National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for natural abundance half-life

  1. Half Life of {sup 127}Te

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batista, Wagner F.; Genezini, Frederico A.; Zamboni, Cibele B.; Zahn, Guilherme S. [Centro do Reator de Pesquisas (CRPq)-Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP). Av. Linneu Prestes, 2242-Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo, SP, 05507-000 (Brazil)

    2009-06-03

    In this work, the half life of the beta-unstable nucleus {sup 127}Te was studied using neutron-irradiated samples of {sup 126}Te. The gamma activity of each of the irradiated samples was followed for 3-5 consecutive half lives. The results were analysed in two different ways, and the resulting half-life was 9.295(5)h, which is compatible with the tabulated value of 9.35(7)h, with much lower uncertainty.

  2. EFFECTIVE DOSIMETRIC HALF LIFE OF CESIUM 137 SOIL CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T; P Fledderman, P; Michael Paller, M

    2008-01-09

    In the early 1960s, an area of privately-owned swamp adjacent to the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS), known as Creek Plantation, was contaminated by site operations. Studies conducted in 1974 estimated that approximately 925 GBq of {sup 137}Cs was deposited in the swamp. Subsequently, a series of surveys--composed of 52 monitoring locations--was initiated to characterize and trend the contaminated environment. The annual, potential, maximum doses to a hypothetical hunter were estimated by conservatively using the maximum {sup 137}Cs concentrations measured in the soil. The purpose of this report is to calculate an 'effective dosimetric' half-life for {sup 137}Cs in soil (based on the maximum concentrations) and compare it to the effective environmental half-life (based on the geometric mean concentrations).

  3. Precise half-life measurements for the superallowed beta(+) emitters Ar-34 and Cl-34 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.; Brinkley, J. F.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Mayes, V. E.; Nica, N.; Sanchez-Vega, M.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

    2006-01-01

    To contribute meaningfully to any test of the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix, the measured ft value of a superallowed 0(+)-> 0(+) beta(+) transition must be obtained to a precision of 0.1% or better. We have determined the half-life of the superallowed emitter Ar-34 to be 843.8(4)ms... daughter Cl-34. We achieved the required precision on Ar-34 by analyzing the parent-daughter composite decay with a new fitting technique. We also obtained an improved half-life for Cl-34 of 1.5268(5) s, which has 0.03% precision and is a factor of two...

  4. $?$-Decay Half-Life of the $rp$-Process Waiting Point Nuclide $^{84}$Mo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. B. Stoker; P. F. Mantica; D. Bazin; A. Becerril; J. S. Berryman; H. L. Crawford; A. Estrade; C. J. Guess; G. W. Hitt; G. Lorusso; M. Matos; K. Minamisono; F. Montes; J. Pereira; G. Perdikakis; H. Schatz; K. Smith; R. G. T. Zegers

    2009-01-08

    A half-life of 2.2 $\\pm$ 0.2 s has been deduced for the ground-state $\\beta$ decay of $^{84}$Mo, more than 1$\\sigma$ shorter than the previously adopted value. $^{84}$Mo is an even-even N = Z nucleus lying on the proton dripline, created during explosive hydrogen burning in Type I X-ray bursts in the rapid proton capture ($rp$) process. The effect of the measured half-life on $rp$-process reaction flow is explored. Implications on theoretical treatments of nuclear deformation in $^{84}$Mo are also discussed.

  5. Noise in protein expression scales with natural protein abundance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulsson, Johan

    Noise in protein expression scales with natural protein abundance Arren Bar-Even1, Johan Paulsson2,3, Narendra Maheshri4, Miri Carmi1, Erin O'Shea4, Yitzhak Pilpel1 & Naama Barkai1,5 Noise in gene expression-specific regulation. Studies of individual promoters have suggested different dominating noise sources, raising

  6. Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed beta(+) emitter (38)K(m) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, G. C.; Boisvert, G.; Bricault, P.; Churchman, R.; Dombsky, M.; Lindner, T.; Macdonald, J. A.; Vandervoort, E.; Bishop, S.; D'Auria, J. M.; Hardy, John C.; Iacob, V. E.; Leslie, J. R.; Mak, H. -B.

    2010-01-01

    The half-life of (38)K(m) has been measured to be 924.46(14) ms, a result that is a factor of two more precise than any of the five previous measurements of this quantity. The previous results are not consistent with one another, but our result...

  7. Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed beta(+) emitter (10)C 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.; Golovko, V.; Goodwin, J.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    The half-life of (10)C has been measured to be 19.310(4) s, a result with 0.02% precision, which is a factor of three improvement over the best previous result. Since (10)C is the lightest superallowed 0(+)-> 0(+) beta(+) emitter, its ft value has...

  8. Half-life of the electron-capture decay of (97)Ru: Precision measurement shows no temperature dependence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodwin, J. R.; Golovko, V. V.; Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.

    2009-01-01

    as having a 1.2(2)% shorter half-life at 12 K [5]; and 7Be, which decays by pure electron capture, apparently had a half-life longer by 0.9(2)% at 12 K in palladium and by 0.7(2)% in indium [6]. The authors of these reports also proposed a theoretical... for any allowed transition from 97Ru is 892 keV, the nucleus must decay by pure electron capture. Three years ago, Wang et al. [6] reported half-life measurements of another pure electron-capture emitter, 7Be, situated in both palladium and indium...

  9. Half-life determination for {sup 108}Ag and {sup 110}Ag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahn, Guilherme S.; Genezini, Frederico A.

    2014-11-11

    In this work, the half-life of the short-lived silver radionuclides {sup 108}Ag and {sup 110}Ag were measured by following the activity of samples after they were irradiated in the IEA-R1 reactor. The results were then fitted using a non-paralizable dead time correction to the regular exponential decay and the individual half-life values obtained were then analyzed using both the Normalized Residuals and the Rajeval techniques, in order to reach the most exact and precise final values. To check the validity of dead-time correction, a second correction method was also employed by means of counting a long-lived {sup 60}Co radioactive source together with the samples as a livetime chronometer. The final half-live values obtained using both dead-time correction methods were in good agreement, showing that the correction was properly assessed. The results obtained are partially compatible with the literature values, but with a lower uncertainty, and allow a discussion on the last ENSDF compilations' values.

  10. Measurement of the half-life of (198)Au in a nonmetal: High-precision measurement shows no host-material dependence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodwin, J. R.; Nica, N.; Iacob, V. E.; Dibidad, A.; Hardy, John C.

    2010-01-01

    . In their subsequent study of the ?? decay of 198Au sited in a pure-gold host material, Spillane et al. [3] claimed to have observed both these effects, albeit to a lesser extent than the theory predicted. The theory predicts that at room temperature the half... of the half-life of 198Au in gold metal?ours [4] and that of Spillane et al. [3]?were performed with sources prepared by neutron activation of natural gold, 197Au. To obtain comparable conditions and statistics for our measurement in a nonmetal, we wished...

  11. Development of a time-variable nuclear pulser for half life measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahn, Guilherme S.; Domienikan, Claudio; Carvalhaes, Roberto P. M.; Genezini, Frederico A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN-CNEN/SP. P.O. Box 11049, Sao Paulo, 05422-970 (Brazil)

    2013-05-06

    In this work a time-variable pulser system with an exponentially-decaying pulse frequency is presented, which was developed using the low-cost, open-source Arduino microcontroler plataform. In this system, the microcontroller produces a TTL signal in the selected rate and a pulse shaper board adjusts it to be entered in an amplifier as a conventional pulser signal; both the decay constant and the initial pulse rate can be adjusted using a user-friendly control software, and the pulse amplitude can be adjusted using a potentiometer in the pulse shaper board. The pulser was tested using several combinations of initial pulse rate and decay constant, and the results show that the system is stable and reliable, and is suitable to be used in half-life measurements.

  12. Conversion of experimental half-life to effective electron neutrino mass in 0nubetabeta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smolnikov, Anatoly; Grabmayr, Peter [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia, and Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    The Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) collaboration will be searching for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. As a result it will measure the half-life T{sub 1/2} of this rare process; or at least a new value for the lower limit for T{sub 1/2} will be derived. The sensitivity of the GERDA experiment on the effective electron neutrino mass depends on the theoretical value for the nuclear matrix element M and the kinematical phase space factor G.In this Brief Report we focus on existing difficulties in applying the dimensionless values of M calculated by various theoretical groups, which use different methods and parametrizations. The implicit radius dependencies in M and G are discussed. Resulting values of the neutrino mass are tabulated for various representative half-lives T{sub 1/2} representing the sensitivity of the various phases of the GERDA experiment.

  13. EFFECTIVE HALF-LIFE OF CESIUM-137 IN VARIOUS ENVIRONMENTAL MEDIA AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T.; Paller, M.; Baker, R.

    2013-12-12

    During the operational history of the Savannah River Site (SRS), many different radionuclides have been released from site facilities into the SRS environment. However, only a relatively small number of pathways, most importantly {sup 137}Cs in fish and deer, have contributed significantly to doses and risks to the public. The “effective” half-lives (T{sub e}) of {sup 137}Cs (which include both physical decay and environmental dispersion) in Savannah River floodplain soil and vegetation and in fish and white-tailed deer from the SRS were estimated using long-term monitoring data. For 1974–2011, the T{sub e}s of {sup 137}Cs in Savannah River floodplain soil and vegetation were 17.0 years (95% CI = 14.2–19.9) and 13.4 years (95% CI = 10.8–16.0), respectively. These T{sub e}s were greater than in a previous study that used data collected only through 2005 as a likely result of changes in the flood regime of the Savannah River. Field analyses of {sup 137}Cs concentrations in deer collected during yearly controlled hunts at the SRS indicated an overall T{sub e} of 15.9 years (95% CI = 12.3–19.6) for 1965–2011; however, the T{sub e} for 1990–2011 was significantly shorter (11.8 years, 95% CI = 4.8–18.8) due to an increase in the rate of {sup 137}Cs removal. The shortest T{sub e}s were for fish in SRS streams and the Savannah River (3.5–9.0 years), where dilution and dispersal resulted in rapid {sup 137}Cs removal. Long-term data show that T{sub e}s are significantly shorter than the physical half-life of {sup 137}Cs in the SRS environment but that they can change over time. Therefore, it is desirable have a long period of record for calculating Tes and risky to extrapolate T{sub e}s beyond this period unless the processes governing {sup 137}Cs removal are clearly understood.

  14. Measurement of the Double-Beta Decay Half-life of {sup 136}Xe in KamLAND-Zen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KamLAND-Zen Collaboration; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Hanakago, H.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kato, R.; Koga, M.; Matsuda, S.; Mitsui, T.; Nakada, T.; Nakamura, K.; Obata, A.; Oki, A.; Ono, Y.; Shimizu, I.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B. D.; Yamada, S.; Yoshida, H.; Kozlov, A.; Yoshida, S.; Banks, T. I.; Detwiler, J. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Han, K.; O'Donnell, T.; Berger, B. E.; Efremenko, Y.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Enomoto, S.; Decowski, M. P.

    2012-01-23

    We present results from the KamLAND-Zen double-beta decay experiment based on an exposure of 77.6 days with 129 kg of {sup 136}Xe. The measured two-neutrino double-beta decay half-life of {sup 136}Xe is T{sup 2{nu}}{sub 1/2} = 2:38 {+-}#6; 0:02(stat)#6;{+-}0.14(syst)#2;x10{sup 21} yr, consistent with a recent measurement by EXO-200. We also obtain a lower limit for the neutrinoless double-beta decay half-life, T{sup 0{nu}}{sub 1/2} > 5.7 x#2; 10{sup 24} yr at 90% C.L.

  15. Natural abundance 17O DNP two-dimensional and surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Perras, Frédéric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-06-22

    Due to its extremely low natural abundance and quadrupolar nature, the 17O nuclide is very rarely used for spectroscopic investigation of solids by NMR without isotope enrichment. Additionally, the applicability of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which leads to sensitivity enhancements of 2 orders of magnitude, to 17O is wrought with challenges due to the lack of spin diffusion and low polarization transfer efficiency from 1H. Here, we demonstrate new DNP-based measurements that extend 17O solid-state NMR beyond its current capabilities. The use of the PRESTO technique instead of conventional 1H–17O cross-polarization greatly improves the sensitivity and enables the facile measurementmore »of undistorted line shapes and two-dimensional 1H–17O HETCOR NMR spectra as well as accurate internuclear distance measurements at natural abundance. This was applied for distinguishing hydrogen-bonded and lone 17O sites on the surface of silica gel; the one-dimensional spectrum of which could not be used to extract such detail. As a result, this greatly enhanced sensitivity has enabled, for the first time, the detection of surface hydroxyl sites on mesoporous silica at natural abundance, thereby extending the concept of DNP surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy to the 17O nuclide.« less

  16. Manipulating the abundance of natural enemies in ornamental landscapes with floral resource plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanks, Lawrence M.

    used yellow sticky cards and a vacuum sampler to collect arthropods from experimental plots in 2000 natural enemy survival and effectiveness, including microclimate, avail- ability of food for adults

  17. Studies of minute quantities of natural abundance molecules using 2D heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy under 100kHz MAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nishiyama, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Malon, M.; Singappuli-Arachchige, D.; Slowing, I. I.; Pruski, M.

    2015-02-16

    Two-dimensional 1H{13C} heteronuclear correlation solid-state NMR spectra of naturally abundant solid materials are presented, acquired using the 0.75-mm magic angle spinning (MAS) probe at spinning rates up to 100 kHz. In spite of the miniscule sample volume (290 nL), high-quality HSQC-type spectra of bulk samples as well as surface-bound molecules can be obtained within hours of experimental time. The experiments are compared with those carried out at 40 kHz MAS using a 1.6-mm probe, which offered higher overall sensitivity due to a larger rotor volume. The benefits of ultrafast MAS in such experiments include superior resolution in 1H dimension withoutmore »resorting to 1H–1H homonuclear RF decoupling, easy optimization, and applicability to mass-limited samples. As a result, the HMQC spectra of surface-bound species can be also acquired under 100 kHz MAS, although the dephasing of transverse magnetization has significant effect on the efficiency transfer under MAS alone.« less

  18. Cumulative fission yields of short-lived isotopes under natural-abundance-boron-carbide-moderated neutron spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finn, Erin C.; Metz, Lori A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Pierson, Bruce; Wittman, Richard S.; Friese, Judah I.; Kephart, Rosara F.

    2015-04-09

    The availability of gamma spectroscopy data on samples containing mixed fission products at short times after irradiation is limited. Due to this limitation, data interpretation methods for gamma spectra of mixed fission product samples, where the individual fission products have not been chemically isolated from interferences, are not well-developed. The limitation is particularly pronounced for fast pooled neutron spectra because of the lack of available fast reactors in the United States. Samples containing the actinide isotopes 233, 235, 238U, 237Np, and 239Pu individually were subjected to a 2$ pulse in the Washington State University 1 MW TRIGA reactor. To achieve a fission-energy neutron spectrum, the spectrum was tailored using a natural abundance boron carbide capsule to absorb neutrons in the thermal and epithermal region of the spectrum. Our tailored neutron spectrum is unique to the WSU reactor facility, consisting of a soft fission spectrum that contains some measurable flux in the resonance region. This results in a neutron spectrum at greater than 0.1 keV with an average energy of 70 keV, similar to fast reactor spectra and approaching that of 235U fission. Unique fission product gamma spectra were collected from 4 minutes to 1 week after fission using single-crystal high purity germanium detectors. Cumulative fission product yields measured in the current work generally agree with published fast pooled fission product yield values from ENDF/B-VII, though a bias was noted for 239Pu. The present work contributes to the compilation of energy-resolved fission product yield nuclear data for nuclear forensic purposes.

  19. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2009-02-28

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS ¹?N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by ¹?N NMR. Liquid state ¹?N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (¹H–¹?N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  20. {sup 39}Ar Detection at the 10{sup -16} Isotopic Abundance Level with Atom Trap Trace Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, W.; Williams, W.; Bailey, K.; O'Connor, T. P.; Mueller, P.; Davis, A. M.; Hu, S.-M.; Sun, Y. R.; Lu, Z.-T.; Purtschert, R.; Sturchio, N. C.

    2011-03-11

    Atom trap trace analysis, a laser-based atom counting method, has been applied to analyze atmospheric {sup 39}Ar (half-life=269 yr), a cosmogenic isotope with an isotopic abundance of 8x10{sup -16}. In addition to the superior selectivity demonstrated in this work, the counting rate and efficiency of atom trap trace analysis have been improved by 2 orders of magnitude over prior results. The significant applications of this new analytical capability lie in radioisotope dating of ice and water samples and in the development of dark matter detectors.

  1. Helioseismology and Solar Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

    2007-11-28

    Helioseismology has allowed us to study the structure of the Sun in unprecedented detail. One of the triumphs of the theory of stellar evolution was that helioseismic studies had shown that the structure of solar models is very similar to that of the Sun. However, this agreement has been spoiled by recent revisions of the solar heavy-element abundances. Heavy element abundances determine the opacity of the stellar material and hence, are an important input to stellar model calculations. The models with the new, low abundances do not satisfy helioseismic constraints. We review here how heavy-element abundances affect solar models, how these models are tested with helioseismology, and the impact of the new abundances on standard solar models. We also discuss the attempts made to improve the agreement of the low-abundance models with the Sun and discuss how helioseismology is being used to determine the solar heavy-element abundance. A review of current literature shows that attempts to improve agreement between solar models with low heavy-element abundances and seismic inference have been unsuccessful so far. The low-metallicity models that have the least disagreement with seismic data require changing all input physics to stellar models beyond their acceptable ranges. Seismic determinations of the solar heavy-element abundance yield results that are consistent with the older, higher values of the solar abundance, and hence, no major changes to the inputs to solar models are required to make higher-metallicity solar models consistent with helioseismic data.

  2. 1Scientific RepoRts | 5:14055 | DOi: 10.1038/srep14055 www.nature.com/scientificreports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    penetration, but face limitations in tracer half-life and radiation dose. Clinically, most cell tracking with naturally low MRI signal (e.g., bones, tendon, lungs, or any tissues near air). Moreover, MRI methods by Philips Research that directly images the intense magnetization of SPIOs rather than indirectly detecting

  3. The Solar Argon Abundance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katharina Lodders

    2007-10-24

    The solar argon abundance cannot be directly derived by spectroscopic observations of the solar photosphere. The solar Ar abundance is evaluated from solar wind measurements, nucleosynthetic arguments, observations of B stars, HII regions, planetary nebulae, and noble gas abundances measured in Jupiter's atmosphere. These data lead to a recommended argon abundance of N(Ar) = 91,200(+/-)23,700 (on a scale where Si = 10^6 atoms). The recommended abundance for the solar photosphere (on a scale where log N(H) = 12) is A(Ar)photo = 6.50(+/-)0.10, and taking element settling into account, the solar system (protosolar) abundance is A(Ar)solsys = 6.57(+/-)0.10.

  4. Element Abundances at High Redshifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max Pettini

    1999-02-11

    I review measurements of element abundances in different components of the high redshift universe, including the Lyman alpha forest, damped Lyman alpha systems, and Lyman break galaxies. Although progress is being made in all three areas, recent work has also produced some surprises and shown that established ideas about the nature of the damped Lyman alpha systems in particular may be too simplistic. Overall, our knowledge of metal abundances at high z is still very sketchy. Most significantly, there seems to be an order of magnitude shortfall in the comoving density of metals which have been measured up to now compared with those produced by the star formation activity seen in Lyman break galaxies. At least some of the missing metals are likely to be in hot gas in galactic halos and proto-clusters.

  5. r-Process Abundance Signatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. J. Cowan; C. Sneden

    2002-12-05

    Abundance observations indicate the presence of rapid-neutron capture (i.e., r-process) elements in old Galactic halo and globular cluster stars. These observations demonstrate that the earliest generations of stars in the Galaxy, responsible for neutron-capture synthesis and the progenitors of the halo stars, were rapidly evolving. Abundance comparisons among large numbers of stars provide clues about the nature of neutron-capture element synthesis both during the earliest times and throughout the history of the Galaxy. In particular, these comparisons suggest differences in the way the heavier (including Ba and above) and lighter neutron capture elements are synthesized in nature. Understanding these differences will help to identify the astrophysical site (or sites) of and conditions in the r-process. The abundance comparisons also demonstrate a large star-to-star scatter in the neutron-capture/iron ratios at low metallicities- which disappears with increasing [Fe/H]- and suggests an early, chemically unmixed and inhomogeneous Galaxy. The very recent neutron-capture element observations indicate that the early phases of Galactic nucleosynthesis, and the associated chemical evolution, are quite complex, with the yields from different (progenitor) mass-range stars contributing to different chemical mixes. Stellar abundance comparisons suggest a change from the r-process to the slow neutron capture (i.e., s-) process at higher metallicities (and later times) in the Galaxy. Finally, the detection of thorium and uranium in halo and globular cluster stars offers a promising, independent age-dating technique that can put lower limits on the age of the Galaxy and thus the Universe.

  6. Earth-Abundant Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE funds research into Earth-abundant materials for thin-film solar applications in response to the issue of materials scarcity surrounding other photovoltaic (PV) technologies. The sections below...

  7. Planning Amid Abundance: Alaska’s FY 2013 Budget Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBeath, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    because the abundance of shale gas in the lower-48 statesfrom heavy oil, natural gas and shale oil. Fiscal stabilityof natural gas. If so, this would be among the largest shale

  8. NSE abundance data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Odrzywolek

    2010-08-04

    Novel method of calculating Nuclear Statistical Equilibrium is presented. Basic equations are carefully solved using arbitrary precision arithmetic. Special interpolation procedure is then used to retrieve all abundances using tabulated results for neutrons and protons, together with basic nuclear data. Proton and neutron abundance tables, basic nuclear data and partition functions for nuclides used in calculations are provided. Simple interpolation algorithm using pre-calculated p and n abundances tabulated as a functions of kT, rho and Ye is outlined. Unique properties of this method are: (1) ability to pick-up out of NSE selected nuclei only (2) computational time scaling linearly with number of re-calculated abundances (3) relatively small amount of stored data: only two large tables (4) slightly faster than solving NSE equations using traditional Newton-Raphson methods for small networks (few tens of species); superior for huge (800-3000) networks (5) do not require initial guess; works well on random input (6) can tailored to specific application (7) ability to use third-party NSE solvers to obtain fully compatible tables (8) encapsulation of the NSE code for bug-free calculations. Range of applications for this approach is possible: coverage test of traditional NSE Newton-Raphson codes, generating starting values, code-to-code verification and possible replacement of the old legacy procedures in supernova simulations.

  9. Primordial Deuterium Abundance Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei A. Levshakov; Wilhelm H. Kegel; Fumio Takahara

    1997-12-23

    Deuterium abundances measured recently from QSO absorption-line systems lie in the range from 3 10^{-5} to 3 10^{-4}, which shed some questions on standard big bang theory. We show that this discordance may simply be an artifact caused by inadequate analysis ignoring spatial correlations in the velocity field in turbulent media. The generalized procedure (accounting for such correlations) is suggested to reconcile the D/H measurements. An example is presented based on two high-resolution observations of Q1009+2956 (low D/H) [1,2] and Q1718+4807 (high D/H) [8,9]. We show that both observations are compatible with D/H = 4.1 - 4.6 10^{-5}, and thus support SBBN. The estimated mean value = 4.4 10^{-5} corresponds to the baryon-to-photon ratio during SBBN eta = 4.4 10^{-10} which yields the present-day baryon density Omega_b h^2 = 0.015.

  10. Determining solar abundances using helioseismology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Antia; Sarbani Basu

    2006-02-28

    The recent downward revision of solar photospheric abundances of Oxygen and other heavy elements has resulted in serious discrepancies between solar models and solar structure as determined through helioseismology. In this work we investigate the possibility of determining the solar heavy-element abundance without reference to spectroscopy by using helioseismic data. Using the dimensionless sound-speed derivative in the solar convection zone, we find that the heavy element abundance, Z, of 0.0172 +/- 0.002, which is closer to the older, higher value of the abundances.

  11. Origin of Cosmic Chemical Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maio, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological N-body hydrodynamic computations following atomic and molecular chemistry (e$^-$, H, H$^+$, H$^-$, He, He$^+$, He$^{++}$, D, D$^+$, H$_2$, H$_2^+$, HD, HeH$^+$), gas cooling, star formation and production of heavy elements (C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Fe, etc.) from stars covering a range of mass and metallicity are used to explore the origin of several chemical abundance patterns and to study both the metal and molecular content during simulated galaxy assembly. The resulting trends show a remarkable similarity to up-to-date observations of the most metal-poor damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ absorbers at redshift $z\\gtrsim 2$. These exhibit a transient nature and represent collapsing gaseous structures captured while cooling is becoming effective in lowering the temperature below $\\sim 10^4\\,\\rm K$, before they are disrupted by episodes of star formation or tidal effects. Our theoretical results agree with the available data for typical elemental ratios, such as [C/O], [Si/Fe], [O/Fe], [Si/O], [Fe/H], [O/...

  12. Literature survey of isotopic abundance data for 1987-1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, N.E. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

    1989-08-09

    I have compiled all of the data on isotopic abundance measurements and their variation in nature for the time period since the last General Assembly. Most of the data deals with the variations in the abundances as given by per mil deviations from some standard. As such, they are not of major interest to the Atomic Weights Commission. However, there were some measurements which are of general interest in this list.

  13. Primordial Lithium Abundance in Catalyzed Big Bang Nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Bird; Kristen Koopmans; Maxim Pospelov

    2008-05-19

    There exists a well known problem with the Li7+Be7 abundance predicted by standard big bang nucleosynthesis being larger than the value observed in population II stars. The catalysis of big bang nucleosynthesis by metastable, \\tau_X \\ge 10^3 sec, charged particles X^- is capable of suppressing the primordial Li7+Be7, abundance and making it consistent with the observations. We show that to produce the correct abundance, this mechanism of suppression places a requirement on the initial abundance of X^- at temperatures of 4\\times 10^8 K to be on the order of or larger than 0.02 per baryon, which is within the natural range of abundances in models with metastable electroweak-scale particles. The suppression of Li7+Be7, is triggered by the formation of (Be7X^-), compound nuclei, with fast depletion of their abundances by catalyzed proton reactions, and in some models by direct capture of X^- on Be7. The combination of Li7+Be7 and Li6 constraints favours the window of lifetimes, 1000s \\la tau_X \\leq 2000 s.

  14. The oxygen abundance distribution in M101

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin

    2001-05-07

    The well-observed spiral galaxy M101 was considered. The radial distributions of oxygen abundances determined in three different ways (with the classic Te - method, with the R23 - method, and with the P -- method) were compared. It was found that the parameters (the central oxygen abundance and the gradient) of the radial O/H(P) abundance distribution are close to those of the O/H(Te) abundance distribution. The parameters of the O/H(R23) abundance distribution differ significantly from those of the O/H(Te) abundance distribution: the central O/H(R23) oxygen abundance is higher by around 0.4dex and the gradient is steeper by a factor of around 1.5 as compared to those values in the O/H(Te) abundance distribution. The dispersion in O/H(P) abundance at fixed radius is rather small, around 0.08 dex, and is equal to that in O/H(Te) abundance. The dispersion in O/H(R23) abundance at fixed radius is appreciably larger, around 0.16 dex, compared to that in O/H(Te) abundance. It has been shown that the extra dispersion in O/H(R23) abundances is an artifact and reflects scatter in excitation parameter P at fixed radius.

  15. Metaproteomics reveals abundant transposase expression in mutualistic endosymbionts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleiner, Manuel; Young, Jacque C; Shah, Manesh B; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Dubilier, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Transposases, enzymes that catalyze the movement of mobile genetic elements, are the most abundant genes in nature. While many bacteria encode an abundance of transposases in their genomes, the current paradigm is that transposase gene expression is tightly regulated and generally low due to its severe mutagenic effects. In the current study, we detected the highest number of transposase proteins ever reported in bacteria, in symbionts of the gutless marine worm Olavius algarvensis using metaproteomics. At least 26 different transposases from 12 different families were detected and genomic and proteomic analyses suggest many of these are active. This high expression of transposases indicates that the mechanisms for their tight regulation have been disabled or destroyed. Based on recent studies on other symbionts and pathogens that showed high transposase transcription, we speculate that abundant transposase expression might be common in symbionts and pathogens.

  16. THE SOLAR ARGON ABUNDANCE Katharina Lodders1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE SOLAR ARGON ABUNDANCE Katharina Lodders1 Received 2007 May 26; accepted 2007 October 16 ABSTRACT The solar argon abundance cannot be directly derived by spectroscopic observations of the solar photosphere. The solar argon abundance is evaluated from solar wind measurements, nucleosynthetic arguments

  17. Spectroscopic Study on the Beryllium Abundances of Red Giant Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takeda, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    An extensive spectroscopic study was carried out for the beryllium abundances of 200 red giants (mostly of late G and early K type), which were determined from the near-UV Be II 3131.066 line based on high-dispersion spectra obtained by Subaru/HDS, with an aim of investigating the nature of surface Be contents in these evolved giants; e.g., dependence upon stellar parameters, degree of peculiarity along with its origin and build-up timing. We found that Be is considerably deficient (to widely different degree from star to star) in the photosphere of these evolved giants by ~1-3 dex (or more) compared to the initial abundance. While the resulting Be abundances (A(Be)) appear to weakly depend upon T_eff, log g, [Fe/H], M, age, and v_sin i, this may be attributed to the metallicity dependence of A(Be) coupled with the mutual correlation between these stellar parameters, since such tendencies almost disappear in the metallicity-scaled Be abundance ([Be/Fe]). By comparing the Be abundances (as well as their correl...

  18. Abundance Ratios in Early-Type Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynier Peletier

    1999-04-21

    Although evidence is accumulating that abundance ratios in galaxies are often non-solar, they are far from understood. I resume the current evidence for non-solar abundance ratios, supplementing the recent review by Worthey (1998) with some new results. It appears that the Mg/Fe abundance ratio only depends on the mass of the galaxy, not on the formation time-scale. For massive galaxies [Mg/Fe] > 0, while small galaxies show solar abundance ratios. Information about abundances of other element is scarce, but new evidence is given that [Ca/Fe] is solar, or slightly lower than solar, contrary to what is expected for an alpha-element.

  19. Using automatically-triggered cameras to monitor and estimate bobcat abundance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heilbrun, Richard David

    2002-01-01

    's ability to identify unique pelt and facial markings. Individual bobcats were successfully identified using these natural markings. Scent stations and physical capture combined with radio telemetry were unable to monitor changes in abundance or provide...

  20. Relic abundance of light photinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, D.J. [Department of Physics and Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); [NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Farrar, G.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855 (United States); Kolb, E.W. [NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)] [NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    1997-11-01

    We solve the coupled Boltzmann equation for the system of light photinos interacting with pions and R{sup 0}{close_quote}s (the gluon-gluino bound state) to determine the relic abundance of light photinos in the light gaugino scenario. Cosmology bounds the ratio r of the R{sup 0} mass to the {tilde {gamma}} mass to be less than about 1.8. We also use a model Lagrangian embodying crossing symmetry between the R{sup 0}{leftrightarrow}{tilde {gamma}}{pi}{pi} and R{sup 0}{pi}{leftrightarrow}{tilde {gamma}}{pi} reactions to identify cosmologically favored regions of R{sup 0} lifetime as a function of R{sup 0} and {tilde {gamma}} masses. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Stellar abundances of beryllium and CUBES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smiljanic, R

    2014-01-01

    Stellar abundances of beryllium are useful in different areas of astrophysics, including studies of the Galactic chemical evolution, of stellar evolution, and of the formation of globular clusters. Determining Be abundances in stars is, however, a challenging endeavor. The two Be II resonance lines useful for abundance analyses are in the near UV, a region strongly affected by atmospheric extinction. CUBES is a new spectrograph planned for the VLT that will be more sensitive than current instruments in the near UV spectral region. It will allow the observation of fainter stars, expanding the number of targets where Be abundances can be determined. Here, a brief review of stellar abundances of Be is presented together with a discussion of science cases for CUBES. In particular, preliminary simulations of CUBES spectra are presented, highlighting its possible impact in investigations of Be abundances of extremely metal-poor stars and of stars in globular clusters.

  2. On the oxygen abundance in our Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin; F. Ferrini; R. V. Shkvarun

    2003-02-03

    The compilation of published spectra of Galactic HII regions with available diagnostic [OIII]4363 line has been carried out. Our list contains 71 individual measurements of 13 HII regions in the range of galactocentric distances from 6.6 to 14.8 kpc. The oxygen abundances in all the HII regions were recomputed in the same way, using the classic Te - method. The oxygen abundance at the solar galactocentric distance traced by those HII regions is in agreement with the oxygen abundance in the interstellar medium in the solar vicinity derived with high precision from the interstellar absorption lines towards stars. The derived radial oxygen abundance distribution was compared with that for HII regions from the Shaver et al. (1983) sample which is the basis of many models for the chemical evolution of our Galaxy. It was found that the original Shaver et al.'s oxygen abundances are overestimated by 0.2-0.3 dex. Oxygen abundances in HII regions from the Shaver et al. sample have been redetermined with the recently suggested P - method. The radial distribution of oxygen abundances from the Shaver et al. sample redetermined with the P - method is in agreement with our radial distribution of (O/H)_Te abundances.

  3. Comparative analysis of spectra of the background of the proportional counter filled with Kr, enriched in Kr-78, and with Kr of natural content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. M. Gavriljuk; V. N. Gavrin; A. M. Gangapshev; V. V. Kazalov; V. V. Kuzminov; S. I. Panasenko; S. S. Ratkevich

    2007-11-16

    The results of the experiment searching for 2K-capture with large low-background proportional counter are presented. The comparison of spectra of the background of the proportional counter filled with Kr enriched in $^{78}$Kr (8400 hr) and with natural Kr (3039 hr) is given. A new limit on the half-life of $^{78}$Kr with regard to 2K-capture, T$_{1/2}\\geq2.0\\cdot10^{21}$ yrs (95% C.L.) has been obtained.

  4. Prolonged lipoprotein half-life: effect on oxidative stability and physical features of lipoprotein particles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simeral, Stephanie Bianco

    2002-01-01

    of lipoprotein density classes of VLDL, LDL, and high density lipoproteins (HDL) occur in accordance with effects observed in mammalian models of delayed LDL clearance such as the LDL-receptor knockout mouse that is also known to experience prolonged circulation...

  5. Can Environmental Factors Affect Half-Life in Beta-Decay? An Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodwin, John 1953-

    2013-01-16

    Early in the history of the field of nuclear science, experiments were performed to ascertain whether the half-lives of the radioactive substances being studied – isotopes then called the “radium emanation” [222Rn], “radium A” [218Po], “radium B...

  6. Method of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bray, L.A.; Ryan, J.L.

    1999-03-23

    The present invention is a method of removing an impurity of plutonium, lead or a combination thereof from a mixture of radionuclides that contains the impurity and at least one parent radionuclide. The method has the steps of (a) insuring that the mixture is a hydrochloric acid mixture; (b) oxidizing the acidic mixture and specifically oxidizing the impurity to its highest oxidation state; and (c) passing the oxidized mixture through a chloride form anion exchange column whereupon the oxidized impurity absorbs to the chloride form anion exchange column and the {sup 229}Th or {sup 227}Ac ``cow`` radionuclide passes through the chloride form anion exchange column. The plutonium is removed for the purpose of obtaining other alpha emitting radionuclides in a highly purified form suitable for medical therapy. In addition to plutonium, lead, iron, cobalt, copper, uranium, and other metallic cations that form chloride anionic complexes that may be present in the mixture are removed from the mixture on the chloride form anion exchange column. 8 figs.

  7. Methods of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bray, L.A.; Ryan, J.L.

    1998-09-15

    The present invention is a method of obtaining a radionuclide product selected from the group consisting of {sup 223}Ra and {sup 225}Ac, from a radionuclide ``cow`` of {sup 227}Ac or {sup 229}Th respectively. The method comprises the steps of (a) permitting ingrowth of at least one radionuclide daughter from said radionuclide ``cow`` forming an ingrown mixture; (b) insuring that the ingrown mixture is a nitric acid ingrown mixture; (c) passing the nitric acid ingrown mixture through a first nitrate form ion exchange column which permits separating the ``cow`` from at least one radionuclide daughter; (d) insuring that the at least one radionuclide daughter contains the radionuclide product; (e) passing the at least one radionuclide daughter through a second ion exchange column and separating the at least one radionuclide daughter from the radionuclide product and (f) recycling the at least one radionuclide daughter by adding it to the ``cow``. In one embodiment the radionuclide ``cow`` is the {sup 227}Ac, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a {sup 227}Th and the product radionuclide is the {sup 223}Ra and the first nitrate form ion exchange column passes the {sup 227}Ac and retains the {sup 227}Th. In another embodiment the radionuclide ``cow`` is the {sup 229}Th, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a {sup 225}Ra and said product radionuclide is the {sup 225}Ac and the {sup 225}Ac and nitrate form ion exchange column retains the {sup 229}Th and passes the {sup 225}Ra/Ac. 8 figs.

  8. Average and recommended half-life values for two neutrino double beta decay: upgrade'05

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Barabash

    2006-02-17

    All existing ``positive'' results on two neutrino double beta decay in different nuclei were analyzed. Using the procedure recommended by the Particle Data Group, weighted average values for half-lives of $^{48}$Ca, $^{76}$Ge, $^{82}$Se, $^{96}$Zr, $^{100}$Mo, $^{100}$Mo - $^{100}$Ru ($0^+_1$), $^{116}$Cd, $^{150}$Nd, $^{150}$Nd - $^{150}$Sm ($0^+_1$) and $^{238}$U were obtained. Existing geochemical data were analyzed and recommended values for half-lives of $^{128}$Te, $^{130}$Te and $^{130}$Ba are proposed. We recommend the use of these results as presently the most precise and reliable values for half-lives.

  9. Average and recommended half-life values for two neutrino double beta decay: upgrade-09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Barabash

    2009-08-28

    All existing ``positive'' results on two neutrino double beta decay in different nuclei were analyzed. Using the procedure recommended by the Particle Data Group, weighted average values for half-lives of $^{48}$Ca, $^{76}$Ge, $^{82}$Se, $^{96}$Zr, $^{100}$Mo, $^{100}$Mo - $^{100}$Ru ($0^+_1$), $^{116}$Cd, $^{130}$Te, $^{150}$Nd, $^{150}$Nd - $^{150}$Sm ($0^+_1$) and $^{238}$U were obtained. Existing geochemical data were analyzed and recommended values for half-lives of $^{128}$Te, $^{130}$Te and $^{130}$Ba are proposed. We recommend the use of these results as presently the most precise and reliable values for half-lives.

  10. Average (RECOMMENDED) Half-Life Values for Two Neutrino Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Barabash

    2002-03-01

    All existing "positive" results on two neutrino double beta decay in different nuclei were analyzed. Using procedure recommended by Particle Data Group weighted average values for half-lives of $^{48}$Ca, $^{76}$Ge, $^{82}$Se, $^{96}$Zr, $^{100}$Mo, $^{100}$Mo - $^{100}$Ru ($0^+_1$), $^{116}$Cd, $^{150}$Nd and $^{238}$U were obtained. Existing geochemical data were analyzed and recommended values for half-lives of $^{128}$Te and $^{130}$Te are proposed. We recommend to use these results as most precise and reliable values for half-lives at this moment.

  11. TOWARDS A PRECISION MEASUREMENT OF THE HALF LIFE OF NEUTRINOLESS DOUBLE BETA DECAY OF 136

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gratta, Giorgio

    ). Even if debatable, a first hint came from the claimed observation of neutrinoless double beta decay

  12. The half-life of {sup 131g,m}Te

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruivo, J. C.; Zamboni, C. B.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Heder Medina, Nilberto

    2013-05-06

    In this work, the half-lives of {sup 131m}Te and {sup 131g}Te were measured. Radioactive sources of {sup 131}Te were obtained using the {sup 130}Te(n,{gamma}){sup 131}Te nuclear reaction. These nuclear parameters have been determined with a better confidence and accuracy than previously available: 18.89 {+-} 0.11 min and 33.18 {+-} 0.13 h, respectively. These results are quite helpful for new calculations that attempt to describe the low-lying levels in {sup 131}I from the decay of {sup 131g,m}Te.

  13. Average and recommended half-life values for two neutrino double beta decay: Upgrade-2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barabash, A. S. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, B. Cheremushkinskaya 25, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-30

    All existing positive results on two neutrino double beta decay in different nuclei were analyzed. Using the procedure recommended by the Particle Data Group, weighted average values for half-lives of {sup 48}Ca, {sup 76}Ge, {sup 82}Se, {sup 96}Zr, {sup 100}Mo, {sup 100}Mo?{sup 100}Ru (0{sub 1}{sup +}), {sup 116}Cd, {sup 130}Te, {sup 136}Xe, {sup 150}Nd, {sup 150}Nd?{sup 150}Sm (0{sub 1}{sup +}) and {sup 238}U were obtained. Existing geochemical data were analyzed and recommended values for half-lives of {sup 128}Te and {sup 130}Ba are proposed. I recommend the use of these results as the most currently reliable values for half-lives.

  14. Method of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bray, Lane A. (Richland, WA); Ryan, Jack L. (West Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a method of removing an impurity of plutonium, lead or a combination thereof from a mixture of radionuclides that contains the impurity and at least one parent radionuclide. The method has the steps of (a) insuring that the mixture is a hydrochloric acid mixture; (b) oxidizing the acidic mixture and specifically oxidizing the impurity to its highest oxidation state; and (c) passing the oxidized mixture through a chloride form anion exchange column whereupon the oxidized impurity absorbs to the chloride form anion exchange column and the 22.sup.9 Th or 2.sup.27 Ac "cow" radionuclide passes through the chloride form anion exchange column. The plutonium is removed for the purpose of obtaining other alpha emitting radionuclides in a highly purified form suitable for medical therapy. In addition to plutonium; lead, iron, cobalt, copper, uranium, and other metallic cations that form chloride anionic complexes that may be present in the mixture; are removed from the mixture on the chloride form anion exchange column.

  15. Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed beta(+) emitter (26)Si 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.; Banu, A.; Chen, L.; Golovko, V. V.; Goodwin, J.; Horvat, V.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    to select 26Si, the resulting 25.2-A-MeV radioactive beam was extracted into air through a 51-?m-thick kapton window. This beam, typically of 2? 104 ions per second, passed through a 0.3-mm thin BC-404 plastic scintillator, where the ions were counted... dependence of the rate at which 26Si was accumulated in the tape during the collection period. The number of ions registered in the scintillator located just in front of the aluminum degraders was recorded as a function of time with each cycle...

  16. Half-life measurements of isomeric states populated in projectile fragmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowry, M.; Podolay, Zs.

    2012-10-20

    The half-lives of excited isomeric states observed in {sup 195}Au, {sup 201}Tl and {sup 215}Rn are reported for the first time. Delayed {gamma}-rays were correlated with nuclei produced in the projectile fragmentation of relativistic {sup 238}U ions, unambiguously identified in terms of their atomic number (Z) and mass-to-charge ratio (A/Q) after traversing an in-flight separator. The observation of a long-lived isomeric state in {sup 195}Au with t{sub 1/2} = 16{sub -4}{sup +8}{mu}s is presented. Two shorter-lived isomeric states were detected in {sup 201}Tl and {sup 215}Rn with t{sub 1/2} = 95{sub -21}{sup +39} and 57{sub -12}{sup +21} ns respectively. In total 24 isomeric states were identified in different nuclei from Pt to Rn (A {approx} 200) during the current study, the majority of which were previously reported. The wealth of spectroscopic data provides the opportunity to determine the isomeric ratios over a wide range of Z, A and angular momentum (I h) of the reaction products. In particular, high-spin states with I Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 18 h provide a robust test of theoretical models of fragmentation.

  17. Beryllium abundances in metal-poor stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. F. Tan; J. R. Shi; G. Zhao

    2008-10-15

    We have determined beryllium abundances for 25 metal-poor stars based on the high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectra from the VLT/UVES database. Our results confirm that Be abundances increase with Fe, supporting the global enrichment of Be in the Galaxy. Oxygen abundances based on [O I] forbidden line implies a linear relation with a slope close to one for the Be vs. O trend, which indicates that Be is probably produced in a primary process. Some strong evidences are found for the intrinsic dispersion of Be abundances at a given metallicity. The deviation of HD132475 and HD126681 from the general Be vs. Fe and Be vs. O trend favours the predictions of the superbubble model, though the possibility that such dispersion originates from the inhomogeneous enrichment in Fe and O of the protogalactic gas cannot be excluded.

  18. Adenine Abundance in a Collapsing Molecular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandip K. Chakrabarti; Sonali Chakrabarti

    2000-03-18

    A vital ingredient of DNA molecule named adenine may be produced by successive addition of HCN during molecular cloud collapse and star formation. We compute its abundance in a collapsing cloud as a function of the reaction rate and show that in much of the circumstances the resulting amount may be sufficient to contaminate planets, comets and meteorites. We introduce a $f$-parameter which may be used to study the abundance where radiative association takes place.

  19. The iron abundance of the Magellanic Bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. L. Dufton; R. S. I. Ryans; H. M. A. Thompson; R. A. Street

    2008-02-01

    High-resolution HST ultra-violet spectra for five B-type stars in the Magellanic Bridge and in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds have been analysed to estimate their iron abundances. Those for the Clouds are lower than estimates obtained from late-type stars or the optical lines in B-type stars by approximately 0.5 dex. This may be due to systematic errors possibly arising from non-LTE effects or from errors in the atomic data as similar low Fe abundances having previously been reported from the analysis of the ultra-violet spectra of Galactic early-type stars. The iron abundance estimates for all three Bridge targets appear to be significantly lower than those found for the SMC and LMC by approximately -0.5 dex and -0.8 dex respectively and these differential results should not be affected by any systematic errors present in the absolute abundance estimates. These differential iron abundance estimates are consistent with the underabundances for C, N, O, Mg and Si of approximately -1.1 dex relative to our Galaxy previously found in our Bridge targets. The implications of these very low metal abundances for the Magellanic Bridge are discussed in terms of metal deficient material being stripped from the SMC.

  20. Oxygen abundance of open cluster dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. -X. Shen; X. -W. Liu; H. -W. Zhang; B. Jones; D. N. C. Lin

    2007-03-30

    We present oxygen abundances of dwarfs in the young open cluster IC 4665 deduced from the OI $\\lambda$7774 triplet lines and of dwarfs in the open cluster Pleiades derived from the [OI] $\\lambda$6300 forbidden line. Stellar parameters and oxygen abundances were derived using the spectroscopic synthesis tool SME (Spectroscopy Made Easy). We find a dramatic increase in the upper boundary of the OI triplet abundances with decreasing temperature in the dwarfs of IC 4665, consistent with the trend found by Schuler et al. in the open clusters Pleiades and M 34, and to a less extent in the cool dwarfs of Hyades (Schuler et al. 2006a) and UMa (King & Schuler 2005). By contrast, oxygen abundances derived from the [OI] $\\lambda$6300 forbidden line for stars in Pleiades and Hyades (Schuler et al. 2006b) are constant within the errors. Possible mechanisms that may lead a varying oxygen triplet line abundance are examined, including systematic errors in the stellar parameter determinations, the NLTE effects, surface activities and granulation. The age-related effects stellar surface activities (especially the chromospheric activities) are suggested by our analysis to blame for the large spreads of oxygen triplet line abundances.

  1. Ecological niche structure determines rangewide abundance patterns of species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martí nez-Meyer, Enrique; Dí az-Porras, Daniel; Peterson, A. Townsend; Yá ñ ez-Arenas, Carlos

    2012-09-03

    Spatial abundance patterns across species’ ranges have seen intense attention in macroecology and biogeography. One key hypothesis has been that abundance declines with geographic distance from the range center (‘abundant-center ...

  2. Abundances for p-process nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Laeter, John R.

    2008-04-15

    An important constraint in developing models of p-process nucleosynthesis is that the abundances of many of the p-process nuclides are not well known. A recent review of the p-process has identified six p-process nuclides that are of particular significance to p-process theorists [M. Arnould and S. Goriely, Phys. Rep. 384, 1 (2003)]. These nuclides are {sup 92,94}Mo, {sup 96,98}Ru, {sup 138}La, and {sup 180}Ta{sup m}. The absence of accurate abundances for these isotopes is due to the fact that the isotopic composition of the elements concerned have not been corrected for isotope fractionation induced by the thermal ionization mass spectrometric instruments used to measure them. To remedy this deficiency, a VG 354 mass spectrometer was calibrated using gravimetric mixtures of enriched isotopes to enable the absolute isotopic compositions of these elements to be obtained. Although the isotopic abundances of {sup 92,94}Mo, {sup 138}La, and {sup 180}Ta{sup m} have previously been reported, the absolute abundances of {sup 96,98}Ru are reported for the first time in this article, with a significant reduction in the magnitude of the values as compared to existing abundances.

  3. The solar photospheric abundance of zirconium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caffau, Elisabetta; Ludwig, Hans-Günter; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Steffen, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium (Zr), together with strontium and yttrium, is an important element in the understanding of the Galactic nucleosynthesis. In fact, the triad Sr-Y-Zr constitutes the first peak of s-process elements. Despite its general relevance not many studies of the solar abundance of Zr were conducted. We derive the zirconium abundance in the solar photosphere with the same CO5BOLD hydrodynamical model of the solar atmosphere that we previously used to investigate the abundances of C-N-O. We review the zirconium lines available in the observed solar spectra and select a sample of lines to determine the zirconium abundance, considering lines of neutral and singly ionised zirconium. We apply different line profile fitting strategies for a reliable analysis of Zr lines that are blended by lines of other elements. The abundance obtained from lines of neutral zirconium is very uncertain because these lines are commonly blended and weak in the solar spectrum. However, we believe that some lines of ionised zirconium are...

  4. Engineering Density of States of Earth Abundant Semiconductors...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of States of Earth Abundant Semiconductors for Enhanced Thermoelectric Power Factor Engineering Density of States of Earth Abundant Semiconductors for Enhanced Thermoelectric...

  5. Abundances of massive stars: some recent developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Morel

    2008-11-25

    Thanks to their usefulness in various fields of astrophysics (e.g. mixing processes in stars, chemical evolution of galaxies), the last few years have witnessed a large increase in the amount of abundance data for early-type stars. Two intriguing results emerging since the last reviews on this topic will be discussed: (a) nearby OB stars exhibit metal abundances generally lower than the solar/meteoritic estimates; (b) evolutionary models of single objects including rotation are largely unsuccessful in explaining the CNO properties of stars in the Galaxy and in the Magellanic clouds.

  6. Natural Gas as a Boiler Fuel of Choice in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kmetz, W. J.

    1992-01-01

    Natural gas is abundant, clean burning, and cost competitive with other fuels. In addition to superior economic fundamentals, the expanded use of natural gas will be enhanced by political and industry leaders. Natural gas therefore will continue...

  7. CAUSES OF FLUCTUATIONS IN ABUNDANCE OF CONNECTICUT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAUSES OF FLUCTUATIONS IN ABUNDANCE OF CONNECTICUT ·RIVER .SHAD BY REYNOLD A. FREDIN FISHERY effort, and tagging data which was used t.o estimate the size of the shad runs in the Connecticut River. effect on the" size of the runs entering the river," Investigation of the Connecticut River shad fishery

  8. Tokyo Tech International Symposium New Horizon of Electronic Materials Using Abundant Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, Sweden) In Harmony with the Environment: New Materials Harnessing Nature's Energy Flows 14Tokyo Tech International Symposium New Horizon of Electronic Materials Using Abundant Elements Date Theoretical and Computational Approach to New Materials Date: 10:00-19:00, 4th June, 2015: Lecture Session 10

  9. NREL Explores Earth-Abundant Materials for Future Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-10-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are using a theory-driven technique - sequential cation mutation - to understand the nature and limitations of promising solar cell materials that can replace today's technologies. Finding new materials that use Earth-abundant elements and are easily manufactured is important for large-scale solar electricity deployment.

  10. Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blog entry Combined Heat And Power Installation Market Size Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Installation Market to be Driven by Abundant Availability of Natural Gas John55364 14...

  11. Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    icon Blog entry Combined Heat And Power Installation Market Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Installation Market to be Driven by Abundant Availability of Natural Gas John55364 14...

  12. Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Due to Increased Investment in Offshore Exploration Projects Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Installation Market to be Driven by Abundant Availability of Natural Gas Oilfield...

  13. Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blog entry Global Combined Heat And Power Installation Market Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Installation Market to be Driven by Abundant Availability of Natural Gas John55364 14...

  14. Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blog entry Combined Heat And Power Installation Market Trends Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Installation Market to be Driven by Abundant Availability of Natural Gas John55364 14...

  15. The primordial deuterium abundance : problems and prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei A. Levshakov; Fumio Takahara; Wilhelm H. Kegel

    1997-12-10

    The current status of extragalactic deuterium abundance is discussed using two examples of `low' and `high' D/H measurements. We show that the discordance of these two types of D abundances may be a consequence of the spatial correlations in the stochastic velocity field. Within the framework of the generalized procedure (accounting for such effects) one finds good agreement between different observations and the theoretical predictions for standard big bang nucleosynthesis (SBBN). In particular, we show that the deuterium absorption seen at z = 2.504 toward Q1009+2956 and the H+D Ly-alpha profile observed at z = 0.701 toward Q1718+4807 are compatible with D/H $\\sim 4.1 - 4.6\\times10^{-5}$. This result supports SBBN and, thus, no inhomogeneity is needed. The problem of precise D/H measurements is discussed.

  16. The Isotopic Abundances of Magnesium in Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pamela Gay; David L. Lambert

    1999-11-11

    Isotopic abundance ratios 24^Mg:25^Mg:26^Mg are derived for 20 stars from high- resolution spectra of the MgH A-X 0-0 band at 5140AA. With the exception of the weak g-band giant HR 1299, the stars are dwarfs that sample the metallicity range -1.8 < [Fe/H] <0.0. The abundance of 25^Mg amd 26^Mg relative to the dominant isotope 24^Mg decreases with decreasing [Fe/H] in fair accord with predictions from a recent model of galactic chemical evolution in which the Mg isotopes are synthesised by massive stars. Several stars appear especially enriched in the heavier Mg isotopes suggesting contamination by material from the envelopes of intermediate-mass AGB stars.

  17. ChemCam data abundant at Planetary Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ChemCam data abundant at Planetary Conference ChemCam data abundant at Planetary Conference Members of the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover ChemCam team will present more...

  18. On the relic abundance of light photinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Daniel J.H. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Farrar, Glennys R. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Kolb, Edward W. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    1997-11-01

    We solve the coupled Boltzmann equation for the system of light photinos interacting with pions and $R~0$'s (the gluon-gluino bound state) to determine the relic abundance of light photinos in the light gaugino scenario. Cosmology bounds the ratio r of the R~0 mass to the photino mass to be less than about 1.8. We also use a model Lagrangian embodying crossing symmetry between the $R~0 \\leftrightarrow \\photino \\pi \\pi$ and $R~0 \\pi \\leftrightarrow \\photino \\pi$ reactions to identify cosmologically favored regions of $R~0$ lifetime as a function of $R~0$ and photino masses.

  19. On the relic abundance of light photinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel J. H. Chung; Glennys R. Farrar; Edward W. Kolb

    1997-03-22

    We solve the coupled Boltzmann equation for the system of light photinos interacting with pions and $R^0$'s (the gluon-gluino bound state) to determine the relic abundance of light photinos in the light gaugino scenario. Cosmology bounds the ratio r of the R^0 mass to the photino mass to be less than about 1.8. We also use a model Lagrangian embodying crossing symmetry between the $R^0 \\leftrightarrow \\photino \\pi \\pi$ and $R^0 \\pi \\leftrightarrow \\photino \\pi$ reactions to identify cosmologically favored regions of $R^0$ lifetime as a function of $R^0$ and photino masses.

  20. Lithium abundances in exoplanet-hosts stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Castro; S. Vauclair; O. Richard; N. C. Santos

    2008-03-20

    Exoplanet-host stars (EHS) are known to present surface chemical abundances different from those of stars without any detected planet (NEHS). EHS are, on the average, overmetallic compared to the Sun. The observations also show that, for cool stars, lithium is more depleted in EHS than in NEHS. The overmetallicity of EHS may be studied in the framework of two different scenarii. We have computed main sequence stellar models with various masses, metallicities and accretion rates. The results show different profiles for the lithium destruction according to the scenario. We compare these results to the spectroscopic observations of lithium.

  1. Primordial Li abundance and massive particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latin-Capital-Letter-Eth apo, H.

    2012-10-20

    The problem of the observed lithium abundance coming from the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis is as of yet unsolved. One of the proposed solutions is including relic massive particles into the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. We investigated the effects of such particles on {sup 4}HeX{sup -}+{sup 2}H{yields}{sup 6}Li+X{sup -}, where the X{sup -} is the negatively charged massive particle. We demonstrate the dominance of long-range part of the potential on the cross-section.

  2. Abundant Renewable Energy ARE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9)ATSAbram-Perezville,AbsolutAbundant

  3. Abundance Ratio Trends and Nucleosynthesis in Elliptical Galaxies and Spheroids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worthey, Guy

    Abundance Ratio Trends and Nucleosynthesis in Elliptical Galaxies and Spheroids Guy Worthey 1, nucleosynthesis, abundances --- galaxies: abundances --- galaxies: elliptical and lenticular, cD --- galaxies of the discussion to other elements in section 3. The fourth section discusses nucleosynthesis and possible hints

  4. MEASUREMENTS OF ABSOLUTE ABUNDANCES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (f). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is f = 1.17 ± 0.22. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation occurs.

  5. Beryllium abundances in stars hosting giant planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. C. Santos; R. J. Garcia Lopez; G. Israelian; M. Mayor; R. Rebolo; A. Garcia-Gil; M. R. Perez de Taoro; S. Randich

    2002-02-25

    We have derived beryllium abundances in a wide sample of stars hosting planets, with spectral types in the range F7V-K0V, aimed at studying in detail the effects of the presence of planets on the structure and evolution of the associated stars. Predictions from current models are compared with the derived abundances and suggestions are provided to explain the observed inconsistencies. We show that while still not clear, the results suggest that theoretical models may have to be revised for stars with Teff<5500K. On the other hand, a comparison between planet host and non-planet host stars shows no clear difference between both populations. Although preliminary, this result favors a ``primordial'' origin for the metallicity ``excess'' observed for the planetary host stars. Under this assumption, i.e. that there would be no differences between stars with and without giant planets, the light element depletion pattern of our sample of stars may also be used to further investigate and constraint Li and Be depletion mechanisms.

  6. Element Abundances through the Cosmic Ages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max Pettini

    2003-03-12

    The horizon for studies of element abundances has expanded dramatically in the last ten years. Once the domain of astronomers concerned chiefly with stars and nearby galaxies, this field has now become a key component of observational cosmology, as technological advances have made it possible to measure the abundances of several chemical elements in a variety of environments at redshifts up to z = 4, when the universe was in its infancy. In this series of lectures I summarise current knowledge on the chemical make-up of distant galaxies observed directly in their starlight, and of interstellar and intergalactic gas seen in absorption against the spectra of bright background sources. The picture which is emerging is one where the universe at z = 3 already included many of the constituents of today's galaxies-even at these early times we see evidence for Population I and II stars, while the `smoking gun' for Population III objects may be hidden in the chemical composition of the lowest density regions of the intergalactic medium, yet to be deciphered.

  7. High Dispersion Spectroscopy of Solar-type Superflare Stars. III. Lithium Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Shibayama, Takuya; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    We report on the abundance analysis of Li in solar-type (G-type main sequence) superflare stars which were found by the analysis of Kepler photometric data. Li is a key element to understand the evolution of the stellar convection zone which reflects the age of solar-type stars. We performed the high dispersion spectroscopy of solar-type superflare stars with Subaru/HDS, and confirmed that 34 stars show no evidence of binarity in our previous study. In this study, we derived the Li abundances of these 34 objects. We investigate correlations of Li abundance with stellar atmospheric parameters, rotational velocity, and superflare activities to understand the nature of superflare stars and the possibility of the nucleosynthesis of Li by superflares. We confirm the large dispersion in the Li abundance, and the correlation with stellar parameters is not seen. As compared with the Li abundance in Hyades cluster which is younger than the Sun, it is suggested that half of the observed stars are younger than Hyades cl...

  8. Marbled murrelet abundance and breeding activity at Naked Island, Prince William Sound, and Kachemak Bay, Alaska, before and after the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Bird study number 6. Exxon Valdez oil spill state/federal natural resource damage assessment final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuletz, K.J.

    1994-08-01

    The author compared pre- and post-spill abundance and breeding activity of murrelets near the Naked Island group in central Prince William Sound, and in Kachemak Bay in lower Cook Inlet. Murrelet numbers at Naked Island were lower in 1989 than in 1978-1980 but not in 1990-1992. At Kachemak Bay, where oiling was minimal, murrelet densities did not change between 1988 and 1989. The results suggest that the murrelet population at Kachemak Bay, further removed temporally and spatially from the spill epicenter, was not affected as the Naked Island populations in 1989. Murrelet numbers were negatively correlated to numbers of boats at both study sites, and cleanup activities likely contributed to disruption in 1989.

  9. Kinetics simulation for natural gas conversion to unsaturated C? hydrocarbons 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Li

    2003-01-01

    Natural gas resource is abundant and can be found throughout the world. But most natural gas reserves are at remote sites and considered stranded because of the extremely expensive transportation cost. Therefore advanced gas-to-liquid (GTL...

  10. Abundance ratios in hierarchical galaxy formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Thomas

    1999-01-18

    The chemical enrichment and stellar abundance ratios of galaxies which form in a hierarchical clustering scheme are calculated. For this purpose I adopt the star formation histories (SFH) as they are delivered by semi-analytic models in Kauffmann (1996}. It turns out that the average SFH of cluster ellipticals does not yield globally alpha-enhanced stellar populations. The star burst that occurs when the elliptical forms in the major merger plays therefore a crucial role in producing alpha-enhancement. Only under the assumption that the IMF is significantly flattened with respect to the Salpeter value during the burst, a Mg/Fe overabundant population can be obtained. In particular for the interpretation of radial gradients in metallicity and alpha-enhancement, the mixing of global and burst populations are of great importance. The model predicts bright field galaxies to be less alpha-enhanced than their counterparts in clusters.

  11. Relationship of Course Woody Debris to Red-Cockaded Woodpecker Prey Diversity and Abundance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, G.S.

    1999-09-03

    The abundance of diversity of prey commonly used by the red-cockaded woodpecker were monitored in experimental plots in which course woody debris was manipulated. In one treatment, all the woody debris over four inches was removed. In the second treatment, the natural amount of mortality remained intact. The overall diversity of prey was unaffected; however, wood roaches were significantly reduced by removal of woody debris. The latter suggests that intensive utilizations or harvesting practices may reduce foraging.

  12. TEA: A Code for Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blecic, Jasmina; Bowman, M Oliver

    2015-01-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. (1958) and Eriksson (1971). It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature-pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows & Sharp (1999), the free thermochemical equilibrium code CEA (Chemical Equilibrium with Applications), and the example given by White et al. (1958). Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is ...

  13. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesca Matteucci; Brad K. Gibson

    1995-03-14

    We study the origin of iron and alpha-elements (O, Mg, Si) in clusters of galaxies. In particular, we discuss the [O/Fe] ratio and the iron mass-to-luminosity ratio in the intracluster medium (ICM) and their link to the chemical and dynamical evolution of elliptical and lenticular galaxies. We adopt a detailed model of galactic evolution incorporating the development of supernovae- driven galactic winds which pollute the ICM with enriched ejecta. We demonstrate \\it quantitatively \\rm the crucial dependence upon the assumed stellar initial mass function in determining the evolution of the mass and abundances ratios of heavy elements in typical model ICMs. We show that completely opposite behaviours of [alpha/Fe] ratios (\\ie positive versus negative ratios) can be obtained by varying the initial mass function without altering the classic assumptions regarding type Ia supernovae progenitors or their nucleosynthesis. Our results indicate that models incorporating somewhat flatter-than-Salpeter initial mass functions (ie x approx 1, as opposed to x=1.35) are preferred, provided the intracluster medium iron mass-to-luminosity ratio, preliminary [alpha/Fe]>0 ASCA results, and present-day type Ia supernovae rates, are to be matched. A simple Virgo cluster simulation which adheres to these constraints shows that approx 70% of the measured ICM iron mass has its origin in type II supernovae, with the remainder being synthesized in type Ia systems.

  14. Origin of Stellar Abundances in the early Galaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montes, F. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory Michigan State University E. Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Beers, T. C. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Cowan, J. [Homer L. Dodge Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Elliot, T.; Schatz, H. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, http://www.jinaweb.org, USA, and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory Michigan State University E. Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Farouqi, K. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Gallino, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale, Universita' di Torino, Via P Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Heil, M. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64220 Darmstadt (Germany); Kratz, K.-L. [Virtuelles Institut fuer Struktur der Kerne und Nukleare Astrophysik (VISTARS), D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, Otto-Hahn-Institut, Joh.-J.-Becherweg 27, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Pfeiffer, B. [Virtuelles Institut fuer Struktur der Kerne und Nukleare Astrophysik (VISTARS), D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Pignatari, M. [Keele University Keele, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2007-10-26

    Observations of metal-poor stars in the last decade have revealed an abundance pattern that have recently been explained as the result of two nucleosynthesis processes, a strong r-process that creates most of the Z{>=}56 and some 38{<=}Z{<=}47 abundances and a light element primary process (LEPP) responsible for creating the remaining 38{<=}Z{<=}47 abundances and some small contribution to heavier elements. We review some of the current literature on the LEPP and show a derived abundance pattern as a function of mass number.

  15. SOLAR MODELS WITH ACCRETION. I. APPLICATION TO THE SOLAR ABUNDANCE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SOLAR MODELS WITH ACCRETION. I. APPLICATION TO THE SOLAR ABUNDANCE PROBLEM Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SOLAR MODELS WITH ACCRETION. I. APPLICATION TO THE SOLAR...

  16. Planning Amid Abundance: Alaska’s FY 2013 Budget Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBeath, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    state’s incentives for oil investment are excessive” (FDNM,increased oil industry investment. Planning Amid Abundance:oil corporations said that additional investment was

  17. High-Performance Thermoelectric Devices Based on Abundant Silicide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development of high-performance thermoelectric devices for vehicle waste heat recovery will include fundamental research to use abundant promising low-cost thermoelectric...

  18. The Ne/O abundance ratio in the quiet Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Young

    2005-10-10

    Aims: To determine the neon-to-oxygen abundance in the quiet Sun, a proxy for the photospheric abundance ratio. Method: An emission measure method applied to extreme ultraviolet emission lines of Ne IV-VI and O III-V ions observed by the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer on the SOHO satellite. Results: The average Ne/O abundance ratio in supergranule cell centre regions is 0.18 +/- 0.05, while in supergranule network regions is 0.16 +/- 0.04. A photospheric Ne/O ratio of 0.17 +/- 0.05 is suggested, in good agreement with the most recent compilation of solar photospheric abundances, but discrepant with a recent Ne/O ratio derived from stellar X-ray spectra and revised neon abundances suggested from solar interior models.

  19. The Void Abundance with Non-Gaussian Primordial Perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Kamionkowski; Licia Verde; Raul Jimenez

    2008-09-03

    We use a Press-Schechter-like calculation to study how the abundance of voids changes in models with non-Gaussian initial conditions. While a positive skewness increases the cluster abundance, a negative skewness does the same for the void abundance. We determine the dependence of the void abundance on the non-Gaussianity parameter fnl for the local-model bispectrum-which approximates the bispectrum in some multi-field inflation models-and for the equilateral bispectrum, which approximates the bispectrum in e.g. string-inspired DBI models of inflation. We show that the void abundance in large-scale-structure surveys currently being considered should probe values as small as fnl < 10 and fnl^eq < 30, over distance scales ~10 Mpc.

  20. The lithium abundances of a large sample of red giants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y. J.; Tan, K. F.; Wang, L.; Zhao, G.; Li, H. N. [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, A20 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Sato, Bun'ei [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Takeda, Y., E-mail: lyj@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: gzhao@nao.cas.cn [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2014-04-20

    The lithium abundances for 378 G/K giants are derived with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium correction considered. Among these are 23 stars that host planetary systems. The lithium abundance is investigated, as a function of metallicity, effective temperature, and rotational velocity, as well as the impact of a giant planet on G/K giants. The results show that the lithium abundance is a function of metallicity and effective temperature. The lithium abundance has no correlation with rotational velocity at v sin i < 10 km s{sup –1}. Giants with planets present lower lithium abundance and slow rotational velocity (v sin i < 4 km s{sup –1}). Our sample includes three Li-rich G/K giants, 36 Li-normal stars, and 339 Li-depleted stars. The fraction of Li-rich stars in this sample agrees with the general rate of less than 1% in the literature, and the stars that show normal amounts of Li are supposed to possess the same abundance at the current interstellar medium. For the Li-depleted giants, Li-deficiency may have already taken place at the main sequence stage for many intermediate mass (1.5-5 M {sub ?}) G/K giants. Finally, we present the lithium abundance and kinematic parameters for an enlarged sample of 565 giants using a compilation of the literature, and confirm that the lithium abundance is a function of metallicity and effective temperature. With the enlarged sample, we investigate the differences between the lithium abundance in thin-/thick-disk giants, which indicate that the lithium abundance in thick-disk giants is more depleted than that in thin-disk giants.

  1. Abundance profiling of extremely metal-poor stars and supernova properties in the early universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tominaga, Nozomu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, 8-9-1 Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); Iwamoto, Nobuyuki [Nuclear Data Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nomoto, Ken'ichi, E-mail: tominaga@konan-u.ac.jp, E-mail: iwamoto.nobuyuki@jaea.go.jp, E-mail: nomoto@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2014-04-20

    After the big bang nucleosynthesis, the first heavy element enrichment in the universe was made by a supernova (SN) explosion of a population (Pop) III star (Pop III SN). The abundance ratios of elements produced from Pop III SNe are recorded in abundance patterns of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars. The observations of the increasing number of EMP stars have made it possible to statistically constrain the explosion properties of Pop III SNe. We present Pop III SN models whose nucleosynthesis yields well reproduce, individually, the abundance patterns of 48 such metal-poor stars as [Fe/H] ? – 3.5. We then derive relations between the abundance ratios of EMP stars and certain explosion properties of Pop III SNe: the higher [(C + N)/Fe] and [(C + N)/Mg] ratios correspond to the smaller ejected Fe mass and the larger compact remnant mass, respectively. Using these relations, the distributions of the abundance ratios of EMP stars are converted to those of the explosion properties of Pop III SNe. Such distributions are compared with those of the explosion properties of present day SNe: the distribution of the ejected Fe mass of Pop III SNe has the same peak as that of the present day SNe but shows an extended tail down to ?10{sup –2}-10{sup –5} M {sub ?}, and the distribution of the mass of the compact remnant of Pop III SNe is as wide as that of the present-day, stellar-mass black holes. Our results demonstrate the importance of large samples of EMP stars obtained by ongoing and future EMP star surveys and subsequent high-dispersion spectroscopic observations in clarifying the nature of Pop III SNe in the early universe.

  2. Reply to the "Comment on 'Precise half-life values for two-neutrino double beta decay"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Barabash

    2010-06-03

    It is demonstrated that remarks and criticism in work [1] (arXiv:1005.2436 nucl-th) have resulted from inattentive reading of work [2] (Phys. Rev.C 81, 035501 (2010)) or just some misunderstanding and do not influence conclusions of work [2].

  3. Measurement of the Double-Beta Decay Half-life of 136Xe in KamLAND-Zen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gando, A.

    2013-01-01

    by fallout from the Fukushima-I reactor accident in Marchof detector materials by Fukushima fallout, which includeCo are not detected near Fukushima or our soil samples, we

  4. Beryllium Abundances in Stars of One-Solar-Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ann Merchant Boesgaard; Julie A. Krugler

    2008-09-26

    We have determined Be abundances in 50 F and G dwarfs in the mass range of 0.9 $\\leq$ M$_\\odot$ $\\leq$ 1.1 as determined by Lambert & Reddy. The effective temperatures are 5600 to 6400 K and metallicities from $-$0.65 to +0.11. The spectra were taken primarily with Keck I + HIRES. The Be abundances were found via spectral synthesis of Be II lines near 3130 \\AA. The Be abundances were investigated as a function of age, temperature, metallicity and Li abundance in this narrow mass range. Even though our stars are similar in mass, they show a range in Be abundances of a factor of $>$40. We find that [Be/Fe] has no dependence on temperature, but does show a spread of a factor of 6 at a given temperature. The reality of the spread is shown by two identical stars which differ from each other by a factor of two only in their abundances of Li and Be. Our thin-disk-star sample fits the trend between Be abundance and [Fe/H] found for halo and thick disk stars, extending it to about 4 orders of magnitude in the two logarithmic quantities. Both Fe and Be appear to increase similarly over time in the Galaxy. One-third of our sample may be classified as subgiants; these more-evolved stars have lower Be abundances than the dwarfs. They have undergone Be depletion by slow mixing on the main sequence and Be dilution during their trip toward the red giant base. There are both Li and Be detections in 60 field stars in the "Li-plateau" of 5900 - 6300 K now and the abundances of the two light elements are correlated with a slope of 0.34 $\\pm$0.05, with greater Li depletion than Be depletion.

  5. The bends in the slopes of radial abundance gradients in the disks of spiral galaxies -- do they exist?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin

    2002-10-17

    Spiral galaxies with a reported bend in the slope of gradient in the oxygen abundances (O/H)_R23, derived with traditionally used R23 - method, were examined. It is shown that the artificial origin of the reported bends can be naturally explained. Two reasons that result in a false bend in the slope of (O/H)_R23 gradient are indicated. It is concluded that at the present time there is no example of a galaxy with an undisputable established bend in the slope of the oxygen abundance gradient.

  6. On the oxygen abundance determination in HII regions: the problem of the line intensities -- oxygen abundance calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin

    2000-04-04

    The problem of the line intensities -- oxygen abundance calibration has been considered. We confirm the idea of McGaugh (1991) that the strong oxygen lines ([OII] 3727, 3729 and [OIII] 4959, 5007) contain the necessary information for determination of accurate abundances in low-metallicity (and may be also in high-metallicity) HII regions. It has been found that the excitation parameters p3 or p2 (which are defined here as contributions of the radiation in [OIII] 4959, 5007 lines and in [OII] 3727, 3729 lines to the "total" oxygen radiation respectively) allow to take into account the variations in R23 values among HII regions with a given oxygen abundance. Based on this fact a new way of the oxygen abundance determination in HII regions has been constructed and corresponding relations between line intensities and the oxygen abundance have been derived empirically using the available oxygen abundances determined via measurement of temperature-sensitive line ratios. In parallel a new R23 calibration has been derived on the base of recent data and compared to previous calibrations. For oxygen-rich HII regions the present R23 calibration is close to that of Edmunds and Pagel (1984): their calibration has the same slope but is shifted towards higher oxygen abundances by around 0.07 dex as compared to the present calibration.

  7. A Temperature and Abundance Retrieval Method for Exoplanet Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madhusudhan, Nikku

    We present a new method to retrieve molecular abundances and temperature profiles from exoplanet atmosphere photometry and spectroscopy. We run millions of one-dimensional (1D) atmosphere models in order to cover the large ...

  8. Abundance of Asymmetric Dark Matter in Brane World Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoernisa Iminniyaz

    2015-05-14

    Relic abundance of asymmetric Dark Matter particles in brane world cosmological scenario is investigated in this article. Hubble expansion rate is enhanced in brane world cosmology and it affects the relic abundance of asymmetric Dark Matter particles. We analyze how the relic abundance of asymmetric Dark Matter is changed in this model. We show that in such kind of nonstandard cosmological scenario, indirect detection of asymmetric Dark Matter is possible if the cross section is small enough which let the anti--particle abundance kept in the same amount with the particle. We show the indirect detection signal like Fermi--LAT constraints can be used to such model only when the cross section and the 5 dimensional Planck mass scale are in appropriate values.

  9. ProteoSpinTM Abundant Serum Protein Depletion Kit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    abundance proteins. Depleted serum profile on 2D is clean and smearless with enrich- ment of some minor CORPORATION 3 General Introduction 2The use of body fluids, including serum and plasma, has become widespread

  10. Beryllium, Lithium and Oxygen Abundances in F-type Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Garcia Lopez; M. C. Dominguez Herrera; M. R. Perez de Taoro; C. Casares; J. L. Rasilla; R. Rebolo; C. Allende Prieto

    1997-10-07

    Beryllium and oxygen abundances have been derived in a sample of F-type field stars for which lithium abundances had been measured previously, with the aim of obtaining observational constraints to discriminate between the different mixing mechanisms proposed. Mixing associated with the transport of angular momentum in the stellar interior and internal gravity waves within the framework of rotating evolutionary models, appear to be promising ways to explain the observations.

  11. THE EFFECTS OF INITIAL ABUNDANCES ON NITROGEN IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Kamber R.; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-12-20

    The dominant form of nitrogen provided to most solar system bodies is currently unknown, though available measurements show that the detected nitrogen in solar system rocks and ices is depleted with respect to solar abundances and the interstellar medium. We use a detailed chemical/physical model of the chemical evolution of a protoplanetary disk to explore the evolution and abundance of nitrogen-bearing molecules. Based on this model, we analyze how initial chemical abundances provided as either gas or ice during the early stages of disk formation influence which species become the dominant nitrogen bearers at later stages. We find that a disk with the majority of its initial nitrogen in either atomic or molecular nitrogen is later dominated by atomic and molecular nitrogen as well as NH{sub 3} and HCN ices, where the dominant species varies with disk radius. When nitrogen is initially in gaseous ammonia, it later becomes trapped in ammonia ice except in the outer disk where atomic nitrogen dominates. For a disk with the initial nitrogen in the form of ammonia ice, the nitrogen remains trapped in the ice as NH{sub 3} at later stages. The model in which most of the initial nitrogen is placed in atomic N best matches the ammonia abundances observed in comets. Furthermore, the initial state of nitrogen influences the abundance of N{sub 2}H{sup +}, which has been detected in protoplanetary disks. Strong N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission is found to be indicative of an N{sub 2} abundance greater than n{sub N{sub 2}}/n{sub H{sub 2}}>10{sup ?6} in addition to tracing the CO snow line. Our models also indicate that NO is potentially detectable, with lower N gas abundances leading to higher NO abundances.

  12. Carbon and Strontium Abundances of Metal-Poor Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David K. Lai; Jennifer A. Johnson; Michael Bolte; Sara Lucatello

    2007-06-20

    We present carbon and strontium abundances for 100 metal-poor stars measured from R$\\sim $7000 spectra obtained with the Echellette Spectrograph and Imager at the Keck Observatory. Using spectral synthesis of the G-band region, we have derived carbon abundances for stars ranging from [Fe/H]$=-1.3$ to [Fe/H]$=-3.8$. The formal errors are $\\sim 0.2$ dex in [C/Fe]. The strontium abundance in these stars was measured using spectral synthesis of the resonance line at 4215 {\\AA}. Using these two abundance measurments along with the barium abundances from our previous study of these stars, we show it is possible to identify neutron-capture-rich stars with our spectra. We find, as in other studies, a large scatter in [C/Fe] below [Fe/H]$ = -2$. Of the stars with [Fe/H]$carbon-rich metal-poor stars. The Sr and Ba abundances show that three of the carbon-rich stars are neutron-capture-rich, while two have normal Ba and Sr. This fraction of carbon enhanced stars is consistent with other studies that include this metallicity range.

  13. Multidimensional metrics for estimating phage abundance, distribution, gene density, and sequence coverage in metagenomes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aziz, Ramy K.; Dwivedi, Bhakti; Akhter, Sajia; Breitbart, Mya; Edwards, Robert A.

    2015-05-08

    Phages are the most abundant biological entities on Earth and play major ecological roles, yet the current sequenced phage genomes do not adequately represent their diversity, and little is known about the abundance and distribution of these sequenced genomes in nature. Although the study of phage ecology has benefited tremendously from the emergence of metagenomic sequencing, a systematic survey of phage genes and genomes in various ecosystems is still lacking, and fundamental questions about phage biology, lifestyle, and ecology remain unanswered. To address these questions and improve comparative analysis of phages in different metagenomes, we screened a core set ofmore »publicly available metagenomic samples for sequences related to completely sequenced phages using the web tool, Phage Eco-Locator. We then adopted and deployed an array of mathematical and statistical metrics for a multidimensional estimation of the abundance and distribution of phage genes and genomes in various ecosystems. Experiments using those metrics individually showed their usefulness in emphasizing the pervasive, yet uneven, distribution of known phage sequences in environmental metagenomes. Using these metrics in combination allowed us to resolve phage genomes into clusters that correlated with their genotypes and taxonomic classes as well as their ecological properties. By adding this set of metrics to current metaviromic analysis pipelines, where they can provide insight regarding phage mosaicism, habitat specificity, and evolution.« less

  14. Multidimensional metrics for estimating phage abundance, distribution, gene density, and sequence coverage in metagenomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aziz, Ramy K.; Dwivedi, Bhakti; Akhter, Sajia; Breitbart, Mya; Edwards, Robert A.

    2015-05-08

    Phages are the most abundant biological entities on Earth and play major ecological roles, yet the current sequenced phage genomes do not adequately represent their diversity, and little is known about the abundance and distribution of these sequenced genomes in nature. Although the study of phage ecology has benefited tremendously from the emergence of metagenomic sequencing, a systematic survey of phage genes and genomes in various ecosystems is still lacking, and fundamental questions about phage biology, lifestyle, and ecology remain unanswered. To address these questions and improve comparative analysis of phages in different metagenomes, we screened a core set of publicly available metagenomic samples for sequences related to completely sequenced phages using the web tool, Phage Eco-Locator. We then adopted and deployed an array of mathematical and statistical metrics for a multidimensional estimation of the abundance and distribution of phage genes and genomes in various ecosystems. Experiments using those metrics individually showed their usefulness in emphasizing the pervasive, yet uneven, distribution of known phage sequences in environmental metagenomes. Using these metrics in combination allowed us to resolve phage genomes into clusters that correlated with their genotypes and taxonomic classes as well as their ecological properties. By adding this set of metrics to current metaviromic analysis pipelines, where they can provide insight regarding phage mosaicism, habitat specificity, and evolution.

  15. Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Heat And Power Installation Market Analysis Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Installation Market to be Driven by Abundant Availability of Natural Gas John55364 14 May 2015 - 04:16...

  16. Lithium Abundances of the Local Thin Disk Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David L. Lambert; Bacham E. Reddy

    2004-01-14

    Lithium abundances are presented for a sample of 181 nearby F and G dwarfs with accurate {\\it Hipparcos} parallaxes. The stars are on circular orbits about the Galactic centre and, hence, are identified as belonging to the thin disk. This sample is combined with two published surveys to provide a catalogue of lithium abundances, metallicities ([Fe/H]), masses, and ages for 451 F-G dwarfs, almost all belonging to the thin disk. The lithium abundances are compared and contrasted with published lithium abundances for F and G stars in local open clusters. The field stars span a larger range in [Fe/H] than the clusters for which [Fe/H] $\\simeq 0.0\\pm0.2$. The initial (i.e., interstellar) lithium abundance of the solar neighborhood, as derived from stars for which astration of lithium is believed to be unimportant, is traced from $\\log\\epsilon$(Li) = 2.2 at [Fe/H] = -1 to $\\log\\epsilon$(Li) = 3.2 at $+0.1$. This form for the evolution is dependent on the assumption that astration of lit hium is negligible for the stars defining the relation. An argument is advanced that this latter assumption may not be entirely correct, and, the evolution of lithium with [Fe/H] may be flatter than previously supposed. A sharp Hyades-like Li-dip is not seen among the field stars and appears to be replaced by a large spread among lithium abundances of stars more massive than the lower mass limit of the dip. Astration of lithium by stars of masses too low to participate in the Li-dip is discussed. These stars show little to no spread in lithium abundance at a given [Fe/H] and mass.

  17. Planning Amid Abundance: Alaska’s FY 2013 Budget Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBeath, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    government revenues: heavy oil and natural gas” (FDNM,for new light crude from heavy oil, natural gas and shale

  18. The chemical abundances of the Ap star HD94660

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giarrusso, M. [Università di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Sezione Astrofisica, Via S. Sofia 78, 95123 Catania (Italy); INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, via S. Sofia 78, 95123 Catania (Italy); INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy)

    2014-05-09

    In this work I present the determination of chemical abundances of the Ap star HD94660, a possible rapid oscillating star. As all the magnetic chemically peculiar objects, it presents CNO underabundance and overabundance of iron peak elements of ?100 times and of rare earths up to 4 dex with respect to the Sun. The determination was based on the conversion of the observed equivalent widths into abundances simultaneously to the determination of effective temperature and gravity. Since the Balmer lines of early type stars are very sensitive to the surface gravity while the flux distribution is sensitive to the effective temperature, I have adopted an iterative procedure to match the H{sub ?} line profile and the observed UV-Vis-NIR magnitudes of HD94660 looking for a consistency between the metallicity of the atmosphere model and the derived abundances. From my spectroscopic analysis, this star belongs to the no-rapid oscillating class.

  19. Solving the discrepancy among the light elements abundances and WMAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuhide Ichikawa; Masahiro Kawasaki; Fuminobu Takahashi

    2004-06-09

    Within the standard big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and cosmic microwave background (CMB) framework, the baryon density measured by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) or the primordial D abundance is much higher than the one measured by the $^4$He or $^7$Li abundances. To solve the discrepancy, we propose a scenario in which additional baryons appear after BBN. We show that simply adding the baryons can not be a solution but the existence of a large lepton asymmetry before BBN makes the scenario successful. These extra baryons and leptons, in addition to the initial baryons which exist before the BBN, can be all produced from $Q$-balls.

  20. Quantum statistical calculation of cluster abundances in hot dense matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerd Ropke

    2014-07-01

    The cluster abundances are calculated from a quantum statistical approach taking into account in-medium corrections. For arbitrary cluster size the self-energy and Pauli blocking shifts are considered. Exploratory calculations are performed for symmetric matter at temperature $T=5$ MeV and baryon density $\\varrho=0.0156$ fm$^{-3}$ to be compared with the solar element distribution. It is shown that the abundances of weakly bound nuclei with mass number $4

  1. Natural Abundance Carbon Isotope Composition of Isoprene Reflects Incomplete Coupling between Isoprene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    discrimination step was the deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase reaction. 2-Methyl-1,3-butadiene (isoprene

  2. NATURE MATERIALS | VOL 13 | MARCH 2014 | www.nature.com/naturematerials 233 hotovoltaic devices --which convert abundant, free solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sargent, Edward H. "Ted"

    that provide a nanoparticle-size-dependent band- gap -- offer an avenue to tandem and multi-junction solar the simultaneous combination of low cost and high efficiency. Si-based solar cells1 , vapour-phase-processed thin-film solar cells such as CdS/CdTe (ref. 2) and next-generation solution- processed solar cells based

  3. Landscape characteristics, land use, and coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) abundance,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    . The proportion of total adult coho salmon abundance supported by a specific stream reach was consistent among these habitat variables explained al- most half of the variation in the annual distribution of adult coho salmon versant de la Snohomish. La proportion du nombre total de saumons adultes maintenue par chaque section de

  4. ORIGINAL PAPER Predicting Avian Abundance Within and Across Tidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi

    ORIGINAL PAPER Predicting Avian Abundance Within and Across Tidal Marshes Using Fine Scientists 2010 Abstract Tidal marsh monitoring and restoration can benefit from the union of fine developed statistical models with relatively high explanatory power. In each case, models were improved

  5. Archaeorhizomycetes: Patterns of Distribution and Abundance in Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Lee

    Chapter 14 Archaeorhizomycetes: Patterns of Distribution and Abundance in Soil Anna Rosling, Ina lineages of soil fungi, and its formal description adds a prominent branch to the Taphrinomycotina among the basal Ascomycota (Rosling et al. 2011). Fungi in the class are strongly associated with soil

  6. Are beryllium abundances anomalous in stars with giant planets?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. C. Santos; G. Israelian; R. J Garcia Lopez; M. Mayor; R. Rebolo; S. Randich; A. Ecuvillon; C. Dominguez Cerdena

    2004-08-05

    In this paper we present beryllium (Be) abundances in a large sample of 41 extra-solar planet host stars, and for 29 stars without any known planetary-mass companion, spanning a large range of effective temperatures. The Be abundances were derived through spectral synthesis done in standard Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium, using spectra obtained with various instruments. The results seem to confirm that overall, planet-host stars have ``normal'' Be abundances, although a small, but not significant, difference might be present. This result is discussed, and we show that this difference is probably not due to any stellar ``pollution'' events. In other words, our results support the idea that the high-metal content of planet-host stars has, overall, a ``primordial'' origin. However, we also find a small subset of planet-host late-F and early-G dwarfs that might have higher than average Be abundances. The reason for the offset is not clear, and might be related either to the engulfment of planetary material, to galactic chemical evolution effects, or to stellar-mass differences for stars of similar temperature.

  7. Implications of Elemental Abundances in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, T

    2005-01-01

    Unusual elemental abundance patterns observed for stars belonging to nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are discussed. Analysis of the [alpha/H] vs. [Fe/H] diagrams where alpha represents Mg or average of alpha-elements reveals that Fe from Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) does not contribute to the stellar abundances in the dSph galaxies where the member stars exhibit low alpha/Fe ratios except for the most massive dSph galaxy, the Sagitarrius. The more massive dwarf (irregular) galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud, also have an SNe Ia signature in the stellar abundances. These findings suggest that the condition of whether SNe Ia contribute to chemical evolution in dwarf galaxies is likely to depend on the mass scale of galaxies. Unusual Mg abundances in some dSph stars are also found to be the origin of the large scatter in the [Mg/Fe] ratios and responsible for a seemingly decreasing [Mg/Fe] feature with increasing [Fe/H]. In addition, the lack of massive stars in the dSph galaxies does not satisfactorily a...

  8. SOIL MICROBIOLOGY Laccase Gene Composition and Relative Abundance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    processes including phenol oxidase (PO) activity and soil organic matter dynamics. Depression of phenol abundance in temperate oak forest soil in which significant decreases in phenol oxidase and increased SOM nutrients and produce extracellular oxidative enzymes that can efficiently degrade lignin [4, 33

  9. Implications of Elemental Abundances in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takuji Tsujimoto

    2005-09-29

    Unusual elemental abundance patterns observed for stars belonging to nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are discussed. Analysis of the [alpha/H] vs. [Fe/H] diagrams where alpha represents Mg or average of alpha-elements reveals that Fe from Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) does not contribute to the stellar abundances in the dSph galaxies where the member stars exhibit low alpha/Fe ratios except for the most massive dSph galaxy, the Sagitarrius. The more massive dwarf (irregular) galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud, also have an SNe Ia signature in the stellar abundances. These findings suggest that the condition of whether SNe Ia contribute to chemical evolution in dwarf galaxies is likely to depend on the mass scale of galaxies. Unusual Mg abundances in some dSph stars are also found to be the origin of the large scatter in the [Mg/Fe] ratios and responsible for a seemingly decreasing [Mg/Fe] feature with increasing [Fe/H]. In addition, the lack of massive stars in the dSph galaxies does not satisfactorily account for the low-alpha signature. Considering the assemblage of deficient elements (O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, and Zn), all of which are synthesized in pre-SN massive stars and in SN explosions, the low-alpha signature appears to reflect the heavy-element yields of massive stars with smaller rotation compared to solar neighborhood stars.

  10. DETERMINING INTERSTELLAR CARBON ABUNDANCES FROM STRONG-LINE TRANSITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sofia, U. J. [Physics Department, American University, Washington, DC 20016 (United States); Parvathi, V. S.; Babu, B. R. S. [Physics Department, University of Calicut, Kerala (India); Murthy, J. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Kormangala, Bengaluru (India)

    2011-01-15

    Carbon is arguably the most important element in the interstellar medium, yet its abundance in gas and dust is poorly understood due to a paucity of data. We explore the possibility of substantially increasing our knowledge of interstellar carbon by applying and assessing a new method for determining the column density of the dominant ion of interstellar carbon in diffuse neutral lines of sight. The method relies on profile fitting of the strong transition of C II at 1334 A in spectra continuum normalized with stellar models. We apply our method to six sight lines for which the carbon abundance has previously been determined with a weak intersystem absorption transition. Our strong-line method consistently shows a significantly lower gas-phase C abundance than the measurements from the weak lines. This result implies that more carbon could reside in dust than was previously thought. This has implications for dust models, which often suffer from a lack of sufficient carbon to plausibly explain extinction. There is no immediately clear explanation for the difference found between the strong- and weak-line C II determinations, but there are indications that the results from the method presented here have advantages over the weak-line column densities. If this is the case, then the reported oscillator strength for the C II transition at 2325 A may be too small. Our findings further suggest that damping wings modeled with a single absorption component may not produce accurate abundances. This problem could affect a large number of H I abundances determined through absorption line analysis that are reported in the literature.

  11. The surface nitrogen abundance of a massive star in relation to its oscillations, rotation, and magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aerts, C. [Institute of Astronomy, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Molenberghs, G. [Faculty of Science, Hasselt University, Martelarenlaan 42, B-3500 Hasselt (Belgium); Kenward, M. G. [Department of Medical Statistics, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E7HT (United Kingdom); Neiner, C., E-mail: conny@ster.kuleuven.be [LESIA, UMR 8109 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, UPMC, Paris Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France)

    2014-02-01

    We have composed a sample of 68 massive stars in our galaxy whose projected rotational velocity, effective temperature, and gravity are available from high-precision spectroscopic measurements. The additional seven observed variables considered here are their surface nitrogen abundance, rotational frequency, magnetic field strength, and the amplitude and frequency of their dominant acoustic and gravity modes of oscillation. A multiple linear regression to estimate the nitrogen abundance combined with principal component analysis, after addressing the incomplete and truncated nature of the data, reveals that the effective temperature and the frequency of the dominant acoustic oscillation mode are the only two significant predictors for the nitrogen abundance, while the projected rotational velocity and the rotational frequency have no predictive power. The dominant gravity mode and the magnetic field strength are correlated with the effective temperature but have no predictive power for the nitrogen abundance. Our findings are completely based on observations and their proper statistical treatment and call for a new strategy in evaluating the outcome of stellar evolution computations.

  12. Cyclotron production of {sup 61}Cu using natural Zn and enriched {sup 64}Zn targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asad, A. H.; Smith, S. V.; Chan, S.; Jeffery, C. M.; Morandeau, L.; Price, R. I. [RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia, Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University, Perth, Australia, and Center of Excellence in Anti-matter Matter Studies, Australian National University, Can (Australia); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States) and Center of Excellence in Anti-matter Matter Studies, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia); RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia); Center of Excellence in Anti-matter Matter Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, and Chemistry, University of Western Australia, Pe (Australia); RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia); RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia and Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia)

    2012-12-19

    Copper-61 ({sup 61}Cu) shares with {sup 64}Cu certain advantages for PET diagnostic imaging, but has a shorter half-life (3.4hr vs. 12.7hr) and a greater probability of positron production per disintegration (61% vs. 17.9%). One important application is for in vivo imaging of hypoxic tissue. In this study {sup 61}Cu was produced using the {sup 64}Zn(p,{alpha}){sup 61}Cu reaction on natural Zn or enriched {sup 64}Zn targets. The enriched {sup 64}Zn (99.82%) was electroplated onto high purity gold or silver foils or onto thin Al discs. A typical target bombardment used 30{mu}A; at 11.7, 14.5 or 17.6MeV over 30-60min. The {sup 61}Cu (radiochemical purity of >95%) was separated using a combination of cation and anion exchange columns. The {sup 64}Zn target material was recovered after each run, for re-use. In a direct comparison with enriched {sup 64}Zn-target results, {sup 61}Cu production using the cheaper {sup nat}Zn target proved to be an effective alternative.

  13. ASPCAP: The Apogee Stellar Parameter and Chemical Abundances Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pérez, Ana E García; Holtzman, Jon A; Shetrone, Matthew; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Carrera, Ricardo; Cunha, Katia; García-Hernández, D A; Johnson, Jennifer A; Majewski, Steven R; Nidever, David L; Schiavon, Ricardo P; Shane, Neville; Smith, Verne V; Sobeck, Jennifer; Troup, Nicholas; Zamora, Olga; Bovy, Jo; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Feuillet, Diane; Frinchaboy, Peter M; Hayden, Michael R; Hearty, Fred R; Nguyen, Duy C; O'Connell, Robert W; Pinsonneault, Marc H; Weinberg, David H; Wilson, John C; Zasowski, Gail

    2015-01-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) has built the largest moderately high-resolution (R=22, 500) spectroscopic map of the stars across the Milky Way, and including dust-obscured areas. The APOGEE Stellar Parameter and Chemical Abundances Pipeline (ASPCAP) is the software developed for the automated analysis of these spectra. ASPCAP determines atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances from observed spectra by comparing observed spectra to libraries of theoretical spectra, using chi-2 minimization in a multidimensional parameter space. The package consists of a fortran90 code that does the actual minimization, and a wrapper IDL code for book-keeping and data handling. This paper explains in detail the ASPCAP components and functionality, and presents results from a number of tests designed to check its performance. ASPCAP provides stellar effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities precise to 2%, 0.1 dex, and 0.05 dex, respectively, for most APOGEE stars, wh...

  14. New Insights on Jupiter's Deep Water Abundance from Disequilibrium Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Dong; Lunine, Jonathan; Mousis, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The bulk water abundance on Jupiter potentially constrains the planet's formation conditions. We improve the chemical constraints on Jupiter's deep water abundance in this paper. The eddy diffusion coefficient is used to model vertical mixing in planetary atmosphere, and based on laboratory studies dedicated to turbulent rotating convection, we propose a new formulation of the eddy diffusion coefficient for the troposphere of giant planets. The new formulation predicts a smooth transition from the slow rotation regime (near the equator) to the rapid rotation regime (near the pole). We estimate an uncertainty for the newly derived coefficient of less than 25$\\%$, which is much better than the one order of magnitude uncertainty used in the literature. We then reevaluate the water constraint provided by CO, using the newer eddy diffusion coefficient. We considered two updated CO kinetic models, one model constrains the water enrichment (relative to solar) between 0.1 and 0.75, while the other constrains the wate...

  15. [?/Fe] ABUNDANCES OF FOUR OUTER M31 HALO STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargas, Luis C.; Geha, Marla; Tollerud, Erik J. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, 260 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Gilbert, Karoline M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kirby, Evan N. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guhathakurta, Puragra, E-mail: luis.vargas@yale.edu [UCO/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    We present alpha element to iron abundance ratios, [?/Fe], for four stars in the outer stellar halo of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). The stars were identified as high-likelihood field halo stars by Gilbert et al. and lie at projected distances between 70 and 140 kpc from M31's center. These are the first alpha abundances measured for a halo star in a galaxy beyond the Milky Way. The stars range in metallicity between [Fe/H] = –2.2 and [Fe/H] = –1.4. The sample's average [?/Fe] ratio is +0.20 ± 0.20. The best-fit average value is elevated above solar, which is consistent with rapid chemical enrichment from Type II supernovae. The mean [?/Fe] ratio of our M31 outer halo sample agrees (within the uncertainties) with that of Milky Way inner/outer halo stars that have a comparable range of [Fe/H].

  16. Beryllium abundance in turn-off stars of NGC 6752

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Pasquini; Piercarlo Bonifacio; Sofia Randich; Daniele Galli; Raffaele G. Gratton; B. Wolff

    2006-12-27

    Aims: To measure the beryllium abundance in two TO stars of the Globular Cluster NGC 6752, one oxygen rich and sodium poor, the other presumably oxygen poor and sodium rich. Be abundances in these stars are used to put on firmer grounds the hypothesis of Be as cosmochronometer and to investigate the formation of Globular Clusters. Method:We present near UV spectra with resolution R$\\sim 45000$ obtained with the UVES spectrograph on the 8.2m VLT Kueyen telescope, analysed with spectrum synthesis based on plane parallel LTE model atmospheres. Results:Be is detected in the O rich star with log(Be/H)=-12.04 $\\pm$0.15, while Be is not detected in the other star for which we obtain the upper limit log(Be/H)$<$-12.2. A large difference in nitrogen abundance (1.6 dex) is found between the two stars. Conclusions:The Be measurement is compatible with what found in field stars with the same [Fe/H] and [O/H]. The 'Be age' of the cluster is found to be 13.3 Gyrs, in excellent agreement with the results from main sequence fitting and stellar evolution. The presence of Be confirms the results previously obtained for the cluster NGC 6397 and supports the hypothesis that Be can be used as a clock for the early formation of the Galaxy. Since only an upper limit is found for the star with low oxygen abundance, we cannot decide between competing scenarios of Globular Cluster formation, but we can exclude that 'polluted' stars are substantially younger than 'unpolluted' ones. We stress that the Be test might be the only measurement capable of distinguishing between these scenarios.

  17. The element abundance FIP effect in the quiet Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. R. Young

    2005-03-02

    The Mg/Ne abundance ratio in the quiet Sun is measured in both network and supergranule cell centre regions through EUV spectra from the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer on SOHO. Twenty four sets of data over the period 1996 March to 1998 June (corresponding to solar minimum) are studied. Emission lines of the sequences Ne IV-VII and Mg V-VIII are simultaneously analysed by comparing with theoretical emissivities from the CHIANTI database to yield the Mg/Ne abundance and emission measure over the temperature region 5.0 < logT < 6.1. The average enhancements over the photospheric Mg/Ne abundance are found to be 1.25 +/- 0.10 (network) and 1.66 +/- 0.23 (cell centres), significantly lower than the typical 4-5 enhancements found in the slow solar wind. This result implies that only a small fraction of the quiet Sun connects into the solar wind. The quiet Sun spectra are also utilised to determine the coronal density and temperature, leading to average values of 2.6^+0.5_-0.4 x 10^8 cm^-3 and log (T/K)=5.95 +/- 0.02. No significant trend with the rise in solar activity during 1996--98 is found for any of the derived quantities, implying that quiet Sun regions show little dependence on the solar cycle.

  18. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE PATTERNS AND THE EARLY ENVIRONMENT OF DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corlies, Lauren; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Bryan, Greg [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Tumlinson, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2013-08-20

    Recent observations suggest that abundance pattern differences exist between low metallicity stars in the Milky Way stellar halo and those in the dwarf satellite galaxies. This paper takes a first look at what role the early environment for pre-galactic star formation might have played in shaping these stellar populations. In particular, we consider whether differences in cross-pollution between the progenitors of the stellar halo and the satellites could help to explain the differences in abundance patterns. Using an N-body simulation, we find that the progenitor halos of the main halo are primarily clustered together at z = 10 while the progenitors of the satellite galaxies remain on the outskirts of this cluster. Next, analytically modeled supernova-driven winds show that main halo progenitors cross-pollute each other more effectively while satellite galaxy progenitors remain more isolated. Thus, inhomogeneous cross-pollution as a result of different high-z spatial locations of each system's progenitors can help to explain observed differences in abundance patterns today. Conversely, these differences are a signature of the inhomogeneity of metal enrichment at early times.

  19. The Origin of Fluorine: Abundances in AGB Carbon Stars Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abia, C; Cristallo, S; de Laverny, P

    2015-01-01

    Revised spectroscopic parameters for the HF molecule and a new CN line list in the 2.3 mu region have been recently available, allowing a revision of the F content in AGB stars. AGB carbon stars are the only observationally confirmed sources of fluorine. Nowadays there is not a consensus on the relevance of AGB stars in its Galactic chemical evolution. The aim of this article is to better constrain the contribution of these stars with a more accurate estimate of their fluorine abundances. Using new spectroscopic tools and LTE spectral synthesis, we redetermine fluorine abundances from several HF lines in the K-band in a sample of Galactic and extragalactic AGB carbon stars of spectral types N, J and SC spanning a wide range of metallicities. On average, the new derived fluorine abundances are systematically lower by 0.33 dex with respect to previous determinations. This may derive from a combination of the lower excitation energies of the HF lines and the larger macroturbulence parameters used here as well as...

  20. Lithium abundance in a sample of solar-like stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López-Valdivia, R; Bertone, E; Chávez, M; de Miera, F Cruz-Saenz; Amazo-Gómez, E M

    2015-01-01

    We report on the determination of the lithium abundance [A(Li)] of 52 solar-like stars. For 41 objects the A(Li) here presented corresponds to the first measurement. We have measured the equivalent widths of the 6708\\AA\\ lithium feature in high-resolution spectroscopic images ($R \\sim 80\\,000$), obtained at the Observatorio Astrof\\'isico Guillermo Haro (Sonora, Mexico), as part of the first scientific observations of the revitalized Lunar and Planetary Laboratory (LPL) Echelle Spectrograph, now known as the Cananea High-resolution Spectrograph (CanHiS). Lithium abundances were derived with the Fortran code MOOG, using as fundamental input a set of atmospheric parameters recently obtained by our group. With the help of an additional small sample with previous A(Li) determinations, we demonstrate that our lithium abundances are in agreement, to within uncertainties, with other works. Two target objects stand out from the rest of the sample. The star BD+47 3218 ($T_{\\rm eff}$ = 6050$\\pm$52 K, A(Li) = 1.86$\\pm$ 0...

  1. Natural Gas Storage Research at Savannah River National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anton, Don; Sulic, Martin; Tamburello, David A.

    2015-05-04

    As an alternative to imported oil, scientists at the Department of Energy’s Savannah River National Laboratory are looking at abundant, domestically sourced natural gas, as an alternative transportation fuel. SRNL is investigating light, inexpensive, adsorbed natural gas storage systems that may fuel the next generation of automobiles.

  2. Natural Gas Supply in Denmark -A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , which describes the markets for electricity and district heat. Specifically on the demand side Foundation for Gas Market Liberalization . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.5 District Heating of the markets of natural gas and electricity and the existence of an abundance of de-centralized combined heat

  3. METHANE AND NITROGEN ABUNDANCES ON PLUTO AND ERIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegler, S. C.; Cornelison, D. M.; Abernathy, M. R.; Bovyn, M. J.; Burt, J. A.; Evans, D. E.; Maleszewski, C. K.; Thompson, Z.; Grundy, W. M.; Romanishin, W.; Vilas, F. E-mail: David.Cornelison@nau.ed E-mail: wjr@nhn.ou.ed

    2010-12-10

    We present spectra of Eris from the MMT 6.5 m Telescope and Red Channel Spectrograph (5700-9800 A, 5 A pixel{sup -1}) on Mt. Hopkins, AZ, and of Pluto from the Steward Observatory 2.3 m Telescope and Boller and Chivens Spectrograph (7100-9400 A, 2 A pixel{sup -1}) on Kitt Peak, AZ. In addition, we present laboratory transmission spectra of methane-nitrogen and methane-argon ice mixtures. By anchoring our analysis in methane and nitrogen solubilities in one another as expressed in the phase diagram of Prokhvatilov and Yantsevich, and comparing methane bands in our Eris and Pluto spectra and methane bands in our laboratory spectra of methane and nitrogen ice mixtures, we find Eris' bulk methane and nitrogen abundances are {approx}10% and {approx}90% and Pluto's bulk methane and nitrogen abundances are {approx}3% and {approx}97%. Such abundances for Pluto are consistent with values reported in the literature. It appears that the bulk volatile composition of Eris is similar to the bulk volatile composition of Pluto. Both objects appear to be dominated by nitrogen ice. Our analysis also suggests, unlike previous work reported in the literature, that the methane and nitrogen stoichiometry is constant with depth into the surface of Eris. Finally, we point out that our Eris spectrum is also consistent with a laboratory ice mixture consisting of 40% methane and 60% argon. Although we cannot rule out an argon-rich surface, it seems more likely that nitrogen is the dominant species on Eris because the nitrogen ice 2.15 {mu}m band is seen in spectra of Pluto and Triton.

  4. Standard big bang nucleosynthesis and primordial CNO abundances after Planck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coc, Alain [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris Sud 11, UMR 8609, Bâtiment 104, F–91405 Orsay Campus (France); Uzan, Jean-Philippe; Vangioni, Elisabeth, E-mail: coc@csnsm.in2p3.fr, E-mail: uzan@iap.fr, E-mail: vangioni@iap.fr [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR-7095 du CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis bd Arago, 75014 Paris (France)

    2014-10-01

    Primordial or big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is one of the three historical strong evidences for the big bang model. The recent results by the Planck satellite mission have slightly changed the estimate of the baryonic density compared to the previous WMAP analysis. This article updates the BBN predictions for the light elements using the cosmological parameters determined by Planck, as well as an improvement of the nuclear network and new spectroscopic observations. There is a slight lowering of the primordial Li/H abundance, however, this lithium value still remains typically 3 times larger than its observed spectroscopic abundance in halo stars of the Galaxy. According to the importance of this ''lithium problem{sup ,} we trace the small changes in its BBN calculated abundance following updates of the baryonic density, neutron lifetime and networks. In addition, for the first time, we provide confidence limits for the production of {sup 6}Li, {sup 9}Be, {sup 11}B and CNO, resulting from our extensive Monte Carlo calculation with our extended network. A specific focus is cast on CNO primordial production. Considering uncertainties on the nuclear rates around the CNO formation, we obtain CNO/H ? (5-30)×10{sup -15}. We further improve this estimate by analyzing correlations between yields and reaction rates and identified new influential reaction rates. These uncertain rates, if simultaneously varied could lead to a significant increase of CNO production: CNO/H?10{sup -13}. This result is important for the study of population III star formation during the dark ages.

  5. MANGANESE ABUNDANCES IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER {omega} CENTAURI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ, 85719 (United States); Bergemann, Maria [Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild Str. 1, 85741 Garching (Germany); Suntzeff, Nicholas B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); Lambert, David L. [University of Texas, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2010-07-01

    We present manganese abundances in 10 red giant members of the globular cluster {omega} Centauri; eight stars are from the most metal-poor population (RGB MP and RGB MInt1) while two targets are members of the more metal-rich groups (RGB MInt2 and MInt3). This is the first time Mn abundances have been studied in this peculiar stellar system. The LTE values of [Mn/Fe] in {omega} Cen overlap those of Milky Way stars in the metal-poor {omega} Cen populations ([Fe/H] {approx}-1.5 to -1.8), however unlike what is observed in Milky Way halo and disk stars, [Mn/Fe] declines in the two more metal-rich RGB MInt2 and MInt3 targets. Non-LTE calculations were carried out in order to derive corrections to the LTE Mn abundances. The non-LTE results for {omega} Cen in comparison with the non-LTE [Mn/Fe] versus [Fe/H] trend obtained for the Milky Way confirm and strengthen the conclusion that the manganese behavior in {omega} Cen is distinct. These results suggest that low-metallicity supernovae (with metallicities {<=} -2) of either Type II or Type Ia dominated the enrichment of the more metal-rich stars in {omega} Cen. The dominance of low-metallicity stars in the chemical evolution of {omega} Cen has been noted previously in the s-process elements where enrichment from metal-poor asymptotic giant branch stars is indicated. In addition, copper, which also has metallicity-dependent yields, exhibits lower values of [Cu/Fe] in the RGB MInt2 and MInt3 {omega} Cen populations.

  6. DIVERSITY OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IMPRINTED IN CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Shigeyama, Toshikazu, E-mail: taku.tsujimoto@nao.ac.jp [Research Center for the Early Universe, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    A time delay of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosions hinders the imprint of their nucleosynthesis on stellar abundances. However, some occasional cases give birth to stars that avoid enrichment of their chemical compositions by massive stars and thereby exhibit an SN-Ia-like elemental feature including a very low [Mg/Fe] ( Almost-Equal-To - 1). We highlight the elemental feature of Fe-group elements for two low-Mg/Fe objects detected in nearby galaxies, and propose the presence of a class of SNe Ia that yield the low abundance ratios of [Cr, Mn, Ni/Fe]. Our novel models of chemical evolution reveal that our proposed class of SNe Ia (slow SNe Ia) is associated with ones exploding on a long timescale after their stellar birth and give a significant impact on the chemical enrichment in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). In the Galaxy, on the other hand, this effect is unseen due to the overwhelming enrichment by the major class of SNe Ia that explode promptly (prompt SNe Ia) and eject a large amount of Fe-group elements. This nicely explains the different [Cr, Mn, Ni/Fe] features between the two galaxies as well as the puzzling feature seen in the LMC stars exhibiting very low Ca but normal Mg abundances. Furthermore, the corresponding channel of slow SN Ia is exemplified by performing detailed nucleosynthesis calculations in the scheme of SNe Ia resulting from a 0.8 + 0.6 M{sub Sun} white dwarf merger.

  7. Platinum-group element abundance patterns in different mantle environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rehkaemper, M.; Halliday, A.N.; Barfod, D.; Fitton, J.G.; Dawson, J.B.

    1997-11-28

    Mantle-derived xenoliths from the Cameroon Line and northern Tanzania display differences in their platinum-group element (PGE) abundance patterns. The Cameroon Line lherzolites have uniform PGE patterns indicating a homogeneous upper mantle over several hundreds of kilometers, with approximately chondritic PGE ratios. The PGE patterns of the Tanzanian peridotites are similar to the PGE systematics of ultramafic rocks from ophiolites. The differences can be explained if the northern Tanzanian lithosphere developed in a fluid-rich suprasubduction zone environment, whereas the Cameroon Line lithosphere only experienced melt extraction from anhydrous periodotites. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Species abundance distribution results from a spatial analogy of central limit theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storch, David

    autocorrelation of abundances, and can be pre- dicted using this information. The theory therefore provides abundances [the species abundance distribution (SAD)] is considered to be a fundamental characteristic covering that plot. We show that this splicing, if applied repeatedly to produce subplots of progressively

  9. AN ASSESSMENT OF WOOD DUCK DISTRIBUTION, ABUNDANCE AND RIPARIAN BREEDING PAIR HABITATS IN SOUTH DAKOTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN ASSESSMENT OF WOOD DUCK DISTRIBUTION, ABUNDANCE AND RIPARIAN BREEDING PAIR HABITATS IN SOUTH #12;AN ASSESSMENT OF WOOD DUCK DISTRIBUTION, ABUNDANCE AND RIPARIAN BREEDING PAIR HABITATS IN SOUTH Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences #12;AN ASSESSMENT OF WOOD DUCK DISTRIBUTION, ABUNDANCE AND RIPARIAN

  10. Non-LTE Abundances of Magnesium, Aluminum and Sulfur in OB Stars Near the Solar Circle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Daflon; K. Cunha; V. V. Smith; K. Butler

    2002-12-09

    Non-LTE abundances of magnesium, aluminum and sulfur are derived for a sample of 23 low-v \\sin i stars belonging to six northern OB associations of the Galactic disk within 1 kpc of the Sun. The abundances are obtained from the fitting of synthetic line profiles to high resolution spectra. A comparison of our results with HII region abundances indicates good agreement for sulfur while the cepheid abundances are higher. The derived abundances of Mg show good overlap with the cepheid results. The aluminum abundances for OB stars are significantly below the cepheid values. But, the OB star results show a dependence with effective temperature and need further investigation. The high Al abundances in the cepheids could be the result of mixing. A discussion of the oxygen abundance in objects near the solar circle suggests that the current mean galactic oxygen abundance in this region is 8.6-8.7 and in agreement with the recently revised oxygen abundance in the solar photosphere. Meaningful comparisons of the absolute S, Al and Mg abundances in OB stars with the Sun must await a reinvestigation of these elements, as well as the meteoritic reference element Si, with 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres for the Sun. No abundance gradients are found within the limited range in galactocentric distances in the present study. Such variations would be expected only if there were large metallicity gradients in the disk.

  11. ELSA: An Integrated, Semi-Automated Nebular Abundance Package

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. D. Johnson; J. S. Levitt; R. B. C. Henry; K. B. Kwitter

    2006-05-03

    We present ELSA, a new modular software package, written in C, to analyze and manage spectroscopic data from emission-line objects. In addition to calculating plasma diagnostics and abundances from nebular emission lines, the software provides a number of convenient features including the ability to ingest logs produced by IRAF's splot task, to semi-automatically merge spectra in different wavelength ranges, and to automatically generate various data tables in machine-readable or LaTeX format. ELSA features a highly sophisticated interstellar reddening correction scheme that takes into account temperature and density effects as well as He II contamination of the hydrogen Balmer lines. Abundance calculations are performed using a 5-level atom approximation with recent atomic data, based on R. Henry's ABUN program. Improvements planned in the near future include use of a three-region ionization model, similar to IRAF's nebular package, error propagation, and the addition of ultraviolet and infrared line analysis capability. Detailed documentation for all aspects of ELSA are available at http://www.williams.edu/Astronomy/research/PN .

  12. Lithium abundances in exoplanet-host stars : modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Castro; S. Vauclair; O. Richard; N. C. Santos

    2008-11-18

    Aims. Exoplanet-host stars (EHS) are known to present superficial chemical abundances different from those of stars without any detected planet (NEHS). EHS are, on the average, overmetallic compared to the Sun. The observations also show that, for cool stars, lithium is more depleted in EHS than in NEHS. The aim of this paper is to obtain constraints on possible models able to explain this difference, in the framework of overmetallic models compared to models with solar abundances. Methods. We have computed main sequence stellar models with various masses and metallicities. The results show different behaviour for the lithium destruction according to those parameters. We compare these results to the spectroscopic observations of lithium. Results. Our models show that the observed lithium differences between EHS and NEHS are not directly due to the overmetallicity of the EHS: some extra mixing is needed below the convective zones. We discuss possible explanations for the needed extra mixing, in particular an increase of the mixing efficiency associated with the development of shear instabilities below the convective zone, triggered by angular momentum transfer due to the planetary migration.

  13. Diversity of Type Ia Supernovae Imprinted in Chemical Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, Takuji

    2012-01-01

    A time delay of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosions hinders the imprint of their nucleosynthesis on stellar abundances. However, some occasional cases give birth to stars that avoid enrichment of their chemical compositions by massive stars and thereby exhibit a SN Ia-like elemental feature including a very low [Mg/Fe] (~-1). We highlight the elemental feature of Fe-group elements for two low-Mg/Fe objects detected in nearby galaxies, and propose the presence of a class of SNe Ia that yield the low abundance ratios of [Cr,Mn,Ni/Fe]. Our novel models of chemical evolution reveal that our proposed class of SNe Ia (slow SNe Ia) is associated with ones exploding on a long timescale after their stellar birth, and gives a significant impact on the chemical enrichment in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). In the Galaxy, on the other hand, this effect is unseen due to the overwhelming enrichment by the major class of SNe Ia that explode promptly (prompt SNe Ia) and eject a large amount of Fe-group elements. This nice...

  14. Ages and Chemical Abundances in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tammy Smecker-Hane; Andrew McWilliam

    1999-10-12

    The dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) in the Local Group are excellent systems on which we can test theories of galaxy formation and evolution. Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) containing many thousands of stars from the asymptotic giant branch to well below the oldest main-sequence turnoff are being used to infer their star-formation histories, and surprisingly complex evolutionary histories have been deduced. Spectroscopy of individual red giant stars in the dSphs is being used to determine the distribution of chemical abundances in them. By combining photometry and spectroscopy, we can overcome the age-metallicity degeneracy inherent in CMDs and determine the evolution of dSphs with unprecedented accuracy. We report on recent progress and discuss a new and exciting avenue of research, high-dispersion spectroscopy that yields abundances for numerous chemical elements. The later allows us to estimate the enrichment from both Type Ia and Type II supernovae (SNe) and places new limits on how much of the Galaxy could have been accreted in the form of dSph-sized fragments and when such mergers could have taken place.

  15. Zirconium, Barium, Lanthanum and Europium Abundances in Open Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, H R; 10.1088/0004-6256/145/4/107

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the s-process elements Zr, Ba, and La and the r-process element Eu in a sample of 50 stars in 19 open clusters. Stellar abundances of each element are based on measures of a minimum of two lines per species via both equivalent width and spectrum synthesis techniques. We investigate cluster mean neutron-capture abundance trends as a function of cluster age and location in the Milky Way disk and compare them to results found in other studies in the literature. We find a statistically significant trend of increasing cluster [Ba/Fe] as a function of decreasing cluster age, in agreement with recent findings for other open cluster samples, supporting the increased importance of low-mass asymptotic giant branch stars to the generation of s-process elements. However, the other s-process elements, [La/Fe] and [Zr/Fe], do not show similar dependences, in contrast to theoretical expectations and the limited observational data from other studies. Conversely, cluster [Eu/Fe] ratios show a slight ...

  16. Predicted Abundances of Carbon Compounds in Volcanic Gases on Io

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Schaefer; Bruce Fegley Jr

    2004-09-17

    We use chemical equilibrium calculations to model the speciation of carbon in volcanic gases on Io. The calculations cover wide temperature (500-2000 K), pressure (10^-8 to 10^+2 bars), and composition ranges (bulk O/S atomic ratios \\~0 to 3), which overlap the nominal conditions at Pele (1760 K, 0.01 bar, O/S ~ 1.5). Bulk C/S atomic ratios ranging from 10^-6 to 10^-1 in volcanic gases are used with a nominal value of 10^-3 based upon upper limits from Voyager for carbon in the Loki plume on Io. Carbon monoxide and CO2 are the two major carbon gases under all conditions studied. Carbonyl sulfide and CS2 are orders of magnitude less abundant. Consideration of different loss processes (photolysis, condensation, kinetic reactions in the plume) indicates that photolysis is probably the major loss process for all gases. Both CO and CO2 should be observable in volcanic plumes and in Io's atmosphere at abundances of several hundred parts per million by volume for a bulk C/S ratio of 10^-3.

  17. Nature's software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Canarutto

    2014-04-20

    I bring forward some arguments to support the thesis that nature is fundamentally discrete, and present my own thoughts about the direction in which one could look for a possible, consistent "theory of everything" describing gravitation and quantum particles.

  18. Chemical Abundance Trends in the Milky Way Disk: Implications on the Origin of the Galactic Thick Disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Judy

    2012-01-01

    1.2 Chemical Abundances and Metallicity Gradients: Probes ofOF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE TRENDS IN THE238 vii Abstract Chemical Abundance Trends in the Milky Way

  19. Abundance determinations in HII regions: model fitting versus Te-method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin

    2002-11-14

    The discrepancy between the oxygen abundances in high-metallicity HII regions determined through the Te-method (and/or through the corresponding "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibration) and that determined through the model fitting (and/or through the corresponding "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibration) is discussed. It is suggested to use the interstellar oxygen abundance in the solar vicinity, derived with very high precision from the high-resolution observations of the weak interstellar absorption lines towards the stars, as a "Rosetta stone" to verify the validity of the oxygen abundances derived in HII regions with the Te-method at high abundances. The agreement between the value of the oxygen abundance at the solar galactocentric distance traced by the abundances derived in HII regions through the Te-method and that derived from the interstellar absorption lines towards the stars is strong evidence in favor of that i) the two-zone model for Te seems to be a realistic interpretation of the temperature structure within HII regions, and ii) the classic Te-method provides accurate oxygen abundances in HII regions. It has been concluded that the "strong lines - oxygen abundance" calibrations must be based on the HII regions with the oxygen abundances derived with the Te-method but not on the existing grids of the models for HII regions.

  20. Carbon stars in local group dwarf galaxies: C and O abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Wahlin; K. Eriksson; B. Gustafsson; K. H. Hinkle; D. L. Lambert; N. Ryde; B. Westerlund

    2006-05-10

    We present abundances of carbon and oxygen as well as abundance ratios 12C/13C for a sample of carbon stars in the LMC, SMC, Carina, Sculptor and Fornax dwarf galaxies. The overall metallicities in these dwarf galaxies are lower than in the galactic disc. The observations cover most of the AGB and we discuss the abundance patterns in different regions along the AGB. The abundances are determined from infrared spectra obtained with the ISAAC spectrometer on VLT (R=1500) and the Phoenix Spectrometer on Gemini South (R=50000). The synthetic spectra used in the analysis were computed with MARCS model atmospheres. We find that the oxygen abundance is decreasing with decreasing overall metallicity of the system while the C/O ratio at a given evolutionary phase is increasing with decreasing oxygen abundance. keywords Stars: abundances -- Stars: carbon -- Stars: AGB and post-AGB -- Galaxies: dwarf -- Local Group -- Infrared: stars

  1. Impact of individual nuclear masses on r-process abundances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mumpower, M. R.; Surman, R.; Fang, D. -L.; Beard, M.; Möller, P.; Kawano, T.; Aprahamian, A.

    2015-09-15

    We have performed for the first time a comprehensive study of the sensitivity of r-process nucleosynthesis to individual nuclear masses across the chart of nuclides. Using the latest version (2012) of the Finite-Range Droplet Model, we consider mass variations of ±0.5 MeV and propagate each mass change to all affected quantities, including Q values, reaction rates, and branching ratios. We find such mass variations can result in up to an order of magnitude local change in the final abundance pattern produced in an r-process simulation. As a result, we identify key nuclei whose masses have a substantial impact on abundancemore »predictions for hot, cold, and neutron star merger r-process scenarios and could be measured at future radioactive beam facilities.« less

  2. Accretion, radial flows and abundance gradients in spiral galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pezzulli, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The metal-poor gas continuously accreting onto the discs of spiral galaxies is unlikely to arrive from the intergalactic medium (IGM) with exactly the same rotation velocity as the galaxy itself and even a small angular momentum mismatch inevitably drives radial gas flows within the disc, with significant consequences to galaxy evolution. Here we provide some general analytic tools to compute accretion profiles, radial gas flows and abundance gradients in spiral galaxies as a function of the angular momentum of accreting material. We generalize existing solutions for the decomposition of the gas flows, required to reproduce the structural properties of galaxy discs, into direct accretion from the IGM and a radial mass flux within the disc. We then solve the equation of metallicity evolution in the presence of radial gas flows with a novel method, based on characteristic lines, which greatly reduces the numerical demand on the computation and sheds light on the crucial role of boundary conditions on the abunda...

  3. Planning Amid Abundance: Alaska’s FY 2013 Budget Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBeath, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    on liquefied natural gas (LNG). He met with the Alaska CEOsof the companies’ position on LNG exports with the state’s (unclear whether a large LNG project would be feasible and

  4. Neon and Sulfur Abundances of Planetary Nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Bernard-Salas; S. R. Pottasch; S. Gutenkunst; P. W. Morris; J. R. Houck

    2007-09-20

    The chemical abundances of neon and sulfur for 25 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Magellanic Clouds are presented. These abundances have been derived using mainly infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope. The implications for the chemical evolution of these elements are discussed. A comparison with similarly obtained abundances of Galactic PNe and HII regions and Magellanic Clouds HII regions is also given. The average neon abundances are 6.0x10(-5) and 2.7x10(-5) for the PNe in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds respectively. These are ~1/3 and 1/6 of the average abundances of Galactic planetary nebulae to which we compare. The average sulfur abundances for the LMC and SMC are respectively 2.7x10(-6) and 1.0x10(-6). The Ne/S ratio (23.5) is on average higher than the ratio found in Galactic PNe (16) but the range of values in both data sets is similar for most of the objects. The neon abundances found in PNe and HII regions agree with each other. It is possible that a few (3-4) of the PNe in the sample have experienced some neon enrichment, but for two of these objects the high Ne/S ratio can be explained by their very low sulfur abundances. The neon and sulfur abundances derived in this paper are also compared to previously published abundances using optical data and photo-ionization models.

  5. Diversity, abundance, seasonality and interactions of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in pecans in Mumford, Robertson Co., Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calixto Sanchez, Alejandro Antonio

    2005-02-17

    of ants/8 trees) and seasonality in Mumford, TX, in three different treatments ??? 52 22. Dorymyrmex flavus relative nest abundance (number of nests/4 transects) and seasonality in Mumford, TX, in three different treatments..., in three different treatments ??? 56 25. Forelius pruinosus relative abundance (number of ants/8 trees) and seasonality in Mumford, TX, in three different treatments ??? 57 26. Forelius pruinosus relative nest abundance (number of nests/4...

  6. The Water Vapor Abundance in Orion KL Outflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Cernicharo; J. R. Goicoechea; F. Daniel; M. R. Lerate; M. J. Barlow; B. M. Swinyard; E. van Dishoeck; T. L. Lim; S. Viti; J. Yates

    2006-08-16

    We present the detection and modeling of more than 70 far-IR pure rotational lines of water vapor, including the 18O and 17O isotopologues, towards Orion KL. Observations were performed with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer Fabry-Perot (LWS/FP; R~6800-9700) on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) between ~43 and ~197 um. The water line profiles evolve from P-Cygni type profiles (even for the H2O18 lines) to pure emission at wavelengths above ~100 um. We find that most of the water emission/absorption arises from an extended flow of gas expanding at 25+-5 kms^-1. Non-local radiative transfer models show that much of the water excitation and line profile formation is driven by the dust continuum emission. The derived beam averaged water abundance is 2-3x10^-5. The inferred gas temperature Tk=80-100 K suggests that: (i) water could have been formed in the "plateau" by gas phase neutral-neutral reactions with activation barriers if the gas was previously heated (e.g. by shocks) to >500 K and/or (ii) H2O formation in the outflow is dominated by in-situ evaporation of grain water-ice mantles and/or (iii) H2O was formed in the innermost and warmer regions (e.g. the hot core) and was swept up in ~1000 yr, the dynamical timescale of the outflow.

  7. Lightest sterile neutrino abundance within the nuMSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takehiko Asaka; Mikko Laine; Mikhail Shaposhnikov

    2015-01-09

    We determine the abundance of the lightest (dark matter) sterile neutrinos created in the Early Universe due to active-sterile neutrino transitions from the thermal plasma. Our starting point is the field-theoretic formula for the sterile neutrino production rate, derived in our previous work [JHEP 06(2006)053], which allows to systematically incorporate all relevant effects, and also to analyse various hadronic uncertainties. Our numerical results differ moderately from previous computations in the literature, and lead to an absolute upper bound on the mixing angles of the dark matter sterile neutrino. Comparing this bound with existing astrophysical X-ray constraints, we find that the Dodelson-Widrow scenario, which proposes sterile neutrinos generated by active-sterile neutrino transitions to be the sole source of dark matter, is only possible for sterile neutrino masses lighter than 3.5 keV (6 keV if all hadronic uncertainties are pushed in one direction and the most stringent X-ray bounds are relaxed by a factor of two). This upper bound may conflict with a lower bound from structure formation, but a definitive conclusion necessitates numerical simulations with the non-equilibrium momentum distribution function that we derive. If other production mechanisms are also operative, no upper bound on the sterile neutrino mass can be established.

  8. LARGE ABUNDANCES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN TITAN'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M.; Dinelli, B. M.; Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E.; Moriconi, M. L.; Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2013-06-20

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 {mu}m in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al. We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 {mu}m. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} particles cm{sup -3}. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is {approx}430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 nm{sup 2}; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  9. STELLAR ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE PATTERNS: IMPLICATIONS FOR PLANET FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambers, J. E.

    2010-11-20

    The solar photosphere is depleted in refractory elements compared to most solar twins, with the degree of depletion increasing with an element's condensation temperature. Here, I show that adding 4 Earth masses of Earth-like and carbonaceous-chondrite-like material to the solar convection zone brings the Sun's composition into line with the mean value for the solar twins. The observed solar composition could have arisen if the Sun's convection zone accreted material from the solar nebula that was depleted in refractory elements due to the formation of the terrestrial planets and ejection of rocky protoplanets from the asteroid belt. Most solar analogs are missing 0-10 Earth masses of rocky material compared to the most refractory-rich stars, providing an upper limit to the mass of rocky terrestrial planets that they possess. The missing mass is correlated with stellar metallicity. This suggests that the efficiency of planetesimal formation increases with stellar metallicity. Stars with and without known giant planets show a similar distribution of abundance trends. If refractory depletion is a signature of the presence of terrestrial planets, this suggests that there is not a strong correlation between the presence of terrestrial and giant planets in the same system.

  10. Metal Abundance Properties of M81 Globular Cluster System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Ma; David Burstein; Zhou Fan; Xu Zhou; Jiansheng Chen; Zhaoji Jiang; Zhenyu Wu; Jianghua Wu

    2007-08-30

    This paper is the third in the series of papers on M81 globular clusters. In this paper, we present spatial and metal abundance properties of 95 M81 globular clusters, which comprise nearly half of all the M81 globular cluster system. These globular clusters are divided into two M81 metallicity groups by a KMM test. Our results show that, the metal-rich clusters did not demonstrate a centrally concentrated spatial distribution as ones in M31, and metal-poor clusters tend to be less spatially concentrated. In other words, the distribution of the metal-rich clusters in M81 is not very similar to that of M31. Most of the metal-rich clusters distribute at projected radii of 4-8 kpc. It is also noted that the metal-rich clusters distribute within the inner 20 kpc, and the metal-poor ones do out to radii of ~40 kpc. Like our Galaxy and M31, the metallicity distribution of globular clusters in M81 along galactocentric radius suggests that some dissipation occurred during the formation of the globular cluster system, i.e. smooth, pressure-supported collapse models of galaxies are unlikely to produce such radial distribution of metallicity presented in this paper. There is not evident correlation between globular cluster luminosity and metallicity in M81 globular clusters. The overwhelming conclusion of this paper seems to be that a more complete and thorough cluster search is needed in M81.

  11. THE CORONAL ABUNDANCES OF MID-F DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Brian E.; Laming, J. Martin [Naval Research Laboratory, Space Science Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2013-05-10

    A Chandra spectrum of the moderately active nearby F6 V star {pi}{sup 3} Ori is used to study the coronal properties of mid-F dwarfs. We find that {pi}{sup 3} Ori's coronal emission measure distribution is very similar to those of moderately active G and K dwarfs, with an emission measure peak near log T = 6.6 seeming to be ubiquitous for such stars. In contrast to coronal temperature, coronal abundances are known to depend on spectral type for main sequence stars. Based on this previously known relation, we expected {pi}{sup 3} Ori's corona to exhibit an extremely strong ''first ionization potential (FIP) effect'', a phenomenon first identified on the Sun where elements with low FIP are enhanced in the corona. We instead find that {pi}{sup 3} Ori's corona exhibits a FIP effect essentially identical to that of the Sun and other early G dwarfs, perhaps indicating that the increase in FIP bias toward earlier spectral types stops or at least slows for F stars. We find that {pi}{sup 3} Ori's coronal characteristics are significantly different from two previously studied mid-F stars, Procyon (F5 IV-V) and {tau} Boo (F7 V). We believe {pi}{sup 3} Ori is more representative of the coronal characteristics of mid-F dwarfs, with Procyon being different because of luminosity class, and {tau} Boo being different because of the effects of one of two close companions, one stellar ({tau} Boo B: M2 V) and one planetary.

  12. Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential2, 2014ProvedYear Jan Feb MarNGPL Production,Energy Office

  13. Monash researchers led by Dr. Dan Li have developed a novel method for converting natural graphite into highly porous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albrecht, David

    natural graphite into highly porous graphene film for advanced applications. Figure 1: illustrates the conversion of inexpensive & abundant graphite into highly porous, mechanically robust conductive films (eg capacitors, batteries and fuel cells) n LCD displays and photovoltaic devices n Composites

  14. Natural enemies and mortality factors of the coffee leafminer Leucoptera coffeella (Guerin-Meneville) (Lepidoptera: Lyonetiidae) in Chiapas, Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lomeli-Flores, Refugio

    2009-05-15

    Through field surveys and laboratory experiments, this study assessed in part the impacts of host plant, natural enemies, and weather variables on coffee leafminer Leucoptera coffeella distribution and abundance at two ...

  15. A MASS-DEPENDENT YIELD ORIGIN OF NEUTRON-CAPTURE ELEMENT ABUNDANCE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ULTRA-FAINT DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Duane M.; Johnston, Kathryn V. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York City, NY 10027 (United States); Tumlinson, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Sen, Bodhisattva [Department of Statistics, Columbia University, New York City, NY 10027 (United States); Simon, Joshua D. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    One way to constrain the nature of the high-redshift progenitors of the Milky Way (MW) is to look at the low-metallicity stellar populations of the different Galactic components today. For example, high-resolution spectroscopy of very metal poor (VMP) stars demonstrates remarkable agreement between the distribution of [Ti/Fe] in the stellar populations of the MW halo and ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies. In contrast, for the neutron-capture (nc) abundance ratio distributions [(Sr, Ba)/Fe], the peak of the small UFD sample (6 stars) exhibits a significant under-abundance relative to the VMP stars in the larger MW halo sample ({approx}300 stars). We present a simple scenario that can simultaneously explain these similarities and differences by assuming: (1) that the MW VMP stars were predominately enriched by a prior generation of stars which possessed a higher total mass than the prior generation of stars that enriched the UFD VMP stars; and (2) a much stronger mass-dependent yield (MDY) for nc-elements than for the (known) MDY for Ti. Simple statistical tests demonstrate that conditions (1) and (2) are consistent with the observed abundance distributions, albeit without strong constraints on model parameters. A comparison of the broad constraints for these nc-MDY with those derived in the literature seems to rule out Ba production from low-mass supernovae (SNe) and affirms models that primarily generate yields from high-mass SNe. Our scenario can be confirmed by a relatively modest (factor of {approx}3-4) increase in the number of high-resolution spectra of VMP stars in UFDs.

  16. Techniques and Technology Article Aerial Surveys for Estimating Wild Turkey Abundance in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    Techniques and Technology Article Aerial Surveys for Estimating Wild Turkey Abundance in the Texas Aerial surveys have been used to estimate abundance of several wild bird species including wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo). We used inflatable turkey decoys at 3 study sites in the Texas Rolling Plains

  17. X-shooter Science Verification Proposal Title: Precise abundance determination of extremely metal poor HII galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liske, Jochen

    the task of obtaining a data base of HII galaxies with accurately derived abundances and a realistic poor HII galaxies Investigators Institute EMAIL ´Angeles I. D´iaz UAM angeles.diaz@uam.es Roberto and abundances derived from SDSS data can only #12;be taken as broad estimates and challenges the methodology

  18. Raman scattering method and apparatus for measuring isotope ratios and isotopic abundances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harney, Robert C. (5665 Charlotte Way, No. 80, Livermore, CA 94550); Bloom, Stewart D. (141 Via Serena, Alamo, CA 94507)

    1978-01-01

    Raman scattering is used to measure isotope ratios and/or isotopic abundances. A beam of quasi-monochromatic photons is directed onto the sample to be analyzed, and the resulting Raman-scattered photons are detected and counted for each isotopic species of interest. These photon counts are treated mathematically to yield the desired isotope ratios or isotopic abundances.

  19. The Solar Wind Helium Abundance: Variation with Wind Speed and the Solar Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, John

    The Solar Wind Helium Abundance: Variation with Wind Speed and the Solar Cycle Matthias R. Aellig Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM 87545 Abstract We investigate the helium abundance in the solar wind of 1994 and early 2000 are analyzed. In agreement with similar work for previous solar cycles, we find

  20. Lithium abundance in a turnoff halo star on an extreme orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spite, Monique; Caffau, Elisabetta; Bonifacio, Piercarlo

    2015-01-01

    The lithium abundance in turnoff stars of the old population of our Galaxy is remarkably constant in the metallicity interval -2.8\\textless{}[Fe/H] \\textless{}-2.0, defining a plateau. The Li abundance of these turnoff stars is clearly lower than the abundance predicted by the primordial nucleosynthesis in the frame of the standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis. Different scenarios have been proposed for explaining this discrepancy, along with the very low scatter of the lithium abundance around the plateau. The recently identified very high velocity star, WISE J072543.88-235119.7 appears to belong to the old Galactic population, and appears to be an extreme halo star on a bound, retrograde Galactic orbit. In this paper, we study the abundance ratios and, in particular the lithium abundance, in this star. The available spectra (ESO-Very Large Telescope) are analyzed and the abundances of Li, C, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Sr and Ba are determined.The abundance ratios in WISE J072543.88-235119.7...

  1. On the oxygen abundance determination in HII regions: High - metallicity regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin

    2001-01-25

    This is our second paper devoted to the problem of line intensity - oxygen abundance calibration starting from the idea of McGaugh (1991) that the strong oxygen lines contain the necessary information to determine accurate abundances in HII regions. The high-metallicity HII regions are considered. A relation of the type O/H=f(P,R23) between oxygen abundance and the value of abundance index R23 introduced by Pagel et al. (1979) and the excitation parameter P (which is defined here as the contribution of the radiation in [OIII]4959,5007 lines to the "total" oxygen radiation) has been derived empirically using the available oxygen abundances determined via measurement of a temperature-sensitive line ratio [OIII]4959,5007/[OIII]4363 (Te - method). By comparing oxygen abundances derived with the Te - method and those derived with the suggested relations (P - method), it was found that the precision of oxygen abundance determination with the P - method is around 0.1 dex and is comparable to that of the Te - method. A relation of the type Te=f(P,R23) between electron temperature and the values of abundance index R23 and the excitation parameter P was derived empirically using the available electron temperatures determined via measurement of temperature-sensitive line ratios. The mean difference between electron temperatures derived through the Te=f(P,23 relation and determined via measurement of the temperature-sensitive line ratio is around 500K.

  2. Trend for Thermoelectric Materials and Their Earth Abundance R. AMATYA1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ram, Rajeev J.

    Trend for Thermoelectric Materials and Their Earth Abundance R. AMATYA1,2 and R.J. RAM1 1 to their price volatility as applications (competing with thermoelectrics) con- tinue to grow, for example with crustal abundance of 30 ppm ($4 9 1018 metric tons) has ZT greater than 0.8. Key words: Thermoelectric

  3. ANALYSIS OF RICIN TOXIN PREPARATIONS FOR CARBOHYDRATE AND FATTY ACID ABUNDANCE AND ISOTOPE RATIO INFORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Colburn, Heather A.; Moran, James J.; Melville, Angela M.

    2009-12-01

    This report describes method development and preliminary evaluation for analyzing castor samples for signatures of purifying ricin. Ricin purification from the source castor seeds is essentially a problem of protein purification using common biochemical methods. Indications of protein purification will likely manifest themselves as removal of the non-protein fractions of the seed. Two major, non-protein, types of biochemical constituents in the seed are the castor oil and various carbohydrates. The oil comprises roughly half the seed weight while the carbohydrate component comprises roughly half of the remaining “mash” left after oil and hull removal. Different castor oil and carbohydrate components can serve as indicators of specific toxin processing steps. Ricinoleic acid is a relatively unique fatty acid in nature and is the most abundant component of castor oil. The loss of ricinoleic acid indicates a step to remove oil from the seeds. The relative amounts of carbohydrates and carbohydrate-like compounds, including arabinose, xylose, myo-inositol fucose, rhamnose, glucosamine and mannose detected in the sample can also indicate specific processing steps. For instance, the differential loss of arabinose relative to mannose and N-acetyl glucosamine indicates enrichment for the protein fraction of the seed using protein precipitation. The methods developed in this project center on fatty acid and carbohydrate extraction from castor samples followed by derivatization to permit analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Method descriptions herein include: the source and preparation of castor materials used for method evaluation, the equipment and description of procedure required for chemical derivatization, and the instrument parameters used in the analysis. Two types of derivatization methods describe analysis of carbohydrates and one procedure for analysis of fatty acids. Two types of GC-MS analysis is included in the method development, one employing a quadrupole MS system for compound identification and an isotope ratio MS for measuring the stable isotope ratios of deuterium and hydrogen (D/H) in fatty acids. Finally, the method for analyzing the compound abundance data is included. This study indicates that removal of ricinoleic acid is a conserved consequence of each processing step we tested. Furthermore, the stable isotope D/H ratio of ricinoleic acid distinguished between two of the three castor seed sources. Concentrations of arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucosamine and myo-inositol differentiated between crude or acetone extracted samples and samples produced by protein precipitation. Taken together these data illustrate the ability to distinguish between processes used to purify a ricin sample as well as potentially the source seeds.

  4. The Abundance of Fluorine in Normal G and K Stars of the Galactic Thin Disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilachowski, Catherine A

    2015-01-01

    The abundance of fluorine is determined from the (2-0) R9 2.3358 micron feature of the molecule HF for several dozen normal G and K stars in the Galactic thin disk from spectra obtained with the Phoenix IR spectrometer on the 2.1-m telescope at Kitt Peak. The abundances are analyzed in the context of Galactic chemical evolution to explore the contributions of supernovae and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to the abundance of fluorine in the thin disk. The average abundance of fluorine in the thin disk is found to be [F/Fe] = +0.23 +/- 0.03, and the [F/Fe] ratio is flat or declines slowly with metallicity in the range from -0.6 supernovae contributes significantly to the Galactic fluorine abundance, although contributions from AGB stars may also be important.

  5. Record of Cycling Operation of the Natural Nuclear Reactor in the Oklo/Okelobondo Area in Gabon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Record of Cycling Operation of the Natural Nuclear Reactor in the Oklo/Okelobondo Area in Gabon A billion yr old Oklo natural nuclear reactor. In addition to elevated abundances of fission-produced Zr, Ce nuclear chain reaction was predicted by Kuroda [1] 20 years before the remnants of the natural reactor

  6. Stellar abundances in the solar neighborhood: The Hypatia Catalog (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback System inStatus of the MEIC ion collider

  7. The Dependence of Subhalo Abundance on Halo Concentration (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback SystemGimbaledM-PACEConnectTheoretical and Experimental|

  8. The Dependence of Subhalo Abundance on Halo Concentration (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback SystemGimbaledM-PACEConnectTheoretical and Experimental||

  9. Chemical Constraints on the Water and Total Oxygen Abundances in the Deep Atmosphere of Saturn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Channon Visscher; Bruce Fegley Jr

    2005-01-07

    Thermochemical equilibrium and kinetic calculations for the trace gases CO, PH3, and SiH4 give three independent constraints on the water and total oxygen abundances of Saturn's deep atmosphere. A lower limit to the water abundance of H2O/H2 > 1.7 x 10^-3 is given by CO chemistry while an upper limit of H2O/H2 water enrichment on Saturn of 1.9 to 6.1 times the solar system abundance (H2O/H2 = 8.96 x 10^-4). The total oxygen abundance must be at least 1.7 times the solar system abundance (O/H2 = 1.16 x 10^-3) in order for the SiH4 to remain below a detection limit of SiH4/H2 < 2 x 10^-10. A combination of the CO, PH3, and SiH4 constraints suggests that the total oxygen abundance on Saturn is 3.2 to 6.4 times the solar system abundance. Our results indicate that oxygen on Saturn is less enriched than other heavy elements (such as C and P) relative to a solar system composition. This work was supported by NASA NAG5-11958.

  10. Stochastic chemical enrichment in metal-poor systems II. Abundance ratios and scatter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Karlsson; B. Gustafsson

    2005-04-27

    A stochastic model of the chemical enrichment of metal-poor systems by core-collapse supernovae is used to study the scatter in stellar abundance ratios. The resulting scatter in abundance ratios, e.g. as functions of the overall metallicity, is demonstrated to be crucially dependent on the as yet uncertain supernovae yields. The observed abundance ratios and their scatters therefore have diagnostic power as regards the yields. The relatively small star-to-star scatter observed in many chemical abundance ratios, e.g. by Cayrel et al. (2004) for stars down to [Fe/H] = -4, is tentatively explained by the averaging of a large number of contributing supernovae and by the cosmic selection effects favoring contributions from supernovae in a certain mass range for the most metal-poor stars. The scatter in observed abundances of alpha-elements is understood in terms of observational errors only, while additional spread in yields or sites of nucleosynthesis may affect the odd-even elements Na and Al. For the iron-group elements we find systematically too high predicted Cr/Fe and Cr/Mg ratios, as well as differences between the different sets of yields, both in terms of predicted abundance ratios and scatter. The semi-empirical yields recently suggested by Francois et al. (2004) are found to lead to scatter in abundance ratios significantly greater than observed, when applied in the inhomogeneous models. "Spurs", very narrow sequences in abundance-ratio diagrams, may disclose a single-supernova origin of the elements of the stars on the sequence. Verification of the existence of such features, called single supernova sequences (SSSs), is challenging. This will require samples of several hundred stars with abundance ratios observed to accuracies of 0.05 dex or better.

  11. ,"Natural Gas Consumption",,,"Natural Gas Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Census Division, 1999" ,"Natural Gas Consumption",,,"Natural Gas Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand cubic feet)","per Square Foot (cubic feet)","per Worker (thousand cubic...

  12. Seasonal Abundance of the Greenbug and its Natural Enemies in Grain Sorghum in the Texas High Plains. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teetes, George L.; Lopez, Ector G.; Schaefer, Curtis A.

    1975-01-01

    . Major predators recorded weekly were: Hippodanzia spp., Chn~sopa spp., Scyrnrzus spp., Syriphid spp. (larvae), spiders, and three hemipteran species, Orius spp., Nabis spp.. and Geocoris spp. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Greenbugs infested grain sorghum...

  13. Increased seawater temperature increases the abundance and alters the structure of natural Vibrio populations associated with the coral Pocillopora damicornis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tout, Jessica

    Rising seawater temperature associated with global climate change is a significant threat to coral health and is linked to increasing coral disease and pathogen-related bleaching events. We performed heat stress experiments ...

  14. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR Enables the Analysis of Sn-Beta Zeolite Prepared with Natural Abundance [superscript 119]Sn Precursors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunther, William Robert

    The catalytic activity of tin-containing zeolites, such as Sn-Beta, is critically dependent on the successful incorporation of the tin metal center into the zeolite framework. However, synchrotron-based techniques or ...

  15. NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

  16. NEW ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS OF CADMIUM, LUTETIUM, AND OSMIUM IN THE r-PROCESS ENRICHED STAR BD +17 3248

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, John

    NEW ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS OF CADMIUM, LUTETIUM, AND OSMIUM IN THE r-PROCESS ENRICHED STAR BD +17 ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS OF CADMIUM, LUTETIUM, AND OSMIUM IN THE r-PROCESS ENRICHED STAR BD +17 3248, Ian U

  17. Abundance analysis of SB2 binary stars with HgMn primaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Ryabchikova

    1998-05-06

    We present a short review of the abundances in the atmospheres of SB2 systems with Mercury-Manganese (HgMn) primaries. Up to now a careful study has been made for both components of 8 out of 17 known SB2 binaries with orbital periods shorter than 100 days and mass ratio ranging from 1.08 to 2.2. For all eight systems we observe a lower Mn abundance in the secondary's atmospheres than in the primary's. Significant difference in the abundances is also found for some peculiar elements such as Ga, Xe, Pt. All secondary stars with effective temperatures less than 10000 K show abundance characteristics typical of the metallic-line stars.

  18. Asteroseismic estimate of helium abundance of a solar analog binary system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, Kuldeep; Antia, H. M.; Faria, João P.; Monteiro, Mário J. P. F. G.; Basu, Sarbani; Mazumdar, Anwesh; Appourchaux, Thierry; Chaplin, William J.; García, Rafael A.

    2014-08-01

    16 Cyg A and B are among the brightest stars observed by Kepler. What makes these stars more interesting is that they are solar analogs. 16 Cyg A and B exhibit solar-like oscillations. In this work we use oscillation frequencies obtained using 2.5 yr of Kepler data to determine the current helium abundance of these stars. For this we use the fact that the helium ionization zone leaves a signature on the oscillation frequencies and that this signature can be calibrated to determine the helium abundance of that layer. By calibrating the signature of the helium ionization zone against models of known helium abundance, the helium abundance in the envelope of 16 Cyg A is found to lie in the range of 0.231 to 0.251 and that of 16 Cyg B lies in the range of 0.218 to 0.266.

  19. Earth-abundant Solar Cells: Can Iron Complexes Serve as Photosensitize...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Earth-abundant Solar Cells: Can Iron Complexes Serve as Photosensitizers in DSSCs November 10, 2015 11:00AM to 12:00PM Presenter Elena Jakubikova, North Carolina State University...

  20. Earth abundant materials for high efficiency heterojunction thin film solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buonassisi, Tonio

    We investigate earth abundant materials for thin-film solar cells that can meet tens of terawatts level deployment potential. Candidate materials are identified by combinatorial search, large-scale electronic structure ...

  1. Distribution and abundance of endangered Florida Key deer on outer islands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, Dominque Elijah

    2007-04-25

    -based survey data. All outer islands exhibited estimated abundances considerably below carrying capacities, with larger populations occurring closer to Big Pine Key. Results indicated that other islands and complexes such as Ramrod Key, Water Key...

  2. High-Performance Thermoelectric Devices Based on Abundant Silicide Materials for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Development of high-performance thermoelectric devices for vehicle waste heat recovery will include fundamental research to use abundant promising low-cost thermoelectric materials, thermal management and interfaces design, and metrology

  3. Oxygen abundances in dwarf irregular galaxies and the metallicity - luminosity relationship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin

    2001-05-21

    The low-luminosity dwarf irregular galaxies are considered. The oxygen abundances in HII regions of dwarf irregular galaxies were recalculated from published spectra through the recently suggested P - method. It has been found that the metallicity of low-luminosity dwarf irregular galaxies, with a few exceptions, correlates well with galaxy luminosity. The dispersion of oxygen abundances around the metallicity - luminosity relationship increases with decreasing of galaxy luminosity, as was found by Richer and McCall (1995). No relationship between the oxygen abundance and the absolute magnitude in the blue band for irregular galaxies obtained by Hidalgo-Gamez and Olofsson (1998) can be explained by the large uncertainties in the oxygen abundances derived through the Te - method, that in turn can be explained by the large uncertainties in the measurements of the strengths of the weak oxygen line [OIII]4363 used in the Te - method.

  4. Effect of Warming and Precipitation Distribution on Soil Respiration and Mycorrhizal Abundance in Post Oak Savannah 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cartmill, Andrew David

    2012-07-16

    , and precipitation distribution on soil CO2 efflux, its underlying components, and mycorrhizal abundance in southern post oak savannah. Post oak savannah in the south-central US are dominated by three contrasting plant functional types: Schizachyrium scoparium (Michx...

  5. The Abundance of Boron in Evolved A- and B-Type Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim A. Venn; David L. Lambert; Michael Lemke

    1995-08-01

    Boron abundances in A- and B-type stars may be a successful way to track evolutionary effects in these hot stars. The light elements -- Li, Be, and B -- are tracers of exposure to temperatures more moderate than those in which the H-burning CN-cycle operates. Thus, any exposure of surface stellar layers to deeper layers will affect these light element abundances. Li and Be are used in this role in investigations of evolutionary processes in cool stars, but are not observable in hotter stars. An investigation of boron, however, is possible through the B II 1362=C5 resonance line. We have gathered high resolution spectra from the IUE database of A- and B-type stars near 10~M$_\\odot$ for which nitrogen abundances have been determined (by Gies & Lambert, 1992, and Venn 1995). The B II 1362=C5 line is blended throughout the temperature range of this program, requiring spectrum syntheses to recover the boron abundances. For no star could we synthesize the 1362=C5 region using the meteoritic/solar boron abundance of log(B) =3D 2.88 (Anders & Grevesse 1989); a lower boron abundance was necessary which may reflect evolutionary effects (e.g., mass loss or mixing near the main-sequence), the natal composition of the star forming regions, or a systematic error in the analyses (e.g., non-LTE effects). Regardless of the initial boron abundance, and despite the possibility of non-LTE effects, it seems clear that boron is severely depleted in some stars. It may be that the nitrogen and boron abundances are anticorrelated, as would be expected from mixing between the H-burning and outer stellar layers. If, as we suspect, a residue of boron is present in the A-type supergiants, we may exclude a scenario in which mixing occurs continuously between the surface and the deep

  6. The Ne-to-O abundance ratio of the interstellar medium from IBEX-Lo observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.; Kucharek, H.; Möbius, E.; Leonard, T.; Bzowski, M.; Sokó?, J. M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we report on a two-year study to estimate the Ne/O abundance ratio in the gas phase of the local interstellar cloud (LIC). Based on the first two years of observations with the Interstellar Boundary Explorer, we determined the fluxes of interstellar neutral (ISN) O and Ne atoms at the Earth's orbit in spring 2009 and 2010. A temporal variation of the Ne/O abundance ratio at the Earth's orbit could be expected due to solar cycle-related effects such as changes of ionization. However, this study shows that there is no significant change in the Ne/O ratio at the Earths orbit from 2009 to 2010. We used time-dependent survival probabilities of the ISNs to calculate the Ne/O abundance ratio at the termination shock. Then we estimated the Ne/O abundance ratio in the gas phase of the LIC with the use of filtration factors and the ionization fractions. From our analysis, the Ne/O abundance ratio in the LIC is 0.33 ± 0.07, which is in agreement with the abundance ratio inferred from pickup-ion measurements.

  7. Natural Gas Basics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NREL Clean Cities

    2010-04-01

    Fact sheet answers questions about natural gas production and use in transportation. Natural gas vehicles are also described.

  8. New Rare Earth Element Abundance Distributions for the Sun and Five r-Process-Rich Very Metal-Poor Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sneden, Christopher; Cowan, John J; Ivans, Inese I; Hartog, Elizabeth A Den

    2009-01-01

    We have derived new abundances of the rare-earth elements Pr, Dy, Tm, Yb, and Lu for the solar photosphere and for five very metal-poor, neutron-capture r-process-rich giant stars. The photospheric values for all five elements are in good agreement with meteoritic abundances. For the low metallicity sample, these abundances have been combined with new Ce abundances from a companion paper, and reconsideration of a few other elements in individual stars, to produce internally-consistent Ba, rare-earth, and Hf (56<= Z <= 72) element distributions. These have been used in a critical comparison between stellar and solar r-process abundance mixes.

  9. Environmental Survey Report for ORNL: Small Mammal Abundance and Distribution Survey Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park 2009 - 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R; Reasor, R. Scott; Campbell, Claire L.

    2009-12-01

    This report summarizes a 1-year small mammal biodiversity survey conducted on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park (OR Research Park). The task was implemented through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Natural Resources Management Program and included researchers from the ORNL Environmental Sciences Division, interns in the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Higher Education Research Experiences Program, and ORNL Environmental Protection Services staff. Eight sites were surveyed reservation wide. The survey was conducted in an effort to determine species abundance and diversity of small mammal populations throughout the reservation and to continue the historical inventory of small mammal presence for biodiversity records. This data collection effort was in support of the approved Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation, a major goal of which is to maintain and enhance wildlife biodiversity on the Reservation. Three of the sites (Poplar Creek, McNew Hollow, and Deer Check Station Field) were previously surveyed during a major natural resources inventory conducted in 1996. Five new sites were included in this study: Bearden Creek, Rainy Knob (Natural Area 21), Gum Hollow, White Oak Creek and Melton Branch. The 2009-2010 small mammal surveys were conducted from June 2009 to July 2010 on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park (OR Research Park). The survey had two main goals: (1) to determine species abundance and diversity and (2) to update historical records on the OR Research Park. The park is located on the Department of Energy-owned Oak Ridge Reservation, which encompasses 13,580 ha. The primary focus of the study was riparian zones. In addition to small mammal sampling, vegetation and coarse woody debris samples were taken at certain sites to determine any correlations between habitat and species presence. During the survey all specimens were captured and released using live trapping techniques including Sherman and pitfall traps. In total 227 small mammals representing nine species were captured during the course of the study. The most common species found in the study was the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus). The least common species found were the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius), woodland vole (Microtus pinetorum), and northern short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda).

  10. NEON AND CNO ABUNDANCES FOR EXTREME HELIUM STARS-A NON-LTE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandey, Gajendra [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, 560034 (India); Lambert, David L., E-mail: pandey@iiap.res.in, E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu [W.J. McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712-1083 (United States)

    2011-02-01

    A non-LTE (NLTE) abundance analysis was carried out for three extreme helium stars (EHes): BD+10{sup 0} 2179, BD-9{sup 0} 4395, and LS IV+6{sup 0} 002, from their optical spectra with NLTE model atmospheres. NLTE TLUSTY model atmospheres were computed with H, He, C, N, O, and Ne treated in NLTE. Model atmosphere parameters were chosen from consideration of fits to observed He I line profiles and ionization equilibria of C and N ions. The program SYNSPEC was then used to determine the NLTE abundances for Ne as well as H, He, C, N, and O. LTE neon abundances from Ne I lines in the EHes: LSE 78, V1920 Cyg, HD 124448, and PV Tel, are derived from published models and an estimate of the NLTE correction applied to obtain the NLTE Ne abundance. We show that the derived abundances of these key elements, including Ne, are well matched with semi-quantitative predictions for the EHe resulting from a cold merger (i.e., no nucleosynthesis during the merger) of an He white dwarf with a C-O white dwarf.

  11. NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP SITE LICENSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    Biotechnology Nature Cell Biology Nature Chemical Biology Nature Chemistry Nature Climate Change Nature of Information Technology Journal of Information Technology Teaching Cases Journal of International Business

  12. Primordial Helium Abundance: A Reanalysis of the Izotov-Thuan Spectroscopic Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masataka Fukugita; Masahiro Kawasaki

    2006-11-09

    A reanalysis is made for the helium abundance determination for the Izotov-Thuan (2004) spectroscopic sample of extragalactic H II regions. We find that the effect of underlying stellar absorption of the He I lines, which is more important for metal poor systems, affects significantly the inferred primordial helium abundance $Y_p$ obtained in the zero metallicity limit and the slope of linear extrapolation, $dY/dZ$. This brings $Y_p$ from $0.234\\pm0.004$ to $0.250\\pm 0.004$ and $dY/dZ=4.7\\pm 1.0$ to $1.1\\pm 1.4$. Conservatively, this indicates the importance of the proper understanding of underlying stellar absorption for accurate determinations of the primordial helium abundance to the error of $\\delta Y_p\\simeq 0.002-0.004$.

  13. Parent Stars of Extrasolar Planets. X. Lithium Abundances and vsini Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, G; Tobin, R W

    2009-01-01

    We determine Li abundances and vsini values from new spectra of 53 stars with Doppler-detected planets not included in our previous papers in this series. We also examine two sets of stars without detected planets, which together serve as our comparison sample. Using the method of comparison of Li abundances and vsini values between two sets of stars we introduced in Gonzalez (2008), we confirm that these two quantities are smaller among stars with planets compared to stars without detected planets near the solar temperature. The transition from low to high Li abundance among SWPs occurs near 5850 K, a revision of about 50 K from our previous determination. The transition from low to high vsini occurs near 6000 K, but this temperature is not as well constrained.

  14. Oxygen in Galactic Disk Stars: non-LTE abundances from the 777 nm O I triplet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Ramirez; C. Allende Prieto; D. L. Lambert

    2005-06-29

    Oxygen abundances for a large sample of dwarf and giant stars kinematically selected to be part of the Galactic thin and thick disks have been determined from a non-LTE analysis of the O I triplet lines at 777 nm. The abundance analysis was performed using the infrared flux method temperature scale, trigonometric surface gravities, and accurate atomic data. Within this framework, the ionization balance of iron lines could not be satisfied and so we adopted the iron abundances from Fe II lines only given that they are relatively less sensitive to changes in the atmospheric parameters. We show the resulting [O/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] relationship and briefly discuss its implications.

  15. Thorium Abundances in Solar Twins and Analogues: Implications for the Habitability of Extrasolar Planetary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unterborn, Cayman T; Panero, Wendy R

    2015-01-01

    We present the first investigation of Th abundances in Solar twins and analogues to understand the possible range of this radioactive element and its effect on rocky planet interior dynamics and potential habitability. The abundances of the radioactive elements Th and U are key components of a planet's energy budget, making up 30% to 50% of the Earth's (Korenaga 2008; All\\`egre et al. 2001; Schubert et al. 1980; Lyubetskaya & Korenaga 2007; The KamLAND Collaboration 2011; Huang et al. 2013). Radiogenic heat drives interior mantle convection and surface plate tectonics, which sustains a deep carbon and water cycle and thereby aides in creating Earth's habitable surface. Unlike other heat sources that are dependent on the planet's specific formation history, the radiogenic heat budget is directly related to the mantle concentration of these nuclides. As a refractory element, the stellar abundance of Th is faithfully reflected in the terrestrial planet's concentration. We find that log eps Th varies from 59%...

  16. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE ANALYSIS OF A NEUTRON-CAPTURE ENHANCED RED GIANT IN THE BULGE PLAUT FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Christian I.; Rich, R. Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 430 Portola Plaza, Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 430 Portola Plaza, Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); McWilliam, Andrew, E-mail: cijohnson@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: rmr@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: cjohnson@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: andy@obs.carnegiescience.edu [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)] [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2013-09-20

    We present chemical abundances for 27 elements ranging from oxygen to erbium in the metal-poor ([Fe/H] = –1.67) bulge red giant branch star 2MASS 18174532-3353235. The results are based on equivalent width and spectrum synthesis analyses of a high-resolution (R ? 30, 000) spectrum obtained with the Magellan-MIKE spectrograph. While the light (Z ?< 30) element abundance patterns match those of similar metallicity bulge and halo stars, the strongly enhanced heavy element abundances are more similar to 'r-II' halo stars (e.g., CS 22892-052) typically found at [Fe/H] ?< – 2.5. We find that the heaviest elements (Z ? 56) closely follow the scaled-solar r-process abundance pattern. We do not find evidence supporting significant s-process contributions; however, the intermediate mass elements (e.g., Y and Zr) appear to have been produced through a different process than the heaviest elements. The light and heavy element abundance patterns of 2MASS 18174532-3353235 are in good agreement with the more metal-poor r-process enhanced stars CS 22892-052 and BD +17{sup o}3248. 2MASS 18174532-3353235 also shares many chemical characteristics with the similar metallicity but comparatively ?-poor Ursa Minor dwarf galaxy giant COS 82. Interestingly, the Mo and Ru abundances of 2MASS 18174532-3353235 are also strongly enhanced and follow a similar trend recently found to be common in moderately metal-poor main-sequence turn-off halo stars.

  17. ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION OF WEAK G BAND STARS: CNO AND Li ABUNDANCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczak, Jens; Lambert, David L., E-mail: adamczak@astro.as.utexas.edu [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2013-03-10

    We determined the chemical composition of a large sample of weak G band stars-a rare class of G and K giants of intermediate mass with unusual abundances of C, N, and Li. We have observed 24 weak G band stars with the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at the McDonald Observatory and derived spectroscopic abundances for C, N, O, and Li, as well as for selected elements from Na-Eu. The results show that the atmospheres of weak G band stars are highly contaminated with CN-cycle products. The C underabundance is about a factor of 20 larger than for normal giants and the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratio approaches the CN-cycle equilibrium value. In addition to the striking CN-cycle signature the strong N overabundance may indicate the presence of partially ON-cycled material in the atmospheres of the weak G band stars. The exact mechanism responsible for the transport of the elements to the surface has yet to be identified but could be induced by rapid rotation of the main sequence progenitors of the stars. The unusually high Li abundances in some of the stars are an indicator for Li production by the Cameron-Fowler mechanism. A quantitative prediction of a weak G band star's Li abundance is complicated by the strong temperature sensitivity of the mechanism and its participants. In addition to the unusual abundances of CN-cycle elements and Li, we find an overabundance of Na that is in accordance with the NeNa chain running in parallel with the CN cycle. Apart from these peculiarities, the element abundances in a weak G band star's atmosphere are consistent with those of normal giants.

  18. Early solar mass loss, opacity uncertainties, and the solar abundance problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzik, Joyce Ann; Keady, John; Kilcrease, David

    2009-01-01

    Solar models calibrated with the new element abundance mixture of Asplund et al. published in 2005 no longer produce good agreement with the sound speed, convection zone depth, and convection zone helium abundance inferred from solar oscillation data. Attempts to modify the input physics of the standard model, for example, by including enhanced diffusion, increased opacities, accretion, convective overshoot, or gravity waves have not restored the good agreement attained with the prior abundances. Here we present new models including early mass loss via a stronger solar wind. Early mass loss has been investigated prior to the solar abundance problem to deplete lithium and resolve the 'faint early sun problem'. We find that mass loss modifies the core structure and deepens the convection zone, and so improves agreement with oscillation data using the new abundances: however the amount of mass loss must be small to avoid destroying all of the surface lithium, and agreement is not fully restored. We also considered the prospects for increasing solar interior opacities. In order to increase mixture opacities by the 30% required to mitigate the abundance problem, the opacities of individual elements (e.g., O, N, C, and Fe) must be revised by a factor of two to three for solar interior conditions: we are investigating the possibility of broader calculated line wings for bound-bound transitions at the relevant temperatures to enhance opacity. We find that including all of the elements in the AGS05 opacity mixture (through uranium at atomic number Z=92) instead of only the 17 elements in the OPAL opacity mixture increases opacities by a negligible 0.2%.

  19. Natural Gas Applications

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas Applications. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Applications...

  20. Microbial Pathogens Trigger Host DNA Double-Strand Breaks Whose Abundance Is Reduced by Plant Defense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of an alternative mediator of pathogen-induced H2AX phosphorylation. In summary, pathogenic microorganisms canMicrobial Pathogens Trigger Host DNA Double-Strand Breaks Whose Abundance Is Reduced by Plant largely unknown. We report that multiple bacterial, fungal and oomycete plant pathogen species induce

  1. Nucleosynthesis and mixing on the Asymptotic Giant Branch. III. Predicted and observed s-process abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Busso; R. Gallino; D. L. Lambert; C. Travaglio; V. V. Smith

    2001-04-26

    We present the results of s-process nucleosynthesis calculations for AGB stars of different metallicities and initial masses. The computations were based on previously published stellar evolutionary models that account for the III dredge up phenomenon occurring late on the AGB. Neutron production is driven by the 13C(alpha,n)16O reaction during the interpulse periods in a tiny layer in radiative equilibrium at the top of the He- and C-rich shell. The s-enriched material is subsequently mixed with the envelope by the III dredge up, and the envelope composition is computed after each thermal pulse. We follow the changes in the photospheric abundance of the Ba-peak elements (heavy s, or `hs') and that of the Zr-peak ones (light s, or `ls'), whose logarithmic ratio [hs/ls] has often been adopted as an indicator of the s-process efficiency. The theoretical predictions are compared with published abundances of s elements for Galactic AGB giants of classes MS, S, SC, post-AGB supergiants, and for various classes of binary stars. The observations in general confirm the complex dependence of n captures on metallicity. They suggest that a moderate spread exists in the abundance of 13C that is burnt in different stars. Although additional observations are needed, a good understanding has been achieved of s-process operation in AGB. The detailed abundance distribution including the light elements (CNO) of a few s-enriched stars at different metallicity are examined.

  2. Seeding the Pregenetic Earth: Meteoritic Abundances of Nucleobases and Potential Reaction Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Ben K D

    2015-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are a class of meteorite known for having a high content of water and organics. In this study, abundances of the nucleobases, i.e., the building blocks of RNA and DNA, found in carbonaceous chondrites are collated from a variety of published data and compared across various meteorite classes. An extensive review of abiotic chemical reactions producing nucleobases is then performed. These reactions are then reduced to a list of 15 individual reaction pathways that could potentially occur within meteorite parent bodies. The nucleobases guanine, adenine and uracil are found in carbonaceous chondrites in the amounts of 1$-$500 ppb. It is currently unknown which reaction is responsible for their synthesis within the meteorite parent bodies. One class of carbonaceous meteorites dominate the abundances of both amino acids and nucleobases$-$the so-called CM2 (e.g. Murchison meteorite). CR2 meteorites (e.g. Graves Nunataks) also dominate the abundances of amino acids, but are the least abundant...

  3. The distribution and abundance of animal populations in a climate of uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The distribution and abundance of animal populations in a climate of uncertainty A° sa Berggren-term patterns. To better understand and predict the effects of climate change on the distribution of species provide: (1) a formal mathematical definition of distribution limits that is both operational

  4. Scientists must be able to assess popu-lation abundance with a high degree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veer, 1991; Norcross et al., 1999). Until recently, however, few studies have been directed to- ward that minimize the variance in estimates of abundance are needed. Recently, the National Research Council (NRC and survival of marine fish species (Murawski and Finn, 1988; Gadomski and Caddell, 1991; Reichert and van der

  5. Call for Proposals Abundant, Clean, and Cost-Effective Energy Systems for Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Call for Proposals Abundant, Clean, and Cost-Effective Energy Systems for Sustainability (ACCESS) Deadline: November 1, 2011 McDonnell Academy Global Energy and Environment Partnership (MAGEEP) www with our McDonnell Academy Partner Universities. Many of the projects that were initially supported by seed

  6. On the volatile inventory of Titan from isotopic abundances in nitrogen and methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    On the volatile inventory of Titan from isotopic abundances in nitrogen and methane Jonathan I enhancement. The enrichment in deuterated methane is now much better determined than it was when Pinto et al dissociation rates of normal and deuterated methane. We utilize the improved data and models to compute initial

  7. DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE OF THE BOTTLENOSE DOLPHIN, TURSIOPS TRUNCATUS (MONTAGU, 1821), IN VIRGINIA}

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Virginia in 1980 and 1981. Bottlenose dolphin density was estimated using line transect methods and a 4, there are few quantitative data available to assess the abundance, distribution, and seasonal occur- rence Hatteras Island, NC from circa 1797 to 1929, the primary products of the fishery being hides and oil (True

  8. Sulfur, Chlorine, and Argon Abundances in Planetary Nebulae. III: Observations and Results for a Final Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. B. Kwitter; R. B. C. Henry; J. B. Milingo

    2002-09-25

    This paper is the fourth in a series whose purpose is to study the interstellar abundances of sulfur, chlorine, and argon in the Galaxy using a sample of 86 planetary nebulae. Here we present new high-quality spectrophotometric observations of 20 Galactic planetary nebulae with spectral coverage from 3700-9600 Angstroms. A major feature of our observations throughout the entire study has been the inclusion of the near-infrared lines of [S III] 9069,9532, which allows us to calculate accurate S+2 abundances and to either improve upon or convincingly confirm results of earlier sulfur abundance studies. For each of the 20 objects here we calculate ratios of S/O, Cl/O, and Ar/O and find average values of S/O=1.1E-2+/-1.1E-2, Cl/O=4.2E-4+/-5.3E-4, and Ar/O=5.7E-3+/-4.3E-3. For six objects we are able to compare abundances of S+3 calculated directly from available [S IV] 10.5 micron measurements with those inferred indirectly from the values of the ionization correction factors for sulfur. In the final paper of the series, we will compile results from all 86 objects, search for and evaluate trends, and use chemical evolution models to interpret our results.

  9. REEVALUATION OF FISHING EFFORT AND APPARENT ABUNDANCE IN THE HAWAIIAN FISHERY FOR SKIPJACK TUNA,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REEVALUATION OF FISHING EFFORT AND APPARENT ABUNDANCE IN THE HAWAIIAN FISHERY FOR SKIPJACK TUNA trip, definedas one on which fish were caught, underestimates effort. Catch per day fished, calculated fished in 1965-70, and a method ofestimating the latter from the former in 1948-64 based

  10. Spatial pattern and temporal dynamics of northern bobwhite abundance and agricultural landuse, and potential casual factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okay, Atiye Zeynep

    2006-04-12

    recognizable periods in the spatial and temporal dynamics of NBW abundance between 1920 and 1990. Severe weather conditions and habitat loss due to land use change appeared to be the most important factors influencing the long-term trends and spatial patterns...

  11. Bacterial traits, organism mass, and numerical abundance in the detrital soil food web of Dutch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Joel E.

    LETTER Bacterial traits, organism mass, and numerical abundance in the detrital soil food web.mulder@rivm.nl Abstract This paper compares responses to environmental stress of the ecophysiological traits of organisms in the detrital soil food webs of grasslands in the Netherlands, using the relationship between average body mass

  12. Small Molecule Screen Reveals Regulation of Survival Motor Neuron Protein Abundance by Ras Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockwell, Brent R.

    Small Molecule Screen Reveals Regulation of Survival Motor Neuron Protein Abundance by Ras Proteins States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Small molecule modulators of protein activity have proven invaluable in the study of protein function and regulation. While inhibitors of protein activity

  13. EARTH ABUNDANT MATERIALS FOR HIGH EFFICIENCY HETEROJUNCTION THIN FILM SOLAR CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    materials for thin film solar cells such as CdTe and CIGS suffer from concerns over resource scarcity (eEARTH ABUNDANT MATERIALS FOR HIGH EFFICIENCY HETEROJUNCTION THIN FILM SOLAR CELLS Yun Seog Lee 1 conversion efficiencies should be increased. In terms of reducing module cost, thin film solar cells

  14. Introduction Yellowstone National Park with its thermal features and abundant wildlife draws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Introduction Yellowstone National Park with its thermal features and abundant wildlife draws about pollution. Measurements of air quality at the West Entrance found CO concentrations comparable to highly by percentages Snowmobile Snowmobile Snowmobil e Snowcoach Snowcoach Pollutant average 2-stroke average 4-stroke

  15. Solar Cells from Earth-Abundant Semiconductors with Plasmon-Enhanced Light Absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwater, Harry

    2012-04-30

    Progress is reported in these areas: Plasmonic Light Trapping in Thin Film a-Si Solar Cells; Plasmonic Light Trapping in Thin InGaN Quantum Well Solar Cells; and Earth Abundant Cu{sub 2}O and Zn{sub 3}P{sub 2} Solar Cells.

  16. Land use and habitat gradients determine bird community diversity and abundance in suburban, rural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Land use and habitat gradients determine bird community diversity and abundance in suburban, rural, with reserves slightly below rural. Although reserves were like rural lands in diversity of bird communities bird communities, but differed in grassland and savanna bird communities. The extensive rural forests

  17. Identification of Mammosomatotrophs in the Turkey Hen Pituitary: Increased Abundance during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramachandran, Ramesh

    Identification of Mammosomatotrophs in the Turkey Hen Pituitary: Increased Abundance during turkey hens is associated with recruitment of lactotrophs in the pituitary gland. In this study we have- mosomatotrophs in the anterior pituitary gland of egg-laying turkey hens and incubating hens, and 2) verify PRL

  18. Age Structure of Golden-cheeked Warblers in Areas of Low Abundance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruett, Hannah L

    2014-08-05

    . I examined the age structure of golden-cheeked warblers in areas of low abundance to determine if there are patterns of differential habitat use based on age in this species. Over two breeding seasons, I monitored 13 low-density and 10 high...

  19. Regional Climate Effect on Population Abundance of Major Duck Species in Interior Plains of Canada 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Mengmeng

    2013-05-06

    to the long-term breeding population data gathered by Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey and monthly weather data from Environment Canada in order to explore the pattern in the duck abundance data and the effect of local weather on population...

  20. Bringing you a prosperous future where energy is clean, abundant, reliable and affordable Industrial Technologies Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Bringing you a prosperous future where energy is clean, abundant, reliable and affordable Program A Strong Energy Portfolio for a Strong America Energy efficiency and clean, renewable energy Industrial Technologies Program U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  1. Monitoring Butterfly Abundance: Beyond Pollard Walks Jero^ me Pellet1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Monitoring Butterfly Abundance: Beyond Pollard Walks Je´ro^ me Pellet1,2 *, Jason T. Bried3 , David to the characteristics of the species under scrutiny and resources availability. Citation: Pellet J, Bried JT, Parietti D Copyright: ß 2012 Pellet et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative

  2. RELATIVE ABUNDANCE OF WHITE GRUBS (COLEOPTERA: SCARABAEIDAE) IN FLORIDA SUGARCANE ON SAND AND MUCK SOILS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    the abundance of white grub species (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). Adult flight activity was monitored with light adult 19 #12;Scarabaeidae came from sugarcane fields. Three of the traps were located in fields on muck. Sugarcane plants in the sampled fields were 2 or more years old (ratoon crops) and were selected because

  3. Solar Flare Element Abundances from the Solar Assembly for X-rays (SAX) on MESSENGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nittler, Larry R.

    Solar Flare Element Abundances from the Solar Assembly for X-rays (SAX) on MESSENGER Brian RV have been analyzed for 526 large flares detected with the Solar Assembly for X-rays (SAX on 2004 August 3 and capture into orbit around Mercury in 2011, SAX has observed hundreds of solar flares

  4. Complex hydraulic and substrate variables limit freshwater mussel species richness and abundance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaughn, Caryn

    Complex hydraulic and substrate variables limit freshwater mussel species richness and abundance. We examined how substrate and complex hydraulic variables limit the distribution of freshwater mussels. We sampled mussels and measured substrate and hydraulic variables (at low and high flows) at 6

  5. Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011, United States § Department of Crop and Soil, Ames, Iowa 50011, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Large-scale soil application

  6. Abundance, Composition, and Sinking Rates of Fish Fecal Pellets in the Santa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abundance, Composition, and Sinking Rates of Fish Fecal Pellets in the Santa Barbara Channel Grace.O. Box 1346, Gloucester Point, Virginia 23062, USA. Rapidly sinking fecal pellets are an important composition, particulate organic carbon/nitrogen (POC/PON), and sinking rates of fecal pellets produced

  7. Introduction Midpoint Rule Study Statistical Method Study Estimating Pest Abundance for High Aggregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the pest abundance can lead to the failure to take action when it is needed. Figure: Coconut Hispine Beetle http://www.malaeng.com/blog/?s=coconut+hispine · An outbreak of the Coconut Hispine Beetle in South-east Asia destroyed 16 % of coconut trees in Cambodia.(1) · Had no action been taken in Vietnam, $1 billion

  8. Abstract--Estimates of the abun-dance of American horseshoe crabs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    adjusted the number of releases according to relocation rates from a telemetry study. The abundance interests by commercial watermen, birdwatchers, biopharmaceutical companies, and eco-tourists (Odell et al; whereas wave energy is only a contributing factor because typical estuarine waves do reach nest depth

  9. ABUNDANCE OF A NOVEL DINOFLAGELLATE PHYLOTYPE IN THE ROSS SEA, ANTARCTICA1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caron, David

    communities of coastal Antarctica (Garrison et al. 1986). Diverse and abundant assem- blages of protists, Garrison and Gowing 1993, Palmi- sano and Garrison 1993, Dennett et al. 2001, Kang et al. 2001). Microalgae environments including sea-ice communities (chroococcoid cyanobacteria are very rare; Garrison et al. 1986

  10. Fingerprints of anomalous primordial Universe on the abundance of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baghram, Shant; Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein E-mail: abolhasani@ipm.ir E-mail: MohammadHossein.Namjoo@utdallas.edu

    2014-12-01

    We study the predictions of anomalous inflationary models on the abundance of structures in large scale structure observations. The anomalous features encoded in primordial curvature perturbation power spectrum are (a): localized feature in momentum space, (b): hemispherical asymmetry and (c): statistical anisotropies. We present a model-independent expression relating the number density of structures to the changes in the matter density variance. Models with localized feature can alleviate the tension between observations and numerical simulations of cold dark matter structures on galactic scales as a possible solution to the missing satellite problem. In models with hemispherical asymmetry we show that the abundance of structures becomes asymmetric depending on the direction of observation to sky. In addition, we study the effects of scale-dependent dipole amplitude on the abundance of structures. Using the quasars data and adopting the power-law scaling k{sup n{sub A}-1} for the amplitude of dipole we find the upper bound n{sub A} < 0.6 for the spectral index of the dipole asymmetry. In all cases there is a critical mass scale M{sub c} in which for M M{sub c}) the enhancement in variance induced from anomalous feature decreases (increases) the abundance of dark matter structures in Universe.

  11. Spawning Areas and Abundance of Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tsha>vytscha)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the main river. Over the past 60 years, the construction of dams has inundated, impeded, or blocked access. Important spawning areas are listed and charted in this report according to their past use (before 1965 of the main stem are also given. Former and present levels of abundance are listed according to three major

  12. Abundance Signatures in Halo Stars: Clues to Nucleosynthesis in the First Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, John

    Abundance Signatures in Halo Stars: Clues to Nucleosynthesis in the First Stars John J. Cowan-based telescopes to make extensive studies of Galactic halo stars. These stars contain the nucleosynthesis products the earliest Galactic r-process nucleosynthesis. These in turn will help to identify the characteristics

  13. size; island size promoted abundances of some organisms and reduced others (Fig. 1). Second,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Springer, Timothy A.

    - systems. Although a growing number of studies have used the concepts developed in island geographysize; island size promoted abundances of some organisms and reduced others (Fig. 1). Second, our study found diversity, community compo- sition, and ecosystem functioning all responded to island

  14. Analytical Formulas of Molecular Ion Abundances and N2H+ Ring in Protoplanetary Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aikawa, Yuri; Nomura, Hideko; Qi, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the chemistry of ion molecules in protoplanetary disks, motivated by the detection of N$_2$H$^+$ ring around TW Hya. While the ring inner radius coincides with the CO snow line, it is not apparent why N$_2$H$^+$ is abundant outside the CO snow line in spite of the similar sublimation temperatures of CO and N$_2$. Using the full gas-grain network model, we reproduced the N$_2$H$^+$ ring in a disk model with millimeter grains. The chemical conversion of CO and N$_2$ to less volatile species (sink effect hereinafter) is found to affect the N$_2$H$^+$ distribution. Since the efficiency of the sink depends on various parameters such as activation barriers of grain surface reactions, which are not well constrained, we also constructed the no-sink model; the total (gas and ice) CO and N$_2$ abundances are set constant, and their gaseous abundances are given by the balance between adsorption and desorption. Abundances of molecular ions in the no-sink model are calculated by analytical formulas, which a...

  15. Food-Web Models Predict Species Abundances in Response to Habitat Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotelli, Nicholas J.

    sizes of food-web constituents than did simple keystone species models, models that included only-species demographic analyses [9] and assessments of extinction risk. Single-factor models also include keystone species effects, which emphasize responses of populations to changes in the abundance of a single keystone

  16. Measuring marine fish biodiversity: temporal changes in abundance, life history and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A.

    Measuring marine fish biodiversity: temporal changes in abundance, life history and demography, B3H 4J1 Canada Patterns in marine fish biodiversity can be assessed by quantifying temporal), sole (Solea solea) and pelagic sharks. Combining population data across regions and species, marine

  17. Energetic electron precipitation and the NO abundance in the upper atmosphere: A direct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Østgaard, Nikolai

    Energetic electron precipitation and the NO abundance in the upper atmosphere: A direct comparison precipitating energetic electrons. The comparisons are done for the beginning of a geomagnetic storm event on 2 of the NO g-band. Since a significant part of the electron precipitation takes place during the night

  18. Intervention Analysis of Hurricane Effects on Snail Abundance in a Tropical Forest Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willig, Michael

    Intervention Analysis of Hurricane Effects on Snail Abundance in a Tropical Forest Using Long disturbances, such as hurricanes, have profound effects on pop- ulations, either directly by causing mortality of resources. In the last 20 years, two major disturbances, Hurricane Hugo in 1989 and Hurricane Georges

  19. Abundance and ecological implications of microplastic debris in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Miriam Chanita

    2012-01-01

    of the central North Pacific ocean. Nature 241:271–271. doi:waste distributions in Pacific Ocean. Nature 247:30–32. doi:of the central North Pacific ocean. Nature 241:271–271. doi:

  20. Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Markus

    © 2009 APS Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology Published online: 17 July 2009 | doi:10 perfect fluid. Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 025301 (2009). | Article |1. Nature Nanotechnology ISSN 1748 : Nature Nanotechnology http://www.nature.com/nnano/reshigh/2009/0709/full/nnano.2009.222.html 1 of 1 18

  1. Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    1 Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future Penn State Natural Gas Utilization Workshop Bradley Hall sales to commercial and industrial customers ­ Natural gas, power, oil · Power generation ­ FossilMMBtuEquivalent Wellhead Gas Price, $/MMBtu Monthly US Spot Oil Price, $/MMBtu* U.S. Crude Oil vs. Natural Gas Prices, 2005

  2. Fundamental Parameters and Abundances of Metal-Poor Stars: The SDSS Standard BD +17 4708

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Ramirez; C. Allende Prieto; S. Redfield; D. L. Lambert

    2006-08-25

    The atmospheric parameters and iron abundance of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectrophotometric standard star BD +17 4708 are critically examined using up-to-date Kurucz model atmospheres, LTE line formation calculations, and reliable atomic data. We find Teff = 6141+-50 K, log g = 3.87+-0.08, and [Fe/H]=-1.74+-0.09. The line-of-sight interstellar reddening, bolometric flux, limb-darkened angular diameter, stellar mass, and the abundances of Mg, Si, and Ca are also obtained. This star is a unique example of a moderately metal-poor star for which the effective temperature can be accurately constrained from the observed spectral energy distribution (corrected for reddening). Such analysis leads to a value that is higher than most spectroscopic results previously reported in the literature (~5950 K). We find that the ionization balance of Fe lines is satisfied only if a low Teff (~5950 K) is adopted. With our preferred Teff (6141 K), the mean iron abundance we obtain from the FeII lines is lower by about 0.15 dex than that from the FeI lines, and therefore, the discrepancy between the mean iron abundance from FeI and FeII lines cannot be explained by overionization by UV photons as the main non-LTE effect. We also comment on non-LTE effects and the importance of inelastic collisions with neutral H atoms in the determination of oxygen abundances in metal-poor stars from the 777 nm OI triplet. (Abridged)

  3. Chemical abundances in the extremely carbon-rich and xenon-rich halo planetary nebula H4-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otsuka, Masaaki [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Tajitsu, Akito, E-mail: otsuka@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: tajitsu@subaru.naoj.org [Subaru Telescope, NAOJ, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We performed detailed chemical abundance analysis of the extremely metal-poor ([Ar/H] ? –2) halo planetary nebula (PN) H4-1 based on the multi-wavelength spectra from Subaru/HDS, GALEX, SDSS, and Spitzer/IRS and determined the abundances of 10 elements. The C and O abundances were derived from collisionally excited lines (CELs) and are almost consistent with abundances from recombination lines (RLs). We demonstrated that the large discrepancy in the C abundance between CEL and RL in H4-1 can be solved using the temperature fluctuation model. We reported the first detection of the [Xe III] ?5846 line in H4-1 and determination of its elemental abundance ([Xe/H] > +0.48). H4-1 is the most Xe-rich PN among the Xe-detected PNe. The observed abundances are close to the theoretical prediction by a 2.0 M {sub ?} single star model with an initially element rich ([r/Fe] = +2.0 dex) rapid neutron-capture process (r-process). The observed Xe abundance would be a product of the r-process in primordial supernovae. The [C/O]-[Ba/(Eu or Xe)] diagram suggests that the progenitor of H4-1 shares the evolution with carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP)-r/s and CEMP-no stars. The progenitor of H4-1 is presumably a binary formed in an r-process-rich environment.

  4. Food supplementation leads to increases in large mammal diversity and abundance, but no carry over effect in small mammals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Food supplementation leads to increases in large mammal diversity and abundance, but no carry over: The feeding of wild birds is common in many countries. Apart from impacting birds, food supplementation of food supplementation on small mammal abundance and diversity, and the effects of direct food

  5. EIA - Natural Gas Publications

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    these data from 2005 to 2009 are presented for each State. (12282010) U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves: 2009 National and State...

  6. Supervisory Natural Gas Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energys Office of Fossil Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, Office of Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply (FE) is responsible for regulating natural gas imports and exports...

  7. Natural gas annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

  8. ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES IN THE EJECTA OF OLD CLASSICAL NOVAE FROM LATE-EPOCH SPITZER SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, L. Andrew; Vacca, William D.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Woodward, Charles E.; Shenoy, Dinesh P.; Wagner, R. Mark; Evans, Aneurin; Krautter, Joachim; Schwarz, Greg J.; Starrfield, Sumner

    2012-08-10

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared IRS spectra, supplemented by ground-based optical observations, of the classical novae V1974 Cyg, V382 Vel, and V1494 Aql more than 11, 8, and 4 years after outburst, respectively. The spectra are dominated by forbidden emission from neon and oxygen, though in some cases, there are weak signatures of magnesium, sulfur, and argon. We investigate the geometry and distribution of the late time ejecta by examination of the emission line profiles. Using nebular analysis in the low-density regime, we estimate lower limits on the abundances in these novae. In V1974 Cyg and V382 Vel, our observations confirm the abundance estimates presented by other authors and support the claims that these eruptions occurred on ONe white dwarfs (WDs). We report the first detection of neon emission in V1494 Aql and show that the system most likely contains a CO WD.

  9. The impact of individual nuclear masses on $r$-process abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Mumpower; R. Surman; D. -L. Fang; M. Beard; P. Moller; T. Kawano; A. Aprahamian

    2015-05-28

    We have performed for the first time a comprehensive study of the sensitivity of $r$-process nucleosynthesis to individual nuclear masses across the chart of nuclides. Using the latest version (2012) of the Finite-Range Droplet Model, we consider mass variations of $\\pm0.5$ MeV and propagate each mass change to all affected quantities, including $Q$-values, reaction rates, and branching ratios. We find such mass variations can result in up to an order of magnitude local change in the final abundance pattern produced in an $r$-process simulation. We identify key nuclei whose masses have a substantial impact on abundance predictions for hot, cold, and neutron star merger $r$-process scenarios and could be measured at future radioactive beam facilities.

  10. Wireless Solar Water Splitting Using Silicon-Based Semiconductors and Earth-Abundant Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reece, SY; Hamel, JA; Sung, K; Jarvi, TD; Esswein, AJ; Pijpers, JJH; Nocera, DG

    2011-11-03

    We describe the development of solar water-splitting cells comprising earth-abundant elements that operate in near-neutral pH conditions, both with and without connecting wires. The cells consist of a triple junction, amorphous silicon photovoltaic interfaced to hydrogen- and oxygen-evolving catalysts made from an alloy of earth-abundant metals and a cobalt|borate catalyst, respectively. The devices described here carry out the solar-driven water-splitting reaction at efficiencies of 4.7% for a wired configuration and 2.5% for a wireless configuration when illuminated with 1 sun (100 milliwatts per square centimeter) of air mass 1.5 simulated sunlight. Fuel-forming catalysts interfaced with light-harvesting semiconductors afford a pathway to direct solar-to-fuels conversion that captures many of the basic functional elements of a leaf.

  11. Natural gas annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  12. Natural gas annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-17

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  13. Beryllium abundances in parent stars of extrasolar planets: 16 Cyg A & B and rho 1 Cnc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Garcia Lopez; M. R. Perez de Taoro

    1998-03-03

    The Be II 3131 A doublet has been observed in the solar-type stars 16 Cyg A & B and in the late G-type star rho 1 Cnc, to derive their beryllium abundances. 16 Cyg A & B show similar (solar) beryllium abundances while 16 Cyg B, which has been proposed to have a planetary companion of ~2 M_Jup, is known to be depleted in lithium by a factor larger than 6 with respect to 16 Cyg A. Differences in their rotational histories which could induce different rates of internal mixing of material, and the ingestion of a similar planet by 16 Cyg A are discussed as potential explanations. The existence of two other solar-type stars which are candidates to harbour planetary-mass companions and which show lithium and beryllium abundances close to those of 16 Cyg A, requires a more detailed inspection of the peculiarities of the 16 Cyg system. For rho 1 Cnc, which is the coolest known object candidate to harbour a planetary-mass companion (M > 0.85 M_Jup), we establish a precise upper limit for its beryllium abundance, showing a strong Be depletion which constrains the available mixing mechanisms. Observations of similar stars without companions are required to asses the potential effects of the planetary companion on the observed depletion. It has been recently claimed that rho 1 Cnc appears to be a subgiant. If this were the case, the observed strong Li and Be depletions could be explained by a dilution process taking place during its post-main sequence evolution.

  14. Oxygen Abundances in Nearby Stars. Clues to the formation and evolution of the Galactic disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Ramirez; C. Allende Prieto; D. L. Lambert

    2007-01-12

    The abundances of iron and oxygen are homogeneously determined in a sample of 523 nearby (d-0.3, we find no obvious indication of a sudden decrease (i.e., a 'knee') in the [O/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] pattern of thick-disk stars that would connect the thick and thin disk trends at a high metallicity. We conclude that Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) did not contribute significantly to the chemical enrichment of the thick disk. [Abridged

  15. X-Ray Evidence for Multiphase Hot Gas with Solar Abundances in the Brightest Elliptical Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Buote

    1999-06-22

    We examine whether isothermal models of the hot gas can successfully describe the ASCA and ROSAT spectra of NGC 1399, NGC 4472, NGC 4636, and NGC 5044. Broad-band spectral fitting of the ASCA SIS and GIS data accumulated within a radius of ~5 arcmin for each galaxy shows that isothermal models are unable to fit the SIS data near 1 keV. In addition, these isothermal models typically fail to produce the large equivalent widths of the K-alpha line blends of the H-like and He-like ions of Si and S which are measured independently of the Fe L emission lines. Two-temperature models provide excellent broad-band fits to both the SIS and GIS data of each galaxy with the relative abundances (except for NGC 4636) fixed at their solar values. A simple multiphase cooling flow model fits nearly as well as the two-temperature model for NGC 1399, NGC 4472, and NGC 5044. The multiphase models also predict more accurately the Si and S equivalent widths and the ratios of Si XIV/XIII and S XVI/XV than the isothermal models. Using various approaches we find that the temperature gradients inferred from the ROSAT PSPC data of these galaxies, especially for NGC 1399 and NGC 5044, are inconsistent with the isothermal models derived from fitting the ASCA data within a single-aperture but are very consistent with the multiphase models. Therefore, models which assume isothermal gas within r ~5 arcmin are inconsistent with both the ASCA and ROSAT PSPC data of these elliptical galaxies. Simple two-temperature models and multiphase cooling flows provide good descriptions of these data sets with Fe abundances of ~1-2 solar and (except for NGC 4636) relative abundances fixed at their solar values. We discuss the implications of these nearly solar abundances. (Abridged)

  16. Renewable Natural Gas (Biomethane)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    to Landfill Owner $6.18 Total Cost Per MMBtu #12;Index Price of Natural Gas NYMEX Natural Gas Futures PricesRenewable Natural Gas (Biomethane) #12;Critical Barriers Impeding RNG as a Transportation Fuel-developer of largest RNG production project in U.S. at McCommas Bluff Landfill in Dallas, Texas · Chairman and co

  17. A Comparison of Copper Abundances in Globular Cluster and Halo Field Giant Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jennifer Simmerer; Christopher Sneden; Inese I. Ivans; Robert P. Kraft; Matthew D. Shetrone; Verne V. Smith

    2003-03-07

    We derive [Cu/Fe] for 117 giant stars in ten globular clusters (M3, M4, M5, M10, M13, M15, M71, NGC 7006, NCG 288, and NGC 362) and find that globular cluster Cu abundances appear to follow [Cu/Fe] trends found in the field. This result is interesting in light of recent work which indicates that the globular cluster Omega Centauri shows no trend in [Cu/Fe] with [Fe/H] over the abundance range -2.0 <[Fe/H]< -0.8. Of particular interest are the two clusters M4 and M5. While at a similar metallicity ([Fe/H] ~- 1.2), they differ greatly in some elemental abundances: M4 is largely overabundant in Si, Ba, and La compared to M5. We find that it is also overabundant in Cu with respect to M5, though this overabundance is in accord with [Cu/Fe] ratios found in the field.

  18. Water abundances in high-mass protostellar envelopes: Herschel observations with HIFI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marseille, M; Herpin, F; Wyrowski, F; Chavarria, L; Pietropaoli, B

    2015-01-01

    We derive the dense core structure and the water abundance in four massive star-forming regions which may help understand the earliest stages of massive star formation. We present Herschel-HIFI observations of the para-H2O 1_11-0_00 and 2_02-1_11 and the para-H2-18O 1_11-0_00 transitions. The envelope contribution to the line profiles is separated from contributions by outflows and foreground clouds. The envelope contribution is modelled using Monte-Carlo radiative transfer codes for dust and molecular lines (MC3D and RATRAN), with the water abundance and the turbulent velocity width as free parameters. While the outflows are mostly seen in emission in high-J lines, envelopes are seen in absorption in ground-state lines, which are almost saturated. The derived water abundances range from 5E-10 to 4E-8 in the outer envelopes. We detect cold clouds surrounding the protostar envelope, thanks to the very high quality of the Herschel-HIFI data and the unique ability of water to probe them. Several foreground cloud...

  19. The abundance of high-redshift objects as a probe of non-Gaussian initial conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabino Matarrese; Licia Verde; Raul Jimenez

    2000-04-25

    The observed abundance of high-redshift galaxies and clusters contains precious information about the properties of the initial perturbations. We present a method to compute analytically the number density of objects as a function of mass and redshift for a range of physically motivated non-Gaussian models. In these models the non-Gaussianity can be dialed from zero and is assumed to be small. We compute the probability density function for the smoothed dark matter density field and we extend the Press and Schechter approach to mildly non-Gaussian density fields. The abundance of high-redshift objects can be directly related to the non-Gaussianity parameter and thus to the physical processes that generated deviations from the Gaussian behaviour. Even a skewness parameter of order 0.1 implies a dramatic change in the predicted abundance of $z\\gap 1$ objects. Observations from NGST and X-ray satellites (XMM) can be used to accurately measure the amount of non-Gaussianity in the primordial density field.

  20. Solar Carbon Monoxide, Thermal Profiling, and the Abundances of C, O, and their Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas R. Ayres; Claude Plymate; Christoph U. Keller

    2006-06-07

    A solar photospheric "thermal profiling" analysis is presented, exploiting the infrared rovibrational bands of carbon monoxide (CO) as observed with the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at Kitt Peak, and from above the Earth's atmosphere by the Shuttle-borne ATMOS experiment. Visible continuum intensities and center-limb behavior constrained the temperature profile of the deep photosphere, while CO center-limb behavior defined the thermal structure at higher altitudes. The oxygen abundance was self consistently determined from weak CO absorptions. Our analysis was meant to complement recent studies based on 3-D convection models which, among other things, have revised the historical solar oxygen (and carbon) abundance downward by a factor of nearly two; although in fact our conclusions do not support such a revision. Based on various considerations, an oxygen abundance of 700+/-100 ppm (parts per million relative to hydrogen) is recommended; the large uncertainty reflects the model sensitivity of CO. New solar isotopic ratios also are reported for 13C, 17O, and 18O.

  1. Chemical Abundances of Planetary Nebulae in the Substructures of M31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Xuan; Guerrero, Martin A; Liu, Xiaowei; Yuan, Haibo; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Bing

    2015-01-01

    We present deep spectroscopy of planetary nebulae (PNe) that are associated with the substructures of the Andromeda Galaxy (M31). The spectra were obtained with the OSIRIS spectrograph on the 10.4 m GTC. Seven targets were selected for the observations, three in the Northern Spur and four associated with the Giant Stream. The most distant target in our sample, with a rectified galactocentric distance >100 kpc, was the first PN discovered in the outer streams of M31. The [O III] 4363 auroral line was well detected in the spectra of all targets, enabling electron temperature determination. Ionic abundances are derived based on the [O III] temperatures, and elemental abundances of helium, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulfur, and argon are estimated. The relatively low N/O and He/H ratios as well as abundance ratios of alpha-elements indicate that our target PNe might belong to populations as old as ~2 Gyr. Our PN sample, including the current seven and the previous three observed by Fang et al., have rather homogeneo...

  2. Chemical Feature of Eu abundance in the Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, Takuji; Shigeyama, Toshikazu; Aoki, Wako

    2015-01-01

    Chemical abundance of r-process elements in nearby dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies is a powerful tool to probe the site of r-process since their small-mass scale can sort out individual events producing r-process elements. A merger of binary neutron stars is a promising candidate of this site. In faint, or less massive dSph galaxies such as the Draco, a few binary neutron star mergers are expected to have occurred at most over the whole past. We have measured chemical abundances including Eu and Ba of three red giants in the Draco dSph by Subaru/HDS observation. The Eu detection for one star with [Fe/H]=-1.45 confirms a broadly constant [Eu/H] of ~-1.3 for stars with [Fe/H]>-2. This feature is shared by other dSphs with similar masses, i.e., the Sculptor and the Carina, and suggests that neutron star merger is the origin of r-process elements in terms of its rarity. In addition, two very metal-poor stars with [Fe/H]=-2.12 and -2.51 are found to exhibit very low Eu abundances such as [Eu/H]<-2 with an impl...

  3. Origin of the unusually low nitrogen abundances in young populations of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bekki, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    It is a longstanding problem that HII regions and very young stellar populations in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have the nitrogen abundances ([N/H]) by a factor of ~7 lower than the solar value. We here discuss a new scenario in which the observed unusually low nitrogen abundances can be closely associated with recent collision and subsequent accretion of HI high velocity clouds (HVCs) that surround the Galaxy and have low nitrogen abundances. We show that if the observed low [N/H] is limited to very young stars with ages less than ~10^7 yr, then the collision/accretion rate of the HVCs onto the LMC needs to be ~ 0.2 M_sun/yr (corresponding to the total HVC mass of 10^6-10^7 M_sun) to dilute the original interstellar medium (ISM) before star formation. The required accretion rate means that even if the typical mass of HVCs accreted onto the LMC is ~ 10^7 M_sun, the Galaxy needs to have ~2500 massive HVCs within the LMC's orbital radius with respect to the Galactic center. The required rather large number...

  4. Big Bang nucleosynthesis in scalar tensor gravity: the key problem of the $^7$Li abundance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Larena; Jean-Michel Alimi; Arturo Serna

    2006-11-20

    Combined with other CMB experiments, the WMAP survey provides an accurate estimate of the baryon density of the Universe. In the framework of the standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), such a baryon density leads to predictions for the primordial abundances of $^{4}$He and D in good agreement with observations. However, it also leads to a significant discrepancy between the predicted and observed primordial abundance of $^{7}$Li. Such a discrepancy is often termed as 'the lithium problem'. In this paper, we analyze this problem in the framework of scalar-tensor theories of gravity. It is shown that an expansion of the Universe slightly slower than in General Relativity before BBN, but faster during BBN, solves the lithium problem and leads to $^4$He and D primordial abundances consistent with the observational constraints. This kind of behavior is obtained in numerous scalar-tensor models, both with and without a self-interaction potential for the scalar field. In models with a self-interacting scalar field, the convergence towards General Relativity is ensured without any condition, thanks to an attraction mechanism which starts to work during the radiation-dominated epoch.

  5. The Abundance Distribution in the Extrasolar-Planet Host Star HD19994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verne V. Smith; Katia Cunha; Daniela Lazzaro

    2001-03-04

    Abundances of 22 elements have been determined from a high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectrum of HD19994, a star recently announced as harboring an extrasolar planet. A detailed spectroscopic analysis of this stars finds it to have a mass of 1.2+/-0.1Msun. HD19994 is found to be slightly enriched in "metals" relative to the Sun 9[Fe/H]=+0.09+/-0.05 and an average of all metals of [m/H]=+0.13), as are most stars known with extrasolar planets. In a search for possible signatures of accretion of metal-rich gas onto the parent stars (using HD19994 and published abundances for other stars), it is found that a small subset of stars with planets exhibit a trend of increasing [X/H] with increasing condensation temperature for a given element X. This trend may point to the accretion of chemically fractionated solid material into the outer (thin) convection zones of these solar-type stars. It is also found that this small group of stars exhibiting an accretion signature all have large planets orbiting much closer than is found, in general, for stars with planets not showing this peculiar abundance trend, suggesting a physical link between accretion and orbital separation. In addition, the stars showing evidence of fractionated accretion are, on average, of larger mass (1.2Msun) than stars not showing measurable evidence of accretion (1.0Msun).

  6. A PRECISE WATER ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENT FOR THE HOT JUPITER WASP-43b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreidberg, Laura; Bean, Jacob L.; Stevenson, Kevin B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Désert, Jean-Michel [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Line, Michael R.; Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Madhusudhan, Nikku [Institute for Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 OHA (United Kingdom); Showman, Adam P.; Kataria, Tiffany [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tuscon, AZ 85721 (United States); Charbonneau, David [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); McCullough, Peter R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Seager, Sara [Department of Physics, Massachussetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Henry, Gregory W.; Williamson, Michael [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States); Homeier, Derek, E-mail: laura.kreidberg@uchicago.edu [Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, UMR 5574, CNRS, Université de Lyon, École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d'Italie, F-69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

    2014-10-01

    The water abundance in a planetary atmosphere provides a key constraint on the planet's primordial origins because water ice is expected to play an important role in the core accretion model of planet formation. However, the water content of the solar system giant planets is not well known because water is sequestered in clouds deep in their atmospheres. By contrast, short-period exoplanets have such high temperatures that their atmospheres have water in the gas phase, making it possible to measure the water abundance for these objects. We present a precise determination of the water abundance in the atmosphere of the 2 M {sub Jup} short-period exoplanet WASP-43b based on thermal emission and transmission spectroscopy measurements obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. We find the water content is consistent with the value expected in a solar composition gas at planetary temperatures (0.4-3.5 × solar at 1? confidence). The metallicity of WASP-43b's atmosphere suggested by this result extends the trend observed in the solar system of lower metal enrichment for higher planet masses.

  7. Nature Publishing Group Site Licenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    Biotechnology Nature Cell Biology Nature Chemical Biology Nature Chemistry Nature Climate Change Nature Journal of Financial Services Marketing Journal of Information Technology Journal of Information Technology Teaching Cases Journal of International Business Studies Journal of International Relations

  8. How do Uncertainties in the Surface Chemical Abundances of the Sun Affect the Predicted Solar Neutrino Fluxes?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John N. Bahcall; Aldo M. Serenelli

    2005-03-11

    We show that uncertainties in the values of the surface heavy element abundances of the Sun are the largest source of the theoretical uncertainty in calculating the p-p, pep, 8B, 13N, 15O, and 17F solar neutrino fluxes. We evaluate for the first time the sensitivity (partial derivative) of each solar neutrino flux with respect to the surface abundance of each element. We then calculate the uncertainties in each neutrino flux using `conservative (preferred)' and `optimistic' estimates for the uncertainties in the element abundances. The total conservative (optimistic) composition uncertainty in the predicted 8B neutrino flux is 11.6% (5.0%) when sensitivities to individual element abundances are used. The traditional method that lumps all abundances into a single quantity (total heavy element to hydrogen ratio, Z/X) yields a larger uncertainty, 20%. The uncertainties in the carbon, oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, and iron abundances all make significant contributions to the uncertainties in calculating solar neutrino fluxes; the uncertainties of different elements are most important for different neutrino fluxes. The uncertainty in the iron abundance is the largest source of the estimated composition uncertainties of the important 7Be and 8B solar neutrinos. Carbon is the largest contributor to the uncertainty in the calculation of the p-p, 13N, and 15O neutrino fluxes. However, for all neutrino fluxes, several elements contribute comparable amounts to the total composition uncertainty.

  9. The solar photospheric abundance of hafnium and thorium. Results from CO5BOLD 3D hydrodynamic model atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elisabetta Caffau; L. Sbordone; H. -G. Ludwig; P. Bonifacio; M. Steffen; N. T. Behara

    2008-03-25

    Context: The stable element hafnium (Hf) and the radioactive element thorium (Th) were recently suggested as a suitable pair for radioactive dating of stars. The applicability of this elemental pair needs to be established for stellar spectroscopy. Aims: We aim at a spectroscopic determination of the abundance of Hf and Th in the solar photosphere based on a \\cobold 3D hydrodynamical model atmosphere. We put this into a wider context by investigating 3D abundance corrections for a set of G- and F-type dwarfs. Method: High-resolution, high signal-to-noise solar spectra were compared to line synthesis calculations performed on a solar CO5BOLD model. For the other atmospheres, we compared synthetic spectra of CO5BOLD 3D and associated 1D models. Results: For Hf we find a photospheric abundance A(Hf)=0.87+-0.04, in good agreement with a previous analysis, based on 1D model atmospheres. The weak Th ii 401.9 nm line constitutes the only Th abundance indicator available in the solar spectrum. It lies in the red wing of an Ni-Fe blend exhibiting a non-negligible convective asymmetry. Accounting for the asymmetry-related additional absorption, we obtain A(Th)=0.09+-0.03, consistent with the meteoritic abundance, and about 0.1 dex lower than obtained in previous photospheric abundance determinations. Conclusions: Only for the second time, to our knowledge, has am non-negligible effect of convective line asymmetries on an abundance derivation been highlighted. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations should be employed to measure Th abundances in dwarfs if similar blending is present, as in the solar case. In contrast, 3D effects on Hf abundances are small in G- to mid F-type dwarfs and sub-giants, and 1D model atmospheres can be conveniently used.

  10. Riding, R. 2005. Secular variations in abundance of calcified algae and cyanobacteria: how biomineralization can reflect global changes in temperature and water chemistry.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riding, Robert

    Riding, R. 2005. Secular variations in abundance of calcified algae and cyanobacteria: how: 312. Secular variations in abundance of calcified algae and bacteria: how biomineralization can algae and cyanobacteria, cellular site and mineralogy of calcification, together with biogeographic

  11. ,"Total Natural Gas Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  12. Natural gas annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

  13. Natural gas dehydration apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Ng, Alvin; Mairal, Anurag P

    2006-11-07

    A process and corresponding apparatus for dehydrating gas, especially natural gas. The process includes an absorption step and a membrane pervaporation step to regenerate the liquid sorbent.

  14. Natural Resources Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration, Corporate Services Office, Office of the Chief Operating Officer, Natural...

  15. Measuring Ages and Elemental Abundances from Unresolved Stellar Populations: Fe, Mg, C, N, and Ca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genevieve J. Graves; Ricardo P. Schiavon

    2008-03-10

    We present a method for determining mean light-weighted ages and abundances of Fe, Mg, C, N, and Ca, from medium resolution spectroscopy of unresolved stellar populations. The method, pioneered by Schiavon (2007), is implemented in a publicly available code called EZ_Ages. The method and error estimation are described, and the results tested for accuracy and consistency, by application to integrated spectra of well-known Galactic globular and open clusters. Ages and abundances from integrated light analysis agree with studies of resolved stars to within +/-0.1 dex for most clusters, and to within +/-0.2 dex for nearly all cases. The results are robust to the choice of Lick indices used in the fitting to within +/-0.1 dex, except for a few systematic deviations which are clearly categorized. The realism of our error estimates is checked through comparison with detailed Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, we apply EZ_Ages to the sample of galaxies presented in Thomas et al. (2005) and compare our derived values of age, [Fe/H], and [alpha/Fe] to their analysis. We find that [alpha/Fe] is very consistent between the two analyses, that ages are consistent for old (Age > 10 Gyr) populations, but show modest systematic differences at younger ages, and that [Fe/H] is fairly consistent, with small systematic differences related to the age systematics. Overall, EZ_Ages provides accurate estimates of fundamental parameters from medium resolution spectra of unresolved stellar populations in the old and intermediate-age regime, for the first time allowing quantitative estimates of the abundances of C, N, and Ca in these unresolved systems. The EZ_Ages code can be downloaded at http://www.ucolick.org/~graves/EZ_Ages.html

  16. DETAILED ABUNDANCES OF TWO VERY METAL-POOR STARS IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.

    2012-12-01

    The most metal-poor stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) can show the nucleosynthetic patterns of one or a few supernovae (SNe). These SNe could have zero metallicity, making metal-poor dSph stars the closest surviving links to Population III stars. Metal-poor dSph stars also help to reveal the formation mechanism of the Milky Way (MW) halo. We present the detailed abundances from Keck/HIRES spectroscopy for two very metal-poor stars in two MW dSphs. One star, in the Sculptor dSph, has [Fe I/H] = -2.40. The other star, in the Ursa Minor dSph, has [Fe I/H] = -3.16. Both stars fall in the previously discovered low-metallicity, high-[{alpha}/Fe] plateau. Most abundance ratios of very metal-poor stars in these two dSphs are largely consistent with very metal-poor halo stars. However, the abundances of Na and some r-process elements lie at the lower end of the envelope defined by inner halo stars of similar metallicity. We propose that the metallicity dependence of SN yields is the cause. The earliest SNe in low-mass dSphs have less gas to pollute than the earliest SNe in massive halo progenitors. As a result, dSph stars at -3 < [Fe/H] < -2 sample SNe with [Fe/H] << -3, whereas halo stars in the same metallicity range sample SNe with [Fe/H] {approx} -3. Consequently, enhancements in [Na/Fe] and [r/Fe] were deferred to higher metallicity in dSphs than in the progenitors of the inner halo.

  17. ORIGIN OF THE UNUSUALLY LOW NITROGEN ABUNDANCES IN YOUNG POPULATIONS OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekki, Kenji [ICRAR, M468, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2010-10-01

    It is a longstanding problem that H II regions and very young stellar populations in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have nitrogen abundances ([N/H]) that are a factor of {approx}7 lower than the solar value. We here discuss a new scenario in which the observed unusually low nitrogen abundances can be closely associated with recent collisions and subsequent accretion of H I high velocity clouds (HVCs) that surround the Galaxy and have low nitrogen abundances. We show that if the observed low [N/H] is limited to very young stars with ages less than {approx}10{sup 7} yr, then the collision/accretion rate of the HVCs onto the LMC needs to be {approx}0.2 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} (corresponding to the total HVC mass of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} M{sub sun}) to dilute the original interstellar medium (ISM) before star formation. The required accretion rate means that even if the typical mass of HVCs accreted onto the LMC is {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun}, the Galaxy needs to have {approx}2500 massive HVCs within the LMC's orbital radius with respect to the Galactic center. The rather large number of required massive HVCs drives us to suggest that the HVCs are not likely to efficiently dilute the ISM of the LMC and consequently lower the [N/H]. We thus suggest the transfer of gas with low [N/H] from the Small Magellanic Cloud to the LMC as a promising scenario that can explain the observed low [N/H].

  18. Review: Manufacturing National Park Nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Review: Manufacturing National Park Nature: Photography,Canada Cronin, J. Keri. Manufacturing National Park Nature:J. Keri Cronin’s book Manufacturing National Park Nature

  19. A simple analytical model for the abundance of damped Ly-?absorbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Roy Choudhury; T. Padmanabhan

    2002-04-01

    A simple analytical model for estimating the fraction (\\Omega_{gas}) of matter in gaseous form within the collapsed dark matter (DM) haloes is presented. The model is developed using (i) the Press-Schechter formalism to estimate the fraction of baryons in DM haloes, and (ii) the observational estimates of the star formation rate at different redshifts. The prediction for \\Omega_{gas} from the model is in broad agreement with the observed abundance of the damped Ly-\\alpha systems. Furthermore, it can be used for estimating the circular velocities of the collapsed haloes at different redshifts, which could be compared with future observations.

  20. Microbial abundance and biomass in sediments of the Texas-Louisiana shelf 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cruz-Kaegi, Marta Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    MICROBIAL ABUNDANCF. AND BIOMASS IN SEDIMENTS OF THF. TEXAS-LOUISIANA SHELF A Thesis by MARTA ELIZABETH CRUZ-KAEGI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfiument of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Oceanography MICROBIAL ABUNDANCE AND BIOMASS IN SEDIMENTS OF THE TEXAS-LOUISIANA SHELF A Thesis by MARTA ELIZABETH CRUZ-KAEGI Approved as to style and content by: I $7& Gilberl T. Rowe (Chair...

  1. Meridional Martian water abundance profiles during the 1988-1989 season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizk, B.; Wells, W.K.; Hunten, D.M.; Stoker, C.R.; Freedman, R.S.; Roush, T.; Pollack, J.B.; Haberle, R.M. (Arizona, University, Tucson (USA) NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (USA))

    1991-04-01

    The Martian southern hemisphere atmospheric water vapor column abundance measurements reported agree with Viking Orbiter atmospheric water detectors during early southern spring and southern autumnal equinox; profiles obtained in southern mid- and late summer, however, indicate the presence of twice as much water both in the southern hemisphere and planetwide. This discrepancy is accounted for by the high optical depths created by two global dust storms during the Viking year, while the present observations were obtained in the case of the relatively dust-free atmosphere of the 1988-1989 opposition. 29 refs.

  2. Abundance and distribution of the western Gulf stone crab (Menippe adina) in Galveston Bay, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boslet, Jane Murray

    1989-01-01

    I BUNDANCE AND DI STRISUT . ON OF THE WESTERN GULF STOiuE CRAB LilFNIL'PC l', Diijil) IN GALVESTON BAY TEXAS Thesis JALXE iiURRAY HOSLET SuL&mitted to th= Office of Graduate Studies of Texa Aai1 University in :. a- Dial fulfullment... of the requirements for the deqree of MAS'I ~ R OI" SCIENCE May 19B9 Major subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences ABUNDANCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE WESTERN GULF STONE CRAB (NENIPPE ADINA) IN GALVESTON BAY, TEXAS A Thesis by JANE MURRAY BOSLET Approved...

  3. Light, alpha, and Fe-peak element abundances in the galactic bulge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Christian I.; Rich, R. Michael; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Kunder, Andrea; Koch, Andreas E-mail: rmr@astro.ucla.edu E-mail: akunder@aip.de

    2014-10-01

    We present radial velocities and chemical abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu for a sample of 156 red giant branch stars in two Galactic bulge fields centered near (l, b) = (+5.25,–3.02) and (0,–12). The (+5.25,–3.02) field also includes observations of the bulge globular cluster NGC 6553. The results are based on high-resolution (R ? 20,000), high signal-to-noise ration (S/N ? 70) FLAMES-GIRAFFE spectra obtained through the European Southern Observatory archive. However, we only selected a subset of the original observations that included spectra with both high S/N and that did not show strong TiO absorption bands. This work extends previous analyses of this data set beyond Fe and the ?-elements Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti. While we find reasonable agreement with past work, the data presented here indicate that the bulge may exhibit a different chemical composition than the local thick disk, especially at [Fe/H] ? –0.5. In particular, the bulge [?/Fe] ratios may remain enhanced to a slightly higher [Fe/H] than the thick disk, and the Fe-peak elements Co, Ni, and Cu appear enhanced compared to the disk. There is also some evidence that the [Na/Fe] (but not [Al/Fe]) trends between the bulge and local disk may be different at low and high metallicity. We also find that the velocity dispersion decreases as a function of increasing [Fe/H] for both fields, and do not detect any significant cold, high-velocity populations. A comparison with chemical enrichment models indicates that a significant fraction of hypernovae may be required to explain the bulge abundance trends, and that initial mass functions that are steep, top-heavy (and do not include strong outflow), or truncated to avoid including contributions from stars >40 M {sub ?} are ruled out, in particular because of disagreement with the Fe-peak abundance data. For most elements, the NGC 6553 stars exhibit abundance trends nearly identical to comparable metallicity bulge field stars. However, the star-to-star scatter and mean [Na/Fe] ratios appear higher in the cluster, perhaps indicating additional self-enrichment.

  4. Solar abundances and helioseismology: fine structure spacings and separation ratios of low-degree p modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu; William J. Chaplin; Yvonne Elsworth; Roger New; Aldo M. Serenelli; Graham A. Verner

    2006-10-02

    We have used 4752 days of data collected by the Birmingham Solar-Oscillations Network (BiSON) to determine very precise oscillation frequencies of acoustic low-degree modes that probe the solar core. We compare the fine (small frequency) spacings and frequency separation ratios formed from these data with those of different solar models. We find that models constructed with low metallicity are incompatible with the observations. The results provide strong support for lowering the theoretical uncertainties on the neutrino fluxes. These uncertainties had recently been raised due to the controversy over the solar abundances.

  5. Non-LTE iron abundances in cool stars: The role of hydrogen collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezzeddine, Rana; Plez, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    In the aim of determining accurate iron abundances in stars, this work is meant to empirically calibrate H-collision cross-sections with iron, where no quantum mechanical calculations have been published yet. Thus, a new iron model atom has been developed, which includes hydrogen collisions for excitation, ionization and charge transfer processes. We show that collisions with hydrogen leading to charge transfer are important for an accurate non-LTE modeling. We apply our calculations on several benchmark stars including the Sun, the metal-rich star {\\alpha} Cen A and the metal-poor star HD140283.

  6. Group dynamics, behavior, and current and historical abundance of peccaries in Costa Rica’s Caribbean lowlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Andrea; O'Neill, Brian James; Timm, Robert M.; Gerow, Kenneth G.; McClearn, Deedra

    2013-08-14

    The abundances and habitat preferences of peccaries in Neotropical forests are important to understand because these keystone species influence many aspects of the ecosystem. In the Caribbean lowlands of Costa Rica, we ...

  7. UTILIZATION OF TWO-STAGE SINGLE-PASS ELECTROFISHING TO ESTIMATE ABUNDANCE AND DEVELOP RECOVERY-MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UTILIZATION OF TWO-STAGE SINGLE-PASS ELECTROFISHING TO ESTIMATE ABUNDANCE AND DEVELOP RECOVERY Management (Planning) Title of Thesis: Utilization of two-stage single-pass electrofishing to estimate

  8. Mn abundances in the stars of the Galactic disc with metallicities -1.0 < [Fe/H] < 0.3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishenina, T; Pignatari, M; Thielemann, F -K; Korotin, S A

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present and discuss the observations of the Mn abundances for 247 FGK dwarfs, located in the Galactic disc with metallicity -1supernovae. We confirm the basel...

  9. Abundance of northern bobwhite and scaled quail in Texas: influence of weather and land-cover change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridges, Andrew Scott

    1999-01-01

    virginianus) has not declined in central portions of Texas. In eastern Texas ecological regions, however, declines were documented in the Cross Timbers, Gulf Prairies and Marshes, and Pinewoods. Scaled quail (Callipepla squamata) abundance in Texas exhibited...

  10. Influence of hydrological seasonality on sandbank benthos: algal biomass and shrimp abundance in a large neotropical river 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montoya Ceballos, Jose Vicente

    2009-05-15

    In this study, I examined the influence of hydrological seasonality on spatiotemporal variation of algal biomass and shrimp abundance on sandbanks of the Cinaruco River in southwestern Venezuela. Seasonal variations of ...

  11. Alameda Song Sparrow Abundance Related to Salt Marsh Vegetation Patch Size and Shape Metrics Quantified from Remote Sensing Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffett, Kevan B.; Law, Jaslyn; Gorelick, Steven M.; Nur, Nadav; Wood, Julian K.

    2014-01-01

    deviations of M. m. pusil- lula density index in marshes ofmodel suggested that M. m. pusil- lula abundance during theremaining, M. m.  pusil- lula is the most threatened by salt

  12. HIGH PRECISION ABUNDANCES OF THE OLD SOLAR TWIN HIP 102152: INSIGHTS ON Li DEPLETION FROM THE OLDEST SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monroe, TalaWanda R.; Melendez, Jorge; Tucci Maia, Marcelo; Freitas, Fabricio C.; Yong, David; Asplund, Martin; Alves-Brito, Alan; Casagrande, Luca; Bergemann, Maria; Bedell, Megan; Bean, Jacob; Lind, Karin; Castro, Matthieu; Do Nascimento, Jose-Dias; Bazot, Michael

    2013-09-10

    We present the first detailed chemical abundance analysis of the old 8.2 Gyr solar twin, HIP 102152. We derive differential abundances of 21 elements relative to the Sun with precisions as high as 0.004 dex ({approx}<1%), using ultra high-resolution (R = 110,000), high S/N UVES spectra obtained on the 8.2 m Very Large Telescope. Our determined metallicity of HIP 102152 is [Fe/H] = -0.013 {+-} 0.004. The atmospheric parameters of the star were determined to be 54 K cooler than the Sun, 0.09 dex lower in surface gravity, and a microturbulence identical to our derived solar value. Elemental abundance ratios examined versus dust condensation temperature reveal a solar abundance pattern for this star, in contrast to most solar twins. The abundance pattern of HIP 102152 appears to be the most similar to solar of any known solar twin. Abundances of the younger, 2.9 Gyr solar twin, 18 Sco, were also determined from UVES spectra to serve as a comparison for HIP 102152. The solar chemical pattern of HIP 102152 makes it a potential candidate to host terrestrial planets, which is reinforced by the lack of giant planets in its terrestrial planet region. The following non-local thermodynamic equilibrium Li abundances were obtained for HIP 102152, 18 Sco, and the Sun: log {epsilon} (Li) = 0.48 {+-} 0.07, 1.62 {+-} 0.02, and 1.07 {+-} 0.02, respectively. The Li abundance of HIP 102152 is the lowest reported to date for a solar twin, and allows us to consider an emerging, tightly constrained Li-age trend for solar twin stars.

  13. Natural SUSY and the Higgs boson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Peisi

    2014-01-01

    Supersymmetry (SUSY) solves the hierarchy problem by introducing a super partner to each Standard Model(SM) particle. SUSY must be broken in nature, which means the fine-tuning is reintroduced to some level. Natural SUSY models enjoy low fine-tuning by featuring a small super potential parameter ? ~ 125 GeV, while the third generation squarks have mass less than 1.5 TeV. First and second generation sfermions can be at the multi-TeV level which yields a decoupling solution to the SUSY flavor and CP problem. However, models of Natural SUSY have difficulties in predicting a m{sub h} at 125 GeV, because the third generation is too light to give large radiative correction to the Higgs mass. The models of Radiative Natural SUSY (RNS) address this problem by allowing for high scale soft SUSY breaking Higgs mass m{sub Hu} > m{sub 0}, which leads to automatic cancellation by the Renormalization Group (RG) running effect. Coupled with the large mixing in the stop sector, RNS allows low fine-tuning at 3-10 % level and a 125 GeV SM-like Higgs. RNS can be reached at the LHC, and a linear collider. If the strong CP problem is solved by the Peccei-Quinn mechanism, then RNS accommodates mixed axion-Higgsino cold dark matter, where the Higgsino-like WIMPs, which in this case make up only a fraction of the relic abundance, can be detectable at future WIMP detectors.

  14. PHYS 390 Lecture 35 -Universal helium abundance 35 -1 2001 by David Boal, Simon Fraser University. All rights reserved; further resale or copying is strictly prohibited.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boal, David

    helium abundance What's important: · proton/neutron ratio · helium production in the early universe TextPHYS 390 Lecture 35 - Universal helium abundance 35 - 1 © 2001 by David Boal, Simon Fraser: Peebles, Chap. VIII Universal helium abundance We have described two characteristics of the Universe

  15. Antihydrogen, CPT, and Naturalness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makoto C. Fujiwara

    2013-09-28

    Studying fundamental symmetries of Nature has proven fruitful in particle physics. I argue that recent results at the LHC, and the naturalness problem highlighted by them, provide a renewed motivation for tests of CPT symmetry as a probe for physics beyond quantum field theory. I also discuss prospects for antihydrogen CPT tests with sensitivities to Planck scale suppressed effects.

  16. INTRODUCTION Nature's microbiome: introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). But outside this field, nature's microbiome--the communities of microbes colonizing host eukaryotes (LederbergINTRODUCTION Nature's microbiome: introduction JACOB A. RUSSELL,* NICOLE DUBILIER and JENNIFER A of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA Keywords: metagenomics, microbiome, next generation sequencing

  17. NATURAL MARINE HYDROCARBON SEEPAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luyendyk, Bruce

    oil and gas (Fischer, 1977).The offshore gaseous seepage is controlled Geology; November 1999; v. 27; no. 11; p. 1047­1050; 4 figures. 1047 Decrease in natural marine hydrocarbon seepage near Coal OilNATURAL MARINE HYDROCARBON SEEPAGE Hydrocarbon seepage from the world's conti- nental shelves

  18. SULFUR REMOVAL FROM PIPE LINE NATURAL GAS FUEL: APPLICATION TO FUEL CELL POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, David L.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2003-11-21

    Pipeline natural gas is being considered as the fuel of choice for utilization in fuel cell-based distributed generation systems because of its abundant supply and the existing supply infrastructure (1). For effective utilization in fuel cells, pipeline gas requires efficient removal of sulfur impurities (naturally occurring sulfur compounds or sulfur bearing odorants) to prevent the electrical performance degradation of the fuel cell system. Sulfur odorants such as thiols and sulfides are added to pipeline natural gas and to LPG to ensure safe handling during transportation and utilization. The odorants allow the detection of minute gas line leaks, thereby minimizing the potential for explosions or fires.

  19. s- and r-process element abundances in the CMD of 47 Tucanae using the Robert Stobie Spectrograph on SALT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. C. Worley; P. L. Cottrell; E. C. Wylie de Boer

    2008-02-04

    A recent study by Wylie et al 2006 has revealed that s-process element abundances are enhanced relative to iron in both red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch stars of 47 Tucanae. A more detailed investigation into s-process element abundances throughout the colour-magnitude diagram of 47 Tucanae is vital in order to determine whether the observed enhancements are intrinsic to the cluster. This paper explores this possibility through observational and theoretical means. The visibility of s- and r-process element lines in synthetic spectra of giant and dwarf stars throughout the colour magnitude diagram of 47 Tucanae has been explored. It was determined that a resolving power of 10 000 was sufficient to observe s-process element abundance variations in globular cluster giant branch stars. These synthetic results were compared with the spectra of eleven 47 Tucanae giant branch stars observed during the performance verification of the Robert Stobie Spectrograph on the Southern African Large Telescope. Three s-process elements, Zr, Ba, Nd, and one r-process element, Eu, were investigated. No abundance variations were found such that [X/Fe] = 0.0 +/- 0.5 dex. It was concluded that this resolving power, R ~ 5000, was not sufficient to obtain exact abundances but upper limits on the s-process element abundances could be determined.

  20. Thermoacoustic natural gas liquefier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.; Gardner, D.; Hayden, M.; Radebaugh, R.; Wollan, J.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to develop a natural-gas-powered natural-gas liquefier that has absolutely no moving parts and requires no electrical power. It should have high efficiency, remarkable reliability, and low cost. The thermoacoustic natural-gas liquefier (TANGL) is based on our recent invention of the first no-moving-parts cryogenic refrigerator. In short, our invention uses acoustic phenomena to produce refrigeration from heat, with no moving parts. The required apparatus comprises nothing more than heat exchangers and pipes, made of common materials, without exacting tolerances. Its initial experimental success in a small size lead us to propose a more ambitious application: large-energy liquefaction of natural gas, using combustion of natural gas as the energy source. TANGL was designed to be maintenance-free, inexpensive, portable, and environmentally benign.

  1. SEASONAL CHANGES IN TITAN'S POLAR TRACE GAS ABUNDANCE OBSERVED BY CASSINI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teanby, N. A. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen's Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Irwin, P. G. J. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); De Kok, R. [SRON, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Nixon, C. A., E-mail: n.teanby@bristol.ac.u [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2010-11-20

    We use a six-year data set (2004-2010) of mid-infrared spectra measured by Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer to search for seasonal variations in Titan's atmospheric temperature and composition. During most of Cassini's mission Titan's northern hemisphere has been in winter, with an intense stratospheric polar vortex highly enriched in trace gases, and a single south-to-north circulation cell. Following northern spring equinox in mid-2009, dramatic changes in atmospheric temperature and composition were expected, but until now the temporal coverage of polar latitudes has been too sparse to discern trends. Here, we show that during equinox and post-equinox periods, abundances of trace gases at both poles have begun to increase. We propose that increases in north polar trace gases are due to a seasonal reduction in gas depletion by horizontal mixing across the vortex boundary. A simultaneous south polar abundance increase suggests that Titan is now entering, or is about to enter, a transitional circulation regime with two branches, rather than the single branch circulation pattern previously observed.

  2. THE DUAL ORIGIN OF STELLAR HALOS. II. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES AS TRACERS OF FORMATION HISTORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolotov, Adi; Hogg, David W. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Willman, Beth [Haverford College, Department of Astronomy, 370 Lancaster Avenue, Haverford, PA 19041 (United States); Brooks, Alyson M. [California Institute of Technology, M/C 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Governato, Fabio [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Shen, Sijing; Wadsley, James, E-mail: az481@nyu.ed, E-mail: bwillman@haverford.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L88 4M1 (Canada)

    2010-09-20

    Fully cosmological, high-resolution N-body+smooth particle hydrodynamic simulations are used to investigate the chemical abundance trends of stars in simulated stellar halos as a function of their origin. These simulations employ a physically motivated supernova feedback recipe, as well as metal enrichment, metal cooling, and metal diffusion. As presented in an earlier paper, the simulated galaxies in this study are surrounded by stellar halos whose inner regions contain both stars accreted from satellite galaxies and stars formed in situ in the central regions of the main galaxies and later displaced by mergers into their inner halos. The abundance patterns ([Fe/H] and [O/Fe]) of halo stars located within 10 kpc of a solar-like observer are analyzed. We find that for galaxies which have not experienced a recent major merger, in situ stars at the high [Fe/H] end of the metallicity distribution function are more [{alpha}/Fe]-rich than accreted stars at similar [Fe/H]. This dichotomy in the [O/Fe] of halo stars at a given [Fe/H] results from the different potential wells within which in situ and accreted halo stars form. These results qualitatively match recent observations of local Milky Way halo stars. It may thus be possible for observers to uncover the relative contribution of different physical processes to the formation of stellar halos by observing such trends in the halo populations of the Milky Way and other local L{sup *} galaxies.

  3. The Reduction of the Electron Abundance during the Pre-explosion Simmering in White Dwarf Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chamulak, David A; Timmes, F X; Dupczak, Kimberly

    2008-01-01

    Prior to the explosion of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf in a Type Ia supernova there is a long "simmering," during which the 12C+12C reaction gradually heats the white dwarf on a long (~ 10^3 yr) timescale. Protons liberated by the 12C+12C->23Na+p branch capture onto 12C to make beta-unstable 13N, which in turn electron captures. Piro & Bildsten showed that, as a result of this electron capture, there is a maximum electron abundance Ye at the time of the explosion. We investigate the nuclear reactions during this simmering with a series of self-heating, at constant pressure, reaction network calculations. Unlike in AGB stars, p captures onto 22Ne and heavier trace nuclei do not play a significant role; at high concentrations of 22Ne (appropriate for progenitors with three times solar O/H), proton captures onto 22Ne reduce the production of 13N by < 10%. The reaction 13C(alpha,n)16O is a strong neutron source, but the 12C abundance is sufficiently high that the neutrons preferentially capture onto 12C, ra...

  4. History of Milky Way Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies Imprinted on Abundance Patterns of Neutron-Capture Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takuji Tsujimoto; Toshikazu Shigeyama

    2002-05-02

    Stellar abundance pattern of neutron-capture elements such as barium is used as a powerful tool to infer how star formation proceeded in dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. It is found that the abundance correlation of barium with iron in stars belonging to dSph galaxies orbiting the Milky Way, i.e., Draco, Sextans, and Ursa Minor have a feature similar to the barium-iron correlation in Galactic metal-poor stars. The common feature of these two correlations can be realized by our inhomogeneous chemical evolution model based on the supernova-driven star formation scenario if dSph stars formed from gas with a velocity dispersion of ~26 km/s. This velocity dispersion together with the stellar luminosities strongly suggest that dark matter dominated dSph galaxies. The tidal force of the Milky Way links this velocity dispersion with the currently observed value <10 km/s by stripping the dark matter in dSph galaxies. As a result, the total mass of each dSph galaxy is found to have been originally ~25 times larger than at present. Our inhomogeneous chemical evolution model succeeds in reproducing the stellar [Fe/H] distribution function observed in Sextans. In this model, supernovae immediately after the end of the star formation epoch can expel the remaining gas over the gravitational potential of the dSph galaxy.

  5. The solar wind neon abundance observed with ACE/SWICS and ULYSSES/SWICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shearer, Paul; Raines, Jim M.; Lepri, Susan T.; Thomas, Jonathan W.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Landi, Enrico; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Von Steiger, Rudolf

    2014-07-01

    Using in situ ion spectrometry data from ACE/SWICS, we determine the solar wind Ne/O elemental abundance ratio and examine its dependence on wind speed and evolution with the solar cycle. We find that Ne/O is inversely correlated with wind speed, is nearly constant in the fast wind, and correlates strongly with solar activity in the slow wind. In fast wind streams with speeds above 600 km s{sup –1}, we find Ne/O = 0.10 ± 0.02, in good agreement with the extensive polar observations by Ulysses/SWICS. In slow wind streams with speeds below 400 km s{sup –1}, Ne/O ranges from a low of 0.12 ± 0.02 at solar maximum to a high of 0.17 ± 0.03 at solar minimum. These measurements place new and significant empirical constraints on the fractionation mechanisms governing solar wind composition and have implications for the coronal and photospheric abundances of neon and oxygen. The results are made possible by a new data analysis method that robustly identifies rare elements in the measured ion spectra. The method is also applied to Ulysses/SWICS data, which confirms the ACE observations and extends our view of solar wind neon into the three-dimensional heliosphere.

  6. What are the Sources of Solar Energetic Particles? Element Abundances and Source Plasma Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reames, Donald V

    2015-01-01

    We have spent 50 years in heated discussion over which populations of solar energetic particles (SEPs) are accelerated at flares and which by shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The association of the large "gradual" SEP events with shock acceleration is supported by the extensive spatial distribution of SEPs and by the delayed acceleration of the particles. The relative abundances of the elements in these gradual events are a measure of those in the ambient solar corona, differing from those in the photosphere by a widely-observed function of the first ionization potential (FIP) of the elements. SEP events we call "impulsive", the traditional "3He-rich" events with enhanced heavy-element abundances, are associated with type III radio bursts, flares, and narrow CMEs; they selectively populate flux tubes that thread a localized source, and they are fit to new particle-in-cell models of magnetic reconnection on open field lines as found in solar jets. These models help explain ...

  7. Tin Anode for Sodium-Ion Batteries Using Natural Wood Fiber as a Mechanical Buffer and Electrolyte Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Tin Anode for Sodium-Ion Batteries Using Natural Wood Fiber as a Mechanical Buffer and Electrolyte Information ABSTRACT: Sodium (Na)-ion batteries offer an attractive option for low cost grid scale storage due to the abundance of Na. Tin (Sn) is touted as a high capacity anode for Na-ion batteries with a high theoretical

  8. ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE RATIOS IN STARS OF THE OUTER GALACTIC DISK. IV. A NEW SAMPLE OF OPEN CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yong, David; Carney, Bruce W.; Friel, Eileen D. E-mail: bruce@physics.unc.edu

    2012-10-01

    We present radial velocities and chemical abundances for nine stars in the old, distant open clusters Be18, Be21, Be22, Be32, and PWM4. For Be18 and PWM4, these are the first chemical abundance measurements. Combining our data with literature results produces a compilation of some 68 chemical abundance measurements in 49 unique clusters. For this combined sample, we study the chemical abundances of open clusters as a function of distance, age, and metallicity. We confirm that the metallicity gradient in the outer disk is flatter than the gradient in the vicinity of the solar neighborhood. We also confirm that the open clusters in the outer disk are metal-poor with enhancements in the ratios [{alpha}/Fe] and perhaps [Eu/Fe]. All elements show negligible or small trends between [X/Fe] and distance (<0.02 dex kpc{sup -1}), but for some elements, there is a hint that the local (R{sub GC} < 13 kpc) and distant (R{sub GC} > 13 kpc) samples may have different trends with distance. There is no evidence for significant abundance trends versus age (<0.04 dex Gyr{sup -1}). We measure the linear relation between [X/Fe] and metallicity, [Fe/H], and find that the scatter about the mean trend is comparable to the measurement uncertainties. Comparison with solar neighborhood field giants shows that the open clusters share similar abundance ratios [X/Fe] at a given metallicity. While the flattening of the metallicity gradient and enhanced [{alpha}/Fe] ratios in the outer disk suggest a chemical enrichment history different from that of the solar neighborhood, we echo the sentiments expressed by Friel et al. that definitive conclusions await homogeneous analyses of larger samples of stars in larger numbers of clusters. Arguably, our understanding of the evolution of the outer disk from open clusters is currently limited by systematic abundance differences between various studies.

  9. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    State, 1980-1998 PDF 12 Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 1980-1998 PDF 13 Natural Gas Production, Transmission, and Consumption by State, 1967-1998 PDF 14 Consumption of...

  10. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    State, 1980-1997 PDF 12 Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 1980-1997 PDF 13 Natural Gas Production, Transmission, and Consumption by State, 1967-1997 PDF 14 Consumption of...

  11. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    State, 1980-1996 PDF 12 Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 1980-1996 PDF 13 Natural Gas Production, Transmission, and Consumption by State, 1967-1996 PDF 14 Consumption of...

  12. In Her Nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scribner, Rachel

    2014-05-31

    /, includes nine oil paintings displayed on the walls of the gallery. The paintings are based on structures existing in nature, but suggest an interior landscape and personal expression. Ranging in size and orientation, the paintings compromise...

  13. Natural Gas Regulations (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Administrative Regulation title 805 promulgates the rules and regulations pertaining to natural gas production in Kentucky. In addition to KAR title 405, chapter 30, which pertains to any...

  14. Future of Natural Gas

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Natural Gas Bill Eisele, CEM SC Electric & Gas Co Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral. Florida Agenda * Gas Facts *...

  15. Natural gas monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    This document highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Data presented include volume and price, production, consumption, underground storage, and interstate pipeline activities.

  16. Natural lighting and skylights 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Benjamin Hampton

    1961-01-01

    There are many physiological and psychological factors which enter into the proper design of space for human occupancy. One of these elements is light. Both natural light and manufactured light are basic tools with which any designer must work...

  17. Naturalism and Causal Explanation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toribio, Josefa

    1999-01-01

    Semantic properties are not commonly held to be part of the basic ontological furniture of the world. Consequently, we confront a problem: how to 'naturalize' semantics so as to reveal these properties in their true ...

  18. Abundance ratios of volatile vs. refractory elements in planet-harbouring stars: hints of pollution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ecuvillon; G. Israelian; N. C. Santos; M. Mayor; G. Gilli

    2005-12-08

    We present the [X/H] trends as function of the elemental condensation temperature Tc in 88 planet host stars and in a volume-limited comparison sample of 33 dwarfs without detected planetary companions. We gathered homogeneous abundance results for many volatile and refractory elements spanning a wide range of Tc, from a few dozens to several hundreds kelvin. We investigate possible anomalous trends of planet hosts with respect to comparison sample stars in order to detect evidence of possible pollution events. No significant differences are found in the behaviour of stars with and without planets. This result is in agreement with a ``primordial'' origin of the metal excess in planet host stars. However, a subgroup of 5 planet host and 1 comparison sample stars stands out for having particularly high [X/H] vs. Tc slopes.

  19. The impact of global nuclear mass model uncertainties on $r$-process abundance predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Mumpower; R. Surman; A. Aprahamian

    2014-11-14

    Rapid neutron capture or `$r$-process' nucleosynthesis may be responsible for half the production of heavy elements above iron on the periodic table. Masses are one of the most important nuclear physics ingredients that go into calculations of $r$-process nucleosynthesis as they enter into the calculations of reaction rates, decay rates, branching ratios and Q-values. We explore the impact of uncertainties in three nuclear mass models on $r$-process abundances by performing global monte carlo simulations. We show that root-mean-square (rms) errors of current mass models are large so that current $r$-process predictions are insufficient in predicting features found in solar residuals and in $r$-process enhanced metal poor stars. We conclude that the reduction of global rms errors below $100$ keV will allow for more robust $r$-process predictions.

  20. Chemical Abundances in 35 Metal-Poor Stars. I. Basic Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong-Deok Lee; Sang-Gak Lee; Kang-Min Kim

    2008-05-30

    We carried out a homogeneous abundance study for various elements, including $\\alpha$-elements, iron peak elements and $n$-capture elements for 35 metal-poor stars with a wide metallicity range ($-3.0\\lesssim$[Fe/H]$\\lesssim-0.5$). High-resolution ($R\\simeq30$k), high signal-to-noise($S/N\\geq110$) spectra with a wavelength range of 3800 to 10500 \\AA using the Bohyunsan Optical Echelle Spectrograph (BOES). Equivalent widths were measured by means of the Gaussian-fitting method for numerous isolated weak lines of elements. Atmospheric parameters were determined by a self-consistent LTE analysis technique using Fe I and Fe II lines. In this study, we present the EWs of lines and atmospheric parameters for 35 metal-poor stars.

  1. Abundances of presolar graphite and SiC from supernovae and AGB stars in the Murchison meteorite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amari, Sachiko; Zinner, Ernst [McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences and the Physics Department, Washington University, One Brookings Dr., St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Gallino, Roberto [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)

    2014-05-02

    Pesolar graphite grains exhibit a range of densities (1.65 – 2.20 g/cm{sup 3}). We investigated abundances of presolar graphite grains formed in supernovae and in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the four density fractions KE3, KFA1, KFB1 and KFC1 extracted from the Murchison meteorite to probe dust productions in these stellar sources. Seventy-six and 50% of the grains in the low-density fractions KE3 and KFA1, respectively, are supernova grains, while only 7.2% and 0.9% of the grains in the high-density fractions KFB1 and KFC1 have a supernova origin. Grains of AGB star origin are concentrated in the high-density fractions KFB1 and KFC1. From the C isotopic distributions of these fractions and the presence of s-process Kr with {sup 86}Kr/{sup 82}Kr?=?4.43±0.46 in KFC1, we estimate that 76% and 80% of the grains in KFB1 and KFC1, respectively, formed in AGB stars. From the abundance of graphite grains in the Murchison meteorite, 0.88 ppm, the abundances of graphite from supernovae and AGB stars are 0.24 ppm and 0.44 ppm, respectively: the abundances of graphite in supernovae and AGB stars are comparable. In contrast, it has been known that 1% of SiC grains formed in supernovae and 95% formed in AGB stars in meteorites. Since the abundance of SiC grains is 5.85 ppm in the Murchison meteorite, the abundances of SiC from supernovae and AGB stars are 0.063 ppm and 5.6 ppm, respectively: the dominant source of SiC grains is AGB stars. Since SiC grains are harder and likely to survive better in space than graphite grains, the abundance of supernova graphite grains, which is higher than that of supernova SiC grains, indicates that supernovae proficiently produce graphite grains. Graphite grains from AGB stars are, in contrast, less abundant that SiC grains from AGB stars (0.44 ppm vs. 5.6 ppm). It is difficult to derive firm conclusions for graphite and SiC formation in AGB stars due to the difference in susceptibility to grain destruction. Metallicity of the parent AGB stars of graphite grains is much lower than that of SiC grains and the difference in metallicity might also have affected to the difference in the abundances in the Murchison meteorite.

  2. Quadrature conductivity: A quantitative indicator of bacterial abundance in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chi Zhang; Andre Revil; Yoshiko Fujita; Junko Munakata-Marr; George Redden

    2014-09-01

    ABSTRACT The abundance and growth stages of bacteria in subsurface porous media affect the concentrations and distributions of charged species within the solid-solution interfaces. Therefore, spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements can be used to monitor changes in bacterial biomass and growth stage. Our goal was to gain a better understanding of the SIP response of bacteria present in a porous material. Bacterial cell surfaces possess an electric double layer and therefore become polarized in an electric field. We performed SIP measurements over the frequency range of 0.1–1 kHz on cell suspensions alone and cell suspensions mixed with sand at four pore water conductivities. We used Zymomonas mobilis at four different cell densities (in- cluding the background). The quadrature conductivity spectra exhibited two peaks, one around 0.05–0.10 Hz and the other around 1–10 Hz. Because SIP measurements on bacterial suspensions are typically made at frequencies greater than 1 Hz, these peaks have not been previously reported. In the bac-terial suspensions in growth medium, the quadrature conduc-tivity at peak I was linearly proportional to the density of the bacteria. For the case of the suspensions mixed with sands, we observed that peak II presented a smaller increase in the quadrature conductivity with the cell density. A comparison of the experiments with and without sand grains illustrated the effect of the porous medium on the overall quadrature con- ductivity response (decrease in the amplitude and shift of the peaks to the lower frequencies). Our results indicate that for a given porous medium, time-lapse SIP has potential for mon- itoring changes in bacterial abundance within porous media.

  3. RUBIDIUM ABUNDANCES IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTERS NGC 6752, NGC 1904, AND NGC 104 (47 Tuc)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Orazi, Valentina [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Balaclava Road, North Ryde, NSW 2109 (Australia); Lugaro, Maria; Campbell, Simon W. [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Building 28, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia); Bragaglia, Angela; Carretta, Eugenio [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Gratton, Raffaele G.; Lucatello, Sara [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); D'Antona, Francesca, E-mail: valentina.dorazi@mq.edu.au [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio (Italy)

    2013-10-10

    Large star-to-star variations of the abundances of proton-capture elements, such as Na and O, in globular clusters (GCs) are interpreted as the effect of internal pollution resulting from the presence of multiple stellar populations. To better constrain this scenario, we investigate the abundance distribution of the heavy element rubidium (Rb) in NGC 6752, NGC 1904, and NGC 104 (47 Tuc). Combining the results from our sample with those in the literature, we found that Rb exhibits no star-to-star variations, regardless of cluster metallicity, with the possible intriguing, although very uncertain, exception of the metal-rich bulge cluster NGC 6388. If no star-to-star variations can be confirmed for all GCs, this finding implies that the stellar source of the proton-capture element variations must not have produced significant amounts of Rb. This element is observed to be enhanced at extremely high levels in intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (IM-AGB) stars in the Magellanic Clouds (i.e., at a metallicity similar to 47 Tuc and NGC 6388). This fact may present a challenge to this popular candidate polluter, unless the mass range of the observed IM-AGB stars does not participate in the formation of the second-generation stars in GCs. A number of possible solutions are available to resolve this conundrum, including the fact that the Magellanic Cloud observations are very uncertain and may need to be revised. The fast rotating massive stars scenario would not face this potential problem as the slow mechanical winds of these stars during their main-sequence phase do not carry any Rb enhancements; however, these candidates face even bigger issues such as the production of Li and the close overlap with core-collapse supernova timescales. Observations of Sr, Rb, and Zr in metal-rich clusters such as NGC 6388 and NGC 6441 are sorely needed to clarify the situation.

  4. The Reduction of the Electron Abundance during the Pre-explosion Simmering in White Dwarf Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Chamulak; Edward F. Brown; F. X. Timmes; Kimberly Dupczak

    2008-02-28

    Prior to the explosion of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf in a Type Ia supernova there is a long "simmering," during which the 12C + 12C reaction gradually heats the white dwarf on a long (~ 1000 yr) timescale. Piro & Bildsten showed that weak reactions during this simmering set a maximum electron abundance Ye at the time of the explosion. We investigate the nuclear reactions during this simmering with a series of self-heating, at constant pressure, reaction network calculations. Unlike in AGB stars, proton captures onto 22Ne and heavier trace nuclei do not play a significant role. The 12C abundance is sufficiently high that the neutrons preferentially capture onto 12C, rather than iron group nuclei. As an aid to hydrodynamical simulations of the simmering phase, we present fits to the rates of heating, electron capture, change in mean atomic mass, and consumption of 12C in terms of the screened thermally averaged cross section for 12C + 12C. Our evaluation of the net heating rate includes contributions from electron captures into the 3.68 MeV excited state of 13C. This results in a slightly larger energy release, per 12C consumed, than that found by Piro & Bildsten, but less than that released for a burn to only 20Ne and 23Na. We compare our one-zone results to more accurate integrations over the white dwarf structure to estimate the amount of 12C that must be consumed to raise the white dwarf temperature, and hence to determine the net reduction of Ye during simmering.

  5. Grid of theoretical NLTE equivalent widths of four Ba II lines and barium abundance in cool stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korotin, S A; Hansen, C J; Caffau, E; Bonifacio, P; Spite, M; Spite, F; Francois, P

    2015-01-01

    We present a grid of computed non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) equivalent widths (EW) and NLTE abundance corrections for four Ba II lines: 4554, 5853, 6141, and 6496 A. The grid can be useful in deriving the NLTE barium abundance in stars having parameters in the following ranges: effective temperature from 4000 K to 6500 K, surface gravity log g from 0 to 5, microturbulent velocity 0 km s^-1 to 3 km s^-1, metallicity [Fe/H] from -2 to +0.5, and [Ba/Fe] from -0.4 to +0.6. The NLTE abundance can be either derived by EW interpolation (using the observed Ba II line EW) or by using the NLTE correction applied to a previously determined LTE abundance. Ba II line equivalent widths and the NLTE corrections were calculated using the updated MULTI code and the Ba II atomic model that was previously applied to determine the NLTE barium abundance in different types of stars. The grid is available on-line through the web, and we find that the grid Ba NLTE corrections are almost as accurate as direct NLTE profil...

  6. Non-LTE analysis of copper abundances for the two distinct halo populations in the solar neighborhood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, H L; Nissen, P E; Zhao, G

    2015-01-01

    Two distinct halo populations were found in the solar neighborhood by a series of works. They can be clearly separated by [alpha\\Fe] and several other elemental abundance ratios including [Cu/Fe]. Very recently, a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) study revealed that relatively large departures exist between LTE and non-LTE results in copper abundance analysis. We aim to derive the copper abundances for the stars from the sample of Nissen et al (2010) with both LTE and non-LTE calculations. Based on our results, we study the non-LTE effects of copper and investigate whether the high-alpha population can still be distinguished from the low-alpha population in the non-LTE [Cu/Fe] results. Our differential abundance ratios are derived from the high-resolution spectra collected from VLT/UVES and NOT/FIES spectrographs. Applying the MAFAGS opacity sampling atmospheric models and spectrum synthesis method, we derive the non-LTE copper abundances based on the new atomic model with current atomic data obt...

  7. New Abundance Determinations of Cadmium, Lutetium, and Osmium in the r-process Enriched Star BD+173248

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roederer, Ian U; Lawler, James E; Cowan, John J

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of Cd I (Z = 48), Lu II (Z = 71), and Os II (Z = 76) in the metal-poor star BD+173248. These abundances are derived from an ultraviolet spectrum obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. This is the first detection of these neutron-capture species in a metal-poor star enriched by the r-process. We supplement these measurements with new abundances of Mo I, Ru I, and Rh I derived from an optical spectrum obtained with the High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph on Keck. Combined with previous abundance derivations, 32 neutron-capture elements have been detected in BD+173248, the most complete neutron-capture abundance pattern in any metal-poor star to date. The light neutron-capture elements (38 <= Z <= 48) show a more pronounced even-odd effect than expected from current Solar system r-process abundance predictions. The age for BD+173248 derived from the Th II/Os II chronometer is in better agreement with the age derived from other chronome...

  8. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Supply Basins...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Major Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors, 2008 U.S. Natural Gas Transporation Corridors out of Major...

  9. Q-Value and Half-Lives for the Double-Beta-Decay Nuclide 110Pd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fink; J. Barea; D. Beck; K. Blaum; Ch. Böhm; Ch. Borgmann; M. Breitenfeldt; F. Herfurth; A. Herlert; J. Kotila; M. Kowalska; S. Kreim; D. Lunney; S. Naimi; M. Rosenbusch; S. Schwarz; L. Schweikhard; F. Simkovic; J. Stanja; K. Zuber

    2011-12-25

    The 110Pd double-beta decay Q-value was measured with the Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP to be Q = 2017.85(64) keV. This value shifted by 14 keV compared to the literature value and is 17 times more precise, resulting in new phase-space factors for the two-neutrino and neutrinoless decay modes. In addition a new set of the relevant matrix elements has been calculated. The expected half-life of the two-neutrino mode was reevaluated as 1.5(6) E20 yr. With its high natural abundance, the new results reveal 110Pd to be an excellent candidate for double-beta decay studies.

  10. Abundance gradients in low surface brightness spirals: clues on the origin of common gradients in galactic discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bresolin, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    We acquired spectra of 141 HII regions in ten late-type low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs). The analysis of the chemical abundances obtained from the nebular emission lines shows that metallicity gradients are a common feature of LSBGs, contrary to previous claims concerning the absence of such gradients in this class of galaxies. The average slope, when expressed in units of the isophotal radius, is found to be significantly shallower in comparison to galaxies of high surface brightness. This result can be attributed to the reduced surface brightness range measured across their discs, when combined with a universal surface mass density-metallicity relation. With a similar argument we explain the common abundance gradient observed in high surface brightness galaxy (HSBG) discs and its approximate dispersion. This conclusion is reinforced by our result that LSBGs share the same common abundance gradient with HSBGs, when the slope is expressed in terms of the exponential disc scale length.

  11. Star-to-Star Abundance Variations among Bright Giants in the Mildly Metal-Poor Globular Cluster M4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inese I. Ivans; Christopher Sneden; Robert P. Kraft; Nicholas B. Suntzeff; Verne V. Smith; G. Edward Langer; Jon P. Fulbright; .

    1999-05-27

    We present a chemical composition analysis of 36 giants in the nearby mildy metal-poor ( = -1.18) "CN-bimodal" globular cluster M4. Confronted with a cluster that has large and variable interstellar extinction across the cluster face, we combined traditional spectroscopic abundance methods with modifications to line-depth ratio techniques to determine the atmospheric parameters of our stars. We derive a total-to-selective extinction ratio of 3.4 and an average reddening of 0.33 which is significantly lower than that estimated by using the dust maps made by Schlegel et al. (1998). Abundance ratios for Sc, Ti, V, Ni, & Eu are typical of halo field and cluster stars. However, Si, Al, Ba, & La are overabundant with respect to what is seen in other globular clusters of similar metallicity. Superimposed on the primordial abundance distribution is evidence for the existence of proton-capture synthesis. We recover some of the C, N, O, Na, Mg, & Al abundance swings and correlations found in other more metal-poor globular clusters but the range of variation is muted. The Al enhancements appear to be from the destruction of 25,26Mg, not 24Mg. The C+N+O abundance sum is constant to within the observational errors, and agrees with the C+N+O total that might be expected for M4 stars at birth. The M4 AGB stars have C,N,O abundances that show less evidence for proton- capture nucleosynthesis than is found in the less-evolved stars of the RGB. Deeply-mixed stars of the RGB, subsequent to the helium core flash, might take up residence on the blue end of the HB, and thus fail to evolve back to the AGB but reasons for skepticism concerning this scenario are noted.

  12. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN FIELD RED GIANTS FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION H-BAND SPECTRA USING THE APOGEE SPECTRAL LINELIST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Verne V.; Cunha, Katia [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)] [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Shetrone, Matthew D. [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Meszaros, Szabolcs; Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto d'Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)] [Instituto d'Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States)] [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Garcia Perez, Ana; Majewski, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Schiavon, Ricardo [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 5UX (United Kingdom)] [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 5UX (United Kingdom); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Johnson, Jennifer A., E-mail: vsmith@noao.edu [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    High-resolution H-band spectra of five bright field K, M, and MS giants, obtained from the archives of the Kitt Peak National Observatory Fourier transform spectrometer, are analyzed to determine chemical abundances of 16 elements. The abundances were derived via spectrum synthesis using the detailed linelist prepared for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), which is a high-resolution near-infrared spectroscopic survey to derive detailed chemical abundance distributions and precise radial velocities for 100,000 red giants sampling all Galactic stellar populations. The red giant sample studied here was chosen to probe which chemical elements can be derived reliably from the H-band APOGEE spectral region. These red giants consist of two K-giants ({alpha} Boo and {mu} Leo), two M-giants ({beta} And and {delta} Oph), and one thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) star of spectral type MS (HD 199799). Measured chemical abundances include the cosmochemically important isotopes {sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, {sup 14}N, and {sup 16}O, along with Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu. The K and M giants exhibit the abundance signature of the first dredge-up of CN-cycle material, while the TP-AGB star shows clear evidence of the addition of {sup 12}C synthesized during {sup 4}He-burning thermal pulses and subsequent third dredge-up. A comparison of the abundances derived here with published values for these stars reveals consistent results to {approx}0.1 dex. The APOGEE spectral region and linelist is thus well suited for probing both Galactic chemical evolution, as well as internal nucleosynthesis and mixing in populations of red giants via high-resolution spectroscopy.

  13. Arizona Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural GasYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun19

  14. Arkansas Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - NaturalYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun43 3.84

  15. Dry Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  16. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  18. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  20. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  1. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust 325, 200722, 20071,

  2. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust 325, 200722,

  3. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust 325, 200722,15, 2007

  4. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust 325, 200722,15,

  5. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust 325, 200722,15,9,

  6. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust 325, 200722,15,9,5,

  7. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust 325,

  8. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust 325,9, 2007 (next

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust 325,9, 2007 (next26,

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust 325,9, 2007

  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust 325,9, 200710, 2007

  12. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust 325,9, 200710,

  13. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust 325,9, 200710,24,

  14. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  16. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust 325,9,14, 2007 (next

  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  18. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust 325,9,14, 20078,

  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust 325,9,14,

  20. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  1. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  2. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  3. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  4. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  5. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  6. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  7. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  8. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  12. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  13. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  14. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13, 20078, 2007 (next

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13, 20078, 2007

  16. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13, 20078, 20071,

  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13, 20078, 20071,8,

  18. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13, 20078,

  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13, 20078,29, 2007

  20. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13, 20078,29,

  1. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13, 20078,29,5 to

  2. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13, 20078,29,5 to12

  3. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13, 20078,29,5

  4. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13, 20078,29,52, 2007

  5. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13, 20078,29,52,

  6. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13, 20078,29,52,16,

  7. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,

  8. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30, to Wednesday,

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30, to

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30, to13, to

  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30, to13, to20, to

  12. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30, to13, to20,

  13. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30, to13, to20,5,

  14. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30, to13,

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30, to13,19, to

  16. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30, to13,19, to26,

  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30, to13,19,

  18. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30, to13,19,9, to

  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30, to13,19,9,

  20. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30, to13,19,9,23,

  1. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,

  2. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5, 2008 Next

  3. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5, 2008 Next2,

  4. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5, 2008

  5. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5, 20085, 2008

  6. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5, 20085,

  7. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5, 20085,9,

  8. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5, 20085,9,6,

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5, 20085,9,6,,

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5,

  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5,7, 2008 Next

  12. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5,7, 2008

  13. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5,7, 20081,

  14. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5,7, 20081,7,

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5,7, 20081,7,4,

  16. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5,7,

  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5,7,8, 2008

  18. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5,7,8, 20084,

  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5,7,8, 20084,1,

  20. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5,7,8,

  1. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5,7,8,5, 2008

  2. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5,7,8,5, 2008,

  3. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5,7,8,5,

  4. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5,7,8,5,6, 2008

  5. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5,7,8,5,6,

  6. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5,7,8,5,6,30,

  7. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next releaseAugust13,30,5,7,8,5,6,30,6,

  8. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next Release: December 4,

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next Release: December

  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next Release: December1,

  12. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next Release: December1,8,

  13. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next Release:

  14. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next Release:15, 2009 Next

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next Release:15, 2009

  16. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next Release:15, 20099,

  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next Release:15, 20099,5,

  18. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next Release:15,

  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next Release:15,9, 2009

  20. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next Release:15,9, 200926,

  1. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next Release:15,9,

  2. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next Release:15,9,2, 2009

  3. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next Release:15,9,2,

  4. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next Release:15,9,2,26,

  5. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next Release:15,9,2,26,,

  6. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next Release:15,9,2,26,,9,

  7. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next

  8. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 2009 Next Release:

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 2009 Next

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 2009 Next7, 2009

  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 2009 Next7, 20094,

  12. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 2009 Next7,

  13. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 2009 Next7,8, 2009

  14. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 2009 Next7,8,

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 2009 Next7,8,1,

  16. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 2009 Next7,8,1,8,

  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 2009 Next7,8,1,8,5,

  18. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 2009

  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099, 2009 Next

  20. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099, 2009 Next6,

  1. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099, 2009

  2. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099, 20090, 2009

  3. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099, 20090,

  4. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099, 20090,3,

  5. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099, 20090,3,0,

  6. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099, 20090,3,0,7,

  7. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099,

  8. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099,0, 2009 at

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099,0, 2009 at7,

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099,0, 2009

  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099,0, 2009, 2009

  12. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099,0, 2009,

  13. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099,0, 2009,5,

  14. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099,0, 2009,5,2,

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099,0,

  16. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099,0,5, 2009 at

  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099,0,5, 2009

  18. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099,0,5, 20099,

  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099,0,5, 20099,3,

  20. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 2008 Next3, 20099,0,5,