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1

Glossary Item - Half-life  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Half-life Thallium-208 decays into lead-208 with a half-life of 3.05 minutes. The half-life describes the amount of time needed for half of a sample of unstable atoms or particles...

2

NIST Radionuclide Half-Life Measurements (HTML)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Radionuclide, Number of Sources, Number of Half Lives Followed, Half Life *, Statistical Standard Uncertainty, Other Standard Uncertainty, References ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

3

NIST Radionuclide Half-Life Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The half lives of many radionuclides have been measured in the Radioactivity Group of NIST. The table below, based on "New and revised half-life ...

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

4

A Calorimetric Determination of the Half Life of Polonium-210 (Final Report)  

SciTech Connect

Six determinations have been made of the half life of polonium with four different steady-state, resistance-bridge calorimeters and five different samples of polonium. These six values of the half life have been weighted and combined to give a grand-mean value of the half life of 138.4005 + - 0.0051 days.

Eichelberger, J. F.; Jordan, K. C.; Orr, S. R.; Parks, J. R.

1953-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

5

Frostbite Theater - The Half-life of Barium-137m - Collect the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

four in our experiment to measure the half-life of barium-137m. Choose your detector and start collecting data Show Transcript Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold...

6

Can Environmental Factors Affect Half-Life in Beta-Decay? An Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Early in the history of the field of nuclear science, experiments were performed to ascertain whether the half-lives of the radioactive substances being studied – isotopes then called the “radium emanation” [222Rn], “radium A” [218Po], “radium B” [214Pb], and “radium C” [214Bi] - were dependent upon any external factors. At that time, the external factors deemed most likely to affect half-life were temperature and pressure. After several experiments, designed to pick up any change in half-life in the course of changing temperature or pressure, had failed to find any significant changes, it was concluded that half-life does not depend on the physical properties of external environment. And that was the state of the field for a long time - for almost 100 years, in fact. Fairly recently, however, half-life measurements were recorded, and published, that seemed to show a change in half-life at the few percent level for certain radioactive nuclides which were exposed to extremes of temperature - thus challenging the long-held belief in the unchangeability of half-lives. In addition to half-life changes caused by temperature change, other experiments seemed to find half-life changes caused by other external influences, including the chemical environment of the decaying radioactive nuclide, and even the distance between Earth and the Sun at the time of the half-life measurement. In this study we present evidence that the initial beliefs in the immutability of radioactive half-life (with the exception of a few nuclides decaying by electron capture whose orbital electrons are involved in both the decay and also in the chemical bonding of those nuclides) is indeed correct; we have done this by performing precise half-life measurements on the ?? emitter 198Au, the EC emitter 97Ru, and on the ?? emitter 198Au when sited in gold(III) oxide, Au2O3, (an insulator for practical purposes). We have performed various experiments designed to detect any half-life change at the level of a few parts in 10^4 due to change in temperature, physical environment, or the Earth-Sun distance. In these experiments, we have found no significant half-life change due to any of these external factors. These results represent the most accurate demonstrations of the immutability of radioactive half-life change ever made.

Goodwin, John 1953-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Frostbite Theater - The Half-life of Barium-137m - Collect the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collect the Data This is data run number one in our experiment to measure the half-life of barium-137m. Choose your detector and start collecting data Show Transcript ...

8

Chlorine-36 abundance in natural and synthetic perchlorate  

SciTech Connect

Perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) is ubiquitous in the environment. It occurs naturally as a product of atmospheric photochemical reactions, and is synthesized for military, aerospace, and industrial applications. Nitrate-enriched soils of the Atacama Desert (Chile) contain high concentrations of natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -}; nitrate produced from these soils has been exported worldwide since the mid-1800's for use in agriculture. The widespread introduction of synthetic and agricultural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} into the environment has complicated attempts to understand the geochemical cycle of ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. Natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} samples from the southwestern United States have relatively high {sup 36}Cl abundances ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 3,100 x 10{sup -15} to 28,800 x 10{sup -15}), compared with samples of synthetic ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 0.0 x 10{sup -15} to 40 x 10{sup -15}) and Atacama Desert ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 0.9 x 10{sup -15} to 590 x 10{sup -15}) ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. These data give a lower limit for the initial {sup 36}Cl abundance of natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and provide temporal and other constraints on its geochemical cycle.

Heikoop, Jeffrey M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dale, M [NON LANL; Sturchio, Neil C [UNIV OF ILLIONOIS; Caffee, M [PURDUE UNIV; Belosa, A D [UNIV OF ILLINOIS; Heraty, Jr., L J [UNIV OF ILLINOIS; Bohike, J K [RESTON, VA; Hatzinger, P B [SHAW ENIVIORNMENTAL C0.; Jackson, W A [TEXAS TECH; Gu, B [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Frostbite Theater - The Half-life of Barium-137m - Equipment Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Should a Person Touch 200,000 Volts? Should a Person Touch 200,000 Volts? Previous Video (Should a Person Touch 200,000 Volts?) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Collect the Data!) Collect the Data! Equipment Overview Use our equipment to measure the half-life of a radioactive isotope, barium-137m! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: Today, you're going to measure the half-life of a radioactive isotope, metastable barium-137! This is an actual experiment that you're going to do using our equipment! Steve: The half-life of a radioactive substance is the amount of time it takes for half of that substance to undergo decay. Now, half-lives can range from billions of years to a tiny fraction of a second. Happily, the

10

Frostbite Theater - The Half-life of Barium-137m - Collect the Data!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

five in our experiment to measure the half-life of five in our experiment to measure the half-life of barium-137m. Choose your detector and start collecting data! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: This is data run number five in our experiment to measure the half-life of metastable barium-137. If you want to know more about the equipment and materials we're using, please see the first video in this series. Steve: Joanna and I have already measured the background rate in this room. If you're using the Geiger-Müeller tube, the average background rate is 46.1 counts per minute. If you're using the scintillator with the photomultiplier tube, the average background rate is 3,454.4 counts per

11

Frostbite Theater - The Half-life of Barium-137m - Collect the Data!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

three in our experiment to measure the half-life of three in our experiment to measure the half-life of barium-137m. Choose your detector and start collecting data! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: This is data run number three in our experiment to measure the half-life of metastable barium-137. If you want to know more about the equipment and materials we're using, please see the first video in this series. Steve: Joanna and I have already measured the background rate in this room. If you're using the Geiger-Müeller tube, the average background rate is 46.1 counts per minute. If you're using the scintillator with the photomultiplier tube, the average background rate is 3,454.4 counts per

12

Frostbite Theater - The Half-life of Barium-137m - Collect the Data!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

two in our experiment to measure the half-life of two in our experiment to measure the half-life of barium-137m. Choose your detector and start collecting data! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: This is data run number two in our experiment to measure the half-life of metastable barium-137. If you want to know more about the equipment and materials we're using, please see the first video in this series. Steve: Joanna and I have already measured the background rate in this room. If you're using the Geiger-Müeller tube, the average background rate is 46.1 counts per minute. If you're using the scintillator with the photomultiplier tube, the average background rate is 3,454.4 counts per

13

Frostbite Theater - The Half-life of Barium-137m - Calculations and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collect the Data! Collect the Data! Previous Video (Collect the Data!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (How to Make a Cloud Chamber!) How to Make a Cloud Chamber! Calculations and Results Now that you have your data, it's time to calculate the half-life of barium-137m! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: We're finally ready to calculate the half-life of metastable barium-137 using the data that you collected earlier. If you haven't collected any data, you may want to watch the first two videos in this series. Steve: We're going to start with an equation. Don't panic. As far as equations go in physics, this one isn't too bad. Joanna: This equation tells us that the activity of a radioactive substance

14

Research on the Natural Abundance of Deuterium and Other Isotopes in Nature. Final Report for Period Ending September 30, 1958  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

[Research from September 1957 to 1958 plus a] bibliography, containing about 78 references, on the natural abundance of deuterium and other isotopes in nature is presented. (W.L.H.)

Urey, H. C.

1959-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Ecological half-life of 137Cs in fish from a stream contaminated by nuclear reactor effluents  

SciTech Connect

Radiocesium ({sup 137}Cs) concentrations were determined during 1974, 1981 and 1998 for seven species of fish inhabiting a stream (Steel Creek) contaminated by effluents from a nuclear reactor to examine the decline of this radionuclide in a natural ecosystem. Median {sup 137}Cs concentrations were highest in Micropterus salmoides (largemouth bass) during each year of the investigation (1974 = 6.67 Bq g{sup -1} dry wt. of whole body; 1981 = 3.72 Bq g{sup -1}; 1998 = 0.35 Bq g{sup -1}), but no patterns of differences were observed among Aphredoderus sayanus (pirate perch), Esox americanus (redfin pickerel), Lepomis auritus (redbreast sunfish), L. gulosus (warmouth), L. punctatus (spotted sunfish), and Notropis cummingsae (dusky shiner). Results demonstrated a rapid decline in {sup 137}Cs within fish from Steel Creek during the 24-year period. For example, {sup 137}Cs concentrations in all fish species declined significantly among years, even after accounting for radioactive decay. The observed percent declines in {sup 137}Cs concentrations of individual species were 3-4 times greater between 1974 and 1981 compared to that expected by physical decay alone, and 2-3 times greater during 1981-1998. Ecological half-lives (EHLs) of {sup 137}Cs in fish ranged from 4.43 years in A. sayanus to 6.53 years in L. gulosus. The EHL for {sup 137}Cs in all fish species combined was 5.54 years. Current levels of {sup 137}Cs in fish from Steel Creek (1.16 Bq g{sup -1} dry wt. of whole body to below detection limits) indicate that the consumption of fish from this ecosystem poses little risk to humans and sensitive wildlife species. These results demonstrate the importance of incorporating the concept of ecological half-life into determinations concerning the length and severity of potential risks associated with radiocontaminants.

Peles, J. [Pennsylvania State University, McKeesport; BryanJr, A. [Savannah River Ecology Lab; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ribble, D. [Trinity University; Smith, M. [Savannah River Ecology Lab

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Determining thyroid {sup 131}I effective half-life for the treatment planning of Graves' disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Thyroid {sup 131}I effective half-life (T{sub eff}) is an essential parameter in patient therapy when accurate radiation dose is desirable for producing an intended therapeutic outcome. Multiple {sup 131}I uptake measurements and resources from patients themselves and from nuclear medicine facilities are requisites for determining T{sub eff}, these being limiting factors when implementing the treatment planning of Graves' disease (GD) in radionuclide therapy. With the aim of optimizing this process, this study presents a practical, propitious, and accurate method of determining T{sub eff} for dosimetric purposes. Methods: A total of 50 patients with GD were included in this prospective study. Thyroidal {sup 131}I uptake was measured at 2-h, 6-h, 24-h, 48-h, 96-h, and 220-h postradioiodine administration. T{sub eff} was calculated by considering sets of two measured points (24-48-h, 24-96-h, and 24-220-h), sets of three (24-48-96-h, 24-48-220-h, and 24-96-220-h), and sets of four (24-48-96-220-h). Results: When considering all the measured points, the representative T{sub eff} for all the patients was 6.95 ({+-}0.81) days, whereas when using such sets of points as (24-220-h), (24-96-220-h), and (24-48-220-h), this was 6.85 ({+-}0.81), 6.90 ({+-}0.81), and 6.95 ({+-}0.81) days, respectively. According to the mean deviations 2.2 ({+-}2.4)%, 2.1 ({+-}2.0)%, and 0.04 ({+-}0.09)% found in T{sub eff}, calculated based on all the measured points in time, and with methods using the (24-220-h), (24-48-220-h), and (24-96-220-h) sets, respectively, no meaningful statistical difference was noted among the three methods (p > 0.500, t test). Conclusions: T{sub eff} obtained from only two thyroid {sup 131}I uptakes measured at 24-h and 220-h, besides proving to be sufficient, accurate enough, and easily applicable, attributes additional major cost-benefits for patients, and facilitates the application of the method for dosimetric purposes in the treatment planning of Graves' disease.

Willegaignon, Jose; Sapienza, Marcelo T.; Barberio Coura Filho, George; Buchpiguel, Carlos A. [Cancer Institute of Sao Paulo State (ICESP), Clinical Hospital, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Nuclear Medicine Service, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Traino, Antonio C. [Unit of Medical Physics, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Pisa 56126 (Italy)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Measurement of the Double-Beta Decay Half-life of {sup 136}Xe in KamLAND-Zen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present results from the KamLAND-Zen double-beta decay experiment based on an exposure of 77.6 days with 129 kg of {sup 136}Xe. The measured two-neutrino double-beta decay half-life of {sup 136}Xe is T{sup 2{nu}}{sub 1/2} = 2:38 {+-}#6; 0:02(stat)#6;{+-}0.14(syst)#2;x10{sup 21} yr, consistent with a recent measurement by EXO-200. We also obtain a lower limit for the neutrinoless double-beta decay half-life, T{sup 0{nu}}{sub 1/2} > 5.7 x#2; 10{sup 24} yr at 90% C.L.

KamLAND-Zen Collaboration; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Hanakago, H.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kato, R.; Koga, M.; Matsuda, S.; Mitsui, T.; Nakada, T.; Nakamura, K.; Obata, A.; Oki, A.; Ono, Y.; Shimizu, I.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B. D.; Yamada, S.; Yoshida, H.; Kozlov, A.; Yoshida, S.; Banks, T. I.; Detwiler, J. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Han, K.; O'Donnell, T.; Berger, B. E.; Efremenko, Y.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Enomoto, S.; Decowski, M. P.

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

18

The significance of using the Newcomb-Benford law as a test of nuclear half-life calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Half-life number sequences collected from nuclear data charts are found to obey the Newcomb-Benford law. Based on this fact, it has been suggested recently, that this law should be used to test the quality of nuclear decay models. In this paper we briefly recall how, when and why the Newcomb-Benford law can be observed in a set of numbers with a given probability distribution. We investigate the special case of nuclear half-lives, and show that the law provides no additional clue in understanding decay half-lives. Thus, it can play no significant role in testing nuclear decay theories.

Farkas, Janos

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

The significance of using the Newcomb-Benford law as a test of nuclear half-life calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Half-life number sequences collected from nuclear data charts are found to obey the Newcomb-Benford law. Based on this fact, it has been suggested recently, that this law should be used to test the quality of nuclear decay models. In this paper we briefly recall how, when and why the Newcomb-Benford law can be observed in a set of numbers with a given probability distribution. We investigate the special case of nuclear half-lives, and show that the law provides no additional clue in understanding decay half-lives. Thus, it can play no significant role in testing nuclear decay theories.

Janos Farkas; Gyorgy Gyurky

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

20

Half-Life  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decaimientos Vida Media Avanzar Volver Principal ESTOY PERDIDO Un pedazo de uranio, por s mismo, decaer gradualmente hacia varias partculas ms pequeas. La tasa de...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Natural Gas: From Shortages to Abundance in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent dramatic and largely unanticipated growth in the current and expected future production of shale gas, and the related developments in the production of shale oil, have dramatically changed the energy future of the U.S. and potentially of the world compared to what experts were forecasting only a few years ago. These changes would not have been realized as quickly and efficiently absent deregulation of the wellhead price of natural gas, unbundling of gas supplies from pipeline transportation services, the associated development of efficient liquid markets for natural gas, and reforms to the licensing and regulation of prices for gas pipelines charge to move gas from where it is produced to where it is consumed. This economic platform supported the integration of technological advances in vertical drilling, downhole telemetry, horizontal drilling, monitoring and control of deep drilling equipment, and hydraulic fracturing to exploit economically shale gas deposits that were identified long ago, but considered to be uneconomical until recently. I. Natural Gas Wellhead Price and Pipeline Regulation Federal regulation of the natural gas industry began with the Natural Gas Act of 1938 (NGA). The NGA gave the Federal Power Commission (FPC), later the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the authority to license the construction and expansion of new interstate natural gas pipelines, to ensure that they are operated safely, and to regulate the prices 1

Paul L. Joskow

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Natural 15N- and 13C-abundance as indicators of forest nitrogen status and soil carbon dynamics  

SciTech Connect

This book highlights new and emerging uses of stable isotope analysis in a variety of ecological disciplines. While the use of natural abundance isotopes in ecological research is now relatively standard, new techniques and ways of interpreting patterns are developing rapidly. The second edition of this book provides a thorough, up-to-date examination of these methods of research. As part of the Ecological Methods and Concepts series which provides the latest information on experimental techniques in ecology, this book looks at a wide range of techniques that use natural abundance isotopes to: {sm_bullet} follow whole ecosystem element cycling {sm_bullet} understand processes of soil organic matter formation {sm_bullet} follow the movement of water in whole watersheds {sm_bullet} understand the effects of pollution in both terrestrial and aquatic environments {sm_bullet} study extreme systems such as hydrothermal vents {sm_bullet}follow migrating organisms In each case, the book explains the background to the methodology, looks at the underlying principles and assumptions, and outlines the potential limitations and pitfalls. Stable Isotopes in Ecology and Environmental Science is an ideal resource for both ecologists who are new to isotopic analysis, and more experienced isotope ecologists interested in innovative techniques and pioneering new uses.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL; Lu, Benwhea Bonnie [ORNL; Brice, Deanne Jane [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Natural Gas Development and Grassland Songbird Abundance in Southwestern Saskatchewan: The Impact of Gas Wells and Cumulative Disturbance .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The quantity and quality of remaining grasslands in southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada, are threatened by expansion of natural gas development. The number of natural gas wells… (more)

Bogard, Holly Jayne Kalyn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

PRUDENT DEVELOPMENT Realizing the Potential of North America’s Abundant Natural Gas and Oil Resources National Petroleum Council • 2011PRUDENT DEVELOPMENT Realizing the Potential of North America’s Abundant Natural Gas and Oil Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Petroleum Council is a federal advisory committee to the Secretary of Energy. The sole purpose of the National Petroleum Council is to advise, inform, and make recommendations to the Secretary of Energy on any matter requested by the Secretary relating to oil and natural gas or to the oil and gas industries.

A National; Petroleum Council; Steven Chu Secretary

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Incrementality, Half-life, and Threshold Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In A. Kent, editor, Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science. Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, Basel, 2000. To appear. ...

2001-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

26

Helioseismology and Solar Abundances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Helioseismology has allowed us to study the structure of the Sun in unprecedented detail. One of the triumphs of the theory of stellar evolution was that helioseismic studies had shown that the structure of solar models is very similar to that of the Sun. However, this agreement has been spoiled by recent revisions of the solar heavy-element abundances. Heavy element abundances determine the opacity of the stellar material and hence, are an important input to stellar model calculations. The models with the new, low abundances do not satisfy helioseismic constraints. We review here how heavy-element abundances affect solar models, how these models are tested with helioseismology, and the impact of the new abundances on standard solar models. We also discuss the attempts made to improve the agreement of the low-abundance models with the Sun and discuss how helioseismology is being used to determine the solar heavy-element abundance. A review of current literature shows that attempts to improve agreement between solar models with low heavy-element abundances and seismic inference have been unsuccessful so far. The low-metallicity models that have the least disagreement with seismic data require changing all input physics to stellar models beyond their acceptable ranges. Seismic determinations of the solar heavy-element abundance yield results that are consistent with the older, higher values of the solar abundance, and hence, no major changes to the inputs to solar models are required to make higher-metallicity solar models consistent with helioseismic data.

Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

27

The Solar Argon Abundance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar argon abundance cannot be directly derived by spectroscopic observations of the solar photosphere. The solar Ar abundance is evaluated from solar wind measurements, nucleosynthetic arguments, observations of B stars, HII regions, planetary nebulae, and noble gas abundances measured in Jupiter's atmosphere. These data lead to a recommended argon abundance of N(Ar) = 91,200(+/-)23,700 (on a scale where Si = 10^6 atoms). The recommended abundance for the solar photosphere (on a scale where log N(H) = 12) is A(Ar)photo = 6.50(+/-)0.10, and taking element settling into account, the solar system (protosolar) abundance is A(Ar)solsys = 6.57(+/-)0.10.

Katharina Lodders

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

28

Production of 239 Pu from a natural Uranium disk and "hot" rock using a neutron howitzer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A neutron howitzer was used to produce 239Np from the targets of natural U and a hot rock. An intrinsic Germanium detector enabled the observations of the gamma rays in the decay of 239Np and a determination of its half life of 2.3 days. This shows that 239Pu had been produced in both targets

Steiner, Joseph; De Marco, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Production of 239 Pu from a natural Uranium disk and "hot" rock using a neutron howitzer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A neutron howitzer was used to produce 239Np from the targets of natural U and a hot rock. An intrinsic Germanium detector enabled the observations of the gamma rays in the decay of 239Np and a determination of its half life of 2.3 days. This shows that 239Pu had been produced in both targets

Joseph Steiner; Aaron Anderson; Michael De Marco

2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

30

Nebular Abundance Errors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The errors inherent to the use of the standard "ionization correction factor" ("i_CF") method of calculating nebular conditions and relative abundances of H, He, N, O, Ne, S, and Ar in emission line nebulae have been investigated under conditions typical for planetary nebulae. The photoionization code CLOUDY was used to construct a series of model nebulae with properties spanning the range typical of PNe. Its radial "profiles" of bright, frequently observed optical emission lines were then summed over a variety of "apertures" to generate sets of emission line measurements. These resulting line ratios were processed using the i_CF method to "derive" nebular conditions and abundances. We find that for lines which are summed over the entire nebula the i_CF-derived abundances differ from the input abundances by less than 5% for He and O up to 25% or more for Ne, S, and Ar. For resolved observations, however, the discrepancies are often much larger and are systematically variable with radius. This effect is especially pronounced in low-ionization zones where nitrogen and oxygen are neutral or once-ionized such as in FLIERs, ansae and ionization fronts. We argue that the reports of stellar-enriched N in the FLIERs of several PNe are probably specious.

J. Alexander; B. Balick

1997-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

31

Natural  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Imports Volume (million cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 2,094,387 2,266,751 2,566,049 2,816,408 2,883,277 Mexico .............................. 0 1,678 7,013 6,722 13,862 Total Pipeline Imports....... 2,094,387 2,268,429 2,573,061 2,823,130 2,897,138 LNG Algeria .............................. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 35,325 United Arab Emirates ....... 0 0 0 0 4,949 Total LNG Imports............. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 40,274 Total Imports......................... 2,137,504 2,350,115 2,623,839 2,841,048 2,937,413 Average Price (dollars per thousand cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 1.84 2.02 1.86 1.48 1.96 Mexico .............................. - 1.94 1.99 1.53 2.25 Total Pipeline Imports.......

32

Half-Life for Double Beta-Decay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Energy Series, Plutonium Proje-ct Record Vblo 14B "Huolear Energy Series, Plutonium Project Record Yolo 14B "extracting and separating the plutonium fraction by chemical

Levine, C.A.; Ghiorso, A.; Seaborg, G.T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Abundance,Biomass, and Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abundance,Biomass, and Production Daniel B.Hayes,James R.Bence,Thomas J.Kwak, and Bradley E, the proportion of fish present that are #12;Abundance,Biomass,and Production 329 detected (i.e., sightability; available at http://www.ruwpa.st-and.ac.uk/distance/). #12;Abundance,Biomass,and Production 331 Box 8

Kwak, Thomas J.

34

Constraining solar abundances using helioseismology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent analyses of solar photospheric abundances suggest that the oxygen abundance in the solar atmosphere needs to be revised downwards. In this study we investigate the consequence of this revision on helioseismic analyses of the depth of the solar convection zone and the helium abundance in the solar envelope and find no significant effect. We also find that the revised abundances along with the current OPAL opacity tables are not consistent with seismic data. A significant upward revision of the opacity tables is required to make solar models with lower oxygen abundance consistent with seismic observations.

Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

2004-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

35

Determining solar abundances using helioseismology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent downward revision of solar photospheric abundances of Oxygen and other heavy elements has resulted in serious discrepancies between solar models and solar structure as determined through helioseismology. In this work we investigate the possibility of determining the solar heavy-element abundance without reference to spectroscopy by using helioseismic data. Using the dimensionless sound-speed derivative in the solar convection zone, we find that the heavy element abundance, Z, of 0.0172 +/- 0.002, which is closer to the older, higher value of the abundances.

H. M. Antia; Sarbani Basu

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

36

Nucleosynthesis: Stellar and Solar Abundances and Atomic Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abundance observations indicate the presence of often surprisingly large amounts of neutron capture (i.e., s- and r-process) elements in old Galactic halo and globular cluster stars. These observations provide insight into the nature of the earliest generations of stars in the Galaxy -- the progenitors of the halo stars -- responsible for neutron-capture synthesis. Comparisons of abundance trends can be used to understand the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the nature of heavy element nucleosynthesis. In addition age determinations, based upon long-lived radioactive nuclei abundances, can now be obtained. These stellar abundance determinations depend critically upon atomic data. Improved laboratory transition probabilities have been recently obtained for a number of elements. These new gf values have been used to greatly refine the abundances of neutron-capture elemental abundances in the solar photosphere and in very metal-poor Galactic halo stars. The newly determined stellar abundances are surprisingly consistent with a (relative) Solar System r-process pattern, and are also consistent with abundance predictions expected from such neutron-capture nucleosynthesis.

John J. Cowan; James E. Lawler; Christopher Sneden; E. A. Den Hartog; Jason Collier

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

37

Solar System Abundances of the Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Representative abundances of the chemical elements for use as a solar abundance standard in astronomical and planetary studies are summarized. Updated abundance tables for solar system abundances based on meteorites and photospheric measurements are presented.

Lodders, Katharina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Abundance Analysis of Planetary Host Stars I. Differential Iron Abundances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present atmospheric parameters and iron abundances derived from high-resolution spectra for three samples of dwarf stars: stars which are known to host close-in giant planets (CGP), stars for which radial velocity data exclude the presence of a close-in giant planetary companion (no-CGP), as well as a random sample of dwarfs with a spectral type and magnitude distribution similar to that of the planetary host stars (control). All stars have been observed with the same instrument and have been analyzed using the same model atmospheres, atomic data and equivalent width modeling program. Abundances have been derived differentially to the Sun, using a solar spectrum obtained with Callisto as the reflector with the same instrumentation. We find that the iron abundances of CGP dwarfs are on average by 0.22 dex greater than that of no-CGP dwarfs. The iron abundance distributions of both the CGP and no-CGP dwarfs are different than that of the control dwarfs, while the combined iron abundances have a distribution which is very similar to that of the control dwarfs. All four samples (CGP, no-CGP, combined, control) have different effective temperature distributions. We show that metal enrichment occurs only for CGP dwarfs with temperatures just below solar and approximately 300 K higher than solar, whereas the abundance difference is insignificant at Teff around 6000 K.

U. Heiter; R. E. Luck

2003-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

39

THE SOLAR FLARE IRON ABUNDANCE  

SciTech Connect

The abundance of iron is measured from emission line complexes at 6.65 keV (Fe line) and 8 keV (Fe/Ni line) in RHESSI X-ray spectra during solar flares. Spectra during long-duration flares with steady declines were selected, with an isothermal assumption and improved data analysis methods over previous work. Two spectral fitting models give comparable results, viz., an iron abundance that is lower than previous coronal values but higher than photospheric values. In the preferred method, the estimated Fe abundance is A(Fe) = 7.91 {+-} 0.10 (on a logarithmic scale, with A(H) = 12) or 2.6 {+-} 0.6 times the photospheric Fe abundance. Our estimate is based on a detailed analysis of 1898 spectra taken during 20 flares. No variation from flare to flare is indicated. This argues for a fractionation mechanism similar to quiet-Sun plasma. The new value of A(Fe) has important implications for radiation loss curves, which are estimated.

Phillips, K. J. H. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking RH6 5NT (United Kingdom); Dennis, B. R., E-mail: kjhp@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: Brian.R.Dennis@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

40

NETL: Oil and Natural Gas: Natural Gas Reources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Resources Research Project Summaries Reference Shelf O&G Document Archive The United States is endowed with an abundance of natural gas resources. Besides its use for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Abundant Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abundant Power Abundant Power Place Charlotte, North Carolina Zip 28204 Sector Renewable Energy Product North Carolina-based firm focused on capital formation, financing and project development for renewable energy projects. Coordinates 35.2225°, -80.837539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2225,"lon":-80.837539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

42

Abundant Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Abundant Biofuels Place Monterey, California Sector Biofuels Product Abundant Biofuels plans to develop biodiesel feedstock plantations, refineries, and distribution channels in one or more Caribbean, Central American, or South American countries. Coordinates 38.413256°, -79.582974° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.413256,"lon":-79.582974,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

43

Primordial Lithium Abundance in Catalyzed Big Bang Nucleosynthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There exists a well known problem with the Li7+Be7 abundance predicted by standard big bang nucleosynthesis being larger than the value observed in population II stars. The catalysis of big bang nucleosynthesis by metastable, \\tau_X \\ge 10^3 sec, charged particles X^- is capable of suppressing the primordial Li7+Be7, abundance and making it consistent with the observations. We show that to produce the correct abundance, this mechanism of suppression places a requirement on the initial abundance of X^- at temperatures of 4\\times 10^8 K to be on the order of or larger than 0.02 per baryon, which is within the natural range of abundances in models with metastable electroweak-scale particles. The suppression of Li7+Be7, is triggered by the formation of (Be7X^-), compound nuclei, with fast depletion of their abundances by catalyzed proton reactions, and in some models by direct capture of X^- on Be7. The combination of Li7+Be7 and Li6 constraints favours the window of lifetimes, 1000s \\la tau_X \\leq 2000 s.

Chris Bird; Kristen Koopmans; Maxim Pospelov

2007-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

44

LITERATURE SURVEY ON ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO MEASUREMENTS - 2001-2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Along with my usual weekly review of the published literature for new nuclear data, I also search for new candidates for best measurements of isotopic abundances from a single source. Most of the published articles, that I previously had found in the Research Library at the Brookhaven Lab, have already been sent to the members of the Atomic Weights Commission, by either Michael Berglund or Thomas Walczyk. In the last few days, I checked the published literature for any other articles in the areas of natural variations in isotopic abundance ratios, measurements of isotopic abundance ratios on samples of extra-terrestrial material and isotopic abundance ratio measurements performed using ICPMS instruments. Hopefully this information will be of interest to members of the Commission, the sub-committee on isotopic abundance measurements (SIAM), members of the former sub-committee on natural isotopic fractionation (SNIF), the sub-committee on extra-terrestrial isotope ratios (SETIR), the RTCE Task Group and the Guidelines Task Group, who are dealing with ICPMS and TIMS comparisons. In the following report, I categorize the publications in one of four areas. Measurements performed using either positive or negative ions with Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer, TIMS, instruments; measurements performed on Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer, ICPMS, instruments; measurements of natural variations of the isotopic abundance ratios; and finally measurements on extra-terrestrial samples with instrumentation of either type. There is overlap in these areas. I selected out variations and ET results first and then categorized the rest of the papers by TIMS and ICPMS.

HOLDEN, N.E.

2005-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

45

Metaproteomics reveals abundant transposase expression in mutualistic endosymbionts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transposases, enzymes that catalyze the movement of mobile genetic elements, are the most abundant genes in nature. While many bacteria encode an abundance of transposases in their genomes, the current paradigm is that transposase gene expression is tightly regulated and generally low due to its severe mutagenic effects. In the current study, we detected the highest number of transposase proteins ever reported in bacteria, in symbionts of the gutless marine worm Olavius algarvensis using metaproteomics. At least 26 different transposases from 12 different families were detected and genomic and proteomic analyses suggest many of these are active. This high expression of transposases indicates that the mechanisms for their tight regulation have been disabled or destroyed. Based on recent studies on other symbionts and pathogens that showed high transposase transcription, we speculate that abundant transposase expression might be common in symbionts and pathogens.

Kleiner, Manuel [Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology; Young, Jacque C [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Dubilier, Nicole [Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Glossary Term - 10 Most Abundant Elements in the Earth's Crust  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Earth's Crust Previous Term (10 Most Abundant Compounds in the Earth's Crust) Glossary Main Index Next Term (10 Most Abundant Elements in the Universe) 10 Most Abundant...

47

The abundance of cetaceans in California waters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The abundance of cetaceans in California waters. Part II: Aerial surveys in winter and spring abundance estimates were calculated aftercompletionofthefirst aerial survey in 1991 (Forney and Barlow, 1993 aerial surveys. Survey methods The methods used during the 1991- 92 aerial surveys are described

48

Coronal Abundances in Orion Nebula Cluster Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP) observation, we have studied the chemical composition of the hot plasma in a sample of 146 X-ray bright pre-main sequence stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster. We report measurements of individual element abundances for a subsample of 86 slightly-absorbed and bright X-ray sources, using low resolution X-ray spectra obtained from the Chandra ACIS instrument. The X-ray emission originates from a plasma with temperatures and elemental abundances very similar to those of active coronae in older stars. A clear pattern of abundances vs. First Ionization Potential (FIP) is evident if solar photospheric abundances are assumed as reference. The results are validated by extensive simulations. The observed abundance distributions are compatible with a single pattern of abundances for all stars, although a weak dependence on flare loop size may be present. The abundance of calcium is the only one which appears to vary substantially between stars, but this quantity is affected by relatively large uncertainties. The ensemble properties of the X-ray bright COUP sources confirm that the iron in the emitting plasma is underabundant with respect to both the solar composition and to the average stellar photospheric values. Comparison of the present plasma abundances with those of the stellar photospheres and those of the gaseous component of the nebula, indicates a good agreement for all the other elements with available measurements, and in particular for the high-FIP elements (Ne, Ar, O, and S) and for the low-FIP element Si. We conclude that there is evidence of a significant chemical fractionation effect only for iron, which appears to be depleted by a factor 1.5--3 with respect to the stellar composition.

A. Maggio; E. Flaccomio; F. Favata; G. Micela; S. Sciortino; E. D. Feigelson; K. V. Getman

2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

49

Natural Gas Supply in Denmark -A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Supply in Denmark - A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the Liberalized Gas Market of the markets of natural gas and electricity and the existence of an abundance of de-centralized combined heat and power generators of which most are natural gas fired, leads to the natural assumption that the future

50

Glossary Term - 10 Most Abundant Compounds in the Earth's Crust  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vanadis Previous Term (Vanadis) Glossary Main Index Next Term (10 Most Abundant Elements in the Earth's Crust) 10 Most Abundant Elements
in the Earth's Crust 10 Most Abundant...

51

Unprecedented accurate abundances: signatures of other Earths?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For more than 140 years the chemical composition of our Sun has been considered typical of solar-type stars. Our highly differential elemental abundance analysis of unprecedented accuracy (~0.01 dex) of the Sun relative to solar twins, shows that the Sun has a peculiar chemical composition with a ~20% depletion of refractory elements relative to the volatile elements in comparison with solar twins. The abundance differences correlate strongly with the condensation temperatures of the elements. A similar study of solar analogs from planet surveys shows that this peculiarity also holds in comparisons with solar analogs known to have close-in giant planets while the majority of solar analogs without detected giant planets show the solar abundance pattern. The peculiarities in the solar chemical composition can be explained as signatures of the formation of terrestrial planets like our own Earth.

Melendez, J; Gustafsson, B; Yong, D; Ramírez, I

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Glossary Term - 10 Most Abundant Elements in the Universe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth's Crust Previous Term (10 Most Abundant Elements in the Earth's Crust) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Alpha Decay) Alpha Decay 10 Most Abundant Elements in the Universe...

53

Chemical Abundances in SFG and DLA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the chemical abundances of local star-forming galaxies which cause Damped Lyman Alpha lines. A metallicity versus redshift diagram is constructed, on which the chemical abundances of low-redshift star-forming galaxy populations are compared with those of high-redshift Damped Lyman Alpha systems. We disucss two types of experiments on individual star-forming galaxies. In the first, the Damped Lyman Alpha line is created against an internal ultraviolet light source generated by a star-forming cluster or a supernova explosion. In the second, the Damped Lyman Alpha line is seen against a background Quasar. The metallicities measured from ionized gas in the star-forming regions, and neutral gas in the Damped Lyman Alpha systems, are compared with one another on a case-by-case basis. We highlight the occurrence of the star-forming galaxy/Quasar pair SBS 1543+593/HS 1543+5921, where the emission- and absorption-line derived abundances give the same result. We argue that we therefore can in principle, interpret Damped Lyman Alpha system metallicities as an extension of star-forming galaxy metallicities to higher redshifts, supporting that gas-rich galaxies had lower chemical abundances when the were younger.

Regina E. Schulte-Ladbeck; Brigitte König; Brian Cherinka

2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

54

Internal Rotation, Mixing and Lithium Abundances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium is an excellent tracer of mixing in stars as it is destroyed (by nuclear reactions) at a temperature around $\\sim 2.5\\times 10^6$ K. The lithium destruction zone is typically located in the radiative region of a star. If the radiative regions are stable, the observed surface value of lithium should remain constant with time. However, comparison of the meteoritic and photospheric Li abundances in the Sun indicate that the surface abundance of Li in the Sun has been depleted by more than two orders of magnitude. This is not predicted by solar models and is a long standing problem. Observations of Li in open clusters indicate that Li depletion is occurring on the main sequence. Furthermore, there is now compelling observational evidence that a spread of lithium abundances is present in nearly identical stars. This suggests that some transport process is occurring in stellar radiative regions. Helioseismic inversions support this conclusion, for they suggest that standard solar models need to be modified below the base of the convection zone. There are a number of possible theoretical explanations for this transport process. The relation between Li abundances, rotation rates and the presence of a tidally locked companion along with the observed internal rotation in the Sun indicate that the mixing is most likely induced by rotation. The current status of non-standard (particularly rotational) stellar models which attempt to account for the lithium observations are reviewed.

Brian Chaboyer

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

55

Experimental Limit to Interstellar 244 Pu Abundance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-lived nuclides, now extinct in the solar system, are expected to be present in interstellar matter (ISM). Grains of ISM origin were recently discovered in the inner solar system and at Earth orbit and may accrete onto Earth after ablation in the atmosphere. A favorable matrix for detection of such extraterrestrial material is presented by deep-sea sediments with very low sedimentation rates (0.8–3 mm/kyr). We report here on the measurement of Pu isotopic abundances in a 1-kg deep-sea dry sediment collected in 1992 in the North Pacific. Our estimate of (3 ± 3) × 105 244Pu atoms in the Pu-separated fraction of the sample shows no excess over the expected stratospheric nuclear fallout content and under reasonable assumptions sets a limit of 0.2 244 Pu atoms/cm 2 yr for extra-terrestrial deposition. Using available data on ISM steady-state flux on Earth, we derive a limit of 2 × 10?11 g-244Pu/g-ISM for the abundance of 244Pu in ISM. Subject headings: Nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances – ISM: abundances–instrumentation: spectrographs–methods: laboratory

M. Paul; A. Valenta; I. Ahmad; D. Berkovits; C. Bordeanu; S. Ghelberg; A. Hershkowitz; S. Jiang; T. Nakanishi; K. Sakamoto

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The abundance of cetaceans in California waters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on cetacean populations with- out knowing population sizes. Co- ordinated ship and aerial surveys were and 1992. Results from the ship survey are reported here; population estimates from the aerial surveysThe abundance of cetaceans in California waters. Part I: Ship surveys in summer and fall of 1991

57

Analysis of environmental influences in nuclear half-life measurements exhibiting time-dependent decay rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a recent series of papers evidence has been presented for correlations between solar activity and nuclear decay rates. This includes an apparent correlation between Earth-Sun distance and data taken at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Although these correlations could arise from a direct interaction between the decaying nuclei and some particles or fields emanating from the Sun, they could also represent an "environmental" effect arising from a seasonal variation of the sensitivities of the BNL and PTB detectors due to changes in temperature, relative humidity, background radiation, etc. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of the responses of the detectors actually used in the BNL and PTB experiments, and show that sensitivities to seasonal variations in the respective detectors are likely too small to produce the observed fluctuations.

Jere H. Jenkins; Daniel W. Mundy; Ephraim Fischbach

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

58

Method of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method of removing an impurity of plutonium, lead or a combination thereof from a mixture of radionuclides that contains the impurity and at least one parent radionuclide. The method has the steps of (a) insuring that the mixture is a hydrochloric acid mixture; (b) oxidizing the acidic mixture and specifically oxidizing the impurity to its highest oxidation state; and (c) passing the oxidized mixture through a chloride form anion exchange column whereupon the oxidized impurity absorbs to the chloride form anion exchange column and the 22.sup.9 Th or 2.sup.27 Ac "cow" radionuclide passes through the chloride form anion exchange column. The plutonium is removed for the purpose of obtaining other alpha emitting radionuclides in a highly purified form suitable for medical therapy. In addition to plutonium; lead, iron, cobalt, copper, uranium, and other metallic cations that form chloride anionic complexes that may be present in the mixture; are removed from the mixture on the chloride form anion exchange column.

Bray, Lane A. (Richland, WA); Ryan, Jack L. (West Richland, WA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

-DECAY HALF-LIFE OF THE rp-PROCESS WAITING-POINT NUCLIDE 84  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

84 Mo By Joshua Bradshaw Stoker 84Mo is an even-even N = Z nucleus lying on the proton drip line to deduce half-lives and other properties of the decay required that the average time between implantations you for your insights and conversations to breakup many tense work days. My family certainly has

Mantica, Paul F.

60

Prolonged lipoprotein half-life: effect on oxidative stability and physical features of lipoprotein particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is responsible for two out of the three leading causes of death in the United States. Oxidatively modified apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein (apoB-LPs) are known to contribute to atherosclerotic lesion formation. Based on separate studies, small, dense LDL (apoB-LPs) with longer half-lives have proven to be more susceptible to oxidative modification. The primary purpose of this investigation was to determine: 1) whether the yolk-specific very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDLy) have smaller diameters in Restricted Ovulator (R/O) hens where apoB-LP clearance is delayed by apoB-LP receptor dysfunction compared to sister hens with normal ovarian function 2) whether, in this same model, changes in the relative amounts of lipoprotein density classes of VLDL, LDL, and high density lipoproteins (HDL) occur in accordance with effects observed in mammalian models of delayed LDL clearance such as the LDL-receptor knockout mouse that is also known to experience prolonged circulation and continued intravascular metabolism and, 3) whether delayed apoB-LP clearance results in increased particle susceptibility to oxidation under conditions of relatively high plasma estrogen. No significant difference was found between the VLDLy diameters collected from twenty-three sexually mature R/O and twenty-nine normal (NOR) laying sister hens. The composition of VLDL and LDL fractions significantly differed in total plasma C and triacylglyceride between R/O and NOR hens, indicating continued intravascular metabolism for VLDLy in R/O hens. Oxidative susceptibility of VLDLy was measured by conjugated diene and hexanal formation under copper ion exposure. The initiation and propagation of conjugated diene formation was significantly faster (P < 0.05) for VLDLy isolated from the R/O hens when compared to VLDLy isolated from the NOR hens. The R/O VLDLy particles produced significantly (P < 0.05) greater amounts of hexanal than the NOR particles for the first five hours of incubation with copper. These findings demonstrate that lipoprotein susceptibility to oxidation is highly dependent on particle age. Thus, any treatment to reduce apo B-LP concentration, an indirect measure of apoB-LP clearance rate, would also reduce apo B-LP age and ASCVD risk.

Simeral, Stephanie Bianco

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

SIMPLIFIED PROCEDURE FOR CERTAIN USERS OF SEALED SOURCES, SHORT HALF-LIFE MATERIALS,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Decommissioning 13 I. Performance 13 J. Nuclear Fuel 14 K. Nuclear Insurance 14 L. Relicensing or Plant Retirement the period 2003-2006 related to decommissioning plans for the nuclear power plant. (Diablo Canyon, SONGS 1, 2CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INSTRUCTIONS FOR SUBMITTING NUCLEAR POWER PLANT-RELATED DATA

62

Half-life calculation of one-proton emitters with a shell model potential  

SciTech Connect

The accumulated amount of data for half-lives of proton emitters still remains a challenge to the ability of nuclear models to reproduce them consistently. These nuclei are far from beta stability line in a region where the validity of current nuclear models is not guaranteed. A nuclear shell model is introduced to the calculation of the nuclear barrier of less deformed proton emitters. The predictions using the proposed model are in good agreement with the data, with the advantage of have used only a single parameter in the model.

Rodrigues, M. M.; Duarte, S. B. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF/MCT Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Teruya, N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba - UFPB Campus de Joao Pessoa, 58051-970, Joao Pessoa - PB (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

63

The half-life of {sup 131g,m}Te  

SciTech Connect

In this work, the half-lives of {sup 131m}Te and {sup 131g}Te were measured. Radioactive sources of {sup 131}Te were obtained using the {sup 130}Te(n,{gamma}){sup 131}Te nuclear reaction. These nuclear parameters have been determined with a better confidence and accuracy than previously available: 18.89 {+-} 0.11 min and 33.18 {+-} 0.13 h, respectively. These results are quite helpful for new calculations that attempt to describe the low-lying levels in {sup 131}I from the decay of {sup 131g,m}Te.

Ruivo, J. C.; Zamboni, C. B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN / CNEN - SP) Av. Professor Lineu Prestes 2242 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, J. R. B. [Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brazil Travessa R da Rua do Matao 187 05508-090 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Heder Medina, Nilberto

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

64

Methods of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method of obtaining a radionuclide product selected from the group consisting of {sup 223}Ra and {sup 225}Ac, from a radionuclide ``cow`` of {sup 227}Ac or {sup 229}Th respectively. The method comprises the steps of (a) permitting ingrowth of at least one radionuclide daughter from said radionuclide ``cow`` forming an ingrown mixture; (b) insuring that the ingrown mixture is a nitric acid ingrown mixture; (c) passing the nitric acid ingrown mixture through a first nitrate form ion exchange column which permits separating the ``cow`` from at least one radionuclide daughter; (d) insuring that the at least one radionuclide daughter contains the radionuclide product; (e) passing the at least one radionuclide daughter through a second ion exchange column and separating the at least one radionuclide daughter from the radionuclide product and (f) recycling the at least one radionuclide daughter by adding it to the ``cow``. In one embodiment the radionuclide ``cow`` is the {sup 227}Ac, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a {sup 227}Th and the product radionuclide is the {sup 223}Ra and the first nitrate form ion exchange column passes the {sup 227}Ac and retains the {sup 227}Th. In another embodiment the radionuclide ``cow`` is the {sup 229}Th, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a {sup 225}Ra and said product radionuclide is the {sup 225}Ac and the {sup 225}Ac and nitrate form ion exchange column retains the {sup 229}Th and passes the {sup 225}Ra/Ac. 8 figs.

Bray, L.A.; Ryan, J.L.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Method of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method of removing an impurity of plutonium, lead or a combination thereof from a mixture of radionuclides that contains the impurity and at least one parent radionuclide. The method has the steps of (a) insuring that the mixture is a hydrochloric acid mixture; (b) oxidizing the acidic mixture and specifically oxidizing the impurity to its highest oxidation state; and (c) passing the oxidized mixture through a chloride form anion exchange column whereupon the oxidized impurity absorbs to the chloride form anion exchange column and the {sup 229}Th or {sup 227}Ac ``cow`` radionuclide passes through the chloride form anion exchange column. The plutonium is removed for the purpose of obtaining other alpha emitting radionuclides in a highly purified form suitable for medical therapy. In addition to plutonium, lead, iron, cobalt, copper, uranium, and other metallic cations that form chloride anionic complexes that may be present in the mixture are removed from the mixture on the chloride form anion exchange column. 8 figs.

Bray, L.A.; Ryan, J.L.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

66

Methods of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method of obtaining a radionuclide product selected from the group consisting of .sup.223 Ra and .sup.225 Ac, from a radionuclide "cow" of .sup.227 Ac or .sup.229 Th respectively. The method comprises the steps of a) permitting ingrowth of at least one radionuclide daughter from said radionuclide "cow" forming an ingrown mixture; b) insuring that the ingrown mixture is a nitric acid ingrown mixture; c) passing the nitric acid ingrown mixture through a first nitrate form ion exchange column which permits separating the "cow" from at least one radionuclide daughter; d) insuring that the at least one radionuclide daughter contains the radionuclide product; e) passing the at least one radionuclide daughter through a second ion exchange column and separating the at least one radionuclide daughter from the radionuclide product and f) recycling the at least one radionuclide daughter by adding it to the "cow". In one embodiment the radionuclide "cow" is the .sup.227 Ac, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a .sup.227 Th and the product radionuclide is the .sup.223 Ra and the first nitrate form ion exchange column passes the .sup.227 Ac and retains the .sup.227 Th. In another embodiment the radionuclide "cow"is the .sup.229 Th, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a .sup.225 Ra and said product radionuclide is the .sup.225 Ac and the .sup.225 Ac and nitrate form ion exchange column retains the .sup.229 Th and passes the .sup.225 Ra/Ac.

Bray, Lane A. (Richland, WA); Ryan, Jack L. (West Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

NREL Explores Earth-Abundant Materials for Future Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are using a theory-driven technique - sequential cation mutation - to understand the nature and limitations of promising solar cell materials that can replace today's technologies. Finding new materials that use Earth-abundant elements and are easily manufactured is important for large-scale solar electricity deployment.

Not Available

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas Pennsylvania, ex- amining natural gas concentrations and isotopic signatures with proximity to shale gas wells this transformation, with shale gas and other unconventional sources now yielding more than one- half of all US

Jackson, Robert B.

69

Abundance analysis of planetary host stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present atmospheric parameters and Fe abundances derived for the majority of dwarf stars (north of -30 degrees declination) which are up to now known to host extrasolar planets. High-resolution spectra have been obtained with the Sandiford Echelle spectrograph on the 2.1m telescope at the University of Texas McDonald Observatory. We have used the same model atmospheres, atomic data and equivalent width modeling program for the analysis of all stars. Abundances have been derived differentially to the Sun, using a solar spectrum obtained with Callisto as the reflector with the same instrumentation. A similar analysis has been performed for a sample of stars for which radial velocity data exclude the presence of a close-in giant planetary companion. The results are compared to the recent studies found in the literature.

U. Heiter; R. E. Luck

2002-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

70

Experimental Limit to Interstellar 244Pu Abundance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-lived nuclides, now extinct in the solar system, are expected to be present in the interstellar medium (ISM). Grains of ISM origin were recently discovered in the inner solar system and at Earth orbit and may accrete onto Earth after ablation in the atmosphere. A favorable matrix for detection of such extraterrestrial material is presented by deep open-sea sediments with very low sedimentation rates (0.8-3 mm/kyr). We report here on the measurement of Pu isotopic abundances in a 1-kg deep-sea dry sediment collected in 1992 in the North Pacific. Our measured value of (3+-3)x10^5 244Pu atoms in the Pu-separated fraction of the sample shows no excess over the expected stratospheric nuclear fallout content and under reasonable assumptions we derive a limit of 2x10^-11 g-244Pu/g-ISM for the abundance of 244Pu in ISM.

Paul, M; Ahmad, I; Berkovits, D; Bordeanu, C; Ghelberg, S; Hashimoto, Y; Hershcovitch, A I; Jiang, S; Nakanishi, T; Sakamoto, K

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Experimental Limit to Interstellar 244Pu Abundance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short-lived nuclides, now extinct in the solar system, are expected to be present in the interstellar medium (ISM). Grains of ISM origin were recently discovered in the inner solar system and at Earth orbit and may accrete onto Earth after ablation in the atmosphere. A favorable matrix for detection of such extraterrestrial material is presented by deep open-sea sediments with very low sedimentation rates (0.8-3 mm/kyr). We report here on the measurement of Pu isotopic abundances in a 1-kg deep-sea dry sediment collected in 1992 in the North Pacific. Our measured value of (3+-3)x10^5 244Pu atoms in the Pu-separated fraction of the sample shows no excess over the expected stratospheric nuclear fallout content and under reasonable assumptions we derive a limit of 2x10^-11 g-244Pu/g-ISM for the abundance of 244Pu in ISM.

M. Paul; A. Valenta; I. Ahmad; D. Berkovits; C. Bordeanu; S. Ghelberg; Y. Hashimoto; A. Hershkowitz; S. Jiang; T. Nakanishi; K. Sakamoto

2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

72

Sulfur, Chlorine, & Argon Abundances in Planetary Nebulae. IIB: Abundances in a Southern Sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have undertaken a large spectroscopic survey of over 80 planetary nebulae with the goal of providing a homogeneous spectroscopic database between 3600-9600 Angstroms, as well as a set of consistently determined abundances, especially for oxygen, sulfur, chlorine, and argon. In the current paper we calculate and report the S/O, Cl/O, and Ar/O abundance ratios for 45 southern planetary nebulae (predominantly Type II), using our own recently observed line strengths published in an earlier paper. One of the salient features of our work is the use of the NIR lines of [S III] 9069,9532 coupled with the [S III] temperature, to determine the S++ ionic abundance. We find the following average abundances for these objects: S/O=0.011(+/-0.0064), Cl/O=0.00031(+/-0.00012), and Ar/O=0.0051(+/-0.0020).

J. B. Milingo; R. B. C. Henry; K. B. Kwitter

2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

73

Monitored natural attenuation of manufactured gas plant tar mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ground water: a 14-year field study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site 24 was the subject of a 14-year (5110-day) study of a ground water plume created by the disposal of manufactured gas plant (MGP) tar into a shallow sandy aquifer approximately 25 years prior to the study. The ground water plume in 1988 extended from a well-defined source area to a distance of approximately 400 m down gradient. A system of monitoring wells was installed along six transects that ran perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the plume centerline. The MGP tar source was removed from the site in 1991 and a 14-year ground water monitored natural attenuation (MNA) study commenced. The program measured the dissolved mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs and PAHs) periodically over time, which decreased significantly over the 14-year period. Naphthalene decreased to less than 99% of the original dissolved mass, with mass degradation rates of 0.30 per year (half-life 2.3 years). Bulk attenuation rate constants for plume centerline concentrations over time ranged from 0.33 {+-} 0.09 per year (half-life 2.3 {+-} 0.8 years) for toluene and 0.45 {+-} 0.06 per year (half-life 1.6 {+-} 0.2 years) for naphthalene. The hydrogeologic setting at Site 24, having a sandy aquifer, shallow water table, clay confining layer, and aerobic conditions, was ideal for demonstrating MNA. However, these results demonstrate that MNA is a viable remedial strategy for ground water at sites impacted by MAHs and PAHs after the original source is removed, stabilized, or contained.

Neuhauser, E.F.; Ripp, J.A.; Azzolina, N.A.; Madsen, E.L.; Mauro, D.M.; Taylor, T. [Foth Infrastructure & Environment LLC, Green Bay, WI (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Natural gas production/consumption retrospective 2010 - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In 2010, the natural gas industry saw an abundance of production and strong consumption. On an average annual basis, marketed production of natural gas grew to 61.8 ...

75

$^7$Li Abundances in Halo Stars: Testing Stellar Evolution Models and the Primordial $^7$Li Abundance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large number of stellar evolution models with [Fe/H] = -2.3 and -3.3 have been calculated in order to determine the primordial $^7$Li abundance and to test current stellar evolution models by a comparison to the extensive database of Li abundances in extremely metal poor halo stars observed by Thorburn (1994). Standard models do a good job of fitting the observed Li abundances in stars hotter than 5600 K. They predict a primordial $^7$Li abundance of Log N(Li) = 2.24\\pm 0.03$. Models which include microscopic diffusion predict a downward curvature in the $^7$Li destruction isochrones at hot temperatures which is not present in the observations. Thus, the observations clearly rule out models which include uninhibited microscopic diffusion of $^7$Li from the surface of the star. The [Fe/H] = -2.3 stellar models which include both diffusion and rotational mixing provide an excellent match to the observations. Both the plateau stars and the heavily depleted cool stars are well fit by these models. The rotational mixing leads to considerable $^7$Li depletion in these models and the primordial $^7$Li abundance inferred from these models is Log N(Li) = $3.08\\pm 0.1$.

Brian Chaboyer; P. Demarque

1994-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

76

Lithium abundances in exoplanet-hosts stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exoplanet-host stars (EHS) are known to present surface chemical abundances different from those of stars without any detected planet (NEHS). EHS are, on the average, overmetallic compared to the Sun. The observations also show that, for cool stars, lithium is more depleted in EHS than in NEHS. The overmetallicity of EHS may be studied in the framework of two different scenarii. We have computed main sequence stellar models with various masses, metallicities and accretion rates. The results show different profiles for the lithium destruction according to the scenario. We compare these results to the spectroscopic observations of lithium.

M. Castro; S. Vauclair; O. Richard; N. C. Santos

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

77

Cosmological implications of light element abundances: Theory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Primordial nucleosynthesis provides (with the microwave background radiation) one of the two quantitative experimental tests of the hot Big Bang cosmological model (versus alternative explanations for the observed Hubble expansion). The standard homogeneous-isotopic calculation fits the light element abundances ranging from [sup 1]H at 76% and [sup 4]He at 24% by mass through [sup 2]H and [sup 3]He at parts in 10[sup 5] down to [sup 7]Li at parts in 10[sup 10]. It is also noted how the recent Large Electron Positron Collider (and Stanford Linear Collider) results on the number of neutrinos (N[sub [nu

Schramm, D.N. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States) Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A Simple Explanation for Taxon Abundance Patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For taxonomic levels higher than species, the abundance distributions of number of subtaxa per taxon tend to approximate power laws, but often show strong deviationns from such a law. Previously, these deviations were attributed to finite-time effects in a continuous time branching process at the generic level. Instead, we describe here a simple discrete branching process which generates the observed distributions and find that the distribution's deviation from power-law form is not caused by disequilibration, but rather that it is time-independent and determined by the evolutionary properties of the taxa of interest. Our model predicts-with no free parameters-the rank-frequency distribution of number of families in fossil marine animal orders obtained from the fossil record. We find that near power-law distributions are statistically almost inevitable for taxa higher than species. The branching model also sheds light on species abundance patterns, as well as on links between evolutionary processes, self-orga...

Chu, J; Chu, Johan; Adami, Christoph

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Rubidium and lead abundances in giant stars of the globular clusters M4 and M5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present measurements of the neutron-capture elements Rb and Pb for bright giants in the globular clusters M4 and M5. The clusters are of similar metallicity ([Fe/H] = -1.2) but M4 is decidedly s-process enriched relative to M5: [Ba/Fe] = +0.6 for M4 but 0.0 for M5. The Rb and Pb abundances were derived by comparing synthetic spectra with high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra obtained with MIKE on the Magellan telescope. Abundances of Y, Zr, La, and Eu were also obtained. In M4, the mean abundances from 12 giants are [Rb/Fe] = 0.39 +/- 0.02 (sigma = 0.07), [Rb/Zr] = 0.17 +/- 0.03 (sigma = 0.08), and [Pb/Fe] = 0.30 +/- 0.02 (sigma = 0.07). In M5, the mean abundances from two giants are [Rb/Fe] = 0.00 +/- 0.05 (sigma = 0.06), [Rb/Zr] = 0.08 +/- 0.08 (sigma = 0.11), and [Pb/Fe] = -0.35 +/- 0.02 (sigma = 0.04). Within the measurement uncertainties, the abundance ratios [Rb/Fe], [Pb/Fe] and [Rb/X] for X = Y, Zr, La are constant from star-to-star in each cluster and none of these ratios are correlated with O or Na abundances. While M4 has a higher Rb abundance than M5, the ratios [Rb/X] are similar in both clusters indicating that the nature of the s-products are very similar for each cluster but the gas from which M4's stars formed had a higher concentration of these products.

David Yong; David L. Lambert; Diane B. Paulson; Bruce W. Carney

2007-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

80

Abundant Renewable Energy ARE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ARE ARE Jump to: navigation, search Name Abundant Renewable Energy (ARE) Place Newberg, Oregon Zip 97132 Sector Solar, Wind energy Product Oregon-based provider of wind turbines, wind towers and dealers for wind turbines as well as solar passive heating systems. Coordinates 45.300325°, -122.975574° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.300325,"lon":-122.975574,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

Abundances at High Redshifts: the Chemical Enrichment History of Damped Lyman-alpha Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Damped Lyman-alpha absorption systems found in the spectra of high redshift quasars are believed to trace the interstellar gas in high redshift galaxies. In this paper, we study the elemental abundances of C, N, O, Al, Si, S, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Zn in a sample of 14 damped Lyman-alpha systems using high quality echelle spectra of quasars obtained with the 10m Keck telescope. These abundances are combined with similar measurements in the literature in order to investigate the chemical evolution of damped Lyman-alpha galaxies in the redshift range 0.7nature of the star formation process in damped Lyman-alpha galaxies, and the nature of damped Lyman-alpha galaxies themselves.

Limin Lu; Wallace L. W. Sargent; Thomas A. Barlow

1996-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

82

Relationship of Course Woody Debris to Red-Cockaded Woodpecker Prey Diversity and Abundance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The abundance of diversity of prey commonly used by the red-cockaded woodpecker were monitored in experimental plots in which course woody debris was manipulated. In one treatment, all the woody debris over four inches was removed. In the second treatment, the natural amount of mortality remained intact. The overall diversity of prey was unaffected; however, wood roaches were significantly reduced by removal of woody debris. The latter suggests that intensive utilizations or harvesting practices may reduce foraging.

Horn, G.S.

1999-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

83

Multiple factors push Western Europe to use less natural gas and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Abundant supply: The availability of low-priced natural gas in the United States has made coal a less competitive fuel for domestic power generation.

84

Halo Star Abundances and r-Process Synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review recent observational studies of heavy element abundances in low metallicity stars and explore some implications of these results for nucleosynthesis and early Galactic chemical evolution.

J. W. Truran; J. J. Cowan; B. D. Fields

2001-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

85

Searching, naturally  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: artificial intelligence, computational linguistics, information retrieval, knowledge representation, natural language processing, text processing

Eileen E. Allen

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 21, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 13, 2011) As the story of abundant natural gas supply continued to provide headlines for the market this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, April 6-13), spot prices at most market locations in the lower 48 States decreased. Moderate temperatures also likely contributed to the price declines by limiting end-use demand and allowing for replenishment of storage supplies. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by 3 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or less than 1 percent, to $4.14 per MMBtu. Other market prices also decreased by up to 10 cents per MMBtu, with a few exceptions in the U.S. Northeast.

87

INTRODUCTION Information on the abundance of large whales in Greenland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for abundance estimates from these surveys and no abundance estimates were calculated. After this, aerial when survey conditions are optimal in Greenlandic waters. Between 1983 and 1993, visual aerial surveys (Larsen, 1995). In 2002 and 2004, visual aerial photographic surveys were conducted (Witting and Kingsley

Laidre, Kristin L.

88

Sulfur, Chlorine, & Argon Abundances in Planetary Nebulae. I: Observations and Abundances in a Northern Sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is the first of a series specifically studying the abundances of sulfur, chlorine, and argon in Type II planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Galactic disk. Ratios of S/O, Cl/O, and Ar/O constitute important tests of differential nucleosynthesis of these elements and serve as strict constraints on massive star yield predictions. We present new ground-based optical spectra extending from 3600-9600 Angstroms for a sample of 19 Type II northern PNe. This range includes the strong near infrared lines of [S III] 9069,9532, which allows us to test extensively their effectiveness as sulfur abundance indicators. We also introduce a new, model-tested ionization correction factor for sulfur. For the present sample, we find average values of S/O=1.2E-2(+/- 0.71E-2), Cl/O=3.3E-4(+/- 1.6E-4), and Ar/O=5.0E-3(+/- 1.9E-3).

K. B. Kwitter; R. B. C. Henry

2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

89

Natural Gas as a Boiler Fuel of Choice in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas is abundant, clean burning, and cost competitive with other fuels. In addition to superior economic fundamentals, the expanded use of natural gas will be enhanced by political and industry leaders. Natural gas therefore will continue to be the boiler fuel choice for Texas electric generating companies.

Kmetz, W. J.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

THE SOLAR HEAVY ELEMENT ABUNDANCES. II. CONSTRAINTS FROM STELLAR ATMOSPHERES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of the bulk metal abundance of the Sun derived from the latest generation of model atmospheres are significantly lower than the earlier standard values. In Paper I, we demonstrated that helioseismic data combined with stellar interiors theory set strong bounds on the solar metal abundance. The seismically derived abundances are inconsistent with the low photospheric abundances if the quoted errors in the atmospheric models (of order 0.05 dex) are correct. In this paper, we undertake a critical analysis of the solar metallicity and its uncertainty from a model atmospheric perspective, focusing on CNO. We argue that the non-LTE (NLTE) corrections for abundances derived from atomic features are overestimated in the recent abundance studies, while systematic errors in the absolute abundances are underestimated. In general, abundances derived from molecular features are lower than those derived from atomic features for the three-dimensional hydro models, while a weaker trend in the opposite direction tends to hold for abundances derived from one-dimensional models. If we adopt the internal consistency between different indicators as a measure of goodness of fit, we obtain intermediate abundances [C/H] = 8.44 +- 0.06, [N/H] = 7.96 +- 0.10 and [O/H] = 8.75 +- 0.08. The errors reflect the fact that both the high and low scales are internally consistent within the errors, and they are too large to conclude that there is a solar abundance problem. However, the center-to-limb continuum flux variations predicted in the simulations appear to be inconsistent with solar data based on recently published work. This would favor the traditional thermal structure and lead to high CNO abundances of (8.52, 7.96, 8.80) close to the seismic scale. We argue that further empirical tests of NLTE corrections and the thermal structure are required for precise absolute abundances. The sensitivity of the simulations to spatial resolution and systematic errors in the underlying atmospheric physics should also be examined, and these effects may lead to an overestimate of the impact of convective overshooting on the thermal structure of the outer layers of the solar atmosphere. The uncertainties in the solar oxygen also imply that strong conclusions about the absence of solar beryllium depletion cannot be made.

Pinsonneault, M. H. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Delahaye, Franck [CEA, IRFU, Serv. Astrophys., F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

91

Abundance trends in the thin and thick disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Milky Way harbours two disks that appear distinct concerning scale-heights, kinematics, and elemental abundance patterns. Recent years have seen a surge of studies of the elemental abundance trends in the disks using high resolution spectroscopy. Here I will review and discuss the currently available data. Special focus will also be put on how we define stars to be members of either disk, and how current models of galaxy formation favour that thick disks are formed from several accreted bodies. The ability for the stellar abundance trends to test such predictions are discussed.

Sofia Feltzing

2004-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

92

NREL: Wind Research - Abundant Renewable Energy's ARE 442 Wind Turbine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abundant Renewable Energy's ARE 442 Wind Turbine Testing and Results Abundant Renewable Energy's ARE 442 Wind Turbine Testing and Results Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. A video of Abundant Renewable Energy's ARE 442 wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL tested Abundant Renewable Energy's ARE 442 turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The ARE 442 is a 10-kilowatt (kW), three-bladed, horizontal-axis upwind small wind turbine. It has a hub height of 30.9 meters and a rotor diameter of 7.2 meters. The turbine has a single-phase permanent-magnet generator that operates at variable voltages up to 410 volts AC. Testing Summary The summary of the tests is below with the final reports.

93

Mechanical Properties of Lower-cost, Earth-abundant Chalcogenide ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Mechanical Properties of Lower-cost, Earth-abundant Chalcogenide Thermoelectric Materials, PbSe and PbS, with Additions of 0 to 4% CdS ...

94

A New Earth-Abundant Semiconductor for Solar Energy Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, G2, ZnSnN2: A New Earth-Abundant Semiconductor for Solar Energy Conversion. Author(s), Lise Lahourcade, Naomi C Coronel, Harry A ...

95

Source apportionment of atmospheric PAHs in the Western Balkans by natural abundance radiocarbon analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress in source apportionment of priority combustion-derived atmospheric pollutants can be made by an inverse approach to inventory emissions, namely, receptor-based compound class-specific radiocarbon analysis (CCSRA) of target pollutants. In the present study, CCSRA of the combustion-derived polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in the atmosphere of the countries of the former republic of Yugoslavia was performed. The carbon stable isotope composition ({delta}{sup 13}C) of PAHs varied between -27.68 and -27.19{per_thousand}, whereas {Delta}{sup 14}C values ranged from -568{per_thousand} for PAHs sampled in Kosovo to -288{per_thousand} for PAHs sampled in the Sarajevo area. The application of an isotopic mass balance model to these {Delta}{sup 14}C data revealed a significant contribution (35-65%) from the combustion of non-fossil material to the atmospheric PAH pollution, even in urban and industrialized areas. Furthermore, consistency was observed between the isotopic composition of PAHs obtained by high-volume sampling and those collected by passive sampling. This encourages the use of passive samplers for CCSRA applications. This marks the first time that a CCSRA investigation could be executed on a geographically wide scale, providing a quantitative field-based source apportionment, which points out that also non-fossil combustion processes should be targeted for remedial action. 36 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Zdenek Zencak; Jana Klanova; Ivan Holoubek; Oerjan Gustafsson [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden). Department of Applied Environmental Science

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Natural abundance radiocarbon studies of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the marine environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power of radiocarbon in biogeochemical studies of the marinepower of radiocarbon in biogeochemical studies of the marine

De Jesus, Roman Paul

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Natural Abundance Radiocarbon Studies of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) in the Marine Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power of radiocarbon in biogeochemical studies of the marinepower of radiocarbon in biogeochemical studies of the marine

de Jesus, Roman P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Macroinvertebrate Abundance and Biomass: 2007 Data, BPA-51; Preliminary Report, February 10, 2009..  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four Excel files containing information on the 2007 macroinvertebrate data were initially provided to Statistical Consulting Services (SCS) by EcoAnalysts on 1/27/2009. These data files contained information on abundance and biomass data at the level of taxonomic groups. The data were subsequently reformatted and compiled, and aggregated for analysis by SCS. All descriptions and analyses below relate to this compiled data. Computations were carried out separately for each site over all sample periods. Basic summary information for both the abundance and biomass data is presented in Print Out No.2. The 14 sites varied widely in their minimum, mean, maximum and variance values. The number of observations ranged from 10 to 18. Some large abundance values (abundance > 40,000) were noted for sites KR6 and KR13. A more detailed summary of each site is given in Print Out No.3. Site KR3, for example, had a mean abundance of 6914 with a sample size of 17. The variance was 4591991 and the standard error of the mean was 1643. The skewness value, a measure of symmetry for the frequency distribution, was moderately large at 1.29 indicating an asymmetric distribution. Biomass for KR3 had a mean value of 0.87 g/m{sup 2} with 17 observations. The variance was 0.8872 and the standard error was 0.228 g/m{sup 2}. Skewness for biomass was also high at 1.29. Further examination of the quantiles and frequency plots for abundance and biomass also indicate considerable skewness. The stem and leaf diagram (frequency plot) for abundance in KR3 shows most of the data centered on smaller values with a few very large counts. The distribution for biomass has a similar pattern. Statistical tests for normality are significant for both response variables in KR3, thus, the hypothesis that the data originates from a symmetric normal distribution is rejected. Because sample size estimation and statistical inference assume normally distributed data, a transformation of the data is required prior to further analysis. As was the case for previous years, the natural logarithm was chosen as a transformation to mitigate distributional skewness. Abundance and biomass for the remaining sites were also notably skewed, therefore, these data were also log transformed prior to analysis. Summary information for the transformed data (referred to as L-abun and L-bio for abundance and biomass, respectively) are given in Print Out No.4. For site KR3, the logarithmic transformation reduced skewness value for biomass to -0.66. The distributions of abundance and biomass in the other sites also generally showed improvement as well. Hence, all subsequent statistical analyses reported here will be based on the log transformed data.

Holderman, Charles

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

99

Carbon and Strontium Abundances of Metal-Poor Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present carbon and strontium abundances for 100 metal-poor stars measured from R$\\sim $7000 spectra obtained with the Echellette Spectrograph and Imager at the Keck Observatory. Using spectral synthesis of the G-band region, we have derived carbon abundances for stars ranging from [Fe/H]$=-1.3$ to [Fe/H]$=-3.8$. The formal errors are $\\sim 0.2$ dex in [C/Fe]. The strontium abundance in these stars was measured using spectral synthesis of the resonance line at 4215 {\\AA}. Using these two abundance measurments along with the barium abundances from our previous study of these stars, we show it is possible to identify neutron-capture-rich stars with our spectra. We find, as in other studies, a large scatter in [C/Fe] below [Fe/H]$ = -2$. Of the stars with [Fe/H]$carbon-rich metal-poor stars. The Sr and Ba abundances show that three of the carbon-rich stars are neutron-capture-rich, while two have normal Ba and Sr. This fraction of carbon enhanced stars is consistent with other studies that include this metallicity range.

David K. Lai; Jennifer A. Johnson; Michael Bolte; Sara Lucatello

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

100

THE SOLAR FLARE SULFUR ABUNDANCE FROM RESIK OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The RESIK instrument on CORONAS-F spacecraft observed several sulfur X-ray lines in three of its four channels covering the wavelength range 3.8-6.1 A during solar flares. The fluxes are analyzed to give the sulfur abundance. Data are chosen for when the instrument parameters were optimized. The measured fluxes of the S XV 1s{sup 2}-1s4p (w4) line at 4.089 A gives A(S) = 7.16 {+-} 0.17 (abundances on a logarithmic scale with A(H) = 12) which we consider to be the most reliable. Estimates from other lines range from 7.13 to 7.24. The preferred S abundance estimate is very close to recent photospheric abundance estimates and to quiet-Sun solar wind and meteoritic abundances. This implies no fractionation of sulfur by processes tending to enhance the coronal abundance from the photospheric that depend on the first ionization potential (FIP), or that sulfur, though its FIP has an intermediate value of 10.36 eV, acts like a 'high-FIP' element.

Sylwester, J.; Sylwester, B. [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, 51-622, Kopernika 11, Wroclaw (Poland); Phillips, K. J. H. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Kuznetsov, V. D., E-mail: js@cbk.pan.wroc.pl, E-mail: bs@cbk.pan.wroc.pl, E-mail: kjhp@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: kvd@izmiran.ru [Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism and Radiowave Propagation (IZMIRAN), Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

SPATIAL VARIATIONS OF DUST ABUNDANCES ACROSS THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD  

SciTech Connect

Using the data obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of the Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) legacy survey, we have studied the variations of the dust composition and abundance across the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Such variations are expected, as the explosive events which have lead to the formation of the many H I shells observed should have affected the dust properties. Using a model and comparing with a reference spectral energy distribution from our Galaxy, we deduce the relative abundance variations of small dust grains across the LMC. We examined the infrared color ratios as well as the relative abundances of very small grains (VSGs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) relative to the big grain abundance. Results show that each dust component could have different origins or evolution in the interstellar medium (ISM). The VSG abundance traces the star formation activity and could result from shattering of larger grains, whereas the PAH abundance increases around molecular clouds as well as in the stellar bar, where they could have been injected into the ISM during mass loss from old stars.

Paradis, Deborah; Reach, William T. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bernard, Jean-Philippe [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, CESR, 9 av. du Colonel Roche, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); Block, Miwa; Engelbracht, Chad W.; Gordon, Karl [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hora, Joseph L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., MS-65, Cambridge, MA, 02138-1516 (United States); Indebetouw, Remy [7 National Radio Astronomy Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3818, Charlottesville, VA 22903-0818 (United States); Kawamura, Akiko [Nagoya University, Department of Astrophysics, Chikusa-Ku, Nagoya, 464-01 (Japan); Meade, Marilyn [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 475 N. Charter St., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Meixner, Margaret; Sewilo, Marta [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Vijh, Uma P. [Ritter Astrophysical Research Center, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Volk, Kevin [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 N. Aohuku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

DIRECT EVALUATION OF THE HELIUM ABUNDANCES IN OMEGA CENTAURI  

SciTech Connect

A direct measure of the helium abundances from the near-infrared transition of He I at 1.08 {mu}m is obtained for two nearly identical red giant stars in the globular cluster Omega Centauri. One star exhibits the He I line; the line is weak or absent in the other star. Detailed non-local thermal equilibrium semi-empirical models including expansion in spherical geometry are developed to match the chromospheric H{alpha}, H{beta}, and Ca II K lines, in order to predict the helium profile and derive a helium abundance. The red giant spectra suggest a helium abundance of Y {<=} 0.22 (LEID 54064) and Y = 0.39-0.44 (LEID 54084) corresponding to a difference in the abundance {Delta}Y {>=} 0.17. Helium is enhanced in the giant star (LEID 54084) that also contains enhanced aluminum and magnesium. This direct evaluation of the helium abundances gives observational support to the theoretical conjecture that multiple populations harbor enhanced helium in addition to light elements that are products of high-temperature hydrogen burning. We demonstrate that the 1.08 {mu}m He I line can yield a helium abundance in cool stars when constraints on the semi-empirical chromospheric model are provided by other spectroscopic features.

Dupree, A. K.; Avrett, E. H., E-mail: dupree@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: eavrett@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

103

Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department supports research and policy options to ensure environmentally sustainable domestic and global supplies of oil and natural gas.

104

ESTIMATED UPPER BOUNDS TO THE HALF-LIFE OF THERMAL DECOMPOSITION OF AMMONIA, HYDROGEN, METHANE, AND PROPANE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An estimate was made of the upper bound for the half-time of dissociation at 100 atm for ammonia, methane, and propane at 2500 deg K and hydrogen at 5000 deg K. In each case a unimolecular reactron in the homogeneous gas phase was chosen as most suitable for this purpose. Slater's theory has been used to estimate the necessary frequency factors. The upper bounds to the half- time for dissociation range from 3 x 10/sup -7/ to 6 x 10/sup -6/ sec. Extrapolation of decomposition rate data obtained at --1000 deg C and 1 atm pressure gives smaller values for the half-time of dissociation. (auth)

Herschbach, D.

1955-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

High?precision ? decay half?life measurements of proton?rich nuclei for testing the CVC hypothesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental study of super?allowed nuclear ? decays serves as a sensitive probe of the conservation of the weak vector current (CVC) and allows tight limits to be set on the presence of scalar or right?handed currents. Once CVC is verified

T. Kurtukian?Nieto; NEX group of CENBG

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Measurement of the Double-Beta Decay Half-life of 136Xe in KamLAND-Zen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with con- tamination by fallout from the Fukushima-I reactormaterials by Fukushima fallout, which include 110m Ag. OnePo- tential backgrounds from fallout nuclei with half-lives

Gando, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Measurement of the Double-Beta Decay Half-life of 136Xe in KamLAND-Zen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by fallout from the Fukushima-I reactor accident in Marchof detector materials by Fukushima fallout, which includeCo are not detected near Fukushima or our soil samples, we

Gando, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Variation in foliar 15N abundance and the availability of soil nitrogen on Walker Branch Watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial patterns in natural {sup 15}N abundance ({sup o}{sup 15}N) in soil, soil solutions, and non-N{sub 2}-fixing plants were studied in the deciduous forest on Walker Branch Watershed near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that foliar {sup o}{sup 15}N values are related to the availability of inorganic nitrogen in mineral soil. Soils collected in or near valley bottoms on the watershed had higher levels of net nitrogen mineralization and net nitrification potential than those sampled from ridges and slopes. More positive foliar {sup o}{sup 15}N values occurred in valley bottoms, which, relative to other positions on the watershed, were characterized by greater availability of soil nitrogen and lower C-to-N ratios in the O{sub i}-horizon, in the surface mineral soil, and in autumn leaf fall. Although leaf nitrogen concentrations changed significantly over the course of the growing season, there was little seasonal variation in foliar {sup o}{sup 15}N values. A hypothesis about the relative importance of different sources of nitrogen to the forest and how nitrogen cycling varies with topography in this nitrogen-deficient ecosystem was derived, in part, from spatial patterns in natural {sup 15}N abundance. There appear to be two processes affecting the topographic patterns in foliar {sup 15}N abundance on this watershed: (1) greater uptake from isotopically heavy pools of inorganic soil nitrogen by plants in valley bottoms, and (2) uptake of isotopically light ammonium-N in atmospheric deposition by plants on ridges and slopes (where the availability of inorganic soil nitrogen to plant roots is more limited). Results from this study indicate that foliar {sup o}{sup 15}N values are positively correlated with net nitrification potential in surface soil.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours 6

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski Usnic; Adam Sieminski Usnic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Under the baseline winter weather scenario, EIA expects end-of-October working gas inventories will total 3,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and end March ...

111

Natural Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

originate? I need to give the intitial natural source of this energy. Replies: The energy source for most known organisms is the sun. Some organisms, such as deep-sea vent fauna...

112

Chemical Abundances of RR Lyrae Type C Star AS162158  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the first extensive model atmosphere and detailed chemical abundance study of eight RR Lyrae variable stars of c subclass throughout their pulsation cycles. Atmospheric parameters effective temperature, surface gravity, microturbulent velocity, and metallicity have been derived. Spectra for this abundace analysis have been obtained with the echelle spectrograph of 100-inch du Pont telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. We have found metallicities and element abundance ratios to be constant within observational uncertainties at all phases of all stars. Moreover, the $\\alpha$-element and Fe-group abundance ratios with respect to iron are consistent with other horizontal-branch members (RRab, blue and red non-variables). The [Fe/H] values of these eight RRc stars have been used to anchor the metallicity scale of a much larger sample of RRc stars obtained with low S/N "snapshot" spectra.

Govea, Jose; Preston, George W; Sneden, Christopher

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

From primordial $^4$He abundance to the Higgs field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We constrain the possible time variation of the Higgs vacuum expectation value ($v$) by recent results on the primordial $^4$He abundance ($Y_P$). For that, we improve the analytic models of the key-processes in our previous analytic calculation of the primordial $^4$He abundance. Furthermore, the latest results on the neutron decay, the baryon to photon ratio based on 5-year WMAP observations and a new dependence of the deuteron binding energy on $v$ are incorporated. Finally, we approximate the weak freeze-out, the cross section of photo-disintegration of the deuteron, the mean lifetime of the free neutron, the mass difference of neutron and proton, the Fermi coupling constant, the mass of the electron and the binding energy of the deuteron by terms of $v$, to constrain its possible time variation by recent results on the primordial $^4$He abundance: $|\\frac{\\Delta v}{v}| ~ \\leq 1.5 \\cdot 10^{-4}$.

Josef M. Gaßner; Harald Lesch; Hartmuth Arenhövel

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

114

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 29, 2007) 15, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 29, 2007) Natural gas spot prices decreased this week, with the changes at most market locations somewhat more modest than the price changes observed over the past couple weeks. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, November 7-14), the price at the Henry Hub decreased 15 cents per MMBtu or about 2 percent. Relatively abundant supplies in the West and high stock levels in storage helped to drive spot prices lower this week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for December delivery moved up about 21 cents to $7.835 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage was 3,536 Bcf as of Friday, November 9, which is 8.4 percent higher than the 5-year average of 3,263 Bcf. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased on the week by $2.44 per barrel or about 3 percent to trade yesterday at $94.02 per barrel or $16.21 per MMBtu.

115

Mercury and platinum abundances in mercury-manganese stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report new results for the elemental and isotopic abundances of the normally rare elements mercury and platinum in HgMn stars. Typical overabundances can be 4 dex or more. The isotopic patterns do not follow the fractionation model of White et al (1976).

C. M. Jomaron; M. M. Dworetsky; D. A. Bohlender

1998-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

116

Carbon Abundances in the Galactic Thin and Thick Disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although carbon is, together with oxygen and nitrogen, one of the most important elements in the study of galactic chemical evolution its production sites are still poorly known and have been much debated (see e.g. Gustafsson et al. 1999; Chiappini et al. 2003). To trace the origin and evolution of carbon we have determined carbon abundances from the forbidden [C I] line at 8727 A and made comparisons to oxygen abundances from the forbidden [O I] line at 6300 A in a sample of 51 nearby F and G dwarf stars. These data and the fact that the forbidden [C I] and [O I] lines are very robust abundance indicators (they are essentially insensitive to deviations from LTE and uncertainties in the stellar parameters, see, e.g., Gustafsson et al. 1999; Asplund et al. 2005) enable us to very accurately measure the C/O ratio as well as individual C and O abundances. Our first results indicate that the time-scale for the main source that contribute to the carbon enrichment of the interstellar medium operate on the same time-scale as those that contribute to the iron enrichment (and can possibly be AGB stars...)

T. Bensby; S. Feltzing

2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

117

GASEOUS CO ABUNDANCE-AN EVOLUTIONARY TRACER FOR MOLECULAR CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect

Planck cold clumps are among the most promising objects to investigate the initial conditions of the evolution of molecular clouds. In this work, by combing the dust emission data from the survey of the Planck satellite with the molecular data of {sup 12}CO/{sup 13}CO/C{sup 18}O (1-0) lines from observations with the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m telescope, we investigate the CO abundance, CO depletion, and CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor of 674 clumps in the early cold cores sample. The median and mean values of the CO abundance are 0.89 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} and 1.28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, respectively. The mean and median of CO depletion factor are 1.7 and 0.9, respectively. The median value of X{sub CO-to-H{sub 2}} for the whole sample is 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} K{sup -1} km{sup -1} s. The CO abundance, CO depletion factor, and CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor are strongly (anti-)correlated to other physical parameters (e.g., dust temperature, dust emissivity spectral index, column density, volume density, and luminosity-to-mass ratio). To conclude, the gaseous CO abundance can be used as an evolutionary tracer for molecular clouds.

Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei, E-mail: liutiepku@gmail.com, E-mail: ywu@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

118

Aerial Surveys to Estimate Abundance of Wintering Waterfowl in Mississippi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Aerial Surveys to Estimate Abundance of Wintering Waterfowl in Mississippi Aaron Pearse, Rick Kaminski, Steve Dinsmore, and Ken Reinecke Monitoring Waterfowl · Banding program · Breeding-ground survey(s) · Hunter surveys · Wintering waterfowl surveys Objectives Design Evaluate Application 1) Sampling 2

Gray, Matthew

119

Accurate estimation of abundance of cetaceans from survey data requires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to both survey design and analysis (Buckland et al., 2001). Aerial surveys of cetaceans depend on rapid- tion of abundance. We present here the results of a series of aerial surveys designed to estimate survey, an object or group of objects is encountered, an aerial observer has only a few seconds

120

Natural System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural System Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development - FY11 Progress Report Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Program Yifeng Wang (SNL) Michael Simpson (INL) Scott Painter (LANL) Hui-Hai Liu (LBNL) Annie B. Kersting (LLNL) July 15, 2011 FCRD-USED-2011-000223 UFD Natural System Evaluation - FY11 Year-End Report July 15, 2011 2 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

U-235 CONTENT OF NATURAL URANIUM. PART I. REPORT OF WORKS LABORATORY DEPARTMENT. PART II. REPORT OF PHYSICS RESEARCH DEPARTMENT  

SciTech Connect

Mass spectrometric comparisons were made of the relative isotopic abundances in natural U with the relative abundances in synthetic standards of known isotopic content. Results are presented from two simultaneous investigations by independent groups. Values obtained were 0.7113 and 0.7117 for the weight% of U/sup 235/ in natural U. (C.H.)

Boardman, W.W.; Meservey, A.B.

1948-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

134,294 32,451 0.37 0 0.00 32 1.09 43,764 0.83 10,456 0.38 39,786 1.26 126,488 0.63 C o n n e c t i c u t Connecticut 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Connecticut, 1992-1996...

123

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.91 119,251 0.60 229 7.81 374,824 7.15 2,867 0.10 189,966 6.01 915,035 4.57 O h i o Ohio 83. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Ohio, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996...

124

Natural games  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Behavior in the context of game theory is described as a natural process that follows the 2nd law of thermodynamics. The rate of entropy increase as the payoff function is derived from statistical physics of open systems. The thermodynamic formalism relates everything in terms of energy and describes various ways to consume free energy. This allows us to associate game theoretical models of behavior to physical reality. Ultimately behavior is viewed as a physical process where flows of energy naturally select ways to consume free energy as soon as possible. This natural process is, according to the profound thermodynamic principle, equivalent to entropy increase in the least time. However, the physical portrayal of behavior does not imply determinism. On the contrary, evolutionary equation for open systems reveals that when there are three or more degrees of freedom for behavior, the course of a game is inherently unpredictable in detail because each move affects motives of moves in the future. Eventually, when no moves are found to consume more free energy, the extensive-form game has arrived at a solution concept that satisfies the minimax theorem. The equilibrium is Lyapunov-stable against variation in behavior within strategies but will be perturbed by a new strategy that will draw even more surrounding resources to the game. Entropy as the payoff function also clarifies motives of collaboration and subjective nature of decision making.

Jani Anttila; Arto Annila

2011-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

125

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0.00 53 1.81 147,893 2.82 7,303 0.27 93,816 2.97 398,581 1.99 W i s c o n s i n Wisconsin 97. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wisconsin, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994...

126

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

10,799 1,953 0.02 0 0.00 0 0.00 2,523 0.05 24 0.00 2,825 0.09 7,325 0.04 V e r m o n t Vermont 93. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Vermont, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995...

127

Natural Gas  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

845,998 243,499 2.75 135,000 0.68 35 1.19 278,606 5.32 7,239 0.26 154,642 4.90 684,022 3.42 P e n n s y l v a n i a Pennsylvania 86. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas...

128

The Formation of the First Low-Mass Stars From Gas With Low Carbon and Oxygen Abundances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first stars in the Universe are predicted to have been much more massive than the Sun. Gravitational condensation accompanied by cooling of the primordial gas due to molecular hydrogen, yields a minimum fragmentation scale of a few hundred solar masses. Numerical simulations indicate that once a gas clump acquires this mass, it undergoes a slow, quasi-hydrostatic contraction without further fragmentation. Here we show that as soon as the primordial gas - left over from the Big Bang - is enriched by supernovae to a carbon or oxygen abundance as small as ~0.01-0.1% of that found in the Sun, cooling by singly-ionized carbon or neutral oxygen can lead to the formation of low-mass stars. This mechanism naturally accommodates the discovery of solar mass stars with unusually low (10^{-5.3} of the solar value) iron abundance but with a high (10^{-1.3} solar) carbon abundance. The minimum stellar mass at early epochs is partially regulated by the temperature of the cosmic microwave background. The derived critical abundances can be used to identify those metal-poor stars in our Milky Way galaxy with elemental patterns imprinted by the first supernovae.

Volker Bromm; Abraham Loeb

2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

129

Shale oil and shale gas resources are globally abundant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. ...

130

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

131

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

132

NREL: News Feature - Sustainable Solutions Abundant in New Offices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Solutions Abundant in New Offices Sustainable Solutions Abundant in New Offices May 24, 2010 Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player. When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But that's what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus. In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S.

133

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 25, 2013 March 25, 2013 Image of how methane hydrates can form in arctic and marine environments. | Illustration by the Energy Department. Data from Alaska Test Could Help Advance Methane Hydrate R&D Methane Hydrates present an enormous energy resource. The Energy Department is working to advance technologies and reap the possible benefits for a more secure energy future. March 22, 2013 ARPA-E Announces $40 Million for Research Projects to Develop Cleaner and Cheaper Transportation Choices for Consumers Two New ARPA-E Programs Will Engage Nation's Brightest Scientists, Engineers and Entrepreneurs in Research Competition to Improve Vehicle Manufacturing Techniques and Natural Gas Conversion January 10, 2013 Today shale gas accounts for about 25 percent of our natural gas production. And experts believe this abundant supply will mean lower energy costs for millions of families; fewer greenhouse gas emissions; and more American jobs. | Photo courtesy of the EIA.

134

Solar Abundance of Elements from Neutron-Capture Cross Sections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excess lightweight products of slow neutron capture in the photosphere, over the mass range of 25 to 207 amu, confirm the solar mass separation recorded by excess lightweight isotopes in the solar wind, over the mass range of 3 to 136 amu [Solar Abundance of the Elements, Meteoritics, volume 18, 1983, pages 209 to 222]. Both measurements show that major elements inside the Sun are Fe, O, Ni, Si and S, like those in rocky planets.

O. Manuel; W. A. Myers; Y. Singh; M. Pleess

2004-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

135

Age and mass of solar twins constrained by lithium abundance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims. We analyze the non-standard mixing history of the solar twins HIP 55459, HIP 79672, HIP 56948, HIP 73815 and HIP 100963, in order to determine as precisely as possible their mass and age. Methods. We computed a grid of evolutionary models with non-standard mixing at given metallicities with the Toulouse-Geneva code for a range of stellar masses assuming an error bar of +- 50K in Teff. We choose the evolutionary model that best fit the observed low lithium abundances observed in the solar twins. Results. Our best model for each solar twin provides a mass and age solution constrained by their Li content and Teff determination. HIP 56948 is the best solar twin at the present time and our analysis gives a mass of 0.994 +- 0.004 Msun and an age of 4.71 +- 1.39 Gyr. Conclusions. Non-standard mixing is required to explain the low Li abundances observed in solar-twins. Li depletion due to the additional mixing in solar-twins is strongly mass dependent. An accurate lithium abundance measurement connected with no...

Nascimento, J D do; Melendez, J; Bazot, M; Théado, S; de Mello, G F Porto; De Medeiros, J R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Primordial Nucleosynthesis: The Predicted and Observed Abundances and Their Consequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a brief time in its early evolution the Universe was a cosmic nuclear reactor. The expansion and cooling of the Universe limited this epoch to the first few minutes, allowing time for the synthesis in astrophysically interesting abundances of only the lightest nuclides (D, 3He, 4He, 7Li). For big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) in the standard models of cosmology and particle physics (SBBN), the SBBN-predicted abundances depend on only one adjustable parameter, the baryon density parameter (the ratio by number of baryons (nucleons) to photons). The predicted and observed abundances of the relic light elements are reviewed, testing the internal consistency of primordial nucleosynthesis. The consistency of BBN is also explored by comparing the values of the cosmological parameters inferred from primordial nucleosynthesis for the standard model and for models with non-standard early Universe expansion rates with those determined from studies of the cosmic background radiation, which provides a snapshot of the Universe some 400 thousand years after BBN ended.

Gary Steigman

2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

137

Natural networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale-free and non-computable characteristics of natural networks are found to result from the least-time dispersal of energy. To consider a network as a thermodynamic system is motivated since ultimately everything that exists can be expressed in terms of energy. According to the variational principle, the network will grow and restructure when flows of energy diminish energy differences between nodes as well as relative to nodes in surrounding systems. The natural process will yield scale-free characteristics because the nodes that contribute to the least-time consumption of free energy preferably attach to each other. Network evolution is a path-dependent and non-deterministic process when there are two or more paths to consume a common source of energy. Although evolutionary courses of these non-Hamiltonian systems cannot be predicted, many mathematical functions, models and measures that characterize networks can be recognized as appropriate approximations of the thermodynamic equation of motion that has been derived from statistical physics of open systems.

Tuomo Hartonen; Arto Annila

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

138

Energy Department Projects Focus on Sustainable Natural Gas Development |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects Focus on Sustainable Natural Gas Projects Focus on Sustainable Natural Gas Development Energy Department Projects Focus on Sustainable Natural Gas Development January 10, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis Today shale gas accounts for about 25 percent of our natural gas production. And experts believe this abundant supply will mean lower energy costs for millions of families; fewer greenhouse gas emissions; and more American jobs. | Photo courtesy of the EIA. Today shale gas accounts for about 25 percent of our natural gas production. And experts believe this abundant supply will mean lower energy costs for millions of families; fewer greenhouse gas emissions; and more American jobs. | Photo courtesy of the EIA. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy What is RPSEA? The Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America - or RPSEA -

139

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

140

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

142

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

143

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

144

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

145

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

146

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

147

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

148

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

149

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

150

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

151

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

152

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

153

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

154

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

155

METHANE AND NITROGEN ABUNDANCES ON PLUTO AND ERIS  

SciTech Connect

We present spectra of Eris from the MMT 6.5 m Telescope and Red Channel Spectrograph (5700-9800 A, 5 A pixel{sup -1}) on Mt. Hopkins, AZ, and of Pluto from the Steward Observatory 2.3 m Telescope and Boller and Chivens Spectrograph (7100-9400 A, 2 A pixel{sup -1}) on Kitt Peak, AZ. In addition, we present laboratory transmission spectra of methane-nitrogen and methane-argon ice mixtures. By anchoring our analysis in methane and nitrogen solubilities in one another as expressed in the phase diagram of Prokhvatilov and Yantsevich, and comparing methane bands in our Eris and Pluto spectra and methane bands in our laboratory spectra of methane and nitrogen ice mixtures, we find Eris' bulk methane and nitrogen abundances are {approx}10% and {approx}90% and Pluto's bulk methane and nitrogen abundances are {approx}3% and {approx}97%. Such abundances for Pluto are consistent with values reported in the literature. It appears that the bulk volatile composition of Eris is similar to the bulk volatile composition of Pluto. Both objects appear to be dominated by nitrogen ice. Our analysis also suggests, unlike previous work reported in the literature, that the methane and nitrogen stoichiometry is constant with depth into the surface of Eris. Finally, we point out that our Eris spectrum is also consistent with a laboratory ice mixture consisting of 40% methane and 60% argon. Although we cannot rule out an argon-rich surface, it seems more likely that nitrogen is the dominant species on Eris because the nitrogen ice 2.15 {mu}m band is seen in spectra of Pluto and Triton.

Tegler, S. C.; Cornelison, D. M.; Abernathy, M. R.; Bovyn, M. J.; Burt, J. A.; Evans, D. E.; Maleszewski, C. K.; Thompson, Z. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 (United States); Grundy, W. M. [Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Romanishin, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Vilas, F., E-mail: Stephen.Tegler@nau.ed, E-mail: David.Cornelison@nau.ed, E-mail: W.Grundy@lowell.ed, E-mail: wjr@nhn.ou.ed, E-mail: fvilas@mmto.or [MMT Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

156

THE RAVE CATALOG OF STELLAR ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES: FIRST DATA RELEASE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present chemical elemental abundances for 36,561 stars observed by the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), an ambitious spectroscopic survey of our Galaxy at Galactic latitudes |b| > 25 Degree-Sign and with magnitudes in the range 9 pipeline in which the curve of growth of individual lines is obtained from a library of absorption line equivalent widths to construct a model spectrum that is then matched to the observed spectrum via a {chi}{sup 2} minimization technique. We plan to extend this pipeline to include estimates for other elements, such as oxygen and sulfur, in future data releases.

Boeche, C.; Williams, M.; De Jong, R. S.; Steinmetz, M. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Siebert, A.; Bienayme, O. [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Fulbright, J. P.; Ruchti, G. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bland-Hawthorn, J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Campbell, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States); Freeman, K. C. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australia National University, Weston Creek, Canberra ACT 2611 (Australia); Gibson, B. K. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Gilmore, G. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Grebel, E. K. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Helmi, A. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Munari, U. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Asiago I-36012 (Italy); Navarro, J. F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Seabroke, G. M. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury, St. Mary RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); and others

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Boron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beryllium Beryllium Previous Element (Beryllium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Carbon) Carbon Isotopes of the Element Boron [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 10 19.9% STABLE 11 80.1% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 6 No Data Available Double Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 7 3.255×10-22 seconds Proton Emission No Data Available Alpha Decay No Data Available 8 770 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 100.00% 9 8.439×10-19 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% Double Alpha Decay 100.00%

158

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Tungsten  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tantalum Tantalum Previous Element (Tantalum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Rhenium) Rhenium Isotopes of the Element Tungsten [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 180 0.12% >= 6.6×10+17 years 182 26.50% STABLE 183 14.31% > 1.3×10+19 years 184 30.64% STABLE 186 28.43% > 2.3×10+19 years Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 157 275 milliseconds Electron Capture No Data Available 158 1.25 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 158m 0.143 milliseconds Isomeric Transition No Data Available Alpha Decay No Data Available 159 7.3 milliseconds Alpha Decay ~ 99.90%

159

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boron Boron Previous Element (Boron) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Nitrogen) Nitrogen Isotopes of the Element Carbon [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 12 98.93% STABLE 13 1.07% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 8 1.981×10-21 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% Alpha Decay No Data Available 9 126.5 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 61.60% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 38.40% 10 19.308 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 11 20.334 minutes Electron Capture 100.00% 12 STABLE - -

160

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Rhenium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tungsten Tungsten Previous Element (Tungsten) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Osmium) Osmium Isotopes of the Element Rhenium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 185 37.40% STABLE 187 62.60% 4.33×10+10 years Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 159 No Data Available No Data Available No Data Available 160 0.82 milliseconds Proton Emission 91.00% Alpha Decay 9.00% 161 0.44 milliseconds Proton Emission 100.00% Alpha Decay <= 1.40% 161m 14.7 milliseconds Alpha Decay 93.00% Proton Emission 7.00% 162 107 milliseconds Alpha Decay 94.00% Electron Capture 6.00%

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Magnesium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sodium Sodium Previous Element (Sodium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Aluminum) Aluminum Isotopes of the Element Magnesium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 24 78.99% STABLE 25 10.00% STABLE 26 11.01% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 19 4.0 picoseconds Double Proton Emission 100.00% 20 90.8 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission ~ 27.00% 21 122 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 32.60% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay < 0.50%

162

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Chlorine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sulfur Sulfur Previous Element (Sulfur) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Argon) Argon Isotopes of the Element Chlorine [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 35 75.76% STABLE 37 24.24% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 28 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 29 < 20 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 30 < 30 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 31 150 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 0.70% 32 298 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

163

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Potassium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argon Argon Previous Element (Argon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Calcium) Calcium Isotopes of the Element Potassium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 39 93.2581% STABLE 40 0.0117% 1.248×10+9 years 41 6.7302% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 32 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 33 < 25 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 34 < 25 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 35 178 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 0.37% 36 342 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

164

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Phosphorus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silicon Silicon Previous Element (Silicon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sulfur) Sulfur Isotopes of the Element Phosphorus [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 31 100% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 24 No Data Available Electron Capture (suspected) No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 25 < 30 nanoseconds Proton Emission 100.00% 26 43.7 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission No Data Available 27 260 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with

165

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Previous Element (Nitrogen) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Fluorine) Fluorine Isotopes of the Element Oxygen [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 16 99.757% STABLE 17 0.038% STABLE 18 0.205% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 12 1.139×10-21 seconds Proton Emission No Data Available 13 8.58 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 100.00% 14 70.620 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 15 122.24 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 16 STABLE - - 17 STABLE - - 18 STABLE - - 19 26.88 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

166

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Gallium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zinc Zinc Previous Element (Zinc) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Germanium) Germanium Isotopes of the Element Gallium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 69 60.108% STABLE 71 39.892% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 56 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 57 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 58 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 59 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 60 70 milliseconds Electron Capture 98.40%

167

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Sodium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neon Neon Previous Element (Neon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Magnesium) Magnesium Isotopes of the Element Sodium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 23 100% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 18 1.3×10-21 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% 19 < 40 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 20 447.9 milliseconds Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 20.05% Electron Capture 100.00% 21 22.49 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 22 2.6027 years Electron Capture 100.00% 23 STABLE - - 24 14.997 hours Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

168

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Neon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fluorine Fluorine Previous Element (Fluorine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sodium) Sodium Isotopes of the Element Neon [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 20 90.48% STABLE 21 0.27% STABLE 22 9.25% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 16 9×10-21 seconds Double Proton Emission 100.00% 17 109.2 milliseconds Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay No Data Available Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 100.00% 18 1.6670 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 19 17.22 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 20 STABLE - -

169

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Copper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nickel Nickel Previous Element (Nickel) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Zinc) Zinc Isotopes of the Element Copper [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 63 69.15% STABLE 65 30.85% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 52 No Data Available Proton Emission No Data Available 53 < 300 nanoseconds Electron Capture No Data Available Proton Emission No Data Available 54 < 75 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 55 27 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 15.0% 56 93 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

170

The Primordial Abundance of $^6$Li and $^9$be  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light element ($^6$Li, $^7$Li and $^9$Be) depletion isochrones for halo stars have been calculated with standard stellar evolution models. These models include the latest available opacities and are computed through the sub-giant branch. If $^6$Li is not produced in appreciable amounts by stellar flares, then the detection of $^6$Li in HD 84937 by Smith, Lambert \\& Nissen (1993) is compatible with standard stellar evolution and standard big bang nucleosynthesis only if HD 84937 is a sub-giant. The present parallax is inconsistent with HD 84937 being a sub-giant star at the $2.5\\, \\sigma$ level. The most metal poor star with a measured $^9$Be abundance is HD 140283, which is a relatively cool sub-giant. Standard stellar evolution predict that $^9$Be will have been depleted in this star by $\\sim 0.3$ dex (for ${\\rm T_{eff}} = 5640$ K). Revising the abundance upward changes the oxygen-beryllium relation, suggesting incompatible with standard comic ray production models, and hence, standard big bang nucleosynthesis. However, an increase in the derived temperature of HD 140283 to 5740 K would result in no depletion of $^9$Be and agreement with standard big bang nucleosynthesis.

Brian Chaboyer

1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

Lithium abundances in exoplanet-host stars : modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims. Exoplanet-host stars (EHS) are known to present superficial chemical abundances different from those of stars without any detected planet (NEHS). EHS are, on the average, overmetallic compared to the Sun. The observations also show that, for cool stars, lithium is more depleted in EHS than in NEHS. The aim of this paper is to obtain constraints on possible models able to explain this difference, in the framework of overmetallic models compared to models with solar abundances. Methods. We have computed main sequence stellar models with various masses and metallicities. The results show different behaviour for the lithium destruction according to those parameters. We compare these results to the spectroscopic observations of lithium. Results. Our models show that the observed lithium differences between EHS and NEHS are not directly due to the overmetallicity of the EHS: some extra mixing is needed below the convective zones. We discuss possible explanations for the needed extra mixing, in particular an increase of the mixing efficiency associated with the development of shear instabilities below the convective zone, triggered by angular momentum transfer due to the planetary migration.

M. Castro; S. Vauclair; O. Richard; N. C. Santos

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

172

The element abundance FIP effect in the quiet Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Mg/Ne abundance ratio in the quiet Sun is measured in both network and supergranule cell centre regions through EUV spectra from the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer on SOHO. Twenty four sets of data over the period 1996 March to 1998 June (corresponding to solar minimum) are studied. Emission lines of the sequences Ne IV-VII and Mg V-VIII are simultaneously analysed by comparing with theoretical emissivities from the CHIANTI database to yield the Mg/Ne abundance and emission measure over the temperature region 5.0 Sun connects into the solar wind. The quiet Sun spectra are also utilised to determine the coronal density and temperature, leading to average values of 2.6^+0.5_-0.4 x 10^8 cm^-3 and log (T/K)=5.95 +/- 0.02. No significant trend with the rise in solar activity during 1996--98 is found for any of the derived quantities, implying that quiet Sun regions show little dependence on the solar cycle.

P. R. Young

2005-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

173

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

174

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

175

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

176

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

177

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

178

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

179

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

180

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

182

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

183

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

184

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

185

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

186

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

187

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

188

NREL Explores Earth-Abundant Materials for Future Solar Cells (Fact Sheet), Innovation: The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Explores Earth-Abundant Explores Earth-Abundant Materials for Future Solar Cells Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are using a theory-driven technique-sequential cation mutation-to understand the nature and limitations of promising solar cell materials that can replace today's technologies. Finding new materials that use Earth-abundant elements and are easily manufactured is important for large-scale solar electricity deployment. The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative is to reduce the installed cost of solar energy systems by about 75% by the end of the decade. Obtaining that goal calls for photovoltaic (PV) technologies to improve in three main areas: solar-cell efficiencies, material processing costs, and scalability to the terawatt (TW), or 10

189

The oxygen abundance gradient in M101: the reliability of the P method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the oxygen abundance determination for 90 HII regions in the inner parts of the grand design galaxy M101. The abundances were derived employing the P method (Pilyugin 2001a). A comparison is made with previous determinations using another calibration and direct measurements of electron temperature to derive the oxygen abundance. The results show agreement with the abundances derived from the electron temperature method and also show that the older calibration is not as accurate as the P method.

B. Cedres; M. A. Urbaneja; J. Cepa

2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

190

The oxygen abundance gradient in M101: the reliability of the P method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the oxygen abundance determination for 90 HII regions in the inner parts of the grand design galaxy M101. The abundances were derived employing the P method (Pilyugin 2001a). A comparison is made with previous determinations using another calibration and direct measurements of electron temperature to derive the oxygen abundance. The results show agreement with the abundances derived from the electron temperature method and also show that the older calibration is not as accurate as the P method.

Cedres, B; Cepa, J

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

SRNL - Natural Attenuation Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Attenuation Monitor covers Natural Attenuation Monitor Published by the US DOE Monitored Natural Attenuation and Enhanced Attenuation for Chlorinated Solvents Technology...

192

Unconventional Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Unconventional Natural Gas Los Alamos scientists are committed to the efficient and environmentally-safe development of major U.S. natural gas and oil resources....

193

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Texas Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Texas Natural Gas Exports...

194

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas Imports Price All Countries (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

195

,"Montana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Montana Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Montana Natural Gas Exports...

196

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Michigan Natural Gas Exports...

197

Dependence of Gas Phase Abundances in the ISM on Column Density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sightlines through high- and intermediate-velocity clouds allow measurements of ionic gas phase abundances, A, at very low values of HI column density, N(HI). Present observations cover over 4 orders of magnitude in N(HI). Remarkably, for several ions we find that the A vs N(HI) relation is the same at high and low column density and that the abundances have a relatively low dispersion (factors of 2-3) at any particular N(HI). Halo gas tends to have slightly higher values of A than disk gas at the same N(HI), suggesting that part of the dispersion may be attributed to the environment. We note that the dispersion is largest for NaI; using NaI as a predictor of N(HI) can lead to large errors. Important implications of the low dispersions regarding the physical nature of the ISM are: (a) because of clumping, over sufficiently long pathlengths N(HI) is a reasonable measure of the_local_ density of_most_ of the H atoms along the sight line; (b) the destruction of grains does not mainly take place in catastrophic events such as strong shocks, but is a continuous function of the mean density; (c) the cycling of the ions becoming attached to grains and being detached must be rapid, and the two rates must be roughly equal under a wide variety of conditions; (d) in gas that has a low average density the attachment should occur within denser concentrations.

B. P. Wakker; J. S. Mathis

2000-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

198

Abundance structure and chemical evolution of the Galactic disc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have obtained high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra for 899 F and G dwarf stars in the Solar neighbourhood. The stars were selected on the basis of their kinematic properties to trace the thin and thick discs, the Hercules stream, and the metal-rich stellar halo. A significant number of stars with kinematic properties 'in between' the thin and thick discs were also observed in order to in greater detail investigate the dichotomy of the Galactic disc. All stars have been homogeneously analysed, using the exact same methods, atomic data, model atmospheres, etc., and also truly differentially to the Sun. Hence, the sample is likely to be free from internal errors, allowing us to, in a multi-dimensional space consisting of detailed elemental abundances, stellar ages, and the full three-dimensional space velocities, reveal very small differences between the stellar populations.

Bensby, T

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research April 13, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Today, three federal agencies announced a formal partnership to coordinate and align all research associated with development of our nation's abundant unconventional natural gas and oil resources. The partnership exemplifies the cross-government coordination required under President Obama's Executive Order released earlier today, which created a new Interagency Working Group to Support Safe and Responsible Development of Unconventional Domestic Natural Gas Resources. This new partnership will help coordinate current and future

200

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research April 13, 2012 - 3:01pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, three federal agencies announced a formal partnership to coordinate and align all research associated with development of our nation's abundant unconventional natural gas and oil resources. The partnership exemplifies the cross-government coordination required under President Obama's Executive Order released earlier today, which created a new Interagency Working Group to Support Safe and Responsible Development of Unconventional Domestic Natural Gas Resources. This new partnership will help coordinate current and future

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research April 13, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Today, three federal agencies announced a formal partnership to coordinate and align all research associated with development of our nation's abundant unconventional natural gas and oil resources. The partnership exemplifies the cross-government coordination required under President Obama's Executive Order released earlier today, which created a new Interagency Working Group to Support Safe and Responsible Development of Unconventional Domestic Natural Gas Resources. This new partnership will help coordinate current and future

202

Natural Gas Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are either fueled exclusively with compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas (dedicated NGVs) or are capable of natural gas and gasoline fueling (bi-fuel NGVs).

203

Carbon stars in local group dwarf galaxies: C and O abundances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present abundances of carbon and oxygen as well as abundance ratios 12C/13C for a sample of carbon stars in the LMC, SMC, Carina, Sculptor and Fornax dwarf galaxies. The overall metallicities in these dwarf galaxies are lower than in the galactic disc. The observations cover most of the AGB and we discuss the abundance patterns in different regions along the AGB. The abundances are determined from infrared spectra obtained with the ISAAC spectrometer on VLT (R=1500) and the Phoenix Spectrometer on Gemini South (R=50000). The synthetic spectra used in the analysis were computed with MARCS model atmospheres. We find that the oxygen abundance is decreasing with decreasing overall metallicity of the system while the C/O ratio at a given evolutionary phase is increasing with decreasing oxygen abundance. keywords Stars: abundances -- Stars: carbon -- Stars: AGB and post-AGB -- Galaxies: dwarf -- Local Group -- Infrared: stars

R. Wahlin; K. Eriksson; B. Gustafsson; K. H. Hinkle; D. L. Lambert; N. Ryde; B. Westerlund

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

204

Variation in foliar [sup 15]N abundance and the availability of soil nitrogen on Walker Branch Watershed  

SciTech Connect

Spatial patterns in natural [sup 15]N abundance ([sigma][sup 15]N) in soil, soil solutions, and non-N[sub 2]-fixing plants were studied in the deciduous forest on Walker Branch Watershed near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values are related to the availability of inorganic nitrogen in mineral soil. Soils collected in or near valley bottoms on the watershed had higher levels of net nitrogen mineralization and net nitrification potential than those sampled from ridges and slopes. More positive foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values occurred in valley bottoms, which, relative to other positions on the watershed, were characterized by greater availability of soil nitrogen and lower C-to-N ratios in the O[sub 1]-horizon, in the surface mineral soil, and in autumn leaf fall. Although leaf nitrogen concentrations changed significantly over the course of the growing season, there was little seasonal variation in foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values. A hypothesis about the relative importance of different sources of nitrogen to the forest and how nitrogen cycling varies with topography in this nitrogen-deficient ecosystem was derived, in part, from spatial patterns in natural [sup 15]N abundance. There appear to be two processes affecting the topographic patterns in foliar [sup 15]N abundance on this watershed: (1) greater uptake from isotopically heavy pools of inorganic soil nitrogen by plants in valley bottoms, and (2) uptake of isotopically light ammonium-N in atmospheric deposition by plants on ridges and slopes (where the availability of inorganic soil nitrogen to plant roots is more limited). Results from this study indicate that foliar [sigma][sup 15]N values are positively correlated with net nitrification potential in surface soil. 34 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs.

Garten, C.T. Jr. (ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

STELLAR ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE PATTERNS: IMPLICATIONS FOR PLANET FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

The solar photosphere is depleted in refractory elements compared to most solar twins, with the degree of depletion increasing with an element's condensation temperature. Here, I show that adding 4 Earth masses of Earth-like and carbonaceous-chondrite-like material to the solar convection zone brings the Sun's composition into line with the mean value for the solar twins. The observed solar composition could have arisen if the Sun's convection zone accreted material from the solar nebula that was depleted in refractory elements due to the formation of the terrestrial planets and ejection of rocky protoplanets from the asteroid belt. Most solar analogs are missing 0-10 Earth masses of rocky material compared to the most refractory-rich stars, providing an upper limit to the mass of rocky terrestrial planets that they possess. The missing mass is correlated with stellar metallicity. This suggests that the efficiency of planetesimal formation increases with stellar metallicity. Stars with and without known giant planets show a similar distribution of abundance trends. If refractory depletion is a signature of the presence of terrestrial planets, this suggests that there is not a strong correlation between the presence of terrestrial and giant planets in the same system.

Chambers, J. E., E-mail: chambers@dtm.ciw.ed [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution for Science, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

2010-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

206

The Water Vapor Abundance in Orion KL Outflows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the detection and modeling of more than 70 far-IR pure rotational lines of water vapor, including the 18O and 17O isotopologues, towards Orion KL. Observations were performed with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer Fabry-Perot (LWS/FP; R~6800-9700) on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) between ~43 and ~197 um. The water line profiles evolve from P-Cygni type profiles (even for the H2O18 lines) to pure emission at wavelengths above ~100 um. We find that most of the water emission/absorption arises from an extended flow of gas expanding at 25+-5 kms^-1. Non-local radiative transfer models show that much of the water excitation and line profile formation is driven by the dust continuum emission. The derived beam averaged water abundance is 2-3x10^-5. The inferred gas temperature Tk=80-100 K suggests that: (i) water could have been formed in the "plateau" by gas phase neutral-neutral reactions with activation barriers if the gas was previously heated (e.g. by shocks) to >500 K and/or (ii) H2O formation in the outflow is dominated by in-situ evaporation of grain water-ice mantles and/or (iii) H2O was formed in the innermost and warmer regions (e.g. the hot core) and was swept up in ~1000 yr, the dynamical timescale of the outflow.

J. Cernicharo; J. R. Goicoechea; F. Daniel; M. R. Lerate; M. J. Barlow; B. M. Swinyard; E. van Dishoeck; T. L. Lim; S. Viti; J. Yates

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

207

Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas, Cheltenham, United Kingdom), Natural Ana- logues for the Geological Storage of CO2, IEA for assessing the health risks of CO2 leakage from on- shore storage reservoirs. Italian gas seeps have already Italian Gas Seeps. Natural CO2 degassing is most abundant in wes- tern Italy (18­20) (Fig. 1). Here

Haszeldine, Stuart

208

Regulation of natural monopolies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter provides a comprehensive overview of the theoretical and empirical literature on the regulation of natural monopolies. It covers alternative definitions of natural monopoly, regulatory goals, alternative ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Natural Gas Annual Archives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

210

Liquefied Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

211

EIA - Natural Gas Publications  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and a weather snapshot. Monthly Natural Gas Monthly Natural and supplemental gas production, supply, consumption, disposition, storage, imports, exports, and prices in the...

212

Natural Gas Exports (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimates for Canadian pipeline volumes are derived from the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates of dry natural gas imports.

213

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas prices, successful application of horizontal drilling, and hydraulic fracturing, as well as significant investments made by natural gas companies in production...

214

Natural Gas Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Production. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Survey of Producing States and Mineral Management Service “Evolving Estimate” in Natural Gas Monthly.

215

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Release: Thursday, August 26, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 18, 2010) Natural...

216

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7, 2009 Next Release: May 14, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 6, 2009) Natural gas...

217

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

218

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

219

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

220

Natural Gas Rules (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources administers the rules that govern natural gas exploration and extraction in the state. DNR works with the Louisiana Department of Environmental...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

ANALYSIS OF RICIN TOXIN PREPARATIONS FOR CARBOHYDRATE AND FATTY ACID ABUNDANCE AND ISOTOPE RATIO INFORMATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes method development and preliminary evaluation for analyzing castor samples for signatures of purifying ricin. Ricin purification from the source castor seeds is essentially a problem of protein purification using common biochemical methods. Indications of protein purification will likely manifest themselves as removal of the non-protein fractions of the seed. Two major, non-protein, types of biochemical constituents in the seed are the castor oil and various carbohydrates. The oil comprises roughly half the seed weight while the carbohydrate component comprises roughly half of the remaining “mash” left after oil and hull removal. Different castor oil and carbohydrate components can serve as indicators of specific toxin processing steps. Ricinoleic acid is a relatively unique fatty acid in nature and is the most abundant component of castor oil. The loss of ricinoleic acid indicates a step to remove oil from the seeds. The relative amounts of carbohydrates and carbohydrate-like compounds, including arabinose, xylose, myo-inositol fucose, rhamnose, glucosamine and mannose detected in the sample can also indicate specific processing steps. For instance, the differential loss of arabinose relative to mannose and N-acetyl glucosamine indicates enrichment for the protein fraction of the seed using protein precipitation. The methods developed in this project center on fatty acid and carbohydrate extraction from castor samples followed by derivatization to permit analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Method descriptions herein include: the source and preparation of castor materials used for method evaluation, the equipment and description of procedure required for chemical derivatization, and the instrument parameters used in the analysis. Two types of derivatization methods describe analysis of carbohydrates and one procedure for analysis of fatty acids. Two types of GC-MS analysis is included in the method development, one employing a quadrupole MS system for compound identification and an isotope ratio MS for measuring the stable isotope ratios of deuterium and hydrogen (D/H) in fatty acids. Finally, the method for analyzing the compound abundance data is included. This study indicates that removal of ricinoleic acid is a conserved consequence of each processing step we tested. Furthermore, the stable isotope D/H ratio of ricinoleic acid distinguished between two of the three castor seed sources. Concentrations of arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucosamine and myo-inositol differentiated between crude or acetone extracted samples and samples produced by protein precipitation. Taken together these data illustrate the ability to distinguish between processes used to purify a ricin sample as well as potentially the source seeds.

Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Colburn, Heather A.; Moran, James J.; Melville, Angela M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

A MASS-DEPENDENT YIELD ORIGIN OF NEUTRON-CAPTURE ELEMENT ABUNDANCE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ULTRA-FAINT DWARFS  

SciTech Connect

One way to constrain the nature of the high-redshift progenitors of the Milky Way (MW) is to look at the low-metallicity stellar populations of the different Galactic components today. For example, high-resolution spectroscopy of very metal poor (VMP) stars demonstrates remarkable agreement between the distribution of [Ti/Fe] in the stellar populations of the MW halo and ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies. In contrast, for the neutron-capture (nc) abundance ratio distributions [(Sr, Ba)/Fe], the peak of the small UFD sample (6 stars) exhibits a significant under-abundance relative to the VMP stars in the larger MW halo sample ({approx}300 stars). We present a simple scenario that can simultaneously explain these similarities and differences by assuming: (1) that the MW VMP stars were predominately enriched by a prior generation of stars which possessed a higher total mass than the prior generation of stars that enriched the UFD VMP stars; and (2) a much stronger mass-dependent yield (MDY) for nc-elements than for the (known) MDY for Ti. Simple statistical tests demonstrate that conditions (1) and (2) are consistent with the observed abundance distributions, albeit without strong constraints on model parameters. A comparison of the broad constraints for these nc-MDY with those derived in the literature seems to rule out Ba production from low-mass supernovae (SNe) and affirms models that primarily generate yields from high-mass SNe. Our scenario can be confirmed by a relatively modest (factor of {approx}3-4) increase in the number of high-resolution spectra of VMP stars in UFDs.

Lee, Duane M.; Johnston, Kathryn V. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York City, NY 10027 (United States); Tumlinson, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Sen, Bodhisattva [Department of Statistics, Columbia University, New York City, NY 10027 (United States); Simon, Joshua D. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

223

PRE-EXPLOITATION ABUNDANCE OF TUNAS IN THE EQUATORIAL CENTRAL PACIFIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRE-EXPLOITATION ABUNDANCE OF TUNAS IN THE EQUATORIAL CENTRAL PACIFIC GARTH I. MURPHY' AND RICHARD S. SHOMURAJ ABSTRACT The tuna resources and the environment in the equatorial central Pacific were the distribution and relative abundance of tunas in relation to the en- vironment. The circulation of the waters

224

The Solar Wind Helium Abundance: Variation with Wind Speed and the Solar Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Solar Wind Helium Abundance: Variation with Wind Speed and the Solar Cycle Matthias R. Aellig Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM 87545 Abstract We investigate the helium abundance in the solar wind of 1994 and early 2000 are analyzed. In agreement with similar work for previous solar cycles, we find

Richardson, John

225

Abundance of narwhals (Monodon monoceros) on the hunting grounds in Greenland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The scientific advice relies heavily on extensive aerial surveys that are the only feasible way to acquire data caused by global warming. This study analyzed data from aerial sighting surveys covering four major on narwhal abundance. DOI: 10.1644/ 09-MAMM-A-198.1. Key words: abundance estimation, aerial survey, Arctic

Laidre, Kristin L.

226

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transmission...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Transmission Path Diagram About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Natural Gas Transmission Path Natural...

227

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...

228

Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Cameron, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million...

229

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and...

230

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Golden Pass, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) (Dollars per...

231

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Savine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet)...

232

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Highgate Springs, VT Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Canada (Million...

233

Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Northeast Gateway, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic...

234

South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas...

235

International Energy Outlook - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2004 Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2004 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected...

236

Rotation and chemical abundances of Ap/Bp stars in the open cluster NGC 6475  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The connection between age, rotation and chemical abundance of magnetic Ap stars is poorly understood. Using open clusters, we are able to study samples of stars that are both co-eval and co-environmental. By determining rotation and chemical abundance for Ap star members of clusters with various ages, the variations of these properties as a function of age and environment can be derived. All four probable Ap star members of the open cluster NGC 6475, as well as one normal late B star, were studied using detailed spectrum synthesis of high resolution UVES-POP spectra. Probable cluster membership was confirmed for all five stars, however chemical abundance anomalies only appear to be present in spectra of three. Projected rotational velocity and chemical abundances for 21 elements ranging from C to Eu are presented for the 5 stars. In the three peculiar stars we find overabundances of Si, Cr, Mn, Fe and rare earths such as Nd, characteristic of Ap stars. The set of chemically peculiar stars show fairly homogeneous abundance tables, however notable differences exist for a few elements. There also exist appreciable differences in the v sin i and main sequence evolutionary stage of the chemically peculiar stars. This may hint at the underlying processes giving rise to the observed abundance anomalies. With this first detailed study of chemical abundances of a complete sample of magnetic Ap/Bp stars in an open cluster, we have initiated an exploration of the environmental and evolutionary influence on chemical peculiarity.

C. P. Folsom; G. A. Wade; S. Bagnulo; J. D. Landstreet

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

237

The chemical abundance of the very metal rich old Open Clusters NGC 6253 and NGC 6791  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the framework of a project aiming at deriving in a homogeneous way the properties (age, distance, reddening and detailed chemical abundances) of a large sample of old open clusters, we present here the metal abundance and the abundance ratios of light (C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti) and heavier (Cr, Mn, Ni, Ba, Eu) elements in the galactic open clusters NGC 6253 and NGC 6791. We performed spectrum synthesis of selected lines on high resolution spectra of four red clump stars in NGC 6253, taken with the UVES and FEROS spectrographs. We also determined abundances of the same elements for four red clump stars in NGC 6791, observed with SARG, for which we had derived the atmospheric parameters and the iron, carbon and oxygen abundances in a previous paper (Gratton et al. 2006). The average metallicity of NGC 6253 is [Fe/H]=+0.46 (rms = 0.03 dex, systematic error = 0.08 dex), obtained by extensive spectral synthesis of Fe lines. This intermediate age cluster closely resembles the old open cluster NGC 6791, as far as the chemical composition is concerned. C, N, O do not show any significant abundance scatter; they are underabundant with respect to the solar values both in NGC 6253 and NGC 6791. We also find no evident star-to-star scatter in any of the elements measured in both clusters, with the possible exception of Na in NGC 6791. The two clusters show very similar abundances, except for Mg, overabundant in NGC 6791 and not in NGC 6253. Both have solar scaled alpha-elements abundances. We have compared our abundance ratios with literature values for disk giants and dwarfs and bulge giants, finding a general good agreement with the run of elemental ratios with [Fe/H] of disk objects.

Eugenio Carretta; Angela Bragaglia; Raffaele Gratton

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

238

THE FIRST ISOLATION OF AMERICIUM IN THE FORM OF PURE COMPOUNDS - THE SPECIFIC ALPHA-ACTIVITY AND HALF-LIFE OF Am241  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Energy Series, Plutonium Project Record, Vol. 14B,the beta-decay of the plutonium isotope of mass 241. Earlypaper was a quantity of plutonium which had been purified

Cunningham, B.B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Natural Gas > About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines > Natural Gas Pipeline Mileage by State About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through...

240

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas futures also reversed gains made in the previous week. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working natural gas in storage increased by 63 Bcf...

242

Perceptions of the natural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis takes on the difficulty of defining a clear line that connects and separates natural and artificial in a contemporary landscape. It is a proposal for a park that addresses the image and understanding of nature. ...

Filipovic, Renata, 1973-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Natural gas annual 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Focused natural deduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural deduction for intuitionistic linear logic is known to be full of non-deterministic choices. In order to control these choices, we combine ideas from intercalation and focusing to arrive at the calculus of focused natural deduction. The calculus ...

Taus Brock-Nannestad; Carsten Schürmann

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Abundant molecular gas in the intergalactic medium of Stephan's Quintet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stephan's Quintet (SQ) is a system consisting of at least four interacting galaxies which is well known for its complex dynamical and star formation history. It possesses a rich intergalactic medium (IGM), where hydrogen clouds, both atomic and molecular, associated with two starbursts (refered to as SQ A and B) have been found. In order to study the extent, origin and fate of the intergalactic molecular gas and its relation to the formation of stars outside galaxies and Tidal Dwarf Galaxies (TDGs), we mapped with the IRAM 30m antenna the carbon monoxide (CO) towards several regions of the IGM in SQ. In both SQ A and B, we detected unusually large amounts of molecular gas (3.1 times 10^9 msun and 7 times 10^8 msun, respectively). In contrast, no significant CO detection was achieved towards HII regions south of the pair NGC 7318a/b despite their high H alpha luminosities. The molecular gas is very extended in both SQ A and SQ B, over areas of between 15 and 25 kpc. The CO clouds seem to have otherwise different properties and may be of a different nature. The integrated CO line of SQ A is in particular much wider than in SQ B. Its CO spectrum shows emission at two velocities (6000 and 6700 km s^{-1}) that are coincident with two HI lines. The strongest emission at 6000 km s^{-1} is however spatially offset from the HI emission and situated on a ridge south-east of the starburst region. In SQ B the CO emission coincides with that of tracers of star formation (halpha, 15 mu m and radio continuum). The CO peak lies slightly offset from the HI peak towards a steep HI gradient. This is indicating that the molecular gas is forming in-situ, possibly in a region of compressed HI, with subsequent star formation. The star forming region at SQ B is the object in SQ that most resembles a TDG.

Ute Lisenfeld; Jonathan Braine; Pierre-Alain Duc; Stephane Leon; Vassilis Charmandaris; Elias Brinks

2002-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

246

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

with active programs. More information is available at: http:www.eia.doe.govcneafelectricitypagerestructuringrestructureelect.html. Information about natural gas...

247

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

248

Natural gas annual 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Stellar abundances and ages for metal-rich Milky Way globular clusters - Stellar parameters and elemental abundances for 9 HB stars in NGC6352  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[ABRIDGED] Metal-rich globular clusters provide important tracers of the formation of our Galaxy. Moreover, and not less important, they are very important calibrators for the derivation of properties of extra-galactic metal-rich stellar populations. Nonetheless, only a few of the metal-rich globular clusters in the Milky Way have been studied using high-resolution stellar spectra to derive elemental abundances. In this paper we present elemental abundances for nine HB stars in the metal-rich globular cluster NGC6352. The elemental abundances are based on high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra obtained with VLT/UVES. The elemental abundances have been derived using standard LTE calculations. We find that NGC6352 has [Fe/H]= -0.55, is enhanced in the alpha-elements to about +0.2 dex for Ca, Si, and Ti relative to Fe. For the iron-peak elements we find solar values. Based on the spectroscopically derived stellar parameters we find that an E(B-V)=0.24 and (m-M) roughly equal to 14.05 better fits the data ...

Feltzing, S; Johnson, R A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Natural gas monthly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly highlights of activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry are presented. Feature articles for this issue are: Natural Gas Overview for Winter 1983-1984 by Karen A. Kelley; and an Analysis of Natural Gas Sales by John H. Herbert. (PSB)

Not Available

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Using Cepheids to determine the galactic abundance gradient I. The solar neighbourhood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A number of studies of abundance gradients in the galactic disk have been performed in recent years. The results obtained are rather disparate: from no detectable gradient to a rather significant slope of about -0.1 dex kpc -1. The present study concerns the abundance gradient based on the spectroscopic analysis of a sample of classical Cepheids. These stars enable one to obtain reliable abundances of a variety of chemical elements. Additionally, they have well determined distances which allow an accurate determination of abundance distributions in the galactic disc. Using 236 high resolution spectra of 77 galactic Cepheids, the radial elemental distribution in the galactic disc between galactocentric distances in the range 6-11 kpc has been investigated. Gradients for 25 chemical elements (from carbon to gadolinium) are derived...

S. M. Andrievsky; V. V. Kovtyukh; R. E. Luck; J. R. D. Lepine; D. Bersier; W. J. Maciel; B. Barbuy; V. G. Klochkova; V. E. Panchuk; R. U. Karpischek

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

252

Earth abundant materials for high efficiency heterojunction thin film solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate earth abundant materials for thin-film solar cells that can meet tens of terawatts level deployment potential. Candidate materials are identified by combinatorial search, large-scale electronic structure ...

Buonassisi, Tonio

253

use of the Nation's abundant fossil resources. The FY 2010 budget  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

use of the Nation's abundant fossil resources. The FY 2010 budget request for FE's Fuels and Power Systems Program is 403.9 million; among other initiatives, efforts entail the...

254

USING THE X-RAY EMISSION LINES OF SEYFERT 2 AGN TO MEASURE ABUNDANCE RATIOS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the metal abundance ratios in the X-ray photoionized gas located near the narrow line region of a sample of Seyfert 2 AGN. The high-resolution X-ray spectra observed with the Chandra high- and low-energy transmission grating spectrometers are compared with models of the resonant scattering and recombination emission from a plasma in thermal balance, and with multiple temperature zones. The abundance ratios in the sample are close to the Solar values, with slight over-abundances of N in NGC 1068, and of Ne in NGC 4151. Our X-ray spectral models use fewer degrees of freedom than previous works. Motivation. Our goal is to use X-ray abundance measurements to cross-calibrate with the optical spectra of quasars. These optical spectra are used to measure the star formation history of the early Universe. 1 To Determine the Abundance Ratios, we fit the Seyfert 2 spectra with models of photoionized plasmas, and then search for deviations in the data from Solar abundances, as shown in Fig. 1. The fluxes of radiative recombination continuum (RRC) features and the radiative recombination (RR) forbidden lines depend little on radiation transfer effects, so they are the most reliable abundance indicators. At low continuum optical depths, the recombination emission flux scales linearly with abundances. Our model allows us to fit the RRC and RR fluxes by accounting for the broad ionization distribution in the plasma. X-ray Emission Line Model. We model a photoionized plasma in ionization equilibrium and thermal balance with a grid of zones, each with ionization parameter log ? = 1.0, 1.5,...4.5 (in c.g.s. units). The XSTAR plasma code yields the charge state distribution of each zone. 2 In order to calculate the recombination emission, we use the photoelectric cross sections

Mario A. Jimenez-garate; Toan Khu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

A New Look At Carbon Abundances In Planetary Nebulae. IV. Implications For Stellar Nucleosynthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is the fourth and final report on a project designed to study carbon abundances in a sample of planetary nebulae representing a broad range in progenitor mass and metallicity. We present newly acquired optical spectrophotometric data for three Galactic planetary nebulae IC 418, NGC 2392, and NGC 3242 and combine them with UV data from the IUE Final Archive for identical positions in each nebula to determine accurate abundances of He, C, N, O, and Ne at one or more locations in each object. We then collect abundances of these elements for the entire sample and compare them with theoretical predictions of planetary nebula abundances from a grid of intermediate mass star models. We find some consistency between observations and theory, lending modest support to our current understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars below 8 M_o in birth mass. Overall, we believe that observed abundances agree with theoretical predictions to well within an order of magnitude but probably not better than within a factor of 2 or 3. But even this level of consistency between observation and theory enhances the validity of published intermediate-mass stellar yields of carbon and nitrogen in the study of the abundance evolution of these elements.

R. B. C. Henry; K. B. Kwitter; J. A. Bates

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

256

O and Na abundance patterns in open clusters of the Galactic disk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims. A global O-Na abundance anti-correlation is observed in globular clusters, which is not present in the Galactic field population. Open clusters are thought to be chemically homogeneous internally. We aim to explore the O and Na abundance pattern among the open cluster population of the Galactic disk. Methods. We combine open cluster abundance ratios of O and Na from high-resolution spectroscopic studies in the literature and normalize them to a common solar scale. We compare the open cluster abundances against the globular clusters and disk field. Results. We find that the different environments show different abundance patterns. The open clusters do not show the O-Na anti-correlation at the extreme O-depletion / Na-enhancement as observed in globular clusters. Furthermore, the high Na abundances in open clusters do not match the disk field stars. If real, it may be suggesting that the dissolution of present-day open clusters is not a significant contribution to building the Galactic disk. Large-scale h...

De Silva, G M; Lattanzio, J; Asplund, M; 10.1051/0004-6361/200912279

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Lithium Abundances in Wide Binaries with Solar-Type Twin Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present high-resolution spectroscopic observations of the \\ion{Li}{1} resonance line in a sample of 62 stars that belong to 31 common-proper motion pairs with twin F or G-type components. Photospheric abundances of lithium were derived by spectral synthesis analysis. For seven of the pairs, we have measured large lithium abundance differences. Eleven other pairs have components with similar lithium abundances. We cannot determine if the remaining 13 pairs have lithium differences because we did not detect the \\ion{Li}{1} lines, and hence we can only provide upper limits to the abundances of both stars. Our results demonstrate that twin stars do not always share the same lithium abundances. Lithium depletion in solar-type stars does not only depend on age, mass, and metallicity. This result is consistent with the spread in lithium abundances among solar-type stars in the solar-age open cluster M67. Our stars are brighter than the M67 members of similar spectral type, making them good targets for detailed fo...

Martín, E L; Pavlenko, Ya V; Lyubchik, Y; Martin, Eduardo L.; Basri, Gibor; Pavlenko, Yakiv; Lyubchik, Yuri

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Lithium Abundances in Wide Binaries with Solar-Type Twin Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present high-resolution spectroscopic observations of the \\ion{Li}{1} resonance line in a sample of 62 stars that belong to 31 common-proper motion pairs with twin F or G-type components. Photospheric abundances of lithium were derived by spectral synthesis analysis. For seven of the pairs, we have measured large lithium abundance differences. Eleven other pairs have components with similar lithium abundances. We cannot determine if the remaining 13 pairs have lithium differences because we did not detect the \\ion{Li}{1} lines, and hence we can only provide upper limits to the abundances of both stars. Our results demonstrate that twin stars do not always share the same lithium abundances. Lithium depletion in solar-type stars does not only depend on age, mass, and metallicity. This result is consistent with the spread in lithium abundances among solar-type stars in the solar-age open cluster M67. Our stars are brighter than the M67 members of similar spectral type, making them good targets for detailed follow-up studies that could shed light on the elusive mechanism responsible for the depletion of lithium during the main-sequence evolution of the Sun and solar-type stars.

Eduardo L. Martin; Gibor Basri; Yakiv Pavlenko; Yuri Lyubchik

2002-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

259

Roles of Naturally Occurring Bacteria in Controlling Iodine-129 Mobility in Subsurface Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

129I is of major concern because of its biophilic nature, excessive inventory, long half-life (~16 million yrs), and high mobility in the natural environment that depends on its chemical speciation. Iodide (I-) has the highest mobility than iodate (IO3-) and is the predominant species in the terrestrial environment due to prevailing pH and Eh conditions. In order to transform I- to less mobile organo-iodine (OI), strong oxidants are necessary to activate the first electron transfer step from I- to reactive intermediates. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of naturally occurring aerobic bacteria isolated from an 129I contaminated aquifer (F-area of the Savannah River Site, SC) on I- oxidation and OI formation. It was demonstrated that 3 of 136 strains accumulated I- (0.2~2%) in the presence of H2O2, when incubated in the presence of an environmentally relevant concentration of I- (0.1 microM). The accumulation was likely through electrophilic substitution resulting in the iodination of cellular constituents. The results indicated that culturable I--accumulating bacteria are not directly responsible for the high fraction of oxidized iodine species (IO3- and OI, >50% of total I) present in the SRS F-area. Several bacterial strains were found to be capable of stimulating I- oxidation through excretion of oxidants and enzymes. Organic acids in spent liquid medium from 27 of 84 aerobic bacterial cultures enhanced H2O2-dependent I- oxidation 2-10 fold. Organic acids enhanced I- oxidation by (1) lowering the pH of the spent medium and (2) reacting with H2O2 to form peroxy carboxylic acids, which are strong oxidizing agents. In the absence of H2O2, spent medium from 44 of 84 bacteria cultures showed I- oxidizing capacities. One I- oxidizing bacterium was studied to characterize its extracellular I- oxidizing component(s). The I- oxidizing capability from the spent medium was inactive by treatments with heat and H2O2 and absent under anaerobic conditions. Conversely, NADH, NADPH and FMN additions stimulated I- oxidation in the spend medium. These results indicate an oxidase(s) catalyzed I- oxidation. Understanding the bacterial activities involved with I- oxidation and OI formation is expected to help reduce 129I mobility in water-soil systems.

Li, Hsiu-Ping

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Natural gas sdtrategic plan  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s natural gas program is aimed at meeting simultaneously our national energy needs, reducing oil imports, protecting our environment, and improving our economy The Natural Gas Strategic Plan for 1995 represents a Department-wide effort to articulate the key issues related to the expanded development and utilization of natural gas, and defines the roles of the federal government and US industry in partnering to accomplish the strategic goals defined. The four overarching goals of the Natural Gas Strategic Plan are to: foster the development of advanced natural gas technologies; encourage the adoption of advanced natural gas technologies in new and existing markets; support the removal of policy impediments to natural gas use in new and existing markets; and foster technologies and policies to maximize the environmental benefits of natural gas use. DOE`s proposed fiscal year (FY) 1996 budget represents a commitment to natural gas research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) from reservoir to end use. DOE has redirected and increased funding for its natural gas exploration, production, delivery and storage, processing, and utilization RD&D programs, shifting funds from other energy programs to programs that will enhance efficiency and advance the role of natural gas in our domestic energy resources portfolio.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Neutron Capture Rates near A=130 which Effect a Global Change to the r-Process Abundance Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the impact of neutron capture rates near the A=130 peak on the r-process abundance pattern. We show that these capture rates can alter the abundances of individual nuclear species, not only in the region of A=130 peak but also throughout the abundance pattern. We discuss in general the nonequilibrium processes that produce these abundance changes and determine which capture rates have the most significant impact.

Surman, Rebecca [Union College; Beun, Joshua [North Carolina State University; Mclaughlin, Gail C [North Carolina State University; Hix, William Raphael [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Neutron Capture Rates near A=130 which Effect a Global Change to the r-Process Abundance Distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the impact of neutron capture rates near the A=130 peak on the $r$-process abundance pattern. We show that these capture rates can alter the abundances of individual nuclear species, not only in the region of A=130 peak, but also throughout the abundance pattern. We discuss the nonequilibrium processes that produce these abundance changes and determine which capture rates have the most significant impact.

R. Surman; J. Beun; G. C. McLaughlin; W. R. Hix

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

264

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

265

Environmental Survey Report for ORNL: Small Mammal Abundance and Distribution Survey Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park 2009 - 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a 1-year small mammal biodiversity survey conducted on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park (OR Research Park). The task was implemented through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Natural Resources Management Program and included researchers from the ORNL Environmental Sciences Division, interns in the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Higher Education Research Experiences Program, and ORNL Environmental Protection Services staff. Eight sites were surveyed reservation wide. The survey was conducted in an effort to determine species abundance and diversity of small mammal populations throughout the reservation and to continue the historical inventory of small mammal presence for biodiversity records. This data collection effort was in support of the approved Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation, a major goal of which is to maintain and enhance wildlife biodiversity on the Reservation. Three of the sites (Poplar Creek, McNew Hollow, and Deer Check Station Field) were previously surveyed during a major natural resources inventory conducted in 1996. Five new sites were included in this study: Bearden Creek, Rainy Knob (Natural Area 21), Gum Hollow, White Oak Creek and Melton Branch. The 2009-2010 small mammal surveys were conducted from June 2009 to July 2010 on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park (OR Research Park). The survey had two main goals: (1) to determine species abundance and diversity and (2) to update historical records on the OR Research Park. The park is located on the Department of Energy-owned Oak Ridge Reservation, which encompasses 13,580 ha. The primary focus of the study was riparian zones. In addition to small mammal sampling, vegetation and coarse woody debris samples were taken at certain sites to determine any correlations between habitat and species presence. During the survey all specimens were captured and released using live trapping techniques including Sherman and pitfall traps. In total 227 small mammals representing nine species were captured during the course of the study. The most common species found in the study was the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus). The least common species found were the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius), woodland vole (Microtus pinetorum), and northern short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda).

Giffen, Neil R [ORNL; Reasor, R. Scott [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE); Campbell, Claire L. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

The abundance of presolar grains in comet 81P/WILD 2  

SciTech Connect

We carried out hypervelocity impact experiments in order to test the possibility that presolar grains are preferentially destroyed during impact of the comet 81P/Wild 2 samples into the Stardust Al foil collectors. Powdered samples of the ungrouped carbonaceous chondrite Acfer 094 were shot at 6 km s{sup -1} into Stardust flight spare Al foil. Craters from the Acfer 094 test shots, as well as ones from the actual Stardust cometary foils, were analyzed by NanoSIMS ion imaging to search for presolar grains. We found two O-rich presolar grains and two presolar SiC grains in the Acfer 94 test shots, with measured abundances in the foils of 4 and 5 ppm, respectively, significantly lower than the amount of presolar grains actually present in this meteorite. Based on known abundances of these phases in Acfer 094, we estimate a loss of over 90% of the O-rich presolar grains; the fraction of SiC lost is lower, reflecting its higher resistance to destruction. In the Stardust cometary foils, we identified four O-rich presolar grains in 5000 {mu}m{sup 2} of crater residue. Including a presolar silicate grain found by Leitner et al., the overall measured abundance of O-rich presolar grains in Wild 2 is {approx}35 ppm. No presolar SiC has been found in the foil searches, although one was identified in the aerogel samples. Based on the known abundances of presolar silicates and oxides in Acfer 094, we can calculate the pre-impact abundances of these grains in the Stardust samples. Our calculations indicate initial abundances of 600-830 ppm for O-rich presolar grains. Assuming a typical diameter of {approx}300 nm for SiC suggests a presolar SiC abundance of {approx}45 ppm. Analyses of the Stardust samples indicated early on that recognizable presolar components were not particularly abundant, an observation that was contrary to expectations that the cometary material would, like interplanetary dust particles, be dominated by primitive materials from the early solar system (including abundant presolar grains), which had remained essentially unaltered over solar system history in the cold environment of the Kuiper Belt. Our work shows that comet Wild 2, in fact, does contain more presolar grains than measurements on the Stardust samples suggest, with abundances similar to those observed in primitive IDPs.

Floss, Christine; Stadermann, Frank J.; Ong, W. J. [Laboratory for Space Sciences, Physics Department, Washington University, 1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)] [Laboratory for Space Sciences, Physics Department, Washington University, 1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Kearsley, Anton T. [Impacts and Astromaterials Research Centre, Science Facilities, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom)] [Impacts and Astromaterials Research Centre, Science Facilities, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Burchell, Mark J., E-mail: floss@wustl.edu [Centre for Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences, School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NH (United Kingdom)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Natural Gas Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: March 2, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2008 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2008. Summary data are presented for each State for 2004 to 2008. The Natural Gas Annual 2008 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2008 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2008. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2008) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2008) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

268

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

269

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

270

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.

271

Natural Gas Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Released: December 28, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2009 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2009. Summary data are presented for each State for 2005 to 2009. The Natural Gas Annual 2009 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2009 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2009. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2009) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2009) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

272

Natural-gas liquids  

SciTech Connect

Casinghead gasoline or natural gasoline, now more suitably known as natural-gas liquids (NGL), was a nuisance when first found, but was developed into a major and profitable commodity. This part of the petroleum industry began at about the turn of the century, and more than 60 yr later the petroleum industry recovers approx. one million bbl of natural-gas liquids a day from 30 billion cu ft of natural gas processed in more than 600 gasoline plants. Although casinghead gasoline first was used for automobile fuel, natural-gas liquids now are used for fuel, industrial solvents, aviation blending stock, synthetic rubber, and many other petrochemical uses. Production from the individual plants is shipped by tank car, tank truck, pipeline, and tankers all over the world. Most of the natural-gas liquids come from wet natural gas which contains a considerable quantity of vapor, ranging from 0.5 to 6 gal/Mcf, and some particularly rich gases contain even more which can be liquefied. Nonassociated gas is generally clean, with a comparatively small quantity of gasoline, 0.1 to 0.5 gas/Mcf. The natural-gas liquids branch of the industry is build around the condensation of vapors in natural gas. Natural-gas liquids are processed either by the compression method or by adsorption processes.

Blackstock, W.B.; McCullough, G.W.; McCutchan, R.C.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnership on Unconventional Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research Obama Administration Announces New Partnership on Unconventional Natural Gas and Oil Research April 13, 2012 - 3:01pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, three federal agencies announced a formal partnership to coordinate and align all research associated with development of our nation's abundant unconventional natural gas and oil resources. The partnership exemplifies the cross-government coordination required under President Obama's Executive Order released earlier today, which created a new Interagency Working Group to Support Safe and Responsible Development of Unconventional Domestic Natural Gas Resources. This new partnership will help coordinate current and future research and scientific studies undertaken by the U.S. Department of

274

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Import/Export ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Natural Gas > About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines > Natural ... The EIA has determined that the informational map displays here do not raise security ...

275

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Transportation...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Corridors > Major U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Corridors Map About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates...

276

Inhomogeneous primordial nucleosynthesis and new abundance constraints on {Omega}{sub b}h{sup 2}  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We discuss the upper limit to the baryonic contribution to the closure density. We consider effects of new observational and theoretical uncertainties in the primordial light element abundances, and the effects of fluctuation geometry on the inhomogeneous nucleosynthesis yields. We also consider implications of the possible detection of a high D/H abundance in a Lyman-{alpha} absorption cloud at high redshift and the implied chemical evolution effects of a high deuterium abundance. We show that there exists a region of the parameter space for inhomogeneous models in which a somewhat higher baryonic contribution to the closure density is possible than that allowed in standard homogeneous models. This result is contrary to some other recent studies and is due to both geometry and recently revised uncertainties in primordial light-element abundances, particularly {sup 7}Li. We find that the presently adopted abundance constraints are consistent with a contribution of baryons to the closure density as high as {Omega}{sub b}h{sub 50}{sup 2} {le} 0.11 ({eta} {le} 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}10}). This corresponds to a 20% increase over the limit from standard homogeneous models ({Omega}{sub b}h{sub 50}{sup 2} {le} 0.08, {eta} {le} 5.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}10}). With a high deuterium abundance the upper limits for the inhomogeneous and homogeneous models would be {Omega}{sub b}h{sub 50}{sup 2} {le} 0.04 and 0.03 ({eta} {le} 2.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} and 1.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}10}), respectively. Even higher limits could be obtained by further relaxing the presently accepted primordial lithium abundance constraint as some have proposed.

Mathews, G.J. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Kajino, T.; Orito, M. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo (Japan)

1995-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

277

ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE DIFFERENCES IN THE 16 CYGNI BINARY SYSTEM: A SIGNATURE OF GAS GIANT PLANET FORMATION?  

SciTech Connect

The atmospheric parameters of the components of the 16 Cygni binary system, in which the secondary has a gas giant planet detected, are measured accurately using high-quality observational data. Abundances relative to solar are obtained for 25 elements with a mean error of {sigma}([X/H]) = 0.023 dex. The fact that 16 Cyg A has about four times more lithium than 16 Cyg B is normal considering the slightly different masses of the stars. The abundance patterns of 16 Cyg A and B, relative to iron, are typical of that observed in most of the so-called solar twin stars, with the exception of the heavy elements (Z > 30), which can, however, be explained by Galactic chemical evolution. Differential (A-B) abundances are measured with even higher precision ({sigma}({Delta}[X/H]) = 0.018 dex, on average). We find that 16 Cyg A is more metal-rich than 16 Cyg B by {Delta}[M/H] = +0.041 {+-} 0.007 dex. On an element-to-element basis, no correlation between the A-B abundance differences and dust condensation temperature (T{sub C}) is detected. Based on these results, we conclude that if the process of planet formation around 16 Cyg B is responsible for the observed abundance pattern, the formation of gas giants produces a constant downward shift in the photospheric abundance of metals, without a T{sub C} correlation. The latter would be produced by the formation of terrestrial planets instead, as suggested by other recent works on precise elemental abundances. Nevertheless, a scenario consistent with these observations requires the convective envelopes of {approx_equal} 1 M{sub sun} stars to reach their present-day sizes about three times quicker than predicted by standard stellar evolution models.

RamIrez, I.; Roederer, I. U.; Fish, J. R. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Melendez, J. [Departamento de Astronomia do IAG/USP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Sao Paulo, 05508-900 SP (Brazil); Cornejo, D., E-mail: ivan@obs.carnegiescience.edu [Departamento de Astrofisica, Agencia Espacial del Peru CONIDA, Luis Felipe Villaran 1069, San Isidro, Lima (Peru)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

278

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 19, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 11, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board as oil prices dropped steeply along with most other major commodities. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas spot price fell 36 cents from $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, May 4, to $4.23 per MMBtu on Wednesday, May 11. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (June 2011) dropped almost 9 percent, falling from $4.577 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $4.181 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose by 70 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 1,827 Bcf, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.

279

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 21, 2010) Natural gas prices rose across market locations in the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose 31 cents, or 7 percent, during the week, averaging $4.70 per million Btu (MMBtu) yesterday, July 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the August 2010 natural gas futures contract for delivery at the Henry Hub rose about 21 cents, or 5 percent, ending the report week at $4.513 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage increased to 2,891 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 16, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

280

Natural Disasters: Some Empirical  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. j N8SIR 74-473 Natural Disasters: Some Empirical and Economic Considerations G. Thomas Sav Buildine Economies ...

2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

each of the consumption sectors, excluding the industrial sector, according to BENTEK Energy Services, LLC. Moderating temperatures likely contributed to lower natural gas...

282

4. Natural Gas Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

hydraulic fracturing, including shales and low permeability (tight) formations. Total U.S. dry natural gas reserves additions replaced 237 percent of 2007 dry

283

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Report," and the Historical Weekly Storage Estimates Database. Other Market Trends: FERC Investigates Natural Gas Wash-Trading: The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC)...

284

Natural Gas Annual 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List ... Hawaii, 2001-2005 ... Energy Information Administration/Natural Gas Annual 2005 vii 54.

285

Natural Gas Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for ... Tables 1 and 2 ...

286

Natural Gas Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Outlook National Association of State Energy Officials State Heating Oil and Propane Conference August 30, 2004 William Trapmann Energy Information ...

287

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

increased to 3,683 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, October 15, according to the Energy Information Administrations (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. The West...

288

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

storage facilities. Other Market Trends: EIA Releases Report on Underground Natural Gas Storage Developments: The Energy Information Administration (EIA) released a special...

289

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","72013","1151989" ,"Release Date:","9302013"...

290

,"Texas Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

291

,"Alabama Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301968" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2011,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,...

292

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

293

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

294

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

295

,"Oregon Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

296

,"Alabama Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301968" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

297

,"Illinois Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

298

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301968" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

299

,"Nevada Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

301967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2012,"6301991" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301982" ,"Data 4","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

300

,"Colorado Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",2,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

,"Virginia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

302

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

303

,"Indiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

304

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","72013","1151989" ,"Release Date:","9302013" ,"Next Release...

305

,"Idaho Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","102013","1151989" ,"Release Date:","172014"...

306

Natural Gas Wellhead Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Slide 19 of 27. Price: Wellhead. Natural gas wellhead prices are projected to move up 5 percent this winter, averaging about $2.28 per Mcf during this ...

307

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of about 50 percent of natural gas production from the Gulf. (See "Other Market Trends" below for details.) Ivan's major impact on prices occurred on Monday, September 13,...

308

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

since July 27, 2004. Prices: Moderate temperatures and a favorable supply situation led to widespread declines in natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States since last...

309

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Release: Thursday, November 4, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 27, 2010) As the...

310

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next Release: Thursday, May 13, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 5, 2010) Since...

311

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

that have helped reshape the natural gas market, with particular emphasis on policy directives during the past 26 years. The linked files provided on the web site provide...

312

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

313

Natural Gas Storage Valuation .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, one methodology for natural gas storage valuation is developed and two methodologies are improved. Then all of the three methodologies are applied… (more)

Li, Yun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"6301973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2011,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"...

315

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2011,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"...

316

,"Delaware Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301967" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2011,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",9,"Annual",2012,"...

317

Biomimetics: Lessons from Nature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... structural coloration, thermal insulation, self-healing, and sensory aid mechanisms are some of the examples found in nature which are of commercial interest.

318

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6...

319

,"Idaho Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",2,"Annual",1975,"6301974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301981" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2012,"6...

320

,"California Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

,"Alaska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 5","Underground Storage",2,"Annual",1975,"6301973" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301969" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

322

,"Georgia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6...

323

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2012,"6...

324

,"Washington Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2012,"6...

325

,"Maryland Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2012,"6...

326

,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6...

327

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

328

,"Iowa Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Iowa Natural Gas Prices",10,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

329

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

330

,"Vermont Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Vermont Natural Gas Prices",10,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

331

,"Ohio Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

332

,"California Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

333

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Natural Gas Prices",10,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

334

,"Maryland Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Natural Gas Prices",12,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

335

,"Michigan Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

336

,"Illinois Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Illinois Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

337

,"Kansas Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

338

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

339

,"Texas Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

340

,"Arizona Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arizona Natural Gas Prices",12,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Natural Gas Prices",12,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

342

,"Florida Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

343

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

344

,"Colorado Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

345

,"Virginia Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

346

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

347

,"Washington Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural Gas Prices",12,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

348

,"Maine Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maine Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

349

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

350

,"Utah Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

351

,"Oregon Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

352

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Prices",12,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

353

,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Massachusetts Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

354

,"Nevada Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nevada Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

355

,"Delaware Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Delaware Natural Gas Prices",10,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

356

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

357

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

358

,"Montana Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

359

,"Idaho Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas Prices",12,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

360

,"Missouri Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

,"Georgia Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Georgia Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

362

,"Indiana Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

363

,"Alabama Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

364

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas Prices",10,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

365

,"Alaska Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Prices",11,"Annual",2012,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

366

,"Hawaii Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Hawaii Natural Gas Prices",8,"Annual",2012,"6301980" ,"Release Date:","10312013" ,"Next Release...

367

Natural gas annual 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2009 Next Release: January 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 14, 2009) In the...

369

,"Iowa Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Iowa Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

370

,"Alabama Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Alabama Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

371

,"Georgia Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Georgia Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

372

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

373

,"Colorado Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Colorado Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

374

,"California Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"California Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

375

,"Florida Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Florida Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

376

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Arkansas Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

377

,"Arizona Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Arizona Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

378

,"Alaska Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Alaska Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

379

,"Delaware Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Delaware Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

380

,"Hawaii Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Hawaii Natural Gas Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

ends up in Clarington was delivered upstream. El Paso Natural Gas Pipeline issued an Emergency Critical Operating Condition Declaration for February 2 until further notice....

382

International Natural Gas Workshop  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

International Natural Gas Workshop U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Room 2E-069 Washington, DC 20585 and a member of ...

383

5. Natural Gas Liquids Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

5. Natural Gas Liquids Statistics Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves U.S. natural gas liquids proved reserves decreased 7 percent to 7,459 million ...

384

,"North Dakota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","North Dakota Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","North Dakota Natural Gas Exports...

385

Dissolution of Technetium(IV) Oxide by Natural and Synthetic Organic Ligands Under both Reducing and Oxidizing Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Technetium-99 (Tc) in nuclear waste is a significant environmental concern due to its long half-life and high mobility in the subsurface. Reductive precipitation of Tc(IV) oxides [TcO2(s)] is an effective means of immobilizing Tc, thereby impeding its migration in groundwater. However, TcO2(s) is subject to dissolution by oxidants and/or complexing agents. In this study we ascertain the effects of a synthetic organic ligand, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), and two natural humic isolates on the dissolution and solubility of Tc(IV) oxides. Pure synthetic TcO2(s) (0.23 mM) was used in batch experiments to determine dissolution kinetics at pH ~6 under both reducing and oxidizing conditions. All organic ligands were found to enhance the dissolution of Tc(IV) oxides, increasing their solubility from ~10-8 M (without ligands) to 4 10-7 M under strictly anoxic conditions. Reduced Tc(IV) was also found to re-oxidize rapidly under oxic conditions, with an observed oxidative dissolution rate approximately an order of magnitude higher than that of ligand-promoted dissolution under reducing conditions. Significantly, oxidative dissolution was inhibited by EDTA but enhanced by humic acid compared with experiments without any complexing agents. The redox functional properties of humics, capable of facilitating intra-molecular electron transfer, may account for this increased oxidation rate under oxic conditions. Our results highlight the importance of complex interactions for the stability and mobility of Tc, and thus for the long-term fate of Tc in contaminated environments.

Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Dong, W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Liang, Liyuan [ORNL; Wall, Nathalie [Washington State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Lithium abundances from the 6104A line in cool Pleiades stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium abundances determined by spectral synthesis from both the 6708A resonance line and the 6104 subordinate line are reported for 11 late-type Pleiades stars, including spectra previously analysed by Russell (1996). We report a 0.7 dex scatter in the abundances from 6708A, and a scatter at least as large from the 6104A line. We find a reasonable correllation between the 6104A and 6708A Li abundances, although four stars have 6104A-determined abundances which are significantly larger than the 6708-determined values, by up to 0.5 dex, suggesting problems with the homogeneous, one-dimensional atmospheres being used. We show that these discrepancies can be explained, although probably not uniquely, by the presence of star spots with plausible coverage fractions. The addition of spots does not significantly reduce the apparent scatter in Li abundances, leaving open the possibility that at least some of the spread is caused by real star-to-star differences in pre-main- sequence Li depletion.

A. Ford; J. Jeffries; B. Smalley

2002-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

387

A Low Solar Oxygen Abundance from the First Overtone OH Lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An extremely high-resolution (> 10^5) high-S/N (> 10^3) solar spectrum has been used to measure 15 very weak first overtone (Delta v = 2) infrared OH lines, resulting in a low solar abundance of A(O) ~ 8.6 when MARCS, 3D, and spatially and temporally averaged 3D model atmospheres are used. A higher abundance is obtained with Kurucz (A(O) ~ 8.7) and Holweger & Muller (A(O) ~ 8.8) model atmospheres. The low solar oxygen abundance obtained in this work is in good agreement with a recent 3D analysis of [OI], OI, OH fundamental (Delta v = 1) vibration-rotation and OH pure rotation lines (Asplund et al. 2004). The present result brings further support for a low solar metallicity, and although using a low solar abundance with OPAL opacities ruins the agreement between the calculated and the helioseismic measurement of the depth of the solar convection zone, recent results from the OP project show that the opacities near the base of the solar convection zone are larger than previously thought, bringing further confidence for a low solar oxygen abundance.

Jorge Melendez

2004-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

388

Astrophysical tests of atomic data important for stellar Mg abundance determinations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnesium abundances of cool stars with different metallicities are important for understanding the galactic chemical evolution. This study tests atomic data used in stellar magnesium abundance analyses. We evaluate non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) line formation for Mg I using the most up-to-date theoretical and experimental atomic data available so far and check the Mg abundances from individual lines in the Sun, four well studied A-type stars, and three reference metal-poor stars. With the adopted gf-values, NLTE abundances derived from the Mg I 4703 A, 5528 A, and Mg Ib lines are consistent within 0.05 dex for each A-type star. The same four Mg I lines in the solar spectrum give consistent NLTE abundances at $\\log N_{\\rm Mg}/N_{\\rm H} = -4.45$, when correcting the van der Waals damping constants inferred from the perturbation theory. Inelastic Mg+H collisions as treated by Barklem, Belyaev, Spielfiedel, Guitou, and Feautrier serve as efficient thermalizing process for the statistical equilibri...

Mashonkina, Lyudmila

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Helioseismic Constraints on the Solar Ne/O Ratio and Heavy Element Abundances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the constraints imposed by helioseismic data on the solar heavy element abundances. In prior work we argued that the measured depth of the surface convection zone R_CZ and the surface helium abundance Y_surf were good metallicity indicators which placed separable constraints on light metals (CNONe) and the heavier species with good relative meteoritic abundances. The resulting interiors-based abundance scale was higher than some published studies based on 3D model atmospheres at a highly significant level. In this paper we explore the usage of the solar sound speed in the radiative interior as an additional diagnostic, and find that it is sensitive to changes in the Ne/O ratio even for models constructed to have the same R_CZ and Y_surf. Three distinct helioseismic tests (opacity in the radiative core, ionization in the convection zone, and the core mean molecular weight) yield consistent results. Our preferred O, Ne and Fe abundances are 8.86 +/-0.04, 8.15 +/-0.17 and 7.50 +/-0.05 respectively. Th...

Delahaye, F; Pinsonneault, L; Zeippen, C J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Supply Basins ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates

391

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview Net additions to storage during the fourth week of April were estimated to have been over 100 Bcf-a record high level for the first month of the refill season. Compared to last year when only 36 Bcf or 1.2 Bcf per day were added to stocks in April, this year the industry appears to be taking advantage of the reduction in demand that typically occurs in April, the first shoulder month of the year, and the recent price declines. After beginning the week down, spot prices at the Henry Hub trended down most days last week to end trading on Friday at $4.49 per MMBtu-the lowest price since early November. On the NYMEX futures market, the near-month (June) contract also moved down most days and ended last week at $4.490-down $0.377 from the previous Friday. Some-early summer high temperatures last week in the Northeast and winter-like weather in the Rockies (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) appear to have had little impact on the natural gas markets as prices declined most days at most major locations.

392

,"Ohio Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050OH3","N3010OH3","N3020OH3","N3035OH3","N3045OH3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Ohio (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Ohio Price of Natural...

393

,"Utah Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050UT3","N3010UT3","N3020UT3","N3035UT3","N3045UT3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Utah (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Utah Price of Natural...

394

Natural Cooling Retrofit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Substantial numbers of existing plants and buildings are found to depend solely upon Mechanical Cooling even though Natural Cooling techniques could be employed utilizing ambient air. Most of these facilities were constructed without Natural Cooling capability due to 'first cost' budget constraints when the cost and availability of energy were of little concern.

Fenster, L. C.; Grantier, A. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

,"Arizona Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"N3050AZ3","N3010AZ3","N3020AZ3","N3035AZ3","NA1570SAZ3","N3045AZ3" "Date","Arizona Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Arizona Natural Gas...

396

,"Vermont Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

80SVT3","N3050VT3","N3010VT3","N3020VT3","N3035VT3","N3045VT3" "Date","Vermont Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Vermont Natural Gas Pipeline and...

397

Natural gas monthly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents current data on the consumption, disposition, production, prices, storage, import and export of natural gas in the United States. Also included are operating and financial data for major interstate natural gas pipeline companies plus data on fillings, ceiling prices, and transportation under the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978. A feature article, entitled Main Line Natural Gas Sales to Industrial Users, 1981, is included. Highlights of this month's publication are: Marketed production of natural gas during 1982 continued its downward trend compared to 1981, with November production of 1511 Bcf compared to 1583 Bcf for November 1981; total natural gas consumption also declined when compared to 1981; as of November 1982, working gas in underground storage was running ahead of a similar period in 1981 by 109 Bcf (3.4 percent); the average wellhead price of natural gas continued to rise in 1982; and applications for determination of maximum lawful prices under the Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA) showed a decrease from October to November, principally for Section 103 classification wells (new onshore production wells).

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Naturally Nonminimal Supersymmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the bounds imposed by naturalness on the masses of superpartners for arbitrary points in nonminimal supersymmetric extensions of the standard model and for arbitrary messenger scales. This constitutes a significant generalization of previous work along these lines. We discuss appropriate measures of naturalness and the status of nonminimal supersymmetry in the light of recent experimental results.

David Wright

1998-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

399

New Offices, New Ways of Working, and Abundant Energy Savings | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Offices, New Ways of Working, and Abundant Energy Savings Offices, New Ways of Working, and Abundant Energy Savings New Offices, New Ways of Working, and Abundant Energy Savings July 6, 2010 - 2:01pm Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL A few weeks ago, our entire communications office was lucky enough to be among the first to move into the new Research Support Facility (RSF) here at the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL). Moving into a new building may not sound all that exciting, but this was a momentous day for NREL: the RSF is ultra-efficient and is a showcase for energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. As the lab's director, Dan Arvizu, said in his welcome message to our office, "The Laboratory began this journey more than thirty years ago, and today-after years of research, planning, and sixteen months of

400

New Offices, New Ways of Working, and Abundant Energy Savings | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Offices, New Ways of Working, and Abundant Energy Savings New Offices, New Ways of Working, and Abundant Energy Savings New Offices, New Ways of Working, and Abundant Energy Savings July 6, 2010 - 2:01pm Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL A few weeks ago, our entire communications office was lucky enough to be among the first to move into the new Research Support Facility (RSF) here at the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL). Moving into a new building may not sound all that exciting, but this was a momentous day for NREL: the RSF is ultra-efficient and is a showcase for energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. As the lab's director, Dan Arvizu, said in his welcome message to our office, "The Laboratory began this journey more than thirty years ago, and today-after years of research, planning, and sixteen months of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Element abundances in cool white dwarfs. II. Ultraviolet observations of DZ white dwarfs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a small data base of homogeneously derived photospheric element abundances of DZ white dwarfs and related objects. Our previous investigations are supplemented with the analysis of ultraviolet spectra for nine white dwarfs. Of particular interest is the detection of Lalpha absorption in van Maanen 2 and a determination of the effective temperature of this star. The new value is about 1000K lower than previous results due to the strong ultraviolet absorption by metals which has to be considered consistently. The metal abundances of our sample stars are compatible with the predictions from the two-phase accretion model of Dupuis et al. (1992, 1993). Small deviations can be observed for the abundance ratios in some objects. This could indicate non-solar metal-to-metal ratios in the accreted material. Hydrogen can be detected in virtually all of our objects. However, its average accretion rate must be at least two orders of magnitude lower than the metal accretion rate.

B. Wolff; D. Koester; J. Liebert

2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

402

Using Cepheids to determine the galactic abundance gradient. III.First results for the outer disc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a continuation of our previous work, which concerned the radial abundance distribution in the galactic disc over the distances 4-10 kpc this paper presents the first results on the metallicicty in the outer disc (RG > 10 kpc). Based on high-resolution spectra obtained for 19 distant Cepheids we sampled galactocentric distances from 10 to 12 kpc. Combined with the results of our previous work on the inner and middle parts of the galactic disc, the present data enable one to study the structure of the radial abundance distribution over a large baseline. In particular, we find indications of a discontinuity in the radial abundance distribution for iron as well as a number of the other elements. The discontinuity is seen at a galactocentric distance RG = 10 kpc. This finding supports the results reported earlier by Twarog et al. (1997).

S. M. Andrievsky; V. V. Kovtyukh; R. E. Luck; J. R. D. Lepine; W. J. Maciel; Yu. V. Beletsky

2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

403

A3. Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Natural Gas Processed and Liquids Extracted at Natural Gas Processing Plants by State, 1996 Table Plant Location Volume of Natural Gas Delivered to Processing Plants a (million cubic feet) Total Liquids Extracted b (thousand barrels) Extraction Loss (million cubic feet) State Production Out of State Production Natural Gas Processed Alabama..................................... 111,656 1,212 112,868 4,009 5,361 Alaska ........................................ 2,987,364 0 2,987,364 33,346 38,453 Arkansas.................................... 214,868 4,609 219,477 383 479 California.................................... 240,566 0 240,566 9,798 12,169 Colorado .................................... 493,748 215 493,963 16,735 23,362 Florida........................................ 5,900 2,614 8,514 1,630 1,649 Illinois.........................................

404

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 3, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 23, 2011) Natural gas spot prices were soft again at nearly all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price fell 10 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (2.5 percent) for the week ending February 23, to $3.83 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, February 18, according to the Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied draw for the week was 81 Bcf, with storage volumes shifting to 48 Bcf below year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the March 2011 natural

405

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 30, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 22, 2011) Natural gas prices fell slightly at most market locations from Wednesday, June 15 to Wednesday, June 22. The Henry Hub price fell 10 cents from $4.52 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday to $4.42 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the July 2011 near-month futures contract fell by 26 cents, or about 6 percent, from $4.58 last Wednesday to $4.32 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,354 this week, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

406

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 20, 2011) Natural gas prices rose at most market locations during the week, as consumption increased. The Henry Hub spot price increased 19 cents from $4.14 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, April 13 to $4.33 per MMBtu on Wednesday, April 20. Futures prices behaved similar to spot prices; at the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (May 2011) rose from $4.141 per MMBtu to $4.310 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,654 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 15, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas

407

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: September 10, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 2, 2009) Natural gas prices posted significant decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices fell at all market locations in the lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 7 and 68 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The price at the Henry Hub spot market fell to $2.25 per MMBtu, decreasing by 51 cents or 18 percent. As of yesterday, the price of natural gas at the Henry Hub was the lowest since February 15, 2002, when natural gas at this location traded at $2.18 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures

408

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 9, 2011) Natural gas spot prices remained soft at nearly all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price rose an insignificant 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (0.5 percent) for the week ending March 9, to $3.81 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,674 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, March 4, according to the Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied draw for the week was 71 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned 32 Bcf above year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the April 2011 natural

409

Sulfur, Chlorine, and Argon Abundances in Planetary Nebulae. IV: Synthesis and the Sulfur Anomaly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have compiled a large sample of O, Ne, S, Cl, and Ar abundances which have been determined for 85 galactic planetary nebulae in a consistent and homogeneous manner using spectra extending from 3600-9600 Angstroms. Sulfur abundances have been computed using the near IR lines of [S III] 9069,9532 along with [S III] temperatures. We find average values, expressed logarithmically with a standard deviation, of log(S/O)=-1.91(+/-.24), log(Cl/O)=-3.52(+/-.16), and log(Ar/O)=-2.29(+/-.18), numbers consistent with previous studies of both planetary nebulae and H II regions. We also find a strong correlation between [O III] and [S III] temperatures among planetary nebulae. In analyzing abundances of Ne, S, Cl, and Ar with respect to O, we find a tight correlation for Ne-O, and loose correlations for Cl-O and Ar-O. All three trends appear to be colinear with observed correlations for H II regions. S and O also show a correlation but there is a definite offset from the behavior exhibited by H II regions and stars. We suggest that this S anomaly is most easily explained by the existence of S^+3, whose abundance must be inferred indirectly when only optical spectra are available, in amounts in excess of what is predicted by model-derived ionization correction factors. Finally for the disk PNe, abundances of O, Ne, S, Cl, and Ar all show gradients when plotted against galactocentric distance. The slopes are statistically indistinguishable from one another, a result which is consistent with the notion that the cosmic abundances of these elements evolve in lockstep.

R. B. C. Henry; K. B. Kwitter; Bruce Balick

2004-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

410

A CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE STUDY OF RED GIANTS IN OPEN CLUSTERS NGC 2204 AND NGC 2243  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed element abundances have been determined for 10-13 stars each in the open clusters (OCs) NGC 2204 and NGC 2243 based on Hydra multi-object echelle spectra obtained with the CTIO 4 m telescope. We have found average cluster metallicities of [Fe/H] = -0.23 {+-} 0.04 and -0.42 {+-} 0.05 for NGC 2204 and NGC 2243, respectively, from an equivalent width analysis. NGC 2243 is the most metal-poor cluster at its Galactocentric radius and is one of the most metal-poor OCs currently known. These two clusters lie {approx}1 kpc below the Galactic plane; it is therefore worthwhile to compare their abundance patterns to those of clusters both closer to and further from the plane. To that end, we combined the results of the current study with those of clusters from our previous work as well as from the literature. To minimize systematic differences between different studies, element abundances of many outer disk OCs as well as thin and thick disk field stars have been placed on our abundance scale. Plots of [X/Fe] versus [Fe/H] for NGC 2204, NGC 2243, other clusters from the literature, and thin and thick disk field stars show NGC 2204 and NGC 2243 to have element abundance patterns comparable to those of other clusters regardless of distance from the plane or center of the Galaxy. Similarly, no individual cluster or group of clusters far from the Galactic mid-plane can be identified as belonging to the thick disk based on their abundance patterns.

Jacobson, Heather R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States); Friel, Eileen D. [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Pilachowski, Catherine A., E-mail: jacob189@msu.edu, E-mail: edfriel@mac.com, E-mail: catyp@astro.indiana.edu [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What Consumers Should Know What Consumers Should Know An Assessment of Prices of Natural Gas Futures Contracts As A Predictor of Realized Spot Prices at the Henry Hub Overview of U.S. Legislation and Regulations Affecting Offshore Natural Gas and Oil Activity Changes in U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Infrastructure in 2004 Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2004) U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports: Issues and Trends 2003 U.S. LNG Markets and Uses: June 2004 Natural Gas Restructuring Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage EIA's Natural Gas Division Survey Form Comments Overview: Thursday, December 1, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 8) Colder-than-normal temperatures contributed to widespread price increases in natural gas spot markets since Wednesday, November 23 as heating demand increased. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub gained 59 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to trade at $11.73 per MMBtu yesterday (November 30). Similarly, at the NYMEX, the price for the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub gained 54 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $12.587 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 25, decreased to 3,225 Bcf, which is 6.3 percent above the 5 year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $1.02 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $57.33 per barrel or $9.88 per MMBtu.

412

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview: Monday, June 04, 2001 Stock builds slowed from their recent pace, even though spot prices continued their downward trend to end the week at the Henry Hub at $3.71 per MMBtu, which is a Friday-to-Friday decline of $0.14 per MMBtu. The NYMEX contract price for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled Tuesday at $3.738, the lowest close-out of a near month contract since the May 2000 contract. The July contract price was $3.930 per MMBtu on Friday, $0.103 lower than a week earlier. Mild weather in the Northeast and Midwest continued to suppress prices on the Eastern Seaboard, while a short burst of warm temperatures in southern California early in the week had the opposite effect on prices in that region. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) Net injections to storage for the week ended Friday, May 25 were 99 Bcf, breaking a 4-week string of 100-plus net injections.

413

Natural Gas Annual, 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2000 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 2000, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1996-2000 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2000 (Table 2) ASCII TXT, are also available.

414

Plentiful natural gas headed for big growth in Mideast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas is increasingly becoming a major contributor in the industrial development of most Middle Eastern countries. Demand there will rise steeply in coming years. This is because of the abundant and growing natural gas resources in the region, the economic benefits of using local resources, as well as increased emphasis on a cleaner environment. Today, proved reserves of natural gas in the Middle East are 45 trillion cu meters (tcm), or 1,488 trillion cu ft (tcf). This is over 30% of the world's natural gas reserves. A table presents data on reserves and production of natural gas in the region. About 20% of this gross production is rein-injecting for oil field pressure maintenance, 13% is flared or vented, and 7% is accounted as losses. The remaining 60% represents consumption in power generation, water desalination, petrochemicals and fertilizers production, aluminum and copper smelting, and fuel for refineries and other industries. The use of natural gas in these various industries is discussed. Thirteen tables present data on gas consumption by country and sector, power generation capacity, major chemicals derived from natural gas, and petrochemical plant capacities.

Hamid, S.H.; Aitani, A.M. (King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

1995-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

415

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 27, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 19, 2011) Natural gas prices fell at most market locations across the country, as bitterly cold weather subsided. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas price fell 7 cents from $4.55 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, January 12, to $4.48 per MMBtu on Wednesday, January 19. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month natural gas contract (February 2011) rose slightly, from $4.531 per MMBtu on January 12 to $4.561 yesterday. The spot price of the West Texas Intermediate crude oil fell by $1 over the week, from $91.85 per barrel on January 12 ($15.84 per MMBtu) to

416

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 9, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 1, 2010) Since Wednesday, August 25, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the lower 48 States, although prices generally rose in the Northeast and Rocky Mountain areas. The Henry Hub spot price fell on the week from $3.99 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.73 per MMBtu, its lowest value since April 1, 2010. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the October 2010 natural gas futures contract fell about 3 percent from $3.896 per MMBtu to $3.762 per MMBtu. During the report week, the September 2010 natural gas futures contract expired at $3.651, having lost about $1.176 per MMBtu during its

417

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 10, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 2, 2011) Natural gas prices showed continued relative weakness during the report week. The spot price at the Henry Hub fell from $3.83 per million Btu (MMBtu) on February 23 to $3.79 per MMBtu on March 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the March 2011 futures contract expired at $3.793 per MMBtu, having declined about 12 percent during its tenure as the near-month contract. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,745 Bcf as of Friday, February 25, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. The spot price of the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil

418

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 15, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 7, 2010) Since Wednesday, March 31, natural gas spot prices climbed at most market locations across the lower 48 States, with increases of as much as 8 percent. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose $0.15, or about 4 percent, to $4.08 per million Btu (MMBtu), in a week of trading shortened by the Good Friday holiday on April 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, April 7, at $4.02 per MMBtu, rising by $0.15 or about 4 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,669 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

419

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 29, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 21, 2011) Natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations across the United States, as moderate temperatures led to declines in demand. Prices at the Henry Hub fell from $4.01 per MMBtu last Wednesday, September 14, to $3.78 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (October 2011) dropped from $4.039 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.73 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,201 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, September 16, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

420

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

cents per MMBtu. Heading into the Memorial Day holiday weekend on Friday, May 25, natural gas spot prices declined at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, as mild...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

At the NYMEX futures market, the settlement price for November delivery of natural gas moved up most days before dropping by almost 0.19 per MMBtu on Friday to end the week...

422

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

States, natural gas spot prices have increased since Wednesday, February 25, at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the...

423

December Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

DOEEIA-0130(9712) Distribution CategoryUC-950 Natural Gas Monthly December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC...

424

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 18, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 10, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board this week, likely in response to cooling temperatures as well as weak economic news. The Henry Hub spot price fell 17 cents from $4.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, August 3, to $4.09 per MMBtu yesterday, August 10. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month contract (September 2011) fell by $0.087 per MMBtu, from $4.090 last Wednesday to $4.003 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage was 2,783 Bcf as of Friday, August 5, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

425

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: July 2, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 24, 2009) Natural gas spot prices generally declined this report week (June 17-24), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.19 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.80. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for natural gas decreased as prices for most energy products fell amid concerns over the economy. The natural gas futures contract for July delivery decreased by 49 cents per MMBtu on the week to $3.761. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday, June 19, is

426

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 3, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 26, 2011) Natural gas spot prices were soft at all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price fell 8 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (about 1.7 percent) for the week ending January 26, to $4.40 per MMBtu. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price settled at $86.15 per barrel ($14.85 per MMBtu), on Wednesday, January 26. This represents a decrease of $4.70 per barrel, or $0.81 per MMBtu, from the previous Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage fell to 2,542 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, January 21, according to the Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The

427

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 16, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 8, 2011) Natural gas prices rose on the week across the board, with somewhat moderate increases in most areas and steep increases in the Northeast United States. The Henry Hub spot price rose 20 cents on the week from $4.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, June 1, to $4.83 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (July 2011) contract rose about 5 percent, from $4.692 last Wednesday to $4.847 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,187 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 3, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

428

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Friday, November 13, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 4, 2009) Natural gas spot prices fell over the week at most market locations, declining on average 16 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Decreases ranged between 2 cents and 77 cents per MMBtu. In the few trading locations where prices rose, increases were modest, ranging between 1 and 4 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell 10 cents on the week, closing at $4.49 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the December 2009 natural gas contract fell 34 cents per MMBtu, or 7 percent. The November contract expired on Wednesday, October 28, at $4.289 per MMBtu.

429

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1996 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1996. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1996. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1996. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

430

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: September 17, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 9, 2009) Natural gas prices posted significant increases at all market locations since last Wednesday, September 2. The Henry Hub spot price increased 47 cents from the previous Wednesday's price of $2.25 per MMBtu. However, intraweek trading was volatile, with natural gas prices falling below $2 per million Btu (MMBtu) at the Henry Hub on Friday, September 4 and rising to $2.72 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month natural gas contract for delivery in October 2009 rose by 11.4 cents to $2.829 per MMBtu, an increase of about 4 percent from the previous

431

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 20, 2011) Responding to extremely hot weather this week, natural gas prices moved up at market locations across the lower 48 States. The spot price at the Henry Hub increased 21 cents from $4.43 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, July 13, to $4.64 per MMBtu yesterday, July 20. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (August 2011) increased from $4.403 per MMBtu to $4.500 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,671 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 15, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

432

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1997 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1997. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1997. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1997. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

433

Renewable Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Natural Gas JOHN DAVIS: The use of clean, domestic natural gas as highway fuel in place of imported oil is growing in popularity with fleets and trucking companies. While natural gas from underground deposits is arguably a limited resource, there is a renewable, eco-friendly resource that we have right here in the U.S.A. And we're here now to give you the straight poop! Every family, farm animal and food processing plant in America produces organic waste that creates a mix of methane, CO2 and other elements called bio gas when it decomposes. Rotten vegetables, moldy bread, last night's leftovers --- they all break down when our garbage gets to the land fill. Incredibly, for

434

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 10, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 2, 2010) Since Wednesday, May 26, natural gas spot prices increased across the lower 48 States, with gains of up to $0.18 per million Btu (MMBtu), at most market locations. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose $0.13 per MMBtu, or about 3 percent, averaging $4.32 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, June 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $4.42 per MMBtu, climbing by $0.25 or about 6 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,357 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May

435

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1998 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1998. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1998. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1998. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

436

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 5, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 27, 2011) Mild temperatures coupled with continued strong domestic production resulted in natural gas cash market prices dropping modestly at nearly all domestic pricing points over the week. The lone exception was the Henry Hub price which rose a token 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (0.5 percent) to $4.35 per MMBtu on April 27. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,685 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 22, according to the U.S. Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 31 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned

437

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2008 , 2008 Next Release: October 9, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, September 24 to Wednesday, October 1) Natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week, as seasonably moderate temperatures minimized natural gas demand in many areas of the country. The return of some Gulf of Mexico supplies during the week provided further downward pressure on spot prices. As of yesterday, October 1, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) reported that 3.5 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day of natural gas production remains shut-in, 16 percent lower than the 4.2 Bcf per day reported 1 week earlier. The Henry Hub spot price fell in the first three trading sessions of

438

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 at 2:00 P.M. 1 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 9, 2011) Continuing its recent trend of languishing below the $4 per million Btu (MMBtu) mark, the Henry Hub natural gas spot price oscillated this week, and posted an overall net increase of 16 cents, from $3.39 per MMBtu last Wednesday, November 2, to $3.55 per MMBtu yesterday, November 9. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (December 2011) natural gas futures contract fell from $3.749 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.652 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,831 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, November 4, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas

439

Tenneco upgrades natural gasoline  

SciTech Connect

Tenneco Oil Co. recently completed a natural gasoline upgrading project at its LaPorte, Tex., facility. The project was started in October 1985. The purpose was to fractionate natural gasoline and isomerize the n-pentane component. Three factors made this a particularly attractive project for the LaPorte complex: 1. The phase down of lead in gasoline made further processing of natural gasoline desirable. 2. Idle equipment and trained personnel were available at the plant as a result of a switch of Tenneco's natural gas liquids (NGL) fractionation to its Mont Belvieu, Tex., facility. 3. The plant interconnects with Houston's local markets. It has pipelines to Mont Belvieu, Texas City, and plants along the Houston Ship Channel, as well as truck, tank car, and barge-loading facilities. Here are the details on the operation of the facilities, the changes which were required to enable the plant to operate successfully, and how this conversion was completed in a timely fashion.

O'Gorman, E.K.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Crude Oil Spot Price, and Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price Graph More Summary Data Prices A major weather front entered the Midwest and the East this week, leading to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

to withdraw natural gas from storage to meet current demand. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working gas in storage decreased to 2,406 Bcf as of...

442

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Henry Hub increased a moderate 0.023 per MMBtu for the week to 3.877. Natural gas in storage decreased to 3,097 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by 2.4 percent. A general...

443

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Working gas in storage was 3,121 Bcf as of Friday, Oct 24, 2003, according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. This is 2.7...

444

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

MMBtu lower than the final price of the November 2009 contract. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage As of Friday, September 24, working natural gas in...

445

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

were more moderate than the price increases for this summer. Wellhead Prices Annual Energy Review More Price Data Storage Working natural gas in storage increased to 2,456...

446

Florida Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet, except where noted) ... History; Citygate Price: 4.79: 4.68: 4.54: 4.47: 4.26: 4.33: 1989-2013: ...

447

Michigan Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet, except where noted) Area: ... History; Citygate Price: 4.74: 4.99: 4.52: 4.48: 4.13: NA: ...

448

Georgia Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Prices ... History; Imports Price: 6.79: 9.71: 3.73: 4.39: 4.20: 2.78: 1999-2012: Pipeline and Distribution Use Price : 1967-2005: ...

449

Maine Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet, except where noted) ... History; Citygate Price: 6.72: 8.18: 11.03: NA: NA: 7.19: 1989-2013: ...

450

Michigan Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet, except where noted) ... History; Wellhead Price: NA: 5.63: 3.92: 3.79 : 1967-2010: Imports Price: ...

451

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet, except where noted) ... History; Citygate Price: 6.14: 7.58: 8.34: 7.51: 7.39: 6.16: 1989-2013: ...

452

Alabama Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Prices (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet, except where noted) Area: ... History; Citygate Price: 4.81: 5.12: 5.31: 4.92: 4.64: NA: ...

453

Natural Gas Production,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Production, Transmission, and Consumption by State, 1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table Alabama ... 530,841 5,361 -35,808 -163,227 0 921 18 325,542...

454

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050MN3","N3010MN3","N3020MN3","N3035MN3","N3045MN3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Minnesota (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Minnesota...

455

,"California Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050CA3","N3010CA3","N3020CA3","N3035CA3","N3045CA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in California (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","California Price...

456

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050TN3","N3010TN3","N3020TN3","N3035TN3","N3045TN3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Tennessee (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Tennessee Price...

457

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kentucky Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,451,1,35,17,,,10,3,0,48...

458

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,13889,36,837,1016,,,1129,181,...

459

,"Florida Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Florida Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,151,-1,1,6,,,0,0,0,36...

460

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,6305,-3,226,165,,,884,391,10,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natural abundance half-life" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

,"Ohio Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Ohio Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,495,-3,48,11,,,113,0,31,60...

462

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050PA3","N3010PA3","N3020PA3","N3035PA3","N3045PA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Pennsylvania (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Pennsylvania...

463

,"Kansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Kansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,11457,-3,122,171,,,219,21,7,7...

464

,"Utah Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet)","Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" 28306,877,0,37,79,,,93,32,2,62...

465

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050LA3","N3010LA3","N3020LA3","N3035LA3","N3045LA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Louisiana (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Louisiana Price...

466

Natural Resource Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Energy Inforamtion Agency of the Dept of Energy provides maps of gas and oil in various formats. The also have maps of drilling history and natural gas proved...

467

Natural Gas Monthly  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas: Gas in place at the time that a reservoir was converted to use as an underground storage reservoir, as in contrast to injected gas volumes. Natural Gas: A gaseous mixture...

468

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

(July 24) to settle at 3.042 per MMBtu, more than 20 cents greater than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,486 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by...

469

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

increased to 2,260 Bcf for the week, which is 19.5 percent above the 5-year average inventory at this time of the year, according to EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. The...

470

Natural Gas Annual 2005  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

historical data back to 1997) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB)...

471

Natural Gas Annual, 1996  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

"Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition". 2. The EIA-176 Query System. This system provides a method of extracting and using the EIA-176 data, and...

472

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

in waters up to 9000 feet deep. Southern Natural Gas Company has scheduled a shut-in test at the Muldon Storage Field in Mississippi for April 5 through April 11. Under the...

473

Natural Gas Imports Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Netscape Navigator 3+ Make sure that JavaScript is enabled in your browser U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports by State (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Data Series: Import...

474

Natural Gas Imports (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Netscape Navigator 3+ Make sure that JavaScript is enabled in your browser U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports by State (Million Cubic Feet) Data Series: Import Volume Import...

475

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10, natural gas spot prices increased more than 50 cents per MMBtu at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with increases exceeding 1 per MMBtu in the...

476

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

12, 2006) Since Wednesday, December 21, natural gas spot prices have decreased at all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases exceeding 3 per MMBtu or about 27...

477

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

increases ranged from 5 to 16 cents at every market location tracked by Natural Gas Intelligence. And even though the storm was fast-moving and short-lived, cash prices for the...

478

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050WI3","N3010WI3","N3020WI3","N3035WI3","N3045WI3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Wisconsin (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Wisconsin...

479

,"Maine Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2012,"6301982" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2012,"6301981" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2012,"6...

480

Sulfur, Chlorine, and Argon Abundances in Planetary Nebulae. III: Observations and Results for a Final Sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is the fourth in a series whose purpose is to study the interstellar abundances of sulfur, chlorine, and argon in the Galaxy using a sample of 86 planetary nebulae. Here we present new high-quality spectrophotometric observations of 20 Galactic planetary nebulae with spectral coverage from 3700-9600 Angstroms. A major feature of our observations throughout the entire study has been the inclusion of the near-infrared lines of [S III] 9069,9532, which allows us to calculate accurate S+2 abundances and to either improve upon or convincingly confirm results of earlier sulfur abundance studies. For each of the 20 objects here we calculate ratios of S/O, Cl/O, and Ar/O and find average values of S/O=1.1E-2+/-1.1E-2, Cl/O=4.2E-4+/-5.3E-4, and Ar/O=5.7E-3+/-4.3E-3. For six objects we are able to compare abundances of S+3 calculated directly from available [S IV] 10.5 micron measurements with those inferred indirectly from the values of the ionization correction factors for sulfur. In the final paper of the series, we will compile results from all 86 objects, search for and evaluate trends, and use chemical evolution models to interpret our results.

K. B. Kwitter; R. B. C. Henry; J. B. Milingo

2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

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481

A Low Solar Oxygen Abundance from the First Overtone OH Lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An extremely high-resolution (> 10^5) high-S/N (> 10^3) solar spectrum has been used to measure 15 very weak first overtone (Delta v = 2) infrared OH lines, resulting in a low solar abundance of A(O) ~ 8.6 when MARCS, 3D, and spatially and temporally averaged 3D model atmospheres are used. A higher abundance is obtained with Kurucz (A(O) ~ 8.7) and Holweger & Muller (A(O) ~ 8.8) model atmospheres. The low solar oxygen abundance obtained in this work is in good agreement with a recent 3D analysis of [OI], OI, OH fundamental (Delta v = 1) vibration-rotation and OH pure rotation lines (Asplund et al. 2004). The present result brings further support for a low solar metallicity, and although using a low solar abundance with OPAL opacities ruins the agreement between the calculated and the helioseismic measurement of the depth of the solar convection zone, recent results from the OP project show that the opacities near the base of the solar convection zone are larger than previously thought, bringing further co...

Melendez, J

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Line formation in solar granulation: V. Missing UV-opacity and the photospheric Be abundance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possibility of unaccounted for opacity sources in the UV for late-type stars has often been invoked to explain discrepancies between predicted and observed flux distributions and spectral line strengths. Such missing UV-opacity could among other things have a significant impact on abundance determination for elements whose only relevant spectral features are accessible in this wavelength region, such as Be. Here, the study by Balachandran & Bell (1998) is re-visited in the light of a realistic 3D hydrodynamical solar model atmosphere and the recently significantly downward revised solar O abundance obtained with the same model atmosphere. The amount of missing UV-opacity, if any, is quantified by enforcing that the OH A-X electronic lines around 313 nm produce the same O abundance as the other available diagnostics: OH vibration-rotation and pure rotation lines in the IR, the forbidden [OI] 630.0 and 636.3 nm lines and high-excitation, permitted OI lines. This additional opacity is then applied for the synthesis of the BeII line at 313.0nm to derive a solar photospheric Be abundance in excellent agreement with the meteoritic value, thus re-enforcing the conclusions of Balachandran & Bell. The about 50% extra opacity over accounted for opacity sources can be well explained by recent calculations by the Iron Project for photo-ionization of FeI.

M. Asplund

2003-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

483

AGE-1 WALLEYE POLLOCK IN THE EASTERN BERING SEA: DISTRIBUTION, ABUNDANCE, DIET, AND ENERGY DENSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AGE-1 WALLEYE POLLOCK IN THE EASTERN BERING SEA: DISTRIBUTION, ABUNDANCE, DIET, AND ENERGY DENSITY performed at sea · Energy density estimated using bomb calorimetry for samples from BASIS and MACE surveys · Confirm ages of age-0 and age-1 pollock using otoliths · Distribution of age-1's further north than age-0

484

The elemental abundance pattern in a galaxy at z=2.626  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discovery of metal-poor stars (where metal is any element more massive than helium) has enabled astronomers to probe the chemical enrichment history of the Milky Way. More recently, element abundances in gas inside high-redshift galaxies has been probed through the absorption lines imprinted on the spectra of background quasars, but these have typically yielded measurements of only a few elements. Furthermore, interpretation of these abundances is complicated by the fact that differential incorporation of metals into dust can produce an abundance pattern similar to that expected from nucleosynthesis by massive stars. Here we report the observation of over 25 elements in a galaxy at z=2.626. With these data, we can examine nucleosynthetic processes independent of the uncertainty arising from depletion. We find that the galaxy was enriched mainly by massive stars (M > 15 solar masses) and propose that it is the progenitor of a massive, elliptical galaxy. The detailed abundance patterns suggest that boron is produced through processes that act independently of metallicity, and may require alternative mechanisms for the nucleosynthesis of germanium.

Jason X. Prochaska; J. Chris Howk; Arthur M. Wolfe

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

485

OXYGEN GAS-PHASE ABUNDANCE REVISITED M. K. Andre,1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Explorer (FUSE) observations of molecular hydrogen. The molecular hydrogen content of these sight lines along these sight lines, which probe a wide range of Galactic environments in the distant interstellar grains are resilient against destruction by shocks, the distant interstellar total oxygen abundance can

Howk, Jay Christopher

486

A probabilistic approach to accurate abundance-based binning of metagenomic reads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important problem in metagenomic analysis is to determine and quantify species (or genomes) in a metagenomic sample. The identification of phylogenetically related groups of sequence reads in a metagenomic dataset is often referred to as binning. ... Keywords: abundance-based binning, expectation maximization, metagenomics, next-generation sequencing

Olga Tanaseichuk; James Borneman; Tao Jiang

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

tribution and abundance. In analysis of survey data, these results are a first approximation of correction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

variables affecting aerial surveys, but the effects of glare on shipboard surveys and observer variabilitytribution and abundance. In analysis of survey data, these results are a first approximation conditions or animal behavior. Further work on survey methodology should examine the effect of eye height

488

Chemical abundances of metal-poor RR Lyrae stars in the Magellanic Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present for the first time a detailed spectroscopic study of chemical element abundances of metal-poor RR Lyrae stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Cloud (LMC and SMC). Using the MagE echelle spectrograph at the 6.5 ...

Haschke, Raoul

489

Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices through  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-56756 Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices through Increased Deployment the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices through Increased Deployment of Renewable Energy-AC03-76SF00098. #12;#12;Easing the Natural Gas Crisis Acknowledgments The work described in this report

490

The Influence of Woodlot Size and Location in Suburban and Rural Matrices on Bird Species Richness and Individual Abundance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study assessed the influence of woodlot area and matrix composition on bird species richness and individual abundance. Bird surveys were conducted in winter 2004… (more)

Chartier, Neil Allen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Combined Natural Gas Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Map of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors Map of Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors see related text enlarge see related text enlarge U.S. Regional Breakdown Map of U.S. Regional Breakout States (in Grey) Highly Dependent on Interstate Pipelines for Natural Gas Supplies Map of States (in Grey) Highly Dependent on Interstate Pipelines for Natural Gas Supplies

492

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Supply Basins...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Major Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors, 2008 U.S. Natural Gas Transporation Corridors out of Major...

493

Sabine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Qatar (Million Cubic Feet) Sabine Pass, LA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Qatar (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun...

494

Freeport, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

495

Molecular Level Characterization and Mobility of Radionuclide-Carrying Natural Organic Matter in Aquatic Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radionuclides, 129I and 239,240Pu, are major products or by-products of nuclear fission and among the top risk drivers for waste disposal at the Savannah River Sites (SRS) and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Sites (RFETS), respectively, due to their perceived mobility in the environment, excessive inventory, toxicity, and long half-life. The objective of this study is to investigate the role of natural organic matter in retarding or facilitating the migration of 129I and 239,240Pu in the Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Measurements of 127I and 129I in humic acids (HAs) and fulvic acids (FAs) obtained by five successive alkaline, two glycerol and one citric acid-alkaline extractions, demonstrated that these extractable humic substances (HS) together account for 54-56 percent and 46 percent of the total 127I and 129I in the soil, respectively. The variations among 127I and 129I concentrations, isotopic ratios (129I/127I), chemical properties of all these humic substances indicated iodine was bound to a small-size aromatic subunit (~10 kDa), while the large-size subunit (~90 kDa), which likely linked the small-size unit through some weak chemical forces, determined the relative mobility of iodine bound to organic matter. Soil resuspension experiments simulating surface runoff or stormflow and erosion events were conducted with soils collected from SRS. Results showed that 72-77 percent of the newly-introduced I- or IO3- were irreversibly sequestered into the organic-rich soil, while the rest was transformed into colloidal and dissolved organo-iodine by the soil. The resulting iodine remobilization contradicts the conventional view that considers only I- or IO3- as the mobile forms. Quantitative structure analysis by 13C DPMAS NMR and solution state 1H NMR on these humic substances indicate that iodine is closely related to the aromatic regions containing esterified products of phenolic and fomic acid or other aliphatic carboxylic acids, amide functionalities, quinone-like structure activated by electron-donating groups (e.g., NH2) or hemicelluloses-lignin-like complex with phenyl-glycosidic linkage. The micro-molecular environment, such as the hydrophobic aliphatic periphery hindering the active aromatic cores and the hydrophilic polysaccharides favoring its accessibility towards hydrophilic iodine species, play another key role in the interactions between iodine and SOM. NMR spectra of the colloidal organic Pu carrier which can potentially be released from the soil during the surface runoff or stormflow showed Pu was transported, at sub-pM concentrations, by a cutin-derived soil degradation products containing siderophore-like moieties and virtually all mobile Pu.

Xu, Chen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Transporting Natural Gas in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

8 LNG (liquefied natural gas) import facilities and 100 LNG peaking facilities (see map). Learn more about the natural gas pipeline network:

497

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Generalized Natural Gas...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity Design Schematic Generalized Natural Gas Pipeline Capcity Design Schematic...

498

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Natural Gas > About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines > U.S ... The EIA has determined that the informational map displays here do not raise security ...

499

Neptune Deepwater Port Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Neptune Deepwater Port Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) from Trinidad and Tobago (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade...

500

Neptune Deepwater Port Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Yemen (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Neptune Deepwater Port Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (price) from Yemen (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...