us to infer the temperature and hydrogen abundance profiles inside the Sun. These profiles also help in setting constraints on the input physics as well as on heavy element abundance in the solar core. Using different treatments of plasma screening for nuclear reaction rates, limits on the cross-section of proton-proton nuclear reaction as a function of heavy element abundance in the solar core are obtained and an upper limit on heavy element abundance in the solar core is also derived from these results.

H. M. Antia; S. M. Chitre

2002-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

69

RELATIVE CHIRAL ABUNDANCES OF CARBON NANOTUBES DETERMINED BYRELATIVE CHIRAL ABUNDANCES OF CARBON NANOTUBES DETERMINED BYRELATIVE CHIRAL ABUNDANCES OF CARBON NANOTUBES DETERMINED BYRELATIVE CHIRAL ABUNDANCES OF CARBON NANOTUBES DETERMINED BY RESONANT RAMAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RELATIVE CHIRAL ABUNDANCES OF CARBON NANOTUBES DETERMINED BYRELATIVE CHIRAL ABUNDANCES OF CARBON NANOTUBES DETERMINED BYRELATIVE CHIRAL ABUNDANCES OF CARBON NANOTUBES DETERMINED BYRELATIVE CHIRAL ABUNDANCES OF CARBON NANOTUBES DETERMINED BY RESONANT RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY USING A TUNABLE DYE LASERRESONANT

Mellor-Crummey, John

70

On the solar abundance of indium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......we suggest that the solar indium abundance is close...line at high excitation energy from a species with low-first ionization energy. 1 http://nuclear-astrophysics...our attention to the solar indium abundance, and...Fig. 8. This research project has been supported by......

N. Vitas; I. Vince; M. Lugaro; O. Andriyenko; M. Gosic; R. J. Rutten

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

71

On the solar nickel and oxygen abundances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Determinations of the solar oxygen content relying on the neutral forbidden transition at 630 nm depend upon the nickel abundance, due to a Ni I blend. Here we rederive the solar nickel abundance, using the same ab initio 3D hydrodynamic model of the solar photosphere employed in the recent revision of the abundances of C, N, O and other elements. Using 17 weak, unblended lines of Ni I together with the most accurate atomic and observational data available we find log epsilon_Ni = 6.17 +/- 0.02 (statistical) +/- 0.05 (systematic), a downwards shift of 0.06 to 0.08 dex relative to previous 1D-based abundances. We investigate the implications of the new nickel abundance for studies of the solar oxygen abundance based on the [O I] 630 nm line in the quiet Sun. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the oxygen abundance implied by the recent sunspot spectropolarimetric study of Centeno & Socas-Navarro needs to be revised downwards from log epsilon_O = 8.86 +/- 0.07 to 8.71 +/- 0.10. This revision is based on the new nickel abundance, application of the best available gf-value for the 630 nm forbidden oxygen line, and a more transparent treatment of CO formation. Determinations of the solar oxygen content relying on forbidden lines now appear to converge around log epsilon_O = 8.7.

Pat Scott; Martin Asplund; Nicolas Grevesse; A. Jacques Sauval

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

72

Helioseismological Implications of Recent Solar Abundance Determinations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that standard solar models are in good agreement with the helioseismologically determined sound speed and density as a function of solar radius, the depth of the convective zone, and the surface helium abundance, as long as those models do not incorporate the most recent heavy element abundance determinations. However, sophisticated new analyses of the solar atmosphere infer lower abundances of the lighter metals (like C, N, O, Ne, and Ar) than the previously widely used surface abundances. We show that solar models that include the lower heavy element abundances disagree with the solar profiles of sound speed and density as well as the depth of the convective zone and the helium abundance. The disagreements for models with the new abundances range from factors of several to many times the quoted uncertainties in the helioseismological measurements. The disagreements are at temperatures below what is required for solar interior fusion reactions and therefore do not significantly affect solar neutrino emission. If errors in thecalculated OPAL opacities are solely responsible for the disagreements, then the corrections in the opacity must extend from 2 times 10^6 K (R = 0.7R_Sun)to 5 times 10^6 K (R = 0.4 R_Sun), with opacity increases of order 10%.

John N. Bahcall; Sarbani Basu; Marc Pinsonneault; Aldo M. Serenelli

2004-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

73

On the solar abundance of indium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The generally adopted value for the solar abundance of indium is over six times higher than the meteoritic value. We address this discrepancy through numerical synthesis of the 451.13 nm line on which all indium abundance studies are based, both for the quiet-sun and the sunspot umbra spectrum, employing standard atmosphere models and accounting for hyperfine structure and Zeeman splitting in detail. The results, as well as a re-appraisal of indium nucleosynthesis, suggest that the solar indium abundance is close to the meteoritic value, and that some unidentified ion line causes the 451.13 nm feature in the quiet-sun spectrum.

N. Vitas; I. Vince; M. Lugaro; O. Andriyenko; M. Gosic; R. J. Rutten

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

1999 Macmillan Magazines Ltd letters to nature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

leads to chaos. Nature 364, 232­235 (1993). 5. Sinclair, A. R. E. et al. Can the solar cycle and climate-wave structure which may be seen in the eight lattice `snapshots' of Fig. 5b­i. Population abundances in the meta process that has the potential to shape the distribution and abundance of species over all scales, from

Allen, Jont

75

SIMPLIFIED PROCEDURE FOR CERTAIN USERS OF SEALED SOURCES, SHORT HALF-LIFE MATERIALS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

authority with a minimum of: (1) a certification that no residual radioactive contamination attributable, AND SMALL QUANTITIES A large number of users of radioactive materials may use a simplified procedure that qualify for simplified decommissioning procedures are those where radioactive materials have been used

76

Half-life calculation of one-proton emitters with a shell model potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accumulated amount of data for half-lives of proton emitters still remains a challenge to the ability of nuclear models to reproduce them consistently. These nuclei are far from beta stability line in a region where the validity of current nuclear models is not guaranteed. A nuclear shell model is introduced to the calculation of the nuclear barrier of less deformed proton emitters. The predictions using the proposed model are in good agreement with the data, with the advantage of have used only a single parameter in the model.

Rodrigues, M. M.; Duarte, S. B. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF/MCT Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Teruya, N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba - UFPB Campus de Joao Pessoa, 58051-970, Joao Pessoa - PB (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

77

Analysis of environmental influences in nuclear half-life measurements exhibiting time-dependent decay rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a recent series of papers evidence has been presented for correlations between solar activity and nuclear decay rates. This includes an apparent correlation between Earth-Sun distance and data taken at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Although these correlations could arise from a direct interaction between the decaying nuclei and some particles or fields emanating from the Sun, they could also represent an "environmental" effect arising from a seasonal variation of the sensitivities of the BNL and PTB detectors due to changes in temperature, relative humidity, background radiation, etc. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of the responses of the detectors actually used in the BNL and PTB experiments, and show that sensitivities to seasonal variations in the respective detectors are likely too small to produce the observed fluctuations.

Jenkins, Jere H; Fischbach, Ephraim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed beta(+) emitter (38)K(m)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada V5A 1S6 J. C. Hardy and V. E. Iacob Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA J. R. Leslie and H.-B. Mak Department of Physics, Queen?s University...

Ball, G. C.; Boisvert, G.; Bricault, P.; Churchman, R.; Dombsky, M.; Lindner, T.; Macdonald, J. A.; Vandervoort, E.; Bishop, S.; D'Auria, J. M.; Hardy, John C.; Iacob, V. E.; Leslie, J. R.; Mak, H. -B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The half-life of DNA in bone: measuring decay kinetics in 158 dated fossils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Charlotte L. Oskam 1 Marie L. Hale 2 Paula F. Campos 3 5 Jose A...the activation energy and R the gas constant. On the basis of the...R. P. Scofield, M. L. Hale, and R. N. Holdaway 2010 Highly...Scofield, C. L. Oskam, M. L. Hale, R. N. Holdaway, and M...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Half-life measurements of 137,139 Cs excited nuclear states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F´isica, Comisi´on Nacional de Energ´ia At´omica, 1429 Buenos Aires, Argentina 3 Universidad Nacional de General San Mart´in, San Mart´in, Argentina 4 CONICET, 1033 Buenos Aires, Argentina 5 Centre de, France 6 Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Highly accurate measurements of the spontaneous fission half-life of 240,242Pu  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fast spectrum neutron-induced fission cross-section data for transuranic isotopes are of special demand from the nuclear data community. In particular highly accurate data are needed for the new generation IV nuclear applications. The aim is to obtain precise neutron-induced fission cross sections for 240Pu and 242Pu. To do so, accurate data on spontaneous fission half-lives must be available. Also, minimizing uncertainties in the detector efficiency is a key point. We studied both isotopes by means of a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber with the goal of improving the present data on the neutron-induced fission cross section. For the two plutonium isotopes the high ?-particle decay rates pose a particular problem to experiments due to piling-up events in the counting gas. Argon methane and methane were employed as counting gases, the latter showed considerable improvement in signal generation due to its higher drift velocity. The detection efficiency for both samples was determined, and improved spontaneous fission half-lives were obtained with very low statistical uncertainty (0.13% for 240Pu and 0.04% for 242Pu): for 240Pu, T1/2,SF=1.1651011 yr (1.1%), and for 242Pu, T1/2,SF=6.741010 yr (1.3%). Systematic uncertainties are due to sample mass (0.4% for 240Pu and 0.9% for 242Pu) and efficiency (1%).

P. Salvador-Castieira; T. Bry?; R. Eykens; F.-J. Hambsch; A. Moens; S. Oberstedt; G. Sibbens; D. Vanleeuw; M. Vidali; C. Pretel

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

82

Methods of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method of obtaining a radionuclide product selected from the group consisting of .sup.223 Ra and .sup.225 Ac, from a radionuclide "cow" of .sup.227 Ac or .sup.229 Th respectively. The method comprises the steps of a) permitting ingrowth of at least one radionuclide daughter from said radionuclide "cow" forming an ingrown mixture; b) insuring that the ingrown mixture is a nitric acid ingrown mixture; c) passing the nitric acid ingrown mixture through a first nitrate form ion exchange column which permits separating the "cow" from at least one radionuclide daughter; d) insuring that the at least one radionuclide daughter contains the radionuclide product; e) passing the at least one radionuclide daughter through a second ion exchange column and separating the at least one radionuclide daughter from the radionuclide product and f) recycling the at least one radionuclide daughter by adding it to the "cow". In one embodiment the radionuclide "cow" is the .sup.227 Ac, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a .sup.227 Th and the product radionuclide is the .sup.223 Ra and the first nitrate form ion exchange column passes the .sup.227 Ac and retains the .sup.227 Th. In another embodiment the radionuclide "cow"is the .sup.229 Th, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a .sup.225 Ra and said product radionuclide is the .sup.225 Ac and the .sup.225 Ac and nitrate form ion exchange column retains the .sup.229 Th and passes the .sup.225 Ra/Ac.

Bray, Lane A. (Richland, WA); Ryan, Jack L. (West Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Prolonged Serum Half-Life of Antineoplastic Drugs by Incorporation into the Low Density Lipoprotein  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cells. J. Supramol. Struct., 10: 467-478, 1979. Shaw. J. M.. Shaw. K. V., Yanovich, S., Iwanik. M., Futch, W. S., Rosowsky, A., and Schook, L. B. Delivery of lipophilic drugs using lipoproteins. Ann. NY Acad. Sci...

P. Chris de Smidt and Theo J. C. van Berkel

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Prolonged lipoprotein half-life: effect on oxidative stability and physical features of lipoprotein particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is responsible for two out of the three leading causes of death in the United States. Oxidatively modified apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein (apoB-LPs) are known to contribute to atherosclerotic...

Simeral, Stephanie Bianco

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Towards a precision measurement of the half life of neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Recent neutrino oscillation experiments provide proof that neutrinos are massive par- ticles, but the absolute neutrino mass scale remains unknown. Observation of neu- trinoless double (more)

Stanford University, Dept. of Physics

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The iron abundance of the Magellanic Bridge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-resolution HST ultra-violet spectra for five B-type stars in the Magellanic Bridge and in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds have been analysed to estimate their iron abundances. Those for the Clouds are lower than estimates obtained from late-type stars or the optical lines in B-type stars by approximately 0.5 dex. This may be due to systematic errors possibly arising from non-LTE effects or from errors in the atomic data as similar low Fe abundances having previously been reported from the analysis of the ultra-violet spectra of Galactic early-type stars. The iron abundance estimates for all three Bridge targets appear to be significantly lower than those found for the SMC and LMC by approximately -0.5 dex and -0.8 dex respectively and these differential results should not be affected by any systematic errors present in the absolute abundance estimates. These differential iron abundance estimates are consistent with the underabundances for C, N, O, Mg and Si of approximately -1.1 dex relative to our Galaxy previously found in our Bridge targets. The implications of these very low metal abundances for the Magellanic Bridge are discussed in terms of metal deficient material being stripped from the SMC.

P. L. Dufton; R. S. I. Ryans; H. M. A. Thompson; R. A. Street

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Planetary nebulae abundances and stellar evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A summary is given of planetary nebulae abundances from ISO measurements. It is shown that these nebulae show abundance gradients (with galactocentric distance), which in the case of neon, argon, sulfur and oxygen (with four exceptions) are the same as HII regions and early type star abundance gradients. The abundance of these elements predicted from these gradients at the distance of the Sun from the center are exactly the solar abundance. Sulfur is the exception to this; the reason for this is discussed. The higher solar neon abundance is confirmed; this is discussed in terms of the results of helioseismology. Evidence is presented for oxygen destruction via ON cycling having occurred in the progenitors of four planetary nebulae with bilobal structure. These progenitor stars had a high mass, probably greater than 5 solar masses. This is deduced from the high values of He/H and N/H found in these nebulae. Formation of nitrogen, helium and carbon are discussed. The high mass progenitors which showed oxygen destruction are shown to have probably destroyed carbon as well. This is probably the result of hot bottom burning.

S. R. Pottasch; J. Bernard-Salas

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

88

Oxygen abundance of open cluster dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present oxygen abundances of dwarfs in the young open cluster IC 4665 deduced from the OI $\\lambda$7774 triplet lines and of dwarfs in the open cluster Pleiades derived from the [OI] $\\lambda$6300 forbidden line. Stellar parameters and oxygen abundances were derived using the spectroscopic synthesis tool SME (Spectroscopy Made Easy). We find a dramatic increase in the upper boundary of the OI triplet abundances with decreasing temperature in the dwarfs of IC 4665, consistent with the trend found by Schuler et al. in the open clusters Pleiades and M 34, and to a less extent in the cool dwarfs of Hyades (Schuler et al. 2006a) and UMa (King & Schuler 2005). By contrast, oxygen abundances derived from the [OI] $\\lambda$6300 forbidden line for stars in Pleiades and Hyades (Schuler et al. 2006b) are constant within the errors. Possible mechanisms that may lead a varying oxygen triplet line abundance are examined, including systematic errors in the stellar parameter determinations, the NLTE effects, surface activities and granulation. The age-related effects stellar surface activities (especially the chromospheric activities) are suggested by our analysis to blame for the large spreads of oxygen triplet line abundances.

Z. -X. Shen; X. -W. Liu; H. -W. Zhang; B. Jones; D. N. C. Lin

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Element abundances in solar energetic particles: two physical processes, two abundance patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abundances of elements comprising solar energetic particles (SEPs) come with two very different patterns. Historically called "impulsive" and "gradual" events, they have been studied for 40 years, 20 years by the Wind spacecraft. Gradual SEP events measure coronal abundances. They are produced when shock waves, driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), accelerate the ambient coronal plasma; we discuss the average abundances of 21 elements that differ from corresponding solar photospheric abundances by a well-known dependence on the first ionization potential (FIP) of the element. The smaller impulsive ("3He-rich") SEP events are associated with magnetic reconnection involving open field lines from solar flares or jets that also eject plasma to produce accompanying CMEs. These events produce striking heavy-element abundance enhancements, relative to coronal abundances, by an average factor of 3 at Ne, 9 at Fe, and 900 for elements with 76 0.1 are even more strongly associated with narrow, slow CMEs, cooler coro...

Reames, Donald V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Dual spatial maps of transcript and protein abundance in the...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dual spatial maps of transcript and protein abundance in the mouse brain. Dual spatial maps of transcript and protein abundance in the mouse brain. Abstract: Integrating...

91

Engineering Density of States of Earth Abundant Semiconductors...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Density of States of Earth Abundant Semiconductors for Enhanced Thermoelectric Power Factor Engineering Density of States of Earth Abundant Semiconductors for Enhanced...

92

Mapping protein abundance patterns in the brain using voxelation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

protein abundance patterns in the brain using voxelation combined with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Mapping protein abundance patterns in the brain using voxelation...

93

Abundances of massive stars: some recent developments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thanks to their usefulness in various fields of astrophysics (e.g. mixing processes in stars, chemical evolution of galaxies), the last few years have witnessed a large increase in the amount of abundance data for early-type stars. Two intriguing results emerging since the last reviews on this topic will be discussed: (a) nearby OB stars exhibit metal abundances generally lower than the solar/meteoritic estimates; (b) evolutionary models of single objects including rotation are largely unsuccessful in explaining the CNO properties of stars in the Galaxy and in the Magellanic clouds.

T. Morel

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

94

CAUSES OF FLUCTUATIONS IN ABUNDANCE OF CONNECTICUT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CAUSES OF FLUCTUATIONS IN ABUNDANCE OF CONNECTICUT ·RIVER .SHAD BY REYNOLD A. FREDIN FISHERY effort, and tagging data which was used t.o estimate the size of the shad runs in the Connecticut River. effect on the" size of the runs entering the river," Investigation of the Connecticut River shad fishery

95

The abundance pattern of the lambda Bootis stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within a project to investigate the properties of lambda Bootis stars, we report on their abundance pattern. High resolution spectra have been obtained for a total of twelve candidate lambda Bootis stars, four of them being contained in spectroscopic binary systems, and detailed abundance analyses have been performed. All program stars show a characteristic lambda Bootis abundance pattern (deficient heavy elements and solar abundant light elements) and an enhanced abundance of Na. This work raises the fraction of lambda Bootis stars with known abundances to 50%. The resulting abundances complemented by literature data are used to construct a "mean lambda Bootis abundance pattern", which exhibits, apart from general underabundances of heavy elements (about -1 dex) and solar abundances of C, N, O, Na and S, a star-to-star scatter which is up to twice as large as for a comparable sample of normal stars.

U. Heiter

2001-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

96

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Oxygen abundances in planet-harbouring stars. Comparison of different abundance indicators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detailed and uniform study of oxygen abundances in 155 solar type stars, 96 of which are planet hosts and 59 of which form part of a volume-limited comparison sample with no known planets. EW measurements were carried out for the [O I] 6300 \\AA line and the O I triplet, and spectral synthesis was performed for several OH lines. NLTE corrections were calculated and applied to the LTE abundance results derived from the O I 7771-5 \\AA\\ triplet. Abundances from [O I], the O I triplet and near-UV OH were obtained in 103, 87 and 77 dwarfs, respectively. We present the first detailed and uniform comparison of these three oxygen indicators in a large sample of solar-type stars. There is good agreement between the [O/H] ratios from forbidden and OH lines, while the NLTE triplet shows a systematically lower abundance. We found that discrepancies between OH, [O I] and the O I triplet do not exceed 0.2 dex in most cases. We have studied abundance trends in planet host and comparison sample stars, and no obvious anomalies related to the presence of planets have been detected. All three indicators show that, on average, [O/Fe] decreases with [Fe/H] in the metallicity range -0.8oxygen overabundance of 0.1-0.2dex with respect to the comparison sample.

A. Ecuvillon; G. Israelian; N. C. Santos; N. G. Shchukina; M. Mayor; R. Rebolo

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

98

Coronal versus photospheric abundances of stars with different activity levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a detailed analysis of the coronal abundance of 4 stars with varying levels of activity and with accurately known photospheric abundances. The coronal abundance is determined here using a line flux analysis and a full determination of the differential emission measure. Photospheric abundance values are taken from literature works. Previous coronal abundance determinations have generally been compared to solar photospheric abundances; from this a number of general properties have been inferred, such as the presence of a coronal metal depletion with an inverse First Ionization Potential correlated with activity level. Here we show that, when coronal abundances are compared with real photospheric values for the individual stars, the resulting pattern can be very different. Also, we present evidence that, in some cases, the coronal metal abundance may not be uniform in the corona; in particular it can vary with the temperature of the emitting plasma.

J. Sanz-Forcada; F. Favata; G. Micela

2003-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

99

CORONAL ABUNDANCES IN ORION NEBULA CLUSTER STARS A. Maggio,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pattern of abundances for all stars, although a weak dependence on flare loop size may be present. The abundance of calcium is the only one which appears to vary substantially between stars, but this quantity

Micela, Giusi

100

DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE OF EGG AND LARVAL POPULATIONS OF THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE OF EGG AND LARVAL POPULATIONS OF THE PACIFIC SARDINE BY ELBERT H OF THE INTERIOR, Douglas McKay, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, John L. Farley, Director DISTRIBUTION abundance_ _______________ ________ __ __ ___ ___ ____ __ 100 Reliability of estimates

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Accuray of Stellar Opacities and the Solar Abundance Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accuray of Stellar Opacities and the Solar Abundance Problem Anil K. Pradhan and Sultana N. Nahar opacity" that might bear on the solar abundances issue. Keywords: Radiative transfer --- in astrophysics­LTE hydrodynamic models. The new abundances of C, N, O, Ne etc. are 30­40% lower than the 'standard' solar

Pradhan, Anil

102

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... CHOOSING an awkward moment, Phillips Petroleum Exploration have announced a new find of natural ...naturalgas ...

1967-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

103

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 21, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 13, 2011) As the story of abundant natural gas supply continued to provide headlines for the market this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, April 6-13), spot prices at most market locations in the lower 48 States decreased. Moderate temperatures also likely contributed to the price declines by limiting end-use demand and allowing for replenishment of storage supplies. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by 3 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or less than 1 percent, to $4.14 per MMBtu. Other market prices also decreased by up to 10 cents per MMBtu, with a few exceptions in the U.S. Northeast.

104

Solar abundances as derived from solar energetic particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies have shown that there are well defined average abundances of heavy ({ital Z}{gt}2) solar energetic particles (SEPs), with variations in the acceleration and propagation producing a systematic flare-to-flare fractionation that depends on the charge per unit mass of the ion. Correcting the average SEP abundances for the fractionation yields SEP-derived coronal abundances for 20 elements. Higher resolution SEP studies have also provided isotopic abundances for 5 elements. SEP-derived abundances indicate that elements with high first ionization potentials ({gt}10 eV) are depleted in the corona relative to the photosphere and provide new information on the solar abundance of C and {sup 22}Ne. Future SEP observations offer the prospect of a significant reduction of the uncertainties in solar elemental and isotopic abundances.

Stone, E.C. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (USA))

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Abundant Renewable Energy ARE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ARE ARE Jump to: navigation, search Name Abundant Renewable Energy (ARE) Place Newberg, Oregon Zip 97132 Sector Solar, Wind energy Product Oregon-based provider of wind turbines, wind towers and dealers for wind turbines as well as solar passive heating systems. Coordinates 45.300325°, -122.975574° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.300325,"lon":-122.975574,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

106

Abundance ratios in hierarchical galaxy formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The chemical enrichment and stellar abundance ratios of galaxies which form in a hierarchical clustering scheme are calculated. For this purpose I adopt the star formation histories (SFH) as they are delivered by semi-analytic models in Kauffmann (1996}. It turns out that the average SFH of cluster ellipticals does not yield globally alpha-enhanced stellar populations. The star burst that occurs when the elliptical forms in the major merger plays therefore a crucial role in producing alpha-enhancement. Only under the assumption that the IMF is significantly flattened with respect to the Salpeter value during the burst, a Mg/Fe overabundant population can be obtained. In particular for the interpretation of radial gradients in metallicity and alpha-enhancement, the mixing of global and burst populations are of great importance. The model predicts bright field galaxies to be less alpha-enhanced than their counterparts in clusters.

D. Thomas

1999-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

107

Large Silicon Abundance in Photodissociation Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have made one-dimensional raster-scan observations of the rho Oph and sigma Sco star-forming regions with two spectrometers (SWS and LWS) on board the ISO. In the rho Oph region, [SiII] 35um, [OI] 63um, 146um, [CII] 158um, and the H2 pure rotational transition lines S(0) to S(3) are detected, and the PDR properties are derived as the radiation field scaled by the solar neighborhood value G_0~30-500, the gas density n~250--2500 /cc, and the surface temperature T~100-400 K. The ratio of [SiII] 35um to [OI] 146um indicates that silicon of 10--20% of the solar abundance must be in the gaseous form in the photodissociation region (PDR), suggesting that efficient dust destruction is undergoing even in the PDR and that part of silicon atoms may be contained in volatile forms in dust grains. The [OI] 63um and [CII] 158um emissions are too weak relative to [OI] 146um to be accounted for by standard PDR models. We propose a simple model, in which overlapping PDR clouds along the line of sight absorb the [OI] 63um and [CII] 158um emissions, and show that the proposed model reproduces the observed line intensities fairly well. In the sigma Sco region, we have detected 3 fine-structure lines, [OI] 63um, [NII] 122um, and [CII] 158um, and derived that 30-80% of the [CII] emission comes from the ionized gas. The upper limit of the [SiII] 35um is compatible with the solar abundance relative to nitrogen and no useful constraint on the gaseous Si is obtained for the sigma Sco region.

Yoko Okada; Takashi Onaka; Takao Nakagawa; Hiroshi Shibai; Daigo Tomono; Yukari Y. Yui

2005-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Natural Gas Pools Characteristics in Sulige Gas Field, Ordos Basin, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are abundant natural gas resources in Sulige gas field, Ordos Basin. The ascertained resources ... setting and reservoir heterogeneity. The characteristics of natural gas pools were analyzed from gas compos...

Lin Xiaoying; Zeng Jianhui; Zhang Shuichang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Low-Cost, Abundant Energy: Paradise Lost?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...that oil make up for the natural...in total consumption for selected...unquestioned reserve pool for U.S...One way to reduce dependency...reduction in consumption. Price increases...admonitions to reduce driving speeds...rates of consumption, achievement...processing water may limit...

Hans H. Landsberg

1974-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

110

The Solar Heavy Element Abundances: I. Constraints from Stellar Interiors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The latest solar atmosphere models include non-LTE corrections and 3D hydrodynamic convection simulations. These models predict a significant reduction in the solar metal abundance, which leads to a serious conflict between helioseismic data and the predictions of solar interiors models. We demonstrate that the helioseismic constraints on the surface convection zone depth and helium abundance combined with stellar interiors models can be used to define the goodness of fit for a given chemical composition. After a detailed examination of the errors in the theoretical models we conclude that models constructed with the older solar abundances are consistent (solar abundance scale are discussed.

Franck Delahaye; Marc Pinsonneault

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

111

High-Performance Thermoelectric Devices Based on Abundant Silicide...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Development of high-performance thermoelectric devices for vehicle waste heat recovery will include fundamental research to use abundant promising low-cost thermoelectric...

112

Oxygen abundances in the most oxygen-rich spiral galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen abundances in the spiral galaxies expected to be richest in oxygen are estimated. The new abundance determinations are based on the recently discovered ff-relation between auroral and nebular oxygen line fluxes in HII regions. We find that the maximum gas-phase oxygen abundance in the central regions of spiral galaxies is 12+log(O/H)~8.75. This value is significantly lower than the previously accepted value. The central oxygen abundance in the Milky Way is similar to that in other large spirals.

L. S. Pilyugin; T. X. Thuan; J. M. Vilchez

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

113

On the Alpha Activity of Natural Tungsten Isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The indication for the ? decay of 180W with a half-life T ? 1/2 =1.1+0.8 ?0.4(stat)0.3(syst)1018 yr has been observed for the first time with the help of the super-low background 116CdWO4 crystal scintillators. In conservative approach the lower limit on half-life of 180W has been established as T ? 1/2 (180W) ? 0.71018 yr at 90 % C.L. Besides, new T ? 1/2 bounds were set for ? decay of

F. A. Danevich A; A. Sh. Georgadze A; V. V. Kobychev A; S. S. Nagorny A; A. S. Nikolaiko A; W

114

1999 Macmillan Magazines Ltd letters to nature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.nature.com 273 seems the most likely interpretation of our results, it is important to note that the excess 7 Li, 197±214 (1989). 3. Herbig, G. H. Lithium abundances in F5-G8 dwarfs. Astrophys. J. 141, 588±609 (1965 in the envelopes of main-sequence stars: constraints implied by the lithium, beryllium and boron observations

115

Quantification of Global MicroRNA Abundance by Selective Isotachophoresis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) for the quantification of global microRNA (miRNA) abundance in total RNA. We leverage the selectivity of ITP-throughput methods to quantify the global abundance of miRNAs in total RNA samples derived from diverse sources which allows fast, accurate, and absolute measurement of global miRNA levels from small amounts of total

Santiago, Juan G.

116

Nitrogen recombination lines and abundance in nova shells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The observed intensities of N II lines in the DQ Her, CP Pup, and T Aur nova shells are compared with theoretical predictions. It is concluded that the relative intensities can be explained with excitation by recombination. The nitrogen abundances obtained from the line intensities relative to hydrogen have values about 400 to 700 times the solar abundance. 27 refs.

Escalante, V.; Dalgarno, A. (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Coyoacan (Mexico) Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Can Recently Derived Solar Photospheric Abundances Be Consistent with Helioseismology?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent solar abundance analyses (Asplund et al. 2004; Lodders 2003) revise downward the abundances of C, N, O, Ne, and Ar, which reduces the solar photospheric Z/X to 0.017, and Z to ~0.013. Solar models evolved with standard opacities and diffusion treatment using these new abundances give poor agreement with helioseismic inferences for sound speed profile, convection zone helium abundance, and convection zone depth. Here we present helioseismic results for evolved solar models with these reduced photospheric abundances, trying varying diffusion treatments. We compare results for models with no diffusion, enhanced thermal diffusion, and enhanced diffusion of C, N, O, Ne, and Mg only. We find that while each of these models provides some improvements compared to a solar model evolved with the new abundances and standard physics, none restores the good agreement with helioseismology attained using the earlier abundances of, e.g., Grevesse & Sauval (1998). We suggest that opacity increases of about 20% for conditions below the convection zone, or the possibility of accretion of lower-Z material at the surface as the sun arrived at the main sequence, should be investigated to restore agreement. In addition, the new abundance determinations should be re-considered, as, if they are correct, it will be difficult to reconcile solar models with helioseismic results.

J. Guzik; L. S. Watson

2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

118

The Ne/O abundance ratio in the quiet Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims: To determine the neon-to-oxygen abundance in the quiet Sun, a proxy for the photospheric abundance ratio. Method: An emission measure method applied to extreme ultraviolet emission lines of Ne IV-VI and O III-V ions observed by the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer on the SOHO satellite. Results: The average Ne/O abundance ratio in supergranule cell centre regions is 0.18 +/- 0.05, while in supergranule network regions is 0.16 +/- 0.04. A photospheric Ne/O ratio of 0.17 +/- 0.05 is suggested, in good agreement with the most recent compilation of solar photospheric abundances, but discrepant with a recent Ne/O ratio derived from stellar X-ray spectra and revised neon abundances suggested from solar interior models.

P. R. Young

2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

119

THE SOLAR HEAVY ELEMENT ABUNDANCES. II. CONSTRAINTS FROM STELLAR ATMOSPHERES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimates of the bulk metal abundance of the Sun derived from the latest generation of model atmospheres are significantly lower than the earlier standard values. In Paper I, we demonstrated that helioseismic data combined with stellar interiors theory set strong bounds on the solar metal abundance. The seismically derived abundances are inconsistent with the low photospheric abundances if the quoted errors in the atmospheric models (of order 0.05 dex) are correct. In this paper, we undertake a critical analysis of the solar metallicity and its uncertainty from a model atmospheric perspective, focusing on CNO. We argue that the non-LTE (NLTE) corrections for abundances derived from atomic features are overestimated in the recent abundance studies, while systematic errors in the absolute abundances are underestimated. In general, abundances derived from molecular features are lower than those derived from atomic features for the three-dimensional hydro models, while a weaker trend in the opposite direction tends to hold for abundances derived from one-dimensional models. If we adopt the internal consistency between different indicators as a measure of goodness of fit, we obtain intermediate abundances [C/H] = 8.44 +- 0.06, [N/H] = 7.96 +- 0.10 and [O/H] = 8.75 +- 0.08. The errors reflect the fact that both the high and low scales are internally consistent within the errors, and they are too large to conclude that there is a solar abundance problem. However, the center-to-limb continuum flux variations predicted in the simulations appear to be inconsistent with solar data based on recently published work. This would favor the traditional thermal structure and lead to high CNO abundances of (8.52, 7.96, 8.80) close to the seismic scale. We argue that further empirical tests of NLTE corrections and the thermal structure are required for precise absolute abundances. The sensitivity of the simulations to spatial resolution and systematic errors in the underlying atmospheric physics should also be examined, and these effects may lead to an overestimate of the impact of convective overshooting on the thermal structure of the outer layers of the solar atmosphere. The uncertainties in the solar oxygen also imply that strong conclusions about the absence of solar beryllium depletion cannot be made.

Pinsonneault, M. H. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Delahaye, Franck [CEA, IRFU, Serv. Astrophys., F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

120

Half-life of the electron-capture decay of (97)Ru: Precision measurement shows no temperature dependence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Gedcke, Quantitative X-ray Spectrometry (Marcel Dekker, New York, 1981), p. 266. [19] D. Radford, http://radware.phy.ornl.gov/main.html; private communication. [20] R. Brun and F. Rademakers, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 389, 81 (1997). [21.... Gedcke, Quantitative X-ray Spectrometry (Marcel Dekker, New York, 1981), p. 266. [19] D. Radford, http://radware.phy.ornl.gov/main.html; private communication. [20] R. Brun and F. Rademakers, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 389, 81 (1997). [21...

Goodwin, J. R.; Golovko, V. V.; Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Measurement of the Double-Beta Decay Half-life of 136Xe in KamLAND-Zen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by fallout from the Fukushima-I reactor accident in Marchof detector materials by Fukushima fallout, which includeCo are not detected near Fukushima or our soil samples, we

Gando, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

natural gasoline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

natural gasoline, condensate, distillate [Liquid hydrocarbons, generally clear or pale straw-coloured and of high API gravity (above 6o), that are produced with wet gas] ? Gasbenzin n, Gasolin n ...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Natural abundance radiocarbon studies of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the marine environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or preservation over the salinity gradient. In addition, theet al. , Along the salinity gradient of the Delaware River,mixing along the salinity gradient indicating that DOC is

De Jesus, Roman Paul

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Natural Abundance Radiocarbon Studies of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) in the Marine Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or preservation over the salinity gradient. In addition, theet al. , Along the salinity gradient of the Delaware River,mixing along the salinity gradient indicating that DOC is

de Jesus, Roman P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Bulk analysis of a simulated environmental sample in natural abundance performed in KAERI for nuclear safeguards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A highly accurate and precise analysis of ultra-trace amounts of nuclear materials contained in environmental samples plays an essential role in monitoring undeclared nuclear activities for nuclear safeguards pur...

Jong-Ho Park; Sunyoung Lee; Young-Geun Ha

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Natural abundances of carbon isotopes in acetate from a coastal marine sediment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...isolat-ed from Cape Lookout Bight sediments. Samples were collected...anoxic sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina. Recently...acetate cycling. Cape Lookout Bight is an organic-rich coastal basin about 2 km2 in area located 115...

NE Blair; CS Martens; DJ Des Marais

1987-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

127

-Amino acids, although less abundant than their -analogues, are also present in peptides and other natural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are a family of carbon, energy and/or reducing power storage polymers, which a characteristic pro- ton NMR signal at 3.15 ppm for the hydroxy hydrogen at car- bon 3. In our experimental work was consumed. Compound 2 was reacted with sodium azide in water using hexadecyltributylphosphonium bromide

128

Sugar in Two Steps Hexose sugars are naturally abundant, but it is often useful to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the decay of U isotopes to Pb can be problematic if damaged parts of zircons, the primary uranium that was quickly depleted. Observations of molecular clouds indicate that ultraviolet radiation selectively depleted in 16O. Yurimoto and Kuramoto (p. 1763; see the Perspective by Yin) have developed a model

Meyer, Karsten

129

Source Apportionment of Atmospheric PAHs in the Western Balkans by Natural Abundance Radiocarbon Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This marks the first time that a CCSRA investigation could be executed on a geographically wide scale, providing a quantitative field-based source apportionment, which points out that also non-fossil combustion processes should be targeted for remedial action. ...

Zdenek Zencak; Jana Klanova; Ivan Holoubek; rjan Gustafsson

2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

130

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 29, 2007) 15, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 29, 2007) Natural gas spot prices decreased this week, with the changes at most market locations somewhat more modest than the price changes observed over the past couple weeks. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, November 7-14), the price at the Henry Hub decreased 15 cents per MMBtu or about 2 percent. Relatively abundant supplies in the West and high stock levels in storage helped to drive spot prices lower this week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for December delivery moved up about 21 cents to $7.835 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage was 3,536 Bcf as of Friday, November 9, which is 8.4 percent higher than the 5-year average of 3,263 Bcf. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased on the week by $2.44 per barrel or about 3 percent to trade yesterday at $94.02 per barrel or $16.21 per MMBtu.

131

NREL: Wind Research - Abundant Renewable Energy's ARE 442 Wind Turbine  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Abundant Renewable Energy's ARE 442 Wind Turbine Testing and Results Abundant Renewable Energy's ARE 442 Wind Turbine Testing and Results Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. A video of Abundant Renewable Energy's ARE 442 wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL tested Abundant Renewable Energy's ARE 442 turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The ARE 442 is a 10-kilowatt (kW), three-bladed, horizontal-axis upwind small wind turbine. It has a hub height of 30.9 meters and a rotor diameter of 7.2 meters. The turbine has a single-phase permanent-magnet generator that operates at variable voltages up to 410 volts AC. Testing Summary The summary of the tests is below with the final reports.

132

Redox Active Catalysts Utilizing Earth Abundant Metals | Center...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Redox Active Catalysts Utilizing Earth Abundant Metals 14 Mar 2014 Ryan Trovitch has recently joined the team of the BISfuel PIs. He is an Assistant Professor at the Department of...

133

Galilean satellite eclipse studies. III - Jovian methane abundance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methane abundance in the lower Jovian stratosphere is measured using the Galilean satellite eclipse technique. The average mixing ratio at the locations measured is larger than the expected value for a solar abundance of carbon with the possibility of some zenographic variation. Observationally compatible values are found for the South Temperate Zone, the edge of the Great Red Spot and the South Tropical Zone, and the Great Red Spot.

Smith, D.W. (Washington, University, Seattle, Wash.); Greene, T.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Solar Heavy Element Abundances: II. Constraints from Stellar Atmospheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimates of the bulk metal abundance of the Sun derived from the latest generation of model atmospheres are significantly lower than the earlier standard values. In Paper I we demonstrated that a low solar metallicity is inconsistent with helioseismology if the quoted errors in the atmospheres models (of order 0.05 dex) are correct. In this paper we undertake a critical analysis of the solar metallicity and its uncertainty from a model atmospheres perspective, focusing on CNO. We argue that the non-LTE corrections for abundances derived from atomic features are overestimated in the recent abundance studies, while systematic errors in the absolute abundances are underestimated. If we adopt the internal consistency between different indicators as a measure of goodness of fit, we obtain intermediate abundances [C/H] = 8.44 +/- 0.06, [N/H] = 7.96 +/- 0.10 and [O/H] = 8.75 +/- 0.08. The errors are too large to conclude that there is a solar abundance problem, and permit both the high and low scales. However, the center-to-limb continuum flux variations predicted in the simulations appear to be inconsistent with solar data, which would favor the traditional thermal structure and lead to high CNO abundances of (8.52, 7.96, 8.80) close to the seismic scale. We argue that further empirical tests of non-LTE corrections and the thermal structure are required for precise absolute abundances. The implications for beryllium depletion and possible sources of error in the numerical simulations are discussed.

M. H. Pinsonneault; Franck Delahaye

2006-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

135

TESTING FOR AZIMUTHAL ABUNDANCE GRADIENTS IN M101  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New optical spectra of 28 H II regions in the M101 disk have been obtained, yielding 10 new detections of the [O III] {lambda}4363 auroral line. The oxygen abundance gradient measured from these data, combined with previous observations, displays a local scatter of 0.15 {+-} 0.03 dex along an arc in the west side of the galaxy, compared with a smaller scatter of 0.08 {+-} 0.01 dex in the rest of the disk. One of the H II regions in our sample (H27) has a significantly lower oxygen abundance than surrounding nebulae at a similar galactocentric distance, while an additional, relatively nearby one (H128) was already known to have a high oxygen abundance for its position in the galaxy. These results represent marginal evidence for the existence of moderate deviations from chemical abundance homogeneity in the interstellar medium of M101. Using a variety of strong-line abundance indicators, we find no evidence for significant large-scale azimuthal variations of the oxygen abundance across the whole disk of the galaxy.

Li, Yanxia; Bresolin, Fabio [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Dr., Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)] [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Dr., Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

136

Carbon and Strontium Abundances of Metal-Poor Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present carbon and strontium abundances for 100 metal-poor stars measured from R$\\sim $7000 spectra obtained with the Echellette Spectrograph and Imager at the Keck Observatory. Using spectral synthesis of the G-band region, we have derived carbon abundances for stars ranging from [Fe/H]$=-1.3$ to [Fe/H]$=-3.8$. The formal errors are $\\sim 0.2$ dex in [C/Fe]. The strontium abundance in these stars was measured using spectral synthesis of the resonance line at 4215 {\\AA}. Using these two abundance measurments along with the barium abundances from our previous study of these stars, we show it is possible to identify neutron-capture-rich stars with our spectra. We find, as in other studies, a large scatter in [C/Fe] below [Fe/H]$ = -2$. Of the stars with [Fe/H]$<-2$, 9$\\pm$4% can be classified as carbon-rich metal-poor stars. The Sr and Ba abundances show that three of the carbon-rich stars are neutron-capture-rich, while two have normal Ba and Sr. This fraction of carbon enhanced stars is consistent with other studies that include this metallicity range.

David K. Lai; Jennifer A. Johnson; Michael Bolte; Sara Lucatello

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

137

The coronal Ne/O abundance of alpha Centauri  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent improvements in the modeling of solar convection and line formation led to downward revisions of the solar photospheric abundances of the lighter elements, which in turn led to changes in the radiative opacity of the solar interior and hence to conflicts with the solar convection zone depth as inferred from helioseismic oscillation frequencies. An increase of the solar Ne/O abundance to values as observed for nearby stars has been proposed as a solution. Because of the absence of strong neon lines in the optical, neon abundances are difficult to measure and the correct solar and stellar Ne/O abundances are currently hotly debated. Based on X-ray spectra obtained with XMM-Newton, we determine a reference value of Ne/O for the inactive, solar-like star alpha Cen (primarily alpha Cen B, which is the dominant component in X-rays), with three independent, line-based methods, using differential emission measure reconstruction and an emission measure-independent method. Our results indicate a value of approx. 0.28 for Ne/O in alpha Cen, approximately twice the value measured for the Sun, but still below the average value obtained for other stars. The low Ne/O abundance of the Sun is peculiar when compared to alpha Cen and other stars; our results emphasize the necessity to obtain more and accurate Ne/O abundance measurements of low activity stars.

C. Liefke; J. H. M. M. Schmitt

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

DIRECT EVALUATION OF THE HELIUM ABUNDANCES IN OMEGA CENTAURI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A direct measure of the helium abundances from the near-infrared transition of He I at 1.08 {mu}m is obtained for two nearly identical red giant stars in the globular cluster Omega Centauri. One star exhibits the He I line; the line is weak or absent in the other star. Detailed non-local thermal equilibrium semi-empirical models including expansion in spherical geometry are developed to match the chromospheric H{alpha}, H{beta}, and Ca II K lines, in order to predict the helium profile and derive a helium abundance. The red giant spectra suggest a helium abundance of Y {<=} 0.22 (LEID 54064) and Y = 0.39-0.44 (LEID 54084) corresponding to a difference in the abundance {Delta}Y {>=} 0.17. Helium is enhanced in the giant star (LEID 54084) that also contains enhanced aluminum and magnesium. This direct evaluation of the helium abundances gives observational support to the theoretical conjecture that multiple populations harbor enhanced helium in addition to light elements that are products of high-temperature hydrogen burning. We demonstrate that the 1.08 {mu}m He I line can yield a helium abundance in cool stars when constraints on the semi-empirical chromospheric model are provided by other spectroscopic features.

Dupree, A. K.; Avrett, E. H., E-mail: dupree@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: eavrett@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

139

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Magnesium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sodium Sodium Previous Element (Sodium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Aluminum) Aluminum Isotopes of the Element Magnesium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 24 78.99% STABLE 25 10.00% STABLE 26 11.01% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 19 4.0 picoseconds Double Proton Emission 100.00% 20 90.8 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission ~ 27.00% 21 122 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 32.60% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay < 0.50%

140

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Chlorine  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sulfur Sulfur Previous Element (Sulfur) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Argon) Argon Isotopes of the Element Chlorine [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 35 75.76% STABLE 37 24.24% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 28 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 29 < 20 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 30 < 30 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 31 150 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 0.70% 32 298 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Potassium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Argon Argon Previous Element (Argon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Calcium) Calcium Isotopes of the Element Potassium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 39 93.2581% STABLE 40 0.0117% 1.248×10+9 years 41 6.7302% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 32 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 33 < 25 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 34 < 25 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 35 178 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 0.37% 36 342 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

142

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Phosphorus  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Silicon Silicon Previous Element (Silicon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sulfur) Sulfur Isotopes of the Element Phosphorus [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 31 100% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 24 No Data Available Electron Capture (suspected) No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 25 < 30 nanoseconds Proton Emission 100.00% 26 43.7 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission No Data Available 27 260 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with

143

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Oxygen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Previous Element (Nitrogen) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Fluorine) Fluorine Isotopes of the Element Oxygen [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 16 99.757% STABLE 17 0.038% STABLE 18 0.205% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 12 1.139×10-21 seconds Proton Emission No Data Available 13 8.58 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 100.00% 14 70.620 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 15 122.24 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 16 STABLE - - 17 STABLE - - 18 STABLE - - 19 26.88 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

144

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Gallium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Zinc Zinc Previous Element (Zinc) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Germanium) Germanium Isotopes of the Element Gallium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 69 60.108% STABLE 71 39.892% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 56 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 57 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 58 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 59 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 60 70 milliseconds Electron Capture 98.40%

145

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Sodium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Neon Neon Previous Element (Neon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Magnesium) Magnesium Isotopes of the Element Sodium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 23 100% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 18 1.3×10-21 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% 19 < 40 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 20 447.9 milliseconds Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 20.05% Electron Capture 100.00% 21 22.49 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 22 2.6027 years Electron Capture 100.00% 23 STABLE - - 24 14.997 hours Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

146

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Neon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fluorine Fluorine Previous Element (Fluorine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sodium) Sodium Isotopes of the Element Neon [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 20 90.48% STABLE 21 0.27% STABLE 22 9.25% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 16 9×10-21 seconds Double Proton Emission 100.00% 17 109.2 milliseconds Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay No Data Available Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 100.00% 18 1.6670 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 19 17.22 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 20 STABLE - -

147

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Copper  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nickel Nickel Previous Element (Nickel) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Zinc) Zinc Isotopes of the Element Copper [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 63 69.15% STABLE 65 30.85% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 52 No Data Available Proton Emission No Data Available 53 < 300 nanoseconds Electron Capture No Data Available Proton Emission No Data Available 54 < 75 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 55 27 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 15.0% 56 93 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

148

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Boron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beryllium Beryllium Previous Element (Beryllium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Carbon) Carbon Isotopes of the Element Boron [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 10 19.9% STABLE 11 80.1% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 6 No Data Available Double Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 7 3.255×10-22 seconds Proton Emission No Data Available Alpha Decay No Data Available 8 770 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 100.00% 9 8.439×10-19 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% Double Alpha Decay 100.00%

149

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Tungsten  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tantalum Tantalum Previous Element (Tantalum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Rhenium) Rhenium Isotopes of the Element Tungsten [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 180 0.12% >= 6.6×10+17 years 182 26.50% STABLE 183 14.31% > 1.3×10+19 years 184 30.64% STABLE 186 28.43% > 2.3×10+19 years Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 157 275 milliseconds Electron Capture No Data Available 158 1.25 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 158m 0.143 milliseconds Isomeric Transition No Data Available Alpha Decay No Data Available 159 7.3 milliseconds Alpha Decay ~ 99.90%

150

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Carbon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Boron Boron Previous Element (Boron) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Nitrogen) Nitrogen Isotopes of the Element Carbon [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 12 98.93% STABLE 13 1.07% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 8 1.981×10-21 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% Alpha Decay No Data Available 9 126.5 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 61.60% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 38.40% 10 19.308 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 11 20.334 minutes Electron Capture 100.00% 12 STABLE - -

151

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Rhenium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tungsten Tungsten Previous Element (Tungsten) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Osmium) Osmium Isotopes of the Element Rhenium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 185 37.40% STABLE 187 62.60% 4.33×10+10 years Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 159 No Data Available No Data Available No Data Available 160 0.82 milliseconds Proton Emission 91.00% Alpha Decay 9.00% 161 0.44 milliseconds Proton Emission 100.00% Alpha Decay <= 1.40% 161m 14.7 milliseconds Alpha Decay 93.00% Proton Emission 7.00% 162 107 milliseconds Alpha Decay 94.00% Electron Capture 6.00%

152

Natural System  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural System Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development - FY11 Progress Report Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Program Yifeng Wang (SNL) Michael Simpson (INL) Scott Painter (LANL) Hui-Hai Liu (LBNL) Annie B. Kersting (LLNL) July 15, 2011 FCRD-USED-2011-000223 UFD Natural System Evaluation - FY11 Year-End Report July 15, 2011 2 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

153

Star formation and the interstellar medium in low surface brightness galaxies. I. Oxygen abundances and abundance gradients in low surface brightness disk galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present measurements of the oxygen abundances in 64 HII regions in 12 LSB galaxies. We find that oxygen abundances are low. No regions with solar abundance have been found, and most have oxygen abundances $\\sim 0.5$ to 0.1 solar. The oxygen abundance appears to be constant as a function of radius, supporting the picture of quiescently and sporadically evolving LSB galaxies.

W. J. G. de Blok; J. M. van der Hulst

1998-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

154

NATURE STUDY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...last two numbers of SCIENCE have appeared articles by Drs. Wheeler and Chapman on the abuses of nature writing as exemplified...imprint of Rand, IeNally and Co., 1903, and its author is Katherine E. Dopp, of the Extension Division of the Chicago University...

E. C. CASE

1904-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Marketing Mother Natures Molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marketing Mother Natures Molecules ... Yet molecules made by Mother Nature, or derivatives thereof, still account for nearly half of the drugs on the market. ...

LISA JARVIS

2012-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

156

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 25, 2013 March 25, 2013 Image of how methane hydrates can form in arctic and marine environments. | Illustration by the Energy Department. Data from Alaska Test Could Help Advance Methane Hydrate R&D Methane Hydrates present an enormous energy resource. The Energy Department is working to advance technologies and reap the possible benefits for a more secure energy future. March 22, 2013 ARPA-E Announces $40 Million for Research Projects to Develop Cleaner and Cheaper Transportation Choices for Consumers Two New ARPA-E Programs Will Engage Nation's Brightest Scientists, Engineers and Entrepreneurs in Research Competition to Improve Vehicle Manufacturing Techniques and Natural Gas Conversion January 10, 2013 Today shale gas accounts for about 25 percent of our natural gas production. And experts believe this abundant supply will mean lower energy costs for millions of families; fewer greenhouse gas emissions; and more American jobs. | Photo courtesy of the EIA.

157

Cosmological Deuterium Abundance and the Baryon Density of the Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standard big bang nucleosynthesis (BBNS) promises accurate predictions of the primordial abundances of deuterium, helium-3, helium-4 and lithium-7 as a function of a single parameter. Previous measurements have nearly always been interpreted as confirmation of the model (Copi, Schramm & Turner 1995). Here we present a measurement of the deuterium to hydrogen ratio (D/H) in a newly discovered high redshift metal-poor gas cloud at redshift $z=2.504$. This confirms our earlier measurement of D/H (Tytler, Fan & Burles 1996), and together they give the first accurate measurement of the primordial D abundance, and a ten fold improvement in the accuracy of the cosmological density of ordinary matter.This is a high density, with most ordinary matter unaccounted or dark, which is too high to agree with measurements of the primordial abundances of helium-4 and lithium-7. Since the D/H measurement is apparently simple, direct, accurate and highly sensitive, we propose that helium requires a systematic correction, and that population II stars have less than the primordial abundance of $^7$Li. Alternatively, there is no concordance between the light element abundances, and the simple model of the big bang must be incomplete and lacking physics, or wrong.

Scott Burles; David Tytler

1996-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

158

Chemical abundances of stars with brown-dwarf companions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well-known that stars with giant planets are on average more metal-rich than stars without giant planets, whereas stars with detected low-mass planets do not need to be metal-rich. With the aim of studying the weak boundary that separates giant planets and brown dwarfs (BDs) and their formation mechanism, we analyze the spectra of a sample of stars with already confirmed BD companions both by radial velocity and astrometry. We employ standard and automatic tools to perform an EW-based analysis and to derive chemical abundances from CORALIE spectra of stars with BD companions. We compare these abundances with those of stars without detected planets and with low-mass and giant-mass planets. We find that stars with BDs do not have metallicities and chemical abundances similar to those of giant-planet hosts but they resemble the composition of stars with low-mass planets. The distribution of mean abundances of $\\alpha$-elements and iron peak elements of stars with BDs exhibit a peak at about solar abundance...

Snchez, D Mata; Israelian, G; Santos, N C; Sahlmann, J; Udry, S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Oxygen abundance in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present two samples of $\\hii$ galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic observations data release 3. The electron temperatures($T_e$) of 225 galaxies are calculated with the photoionized $\\hii$ model and $T_e$ of 3997 galaxies are calculated with an empirical method. The oxygen abundances from the $T_e$ methods of the two samples are determined reliably. The oxygen abundances from a strong line metallicity indicator, such as $R_{23}$, $P$, $N2$, and $O3N2$, are also calculated. We compared oxygen abundances of $\\hii$ galaxies obtained with the $T_e$ method, $R_{23}$ method, $P$ method, $N2$ method, and $O3N2$method. The oxygen abundances derived with the $T_e$ method are systematically lower by $\\sim$0.2 dex than those derived with the $R_{23}$ method, consistent with previous studies based on $\\hii$ region samples. No clear offset for oxygen abundance was found between $T_e$ metallicity and $P$, $N2$ and $O3N2$ metallicity. When we studied the relation between N/O and O/H, we found that in the metallicity regime of $\\zoh > 7.95$, the large scatter of the relation can be explained by the contribution of small mass stars to the production of nitrogen. In the high metallicity regime, $\\zoh > 8.2$, nitrogen is primarily a secondary element produced by stars of all masses.

F. Shi; X. Kong; F. Z. Cheng

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

160

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundant n-region additions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with very uneven abundances. On each fish species, the most abundant ... Source: Poulin, Robert - Department of Zoology, University of Otago Collection: Biology and Medicine...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundance Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with very uneven abundances. On each fish species, the most abundant ... Source: Poulin, Robert - Department of Zoology, University of Otago Collection: Biology and Medicine...

162

More on the solar oxygen abundance Hans-Gunter Ludwig1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abundance is "high" or "low", we derived the oxygen solar abundance using 1D as well as 3D CO5BOLD solar

163

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundance ratio measurements Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1997. Figure 2 shows the helium to proton abundance ra- tio as a function... the largest solar cycle helium to proton abundance ... Source: Richardson, John - Kavli Institute for...

164

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects species abundances Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Density Dependence Shapes Species Abundances in a Tropical Tree Community Liza S. Comita,1... a species' relative abundance, but empirical tests are ... Source: Reich, Peter...

165

Spatial Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by Voxelation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by Voxelation Integrated with High-Throughput Liquid Chromatography Spatial Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by...

166

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundance element Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

160, 291- Summary: may have low abundances of high field strength elements, rare earth elements and Y. Variable vein... in subduction zones. However, abundance variations of...

167

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundant culturable bacteria Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: abundant culturable bacteria Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ria and Virus Like Particles (VLPs) abundance were monitored in enriched seawater batch...

168

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

169

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

170

The chemical abundances of the Ap star HD94660  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work I present the determination of chemical abundances of the Ap star HD94660, a possible rapid oscillating star. As all the magnetic chemically peculiar objects, it presents CNO underabundance and overabundance of iron peak elements of ?100 times and of rare earths up to 4 dex with respect to the Sun. The determination was based on the conversion of the observed equivalent widths into abundances simultaneously to the determination of effective temperature and gravity. Since the Balmer lines of early type stars are very sensitive to the surface gravity while the flux distribution is sensitive to the effective temperature, I have adopted an iterative procedure to match the H{sub ?} line profile and the observed UV-Vis-NIR magnitudes of HD94660 looking for a consistency between the metallicity of the atmosphere model and the derived abundances. From my spectroscopic analysis, this star belongs to the no-rapid oscillating class.

Giarrusso, M. [Universit di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sezione Astrofisica, Via S. Sofia 78, 95123 Catania (Italy); INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, via S. Sofia 78, 95123 Catania (Italy); INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

171

The abundance of AsH3 in Jupiter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both ground-based and airborne observations of the AsH3 Q-branch at 2126/cm, in conjunction with newly-analyzed laboratory comparison spectra at AsH3, are employed in the derivation of a new estimate of Jovian As abundance. The mole fraction on AsH3 in the Jovian atmosphere is 0.22 + or - 0.11 ppb; this is merely 0.5 times the solar abundance, and a factor-of-9 less than the mole fraction found in Saturn, duplicating the pattern noted in the relative abundance of P in these two planets and furnishing a useful constraint for models of heavy element incorporation in the outer planets' gaseous envelopes. 20 refs.

Noll, K.S.; Larson, H.P.; Geballe, T.R. (Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA) Joint Astronomy Centre, Hilo, HI (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Light bosons and photospheric solutions to the solar abundance problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well known that current spectroscopic determinations of the chemical composition of the Sun are starkly at odds with the metallicity implied by helioseismology. We investigate whether the discrepancy may be due to conversion of photons to a new light boson in the solar photosphere. We examine the impact of particles with axion-like interactions with the photon on the inferred photospheric abundances, showing that resonant axion-photon conversion is not possible in the region of the solar atmosphere in which line-formation occurs. Although non-resonant conversion in the line-forming regions can in principle impact derived abundances, constraints from axion-photon conversion experiments rule out the couplings necessary for these effects to be detectable. We show that this extends to hidden photons and chameleons (which would exhibit similar phenomenological behaviour), ruling out known theories of new light bosons as photospheric solutions to the solar abundance problem.

Aaron C. Vincent; Pat Scott; Regner Trampedach

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

173

What Is The Neon Abundance Of The Sun?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have evolved a series of thirteen complete solar models that utilize different assumed heavy element compositions. Models that are based upon the heavy element abundances recently determined by Asplund, Grevesse, and Sauval (2005) are inconsistent with helioseismological measurements. However, models in which the neon abundance is increased by 0.4-0.5 dex to log N(Ne) = 8.29 +- 0.05 (on the scale in which log N(H) = 12) are consistent with the helioseismological measurements even though the other heavy element abundances are in agreement with the determinations of Asplund et al. (2005). These results sharpen and strengthen an earlier study by Antia and Basu (2005). The predicted solar neutrino fluxes are affected by the uncertainties in the composition by less than their 1sigma theoretical uncertainties.

John N. Bahcall; Sarbani Basu; Aldo M. Serenelli

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

174

Demonstration of Natural Gas Engine Driven Air Compressor Technology at Department of Defense Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are offset by differences in prevailing utility rates, efficiencies of partial load operation, reductions in peak demand, heat recovery, and avoiding the cost of back-up generators. Natural gas, a clean-burning fuel, is abundant and readily available...

Lin, M.; Aylor, S. W.; Van Ormer, H.

175

Quantum statistical calculation of cluster abundances in hot dense matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cluster abundances are calculated from a quantum statistical approach taking into account in-medium corrections. For arbitrary cluster size the self-energy and Pauli blocking shifts are considered. Exploratory calculations are performed for symmetric matter at temperature $T=5$ MeV and baryon density $\\varrho=0.0156$ fm$^{-3}$ to be compared with the solar element distribution. It is shown that the abundances of weakly bound nuclei with mass number $4

Gerd Ropke

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Energy Department Projects Focus on Sustainable Natural Gas Development |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Projects Focus on Sustainable Natural Gas Projects Focus on Sustainable Natural Gas Development Energy Department Projects Focus on Sustainable Natural Gas Development January 10, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis Today shale gas accounts for about 25 percent of our natural gas production. And experts believe this abundant supply will mean lower energy costs for millions of families; fewer greenhouse gas emissions; and more American jobs. | Photo courtesy of the EIA. Today shale gas accounts for about 25 percent of our natural gas production. And experts believe this abundant supply will mean lower energy costs for millions of families; fewer greenhouse gas emissions; and more American jobs. | Photo courtesy of the EIA. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy What is RPSEA? The Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America - or RPSEA -

177

Harvard Medical School AbundanceFound Global Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of post residency work primarily centered in global health delivery will receive 40% of the total awardHarvard Medical School AbundanceFound Global Health Loan Forgiveness Program for Graduating who have an intention of pursuing careers in global health delivery. This program is designed

Lahav, Galit

178

On the Abundance of Holmium in the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The abundance of holmium (Z = 67) in the Sun remains uncertain. The photospheric abundance, based on lines of Ho II, has been reported as +0.26 +/- 0.16 (on the usual scale where log(H) = 12.00), while the meteoretic value is +0.51 +/- 0.02. Cowan code calculations have been undertaken to improve the partition function for this ion by including important contributions from unobserved levels arising from the (4f^{11}6p + 4f^{10}(5d + 6s)^{2}) group. Based on 6994 computed energy levels, the partition function for Ho II is 67.41 for a temperature of 6000 K. This is approximately 1.5 times larger than the value derived from the 49 published levels. The new partition function alone leads to an increase in the solar abundance of Ho to log(Ho) = +0.43. This is within 0.08 dex of the meteoretic abundance. Support for this result has been obtained through LTE spectrum synthesis calculations of a previously unidentified weak line at 3416.38 A in the solar spectrum. Attributing the feature to Ho II, the observations may be fitted with log(Ho) = +0.53. This calculation assumes log(gf) = 0.25 and is uncertain by at least 0.1 dex.

Donald J. Bord; Charles R. Cowley

2002-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

179

Incoherent scattering cross sections for some ions of solar abundance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incoherent scattering cross sections are calculated in a relativistic formalism for a number of ions abundant in the solar atmosphere. It is argued that such cross sections are necessary for properly calculating Compton scattering and radiation transport in this or similar environments.

Kahane, Sylvian [Physics Department, Nuclear Research Center Negev, PO Box 9001, 84190 Beer Sheva (Israel)]. E-mail: skahane@bgu.ac.il

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Estimates of cetacean abundance, biomass, and population density are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Carretta et al., 2005), and fish- eries catch many of the same species that cetaceans consume (Trites et al be affected by anthropogenic sound (e.g., sonar, ship noise, and seismic surveys) and cli- mate change by the Scientific Editor. Fish. Bull. 105:509­526 (2007). Abstract--The abundance and popu- lation density

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Constraining dark energy from the abundance of weak gravitational lenses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the prospect of using the observed abundance of weak gravitational lenses to constrain the equation-of-state parameter w of the dark energy. Here we solve the spherical-collapse model with dark energy, clarifying some ambiguities found in the literature, and provide fitting formulas for the overdensity at virialization and the linear-theory overdensity at collapse. We then compute the variation in the predicted weak-lens abundance with w. We find that the predicted redshift distribution and number count of weak lenses are highly degenerate in w and \\Omega_0. If we fix \\Omega_0 the number count for w=-2/3 is a factor of 2 smaller than for the \\LambdaCDM model. However, if we allow \\Omega_0 to vary with w such that the amplitude of the matter power spectrum as measured by COBE matches that obtained from the X-ray cluster abundance, the decrease in the predicted lens abundance is less than 25% for -1 40 degree^2 in order for the number count to differentiate a \\LambdaCDM cosmology from a w=-0.9 model...

Weinberg, N N; Weinberg, Nevin N.; Kamionkowski, Marc

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

SOLAR SYSTEM ABUNDANCES AND CONDENSATION TEMPERATURES OF THE ELEMENTS Katharina Lodders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

determinations for all elements are summarized and the best currently available photospheric abundances are selected. The meteoritic and solar abundances of a few elements (e.g., noble gases, beryllium, boron elemental and isotopic abundances are derived from photospheric abundances by considering settling effects

Fegley Jr., Bruce

183

NEW RADIAL ABUNDANCE GRADIENTS FOR NGC 628 AND NGC 2403  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Motivated by recent interstellar medium studies, we present high quality MMT and Gemini spectroscopic observations of H II regions in the nearby spiral galaxies NGC 628 and NGC 2403 in order to measure their chemical abundance gradients. Using long-slit and multi-object mask optical spectroscopy, we obtained measurements of the temperature sensitive auroral lines [O III] ?4363 and/or [N II] ?5755 at a strength of 4? or greater in 11 H II regions in NGC 628 and 7 regions in NGC 2403. These observations allow us, for the first time, to derive an oxygen abundance gradient in NGC 628 based solely on 'direct' oxygen abundances of H II regions: 12 + log(O/H) = (8.43 0.03) + (0.017 0.002) R{sub g} (dex kpc{sup 1}), with a dispersion in log(O/H) of ? = 0.10 dex, from 14 regions with a radial coverage of ?2-19 kpc. This is a significantly shallower slope than found by previous 'strong-line' abundance studies. In NGC 2403, we derive an oxygen abundance gradient of 12 + log(O/H) = (8.48 0.04) + (0.032 0.007) R{sub g} (dex kpc{sup 1}), with a dispersion in log(O/H) of ? = 0.07 dex, from seven H II with a radial coverage of ?1-10 kpc. Additionally, we measure the N, S, Ne, and Ar abundances. We find the N/O ratio decreases with increasing radius for the inner disk, but reaches a plateau past R{sub 25} in NGC 628. NGC 2403 also has a negative N/O gradient with radius, but we do not sample the outer disk of the galaxy past R{sub 25} and so do not see evidence for a plateau. This bi-modal pattern measured for NGC 628 indicates dominant contributions from secondary nitrogen inside of the R{sub 25} transition and dominantly primary nitrogen farther out. As expected for ?-process elements, S/O, Ne/O, and Ar/O are consistent with constant values over a range in oxygen abundance.

Berg, Danielle A.; Skillman, Evan D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Croxall, Kevin V. [Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Marble, Andrew R. [National Solar Observatory, 950 N Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Smith, J. D. [Ritter Astrophysical Observatory, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Gordon, Karl [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Garnett, Donald R., E-mail: berg@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: croxall.5@osu.edu, E-mail: amarble@nso.edu, E-mail: jd.smith@utoledo.edu, E-mail: kgordon@stsci.edu, E-mail: robk@ast.cam.ac.uk

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

185

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

186

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

187

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

188

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

189

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

190

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

191

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

192

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

193

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

194

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

195

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

196

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

197

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

198

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

199

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

200

Planning Amid Abundance: Alaskas FY 2013 Budget Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heavy oil, natural gas and shale oil. Fiscal stability wasshale formations could contain two billion barrels of oil and

McBeath, Jerry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research April 13, 2012 - 3:01pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, three federal agencies announced a formal partnership to coordinate and align all research associated with development of our nation's abundant unconventional natural gas and oil resources. The partnership exemplifies the cross-government coordination required under President Obama's Executive Order released earlier today, which created a new Interagency Working Group to Support Safe and Responsible Development of Unconventional Domestic Natural Gas Resources. This new partnership will help coordinate current and future

202

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research April 13, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Today, three federal agencies announced a formal partnership to coordinate and align all research associated with development of our nation's abundant unconventional natural gas and oil resources. The partnership exemplifies the cross-government coordination required under President Obama's Executive Order released earlier today, which created a new Interagency Working Group to Support Safe and Responsible Development of Unconventional Domestic Natural Gas Resources. This new partnership will help coordinate current and future

203

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research April 13, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Today, three federal agencies announced a formal partnership to coordinate and align all research associated with development of our nation's abundant unconventional natural gas and oil resources. The partnership exemplifies the cross-government coordination required under President Obama's Executive Order released earlier today, which created a new Interagency Working Group to Support Safe and Responsible Development of Unconventional Domestic Natural Gas Resources. This new partnership will help coordinate current and future

204

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

205

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

206

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

207

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

208

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

209

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

210

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

211

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

212

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

213

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

214

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

215

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

216

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

217

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

218

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

219

NREL: News Feature - Sustainable Solutions Abundant in New Offices  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sustainable Solutions Abundant in New Offices Sustainable Solutions Abundant in New Offices May 24, 2010 Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player. When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But that's what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus. In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S.

220

Light bosons and photospheric solutions to the solar abundance problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well known that current spectroscopic determinations of the chemical composition of the Sun are starkly at odds with the metallicity implied by helioseismology. We propose that the discrepancy may be due to conversion of photons to a new light boson in the solar photosphere. We investigate the impact of particles with axion-like interactions with the photon on the inferred photospheric abundances. Conversion of photons into new light bosons can in principle easily produce the +0.2 dex change in derived abundances required to reconcile spectroscopic and helioseismological determinations of the solar metallicity. We show that this is however not possible for any of the presently-allowed parameter space of either the QCD axion or a standard axion-like particle. We speculate that other models involving photon-boson mixing, such as hidden photons, might prove more successful.

Vincent, Aaron C; Trampedach, Regner

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

222

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

223

Solar Abundance of Elements from Neutron-Capture Cross Sections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Excess lightweight products of slow neutron capture in the photosphere, over the mass range of 25 to 207 amu, confirm the solar mass separation recorded by excess lightweight isotopes in the solar wind, over the mass range of 3 to 136 amu [Solar Abundance of the Elements, Meteoritics, volume 18, 1983, pages 209 to 222]. Both measurements show that major elements inside the Sun are Fe, O, Ni, Si and S, like those in rocky planets.

O. Manuel; W. A. Myers; Y. Singh; M. Pleess

2004-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

224

THE RAVE CATALOG OF STELLAR ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES: FIRST DATA RELEASE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present chemical elemental abundances for 36,561 stars observed by the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), an ambitious spectroscopic survey of our Galaxy at Galactic latitudes |b| > 25 Degree-Sign and with magnitudes in the range 9 abundances for the elements Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, and Ni, with a mean error of {approx}0.2 dex, as judged from accuracy tests performed on synthetic and real spectra. Abundances are estimated through a dedicated processing pipeline in which the curve of growth of individual lines is obtained from a library of absorption line equivalent widths to construct a model spectrum that is then matched to the observed spectrum via a {chi}{sup 2} minimization technique. We plan to extend this pipeline to include estimates for other elements, such as oxygen and sulfur, in future data releases.

Boeche, C.; Williams, M.; De Jong, R. S.; Steinmetz, M. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Siebert, A.; Bienayme, O. [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Fulbright, J. P.; Ruchti, G. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bland-Hawthorn, J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Campbell, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States); Freeman, K. C. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australia National University, Weston Creek, Canberra ACT 2611 (Australia); Gibson, B. K. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Gilmore, G. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Grebel, E. K. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Helmi, A. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Munari, U. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Asiago I-36012 (Italy); Navarro, J. F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Seabroke, G. M. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury, St. Mary RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); and others

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Empirical Solar Abundance Scaling Laws of Supernova {gamma} Process Isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analyzing the solar system abundances, we have found two empirical abundance scaling laws concerning the p- and s-nuclei with the same atomic number. They are evidence that the 27 p-nuclei are synthesized by the supernova {gamma}-process. The scalings lead to a novel concept of 'universality of {gamma}-process' that the s/p and p/p ratios of nuclei produced by individual {gamma}-processes are almost constant, respectively. We have calculated the ratios of materials produced by the {gamma}-process based on core-collapse supernova explosion models under various astrophysical conditions and found that the scalings hold for individual {gamma}-processes independent of the conditions assumed. The results further suggest an extended universality that the s/p ratios in the {gamma}-process layers are not only constant but also centered on a specific value of 3. With this specific value and the scaling of the s/p ratios, we estimate that the ratios of the s-process abundance contributions from the AGB stars to the massive stars are almost 6.7 for the s-nuclei of A>90 in the solar system.

Hayakawa, Takehito [Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kazoo, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Iwamoto, Nobuyuki [Nuclear Data Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kajino, Toshitaka [National Astronomical Observatory, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Shizum, Toshiyuki [Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Umeda, Hideyuki; Nomoto, Ken'Ichi [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

226

Cosmic rays, lithium abundance and excess entropy in galaxy clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the production of $^6$Li in spallation reactions by cosmic rays in order to explain the observed abundance in halo metal-poor stars. We show that heating of ambient gas by cosmic rays is an inevitable consequence of this process, and estimate the energy input required to reproduce the observed abundance of $^6$Li/H$\\sim 10^{-11}$ to be of order a few hundred eV per particle. We draw attention to the possibility that this could explain the excess entropy in gas in galaxy groups and clusters. The evolution of $^6$Li and the accompanying heating of gas is calculated for structures collapsing at the present epoch with injection of cosmic rays at high redshift. We determine the energy required to explain the abundance of $^6$Li at $z \\sim 2$ corresponding to the formation epoch of halo metal-poor stars, and also an increased entropy level of $\\sim 300$ keV cm$^2$ necessary to explain X-ray observations of clusters. The energy budget for this process is consistent with the expected energy output of radio-loud AGNs, and the diffusion length scale of cosmic-ray protons responsible for heating is comparable to the size of regions with excess entropy. We also discuss the constraints imposed by the extragalactic gamma-ray background.

Biman B. Nath; Piero Madau; Joseph Silk

2005-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

227

Cosmic rays, lithium abundance and excess entropy in galaxy clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the production of $^6$Li in spallation reactions by cosmic rays in order to explain the observed abundance in halo metal-poor stars. We show that heating of ambient gas by cosmic rays is an inevitable consequence of this process, and estimate the energy input required to reproduce the observed abundance of $^6$Li/H$\\sim 10^{-11}$ to be of order a few hundred eV per particle. We draw attention to the possibility that this could explain the excess entropy in gas in galaxy groups and clusters. The evolution of $^6$Li and the accompanying heating of gas is calculated for structures collapsing at the present epoch with injection of cosmic rays at high redshift. We determine the energy required to explain the abundance of $^6$Li at $z \\sim 2$ corresponding to the formation epoch of halo metal-poor stars, and also an increased entropy level of $\\sim 300$ keV cm$^2$ necessary to explain X-ray observations of clusters. The energy budget for this process is consistent with the expected energy output of radi...

Nath, B B; Silk, J; Nath, Biman B.; Madau, Piero; Silk, Joseph

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Oxygen abundance methods in the SDSS: view from modern statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our purpose is to find which is the most reliable one among various oxygen abundance determination methods. We will test the validity of several different oxygen abundance determination methods using methods of modern statistics. These methods include Bayesian analysis and information scoring. We will analyze a sample of $\\sim$6000 $\\hii$ galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic observations data release four. All methods that we used drew the same conclusion that the $T_e$ method is a more reliable oxygen abundance determination methods than the Bayesian metallcity method under the existing telescope ability. The ratios of the likelihoods between the different kinds of methods tell us that the $T_e$, $P$, and $O3N2$ methods are consistent with each other because the $P$ and $O3N2$ method are calibrated by $T_e$-method. The Bayesian and $R_{23}$ method are consistent with each other because both are calibrated by a galaxy model. In either case, the $N2$ method is an {\\it unreliable} method.

F. Shi; G. Zhao; James Wicker

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

229

NREL Explores Earth-Abundant Materials for Future Solar Cells (Fact Sheet), Innovation: The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Explores Earth-Abundant Explores Earth-Abundant Materials for Future Solar Cells Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are using a theory-driven technique-sequential cation mutation-to understand the nature and limitations of promising solar cell materials that can replace today's technologies. Finding new materials that use Earth-abundant elements and are easily manufactured is important for large-scale solar electricity deployment. The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative is to reduce the installed cost of solar energy systems by about 75% by the end of the decade. Obtaining that goal calls for photovoltaic (PV) technologies to improve in three main areas: solar-cell efficiencies, material processing costs, and scalability to the terawatt (TW), or 10

230

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

DIRECT OXYGEN ABUNDANCES FOR LOW-LUMINOSITY LVL GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present MMT spectroscopic observations of H II regions in 42 low luminosity galaxies in the Spitzer Local Volume Legacy survey. For 31 of the 42 galaxies in our sample, we were able to measure the temperature sensitive [O III] {lambda}4363 line at a strength of 4{sigma} or greater, and thus determine oxygen abundances using the 'direct' method. Our results provide the first 'direct' estimates of oxygen abundance for 19 of these galaxies. 'Direct' oxygen abundances were compared to B-band luminosities, 4.5 {mu}m luminosities, and stellar masses in order to characterize the luminosity-metallicity and mass-metallicity relationships at low luminosity. We present and analyze a 'Combined Select' sample composed of 38 objects (drawn from a sub-set of our parent sample and the literature) with 'direct' oxygen abundances and reliable distance determinations (based on the tip of the red giant branch or Cepheid variables). Consistent with previous studies, the B band and 4.5 {mu}m luminosity-metallicity relationships for the 38 objects were found to be 12 + log(O/H) = (6.27 {+-} 0.21) + (- 0.11 {+-} 0.01)M{sub B} and 12 + log(O/H) = (6.10 {+-} 0.21) + (- 0.10 {+-} 0.01)M{sub [4.5]} with dispersions of {sigma} = 0.15 and 0.14, respectively. The slopes of the optical and near-IR L-Z relationships have been reported to be different for galaxies with luminosities greater than that of the LMC. However, the similarity of the slopes of the optical and near-IR L-Z relationships for our sample probably reflects little influence by dust extinction in the low luminosity galaxies. For this sample, we derive a mass-metallicity relationship of 12 + log(O/H) = (5.61 {+-} 0.24) + (0.29 {+-} 0.03)log (M{sub *}), which agrees with previous studies; however, the dispersion ({sigma} = 0.15) is not significantly lower than that of the L-Z relationships. Because of the low dispersions in these relationships, if an accurate distance is available, the luminosity of a low luminosity galaxy is often a better indicator of metallicity than that derived using certain 'strong-line' methods, so significant departures from the L-Z relationships may indicate that caution is prudent in such cases. With these new 'direct' metallicities we also revisit the 70/160 {mu}m color metallicity relationship. Additionally, we examine N/O abundance trends with respect to oxygen abundance and B - V color. We find a positive correlation between N/O ratio and B - V color for 0.05 {approx}< B - V {approx}< 0.75: log (N/O) = (1.18 {+-} 0.9) Multiplication-Sign (B - V) + (- 1.92 {+-} 0.08), with a dispersion of {sigma} = 0.14, which is in agreement with previous studies.

Berg, Danielle A.; Skillman, Evan D. [Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Marble, Andrew R.; Engelbracht, Charles W. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Van Zee, Liese [Astronomy Department, Indiana University, 727 East 3rd Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Lee, Janice C. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Calzetti, Daniela [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Dale, Daniel A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, 1000 E. University, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Johnson, Benjamin D., E-mail: berg@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: cengelbracht@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: amarble@nso.edu, E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: jlee@stsci.edu, E-mail: calzetti@astro.umass.edu, E-mail: ddale@uwyo.edu, E-mail: johnson@iap.fr [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, 98 bis Bvd Arago, 75014 Paris (France)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Global climatology of abundance and solar absorption of oxygen collision complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the atmosphere by ZENDER: CLIMATOLOGY OF O2-X ABUNDANCE ANDOCTOBER 27, 1999 Global climatology of abundance and solarWe create a global climatology of wellmixed collision

Zender, Charles S.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

ABUNDANCE ANALYSIS OF HE 21481247, A STAR WITH EXTREMELY ENHANCED NEUTRON CAPTURE ELEMENTS1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and reach the solar abundance, while Pb significantly exceeds it, thus demonstrating the addition to near the solar abundance but not substantially above it. The yield of Pb relative to Ba appears to vary

Faraon, Andrei

234

Region-Specific Protein Abundance Changes in the Brain of MPTP...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Region-Specific Protein Abundance Changes in the Brain of MPTP-induced Parkinsons Disease Mouse Model . Region-Specific Protein Abundance Changes in the Brain of...

235

Chemical Abundances in High-Redshift Neutral Clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutral hydrogen clouds with high column density detected towards distant quasars are unique probes of elemental nucleosynthesis and chemical evolution in the low metallicity regime. They provide measurements for several elements at very early times which are unfeasible in other astrophysical environments. Comparison between refractory and non-refractory elements provides evidence for the presence of dust, and the recently measured Ar probes photoionization. A prominent characteristic is the dominance of a solar abundance pattern, which is somewhat unexpected at low metallicities. It is argued that this property and Nitrogen observations can be used to constrain the age of the Damped Ly_alpha systems and the epoch of star formation.

Paolo Molaro

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

236

Pre-Main Sequence Evolutions of Solar Abundance Lowmass Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the Pre-Main-Sequence (PMS) evolutionary tracks of stars with 0.0065~5.0Ms. The models were evolved from the PMS stellar birthline to the onset of hydrogen burning in the core. The convective turnover timescales which enables an observational test of theoretical model, particulary in the stellar dynamic activity, are also calculated. All models have Sun-like metal abundances, typically considered as the stars in the Galactic disk and the star formation region of Population I star. The convection phenomenon is treated by the usual mixing length approximation. All evolutionary tracks are available upon request.

Youn Kil Jung; Yong-Cheol Kim

2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

237

Cosmic ray abundance measurements with the CAKE balloon experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results from the CAKE (Cosmic Abundance below Knee Energy) balloon experiment which uses nuclear track detectors. The final experiment goal is the determination of the charge spectrum of CR nuclei with Z > 30 in the primary cosmic radiation. The detector, which has a geometric acceptance of \\~ 1.7 m2 sr, was exposed in a trans-mediterranean stratospheric balloon flight. Calibrations of the detectors used (CR39 and Lexan), scanning strategies and algorithms for tracking particles in an automatic mode are presented. The present status of the results is discussed

S. Cecchini; T. Chiarusi; G. Giacomelli; S. Manzoor; E. Medinaceli; L. Patrizii; V. Togo

2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

238

OXYGEN GAS-PHASE ABUNDANCE REVISITED M. K. Andre,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OXYGEN GAS-PHASE ABUNDANCE REVISITED M. K. Andre´,1,2 C. M. Oliveira,2 J. C. Howk,2 R. Ferlet,1 J gas-phase oxygen abundance along the sight lines toward 19 early-type Galactic stars at an average mag?1 with a standard deviation of 15% is consistent with previous surveys. The mean oxygen abundance

Howk, Jay Christopher

239

Hot star wind models with new solar abundances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compare the hot star wind models calculated assuming older solar abundance determination with models calculated using the recently published values derived from 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. We show that the use of new abundances with lower metallicity improves the agreement between wind observation and theory in several aspects: (1) The predicted wind mass-loss rates are lower by a factor of 0.76. This leads to a better agreement with mass-loss rate determinations derived from observations with account of clumping. (2) As a result of the lowering of mass-loss rates, there is a better agreement between predicted modified wind momentum-luminosity relationship and that derived from observations with account of clumping. (3) Both the lower mass fraction of heavier elements and lower mass-loss rates lead to a decrease of the opacity in the X-ray region. This has influence on the prediction of the X-ray line profile shapes. (4) There is a better agreement between predicted PV ionization fractions and those derived from observations.

Jiri Krticka; Jiri Kubat

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Probing AGB nucleosynthesis via accurate Planetary Nebula abundances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The elemental abundances of ten planetary nebulae, derived with high accuracy including ISO and IUE spectra, are analysed with the aid of synthetic evolutionary models for the TP-AGB phase. Model prescriptions are varied until we achieve the simultaneous reproduction of all elemental features, which allows placing important constraints on the characteristic masses and nucleosynthetic processes experienced by the stellar progenitors. First of all, it is possible to separate the sample into two groups of PNe, one indicating the occurrence of only the third dredge-up during the TP-AGB phase, and the other showing also the chemical signature of hot-bottom burning. The former group is reproduced by stellar models with variable molecular opacities (see Marigo 2002), adopting initial solar metallicity, and typical efficiency of the third dredge-up 0.3-0.4. The latter group of PNe, with extremely high He content 0.15TP-AGB progenitors (M > 4.5-5.0 Mo) with LMC composition have suffered a number of very efficient, carbon-poor, dredge-up events. Finally, the neon abundances of the He-rich PNe can be recovered by invoking a significant production of 22Ne during thermal pulses, which would imply a reduced role of the 22Ne(alpha,n)25Mg reaction as neutron source to the s-process nucleosynthesis in these stars.

P. Marigo; J. Bernard-Salas; S. R. Pottasch; A. G. G. M. Tielens; P. R. Wesselius

2003-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The element abundance FIP effect in the quiet Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Mg/Ne abundance ratio in the quiet Sun is measured in both network and supergranule cell centre regions through EUV spectra from the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer on SOHO. Twenty four sets of data over the period 1996 March to 1998 June (corresponding to solar minimum) are studied. Emission lines of the sequences Ne IV-VII and Mg V-VIII are simultaneously analysed by comparing with theoretical emissivities from the CHIANTI database to yield the Mg/Ne abundance and emission measure over the temperature region 5.0 Sun connects into the solar wind. The quiet Sun spectra are also utilised to determine the coronal density and temperature, leading to average values of 2.6^+0.5_-0.4 x 10^8 cm^-3 and log (T/K)=5.95 +/- 0.02. No significant trend with the rise in solar activity during 1996--98 is found for any of the derived quantities, implying that quiet Sun regions show little dependence on the solar cycle.

P. R. Young

2005-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

242

Abundances and Spectra for Cosmic-Ray Nuclei from Li to Fe For 2 to 150 GeV/n  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and have ratios to solar abundances as a function of firstthus and have ratios to solar abundances as a function ofuncertainty in its solar abundance (Casse et al. 1975). A

Orth, Chalres D.; Ruffington, Andrew; Smoot, George F.; Mast, Terry S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Abundance determinations in HII regions: model fitting versus Te-method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discrepancy between the oxygen abundances in high-metallicity HII regions determined through the Te-method (and/or through the corresponding "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibration) and that determined through the model fitting (and/or through the corresponding "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibration) is discussed. It is suggested to use the interstellar oxygen abundance in the solar vicinity, derived with very high precision from the high-resolution observations of the weak interstellar absorption lines towards the stars, as a "Rosetta stone" to verify the validity of the oxygen abundances derived in HII regions with the Te-method at high abundances. The agreement between the value of the oxygen abundance at the solar galactocentric distance traced by the abundances derived in HII regions through the Te-method and that derived from the interstellar absorption lines towards the stars is strong evidence in favor of that i) the two-zone model for Te seems to be a realistic interpretation of the temperature structure within HII regions, and ii) the classic Te-method provides accurate oxygen abundances in HII regions. It has been concluded that the "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibrations must be based on the HII regions with the oxygen abundances derived with the Te-method but not on the existing grids of the models for HII regions.

L. S. Pilyugin

2002-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

244

Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrates ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ...

Willard I. Wilcox; D. B. Carson; D. L. Katz

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

An MCMC determination of the primordial helium abundance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectroscopic observations of the chemical abundances in metal-poor H II regions provide an independent method for estimating the primordial helium abundance. H II regions are described by several physical parameters such as electron density, electron temperature, and reddening, in addition to y, the ratio of helium to hydrogen. It had been customary to estimate or determine self-consistently these parameters to calculate y. Frequentist analyses of the parameter space have been shown to be successful in these parameter determinations, and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques have proven to be very efficient in sampling this parameter space. Nevertheless, accurate determination of the primordial helium abundance from observations of H II regions is constrained by both systematic and statistical uncertainties. In an attempt to better reduce the latter, and continue to better characterize the former, we apply MCMC methods to the large dataset recently compiled by Izotov, Thuan, and Stasi?ska (2007). To improve the reliability of the determination, a high quality dataset is needed. In pursuit of this, a variety of cuts are explored. The efficacy of the He I ?4026 emission line as a constraint on the solutions is first examined, revealing the introduction of systematic bias through its absence. As a clear measure of the quality of the physical solution, a ?{sup 2} analysis proves instrumental in the selection of data compatible with the theoretical model. Nearly two-thirds of the observations fall outside a standard 95% confidence level cut, which highlights the care necessary in selecting systems and warrants further investigation into potential deficiencies of the model or data. In addition, the method also allows us to exclude systems for which parameter estimations are statistical outliers. As a result, the final selected dataset gains in reliability and exhibits improved consistency. Regression to zero metallicity yields Y{sub p} = 0.2534 0.0083, in broad agreement with the WMAP result. The inclusion of more observations shows promise for further reducing the uncertainty, but more high quality spectra are required.

Aver, Erik; Olive, Keith A.; Skillman, Evan D., E-mail: aver@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: olive@umn.edu, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

247

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

248

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

249

Natural Gas Rules (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources administers the rules that govern natural gas exploration and extraction in the state. DNR works with the Louisiana Department of Environmental...

250

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...

251

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

natural gas production output. Rigs Natural Gas Transportation Update Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company yesterday (August 4) said it is mobilizing equipment and manpower for...

252

RE-EXAMINING HIGH ABUNDANCE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY MASS-METALLICITY OUTLIERS: HIGH N/O, EVOLVED WOLF-RAYET GALAXIES?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present new MMT spectroscopic observations of four dwarf galaxies representative of a larger sample observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and identified by Peeples et al. as low-mass, high oxygen abundance outliers from the mass-metallicity relation. Peeples showed that these four objects (with metallicity estimates of 8.5 {<=} 12 + log(O/H) {<=} 8.8) have oxygen abundance offsets of 0.4-0.6 dex from the M{sub B} luminosity-metallicity relation. Our new observations extend the wavelength coverage to include the [O II] {lambda}{lambda}3726, 3729 doublet, which adds leverage in oxygen abundance estimates and allows measurements of N/O ratios. All four spectra are low excitation, with relatively high N/O ratios (N/O {approx}> 0.10), each of which tend to bias estimates based on strong emission lines toward high oxygen abundances. These spectra all fall in a regime where the 'standard' strong-line methods for metallicity determinations are not well calibrated either empirically or by photoionization modeling. By comparing our spectra directly to photoionization models, we estimate oxygen abundances in the range of 7.9 {<=} 12 + log (O/H) {<=} 8.4, consistent with the scatter of the mass-metallicity relation. We discuss the physical nature of these galaxies that leads to their unusual spectra (and previous classification as outliers), finding their low excitation, elevated N/O, and strong Balmer absorption are consistent with the properties expected from galaxies evolving past the 'Wolf-Rayet galaxy' phase. We compare our results to the 'main' sample of Peeples and conclude that they are outliers primarily due to enrichment of nitrogen relative to oxygen and not due to unusually high oxygen abundances for their masses or luminosities.

Berg, Danielle A.; Skillman, Evan D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Marble, Andrew R., E-mail: berg@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: amarble@nso.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© 2009 APS Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology Published online: 17 July 2009 | doi:10 perfect fluid. Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 025301 (2009). | Article |1. Nature Nanotechnology ISSN 1748 : Nature Nanotechnology http://www.nature.com/nnano/reshigh/2009/0709/full/nnano.2009.222.html 1 of 1 18

Müller, Markus

254

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

255

Light-Element Abundances of Giant Stars in the Globular Cluster M71 (NGC 6838)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum is the heaviest light element displaying large star--to--star variations in Galactic globular clusters (GCs). This element may provide additional insight into the origin of the multiple populations now known to be a common place in GCs, and also the nature of the first-generation stars responsible for a cluster's chemical inhomogeneities. In a previous analysis we found that, unlike more metal-poor GCs, 47 Tuc did not exhibit a strong Na-Al correlation, which motivates a careful study of the similar metallicity but less massive GC M71. We present chemical abundances of O, Na, Al, and Fe for 33 giants in M71 using spectra obtained with the WIYN-Hydra spectrograph. Our spectroscopic analysis finds that, similar to 47 Tuc and in contrast with more metal-poor GCs, M71 stars do not exhibit a strong Na-Al correlation and span a relatively narrow range in [Al/Fe], which are characteristics that GC formation models must reproduce.

Cordero, Maria J; Johnson, Christian I; Vesperini, Enrico

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Interlaboratory comparison of different analytical techniques for the determination of oxygen-18 abundance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of six artificially enriched waters, containing between 2,500 and 6,500 ppm oxygen-18, was prepared by adding weighed portions of distilled water and highly enriched H{sub 2}{sup 18}O. These waters were analyzed by radio activation analysis (proton activation PAA) and by gas isotope ratio mass spectrometry (gIRMS) with CO{sub 2} as the analysis gas. Carbon dioxide was prepared from water samples either by using the guanidine reaction, with 3-, 5- and 10-{mu}L samples, or by isotopic equilibration, using small (10 {mu}L) and large (1.5 mL) samples. The large samples were diluted to the natural abundance range prior to analysis as were the 3-{mu}L guanidine samples. Precision was greatest with large sample CO{sub 2} equilibration (mean relative standard deviation (RSD) = 0.108%). The other gIRMS gas preparation techniques had lower precision (3 {mu}L guanidine, RSD = 0.529%, 5 {mu}L guanidine, RSD = 0.364%, 10 {mu}L guanidine, RSD = 0.48%; 10 {mu}L equilibration, RSD = 0.43%) and the lowest precision occurred with PAA (RSD = 0.58%). For all the techniques except small sample equilibration, accuracy (percent deviation of mean evaluation from expected gravimetric mean) was worse than precision (RSD).

Speakman, J.R.; Poppitt, S.D.; Racey, P.A. (Univ. of Aberdeen (Scotland)); Nagy, K.A.; Strathearn, G.E. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA)); Masman, D.; Mook, W.G. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The circulating hemocytes of the white shrimp, Penaeus setiferus: origin, abundance, morphology, and function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) A. ~ (Head of Department) (Member) 4. ~6-&- (Member) May 1978 442840 ABSTBACT The Circulating Hemocytes of the Hhite Shrimp, Penacus setiferus: Origin, Abundance, Morphology.... EDGFuVENTS? LIST OF TABLES vii LIST OF FIGURES viii INTRODUCTION- RL'VIEN OF LITERATURE NATL'RIALS AND METHODS 01 igil'l Abundance Morphology? Function 13 13 14 15 18 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 21 Origin 21 Abundance? 23 Morphology...

Fontaine, Clark Timothy

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

258

Nuclear Coupling of 33S and the Nature of Free Radicals in Irradiated Crystals of Cystine Dihydrochloride: Part II, Charged Radicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...radicals produced by ionizing radiation to be mostly charged molecules...equivalent positions. With the naturally occuring 33S abundance of 0.76% in...consequences in biochemical reactions and radiation effects. In consideration of...

Joseph H. Hadley; Jr.; Walter Gordy

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

The Coronal Abundances of Mid-F Dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Chandra spectrum of the moderately active nearby F6 V star Pi3 Ori is used to study the coronal properties of mid-F dwarfs. We find that Pi3 Ori's coronal emission measure distribution is very similar to those of moderately active G and K dwarfs, with an emission measure peak near $\\log T=6.6$ seeming to be ubiquitous for such stars. In contrast to coronal temperature, coronal abundances are known to depend on spectral type for main sequence stars. Based on this previously known relation, we expected Pi3 Ori's corona to exhibit an extremely strong "FIP effect," a phenomenon first identified on the Sun where elements with low "First Ionization Potential" (FIP) are enhanced in the corona. We instead find that Pi3 Ori's corona exhibits a FIP effect essentially identical to that of the Sun and other early G dwarfs, perhaps indicating that the increase in FIP bias towards earlier spectral types stops or at least slows for F stars. We find that Pi3 Ori's coronal characteristics are significantly different from tw...

Wood, Brian E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

LARGE ABUNDANCES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN TITAN'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 {mu}m in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al. We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 {mu}m. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} particles cm{sup -3}. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is {approx}430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 nm{sup 2}; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), E-18080 Granada (Spain); Dinelli, B. M. [ISAC-CNR, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E. [IAPS-INAF, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Moriconi, M. L. [ISAC-CNR, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J., E-mail: puertas@iaa.es [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Probing AGB nucleosynthesis via accurate Planetary Nebula abundances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The elemental abundances of ten planetary nebulae, derived with high accuracy including ISO and IUE spectra, are analysed with the aid of synthetic evolutionary models for the TP-AGB phase. Model prescriptions are varied until we achieve the simultaneous reproduction of all elemental features, which allows placing important constraints on the characteristic masses and nucleosynthetic processes experienced by the stellar progenitors. First of all, it is possible to separate the sample into two groups of PNe, one indicating the occurrence of only the third dredge-up during the TP-AGB phase, and the other showing also the chemical signature of hot-bottom burning. The former group is reproduced by stellar models with variable molecular opacities (see Marigo 2002), adopting initial solar metallicity, and typical efficiency of the third dredge-up 0.3-0.4. The latter group of PNe, with extremely high He content 0.15 4.5-5.0 Mo) with LMC composition have suffered a number of very efficient, carbon-poor, dredge-up eve...

Marigo, P; Pottasch, S R; Tielens, A G G M; Wesselius, P R

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundance cancer related Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cancer related Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: abundance cancer related Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The Therapeutic Implications of...

263

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundance monitoring hydroacoustic Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: abundance monitoring hydroacoustic Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Introduction Reef fish spawning aggregations have Summary: aggregation at Little Cayman Island, Cayman...

264

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundance isotopic Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: abundance isotopic Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION Isotopes are atoms whose nuclei contain the same number of protons but...

265

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundant nuclear copies Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nuclear copies Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: abundant nuclear copies Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Nuclear membranes control...

266

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundance distribution results Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

al. 2007... ). Species abundance distributions are widely used in ecology ... Source: Poulin, Robert - Department of Zoology, University of Otago Collection: Biology and Medicine...

267

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundance distribution composition Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

al. 2007... ). Species abundance distributions are widely used in ecology ... Source: Poulin, Robert - Department of Zoology, University of Otago Collection: Biology and Medicine...

268

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundance range revealed Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(2006) Moving be- yond assumptions to understand abundance distributions ... Source: Poulin, Robert - Department of Zoology, University of Otago Collection: Biology and Medicine...

269

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundant dicer-dependent small Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

unknown. In this study, we tested whether variation in abundance among ... Source: Poulin, Robert - Department of Zoology, University of Otago Collection: Biology and Medicine...

270

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundance discrepancy problem Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

if we consider the frequency (Fi for species i) instead of abundance, to ... Source: Poulin, Robert - Department of Zoology, University of Otago Collection: Biology and Medicine...

271

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha element abundances Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the Coulomb drag. Inefficient Coulomb drag leads to a low helium abundance in the solar wind. Introduction Source: Richardson, John - Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and...

272

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundance acute-phase proteins Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

various proteomes... segments that become The availability and abundance of intrinsically disordered proteins inside a cell... comparable, mRNAs encod- ing intrinsically disordered...

273

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundance chemical Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Nd, Sm, Zr... may have low abundances of high field strength elements, rare earth elements and Y. ... Source: Becker, Harry - Department of Geology, University of...

274

Female offspring desertion and male-only care increase with natural and experimental increase in food abundance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...times the mean home range radius...cent of the average food consumption of Tengmalm's...cent of the energy requirements...stage was on average 0.58 (s...post-brooding period (average of all nest...reducing their own energy reserves available...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Sensitivity of low degree oscillations to the change in solar abundances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Context. The most recent determination of the solar chemical composition, using a time-dependent, 3D hydrodynamical model of the solar atmosphere, exhibits a significant decrease of C, N, O abundances compared to their previous values. Solar models that use these new abundances are not consistent with helioseismological determinations of the sound speed profile, the surface helium abundance and the convection zone depth. Aims. We investigate the effect of changes of solar abundances on low degree p-mode and g-mode characteristics which are strong constraints of the solar core. We consider particularly the increase of neon abundance in the new solar mixture in order to reduce the discrepancy between models using new abundances and helioseismology. Methods. The observational determinations of solar frequencies from the GOLF instrument are used to test solar models computed with different chemical compositions. We consider in particular the normalized small frequency spacings in the low degree p-mode frequency range. Results. Low-degree small frequency spacings are very sensitive to changes in the heavy-element abundances, notably neon. We show that by considering all the seismic constraints, including the small frequency spacings, a rather large increase of neon abundance by about (0.5 +/- 0.05)dex can be a good solution to the discrepancy between solar models that use new abundances and low degree helioseismology, subject to adjusting slightly the solar age and the highest abundances. We also show that the change in solar abundances, notably neon, considerably affects g-mode frequencies, with relative frequency differences between the old and the new models higher than 1.5%

A. Zaatri; J. Provost; G. Berthomieu; P. Morel; T. Corbard

2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

276

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

277

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"N3050MS3","N3010MS3","N3020MS3","N3035MS3","NA1570SMS3","N3045MS3" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

278

Nature/Culture/Seawater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This essay considers seawater as a substance and symbol in anthropological and social theory. Seawater has occupied an ambiguous place with respect to anthropological categories of nature and culture. Seawater as nature ...

Helmreich, Stefan

279

Natural Gas Monthly  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Natural gas annual 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3010CT3","N3020CT3","N3035CT3","N3045CT3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Connecticut (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Delivered to...

282

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Rotary Rig Count Rises to Highest Level since February 2009. The natural gas rotary rig count was 992 as of Friday, August 13, according to data released by Baker...

283

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Boston forum is open to the public. Additional information is available at http:www.energy.govnews3197.htm. Natural Gas Rig Count: The number of rigs drilling for natural...

284

THE CORONAL ABUNDANCES OF MID-F DWARFS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Chandra spectrum of the moderately active nearby F6 V star {pi}{sup 3} Ori is used to study the coronal properties of mid-F dwarfs. We find that {pi}{sup 3} Ori's coronal emission measure distribution is very similar to those of moderately active G and K dwarfs, with an emission measure peak near log T = 6.6 seeming to be ubiquitous for such stars. In contrast to coronal temperature, coronal abundances are known to depend on spectral type for main sequence stars. Based on this previously known relation, we expected {pi}{sup 3} Ori's corona to exhibit an extremely strong ''first ionization potential (FIP) effect'', a phenomenon first identified on the Sun where elements with low FIP are enhanced in the corona. We instead find that {pi}{sup 3} Ori's corona exhibits a FIP effect essentially identical to that of the Sun and other early G dwarfs, perhaps indicating that the increase in FIP bias toward earlier spectral types stops or at least slows for F stars. We find that {pi}{sup 3} Ori's coronal characteristics are significantly different from two previously studied mid-F stars, Procyon (F5 IV-V) and {tau} Boo (F7 V). We believe {pi}{sup 3} Ori is more representative of the coronal characteristics of mid-F dwarfs, with Procyon being different because of luminosity class, and {tau} Boo being different because of the effects of one of two close companions, one stellar ({tau} Boo B: M2 V) and one planetary.

Wood, Brian E.; Laming, J. Martin [Naval Research Laboratory, Space Science Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

285

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels | Prices | States | International | Country Analysis...

286

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

287

Natural gas annual 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

FR Cnc Nature Revisited  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of FR Cnc reported a tricky nature. We carried out...

M. C. Glvez; A. Golovin; M. Hernn-Obispo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Natural Gas: More Gasbuggies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... first US experiment in the use of underground nuclear explosions to increase the recovery of natural ...naturalgas ...

1969-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

290

Geology of Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... to an accepted plan have produced a most comprehensive geological account of the occurrence of natural ...naturalgas ...

E. F. A.

1936-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

291

A Novel Form of the Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Created by Cysteine Mutations Extends Its Half-Life: Relevance to Cancer and Angiogenesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4. Molecular Modeling of Cys PAI-1 Mutants...SWISS-MODEL (Automated Protein Model Server...analysis revealed a rapid conformational change...bonds, as molecular simulations and three-dimensional structural modeling suggest. After...

Joanna Chorostowska-Wynimko; Rafal Swiercz; Ewa Skrzypczak-Jankun; Adam Wojtowicz; Steven H. Selman; and Jerzy Jankun

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Measurement of the half-life of (198)Au in a nonmetal: High-precision measurement shows no host-material dependence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.ortec-online.com/Solutions/multichannel-analyzers. aspx]. [8] R. Jenkins, R. W. Gould, and D. Gedcke, Quantitative X-ray Spectrometry (Dekker, New York, 1981), p. 266. [9] D. Radford (private communication) [http://radware.phy. ornl.gov/main.html]. [10] R. Brun and F. Rademakers, Nucl. Instrum...

Goodwin, J. R.; Nica, N.; Iacob, V. E.; Dibidad, A.; Hardy, John C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

AID Associates with Single-Stranded DNA with High Affinity and a Long Complex Half-Life in a Sequence-Independent Manner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...indicating that AID binds these bubble substrates with very high affinities...binding affinities of AID to bubble substrates suggests that AID...of relatively high complex stability. AID complex formation on...single-stranded region of the bubble, it remained plausible that...

Mani Larijani; Alexander P. Petrov; Oxana Kolenchenko; Maribel Berru; Sergey N. Krylov; Alberto Martin

2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

294

THE FIRST ISOLATION OF AMERICIUM IN THE FORM OF PURE COMPOUNDS - THE SPECIFIC ALPHA-ACTIVITY AND HALF-LIFE OF Am241  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eng-48 THE FIRST ISOLATION QF AMERICIUM IN THE FORM OF PURECalifornia July 20, 1950 l Americium was discovered inof the chemistry of americium were carried out by its

Cunningham, B.B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Natural Gas Reforming  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Natural gas reforming is an advanced and mature production process that builds upon the existing natural gas pipeline delivery infrastructure. Today, 95% of the hydrogen produced in the United States is made by natural gas reforming in large central plants. This technology is an important pathway for near-term hydrogen production.

296

MODELING PHYTOPLANKTON ABUNDANCE IN SAGINAW BAY, LAKE HURON: USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS TO DISCERN FUNCTIONAL INFLUENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING PHYTOPLANKTON ABUNDANCE IN SAGINAW BAY, LAKE HURON: USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS; phytoplankton Abbreviations: ANN, artificial neural network; Cl? , chloride; DOC, dissolved organic carbon; Kd Phytoplankton abundance, as chl a, in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron was modeled using arti- ficial neural networks

297

Accepted Manuscript Abundances of presolar silicon carbide grains in primitive meteorites deter-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript Abundances of presolar silicon carbide grains in primitive meteorites deter.R., Alexander, C.M., Orthous-Daunay, o-R., Franchi, I.A., Hoppe, P., Abundances of presolar silicon carbide of presolar silicon carbide grains in primitive meteorites determined by NanoSIMS Jemma Davidsona,1,* , Henner

Nittler, Larry R.

298

The Solar Wind Helium Abundance: Variation with Wind Speed and the Solar Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Solar Wind Helium Abundance: Variation with Wind Speed and the Solar Cycle Matthias R. Aellig Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM 87545 Abstract We investigate the helium abundance in the solar wind of 1994 and early 2000 are analyzed. In agreement with similar work for previous solar cycles, we find

Richardson, John

299

Grey seal distribution and abundance in North Wales, 2002-2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Grey seal distribution and abundance in North Wales, 2002-2003 Westcott, S.M. & Stringell, T.B. Stringell Title: "Grey seal distribution and abundance in North Wales, 2002-2003" Authors: Westcott, S Library x1 C. Duck, SMRU x1 Joe Breen EHS x1 PML, Library, Plymouth x1 S. Westcott x5 M. Baines x1 S

Bearhop, Stuart

300

Abundance Patterns in the Interstellar Medium of Early-type Galaxies Observed with Suzaku  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have analyzed 17 early-type galaxies, 13 ellipticals and 4 S0's, observed with Suzaku, and investigated metal abundances (O, Mg, Si, and Fe) and abundance ratios (O/Fe, Mg/Fe, and Si/Fe) in the interstellar medium (ISM). The emission from each on-source region, which is 4 times effective radius, r_e, is reproduced with one- or two- temperature thermal plasma models as well as a multi-temperature model, using APEC plasma code v2.0.1. The multi-temperature model gave almost the same abundances and abundance ratios with the 1T or 2T models. The weighted averages of the O, Mg, Si, and Fe abundances of all the sample galaxies derived from the multi-temperature model fits are 0.83+-0.04, 0.93+-0.03, 0.80+-0.02, and 0.80+-0.02 solar, respectively, in solar units according to the solar abundance table by Lodders (2003). These abundances show no significant dependence on the morphology and environment. The systematic differences in the derived metal abundances between the version 2.0.1 and 1.3.1 of APEC plasma code...

Konami, Saori; Nagino, Ryo; Tamagawa, Toru

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Neon Abundances in B-Stars of the Orion Association: Solving the Solar Model Problem?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on non-LTE Ne abundances for a sample of B-type stellar members of the Orion Association. The abundances were derived by means of non-LTE fully metal-blanketed model atmospheres and extensive model atoms with updated atomic data. We find that these young stars have a very homogeneous abundance of A(Ne) = 8.27 +/- 0.05. This abundance is higher by ~0.4 dex than currently adopted solar value, A(Ne)=7.84, which is derived from lines produced in the corona and active regions. The general agreement between the abundances of C, N, and O derived for B stars with the solar abundances of these elements derived from 3-D hydrodynamical models atmospheres strongly suggests that the abundance patterns of the light elements in the Sun and B stars are broadly similar. If this hypothesis is true, then the Ne abundance derived here is the same within the uncertainties as the value required to reconcile solar models with helioseismological observations.

Katia Cunha; Ivan Hubeny; Thierry Lanz

2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

302

N/O in spiral discs: a new algorithm for abundance determinations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......for observing temperature-sensitive auroral lines for deter- mining N/O abundance ratios in H II regions. We now pro- ceed to test our method. 2.2 Testing the method Input parameters for each model in our grid include ele- mental abundances, gas......

T. R. Thurston; M. G. Edmunds; R. B. C. Henry

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

EARTH ABUNDANT MATERIALS FOR HIGH EFFICIENCY HETEROJUNCTION THIN FILM SOLAR CELLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EARTH ABUNDANT MATERIALS FOR HIGH EFFICIENCY HETEROJUNCTION THIN FILM SOLAR CELLS Yun Seog Lee 1; * Corresponding author: buonassisi@mit.edu; ABSTRACT We investigate earth abundant materials for thin- film solar cuprous oxide (Cu2O) as a prototype candidate for investigation as an absorber layer in thin film solar

Ceder, Gerbrand

304

Seasonal measurements of acetone and methanol: Abundances and implications for atmospheric budgets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2002] and photochemical produc- tion from hydrocarbon precursors. Methanol is often the most abundantSeasonal measurements of acetone and methanol: Abundances and implications for atmospheric budgets December 2005; published 21 February 2006. [1] Acetone and methanol have been measured hourly at a rural

Cohen, Ronald C.

305

The Oxygen Abundance of Nearby Galaxies from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have derived the oxygen abundance for a sample of nearby galaxies in the Data Release 5 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) which possess at least two independent spectra of one or several HII regions with a detected [OIII]4363 auroral line. Since, for nearby galaxies, the [OII]3727 nebular line is out of the observed wavelength range, we propose a method to derive (O/H)_ff abundances using the classic Te method coupled with the ff relation. (O/H)_7325 abundances have also been determined, based on the [OII]7320,7330 line intensities, and using a small modification of the standard Te method. The (O/H)_ff and (O/H)_7325 abundances have been derived with both the one- and two-dimensional t_2 - t_3 relations. It was found that the (O/H)_ff abundances derived with the parametric two-dimensional t_2 - t_3 relation are most reliable. Oxygen abundances have been determined in 29 nearby galaxies, based on 84 individual abundance determinations in HII regions. Because of our selection methods, the metallicity of our galaxies lies in the narrow range 8.2 oxygen abundances in the disk of the spiral galaxy NGC 4490 is determined for the first time.

L. S. Pilyugin; T. X. Thuan

2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

306

NATURE CHEMISTRY | VOL 3 | OCTOBER 2011 | www.nature.com/naturechemistry 763 unlight is the most abundant source of energy we have at our  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as those compris- ing organic solar cells. The structural differences in antennas can be subtle between. Fleming2,3 , Alexandra Olaya-Castro4 and Rienk van Grondelle5 Solar fuel production often starts will be used for solar fuel production, to direct and regulate excitation energy flow using molecular

Fleming, Graham R.

307

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Partnership on Unconventional Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research April 13, 2012 - 3:01pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, three federal agencies announced a formal partnership to coordinate and align all research associated with development of our nation's abundant unconventional natural gas and oil resources. The partnership exemplifies the cross-government coordination required under President Obama's Executive Order released earlier today, which created a new Interagency Working Group to Support Safe and Responsible Development of Unconventional Domestic Natural Gas Resources. This new partnership will help coordinate current and future research and scientific studies undertaken by the U.S. Department of

308

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

309

Abundances and kinematics of K giants in the galactic nuclear bulge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectroscopy and photometry were obtained for 100 K giants in Baade's Window at l = 1/sup 0/, b = -4/sup 0/. The abundance distribution of the nuclear bulge K giants was derived relative to 45 stars of known abundance. The abundances run from -1 to nearly +1 dex, with a peak at 0.3 dex, or twice the solar abundance. Of the 88 stars with derived abundances, 22% exceeded the abundance of the most metal rich local K giants; 50% exceeded the solar abundance, and 10% were metal poor (< -0.6 dex). Radial velocities were measured for 53 nuclear bulge K giants which also have derived abundances. Their velocity dispersion is 104 km/sec. The mean velocity is -19 +/- 14 km/sec; within 1 sigma of the solar Pi velocity of -10 km/sec. When this sample is divided into 3 subsets based on the abundances, the subset of 21 stars > 0.3 dex has sigma = 92 +/- 14 km/sec and the metal poor subset of 16 stars <-0.3 dex has J = 126 +/- 22 km/sec. An intermediate set of 16 stars has sigma = 97 +/- 17 km/sec. The most metal rich stars may have a bulk velocity of -38 +/- 14 km/sec, 1sigma less than the -19 km/sec of the metal poor stars. No evidence was found that either the metal rich or metal poor stars follow the galactic rotation curve; hence, neither population appears to be rotation supported. Optical and infrared photometry is presented for nuclear bulge K giants. The colors of these stars are shown to be too hot for their derived metal abundances.

Rich, R.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

XMM observation of M~87 II. Abundance structure of the interstellar and intergalactic medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on a detailed study of the temperature structure of the intracluster medium in the halo of M~87, abundance profiles of 7 elements, O, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe are derived. In addition, abundance ratios are derived from the ratios of line strengths, whose temperature dependences are small within the temperature range of the ICM of M~87. The abundances of Si, S, Ar, Ca and Fe show strong decreasing gradients outside 2$'$ and become nearly constant within the radius at $\\sim1.5$ solar. The Fe/Si ratio is determined to be 0.9 solar with no radial gradient. In contrast, the O abundance is less than a half of the Si abundance at the center and has a flatter gradient. The Mg abundance is $\\sim$1 solar within 2$'$, which is close to stellar abundance within the same radius. The O/Si/Fe pattern of M~87 is located at the simple extension of that of Galactic stars. The observed Mg/O ratio is about 1.25 solar, which is also the same ratio as for Galactic stars. The O/Si/Fe ratio indicates that the SN Ia contribution to Si and Fe becomes important towards the center and SN Ia products have similar abundances of Si and Fe at least around M~87, which may reflect dimmer SN Ia observed in old stellar systems. The S abundance is similar to the Si abundance at the center, but has a steeper gradient. This result suggests that the S/Si ratio of SN II products is much smaller than the solar ratio.

Kyoko Matsushita; Alexis Finoguenov; Hans Bhringer

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

311

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

312

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Largest Natural Gas Pipeline...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Interstate Pipelines Table About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Thirty Largest U.S. Interstate Natural...

313

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Compressor...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Compressor Stations Illustration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline...

314

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

315

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

316

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.

317

Natural Gas Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Released: December 28, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2009 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2009. Summary data are presented for each State for 2005 to 2009. The Natural Gas Annual 2009 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2009 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2009. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2009) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2009) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

318

Natural Gas Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: March 2, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2008 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2008. Summary data are presented for each State for 2004 to 2008. The Natural Gas Annual 2008 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2008 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2008. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2008) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2008) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

319

Nutrient pulsing as a regulator of phytoplankton abundance and community composition in Galveston Bay, Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Galveston Bay, Texas, is a large shallow estuary with a watershed that includes 60% of the major industrial facilities of Texas. However, the system exhibits low to moderate (220 ?g l?1) microalgal biomass with sporadic phytoplankton blooms. Both nitrogen (N) and phosphate (P) limitation of phytoplankton growth have been proposed for the estuary. However, shifts between N and P limitation of algae growth may occur due to annual fluctuations in nutrient concentrations. The primary goal of this work was to determine the primary limiting nutrient for phytoplankton in Galveston Bay. Nutrient addition bioassays were used to assess short-term (12 days) phytoplankton responses (both biomass and community composition) to potentially limiting nutrients. The experimental bioassays were conducted over an annual cycle using natural water collected from the center to lower part of the estuary. Total phytoplankton biomass increased in the nitrate (10 ?M) additions in 11 of the 13 bioassays, but no significant increases were detected in the phosphate (3 ?M)-only additions. Bioassay results suggest that the phytoplankton community was usually not phosphate limited. All major groups increased in biomass following nitrate additions but diatoms increased in biomass at a faster rate than other groups, shifting the community composition toward higher relative abundance of diatoms. The results of this study suggest that pulsed N input events preferentially favor increases in diatom biomass in this estuary. The broader implications of this study are that N pulsing events, primarily due to river discharge, play an important role in structuring the phytoplankton community in the Galveston Bay estuary.

Erla B. rnlfsdttir; S.Elizabeth Lumsden; James L. Pinckney

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

The Solar Helium Abundance in the Outer Corona Determined from Observations with SUMER/SOHO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At altitudes of about 1.05 solar radii or more, the corona above quiet solar regions becomes essentially isothermal. This obviates many of the difficulties associated with the inverse problem of determining emission measure distributions, and allows for fairly straightforward relative element abundance measurements. We present new values for the He abundance. The first is based on a reanalysis of the He/O ratio studied previously using data acquired by SUMER. A more thorough evaluation of the atomic physics for He II, including a detailed treatment of radiative recombination, increases the predicted emission in the He II Balmer series compared to earlier analyses. We use a recently revised value of the O abundance to derive an He/H abundance ratio of 0.038, (mass fraction, Y=0.13), with an error of ~17% coming mainly from the O abundance uncertainty. We demonstrate that this result may be affected by gravitational settling of O relative to He. We also derive an abundance for He by direct comparison to emission lines of the H I Lyman series, with the result He/H =0.052 +/- 0.005 (Y=0.17), a value similar to He abundances determined in the slow speed solar wind.

J. M. Laming; U. Feldman

2000-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Chemical Constraints on the Water and Total Oxygen Abundances in the Deep Atmosphere of Saturn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermochemical equilibrium and kinetic calculations for the trace gases CO, PH3, and SiH4 give three independent constraints on the water and total oxygen abundances of Saturn's deep atmosphere. A lower limit to the water abundance of H2O/H2 > 1.7 x 10^-3 is given by CO chemistry while an upper limit of H2O/H2 < 5.5 x 10^-3 is given by PH3 chemistry. A combination of the CO and PH3 constraints indicates a water enrichment on Saturn of 1.9 to 6.1 times the solar system abundance (H2O/H2 = 8.96 x 10^-4). The total oxygen abundance must be at least 1.7 times the solar system abundance (O/H2 = 1.16 x 10^-3) in order for the SiH4 to remain below a detection limit of SiH4/H2 < 2 x 10^-10. A combination of the CO, PH3, and SiH4 constraints suggests that the total oxygen abundance on Saturn is 3.2 to 6.4 times the solar system abundance. Our results indicate that oxygen on Saturn is less enriched than other heavy elements (such as C and P) relative to a solar system composition. This work was supported by NASA NAG5-11958.

Channon Visscher; Bruce Fegley Jr

2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

322

On the maximum value of the cosmic abundance of oxygen and the oxygen yield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We search for the maximum oxygen abundance in spiral galaxies. Because this maximum value is expected to occur in the centers of the most luminous galaxies, we have constructed the luminosity - central metallicity diagram for spiral galaxies, based on a large compilation of existing data on oxygen abundances of HII regions in spiral galaxies. We found that this diagram shows a plateau at high luminosities (-22.3 oxygen abundance 12+log(O/H) ~ 8.87. This provides strong evidence that the oxygen abundance in the centers of the most luminous metal-rich galaxies reaches the maximum attainable value of oxygen abundance. Since some fraction of the oxygen (about 0.08 dex) is expected to be locked into dust grains, the maximum value of the true gas+dust oxygen abundance in spiral galaxies is 12+log(O/H) ~ 8.95. This value is a factor of ~ 2 higher than the recently estimated solar value. Based on the derived maximum oxygen abundance in galaxies, we found the oxygen yield to be about 0.0035, depending on the fraction of oxygen incorporated into dust grains.

L. S. Pilyugin; T. X. Thuan; J. M. Vilchez

2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

323

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond ... The column summarizes research articles from Nature that report on anthropogenic activities and natural phenomena that influence the chemical composition of Earth's atmosphere. ...

Sabine Heinhorst; Gordon Cannon

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 19, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 11, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board as oil prices dropped steeply along with most other major commodities. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas spot price fell 36 cents from $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, May 4, to $4.23 per MMBtu on Wednesday, May 11. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (June 2011) dropped almost 9 percent, falling from $4.577 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $4.181 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose by 70 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 1,827 Bcf, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.

325

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 21, 2010) Natural gas prices rose across market locations in the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose 31 cents, or 7 percent, during the week, averaging $4.70 per million Btu (MMBtu) yesterday, July 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the August 2010 natural gas futures contract for delivery at the Henry Hub rose about 21 cents, or 5 percent, ending the report week at $4.513 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage increased to 2,891 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 16, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

326

Thermodynamic, Energy Efficiency, and Power Density Analysis of Reverse Electrodialysis Power Generation with Natural Salinity Gradients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic, Energy Efficiency, and Power Density Analysis of Reverse Electrodialysis Power Generation with Natural Salinity Gradients ... solns. of different salinities. ... River mouths are potentially abundant locations for the exploitation of the clean and renewable salinity gradient energy (SGE) as here perpetually fresh water mixes with saline seawater. ...

Ngai Yin Yip; David A. Vermaas; Kitty Nijmeijer; Menachem Elimelech

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

327

,"Colorado Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","112014","1151989" ,"Release Date:","1302015"...

328

,"California Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

329

,"Maryland Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1999" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

330

,"Georgia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1999" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

331

,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

332

,"Oregon Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1979" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

333

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",1,"Annual",2013,"6302012" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

334

,"Washington Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2013,"...

335

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

336

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

337

,"Alaska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",6,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301969" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

338

,"Maine Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2013,"6301982" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301981" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

339

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

340

,"Idaho Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",2,"Annual",1975,"6301974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301981" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2013,"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

342

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

343

,"Delaware Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301967" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",9,"Annual",2013,"...

344

,"Colorado Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",2,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

345

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301968" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

346

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

347

,"Nevada Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

301967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2013,"6301991" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301982" ,"Data 4","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

348

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"6301973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

349

,"Virginia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

350

,"Alabama Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301968" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

351

,"Indiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

352

Natural Resources Specialist  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

(See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working ? Western Area Power Administration, Corporate Services Office, Office of the Chief Operating Officer, Natural...

353

Assessment in natural sciences.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This research study focusses on assessment in the Natural Sciences learning area in grades 8 and 9. The aspect under focus is the extent to (more)

Singh, Suresh Kamar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Unconventional Natural Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(NETL) Anthony Zammerilli General Engineer Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil Energy Sector Planning and Analysis (ESPA) Robert C. Murray, Thomas Davis, and James...

355

Natural gas annual 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

,"California Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312014"...

357

EIA - Natural Gas Publications  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data collected on Form EIA-914 (Monthly Natural Gas Production Report) for Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico, Texas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Wyoming, Other States...

358

NETL: Natural Gas Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources Significant volumes of natural gas can also be produced from tight (low permeability) sandstone reservoirs and coal seams, both unconventional reservoir rocks. NETL...

359

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

imbalances. Northern Natural Gas Company declared a force majeure after an unplanned repair issue at the Spearman Compressor Station in Ochiltree County, Texas, on Friday,...

360

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Gwinville, Mississippi. The pipeline company has isolated the affected section of pipeline and taken it out of service. Southern Natural intends to prepare a plan for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Natural Cooling Retrofit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the most important design considerations for any method of Natural Cool ing is the chil led water temperature range selected for use during Natural Cool ing. Figure VI shows that for a hypo thetical Chicago plant, the hours of operation for a Natural..." system on the Natural Cool ing cycle. As the pressures and flow rates of the condenser and chil led water systems are seldom the same, the designer must pay careful attention to the cross over system design to ensure harmonious operations on both...

Fenster, L. C.; Grantier, A. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

MIMICKING NATURAL PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

MIMICKING NATURAL PHOTOSYNTHESIS ... O2 Evolution from the Manganese?Oxo Cubane Core Mn4O46+:? A Molecular Mimic of the Photosynthetic Water Oxidation Enzyme? ...

MICHAEL FREEMANTLE

1998-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

363

Warner College of Natural Resources Warner College of Natural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and scientific investigation of renewable and nonrenewable natural resources. Programs include the study of everyWarner College of Natural Resources Warner College of Natural Resources Office in Natural Resources, and Conservation Biology Forestry Geology Natural Resource Recreation and Tourism Natural Resources Management

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

364

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview Net additions to storage during the fourth week of April were estimated to have been over 100 Bcf-a record high level for the first month of the refill season. Compared to last year when only 36 Bcf or 1.2 Bcf per day were added to stocks in April, this year the industry appears to be taking advantage of the reduction in demand that typically occurs in April, the first shoulder month of the year, and the recent price declines. After beginning the week down, spot prices at the Henry Hub trended down most days last week to end trading on Friday at $4.49 per MMBtu-the lowest price since early November. On the NYMEX futures market, the near-month (June) contract also moved down most days and ended last week at $4.490-down $0.377 from the previous Friday. Some-early summer high temperatures last week in the Northeast and winter-like weather in the Rockies (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) appear to have had little impact on the natural gas markets as prices declined most days at most major locations.

365

,"Kansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S3","N3050KS3","N3010KS3","N3020KS3","N3035KS3","NA1570SKS3","N3045KS3" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Kansas Natural Gas Pipeline...

366

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050WY3","N3010WY3","N3020WY3","N3035WY3","NA1570SWY3","N3045WY3" "Date","Wyoming Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Wyoming Natural Gas...

367

,"Montana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050MT3","N3010MT3","N3020MT3","N3035MT3","NA1570SMT3","N3045MT3" "Date","Montana Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Montana Natural Gas Imports...

368

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050OK3","N3010OK3","N3020OK3","N3035OK3","NA1570SOK3","N3045OK3" "Date","Oklahoma Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Oklahoma Natural Gas...

369

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050MI3","N3010MI3","N3020MI3","N3035MI3","NA1570SMI3","N3045MI3" "Date","Michigan Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Natural Gas...

370

,"Vermont Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","NA1480SVT3","N3050VT3","N3010VT3","N3020VT3","N3035VT3","N3045VT3" "Date","Vermont Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Vermont Natural Gas Pipeline...

371

,"Arizona Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050AZ3","N3010AZ3","N3020AZ3","N3035AZ3","NA1570SAZ3","N3045AZ3" "Date","Arizona Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Arizona Natural...

372

,"Florida Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050FL3","N3010FL3","N3020FL3","N3035FL3","NA1570SFL3","N3045FL3" "Date","Florida Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Florida Natural Gas...

373

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050KY3","N3010KY3","N3020KY3","N3035KY3","NA1570SKY3","N3045KY3" "Date","Kentucky Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Kentucky Natural Gas...

374

,"Ohio Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SOH3","N3050OH3","N3010OH3","N3020OH3","N3035OH3","NA1570SOH3","N3045OH3" "Date","Ohio Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Ohio Natural Gas Pipeline...

375

,"Utah Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SUT3","N3050UT3","N3010UT3","N3020UT3","N3035UT3","NA1570SUT3","N3045UT3" "Date","Utah Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Utah Natural Gas Pipeline...

376

Natural Gas Infrastructure Modernization  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In order to help modernize the nations natural gas transmission and distribution systems and reduce methane emissions through common-sense standards, smart investments, and innovative research to advance the state of the art in natural gas system performance, the Department of Energy has launched several new initiatives and enhanced existing programs.

377

VALUING FLARED NATURAL GAS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

LAST YEAR , enough natural gas to supply 27% of U.S. needs was burned off as waste around the world, according to a new report by the World Bank. Flared natural gas is a by-product of petroleum production and is not generally considered worth capture and ...

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

378

E-Print Network 3.0 - astrophysically abundant atoms Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

D.E., Ibbetson, P... the Determination of the Solar Iron Abundance Using Fe I Lines" Astronomy and Astrophysics 296, pg 217-232 (1995... and a Redetermination of the Solar Cobalt...

379

Non-perturbative Effect on Thermal Relic Abundance of Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We point out that thermal relic abundance of the dark matter is strongly altered by a non-perturbative effect called the Sommerfeld enhancement, when constituent particles of the dark matter are non-singlet under the SU(2)_L gauge interaction and much heavier than the weak gauge bosons. Typical candidates for such dark matter particles are the heavy wino- and higgsino-like neutralinos. We investigate the non-perturbative effect on the relic abundance of dark matter for the wino-like neutralino as an example. We show that its thermal abundance is reduced by 50% compared to the perturbative result. The wino-like neutralino mass consistent with the observed dark matter abundance turns out to be 2.7 TeV < m < 3.0 TeV.

Junji Hisano; Shigeki Matsumoto; Minoru Nagai; Osamu Saito; Masato Senami

2006-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

380

E-Print Network 3.0 - abundance solid-state 33s Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: given for S2 is that measured in Hyakutake (33). S2 has not been detected in Hale-Bopp. b abundances... in the protosolar cloud. ISO observations of new solid state...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Abundances of presolar silicon carbide grains in primitive meteorites determined by NanoSIMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abundances of presolar silicon carbide grains in primitive meteorites determined by NanoSIMS Jemma carbide (SiC) grains estimated from their noble gas components show significant variations in even

Nittler, Larry R.

382

High-Performance Thermoelectric Devices Based on Abundant Silicide Materials for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Development of high-performance thermoelectric devices for vehicle waste heat recovery will include fundamental research to use abundant promising low-cost thermoelectric materials, thermal management and interfaces design, and metrology

383

Constraining dynamical dark energy models through the abundance of high-redshift supermassive black holes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Constraining dynamical dark energy models through the abundance...its contribution to the energy density would become rapidly...provided by the NASA Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) -Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) space......

A. Lamastra; N. Menci; F. Fiore; C. Di Porto; L. Amendola

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Influences of vegetation characteristics and invertebrate abundance of Rio Grande wild turkey populations, Edwards Plateau, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since 1970, Rio Grande wild turkey (Meleagris gallapavo intermedia) numbers in the southern region of the Edwards Plateau of Texas have been declining. Nest-site characteristics and invertebrate abundance were hypothesized as limiting wild turkey...

Randel, Charles Jack

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Sequestration ... Large-scale soil application of biochar may enhance soil fertility, increasing crop production for the growing human population, while also sequestering atmospheric carbon. ...

J.-D. Mao; R. L. Johnson; J. Lehmann; D. C. Olk; E. G. Neves; M. L. Thompson; K. Schmidt-Rohr

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

386

Positive Relationship between Freshwater Inflow and Oyster Abundance in Galveston Bay, Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analysis of fisheries-independent data for Galveston Bay, Texas, USA, since 1985 shows eastern oysters...Crassostrea virginica) frequently demonstrate increased abundance of market-sized oysters 1 to 2years afte...

David Buzan; Wen Lee; Jan Culbertson; Nathan Kuhn; Lance Robinson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

ABUNDANCE, MOVEMENTS, AND FEEDING HABITS OF HARBOR SEALS, PHOCA VITULINA, AT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on tidally exposed sand flats in both bays. Harbor seal abundance at Tillamook Bay peaked during pupping (May found in estuaries, along isolated shorelines, and on nearshore rocky islets. Before protection

388

Abundance analysis of SB2 binary stars with HgMn primaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a short review of the abundances in the atmospheres of SB2 systems with Mercury-Manganese (HgMn) primaries. Up to now a careful study has been made for both components of 8 out of 17 known SB2 binaries with orbital periods shorter than 100 days and mass ratio ranging from 1.08 to 2.2. For all eight systems we observe a lower Mn abundance in the secondary's atmospheres than in the primary's. Significant difference in the abundances is also found for some peculiar elements such as Ga, Xe, Pt. All secondary stars with effective temperatures less than 10000 K show abundance characteristics typical of the metallic-line stars.

T. Ryabchikova

1998-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

389

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 20, 2011) Natural gas prices rose at most market locations during the week, as consumption increased. The Henry Hub spot price increased 19 cents from $4.14 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, April 13 to $4.33 per MMBtu on Wednesday, April 20. Futures prices behaved similar to spot prices; at the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (May 2011) rose from $4.141 per MMBtu to $4.310 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,654 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 15, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas

390

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: September 10, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 2, 2009) Natural gas prices posted significant decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices fell at all market locations in the lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 7 and 68 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The price at the Henry Hub spot market fell to $2.25 per MMBtu, decreasing by 51 cents or 18 percent. As of yesterday, the price of natural gas at the Henry Hub was the lowest since February 15, 2002, when natural gas at this location traded at $2.18 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures

391

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 9, 2011) Natural gas spot prices remained soft at nearly all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price rose an insignificant 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (0.5 percent) for the week ending March 9, to $3.81 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,674 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, March 4, according to the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied draw for the week was 71 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned 32 Bcf above year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the April 2011 natural

392

A3. Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Natural Gas Processed and Liquids Extracted at Natural Gas Processing Plants by State, 1996 Table Plant Location Volume of Natural Gas Delivered to Processing Plants a (million cubic feet) Total Liquids Extracted b (thousand barrels) Extraction Loss (million cubic feet) State Production Out of State Production Natural Gas Processed Alabama..................................... 111,656 1,212 112,868 4,009 5,361 Alaska ........................................ 2,987,364 0 2,987,364 33,346 38,453 Arkansas.................................... 214,868 4,609 219,477 383 479 California.................................... 240,566 0 240,566 9,798 12,169 Colorado .................................... 493,748 215 493,963 16,735 23,362 Florida........................................ 5,900 2,614 8,514 1,630 1,649 Illinois.........................................

393

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 3, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 23, 2011) Natural gas spot prices were soft again at nearly all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price fell 10 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (2.5 percent) for the week ending February 23, to $3.83 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, February 18, according to the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied draw for the week was 81 Bcf, with storage volumes shifting to 48 Bcf below year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the March 2011 natural

394

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 30, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 22, 2011) Natural gas prices fell slightly at most market locations from Wednesday, June 15 to Wednesday, June 22. The Henry Hub price fell 10 cents from $4.52 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday to $4.42 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the July 2011 near-month futures contract fell by 26 cents, or about 6 percent, from $4.58 last Wednesday to $4.32 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,354 this week, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

395

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What Consumers Should Know What Consumers Should Know An Assessment of Prices of Natural Gas Futures Contracts As A Predictor of Realized Spot Prices at the Henry Hub Overview of U.S. Legislation and Regulations Affecting Offshore Natural Gas and Oil Activity Changes in U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Infrastructure in 2004 Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2004) U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports: Issues and Trends 2003 U.S. LNG Markets and Uses: June 2004 Natural Gas Restructuring Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage EIA's Natural Gas Division Survey Form Comments Overview: Thursday, December 1, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 8) Colder-than-normal temperatures contributed to widespread price increases in natural gas spot markets since Wednesday, November 23 as heating demand increased. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub gained 59 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to trade at $11.73 per MMBtu yesterday (November 30). Similarly, at the NYMEX, the price for the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub gained 54 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $12.587 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 25, decreased to 3,225 Bcf, which is 6.3 percent above the 5 year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $1.02 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $57.33 per barrel or $9.88 per MMBtu.

396

The metal abundance of circumnuclear star forming regions in early type spirals. Spectrophotometric observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have obtained long-slit observations in the optical and near infrared of 12 circumnuclear HII regions (CNSFR) in the early type spiral galaxies NGC 2903, NGC 3351 and NGC 3504 with the aim of deriving their chemical abundances. Only for one of the regions, the [SIII] $\\lambda$ 6312 \\AA was detected providing, together with the nebular [SIII] lines at $\\lambda\\lambda$ 9069, 9532 \\AA, a value of the electron temperature of T$_e$([SIII])= 8400$^{+ 4650}_{-1250}$K. A semi-empirical method for the derivation of abundances in the high metallicity regime is presented. We obtain abundances which are comparable to those found in high metallicity disc HII regions from direct measurements of electron temperatures and consistent with solar values within the errors. The region with the highest oxygen abundance is R3+R4 in NGC 3504, 12+log(O/H) = 8.85, about 1.5 solar if the solar oxygen abundance is set at the value derived by Asplund et al. (2005), 12+log(O/H)$_{\\odot}$ = 8.66$\\pm$0.05. Region R7 in NGC 3351 has the lowest oxygen abundance of the sample, about 0.6 times solar. In all the observed CNSFR the O/H abundance is dominated by the O$^+$/H$^+$ contribution, as is also the case for high metallicity disc HII regions. For our observed regions, however, also the S$^+$/S$^{2+}$ ratio is larger than one, contrary to what is found in high metallicity disc HII regions for which, in general, the sulphur abundances are dominated by S$^{2+}$/H$^+$...

Angeles I. Diaz; Elena Terlevich; Marcelo Castellanos; Guillermo F. Hagele

2007-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

397

The Diversity, Abundance and Biomass of Termites under Differing Levels of Disturbance in the Mbalmayo Forest Reserve, Southern Cameroon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article The Diversity, Abundance and Biomass of Termites under Differing Levels of...paper presents data on the abundance, biomass and species richness of termites in the...samples was used. Estimated abundance and biomass were extremely high in the near primary...

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The Diversity, Abundance and Biomass of Termites under Differing Levels of Disturbance in the Mbalmayo Forest Reserve, Southern Cameroon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Diversity, Abundance and Biomass of Termites under...Lawton T. G. Wood N. C. Bignell This...on the abundance, biomass and species richness...secondary forest, young plantation, weeded Chromolaena...regime of soil pits, wood samples, mound samples...Estimated abundance and biomass were extremely high...

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

TOWARD A REMOVAL OF TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCIES FROM ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS: NGC 628  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The metal content of a galaxy, a key property for distinguishing between viable galaxy evolutionary scenarios, strongly influences many of the physical processes in the interstellar medium. An absolute and robust determination of extragalactic metallicities is essential in constraining models of chemical enrichment and chemical evolution. Current gas-phase abundance determinations, however, from optical fine-structure lines are uncertain to 0.8 dex as conversion of these optical line fluxes to abundances is strongly dependent on the electron temperature of the ionized gas. In contrast, the far-infrared (far-IR) emission lines can be used to derive an O{sup ++} abundance that is relatively insensitive to temperature, while the ratio of the optical to far-IR lines provides a consistent temperature to be used in the derivation of an O{sup +} abundance. We present observations of the [O III] 88 ?m fine-structure line in NGC 628 that were obtained as part of the Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: a Far Infared Survey with Herschel program. These data are combined with optical integrated field unit data to derive oxygen abundances for seven H II regions. We find the abundance of these regions to all lie between the high and low values of strong-line calibrations and to be in agreement with estimates that assume temperature fluctuations are present in the H II regions.

Croxall, Kevin V. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 4051 McPherson Laboratory, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Smith, J. D.; Pellegrini, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Brandl, B. R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300-RA Leiden (Netherlands); Groves, B. A.; Kreckel, K.; Sandstrom, K. M.; Walter, F.; Schinnerer, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie, Knigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kennicutt, R. C.; Galametz, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Johnson, B. D. [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR7095 CNRS, Universit Pierre and Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Armus, L. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Beiro, P. [Observatoire de Paris, 61 avenue de l'Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Calzetti, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Dale, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Hinz, J. L. [MMT Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hunt, L. K. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Koda, J., E-mail: croxall@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

400

Abundances, Stellar Parameters, and Spectra From the SDSS-III/APOGEE Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The SDSS-III/APOGEE survey operated from 2011-2014 using the APOGEE spectrograph, which collects high-resolution (R~22,500), near-IR (1.51-1.70 microns) spectra with a multiplexing (300 fiber-fed objects) capability. We describe the survey data products that are publicly available, which include catalogs with radial velocity, stellar parameters, and 15 elemental abundances for over 150,000 stars, as well as the more than 500,000 spectra from which these quantities are derived. Calibration relations for the stellar parameters (Teff, log g, [M/H], [alpha/M]) and abundances (C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Ni) are presented and discussed. The internal scatter of the abundances within clusters indicates that abundance precision is generally between 0.05 and 0.09 dex across a broad temperature range; within more limited ranges and at high S/N, it is smaller for some elemental abundances. We assess the accuracy of the abundances using comparison of mean cluster metallicities with literature values...

Holtzman, Jon A; Johnson, Jennifer A; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anders, Friedrich; Andrews, Brett; Beers, Timothy C; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R; Bovy, Jo; Carrera, Ricardo; Cunha, Katia; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Feuillet, Diane; Frinchaboy, Peter M; Galbraith-Frew, Jessica; Perez, Ana E Garcia; Hernandez, D Anibal Garcia; Hasselquist, Sten; Hayden, Michael R; Hearty, Fred R; Ivans, Inese; Majewski, Steven R; Martell, Sarah; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Muna, Demitri; Nidever, David L; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; O'Connell, Robert W; Pan, Kaike; Pinsonneault, Marc; Robin, Annie C; Schiavon, Ricardo P; Shane, Neville; Sobeck, Jennifer; Smith, Verne V; Troup, Nicholas; Weinberg, David H; Wilson, John C; Wood-Vasey, W M; Zamora, Olga; Zasowski, Gail

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

New Measurement of Metal Abundance in the Elliptical Galaxy NGC 4636 with Asca  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High quality X-ray spectra of NGC 4636 are obtained with ASCA. Theoretical models are found unable to reproduce the data in the Fe-L line region. Spectral data above 1.4 keV indicate that Mg to Si abundance ratio is $\\sim 1$ solar. Assuming that the abundance ratios among $\\alpha$-elements are the same with the solar ratios, spectral fit with increased systematic error in the 0.4--1.6 keV range gives abundances of $\\alpha$-elements and Fe to be both $\\sim$ 1 solar by taking one solar of Fe to be 3.24$\\times 10^{-5}$ by number. These new abundance results solve discrepancy between stellar and hot-gas metallicity, but still a low supernova rate is implied. We also detect strong abundance gradients for both $\\alpha$-elements and iron in a similar fashion. The abundance is $\\sim 1$ solar within $4'$, and decreases outerwards down to $0.2\\sim 0.3$ solar at $10'$ from the galaxy center. Dilution due to an extended hot gas is suggested.

Kyoko Matsushita; Kazuo Makishima; Etsuko Rokutanda; Noriko Y. Yamasaki; Takaya Ohashi

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

402

Abundance Inhomogeneity in the Northeastern Rim of the Cygnus Loop Revealed by Suzaku Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of a spatially resolved spectral analysis from four Suzaku observations covering the northeastern rim of the Cygnus Loop. A two-kT_e non-ionization equilibrium (NEI) model fairly well represents our data, which confirms the NEI condition of the plasma there. The metal abundances are depleted relative to the solar values almost everywhere in our field of view. We find abundance inhomogeneities across the field: the northernmost region (Region A) has enhanced absolute abundances compared with other regions. In addition, the relative abundances of Mg/O and Fe/O in Region A are lower than the solar values, while those in the other regions are twice higher than the solar values. As far as we are concerned, neither a circumstellar medium, fragments of ejecta, nor abundance inhomogeneities of the local interstellar medium around the Cygnus Loop can explain the relatively enhanced abundance in Region A. This point is left as an open question for future work.

S. Katsuda; H. Tsunemi; H. Uchida; E. Miyata; N. Nemes; E. D. Miller; K. Mori; J. P. Hughes

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

403

Natural Gas Annual, 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2000 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 2000, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1996-2000 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2000 (Table 2) ASCII TXT, are also available.

404

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview: Monday, June 04, 2001 Stock builds slowed from their recent pace, even though spot prices continued their downward trend to end the week at the Henry Hub at $3.71 per MMBtu, which is a Friday-to-Friday decline of $0.14 per MMBtu. The NYMEX contract price for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled Tuesday at $3.738, the lowest close-out of a near month contract since the May 2000 contract. The July contract price was $3.930 per MMBtu on Friday, $0.103 lower than a week earlier. Mild weather in the Northeast and Midwest continued to suppress prices on the Eastern Seaboard, while a short burst of warm temperatures in southern California early in the week had the opposite effect on prices in that region. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) Net injections to storage for the week ended Friday, May 25 were 99 Bcf, breaking a 4-week string of 100-plus net injections.

405

The Natural Gas Advantage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental think-tank leaders and the new energy secretary are singing the praises of the ever-expanding U.S. natural gas bonanza, but at the same time, they worry about permanent dependence on this fossil fuel. ... This flood of shale-based natural gas finds has been great for U.S. chemical companies because it is a cheap feedstock and fuel source. ... Equally important, it is also revising the greenhouse gas-climate change equation because, when burned to generate electricity, natural gas produces the same electrical output as coal but emits half the amount of carbon dioxide. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

406

New Rare Earth Element Abundance Distributions for the Sun and Five r-Process-Rich Very Metal-Poor Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have derived new abundances of the rare-earth elements Pr, Dy, Tm, Yb, and Lu for the solar photosphere and for five very metal-poor, neutron-capture r-process-rich giant stars. The photospheric values for all five elements are in good agreement with meteoritic abundances. For the low metallicity sample, these abundances have been combined with new Ce abundances from a companion paper, and reconsideration of a few other elements in individual stars, to produce internally-consistent Ba, rare-earth, and Hf (56element distributions. These have been used in a critical comparison between stellar and solar r-process abundance mixes.

Sneden, Christopher; Cowan, John J; Ivans, Inese I; Hartog, Elizabeth A Den

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

47 Natural Gas Market Trends NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

47 Natural Gas Market Trends Chapter 5 NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS INTRODUCTION Natural gas discusses current natural gas market conditions in California and the rest of North America, followed on the outlook for demand, supply, and price of natural gas for the forecasted 20-year horizon. It also addresses

408

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 18, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 10, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board this week, likely in response to cooling temperatures as well as weak economic news. The Henry Hub spot price fell 17 cents from $4.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, August 3, to $4.09 per MMBtu yesterday, August 10. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month contract (September 2011) fell by $0.087 per MMBtu, from $4.090 last Wednesday to $4.003 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage was 2,783 Bcf as of Friday, August 5, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

409

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: July 2, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 24, 2009) Natural gas spot prices generally declined this report week (June 17-24), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.19 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.80. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for natural gas decreased as prices for most energy products fell amid concerns over the economy. The natural gas futures contract for July delivery decreased by 49 cents per MMBtu on the week to $3.761. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday, June 19, is

410

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 3, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 26, 2011) Natural gas spot prices were soft at all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price fell 8 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (about 1.7 percent) for the week ending January 26, to $4.40 per MMBtu. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price settled at $86.15 per barrel ($14.85 per MMBtu), on Wednesday, January 26. This represents a decrease of $4.70 per barrel, or $0.81 per MMBtu, from the previous Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage fell to 2,542 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, January 21, according to the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The

411

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 16, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 8, 2011) Natural gas prices rose on the week across the board, with somewhat moderate increases in most areas and steep increases in the Northeast United States. The Henry Hub spot price rose 20 cents on the week from $4.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, June 1, to $4.83 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (July 2011) contract rose about 5 percent, from $4.692 last Wednesday to $4.847 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,187 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 3, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

412

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Friday, November 13, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 4, 2009) Natural gas spot prices fell over the week at most market locations, declining on average 16 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Decreases ranged between 2 cents and 77 cents per MMBtu. In the few trading locations where prices rose, increases were modest, ranging between 1 and 4 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell 10 cents on the week, closing at $4.49 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the December 2009 natural gas contract fell 34 cents per MMBtu, or 7 percent. The November contract expired on Wednesday, October 28, at $4.289 per MMBtu.

413

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1996 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1996. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1996. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1996. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

414

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: September 17, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 9, 2009) Natural gas prices posted significant increases at all market locations since last Wednesday, September 2. The Henry Hub spot price increased 47 cents from the previous Wednesday's price of $2.25 per MMBtu. However, intraweek trading was volatile, with natural gas prices falling below $2 per million Btu (MMBtu) at the Henry Hub on Friday, September 4 and rising to $2.72 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month natural gas contract for delivery in October 2009 rose by 11.4 cents to $2.829 per MMBtu, an increase of about 4 percent from the previous

415

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 20, 2011) Responding to extremely hot weather this week, natural gas prices moved up at market locations across the lower 48 States. The spot price at the Henry Hub increased 21 cents from $4.43 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, July 13, to $4.64 per MMBtu yesterday, July 20. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (August 2011) increased from $4.403 per MMBtu to $4.500 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,671 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 15, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

416

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1997 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1997. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1997. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1997. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

417

Renewable Natural Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Natural Gas JOHN DAVIS: The use of clean, domestic natural gas as highway fuel in place of imported oil is growing in popularity with fleets and trucking companies. While natural gas from underground deposits is arguably a limited resource, there is a renewable, eco-friendly resource that we have right here in the U.S.A. And we're here now to give you the straight poop! Every family, farm animal and food processing plant in America produces organic waste that creates a mix of methane, CO2 and other elements called bio gas when it decomposes. Rotten vegetables, moldy bread, last night's leftovers --- they all break down when our garbage gets to the land fill. Incredibly, for

418

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 10, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 2, 2010) Since Wednesday, May 26, natural gas spot prices increased across the lower 48 States, with gains of up to $0.18 per million Btu (MMBtu), at most market locations. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose $0.13 per MMBtu, or about 3 percent, averaging $4.32 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, June 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $4.42 per MMBtu, climbing by $0.25 or about 6 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,357 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May

419

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1998 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1998. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1998. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1998. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

420

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 5, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 27, 2011) Mild temperatures coupled with continued strong domestic production resulted in natural gas cash market prices dropping modestly at nearly all domestic pricing points over the week. The lone exception was the Henry Hub price which rose a token 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (0.5 percent) to $4.35 per MMBtu on April 27. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,685 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 22, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 31 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2008 , 2008 Next Release: October 9, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, September 24 to Wednesday, October 1) Natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week, as seasonably moderate temperatures minimized natural gas demand in many areas of the country. The return of some Gulf of Mexico supplies during the week provided further downward pressure on spot prices. As of yesterday, October 1, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) reported that 3.5 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day of natural gas production remains shut-in, 16 percent lower than the 4.2 Bcf per day reported 1 week earlier. The Henry Hub spot price fell in the first three trading sessions of

422

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 at 2:00 P.M. 1 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 9, 2011) Continuing its recent trend of languishing below the $4 per million Btu (MMBtu) mark, the Henry Hub natural gas spot price oscillated this week, and posted an overall net increase of 16 cents, from $3.39 per MMBtu last Wednesday, November 2, to $3.55 per MMBtu yesterday, November 9. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (December 2011) natural gas futures contract fell from $3.749 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.652 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,831 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, November 4, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas

423

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 27, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 19, 2011) Natural gas prices fell at most market locations across the country, as bitterly cold weather subsided. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas price fell 7 cents from $4.55 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, January 12, to $4.48 per MMBtu on Wednesday, January 19. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month natural gas contract (February 2011) rose slightly, from $4.531 per MMBtu on January 12 to $4.561 yesterday. The spot price of the West Texas Intermediate crude oil fell by $1 over the week, from $91.85 per barrel on January 12 ($15.84 per MMBtu) to

424

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 9, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 1, 2010) Since Wednesday, August 25, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the lower 48 States, although prices generally rose in the Northeast and Rocky Mountain areas. The Henry Hub spot price fell on the week from $3.99 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.73 per MMBtu, its lowest value since April 1, 2010. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the October 2010 natural gas futures contract fell about 3 percent from $3.896 per MMBtu to $3.762 per MMBtu. During the report week, the September 2010 natural gas futures contract expired at $3.651, having lost about $1.176 per MMBtu during its

425

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 10, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 2, 2011) Natural gas prices showed continued relative weakness during the report week. The spot price at the Henry Hub fell from $3.83 per million Btu (MMBtu) on February 23 to $3.79 per MMBtu on March 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the March 2011 futures contract expired at $3.793 per MMBtu, having declined about 12 percent during its tenure as the near-month contract. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,745 Bcf as of Friday, February 25, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. The spot price of the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil

426

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 15, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 7, 2010) Since Wednesday, March 31, natural gas spot prices climbed at most market locations across the lower 48 States, with increases of as much as 8 percent. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose $0.15, or about 4 percent, to $4.08 per million Btu (MMBtu), in a week of trading shortened by the Good Friday holiday on April 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, April 7, at $4.02 per MMBtu, rising by $0.15 or about 4 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,669 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

427

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 29, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 21, 2011) Natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations across the United States, as moderate temperatures led to declines in demand. Prices at the Henry Hub fell from $4.01 per MMBtu last Wednesday, September 14, to $3.78 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (October 2011) dropped from $4.039 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.73 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,201 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, September 16, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

428

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050KY3","N3010KY3","N3020KY3","N3035KY3","N3045KY3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Kentucky (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Kentucky Price...

429

,"Colorado Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050CO3","N3010CO3","N3020CO3","N3035CO3","N3045CO3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Colorado (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Colorado Price...

430

,"Illinois Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050IL3","N3010IL3","N3020IL3","N3035IL3","N3045IL3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Illinois (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Illinois Price...

431

,"California Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050CA3","N3010CA3","N3020CA3","N3035CA3","N3045CA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in California (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","California...

432

,"Maryland Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050MD3","N3010MD3","N3020MD3","N3035MD3","N3045MD3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Maryland (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Maryland Price...

433

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050AR3","N3010AR3","N3020AR3","N3035AR3","N3045AR3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Arkansas (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Arkansas Price...

434

,"Virginia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050VA3","N3010VA3","N3020VA3","N3035VA3","N3045VA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Virginia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Virginia Price...

435

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050OK3","N3010OK3","N3020OK3","N3035OK3","N3045OK3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Oklahoma (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Oklahoma Price...

436

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050NE3","N3010NE3","N3020NE3","N3035NE3","N3045NE3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Nebraska (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Nebraska Price...

437

,"Washington Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050WA3","N3010WA3","N3020WA3","N3035WA3","N3045WA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Washington (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Washington...

438

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050TN3","N3010TN3","N3020TN3","N3035TN3","N3045TN3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Tennessee (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Tennessee...

439

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050LA3","N3010LA3","N3020LA3","N3035LA3","N3045LA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Louisiana (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Louisiana...

440

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050MN3","N3010MN3","N3020MN3","N3035MN3","N3045MN3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Minnesota (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Minnesota...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050MI3","N3010MI3","N3020MI3","N3035MI3","N3045MI3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Michigan (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Price...

442

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050PA3","N3010PA3","N3020PA3","N3035PA3","N3045PA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Pennsylvania (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

443

Natural Gas Monthly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

issues Go CorrectionUpdate February 22, 2013 Two Year-To-Date values, for 2010 NGL Composite Spot Price and Natural Gas Spot Price, were incorrectly displayed in Table 3. These...

444

Chapter 8 - Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although natural gas is a nonrenewable resource, it is included for discussion because its sudden growth from fracking will impact the development and use of renewable fuels. Firms who are engaged in the development of processes that employ synthesis gas as an intermediate have concluded that the synthesis gas is more economically obtainable by steam reforming of natural gas than by gasification of waste cellulose. In some instances, firms have largely abandoned the effort to produce a renewable fuel as such, and in others firms are developing hybrid processes that employ natural gas in combination with a fermentation system. Moreover, natural gas itself is an attractive fuel for internal combustion engines since it can be the least expensive option on a cost per joule basis. It is also aided by its high octane number of 130.

Arthur M. Brownstein

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Natural Gas Hydrate Dissociation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Materials for hydrate synthesis mainly include methane gas of purity 99.9% (produced by Nanjing Special Gases Factory Co., Ltd.), natural sea sand of grain sizes 0.063?0.09,...

Qingguo Meng; Changling Liu; Qiang Chen; Yuguang Ye

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Oklo natural nuclear reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although the possibility of natural was considered in the 1950s, this prediction was not confirmed until 1972, when a routine analysis of a uranium ore standard at the nuclear-fuel processing plant in Pierre...

Mark J. Rigali; Bartholomew Nagy

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Natural Toxicants in Foods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of exploring the potential naturally occurring toxic hazards of food plants is not to suggest an irrational avoidance of these common foods. However, it is important to identify, define, and invest...

Ross C. Beier; Herbert N. Nigg

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for natural gas in the electric power sector soared during the week in order to meet heating needs from the current cold spell. The operator for the electric power grid in Texas...

449

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

in waters up to 9000 feet deep. Southern Natural Gas Company has scheduled a shut-in test at the Muldon Storage Field in Mississippi for April 5 through April 11. Under the...

450

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

of 1 Tcf from the 1994 estimate of 51 Tcf. Ultimate potential for natural gas is a science-based estimate of the total amount of conventional gas in the province and is an...

451

Photoreceptors: Improving on Nature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... while it becomes too great a strain for molecular biologists to maintain their posture of humble seekers after truth, and they give way to the impulse to jolly nature along ...

Our Molecular Biology Correspondent

1970-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

452

Natural Gas for Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... AT a time when the Government is exhorting the gas and other major industries concerned with ... and other major industries concerned with natural fuel resources to give a forward boost to coal mining by contracting an annual intake ...

1965-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

453

Natural lighting and skylights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are many physiological and psychological factors which enter into the proper design of space for human occupancy. One of these elements is light. Both natural light and manufactured light are basic tools with which any designer must work...

Evans, Benjamin Hampton

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Inhomogeneous primordial nucleosynthesis and new abundance constraints on {Omega}{sub b}h{sup 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the upper limit to the baryonic contribution to the closure density. We consider effects of new observational and theoretical uncertainties in the primordial light element abundances, and the effects of fluctuation geometry on the inhomogeneous nucleosynthesis yields. We also consider implications of the possible detection of a high D/H abundance in a Lyman-{alpha} absorption cloud at high redshift and the implied chemical evolution effects of a high deuterium abundance. We show that there exists a region of the parameter space for inhomogeneous models in which a somewhat higher baryonic contribution to the closure density is possible than that allowed in standard homogeneous models. This result is contrary to some other recent studies and is due to both geometry and recently revised uncertainties in primordial light-element abundances, particularly {sup 7}Li. We find that the presently adopted abundance constraints are consistent with a contribution of baryons to the closure density as high as {Omega}{sub b}h{sub 50}{sup 2} {le} 0.11 ({eta} {le} 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}10}). This corresponds to a 20% increase over the limit from standard homogeneous models ({Omega}{sub b}h{sub 50}{sup 2} {le} 0.08, {eta} {le} 5.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}10}). With a high deuterium abundance the upper limits for the inhomogeneous and homogeneous models would be {Omega}{sub b}h{sub 50}{sup 2} {le} 0.04 and 0.03 ({eta} {le} 2.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} and 1.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}10}), respectively. Even higher limits could be obtained by further relaxing the presently accepted primordial lithium abundance constraint as some have proposed.

Mathews, G.J. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Kajino, T.; Orito, M. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo (Japan)

1995-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

455

Abundance and ecological implications of microplastic debris in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the central North Pacific ocean. Nature 241:271271. doi:waste distributions in Pacific Ocean. Nature 247:3032. doi:of the central North Pacific ocean. Nature 241:271271. doi:

Goldstein, Miriam Chanita

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Combined Natural Gas Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Map of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors Map of Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors see related text enlarge see related text enlarge U.S. Regional Breakdown Map of U.S. Regional Breakout States (in Grey) Highly Dependent on Interstate Pipelines for Natural Gas Supplies Map of States (in Grey) Highly Dependent on Interstate Pipelines for Natural Gas Supplies

457

Comment on 'Existence of long-lived isomeric states in naturally-occurring neutron-deficient Th isotopes'  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In their article ''Existence of Long-Lived Isomeric States in Naturally-Occuring Neutron-Deficient Th Isotopes''[Phys. Rev. C 76, 021303 (2007)], Marinov et al. fail to demonstrate that basic mass spectrometric protocols, such as abundance sensitivity, linearity, and freedom from possible interferences, have been met. In particular, the claim that four isomeric states of Th have been discovered, using an inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometer (ICP-SFMS), with abundances from (1-10)x10{sup -11} relative to {sup 232}Th, cannot be accepted, given the known abundance sensitivities of other sector field mass spectrometers. Accelerator mass spectrometry is the only mass spectrometric methodology capable of measuring relative abundances of the magnitude claimed by Marinov et al.

Barber, R. C.; De Laeter, J. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Department of Applied Physics, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

A Low Solar Oxygen Abundance from the First Overtone OH Lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An extremely high-resolution (> 10^5) high-S/N (> 10^3) solar spectrum has been used to measure 15 very weak first overtone (Delta v = 2) infrared OH lines, resulting in a low solar abundance of A(O) ~ 8.6 when MARCS, 3D, and spatially and temporally averaged 3D model atmospheres are used. A higher abundance is obtained with Kurucz (A(O) ~ 8.7) and Holweger & Muller (A(O) ~ 8.8) model atmospheres. The low solar oxygen abundance obtained in this work is in good agreement with a recent 3D analysis of [OI], OI, OH fundamental (Delta v = 1) vibration-rotation and OH pure rotation lines (Asplund et al. 2004). The present result brings further support for a low solar metallicity, and although using a low solar abundance with OPAL opacities ruins the agreement between the calculated and the helioseismic measurement of the depth of the solar convection zone, recent results from the OP project show that the opacities near the base of the solar convection zone are larger than previously thought, bringing further confidence for a low solar oxygen abundance.

Jorge Melendez

2004-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

459

Oxygen abundances in G- and F-type stars from HARPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detailed and uniform study of oxygen abundance from two different oxygen lines at 6158$\\AA$ and 6300$\\AA$ in a large sample of solar-type stars. The results are used to check the behaviour of these spectral lines as oxygen abundance indicators and to study the evolution of oxygen in thick and thin disk populations of the Galaxy. Equivalent width measurements were carried out for the [OI]~6158$\\AA$ and OI~6300$\\AA$ lines. LTE abundances were obtained from these two lines in 610 and 535 stars, respectively. We were able to measure oxygen abundance from both indicators in 447 stars, enabling us, for the first time, to compare them in a uniform way. Careful error analysis has been performed. We found that oxygen abundances derived from the 6158$\\AA$ and 6300$\\AA$ lines agree to within 0.1dex in 58\\% of the stars in our sample, and this result improves for higher signal-to-noise values. We confirm an oxygen enhancement in stars of the thick disk, as has also been seen for other $\\alpha$-elements. The ...

de Lis, S Bertran; Adibekyan, V Zh; Santos, N C; Sousa, S G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Barium even-to-odd isotope abundance ratios in thick disk and thin disk stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the Ba even-to-odd isotope abundance ratios in 25 cool dwarf stars with the metallicity [Fe/H] ranged between 0.25 and --1.35. Our method takes advantage of the hyperfine structure (HFS) affecting the \\ion{Ba}{ii} resonance line of the odd isotopes. The fractional abundance of the odd isotopes of Ba is derived from a requirement that Ba abundances from the resonance line $\\lambda 4554$ and subordinate lines $\\lambda 5853$ and $\\lambda 6496$ must be equal. The results are based on NLTE line formation and analysis of high resolution (R $\\sim60000$) high signal-to-noise (S/N $\\ge 200$) observed spectra. We find that the fraction of the odd isotopes of Ba grows toward the lower Ba abundance (or metallicity) and the mean value in the thick disk stars equals 33 $\\pm$ 4%. This indicates the higher contribution of the $r-$process to barium in the thick disk stars compared to the solar system matter. The obtained fraction increases with the [Eu/Ba] abundance ratio growth in agreement with expectations. A significant fraction of the \\emph{even} isotopes of Ba found in old Galactic stars (the thick disk stars), $\\sim67$%, is in contrast to the prediction of the "classical" model of the $s-$process and favors the value predicted by the "stellar" models of Arlandini et al. (1999) and Travaglio et al. (1999).

L. Mashonkina; G. Zhao

2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

The solar abundance problem: the effect of the turbulent kinetic flux on the solar envelope model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent 3D-simulations have shown that the turbulent kinetic flux (TKF) is significant. We discuss the effects of TKF on the size of convection zone and find that the TKF may help to solve the solar abundance problem. The solar abundance problem is that, with new abundances, the solar convection zone depth, sound speed in the radiative interior, the helium abundance and density in the convective envelope are not in agreement with helioseismic inversions. We have done Monte Carlo simulations on solar convective envelope models with different profile of TKF to test the effects. The solar abundance problem is revealed in the standard solar convective envelope model with AGSS09 composition, which shows significant differences ($\\rm{\\sim 10 %}$) on density from the helioseicmic inversions, but the differences in the model with old composition GN93 is small ($\\rm{\\sim 0.5 %}$). In the testing models with different imposed TKF, it is found that the density profile is sensitive to the value of TKF at the base of conve...

Zhang, Q S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

The chemical composition of red giants in 47 Tucanae I: Fundamental parameters and chemical abundance patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Context: The study of chemical abundance patterns in globular clusters is of key importance to constrain the different candidates for intra-cluster pollution of light elements. Aims: We aim at deriving accurate abundances for a large range of elements in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104) to add new constraints to the pollution scenarios for this particular cluster, expanding the range of previously derived element abundances. Methods: Using tailored 1D LTE atmospheric models together with a combination of equivalent width measurements, LTE, and NLTE synthesis we derive stellar parameters and element abundances from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of 13 red giant stars near the tip of the RGB. Results: We derive abundances of a total 27 elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr, Mo, Ru, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Dy). Departures from LTE were taken into account for Na, Al and Ba. We find a mean [Fe/H] = $-0.78\\pm0.07$ and $[\\alpha/{\\rm Fe}]=0.34\\pm0.03$ in...

Thygesen, A O; Andrievsky, S; Korotin, S; Yong, D; Zaggia, S; Ludwig, H -G; Collet, R; Asplund, M; D'Antona, F; Melndez, J; D'Ercole, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Natural Gas Natural Gas Many heavy-duty fleets depend on diesel fuel. But an increasing number of trucking companies are transitioning their vehicles to run on liquefied natural...

464

correspondence NATURE|VOL424|17JULY2003|www.nature.com/nature 251  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

correspondence NATURE|VOL424|17JULY2003|www.nature.com/nature 251 Looking into the safety of AAV vectors Sir -- The News story "Harmful potential of viral vectors fuels doubts over gene therapy" (Nature (H. Nakai et al. Nature Genet. 34, 297­302; 2003), we would like to emphasize

Kay, Mark A.

465

New Offices, New Ways of Working, and Abundant Energy Savings | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Offices, New Ways of Working, and Abundant Energy Savings Offices, New Ways of Working, and Abundant Energy Savings New Offices, New Ways of Working, and Abundant Energy Savings July 6, 2010 - 2:01pm Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL A few weeks ago, our entire communications office was lucky enough to be among the first to move into the new Research Support Facility (RSF) here at the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL). Moving into a new building may not sound all that exciting, but this was a momentous day for NREL: the RSF is ultra-efficient and is a showcase for energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. As the lab's director, Dan Arvizu, said in his welcome message to our office, "The Laboratory began this journey more than thirty years ago, and today-after years of research, planning, and sixteen months of

466

New Offices, New Ways of Working, and Abundant Energy Savings | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New Offices, New Ways of Working, and Abundant Energy Savings New Offices, New Ways of Working, and Abundant Energy Savings New Offices, New Ways of Working, and Abundant Energy Savings July 6, 2010 - 2:01pm Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL A few weeks ago, our entire communications office was lucky enough to be among the first to move into the new Research Support Facility (RSF) here at the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL). Moving into a new building may not sound all that exciting, but this was a momentous day for NREL: the RSF is ultra-efficient and is a showcase for energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. As the lab's director, Dan Arvizu, said in his welcome message to our office, "The Laboratory began this journey more than thirty years ago, and today-after years of research, planning, and sixteen months of

467

CHAOS I: Direct Chemical Abundances for HII Regions in NGC 628  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CHemical Abundances of Spirals (CHAOS) project leverages the combined power of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) with the broad spectral range and sensitivity of the Multi Object Double Spectrograph (MODS) to measure "direct" abundances in large samples of HII regions in spiral galaxies. We present LBT MODS observations of 62 HII regions in the nearby NGC628. We measure one or more auroral lines ([OIII] 4363, [NII] 5755, [SIII] 6312, or [OII] 7320,7330) in a large number of HII regions (40). Comparing derived temperatures from multiple auroral line measurements, we find: a strong correlation between temperatures based on [SIII] and [NII]; and large discrepancies for some temperatures based on [OII] and [OIII]. These trends are consistent with other observations in the literature, yet, given the widespread use and acceptance of [OIII] as a temperature determinant, the magnitude of the T[OIII] discrepancies still came as a surprise. Based on these results, we conduct a uniform abundance analysis using the...

Berg, Danielle A; Skillman, Evan D; Pogge, Richard W; Moustakas, John; Groh-Johnson, Mara

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

The Impact of Stellar Abundance Variations on Stellar Habitable Zone Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The high quality spectra required for radial velocity planet searches are well-suited to providing abundances for a wide array of elements in large samples of stars. Abundance ratios of the most common elements relative to Fe are observed to vary by more than a factor of two in planet host candidates. This level of variation has a substantial impact on the evolution of the host star and the extent of its habitable zone. We present stellar models of 1 solar mass stars with custom compositions representing the full range of these non-solar abundance ratios. We find that the effects derived from variation over the observed range of [O/Fe] are particularly dramatic. Habitability lifetimes for some classes of orbits can vary by gigayears for the observed range in [O/Fe].

Young, Patrick A; Pagano, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

SILICON ABUNDANCES IN NEARBY STARS FROM THE Si I INFRARED LINES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio infrared spectra from the Subaru Telescope atop Mauna Kea. Line formation calculations of Si I infrared lines in the atmospheres of nearby stars are presented. All abundance results of [Si/Fe] are derived from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and NLTE statistical equilibrium calculations and spectrum synthesis methods. We found that NLTE effects for Si I infrared lines are important even for metal-rich stars (>0.1 dex), and the NLTE effects may depend on the surface gravities. A good agreement of silicon abundances between the optical and infrared lines is obtained when the NLTE effects are included, while a large difference is found for the LTE results. The derived silicon abundances are overabundant for metal-poor stars.

Shi, J. R.; Tan, K. F.; Zhao, G. [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Takada-Hidai, M. [Liberal Arts Education Center, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Takeda, Y. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Hu, S. M.; Cao, C., E-mail: sjr@bao.ac.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, Shandong University at Weihai 264209 (China)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

470

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 1, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 23, 2009) Natural gas prices posted across-the-board increases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices rose at almost all market locations in the lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 2 and 23 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The price at the Henry Hub spot market rose to $3.43 per MMBtu, increasing by 15 cents or about 5 percent. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for October delivery increased by 10 cents to $3.860 per MMBtu. The November contract also posted gains this week, albeit much smaller at 4

471

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2009 4, 2009 Next Release: May 21, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 13, 2009) Since Wednesday, May 6, natural gas spot prices rose at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 49 and 95 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub climbed by 75 cents per MMBtu, or about 20 percent, to $4.42 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, May 13, at $4.333 per MMBtu, increasing by 45 cents or about 11 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 2,013 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May 8, which is about 23 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

472

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview - May 21, 2001 Somewhat warmer temperatures early in the week, especially in the South, provided a lift to natural gas spot and futures prices. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) However, a report of another large stock build and a revised forecast for normal to below-normal temperatures over a larger area of the country turned the week's gains into losses. On a week-to-week basis, the spot price of natural gas at the Henry Hub dropped $0.10 to end Friday, May 18 at $4.15 per MMBtu, while the NYMEX price of natural gas for June delivery at the Henry Hub declined $0.013 to $4.291 per MMBtu. At 119 Bcf, net injections to storage for the week ended May 11, 2001, were the highest value for the 8-year period of weekly AGA data.

473

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2009 6, 2009 Next Release: July 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 15, 2009) Natural gas spot prices rose during the week in all trading locations. Price increases ranged between 6 cents and 48 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), with the biggest increases occurring in the Rocky Mountain region. During the report week, the spot price at the Henry Hub increased 15 cents or 5 percent to $3.37 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas near-month contract (August 2009) decreased 7 cents to $3.283 per MMBtu from $3.353 the previous week. During its tenure as the near-month contract, the August 2009 contract has lost 66 cents. As of Friday, July 10, 2009, working gas in storage rose to 2,886

474

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: August 21, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, August 6, to Wednesday, August 13) Since Wednesday, August 6, natural gas spot prices decreased at all markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices falling between $0.20 and 0.77 per million Btu (MMBtu) at most locations. Prices at the Henry Hub fell $0.59 per MMBtu or about 7 percent, to $8.11 per MMBtu—its lowest level since February 8, 2008. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (August 12) at $8.456 per MMBtu, declining $0.31 or about 4 percent since Wednesday, August 6. Natural gas in storage was 2,567 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

475

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 20, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 12, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States, with price hikes ranging between 6 and 30 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week yesterday, May 12, at $4.18 per MMBtu, 18 cents higher than the preceding week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.284 per MMBtu, increasing by 29 cents or about 7 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,089 billion cubic feet (Bcf)

476

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. , 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 8, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 31, 2010) Natural gas spot prices fell almost across the board, as mild weather moved into most areas in the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub price fell by 9 cents, from $4.02 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, March 24, to $3.93 per MMBtu yesterday (March 31). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the April 2010 contract expired on Monday, March 29, at $3.842 per MMBtu. The May 2010 contract ended trading yesterday at $3.869 per MMBtu, a decline of about 29 cents from its closing price of $4.154 per MMBtu on March 24. Inventories of working natural gas in storage rose to 1,638 billion

477

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 7, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 29, 2011) Nearly all pricing points were down slightly for the week on light weather load despite an end-week rally anticipating warmer weather for the approaching July 4th holiday weekend. The Henry Hub price decreased 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) over the week (0.5 percent) to close at $4.40 per MMBtu on June 29. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 2,432 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 24, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 78 Bcf, leaving storage volumes

478

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 22, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 14, 2011) A touch of autumn in the air combined with hopes for the eventual return of winter was likely the catalyst enabling natural gas prices to recapture the $4 mark this week despite an environment of negative consumption fundamentals and continued strong production. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the October 2011 natural gas contract advanced 9.9 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) to close at $4.039 per MMBtu over the week. The Henry Hub price oscillated in a similar but narrow range before closing up 5 cents for the week at $4.01 per MMBtu on September 14. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 3,112 billion cubic

479

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2009 1, 2009 Next Release: May 28, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 20, 2009) Natural gas prices at most trading locations fell on the week because of mild weather as well as continued weakness in the economy. Declines ranged between 37 cents at the Dracut trading area in the Northeast to 90 cents at the El Paso non-Bondad area in the Rocky Mountains. The Henry Hub spot price fell by 67 cents during the week to $3.75 per million Btu (MMBtu). Moving in the opposite direction of natural gas prices, the price of the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil contract rose on the week to $61.45 per barrel, or $10.59 per MMBtu. Oil prices are now at their highest level since November 10, 2008, having more than doubled since falling to a

480

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 18, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 10, 2010) Since Wednesday, March 3, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations across the lower 48 States, with decreases of as much as 11 percent. Prices at the Henry Hub declined $0.32, or about 7 percent, to $4.44 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, March 10, at $4.56 per MMBtu, falling by $0.20 or about 4 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,626 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of March 5, about 1 percent above the 5-year average (2005-2009). The implied

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 16, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 8, 2010) In response to cold weather across much of the United States, natural gas spot prices increased across the board this report week (December 1 – December 8). Though most increases were less than 50 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), prices at a number of trading points (notably in the Northeast and Florida) increased by several dollars. The Henry Hub spot price rose 25 cents, from $4.21 per MMBtu to $4.46 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the natural gas near-month contract (January 2011) also increased, rising from $4.269 per MMBtu on December 1 to $4.606 per MMBtu on December 8.

482

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2008 6, 2008 Next Release: October 23, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For week ending Wednesday, October 15) Since Wednesday, October 8, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States outside the California, West Texas, and Arizona/Nevada regions, with prices rising as much as 76 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub rose 6 cents per MMBtu or about 1 percent, to $6.64 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (October 15) at $6.592 per MMBtu, declining 15 cents per MMBtu or about 2 percent since last Wednesday, October 8. Natural gas in storage was 3,277 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

483

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 26, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 18, 2011) The threat of shut-in production arising from lower Mississippi River flooding likely sent prices up temporarily at nearly all domestic pricing points over the week but the gains failed to stick. The Henry Hub price lost a modest 7 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (1.9 percent) to close at $4.15 per MMBtu on May 18. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,919 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, May 13, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 92 Bcf, leaving storage volumes

484

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: February 26, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 18, 2009) Since Wednesday, February 11, natural gas spot prices declined at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 3 and 78 cents per MMBtu. Prices at the Henry Hub fell 33 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 7 percent, to $4.35 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (February 18) at $4.214 per MMBtu, declining 32 cents per MMBtu or about 7 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 1,996 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of February 13, which is about 8.4 percent above the 5-year average

485

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2008 6, 2008 Next Release: November 14, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, November 5) Since Wednesday, October 29, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States outside the Midwest, Northeast, and Alabama/Mississippi regions, with gains of up to $1.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) in a week of highly variable prices. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 36 cents per MMBtu or about 5 percent, to $6.94 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (November 5) at $7.249 per MMBtu, climbing 47 cents per MMBtu or about 7 percent since last Wednesday, October 29. Natural gas in storage was 3,405 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

486

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 0, 2009 Next Release: August 6, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 29, 2009) Since Wednesday, July 22, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations, with decreases of as much as 19 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub declined by 8 cents per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, to $3.41 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub expired yesterday, July 29, at $3.379 per MMBtu, decreasing by 41 cents or about 11 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 3,023 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of July 24, which is about 19 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

487

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: December 11, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, December 3, 2008) Since Wednesday, November 26, natural gas spot prices decreased at most markets in the Lower 48 States, although selected markets posted relatively modest gains on the week. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 5 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) or less than 0.5 percent, to $6.48 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (December 3) at $6.347 per MMBtu, falling 53 cents per MMBtu or about 8 percent since last Wednesday, November 26. Natural gas in storage was 3,358 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

488

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 23, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 15, 2011) The past week was characterized by passing of the earlier week’s heat wave. The Henry Hub price decreased 31 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) for the week (6.4 percent) to close at $4.52 per MMBtu on June 15. During the midst of the heat wave, working natural gas in storage last week rose to 2,256 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 10, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 69 Bcf, leaving storage volumes positioned 275 Bcf below year-ago levels.

489

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: July 31, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, July 16, natural gas spot prices decreased at all markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices falling more than $1 per MMBtu at most locations during the period. Prices at the Henry Hub fell $1.26 per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 11 percent, to $9.89 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $9.788 per MMBtu, declining $1.61 or about 14 percent since Wednesday, July 16. Natural gas in storage was 2,396 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of July 18, which is about 1 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007), following an implied net injection of 84 Bcf.

490

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 2, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 17, 2010) Natural gas spot prices fell modestly at nearly all domestic pricing points, likely because expectations for colder weather were slow in materializing and storage levels rose again. The Henry Hub price fell 23 cents (about 6 percent) for the week ending November 17, to $3.77 per million Btu (MMBtu). The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price settled at $80.43 per barrel ($13.87 per MMBtu), on Wednesday, November 17. This represents a decrease of $7.34 per barrel, or $1.27 per MMBtu, from the previous Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage set another new all-time record

491

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 30, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 22, 2010) Since Wednesday, September 15, natural gas spot prices fell at most markets across the lower 48 States, with declines of less than 10 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). However, selected markets in the Rocky Mountains and at the Florida citygate posted considerably larger declines, falling by as much as $0.51 per MMBtu. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell $0.04 per MMBtu since last Wednesday, averaging $4.02 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, September 22. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $3.966 per

492

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2008 5, 2008 Next Release: May 22, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot prices increased in a majority of regions of the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, May 7-14).The Henry Hub spot price increased $0.43 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $11.51, the highest average price recorded at the Henry Hub in more than 2 years. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices also continued on an upward trend that has resulted in weekly price increases in 6 of the last 7 report weeks. The futures contract for June delivery increased 27.1 cents per MMBtu on the week to approximately $11.60. During the week ending Friday, May 9, estimated net injections of natural gas into underground storage totaled the largest volume to date

493

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: November 5, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 28, 2009) Natural gas prices posted decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices fell at virtually all market locations in the lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 6 and 46 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). However, a couple trading locations did post gains this week. The price at the Henry Hub spot market fell 21 cents or about 4 percent, ending trading yesterday at $4.59 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for November delivery expired yesterday at $4.289 per MMBtu, falling 81 cents or about 16 percent since last Wednesday. The December

494

Natural Gas Annual, 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Historical The Natural Gas Annual, 1998 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1998. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1994 to 1998. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1998 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1998, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

495

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 14, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 6, 2011) Nearly all pricing points were down overall for the week, some by more than 10 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub price decreased 6 cents per MMBtu over the week (1.4 percent) to close at $4.34 per MMBtu on July 6. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 2,527 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 1, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 95 Bcf, leaving storage volumes positioned 224 Bcf under year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the August 2011 natural

496

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2008 , 2008 Next Release: July 10, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, June 25, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices rising up to 5 percent during the period. Prices at the Henry Hub increased 55 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 4 percent, to $13.31 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterdayat $13.389 per MMBtu, rising 52 cents or about 4 percent since Wednesday, June 25. Natural gas in storage was 2,118 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of June 27, which is about 3 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007), following an implied net injection of 85 Bcf.

497

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 25, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 17, 2010) Natural gas prices continued their decline across much of the country for the week ended February 17. Even prices in the Northeast, which registered large increases during the previous week, fell as of yesterday. On the week, natural gas spot prices registered net decreases at almost all locations in the lower 48 States. The significant price increases for the week ended February 10 in the Northeast occurred in response to the two major snow storms that slammed the Mid-Atlantic and parts of the Northeast. However, with average temperatures this report week resembling historical normals, prices in the

498

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 13, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 5, 2011) Like autumn leaves floating down to earth, natural gas prices dropped decidedly from their $4 support branch this past week. In a whirlwind of generally unsupportive market fundamentals, the Henry Hub price closed down 25 cents for the week to $3.63 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) on October 5. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the November 2011 natural gas contract dropped nearly 23 cents per MMBtu to close at $3.570 per MMBtu over the week. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 3,409 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, September 30, according to the U.S. Energy

499

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 17, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 9, 2009) Natural gas spot prices increased at all trading locations in the lower 48 States since last Wednesday, December 2. The Henry Hub price rose by 60 cents, or almost 13 percent, to $5.27 per million Btu (MMBtu) on the week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the January 2010 natural gas contract rose about 37 cents to $4.898 per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price was higher than price of the near-month contract during 3 days of the report week. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil contract fell by $5.95, or 8 percent, to $70.67 per barrel or $12.18 per MMBtu.

500

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 27, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 19, 2010) Since last Wednesday, May 12, natural gas spot prices generally rose at market locations across the lower 48 States, with only a few exceptions. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price increased about 2 percent since last Wednesday, from $4.18 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.28 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the June 2010 futures contract fell about 3 percent, from $4.284 per MMBtu to $4.158 per MMBtu. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price dropped about 8 percent, from $75.65 per barrel ($13.05 per MMBtu) to $69.91 per barrel