National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for nato symbol f-77

  1. Concealed identification symbols and nondestructive determination of the identification symbols

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A.; Gibbs, Kenneth M.

    2014-09-16

    The concealing of one or more identification symbols into a target object and the subsequent determination or reading of such symbols through non-destructive testing is described. The symbols can be concealed in a manner so that they are not visible to the human eye and/or cannot be readily revealed to the human eye without damage or destruction of the target object. The identification symbols can be determined after concealment by e.g., the compilation of multiple X-ray images. As such, the present invention can also provide e.g., a deterrent to theft and the recovery of lost or stolen objects.

  2. Property:StockSymbol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    StockSymbol Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:StockSymbol&oldid173773...

  3. MINING NUCLEAR TRANSIENT DATA THROUGH SYMBOLIC CONVERSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diego MAndelli; Tunc Aldemir; Alper Yilmaz; Curtis Smith

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DPRA) methodologies generate enormous amounts of data for a very large number of simulations. The data contain temporal information of both the state variables of the simulator and the temporal status of specific systems/components. In order to measure system performances, limitations and resilience, such data need to be carefully analyzed with the objective of discovering the correlations between sequence/timing of events and system dynamics. A first approach toward discovering these correlations from data generated by DPRA methodologies has been performed by organizing scenarios into groups using classification or clustering based algorithms. The identification of the correlations between system dynamics and timing/sequencing of events is performed by observing the temporal distribution of these events in each group of scenarios. Instead of performing “a posteriori” analysis of these correlations, this paper shows how it is possible to identify the correlations implicitly by performing a symbolic conversion of both continuous (temporal profiles of simulator state variables) and discrete (status of systems and components) data. Symbolic conversion is performed for each simulation by properly quantizing both continuous and discrete data and then converting them as a series of symbols. After merging both series together, a temporal phrase is obtained. This phrase preserves duration, coincidence and sequence of both continuous and discrete data in a uniform and consistent manner. In this paper it is also shown that by using specific distance measures, it is still possible to post-process such symbolic data using clustering and classification techniques but in considerably less time since the memory needed to store the data is greatly reduced by the symbolic conversion.

  4. The history of NATO TNF policy: The role of studies, analysis and exercises conference proceedings. Volume 2: Papers and presentations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, R.L.

    1994-02-01

    This conference was organized to study and analyze the role of simulation, analysis, modeling, and exercises in the history of NATO policy. The premise was not that the results of past studies will apply to future policy, but rather that understanding what influenced the decision process -- and how -- would be of value. The structure of the conference was built around discussion panels. The panels were augmented by a series of papers and presentations focusing on particular TNF events, issues, studies, or exercises. The conference proceedings consist of three volumes. Volume 1 contains the conference introduction, agenda, biographical sketches of principal participants, and analytical summary of the presentations and panels. This volume contains a short introduction and the papers and presentations from the conference. Volume 3 contains selected papers by Brig. Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.). Individual papers in this volume were abstracted and indexed for the database.

  5. Multithreaded processor architecture for parallel symbolic computation. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, T.

    1987-09-01

    This paper describes the Multilisp Architecture for Symbolic Applications (MASA), which is a multithreaded processor architecture for parallel symbolic computation with various features intended for effective Multilisp program execution. The principal mechanisms exploited for this processor are multiple contexts, interleaved pipeline execution from separate instruction streams, and synchronization based on a bit in each memory cell. The tagged architecture approach is taken for Lisp program execution, and trap conditions are provided for future object manipulation and garbage collection.

  6. NE-20 ACTION: SSDP Project Charter Revision CONCURRENCES RTG SYMBOL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    0 ACTION: SSDP Project Charter Revision CONCURRENCES RTG SYMBOL James W. Vaughan, Jr. N-923 Acting Assistant Secretary . for Nuclear Energy Murphi Attached for your signature is a revised Project Charter for the 1/ 86 Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP). Since our original M determination in July that there was a need to revise the SSDP Charter, we N K23 have been in discussion with the Richland Operations Field Office (RL). INe Significant differences in management philosophy

  7. CONCURRENC RTG. SYMBOL GC-34 Ms. Mary Beth Brado

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    MAY 2 9 1980 CONCURRENC RTG. SYMBOL GC-34 Ms. Mary Beth Brado "*N'W Town of Lewiston * i..,! 1375 Ridge Road ^r'8 Lewiston, New York 14092 RTG.SYuBOL Dear Ms. Brado: .- ,l13. INirIA Lss iQ. W'Mott This is in response to your letter of January 29, 1980, and subsequent ..... ,. telephone discussions with irr. Brazley of my office, concerning land use 5/ /8 restrictions on the 1,511 acres declared surplus in the Towns of Lewiston RGSYMOL. and Porter, New York. In regard to your question of

  8. The history of NATO TNF policy: The role of studies, analysis and exercises conference proceedings. Volume 3: Papers by Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, R.L.

    1994-02-01

    This conference was organized to study and analyze the role of simulation, analysis, modeling, and exercises in the history of NATO policy. The premise was not that the results of past studies will apply to future policy, but rather that understanding what influenced the decision process-and how-would be of value. The structure of the conference was built around discussion panels. The panels were augmented by a series of papers and presentations focusing on particular TNF events, issues, studies, or exercises. The conference proceedings consist of three volumes. Volume 1 contains the conference introduction, agenda, biographical sketches of principal participants, and analytical summary of the presentations and discussion panels. Volume 2 contains a short introduction and the papers and presentations from the conference. This volume contains selected papers by Brig. Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.).

  9. Politics of NATO short-range nuclear modernization 1983-1990: The follow-on-to-Lance missile decisions. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    The follow-on to Lance (FOTL) missile was born in 1983 with a consensual decision by NATO, in the face of a worsening strategic situation, to pursue short-range nuclear force (SNF) modernization. The program continued despite increasing popular and political opposition in Europe. It ended with a May 1990 cancellation decision by the American bureaucracy that reflected converging pressures from the international system, from America's allies, and from the domestic arena. The thesis attempts to answer each question through the use of one of three analytical perspectives: systemic theory, alliance politics, or domestic politics. It concludes that during this time of diminishing threat at the systemic level, domestic-level factors within the German and American milieu became more important. While certain perspectives are better at explaining particular aspects or temporal periods of modernization cases, analysts should not focus on one perspective to the exclusion of others. Unexplained residual variables fall through the filter of each perspective, calling for further study by other approaches.

  10. Semi-classical properties of Berezin–Toeplitz operators with C{sup k}-symbol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barron, Tatyana Pinsonnault, Martin; Ma, Xiaonan; Marinescu, George

    2014-04-15

    We obtain the semi-classical expansion of the kernels and traces of Toeplitz operators with C{sup k}-symbol on a symplectic manifold. We also give a semi-classical estimate of the distance of a Toeplitz operator to the space of self-adjoint and multiplication operators.

  11. Coherent states, 6j symbols and properties of the next to leading order asymptotic expansions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kami?ski, Wojciech; Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline Street North, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5; Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Am Mühlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam ; Steinhaus, Sebastian; Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Am Mühlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam

    2013-12-15

    We present the first complete derivation of the well-known asymptotic expansion of the SU(2) 6j symbol using a coherent state approach, in particular we succeed in computing the determinant of the Hessian matrix. To do so, we smear the coherent states and perform a partial stationary point analysis with respect to the smearing parameters. This allows us to transform the variables from group elements to dihedral angles of a tetrahedron resulting in an effective action, which coincides with the action of first order Regge calculus associated to a tetrahedron. To perform the remaining stationary point analysis, we compute its Hessian matrix and obtain the correct measure factor. Furthermore, we expand the discussion of the asymptotic formula to next to leading order terms, prove some of their properties and derive a recursion relation for the full 6j symbol.

  12. Development of the Symbolic Manipulator Laboratory modeling package for the kinematic design and optimization of the Future Armor Rearm System robot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March-Leuba, S.; Jansen, J.F.; Kress, R.L.; Babcock, S.M. ); Dubey, R.V. . Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    A new program package, Symbolic Manipulator Laboratory (SML), for the automatic generation of both kinematic and static manipulator models in symbolic form is presented. Critical design parameters may be identified and optimized using symbolic models as shown in the sample application presented for the Future Armor Rearm System (FARS) arm. The computer-aided development of the symbolic models yields equations with reduced numerical complexity. Important considerations have been placed on the closed form solutions simplification and on the user friendly operation. The main emphasis of this research is the development of a methodology which is implemented in a computer program capable of generating symbolic kinematic and static forces models of manipulators. The fact that the models are obtained trigonometrically reduced is among the most significant results of this work and the most difficult to implement. Mathematica, a commercial program that allows symbolic manipulation, is used to implement the program package. SML is written such that the user can change any of the subroutines or create new ones easily. To assist the user, an on-line help has been written to make of SML a user friendly package. Some sample applications are presented. The design and optimization of the 5-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) FARS manipulator using SML is discussed. Finally, the kinematic and static models of two different 7-DOF manipulators are calculated symbolically.

  13. Development of the Symbolic Manipulator Laboratory modeling package for the kinematic design and optimization of the Future Armor Rearm System robot. Ammunition Logistics Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March-Leuba, S.; Jansen, J.F.; Kress, R.L.; Babcock, S.M.; Dubey, R.V.

    1992-08-01

    A new program package, Symbolic Manipulator Laboratory (SML), for the automatic generation of both kinematic and static manipulator models in symbolic form is presented. Critical design parameters may be identified and optimized using symbolic models as shown in the sample application presented for the Future Armor Rearm System (FARS) arm. The computer-aided development of the symbolic models yields equations with reduced numerical complexity. Important considerations have been placed on the closed form solutions simplification and on the user friendly operation. The main emphasis of this research is the development of a methodology which is implemented in a computer program capable of generating symbolic kinematic and static forces models of manipulators. The fact that the models are obtained trigonometrically reduced is among the most significant results of this work and the most difficult to implement. Mathematica, a commercial program that allows symbolic manipulation, is used to implement the program package. SML is written such that the user can change any of the subroutines or create new ones easily. To assist the user, an on-line help has been written to make of SML a user friendly package. Some sample applications are presented. The design and optimization of the 5-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) FARS manipulator using SML is discussed. Finally, the kinematic and static models of two different 7-DOF manipulators are calculated symbolically.

  14. (3 + 1)-dimensional cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries equation for nonextensive dust acoustic waves: Symbolic computation and exact solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Shimin; Wang Hongli; Mei Liquan

    2012-06-15

    By combining the effects of bounded cylindrical geometry, azimuthal and axial perturbations, the nonlinear dust acoustic waves (DAWs) in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of negatively charged dust grains, nonextensive ions, and nonextensive electrons are studied in this paper. Using the reductive perturbation method, a (3 + 1)-dimensional variable-coefficient cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation describing the nonlinear propagation of DAWs is derived. Via the homogeneous balance principle, improved F-expansion technique and symbolic computation, the exact traveling and solitary wave solutions of the KdV equation are presented in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions. Moreover, the effects of the plasma parameters on the solitary wave structures are discussed in detail. The obtained results could help in providing a good fit between theoretical analysis and real applications in space physics and future laboratory plasma experiments where long-range interactions are present.

  15. A Symbol of Excellence brochure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Excellence Every Zero Energy Ready Home offers a cost-effective, high performance package of energy savings, comfort, health, and durability unparalleled in today's...

  16. Support of the NATO Effects Task Group by Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    A method is outlined for measuring the transient attenuation of optical fibers and/or cables exposed to a pulse of radiation (gamma rays, x-rays, electrons, protons, neutrons, etc). It can be employed to determine the level of radiation-induced attenuation (in units of dB/km as a function of time) produced in single-mode or multi-mode optical fibers, in either cabled or uncabled form, due to pulsed exposure to radiation. Co{sup 60} radiation-induced attenuation is measured by optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR) techniques and compared to conventional optical throughput measurements. Relative advantages and disadvantages of the OTDR technique are discussed.

  17. Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Stock Symbol Year founded...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Inc Suite Inco Innovation Centre Memorial University of Newfoundland PO Box St John s A1C S7 Marine and Hydrokinetic http http www greyislandenergy com Canada Gulfstream...

  18. Second highest-ranking U.S. military officer gets classified...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fleet; commander NATO Allied Joint Command, Lisbon; and, commander, Striking and Support Forces NATO. He also served as the commander of North American Aerospace Defense Command...

  19. Instabilities and chaos in quantum optics II; Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute, Il Ciocco, Italy, June 28-July 7, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, N.B.; Arecchi, F.T.; Lugiato, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    The following topics are considered: laser and maser instabilities, classical and quantum noise, transverse effects, dynamics in optical bistability and nonlinear optical media, and methods of analysis in nonlinear dynamics. Particular papers are presented on multistability and chaos in a two-photon microscopic maser, quantum chaos in quantum optics, spatial chaos in bistable optical arrays, four-wave mixing and dynamics, and bifurcation problems in nonlinear optics.

  20. 2012_2013_HAB_Calender_Color&Symbols_FINAL.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    = Board Meeting = Committee Meeting Placeholders = COTW Placeholder = Committee Call Placeholders = DOE Alternative Work Schedule Day Off = ODOE Furlough Days = Federal Holiday HAB FY2013 Calendar August 2013 Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 March 2013 Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 December 2012 Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

  1. White House Solar Panels Are a Symbol of Solar's Progress | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    An insider look at the White House rooftop solar panels. | Video courtesy of the White ... Last week, the White House released a new video highlighting the installation of solar ...

  2. Soviet short-range nuclear forces: flexible response or flexible aggression. Student essay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, T.R.

    1987-03-23

    This essay takes a critical look at Soviet short-range nuclear forces in an effort to identify Soviet capabilities to fight a limited nuclear war with NATO. From an analysis of Soviet military art, weapon-system capabilities and tactics, the author concludes that the Soviets have developed a viable limited-nuclear-attack option. Unless NATO reacts to this option, the limited nuclear attack may become favored Soviet option and result in the rapid defeat of NATO.

  3. Energy Emergency Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Preparedness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assistant Secretary ISER William N. Bryan Director Infrastructure Reliability ISER Stewart Cedres DOE Supports 2012 NATO Summit Visit us at: http:energy.govoeservices...

  4. D

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... DOE F 1325.10 v-79) OFFICIAL FILE COPY 1 CONCURRENCES DATE t--- RTG SYMBOL ,.... INITIALSSIG. DATE RTG SYMBOL INITIALSSIG. I DATE ,.... I -- RTG SYMBOL INITIALSSIG. .... ...

  5. Sciences and society

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-01-10

    J.Luns des Pays-Bas, ancien sécétaire général de NATO (OTAN=Organisation du traité de l'Atlantique Nord) parle du passé, présent et future de la défense européenne et des relations est et ouest

  6. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * SAVANNAH RIVER SITE * AIKEN * SC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    symbols (i.e. symbols, bar codes, numbers, letters, etc.) within an object and retrieval of information by X-ray inspection without destructively dismantling or testing...

  7. Sciences and society

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    J.Luns des Pays-Bas, ancien sécétaire général de NATO (OTAN=Organisation du traité de l'Atlantique Nord) parle du passé, présent et future de la défense européenne et des relations est et ouest

  8. Fermilab | About | Organization | Fermilab Organization | Explanation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Symbols Line Organization: sectors, divisions, sections Line Organization Matrix Organization: centers, projects and programs utilizing resources spanning the entire...

  9. UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System CONTACT INFORMATION UPDATE REPORTING IDENTIFICATION SYMBOL (RIS) RIS: Address: Facility Name: CONTACTS Name Email:...

  10. Reduced circuit implementation of encoder and syndrome generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trager, Barry M; Winograd, Shmuel

    2014-05-27

    An error correction method and system includes an Encoder and Syndrome-generator that operate in parallel to reduce the amount of circuitry used to compute check symbols and syndromes for error correcting codes. The system and method computes the contributions to the syndromes and check symbols 1 bit at a time instead of 1 symbol at a time. As a result, the even syndromes can be computed as powers of the odd syndromes. Further, the system assigns symbol addresses so that there are, for an example GF(2.sup.8) which has 72 symbols, three (3) blocks of addresses which differ by a cube root of unity to allow the data symbols to be combined for reducing size and complexity of odd syndrome circuits. Further, the implementation circuit for generating check symbols is derived from syndrome circuit using the inverse of the part of the syndrome matrix for check locations.

  11. Script identification from images using cluster-based templates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hochberg, J.G.; Kelly, P.M.; Thomas, T.R.

    1998-12-01

    A computer-implemented method identifies a script used to create a document. A set of training documents for each script to be identified is scanned into the computer to store a series of exemplary images representing each script. Pixels forming the exemplary images are electronically processed to define a set of textual symbols corresponding to the exemplary images. Each textual symbol is assigned to a cluster of textual symbols that most closely represents the textual symbol. The cluster of textual symbols is processed to form a representative electronic template for each cluster. A document having a script to be identified is scanned into the computer to form one or more document images representing the script to be identified. Pixels forming the document images are electronically processed to define a set of document textual symbols corresponding to the document images. The set of document textual symbols is compared to the electronic templates to identify the script. 17 figs.

  12. Script identification from images using cluster-based templates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Judith G.; Kelly, Patrick M.; Thomas, Timothy R.

    1998-01-01

    A computer-implemented method identifies a script used to create a document. A set of training documents for each script to be identified is scanned into the computer to store a series of exemplary images representing each script. Pixels forming the exemplary images are electronically processed to define a set of textual symbols corresponding to the exemplary images. Each textual symbol is assigned to a cluster of textual symbols that most closely represents the textual symbol. The cluster of textual symbols is processed to form a representative electronic template for each cluster. A document having a script to be identified is scanned into the computer to form one or more document images representing the script to be identified. Pixels forming the document images are electronically processed to define a set of document textual symbols corresponding to the document images. The set of document textual symbols is compared to the electronic templates to identify the script.

  13. (CO/sub 2/ chemistry and biochemistry, Ginosa Marina, Italy, June 17-28, 1989): Foreign trip report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, F.C.

    1989-07-11

    The traveler attended a conference organized by the NATO Advanced Study Institute on plant molecular biology and presented two invited addresses entitled ''Rubisco: Active-site characterization and mechanistic implications.'' Presentations concerning biological CO/sub 2/ fixation, chemical modifications of proteins, site-directed mutagenesis, CO/sub 2/ chemistry, carbonic anhydrase, biotin-requiring enzymes, and the greenhouse effect were relevant to ongoing investigations of the Protein Chemistry Group and the Protein Engineering Program at ORNL's Biology Division.

  14. National Security Science December 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 2014 In this issue Rethinking the Unthinkable Debunking Nuclear Weapons Myths December 2014 Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory In this issue's cover story, "Rethinking the Unthinkable," Houston T. Hawkins, a retired Air Force colonel and a Laboratory senior fellow, points out that since Vladimir Putin returned to power in Russia, relations with the United States and its NATO allies have cooled down like a thermometer in December. The biting off of

  15. Energy Emergency Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Preparedness Quarterly

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 J U L Y 1 5 , 2 0 1 2 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OE Hosts National Energy Assurance Conference Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) Deputy Assistant Secretary ISER William N. Bryan Director Infrastructure Reliability ISER Stewart Cedres DOE Supports 2012 NATO Summit Visit us at: http://energy.gov/oe/services/energy-assurance/emergency-preparedness OE and the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) hosted

  16. Apparatus And Method For Reconstructing Data Using Cross-Parity Stripes On Storage Media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, James Prescott (Lino Lakes, MN)

    2003-06-17

    An apparatus and method for reconstructing missing data using cross-parity stripes on a storage medium is provided. The apparatus and method may operate on data symbols having sizes greater than a data bit. The apparatus and method makes use of a plurality of parity stripes for reconstructing missing data stripes. The parity symbol values in the parity stripes are used as a basis for determining the value of the missing data symbol in a data stripe. A correction matrix is shifted along the data stripes, correcting missing data symbols as it is shifted. The correction is performed from the outside data stripes towards the inner data stripes to thereby use previously reconstructed data symbols to reconstruct other missing data symbols.

  17. Hanford Advisory Board SharePoint Login Instructions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    two of the following: Uppercase letters Lowercase letters Numbers, or Symbols Once you input all of the needed information, create your account: Hanford Advisory...

  18. --No Title--

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    indicate the historical range for the period 1998-2002. The solid line with diamond symbols represents weekly storage volumes. Source: Weekly storage values from March 15, 2002...

  19. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Astatine Astatine Symbol: At Atomic Number: 85 Atomic Weight (Average): 210* Mass (amu) *209.987143 Abundance r

  20. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Cobalt Cobalt Symbol: Co Atomic Number: 27 Atomic Weight (Average): 58.9332 Mass (amu) 58.933198 Abundance 100.00

  1. Helping our members work together to keep the lights on today...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Situation Awareness 8 Relationships Knowledge (How) Patterns Principles SCADA HMI Smart Grids Understanding (Why) Wisdom Connectedness Data (Symbols) Information (W,W,W) ...

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - Watson Salishan 042412 final.ppt [Compatibility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    symbols are completely grounded in the mathematical rules of the game * Human Language - Words by themselves have no meaning - Only grounded in human cognition - Words navigate,...

  3. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Laboratory's overall space footprint. In addition, the Laboratory now uses fewer natural resources, such as fuel, energy, and chemicals, in its operations. Symbolic seventeen...

  4. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gold Symbol: Au Atomic Number: 79 Atomic Weight (Average): 196.9666 Mass (amu) 196.966550 Abundance 100.00000...

  5. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal Reference: Liu, Y., and P. H. Daum, 2002: "Indirect warming effect from dispersion forcing," Nature 419(6872):580-581. Figure 1. Key Green symbols: triangle - FIRE,...

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - pLecture7.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2. Common molecular models for diatomics 3. Improved treatments 4. Quantitative absorption Term symbols characterize key features of electron spin and orbital angular...

  7. Part B - Requirements & Funding Information PART B - Requirements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Non-severable service) - insert Fund citation (line of accounting) - insert ... account symbol) - insert Fund citation (line of accounting) - insert Fiscal ...

  8. Directory Listings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    employees including their telephone number, routing symbol, and location (buildingroom number) A listing of Headquarters staff by organization including their telephone...

  9. (Use of carbon dioxide in inorganic, organic, and bioorganic reactions, Ginosa, Italy, June 17--28, 1989): Foreign trip report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, H.B.

    1989-07-14

    The traveler attended the NATO Advanced Study Institute in Ginosa, Italy, and presented an oral summary of his research entitled ''Subtle Structural Perturbations at the Active Site of Rubisco by Concerted Site-Directed Mutagenesis and Chemical Modification.'' Topics of the Institute included the chemical fixation, electrochemical and chemical reduction of carbon dioxide, and enzymatic reactions of carbon dioxide. Discussion of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, the enzyme that catalyzes by far most of the earth's yearly carbon dioxide fixation, highlighted ongoing investigations of the enzyme within the Protein Engineering Program of ORNL's Biology Division.

  10. Staggered-grid finite-difference acoustic modeling with the Time-Domain Atmospheric Acoustic Propagation Suite (TDAAPS).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldridge, David Franklin; Collier, Sandra L.; Marlin, David H.; Ostashev, Vladimir E.; Symons, Neill Phillip; Wilson, D. Keith

    2005-05-01

    This document is intended to serve as a users guide for the time-domain atmospheric acoustic propagation suite (TDAAPS) program developed as part of the Department of Defense High-Performance Modernization Office (HPCMP) Common High-Performance Computing Scalable Software Initiative (CHSSI). TDAAPS performs staggered-grid finite-difference modeling of the acoustic velocity-pressure system with the incorporation of spatially inhomogeneous winds. Wherever practical the control structure of the codes are written in C++ using an object oriented design. Sections of code where a large number of calculations are required are written in C or F77 in order to enable better compiler optimization of these sections. The TDAAPS program conforms to a UNIX style calling interface. Most of the actions of the codes are controlled by adding flags to the invoking command line. This document presents a large number of examples and provides new users with the necessary background to perform acoustic modeling with TDAAPS.

  11. Communication systems, transceivers, and methods for generating data based on channel characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forman, Michael A; Young, Derek

    2012-09-18

    Examples of methods for generating data based on a communications channel are described. In one such example, a processing unit may generate a first vector representation based in part on at least two characteristics of a communications channel. A constellation having at least two dimensions may be addressed with the first vector representation to identify a first symbol associated with the first vector representation. The constellation represents a plurality of regions, each region associated with a respective symbol. The symbol may be used to generate data, which may stored in an electronic storage medium and used as a cryptographic key or a spreading code or hopping sequence in a modulation technique.

  12. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tellurium Symbol: Te Atomic Number: 52 Atomic Weight (Average): 127.5858 Mass (amu) 119.904021 121.903055 122.904278 123.902825 124.904435 125.903310 127.904464 129.906229...

  13. Passive solar heating analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.; Jones, R.W.; Mc Farland, R.D.; Wray, W.O.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses about the design of solar heating systems. The terms and symbols are clearly defined. Step-by-step procedures are indicated. Worked examples are given with tables, graphs, appendixes.

  14. Speech processing using conditional observable maximum likelihood continuity mapping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hogden, John; Nix, David

    2004-01-13

    A computer implemented method enables the recognition of speech and speech characteristics. Parameters are initialized of first probability density functions that map between the symbols in the vocabulary of one or more sequences of speech codes that represent speech sounds and a continuity map. Parameters are also initialized of second probability density functions that map between the elements in the vocabulary of one or more desired sequences of speech transcription symbols and the continuity map. The parameters of the probability density functions are then trained to maximize the probabilities of the desired sequences of speech-transcription symbols. A new sequence of speech codes is then input to the continuity map having the trained first and second probability function parameters. A smooth path is identified on the continuity map that has the maximum probability for the new sequence of speech codes. The probability of each speech transcription symbol for each input speech code can then be output.

  15. Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by Gary Edmondo (MiniGIS, Inc., Reno, NV)24 modified by the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy to include symbols for geothermal surface features was used to actively...

  16. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chromium Symbol: Cr Atomic Number: 24 Atomic Weight (Average): 51.99592 Mass (amu) 49.946046 51.940510 52.940651 53.938882 Abundance 4.35000 83.79000 9.50000 2.36...

  17. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lead Symbol: Pb Atomic Number: 82 Atomic Weight (Average): 207.2169 Mass (amu) 203.973037 205.974455 206.975885 207.976641 Abundance 1.40000 24.10000 22.10000 52.40000 IBA...

  18. Catch the Wind Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and manufactures wind sensor products and is listed on the Toronto Venture Exchange (TSX-V) under the symbol CTW.S. References: Catch the Wind Ltd1 This article is a stub. You...

  19. What are the Rare Earths? | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cars components. The Elements Scandium Sc symbol Scandium Atomic Weight: 44.955 gmol Density: 2.958 gcm3 Electron Configuration: Ar 3d14s2 Melting Point: 1814 K, 1541 C,...

  20. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1, 2005 (Next Release on May 18, 2005) Yin-Yang The ancient Chinese philosophical symbol yin-yang represents the understanding of the workings of the universe. This image may be...

  1. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mercury Symbol: Hg Atomic Number: 80 Atomic Weight (Average): 200.5884 Mass (amu) 195.965812 197.966760 198.968269 199.968316 200.970293 201.970632 203.973481 Abundance 0.15000...

  2. Mr. John E. Kieling, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Director and Kimberly Davis Lebak, Field Office Manager, Symbol: DIR-15-127, LA-UR: 15-26713 to Ryan Flynn, NMED, dated August 31, 2015; Subject: Self- Disclosure of...

  3. Mr. John E. Kieling, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Director, and Kimberly Davis-Lebak, Field Office Manager, Symbol: DIR-15-127, LA-UR: 15-26713 to Ryan Flynn, NMED, dated August 31, 2015; Subject: "Self-Disclosure of...

  4. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Partnering Research Cesium Symbol: Cs Atomic Number: 55 Atomic Weight (Average): 132.9054 Mass (amu) 132.905433 Abundance 100.0000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy...

  5. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cadmium Symbol: Cd Atomic Number: 48 Atomic Weight (Average): 112.4116 Mass (amu) 105.906461 107.904186 109.903007 110.904182 111.902761 112.904401 113.903361 115.904758 Abundance...

  6. Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Production...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    that there are 3 chances in 1 million that the associated result (for example, a fatal cancer) will occur in the period covered by the analysis. METRIC PREFIXES Prefix Symbol...

  7. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Copper Symbol: Cu Atomic Number: 29 Atomic Weight (Average): 63.54565 Mass (amu) 62.929599 64.927792 Abundance 69.17000 30.83000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion...

  8. C:\\Forms\\DOE F 1450.6.cdr

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    6 (6-83) A. REQUEST PREPARED BY (Name) B. ORGANIZATION (Assistant SecretaryOffice) C. ROUTING SYMBOL D. TELEPHONE NUMBER E. DATE F. COMPLETE SYSTEM MODULE NAME G. APPLICATION...

  9. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Celebration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today, Dr. King is memorialized on the National Mall where he once spoke, a symbol of how far our Nation has come and a testament to the quiet heroes whose names may never appear in history books,...

  10. EnPI V4.0 Algorithm

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Advanced Manufacturing Office EnPI V4.0 Tool Algorithm Updated September 11 th , 2014 2 Contents Definition of Symbols ................................................................................................................................................3 Facility Level Calculations .........................................................................................................................................4 Calculation Methods when Actual Values are used

  11. OSTI Director Walter Warnick named AAAS Fellow | OSTI, US Dept...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Louis. New Fellows will receive a certificate and a blue and gold rosette pin as a symbol of their distinguished accomplishments. Dr. Warnick is the Office of Science's Acting ...

  12. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Strontium Symbol: Sr Atomic Number: 38 Atomic Weight (Average): 87.61664 Mass (amu) 83.913428 85.909273 86.908890 87.905625 Abundance 0.56000 9.86000 7.00000 82.58000 IBA...

  13. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boron Symbol: B Atomic Number: 5 Atomic Weight (Average): 10.81102 Mass (amu) 10.012938 11.009305 Abundance 19.90000 80.10000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: RBS (Rutherford...

  14. AFS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    area. Note that the default machine type is "i386linux24" (this is used to do the translation of the @ symbol) which may not be what you want. There isn't a clean way to change...

  15. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iridium Symbol: Ir Atomic Number: 77 Atomic Weight (Average): 192.2160 Mass (amu) 190.960603 192.962942 Abundance 37.30000 62.70000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion...

  16. b904984c 2003..2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... were formed at the intersection of chamber wells (30-80 mL each), where chambers had the shape of an ''infinity'' symbol, and the bilayer was formed at the waist of the pattern. ...

  17. http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/usc.cgi?ACTION=RETRIEVE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Congressional findings and declaration of policy Congress finds and declares that wild free-roaming horses and burros are living symbols of the historic and pioneer spirit of the...

  18. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Silicon Symbol: Si Atomic Number: 14 Atomic Weight (Average): 28.08549 Mass (amu) 27.976927 28.976495 29.973770 Abundance 92.23000 4.67000 3.10000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: RBS...

  19. parking permit application - front

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    POSITION TITLE MI FIRST NAME LAST NAME HOME ADDRESS (Street, City, State) EMPLOYER DOE ROUTE SYMBOL WORK PHONE EXT SIGNATURE ST CAR NO 1, MAKE TAG NUMBER ST TAG NUMBER CAR NO 2, MAKE YEARS FEDERAL SERVICE POSITION TITLE MI FIRST NAME LAST NAME HOME ADDRESS (Street, City, State) EMPLOYER DOE ROUTE SYMBOL WORK PHONE EXT INSTRUCTIONS: Complete requested information in each applicable blank. For make of car: Use Ford, Chevrolet, Plymouth, Toyota, Volkswagen, etc., Not model name. Return original

  20. ALFPRINT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Routing Phone Routing Name Number Symbol Room/Bldg Name Number Symbol Room/Bldg AABY, Darrell K. ....................................541-548-4015 BPA 7K24/ AAKHUS, Knut C. ..................................720-962-7375 WAPA 2E/251B AASEN, Robert K...................................202-586-9192 EE-5B 6073/LENF950 ABADI, Ehud B. .....................................503-230-4243 BPA 6K20/905 ABBOTT, Kim V. ....................................510-486-7909 SC-BSO 1023/BERKELEY ABBOTT, Paul

  1. Hobart named American Chemical Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hobart named ACS Fellow Hobart named American Chemical Society Fellow The ACS Fellows program began in 2008 to recognize and honor members for outstanding achievements in and contributions to science, the profession, and ACS. August 21, 2013 David Hobart displays Md, the symbol for Mendelevium, the ninth transuranium element of the actinide series, named after Dimitri Mendeleev, who is honored as the "father" of the periodic table. David Hobart displays Md, the symbol for Mendelevium,

  2. C:\Forms\HQ F 1450.2.cdr

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HQ F 1450.2 (7-82) AUTHORIZED BY (Signature) NAME Do not enter Miss, Mrs. or Mr. (Last, first, middle initial) (Include professional or military title) TELEPHONE NUMBER ROOM NUMBER BUILDING CODE A C T I O N ORGANIZATION ROUTING SYMBOL Instructions: This form is to be used for all directory changes, additions or deletions. Information should be submitted without delay. Type or print all information. Do not use dittos. See reverse side of this form for instructions. ORGANIZATIONAL ROUTING SYMBOL

  3. Headquarters Program & Staff Office Mailing Addresses | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Headquarters Program & Staff Office Mailing Addresses Headquarters Program & Staff Office Mailing Addresses The following addresses are for delivery of regular mail and small packages: Delivery to the Headquarters buildings in Washington, DC: Name of Individual Title Routing Symbol/Forrestal Building U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., S.W. Washington, DC 20585 Name of Individual Title Routing Symbol/L'Enfant Plaza Building U.S. Department of Energy 1000

  4. Chief, SF Eaterials

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    c. Yolmge, Jr., Chief, SF Eaterials January i0, 39501 Aooountability B.-oh, (Bk Ridge J. P. Morgan, Assistant Mreotor, Produotion DiViEiOn, New York Operations Office ACCOUNTABILITY AT MARXITB COMPANY SYMBOL: PMsSO ;< \.' It is Stations, the following new station be listed: Station Symbol MXC OrganiEation Addreae &farHts Co. 166 Rhverly Pl Janloe A. Cutlei .Non York 14, N.Y. ; ' :.' :., 1, ,, : ,, . . . . . . .:

  5. U

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    OCTOBER 2004 SPONSORED BY DOE AND NRC PREPARED BY NAC INTERNATIONAL Updating Of Reporting Identification Symbol Information Please review and update, as necessary, your facility's information in the appropriate Report Identification Symbol (RIS) Directory. The RIS Directory for the Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors is the D-2. The RIS Directory for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and NRC licensees is the D-3. In addition, please review and update, as necessary, the

  6. Bootstrapping the Three-Loop Hexagon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, Lance J.; Drummond, James M.; Henn, Johannes M.; /Humboldt U., Berlin /Santa Barbara, KITP

    2011-11-08

    We consider the hexagonal Wilson loop dual to the six-point MHV amplitude in planar N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory. We apply constraints from the operator product expansion in the near-collinear limit to the symbol of the remainder function at three loops. Using these constraints, and assuming a natural ansatz for the symbol's entries, we determine the symbol up to just two undetermined constants. In the multi-Regge limit, both constants drop out from the symbol, enabling us to make a non-trivial confirmation of the BFKL prediction for the leading-log approximation. This result provides a strong consistency check of both our ansatz for the symbol and the duality between Wilson loops and MHV amplitudes. Furthermore, we predict the form of the full three-loop remainder function in the multi-Regge limit, beyond the leading-log approximation, up to a few constants representing terms not detected by the symbol. Our results confirm an all-loop prediction for the real part of the remainder function in multi-Regge 3 {yields} 3 scattering. In the multi-Regge limit, our result for the remainder function can be expressed entirely in terms of classical polylogarithms. For generic six-point kinematics other functions are required.

  7. The CFE Treaty and changed conditions in Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allentuck, J.

    1994-08-01

    The Treaty on Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE) was signed in November 1990 by sixteen nations, members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), and six nations, members of the Warsaw Treaty Organization (WTO). It was resigned to prevent a major surprise attack in Europe by the conventional forces of one Treaty Organization against those of the other and was the first major arms control treaty to address conventional weapons. This paper focuses on how CFE adapted to changes in the military-political situation in Europe which occurred after 1990 and failed to adapt to others. Suggestions are offered on how it might be changed to make it more relevant under these changed conditions.

  8. Error correcting code with chip kill capability and power saving enhancement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Chen, Dong (Croton On Husdon, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Flynn, William T. (Rochester, MN); Marcella, James A. (Rochester, MN); Takken, Todd (Brewster, NY); Trager, Barry M. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Winograd, Shmuel (Scarsdale, NY)

    2011-08-30

    A method and system are disclosed for detecting memory chip failure in a computer memory system. The method comprises the steps of accessing user data from a set of user data chips, and testing the user data for errors using data from a set of system data chips. This testing is done by generating a sequence of check symbols from the user data, grouping the user data into a sequence of data symbols, and computing a specified sequence of syndromes. If all the syndromes are zero, the user data has no errors. If one of the syndromes is non-zero, then a set of discriminator expressions are computed, and used to determine whether a single or double symbol error has occurred. In the preferred embodiment, less than two full system data chips are used for testing and correcting the user data.

  9. Automatic Thread-Level Parallelization in the Chombo AMR Library

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christen, Matthias; Keen, Noel; Ligocki, Terry; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John; Van Straalen, Brian; Williams, Samuel

    2011-05-26

    The increasing on-chip parallelism has some substantial implications for HPC applications. Currently, hybrid programming models (typically MPI+OpenMP) are employed for mapping software to the hardware in order to leverage the hardware?s architectural features. In this paper, we present an approach that automatically introduces thread level parallelism into Chombo, a parallel adaptive mesh refinement framework for finite difference type PDE solvers. In Chombo, core algorithms are specified in the ChomboFortran, a macro language extension to F77 that is part of the Chombo framework. This domain-specific language forms an already used target language for an automatic migration of the large number of existing algorithms into a hybrid MPI+OpenMP implementation. It also provides access to the auto-tuning methodology that enables tuning certain aspects of an algorithm to hardware characteristics. Performance measurements are presented for a few of the most relevant kernels with respect to a specific application benchmark using this technique as well as benchmark results for the entire application. The kernel benchmarks show that, using auto-tuning, up to a factor of 11 in performance was gained with 4 threads with respect to the serial reference implementation.

  10. ARM - Data Announcements Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2013 [Data Announcements] New VAP Yields Aerosol Optical Depth from Irradiance Measurements Bookmark and Share This plot shows spectral AOD versus time of day from the SASHE at the AMF1 Cape Cod site. The plot shows a cloudy morning (gray symbols) followed by cloud-free conditions (colored symbols in a "rainbow" pattern) with aerosol burden evolving over the course of the day. This plot shows spectral AOD versus time of day from the SASHE at the AMF1 Cape Cod site. The plot shows a

  11. Definite Integrals, Some Involving Residue Theory Evaluated by Maple Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, Kimiko o [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The calculus of residue is applied to evaluate certain integrals in the range (-{infinity} to {infinity}) using the Maple symbolic code. These integrals are of the form {integral}{sub -{infinity}}{sup {infinity}} cos(x)/[(x{sup 2} + a{sup 2})(x{sup 2} + b{sup 2}) (x{sup 2} + c{sup 2})]dx and similar extensions. The Maple code is also applied to expressions in maximum likelihood estimator moments when sampling from the negative binomial distribution. In general the Maple code approach to the integrals gives correct answers to specified decimal places, but the symbolic result may be extremely long and complex.

  12. Presentation Title

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4/20/2015 2:07 PM Budget Atomization April 2015 National Nuclear Security Administration 2 4/20/2015 2:07 PM Overview of NNSA Budget Structure As of May 2014: * 4 Treasury Symbols o Weapons Activities (WA), Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (DNN), Naval Reactors (NR), and Federal Salaries and Expenses (FSE) o Federal personnel accounts in FSE, WA, and NR have sub-accounts within 4 symbols o Congressional approval required to move funds between * 166 Congressional Controls o 123 (74%) < $50M o

  13. In com:ectio;l with Letter Contract $10

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    In com:ectio;l with Letter Contract $10. X-44-153 eng-7 dabed 23 Eay .,.,~1945, please be advised that code symbols till be used therein in place of the nar.e or .formAae of tjle Sgecx1 ."c naterials. Tine codes for these symbols al-0 as follow: unit - 2 t,cns .A - Slack uranium oxide (U302). 3 - iiranium dioxide ('202) 0:1 a purity suitable.lor direct use L. in subsequent uranim ,~etal ;roducblon. ,s??ip:~ing containers shaii be,li;nited Eoieiy.to cmpany labels arid labels using said code

  14. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Dysprosium Dysprosium Symbol: Dy Atomic Number: 66 Atomic Weight (Average): 162.4975 Mass (amu) 155.924287 157.924412 159.925203 160.926939 161.926805 162.928737 163.929183 Abundance 0.06000 0.10000 2.34000 18.90000 25.50000 24.90000 28.2

  15. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Erbium Erbium Symbol: Er Atomic Number: 68 Atomic Weight (Average): 167.2557 Mass (amu) 161.928787 163.929211 165.930305 166.932061 167.932383 169.935476 Abundance 0.14000 1.61000 33.60000 22.95000 26.80000 14.9

  16. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Hafnium Hafnium Symbol: Hf Atomic Number: 72 Atomic Weight (Average): 196.9666 Mass (amu) 173.940065 175.941420 176.943233 177.943710 178.945827 179.946561 Abundance 0.16000 5.20000 18.60000 27.10000 13.74000 35.2

  17. Computers and data-transmission equipment. Alpha-numeric codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-02-04

    In this translated Soviet document, a standard is extended to a binary seven-element code (symbols and their code designations), which is intended for the representation of information at the inputs and outputs of the data transmission equipment, electronic computers, and input/output units.

  18. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nickel Symbol: Ni Atomic Number: 28 Atomic Weight (Average): 58.68786 Mass (amu) 57.935347 59.930789 60.931059 61.928346 63.927968 Abundance 68.27000 26.10000 1.13000 3.59000...

  19. DOE-HDBK-1016/2-93

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Fundamentals Handbook, Engineering Symbology, Prints, and Drawings, Volume 2 of 2 Reaffirmed 1999 The handbook includes information on engineering fluid drawings and prints; piping and instrument drawings; major symbols and conventions; electronic diagrams and schematics; logic circuits and diagrams; and fabrication, construction, and architectural drawings.

  20. The New Element Curium (Atomic Number 96)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; James, R. A.; Ghiorso, A.

    1948-00-00

    Two isotopes of the element with atomic number 96 have been produced by the helium-ion bombardment of plutonium. The name curium, symbol Cm, is proposed for element 96. The chemical experiments indicate that the most stable oxidation state of curium is the III state.

  1. Approval of VPP Logo and Flag

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program, patterned after the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Voluntary Protection Programs, is a visible symbol of our commitment to worker health and safety at Departmental facilities. One implementation activity remaining is formal authorization for flags to be awarded to sites in the program and permission to use a related logo.

  2. No Slide Title

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Symbol (RIS Code) x x x x x x Manufacturer data of source (if known) x x x x x x Neutron component (YesNo) x x x x x x Activity Date (the date for which the source strength...

  3. Laserjet Control Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-07-02

    LC is a single program designed to serve as a Laser Jet printer controller. Options include specifying paper size, print orientation, number of lines per inch, top and bottom margins, end-of-line wrap, symbol set, typeface, style (upright or italic), stroke weight, proportional or fixed spaced font, and point size (height of character whose size can be scaled.

  4. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Symbol: Fe Atomic Number: 26 Atomic Weight (Average): 55.84678 Mass (amu) 53.939612 55.934939 56.935396 57.933278 Abundance 5.80000 91.72000 2.20000 0.28000 IBA Techniques to...

  5. Last Out of Office, Electricity and Lighting Checklist

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Last-Out Energy Conservation Check List Office Symbol/ Name: Suite Room Number: Date/ Initials All Lights in Suite are Off? All Printers in Suite are Off? All Scanners in Suite are Off? Coffee Maker in Suite is Off? All Entrances to Suite are Locked?

  6. Acronyms, initialisms, and abbreviations: Fourth Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolman, B.J.

    1994-04-01

    This document lists acronyms used in technical writing. The immense list is supplemented by an appendix containing chemical elements, classified information access, common abbreviations used for functions, conversion factors for selected SI units, a flowcharting template, greek alphabet, metrix terminology, proofreader`s marks, signs and symbols, and state abbreviations.

  7. Interactions between ingredients in IMX-101: Reactive Chemical Processes Control Insensitive Munitions Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maharrey, Sean P.; Wiese-Smith, Deneille; Highley, Aaron M.; Behrens, Richard; Kay, Jeffrey J

    2014-03-01

    Simultaneous Thermogravimetric Modulated Beam Mass Spectrometry (STMBMS) measurements have been conducted on a new Insensitive Munitions (IM) formulation. IMX-101 is the first explosive to be fully IM qualified under new NATO STANAG guidelines for fielded munitions. The formulation uses dinitroanisole (DNAN) as a new melt cast material to replace TNT, and shows excellent IM performance when formulated with other energetic ingredients. The scope of this work is to explain this superior IM performance by investigating the reactive processes occurring in the material when subjected to a well-controlled thermal environment. The dominant reactive processes observed were a series of complex chemical interactions between the three main ingredients (DNAN, NQ, and NTO) that occurs well below the onset of the normal decomposition process of any of the individual ingredients. This process shifts the thermal response of the formulations to a much lower temperature, where the kinetically controlled reaction processes are much slower. This low temperature shift has the effect of allowing the reactions to consume the reactive solids (NQ, NTO) well before the reaction rates increase and reach thermal runaway, resulting in a relatively benign response to the external stimuli. The main findings on the interaction processes are presented.

  8. WebLogo

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-01-08

    WebLogo is a web based application designed to make the generation of sequence logos as easy and painless as possible. Sequesnce logos are a graphical representation of an amino acid or nucleic acid multiple sequence alignment developed by Tom Schneider and Mike Stephens. Each logo consists of stacks of symbols, one stack for each position in the sequence. The overall height of the stack indicates the sequence conservation at that position, while the height ofmore »symbols within the stack indicates the relative frequency of each amino or nucleic acid at that position. In general, a sequence logo provides a richer and more precise description of, for example, a binding site, than would a consensus sequence.« less

  9. Novel methods for ultra-compact ultra-low-power communications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, John Jeffrey; Ormesher, Richard C.; Kammler, Vivian Guzman

    2004-03-01

    This report describes a new algorithm for the joint estimation of carrier phase, symbol timing and data in a Turbo coded phase shift keyed (PSK) digital communications system. Jointly estimating phase, timing and data can give processing gains of several dB over conventional processing, which consists of joint estimation of carrier phase and symbol timing followed by estimation of the Turbo-coded data. The new joint estimator allows delay and phase locked loops (DLL/PLL) to work at lower bit energies where Turbo codes are most useful. Performance results of software simulations and of a field test are given, as are details of a field programmable gate array (FPGA) implementation that is currently in design.

  10. Methods and apparatuses using filter banks for multi-carrier spread-spectrum signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moradi, Hussein; Farhang, Behrouz; Kutsche, Carl A

    2014-05-20

    A transmitter includes a synthesis filter bank to spread a data symbol to a plurality of frequencies by encoding the data symbol on each frequency, apply a common pulse-shaping filter, and apply gains to the frequencies such that a power level of each frequency is less than a noise level of other communication signals within the spectrum. Each frequency is modulated onto a different evenly spaced subcarrier. A demodulator in a receiver converts a radio frequency input to a spread-spectrum signal in a baseband. A matched filter filters the spread-spectrum signal with a common filter having characteristics matched to the synthesis filter bank in the transmitter by filtering each frequency to generate a sequence of narrow pulses. A carrier recovery unit generates control signals responsive to the sequence of narrow pulses suitable for generating a phase-locked loop between the demodulator, the matched filter, and the carrier recovery unit.

  11. Methods and apparatuses using filter banks for multi-carrier spread-spectrum signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moradi, Hussein; Farhang, Behrouz; Kutsche, Carl A

    2014-10-14

    A transmitter includes a synthesis filter bank to spread a data symbol to a plurality of frequencies by encoding the data symbol on each frequency, apply a common pulse-shaping filter, and apply gains to the frequencies such that a power level of each frequency is less than a noise level of other communication signals within the spectrum. Each frequency is modulated onto a different evenly spaced subcarrier. A demodulator in a receiver converts a radio frequency input to a spread-spectrum signal in a baseband. A matched filter filters the spread-spectrum signal with a common filter having characteristics matched to the synthesis filter bank in the transmitter by filtering each frequency to generate a sequence of narrow pulses. A carrier recovery unit generates control signals responsive to the sequence of narrow pulses suitable for generating a phase-locked loop between the demodulator, the matched filter, and the carrier recovery unit.

  12. Computer Algebra System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-05-04

    DOE-MACSYMA (Project MAC''s SYmbolic MAnipulation system) is a large computer programming system written in LISP. With DOE-MACSYMA the user can differentiate, integrate, take limits, solve systems of linear or polynomial equations, factor polynomials, expand functions in Laurent or Taylor series, solve differential equations (using direct or transform methods), compute Poisson series, plot curves, and manipulate matrices and tensors. A language similar to ALGOL-60 permits users to write their own programs for transforming symbolic expressions. Franzmore » Lisp OPUS 38 provides the environment for the Encore, Celerity, and DEC VAX11 UNIX,SUN(OPUS) versions under UNIX and the Alliant version under Concentrix. Kyoto Common Lisp (KCL) provides the environment for the SUN(KCL),Convex, and IBM PC under UNIX and Data General under AOS/VS.« less

  13. Enthalpies of formation of rare earth orthovanadates, REVO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorogova, M.; Navrotsky, A. Boatner, L.A.

    2007-03-15

    Rare earth orthovanadates, REVO{sub 4}, having the zircon structure, form a series of materials interesting for magnetic, optical, sensor, and electronic applications. Enthalpies of formation of REVO{sub 4} compounds (RE=Sc, Y, Ce-Nd, Sm-Tm, Lu) were determined by oxide melt solution calorimetry in lead borate (2PbO.2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) solvent at 1075 K. The enthalpies of formation from oxide components become more negative with increasing RE ionic radius. This trend is similar to that obtained for the rare earth phosphates. - Graphical abstract: Comparison of enthalpies of formation from oxides at 298 K for REVO{sub 4} [this work] and REPO{sub 4} compounds [S.V. Ushakov, K.B. Helean, A. Navrotsky, L.A. Boatner, J. Mater. Res. 16(9) (2001) 2623] vs. RE{sup 3+} ionic radius. Filled symbols indicate scheelite structure, open symbols zircon structure.

  14. The one-loop six-dimensional hexagon integral with three massive corners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Duca, Vittorio; Dixon, Lance J.; Drummond, James M.; Duhr, Claude; Henn, Johannes M.; Smirnov, Vladimir A.; /Moscow State U.

    2011-11-04

    We compute the six-dimensional hexagon integral with three non-adjacent external masses analytically. After a simple rescaling, it is given by a function of six dual conformally invariant cross-ratios. The result can be expressed as a sum of 24 terms involving only one basic function, which is a simple linear combination of logarithms, dilogarithms, and trilogarithms of uniform degree three transcendentality. Our method uses differential equations to determine the symbol of the function, and an algorithm to reconstruct the latter from its symbol. It is known that six-dimensional hexagon integrals are closely related to scattering amplitudes in N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory, and we therefore expect our result to be helpful for understanding the structure of scattering amplitudes in this theory, in particular at two loops.

  15. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Barium Home About Us Departments Radiation, Nano Materials, & Interface Sciences > Radiation & Solid Interactions > Nanomaterials Sciences > Surface & Interface Sciences Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Energy Sciences Small Science Cluster Business Office News Partnering Research Barium Symbol: Ba Atomic Number: 56 Atomic Weight (Average): 137.3269 Mass (amu) 129.906277 131.905042 133.904490 134.905668 135.904556 136.905816 137.905236 Abundance 0.10600

  16. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Iodine Home About Us Departments Radiation, Nano Materials, & Interface Sciences > Radiation & Solid Interactions > Nanomaterials Sciences > Surface & Interface Sciences Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Energy Sciences Small Science Cluster Business Office News Partnering Research Iodine Symbol: I Atomic Number: 53 Atomic Weight (Average): 126.9045 Mass (amu) 126.904477 Abundance 100.0000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering)

  17. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Lanthanum Home About Us Departments Radiation, Nano Materials, & Interface Sciences > Radiation & Solid Interactions > Nanomaterials Sciences > Surface & Interface Sciences Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Energy Sciences Small Science Cluster Business Office News Partnering Research Lanthanum Symbol: La Atomic Number: 57 Atomic Weight (Average): 138.9054 Mass (amu) 137.907114 138.906355 Abundance 0.09000 99.91000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy

  18. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Xenon Home About Us Departments Radiation, Nano Materials, & Interface Sciences > Radiation & Solid Interactions > Nanomaterials Sciences > Surface & Interface Sciences Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Energy Sciences Small Science Cluster Business Office News Partnering Research Xenon Symbol: Xe Atomic Number: 54 Atomic Weight (Average): 131.2931 Mass (amu) 123.906120 125.905624 127.903531 128.904780 129.903510 130.905076 131.904148 133.905395

  19. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act General Guidelines for Emblem and Logo Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    // American Recovery and Reinvestment Act // General Guidelines for Emblem and Logo Applications Page 1 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act General Guidelines for Emblem and Logo Applications Version 1.0 03 / 20 / 09 Projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) will bear a newly-designed emblem. The emblem is a symbol of President Obama's commitment to the American People to invest their tax dollars wisely to put Americans back to work. The purpose of this document is

  20. An Equal Opportunity Employer / Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Equal Opportunity Employer / Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA Associate Directorate for Business Innovation To/MS: Master Management From/MS: Carolyn Zerkle, ADBI, B254 Phone/Fax: 6-0636/Fax 6-0532 Symbol: ADBI-14-012 Date: October 27, 2014 SUBJECT: SUPPORT FOR SUBCONTRACTING OPPORTUNITIES WITH SMALL BUSINESSES Los Alamos National Laboratory has maintained a strong institutional commitment to small business subcontracting over the years

  1. Sundance2.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-06-09

    Sundance is a system of software components that allows construction of an entire parallel simulator and its derivatives using a high-level symbolic language. With this high-level problem description, it is possible to spacify a weak formulation of a PDE and its discretization method in a small amount of user-level code; furthermore, because derivatives are easily available, a simulation in Sundance is immediately suitable for accelerated PDE-constrained optimization algorithms.

  2. DOE F 1340-3

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (10-96) All Other Editions Are Obsolete OMB Control No. 1910-1500 OMB Burden Disclosure Statement on Back of Page 1 1. Title of Publication 4. Brief Description of Purpose and Contents 5. Originating Office (Address, Room, Building,and Routing Symbol) 17. Estimated Printing Costs (Supplied by GPO Liaison Office) 2. Document No. (Supplied After Approval) 3. Date of This Request 6. Person to Contact 7. Telephone Number (Include Area Code) 15. Reviews Required and Obtained by Submitting Office

  3. Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facts: Uranium Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Nuclear Fuel Facts: Uranium Uranium is a silvery-white metallic chemical element in the periodic table, with atomic number 92. It is assigned the chemical symbol U. A uranium atom has 92 protons and 92 electrons, of which 6 are valence electrons. Uranium has the highest atomic weight (19 kg m) of all naturally occurring elements. Uranium occurs naturally in low concentrations in soil, rock and water, and is commercially extracted from uranium-bearing

  4. U.S. - Pakistan Joint Press Statement | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Pakistan Joint Press Statement U.S. - Pakistan Joint Press Statement March 13, 2006 - 11:50am Addthis ISLAMABAD, PAKISTAN - As agreed during President Bush's visit to Pakistan on 3-4 March 2006, U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman visited Islamabad today to discuss a wide range of issues related to Pakistan's growing energy needs. Secretary Bodman's visit symbolizes the strengthened and expanded relationship between the United States and Pakistan over the last five years. Closer

  5. Fermilab | Inquiring Minds | Neutrino | Discovery | Particles and Forces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics at Fermilab main page | accelerators | collider experiments | neutrino physics | technology computing | theory | astrophysics | discoveries at Fermilab Discoveries at Fermilab - The Tau Neutrino Neutrino Symbol An international collaboration of scientists at the Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory announced on July 21, 2000 the first direct evidence for the subatomic particle called the tau neutrino, the third kind of neutrino known to particle physicists. They

  6. Mathematica

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mathematica Mathematica Description and Overview Mathematica is a fully integrated environment for technical computing. It performs symbolic manipulation of equations, integrals, differential equations, and most other mathematical expressions. Numeric results can be evaluated as well. How to Use Mathematica Running in the Notebook Interface To use the graphical interface to Mathematica, you will need to connect to a NERSC machine with X11. % ssh -X edison.nersc.gov We highly recommend the use of

  7. Mathematical Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Math Mathematical Applications Mathematica Mathematica is a fully integrated environment for technical computing. It performs symbolic manipulation of equations, integrals, differential equations and almost any mathematical expression. Read More » Matlab MATLAB is a high-performance language for technical computing. It integrates computation, visualization, and programming in an easy-to-use environment where problems and solutions are expressed in familiar mathematical notation. Read More »

  8. Mexico's petroleum and US policy: implications for the 1980s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronfeldt, D.; Nehring, R.; Gandara, A.

    1980-06-01

    This report examines selected factor affecting Mexico's future petroleum policies, and then assesses various implications of Mexico's petroleum for US interests and policies. After a brief introduction, the report is divided into three sections. The first offers a detailed analysis of Mexico's petroleum resources and production possibilities. The second considers petroleum as a symbolic issue of profound significance for Mexican nationalism. The final section provides an assessment of these and other factors for US interests, objectives, and policy options during the 1980s.

  9. Creative Disruption, Connections Lead Innovation | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Creative Disruption and Connections Drive Innovation Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Creative Disruption and Connections Drive Innovation Joseph Salvo 2016.02.22 Technology and abstraction with symbolic reasoning have defined the human species from the beginning of historical times to present: language,

  10. Bisfuel Logo | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bisfuel Logo BISfuel is abbreviation of Bio-Inspired Solar Fuels BIS is a prefix or suffix designating the second instance of a thing, which symbolizes bio-inspired solar fuels as an artificial instance of natural photosynthetic catalysts Prefix BIS is used in nomenclature of compounds with two complex ligands coordinating around a central atom which is in line with synthetic nature of the solar fuel catalysts

  11. WIPP Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large file size alert This symbol means the document may be a large file size. Environmental Monitoring Documents about environmental monitoring at WIPP, including annual site environmental reports Environmental Protection Agency Certification Documents about WIPP's EPA certification Federal Regulations Standards and compliance criteria for WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Documents related to the state of New Mexico's oversight of WIPP under the authority of the Resource Conservation and

  12. UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    '.... '|le , * f C. Office Memorandum * UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT .-- J TO ' Leo Graup, Chief, DATE: September 29, 1958 Property Management Branch rFi0 : M. S. Weinstein Industrial Hygiene Branch, HASL SUBJBT: SURVEY AT HAIST PROPETIY SYMBOL: HSH:MSW. Thisl property was purchased during MED operation and used as a dumping ground for refinery residues generated by Linde Air Products during their period of participation in the refinery operations program. \It 2 consists of 10 acres in addition to a

  13. INSIDEFRNTCVR.indd

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ON THE COVER: The cover re ects this document's focus on ASC Program sta . The pyramid of pictures symbolically captures the main idea in one of the sta size estimation methods described herein, namely, that the program's technical sta in key areas is composed of a hierarchy of skill and experience levels. New sta , who may be experts in one speci c area, evolve though experience and mentoring to develop broader expertise over time, culminating in a few seasoned experts with knowledge and

  14. Small, Fast S-Expression Library, Version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-12-02

    This software is a library for C and C++ programmers to use for fast and efficient parsing and processing of symbolic expressions, or s-expressions. An s-expression is a text-representation of a tree data structure, and is the basis for the syntax of the LISP and Scheme programming languages. Multiple similar libraries exist, but this one was designed from the ground up for speed, efficiency, and simplicity.

  15. Solid-State Lighting Patents Resulting from DOE-Funded Projects

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    6, 109 solid-state lighting (SSL) patents have been awarded to research projects funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Since December 2000, when DOE began funding SSL research projects, a total of 261 patent applications have been submitted, ranging from large businesses (83) and small businesses (97) to universities (69) and national laboratories (12). DOE tracks three types of patent applications. A brief overview and the symbol used to identify each application type follows: NP U.S.

  16. C:\Forms\HQ F 1410.8.cdr

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Notification of Incoming Mail Receipt for Incoming Personal Mail Sender Name: Date Processed: Processed by: (Signature and Date of Person Picking up Mail) Employee Name: Routing Symbol: Room Number: Date Received: HQ F 1410.8 (8-84) HQ F 1410.8 (8-84) Date Contacted: MESSAGE To Sender: Mail must be picked up by: or item will be returned to sender. Part 1 Part 2

  17. General Guidelines for Emblem and Logo Applications | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    General Guidelines for Emblem and Logo Applications General Guidelines for Emblem and Logo Applications Projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) will bear a newly-designed emblem. The emblem is a symbol of President Obama's commitment to the American People to invest their tax dollars wisely to put Americans back to work. The purpose of this document is to provide general guidelines and specifications for using the ARRA emblem and corresponding logomark. PDF icon

  18. DOE F 2240.7

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    j U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1992--329-102/60733 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE F 2240.7 (8-88) T R A N S F E R V O U C H E R Voucher No. To: DOE Office _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Appropriation Symbol: 1 Reference: Date of Issuance: From: DOE Office: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ DESCRIPTION OF TRANSACTIONS Fund Type Code Amount "-" indicates credits Prepared by

  19. a J. C. Clarke, Contract FEOM 8 J. P. Morgan, Assist tor, Pznduction Division

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    J. C. Clarke, Contract FEOM 8 J. P. Morgan, Assist tor, Pznduction Division SUBJECT: CONTRACT PROPCX3AL OF r) ELECTRO MXTALLURGICAL DIVISION SYMBOL: PADtJPM UNION CARBIDE & CAFLBON CORPORATION i' .:' CONTRACT NO. W-7405 EN&14 4. . A; BACKGROUND 18 The vacuum casting facilities at the Electra ~etallnrgical Division at Niagara Falls, New York, currently in standby, are needed for the vacuum casting of slrconium sponge to ingot for subsequent con- version to zirconium shapes for the Naval

  20. Mr. Ken Blower, Manager Corporate Environmental Affairs Standard Oil Company of Ohio

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ad. 3 0 II, 0 s 3 = & Mr. Ken Blower, Manager Corporate Environmental Affairs Standard Oil Company of Ohio Midland Building Cleveland, Ohio 44115 qITIALS/SIG Jhitman )ATE 1/ /86 ITG SYMBOL NE-23 Dear Mr. Blower: The Department of Energy (DOE), as part of its Fomerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), has reviewed information on the former DuPont Grasselli Research Laboratory (now Standard Oil Company of Ohio) to determine whether it contains residual radioactivity traceable to

  1. U

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 SPONSORED BY DOE AND NRC PREPARED BY NAC INTERNATIONAL Updated RIS Directories Recently the NMMSS NRC, DOE and International Reporting Identification Symbol Directories were updated and dispatched on CD's to persons on the distribution list. The directories, D-2, D-3 and D-15 are issued at least annually. The D-2 is the DOE facilities directory and the D-3 is the NRC licensee facilities directory. The D-15 is the International facilities directory. The next issue is scheduled for the

  2. UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    UNCLASSIFIED Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System CONTACT INFORMATION UPDATE REPORTING IDENTIFICATION SYMBOL (RIS) RIS: Address: Facility Name: CONTACTS Name Email: Phone/Fax Name Email: Phone/Fax Name Email: Phone/Fax Name Email: Phone/Fax Return Via Mail To: U.S Department Of Energy ATTN: NMMSS Staff NA-73, GTN 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-1290 Return Via Fax To: 301-903-1998 Return Via E-Mail To: NMMSS@nnsa.doe.gov

  3. Modeling The Shock Initiation of PBX-9501 in ALE3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leininger, L; Springer, H K; Mace, J; Mas, E

    2008-07-01

    The SMIS (Specific Munitions Impact Scenario) experimental series performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has determined the 3-dimensional shock initiation behavior of the HMX-based heterogeneous high explosive, PBX 9501. A series of finite element impact calculations have been performed in the ALE3D [1] hydrodynamic code and compared to the SMIS results to validate the code predictions. The SMIS tests use a powder gun to shoot scaled NATO standard fragments at a cylinder of PBX 9501, which has a PMMA case and a steel impact cover. The SMIS real-world shot scenario creates a unique test-bed because many of the fragments arrive at the impact plate off-center and at an angle of impact. The goal of this model validation experiments is to demonstrate the predictive capability of the Tarver-Lee Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model [2] in this fully 3-dimensional regime of Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT). The 3-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian hydrodynamic model in ALE3D applies the Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model with PBX 9501 parameters derived from historical 1-dimensional experimental data. The model includes the off-center and angle of impact variations seen in the experiments. Qualitatively, the ALE3D I&G calculations accurately reproduce the 'Go/No-Go' threshold of the Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT) reaction in the explosive, as well as the case expansion recorded by a high-speed optical camera. Quantitatively, the calculations show good agreement with the shock time of arrival at internal and external diagnostic pins. This exercise demonstrates the utility of the Ignition and Growth model applied in a predictive fashion for the response of heterogeneous high explosives in the SDT regime.

  4. Modeling Three-Dimensional Shock Initiation of PBX 9501 in ALE3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leininger, L; Springer, H K; Mace, J; Mas, E

    2008-07-08

    A recent SMIS (Specific Munitions Impact Scenario) experimental series performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has provided 3-dimensional shock initiation behavior of the HMX-based heterogeneous high explosive, PBX 9501. A series of finite element impact calculations have been performed in the ALE3D [1] hydrodynamic code and compared to the SMIS results to validate and study code predictions. These SMIS tests used a powder gun to shoot scaled NATO standard fragments into a cylinder of PBX 9501, which has a PMMA case and a steel impact cover. This SMIS real-world shot scenario creates a unique test-bed because (1) SMIS tests facilitate the investigation of 3D Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT) within the context of a considerable suite of diagnostics, and (2) many of the fragments arrive at the impact plate off-center and at an angle of impact. A particular goal of these model validation experiments is to demonstrate the predictive capability of the ALE3D implementation of the Tarver-Lee Ignition and Growth reactive flow model [2] within a fully 3-dimensional regime of SDT. The 3-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamic model in ALE3D applies the Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model with PBX 9501 parameters derived from historical 1-dimensional experimental data. The model includes the off-center and angle of impact variations seen in the experiments. Qualitatively, the ALE3D I&G calculations reproduce observed 'Go/No-Go' 3D Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT) reaction in the explosive, as well as the case expansion recorded by a high-speed optical camera. Quantitatively, the calculations show good agreement with the shock time of arrival at internal and external diagnostic pins. This exercise demonstrates the utility of the Ignition and Growth model applied for the response of heterogeneous high explosives in the SDT regime.

  5. Fuel cell stack monitoring and system control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2004-02-17

    A control method for monitoring a fuel cell stack in a fuel cell system in which the actual voltage and actual current from the fuel cell stack are monitored. A preestablished relationship between voltage and current over the operating range of the fuel cell is established. A variance value between the actual measured voltage and the expected voltage magnitude for a given actual measured current is calculated and compared with a predetermined allowable variance. An output is generated if the calculated variance value exceeds the predetermined variance. The predetermined voltage-current for the fuel cell is symbolized as a polarization curve at given operating conditions of the fuel cell.

  6. A History of Building 828, Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullrich, Rebecca

    1999-08-01

    This report documents the history of Building 828 in Sandia National Laboratories' Technical Area I. Building 828 was constructed in 1946 as a mechanical test laboratory for Los Alamos' Z-Division (later Sandia) as it moved to Sandia Base. The building has undergone significant remodeling over the years and has had a variety of occupants. The building was evaluated in compliance with the National Historic Preservation Act, but was not eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. Nevertheless, for many Labs employees, it was a symbol of Sandia's roots in World War II and the Manhattan Project.

  7. A

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    t the November 20, 2013 meeting at Ohkay Conference Center, a newly designed logo was unveiled, the new logo was designed by Na- tive American Artist Paul Torres. Mr. Torres is an intern for the Environmen- tal Projects Office in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The artist provided the expla- nation of the symbolism represented in the new logo. The 2013 logo repre- sents environmental stabil- ity. The corn stalk repre- sents agriculture and throughout history is one of the main food sources in Northern

  8. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Aluminum Aluminum Symbol: Al Atomic Number: 13 Atomic Weight (Average): 26.9815 Mass (amu) 26.981539 Abundance 100.00000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: NRA (NuNuclear Reaction Analysis) Sensitivity >1.E-5 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+1 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-3 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution (FWHM atomic number): 1 PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray

  9. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Argon Argon Symbol: Ar Atomic Number: 18 Atomic Weight (Average): 39.94768 Mass (amu) 35.967546 37.962732 39.962383 Abundance 0.33700 0.06300 99.60000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-3 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution (FWHM atomic number): 1 PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) Sensitivity >1.E-4 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+4 nm Depth Resolution <1

  10. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Bismuth Bismuth Symbol: Bi Atomic Number: 83 Atomic Weight (Average): 208.9804 Mass (amu) 208.980388 Abundance 100.0000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-8 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-5 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution (FWHM atomic number): 5 PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) Sensitivity >1.E

  11. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Calcium Calcium Symbol: Ca Atomic Number: 40 Atomic Weight (Average): 40.07803 Mass (amu) 39.962591 41.958618 42.958767 43.955481 45.953690 47.952534 Abundance 96.4100 0.64700 0.13500 2.08600 0.00400 0.18700 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-6 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-4 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution (FWHM

  12. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Carbon Carbon Symbol: C Atomic Number: 6 Atomic Weight (Average): 12.01104 Mass (amu) 12.000000 13.003355 Abundance 98.90000 1.10000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-4 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution (FWHM atomic number): 1 NRA (Nuclear Reaction Analysis) Sensitivity >1.E-3 atomic fraction Depth Resolution <1.E+4 nm Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm ERD (Elastic Recoil

  13. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Cerium Cerium Symbol: Ce Atomic Number: 58 Atomic Weight (Average): 140.1148 Mass (amu) 135.907140 137.905996 139.905442 141.909249 Abundance 0.19000 0.25000 88.48000 11.08000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-8 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-5 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution (FWHM atomic number): 4

  14. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Chlorine Chlorine Symbol: Cl Atomic Number: 17 Atomic Weight (Average): 35.45277 Mass (amu) 34.968853 36.965903 Abundance 75.77000 24.23000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-3 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution (FWHM atomic number): 1 PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) Sensitivity >1.E-4 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+4 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+4 nm Unique to

  15. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Fluorine Fluorine Symbol: F Atomic Number: 9 Atomic Weight (Average): 18.9984 Mass (amu) 18.998403 Abundance 100.00000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-2 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution (FWHM atomic number): 1 NRA (Nuclear Reaction Analysis) Sensitivity >1.E-6 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+4 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+3 nm Unique to Element Web Site Links:

  16. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Gadolinium Gadolinium Symbol: Gd Atomic Number: 64 Atomic Weight (Average): 157.2521 Mass (amu) 151.919803 153.920876 154.922629 155.922130 156.923967 157.924111 159.927061 Abundance 0.20000 2.18000 14.80000 20.17000 15.65000 24.84000 21.86000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-8 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-5 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth

  17. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Germanium Germanium Symbol: Ge Atomic Number: 32 Atomic Weight (Average): 72.63228 Mass (amu) 69.924250 71.922080 72.923464 73.921179 75.921403 Abundance 20.50000 27.40000 7.80000 36.50000 7.80000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-7 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-4 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution (FWHM atomic

  18. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Krypton Krypton Symbol: Kr Atomic Number: 36 Atomic Weight (Average): 83.8002 Mass (amu) 77.920397 79.916375 81.913483 82.914134 83.911506 85.910614 Abundance 0.35000 2.25000 11.60000 11.50000 57.00000 17.30000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-7 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-4 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution

  19. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Lithium Lithium Symbol: Li Atomic Number: 3 Atomic Weight (Average): 6.940933 Mass (amu) 6.015123 7.01605 Abundance 7.50000 92.5000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-3 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution (FWHM atomic number): 1 NRA (Nuclear Reaction Analysis) Sensitivity >1.E-5 atomic fraction Depth Resolution <1.E+4 nm Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm ERD (Elastic Recoil

  20. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Magnesium Magnesium Symbol: Mg Atomic Number: 12 Atomic Weight (Average): 24.30502 Mass (amu) 23.985042 24.985838 25.982594 Abundance 78.99000 10.00000 11.01000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-3 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution (FWHM atomic number): 1 PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) Sensitivity >1.E-3 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution

  1. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Molybdenum Molybdenum Symbol: Mo Atomic Number: 42 Atomic Weight (Average): 95.91329 Mass (amu) 91.906809 93.905086 94.905838 95.904676 96.906018 97.905405 99.907473 Abundance 14.84000 9.25000 15.92000 16.68000 9.55000 24.13000 9.63000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-7 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-4 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution

  2. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Neodymium Neodymium Symbol: Nd Atomic Number: 60 Atomic Weight (Average): 144.2423 Mass (amu) 141.907731 142.909823 143.910096 144.912582 145.913126 147.916901 149.920900 Abundance 27.13000 12.18000 23.80000 8.30000 17.19000 5.76000 5.64000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-8 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-5 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution

  3. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Neon Neon Symbol: Ne Atomic Number: 10 Atomic Weight (Average): 20.17941 Mass (amu) 19.992439 20.993845 21.991384 Abundance 90.51000 0.27000 9.22000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-2 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution (FWHM atomic number): 1 NRA (Nuclear Reaction Analysis) Sensitivity >1.E-3 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Unique to

  4. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Nitrogen Nitrogen Symbol: N Atomic Number: 7 Atomic Weight (Average): 14.00679 Mass (amu) 14.003074 15.000109 Abundance 99.63000 0.37000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-4 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution (FWHM atomic number): 1 NRA (Nuclear Reaction Analysis) Sensitivity >1.E-4 atomic fraction Depth Resolution <1.E+3 nm Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm ERD (Elastic Recoil

  5. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Osmium Osmium Symbol: Os Atomic Number: 76 Atomic Weight (Average): 190.2398 Mass (amu) 183.952514 185.953852 186.955762 187.955850 188.958156 189.958455 191.961487 Abundance 0.02000 1.58000 1.60000 13.30000 16.10000 26.40000 41.00000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-8 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-5 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution

  6. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Palladium Palladium Symbol: Pd Atomic Number: 46 Atomic Weight (Average): 106.4153 Mass (amu) 101.905609 103.904026 104.905075 105.903475 107.903894 109.905168 Abundance 1.02000 11.14000 22.33000 27.33000 26.46000 11.72000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-7 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-4 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass

  7. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Phosphorus Phosphorus Symbol: P Atomic Number: 15 Atomic Weight (Average): 30.9738 Mass (amu) 30.973762 Abundance 100.00000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: NRA (Nuclear Reaction Analysis) Sensitivity >1.E-4 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-3 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution (FWHM atomic number): 1 PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray

  8. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Platinum Platinum Symbol: Pt Atomic Number: 78 Atomic Weight (Average): 195.0802 Mass (amu) 189.959937 191.961049 193.962679 194.964785 195.964947 197.967897 Abundance 0.01000 0.79000 32.90000 33.80000 25.30000 7.20000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-8 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-5 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass

  9. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Ruthenium Ruthenium Symbol: Ru Atomic Number: 44 Atomic Weight (Average): 101.0189 Mass (amu) 95.907596 97.905287 98.905937 99.904218 100.905581 101.904348 103.905422 Abundance 9.52000 1.88000 12.70000 12.60000 17.00000 31.60000 18.70000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-7 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-4 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution

  10. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Samarium Samarium Symbol: Sm Atomic Number: 62 Atomic Weight (Average): 150.3602 Mass (amu) 143.9102009 146.914907 147.914832 148.917193 149.917285 151.919741 153.922218 Abundance 3.10000 15.00000 11.30000 13.80000 7.40000 26.70000 22.70000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-8 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-5 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution

  11. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Selenium Selenium Symbol: Se Atomic Number: 34 Atomic Weight (Average): 78.99326 Mass (amu) 73.922477 75.919207 76.919908 77.917304 79.916521 81.916709 Abundance 0.90000 9.00000 7.60000 23.50000 49.60000 9.40000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-7 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-4 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution

  12. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Sodium Sodium Symbol: Na Atomic Number: 11 Atomic Weight (Average): 22.9898 Mass (amu) 22.989768 Abundance 100.00 IBA Techniques to Analyze: RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-3 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution (FWHM atomic number): 1 NRA (Nuclear Reaction Analysis) Sensitivity >1.E-6 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Unique to Element Web Site Links:

  13. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Sulfur Sulfur Symbol: S Atomic Number: 16 Atomic Weight (Average): 32.06442 Mass (amu) 31.972071 32.971459 33.967867 35.967081 Abundance 95.02000 0.75000 4.21000 0.02000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-3 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution (FWHM atomic number): 1 PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) Sensitivity >1.E-4 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+4 nm Depth

  14. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Titanium Titanium Symbol: Ti Atomic Number: 22 Atomic Weight (Average): 47.87839 Mass (amu) 45.952633 46.951765 47.947947 48.947871 49.944786 Abundance 8.00000 7.30000 73.8000 5.50000 5.40000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-6 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-4 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution (FWHM atomic number):

  15. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Tungsten Tungsten Symbol: W Atomic Number: 74 Atomic Weight (Average): 183.8489 Mass (amu) 179.946727 181.948225 182.950245 183.950953 185.954377 Abundance 0.13000 26.30000 14.30000 30.67000 28.60000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-8 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-5 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution (FWHM atomic

  16. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Ytterbium Ytterbium Symbol: Yb Atomic Number: 70 Atomic Weight (Average): 173.0342 Mass (amu) 167.933908 169.934774 170.936338 171.936393 172.939639 173.938873 175.942576 Abundance 0.13000 3.05000 14.30000 21.90000 16.12000 31.80000 12.70000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-8 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-5 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution

  17. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Zinc Zinc Symbol: Zn Atomic Number: 30 Atomic Weight (Average): 65.39632 Mass (amu) 63.929145 65.926035 66.927129 67.924846 69.925325 Abundance 48.60000 27.90000 4.10000 18.80000 0.60000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-7 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-4 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution (FWHM atomic number): 2

  18. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Zirconium Zirconium Symbol: Zr Atomic Number: 40 Atomic Weight (Average): 91.22135 Mass (amu) 89.904708 90.905644 91.905039 93.906319 95.908272 Abundance 51.45000 11.27000 17.17000 17.33000 2.78000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-7 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-4 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+3 nm Depth Resolution <1.E+2 nm Mass Resolution (FWHM atomic

  19. Section 43

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    i ' A i (R i&1 ) % v i < i (z,t) ' j 6 k Z k (z) @ 8 k 1 % 8 k 2 @ sin 2Bi)t 24 % 8 k 3 @ cos 2Bi)t 24 . Session Papers 189 (1) (2) Single Column Variational Assimilation Experiments with Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data J.-F. Louis and M. Ă°ivkoviĆ’ Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts In this paper we present results of variational data assimilation One can symbolically write the modified forecast model equa- experiments using Atmospheric Radiation

  20. The Epicure Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dambik, E.; Kline, D.; West, R.

    1993-09-01

    The Epicure Control System supports the Fermilab fixed target physics program. The system is distributed across a network of many different types of components. The use of multiple layers on interfaces for communication between logical tasks fits the client-server model. Physical devices are read and controlled using symbolic references entered into a database with an editor utility. The database system consists of a central portion containing all device information and optimized portions distributed among many nodes. Updates to the database are available throughout the system within minutes after being requested.

  1. 70 Years of Evolution: Special Anniversary Issue | Y-12 National Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex 70 Years of Evolution: ... 70 Years of Evolution: Special Anniversary Issue Posted: February 7, 2013 - 6:01pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 2 | 2013 Y-12 has been a symbol of national strength and global security for 70 years. Though missions have evolved and facilities have been transformed, the site's purpose remains clear: make the world safer. In war and peace, Y-12 has responded to the nation's needs. During the decades-long Cold War, the site ramped up weapons production to

  2. Pit 9 Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 11, 2007 Pit 9 Project Structures Removed For many years, the Pit 9 project at the Department of Energy's Idaho Site was the symbol of frustration for its cleanup program. All of that is coming to a close now, however, as North Wind, Inc. and its subcontractors are successfully tearing down and removing the structures and equipment left over by the original subcontractor for the Pit 9 project. The goal of this dismantlement and disposal project is to remove buildings and equipment to allow

  3. Synthesis and characterization of d{sup 10} metal complexes with mixed 1,3-di(1H-imidazol-4-yl)benzene and multicarboxylate ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Zhi-Hao; Zhao, Yue; Chen, Shui-Sheng; Wang, Peng; Sun, Wei-Yin

    2013-06-15

    Seven new coordination polymers [Zn(H{sub 2}L)(mbdc)] (1), [Zn(H{sub 3}L)(btc)] (2), [Zn(H{sub 2}L)(Hbtc)] (3), [Zn(H{sub 2}L)(Hbtc)]·H{sub 2}O (4), [Zn{sub 2}(H{sub 2}L)(btc)(?{sub 2}-OH)] (5), [Cd(H{sub 2}L)(mbdc)] (6) and [Cd{sub 3}(H{sub 2}L){sub 2}(btc){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]·5H{sub 2}O (7) were synthesized by reactions of the corresponding metal salt with rigid ligand 1,3-di(1H-imidazol-4-yl)benzene (H{sub 2}L) and different carboxylic acids of 1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}mbdc) and benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid (H{sub 3}btc), respectively. The results of X-ray crystallographic analysis indicate that complex 1 is 1D chain while 2 is a (3,3)-connected 2D network with Point (Schläfli) symbol of (4,8{sup 2}). Complexes 3 and 6 are 2D networks, 4 is a 3-fold interpenetrating 3D framework with Point (Schläfli) symbol of (6{sup 5},8) and 5 is a (3,8)-connected 2D network with Point (Schläfli) symbol of (3,4{sup 2}){sub 2}(3{sup 4},4{sup 6},5{sup 6},6{sup 8},7{sup 3},8), while 7 is a (3,10)-connected 3D net with Schläfli symbol of (3,4,5){sub 2}(3{sup 4},4{sup 8},5{sup 18},6{sup 12},7{sup 2},8). The thermal stability and photoluminescence of the complexes were investigated. Furthermore, DFT calculations were performed for 2–4 to discuss the temperature controlled self-assembly of the complexes. - Graphical abstract: Seven new coordination polymers with multicarboxylate and rigid ditopic 4-imidazole containing ligands have been obtained and found to show different structures and topologies. - Highlights: • Metal complexes with diverse structures of 1D chain, 2D network and 3D framework. • Mixed ligands of 1,3-di(1H-imidazol-4-yl)benzene and multicarboxylate. • Photoluminescence property.

  4. DOE fundamentals handbook: Engineering symbology, prints, and drawings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Engineering Symbology, Prints, and Drawings Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of engineering prints, their use, and their function. The handbook includes information on engineering fluid drawings and prints; piping and instrument drawings; major symbols and conventions; electronic diagrams and schematics; logic circuits and diagrams; and fabrication, construction, and architectural drawings. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for reading, interpreting, and using the engineering prints and drawings that are associated with various DOE nuclear facility operations and maintenance.

  5. DOE fundamentals handbook: Engineering symbology, prints, and drawings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Engineering Symbology, Prints, and Drawings Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of engineering prints, their use, and their function. The handbook includes information on engineering fluid drawings and prints; piping and instrument drawings; major symbols and conventions; electronic diagrams and schematics; logic circuits and diagrams; and fabrication, construction, and architectural drawings. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for reading, interpreting, and using the engineering prints and drawings that are associated with various DOE nuclear facility operations and maintenance.

  6. DOE fundamentals handbook: Engineering symbology, prints, and drawings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Engineering Symbology, Prints, and Drawings Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of engineering prints, their use, and their function. The handbook includes information on engineering fluid drawings and prints; piping and instrument drawings; major symbols and conventions; electronic diagrams and schematics; logic circuits and diagrams; and fabrication, construction, and architectural drawings. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for reading, interpreting, and using the engineering prints and drawings that are associated with various DOE nuclear facility operations and maintenance.

  7. In Situ alignment system for phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Kenneth Alan; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2000-01-01

    A device and method to facilitate the gross alignment of patterned object- and image-plane masks in optical systems such as the phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer are provided. When an array of similar pinholes or discreet mask fields is used, confusion can occur over the alignment of the focused beams within the field. Adding to the mask pattern a circumscribed or inscribed set of symbols that are identifiable in situ facilitates the unambiguous gross alignment of the object- and/or image-plane masks. Alternatively, a system of markings can be encoded directly into the window shape to accomplish this same task.

  8. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RECEIPT FOR CONTROLLED MAIL PARCEL SERVICE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HQ F 1410.2 (06-93) U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RECEIPT FOR CONTROLLED MAIL PARCEL SERVICE (Receipt No.) MAIL STATION: DATE: TO: NAME: ROUTING SYMBOL: FROM: DOE Mail Facility, Office of Administration Services 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. ITEM NO. ITEM NO. ITEM NO. SIGN AND RETURN WITHIN 24 HOURS TO AVOID TRACER ACTION TO DOE MAIL FACILITY (Stamp Location) RECEIVED BY: DATE: Printed with soy ink on recycled paper

  9. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Highlights | Emergent Magnetism at LaAIo3/SRTiO3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interfaces; Fact or Fiction? Emergent magnetism at LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces: Fact or Fiction? image Examined LaAlO3/SrTiO3 superlattices fabricated from groups in Spain and the Netherlands with polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR). PNR is intrinsically sensitive to interfacial magnetization; bulk magnetometry is not. Difference between the spin up and down neutron reflectivities normalized by their sum (spin asymmetry) is shown in the figure (symbols). Anticipated spin asymmetry for

  10. NETL Form 580.1-8

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 (10/2000) OPI=BL60 (Previous Editions Obsolete) FAR 945.505.14 REPORT AS OF 30 SEP OR REPORT CONTROL SYMBOL U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ANNUAL REPORT OF PROPERTY IN THE CUSTODY OF CONTRACTORS 1. TO (Enter name and address of property administrator) 2. FROM (Enter full name and address of contractor) ACQUISITION & ASSISTANCE DIVISION DOCUMENT CONTROL (M/S 921-143) US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY PO BOX 10940 PITTSBURGH PA 15236-0940 3. IF GOVERNMENT-OWNED,

  11. MSDS Glossary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Glossary A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z # Select the first letter of the word from the list above to jump to appropriate section of the glossary. If the term you are looking for starts with a digit or symbol, choose the '#' link. The definitions are color coded to their respective sections: Health- blue, Flammability- red, Chemistry- green. - A - Absolute Pressure-The total pressure within a vessel, pipe, etc., not offset by external atmospheric pressure. Absorb-To soak up.

  12. Why the Flamingoes?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    about cams Why the Flamingoes? "You Want Flamingoes with That?" As told by Jay Davis - Founding Director of CAMS The story of how the flamingo came to be the symbol of CAMS is simple, but has interesting side turns and byways. In the late 70s and early 80s, I was the operations manager for the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) at LLNL. TMX was a very complicated plasma physics experiments. As a result, the experimental physics team and their engineering support staff often met Fridays

  13. WIPP Documents - All documents by number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Note: Documents that do not have document numbers are not included in this listing. Large file size alert This symbol means the document may be a large file size. All documents by number Common document prefixes DOE/CAO DOE/TRU DOE/CBFO DOE/WIPP DOE/EA NM DOE/EIS Other DOE/CAO Back to top DOE/CAO 95-1095, Oct. 1995 Remote Handled Transuranic Waste Study This study was conducted to satisfy the requirements defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act and considered by DOE to be a prudent exercise in

  14. WIPP Documents - National TRU Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Label 1 Content 1 Label 2 Content 2 Large file size alert This symbol means the document may be a large file size. National TRU Program Annual Transuranic Waste Inventory Report - 2015 DOE/TRU-15-3425 Rev 0 Effective date 12/15 The information presented in the ATWIR - 2015 serves as a current baseline of the TRU waste inventory for potential disposal at WIPP and may be considered in future Compliance Recertification Applications. The TRU Waste Inventory Profile Reports (Appendices A and B)

  15. I T E L I N E S S

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Unicorn uncovers key data on stockpile 1 Drill tests skills of emergency responders 1 Flag ceremony honors reservists, guards 2 Contractors do "double duty" defense 2 Partial closure of disposal facility planned 5 Future leaders at the Nevada Site Office 6 Milestones 7 Calendar 8 A publication for all members of the NNSA/NSO family Issue 119 September 2006 In This Issue Unicorn uncovers key stockpile data T he Unicorn is a symbol of innocence, a totem that evokes peace, courage, and

  16. The New Element Americium (Atomic Number 95)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G.T.; James, R.A.; Morgan, L.O.

    1948-01-00

    Several isotopes of the new element 95 have been produced and their radiations characterized. The chemical properties of this tripositive element are similar to those of the typical tripositive lanthanide rare-earth elements. Element 95 is different from the latter in the degree and rate of formation of certain compounds of the complex ion type, which makes possible the separation of element 95 from the lanthanide rare-earths. The name americium (after the Americas) and the symbol Am are suggested for the element on the basis of its position as the sixth member of the actinide rare-earth series, analogous to europium, Eu, of the lanthanide series.

  17. Method and system for efficiently searching an encoded vector index

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bui, Thuan Quang; Egan, Randy Lynn; Kathmann, Kevin James

    2001-09-04

    Method and system aspects for efficiently searching an encoded vector index are provided. The aspects include the translation of a search query into a candidate bitmap, and the mapping of data from the candidate bitmap into a search result bitmap according to entry values in the encoded vector index. Further, the translation includes the setting of a bit in the candidate bitmap for each entry in a symbol table that corresponds to candidate of the search query. Also included in the mapping is the identification of a bit value in the candidate bitmap pointed to by an entry in an encoded vector.

  18. C:\Forms\DOE F 5160.1.cdr

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    160.1 DOE 5160 (5-82) U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REPROGAMMING, RESTRUCTURING AND APPROPRIATION TRANSFER SUMMARY (Dollars in Thousands) 1. DOE Serial No: 3. Type of Action: 4. Appropriation Title: 5. Appropriation Symbol: 6. Program Titles and B&R Classification 6a. Program Increases 6b. Source of Funds 7. Description: (Brief description of Highlights) Total Program Increases Program Base B/A B/A B/A B/O B/O B/O Change Requested Revised Program Total Program Decreases 2. Date: INSTRUCTIONS

  19. SPECIAL REREVIEW FINAL DETERMINATION UNCLASSIFIED

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    SPECIAL REREVIEW FINAL DETERMINATION UNCLASSIFIED , ?4~0180N SctuAnr P. 0. 00x *a STATION F New YORK, N. Y. IN RLPLY RCFSRTO EID?f A- 43 MS ~-7405 eng-8 ". Subject: Contract No.H-7405 eng-8 with Metal Hydrides Incorporated. MEMORAhDUM to the Files. 1. Reference is made to basi.c communication dated 27 September 1945, Symbol No. EIDM 1%-30-b, requesting certain information with respect to the subject contract. 2. Reference pars,?-raph a. The Government committed to restore Contractor's plant

  20. ASC-eNews-June-2009.indd

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 SAND #2009-4030 W June 2009 The Meisner Minute I'd like to take a moment in this quarter's issue to congratulate Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) for their success in dedicating the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the early delivery of the Dawn supercomputer. What a great day for simulation at the forefront of science! The dedication of both these capabilities in the same week is symbolic of not only the effort required to do modern science, but also that it's happening at

  1. ATVM Loans Help Boost Pickup Truck Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ATVM Loans Help Boost Pickup Truck Efficiency ATVM Loans Help Boost Pickup Truck Efficiency May 7, 2014 - 4:14pm Addthis ATVM Loans Help Boost Pickup Truck Efficiency Peter W. Davidson Peter W. Davidson Former Executive Director of the Loan Programs Office (LPO) Why do Americans love pickup trucks so much? Trucks can be a symbol of independence and self-sufficiency, a reminder of an era that waxes nostalgic, a family connection, a way to make a living or just pursue happiness. That's the

  2. 79350

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SIDE ONLY HEAD TO FOOT U.S. Department of Energy Request for Print, Mail and Visual Media Services Office of Administrative Management & Support E Printed with soy ink on recycled paper INITIALS THIS ITEM IS A SCIENTIFIC/TECHNICAL DOCUMENT APPROVED BY PA-1 DOE REQUESTOR (Sign) DOE REQUESTOR (Print) RECEIVED BY ROUTING SYMBOL ROOM NO. DATE PHONE NO. LOGGED IN BY ASSIGNED FY JOB CONTROL NO. DOE Badge No.: TOTAL COST OF DUPLICATING Copying Graphics Printing Distribution Operation Date Rec'd

  3. HQ1224

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Routing Phone Fax Symbol Name Number Number Location OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF ENERGY S Office of the Secretary of Energy Ernest J. Moniz, Secretary of Energy ...................................................202-586-6210 202-586-4403 7A-257/FORS DS Office of the Deputy Secretary Elizabet Sherwood-Randall, Deputy Secretary of Energy..................202-586-5500 202-586-7210 7B-252/FORS US Office of the Under Secretary for Science and Energy Franklin M. Orr Jr, Under Secretary for Science and

  4. FROM I J. T.Consiglio, Chief, Middlesex Operations SUBJECT:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ;. ./I . S GOVERNMENT . MATERIM 10 TO t F. M. &more, Direotor, Produotioa Division DATX: November 8, 1948 \ , FROM I J. T.Consiglio, Chief, Middlesex Operations SUBJECT: DISPOSITION OF PORBIGN THORIUM BEARING ORBS AT HIDDLkX REFEBTO SYMBOL2 PAIJTC . J1-jrfTf,clI-tti /a Reference is made to a memorandum to you, subjeot Shipment of Thorium Bearing Ores, dated Ootober 25, 1948, in which an explanation was given concerning the reasons why subjeat materials were stored in bulk form.in bins at

  5. UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION Iew York Operation8 Office

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    fi ' J/ui : ,I/ /J ii%/~it~ - ,,(,C, \,\J,iT/~l \ 11, ?' UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION Iew York Operation8 Office Files (.Thrur V.L.Parsegian, Director, Division of Technical Advisers) Decenber 19, 1950 9; G.Strc&e, Division of Technical Advisers COLD-DRAWING OF TJRAXItZI RODS A BXIDGEPORT BRATS CO'Ei+A!R Symbol: TAtFGSrmam On 12/11/50, an exper%mnt was conducted at the Bridgmort Brass Company in whioh an attanpt m m made to cold-draw hot-foiled rods of uranium tich had been pickled

  6. CONCURRENCES Mr. Frank Casolito New Jersey Department

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CONCURRENCES Mr. Frank Casolito New Jersey Department of nvironmental Protection 380 Scotch Road Trenton, t-ew Jersey 08628 MAR 1 1983 RTG.SYMBOL. INITIALS/SIG. Dear Mr. Cosolito: DATE I am enclosing three copies of the final post remedial action Y'adiolo ical survey report on areas 4 through 10 at the former Kel1ex site in Jers y City, New Jersey. This final report replaces the draft report sent to you on August 3, 1982. There does not appear to be any chanqc in the data fran the draft

  7. NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    , -QAlamos NATIONAL LABORATORY - - - Ut."., - - - memorandum Environmental Protection Division Water Quality & RCRA Group (ENV-RCRA) To/MS: From /MS: Phone/Fax: Symbol: Date: Davis Christensen, ADEP-LTP-PTS, J910 Mark Haagenstad, ENV-RCRA K404 41,// 5-2014 '11fI ENV-RCRA-12-0053 February 29,2012 SUBJECT: LEGACY TA-55 NITRATE SALT WASTES AT TA-54 - POTENTIAL APPLICABILITY OF RCRA DOOlID002ID003 WASTE CODES This memorandum was prepared in response to your request to provide ENV-RCRA's

  8. Jr., Process Development Branch Construction Division SUBJECT:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FR?M : Jr., Process Development Branch Construction Division SUBJECT: INING TESTS AT BOWEN ENGINEERING, INC. - M A Y 16 AND 16,!1961 SYMBOL! EPD:ABBrbt I REY~AKC~: &DiVE;G?i&)il [q a 1 $ a, " I On day 16 and 16,,1951 Bowen Engineering, Inc. made test rune on ypray calcining of boiled-down Mallinokrodt pitohblende raffinate. Theqe rune were made in Bowen'e laboratory unit et North Branch, NT Jel;sey. The initial results indicate that raffidate &$be euocessfully epray oalcined to

  9. S-J=--.- Al' AMERICAN B&E CCMP~,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ,f,. . : '+=z& /. : : ..A. J. Br+in, Chief :%eld.~ervices Branch DATE:IkCember 2, l'jjy S-J=--.- Al' AMERICAN B&E CCMP~, ltlAm m m , coNNEcmcLl!r SYMBOL: .HSF:HG At'the Fwest of the SHoO~the Field Services Branch -eyed &e &+ ~ .*siOn Of ,coPper Clad natural urenium billets at the American Brass ., 1 :c""p"y, .Waterbury,~&maeCticut, on October 20; 1959. . . ,,;. . ,', ,., ," . . <; : ,.. ,. ;. -~:,Process Description' : ' ,' ,:. ..;, . . . . .: ._ _. :

  10. STANDARD FORM NO. 64

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    /qz-5 STANDARD FORM NO. 64 rl . . .' . , G Ojice Memoawl crl LA STATES GOVER pi,+ ip; ; / (' , TO : F. M . Belmore, M remtor, Produution Division DATE: Deomnber FROM : R. F. Van Wy TV Mvision of Teohnioal Advisers SUBJECT: R?IQUEST FOR&m SYMBOL: TA:RFV:rle For use under ooxrkraot AT-300l=Gen-72 at Columibia University, m request 6 pieoes Of A toleranoe of plus ordinary uranium out to the sizes listed below. or llliZlU8 l/16" i8 sati8faotory. P x 1u x 1" 1" x 1 !k x 1"

  11. STATES GOVERNMENT S. R. Sapirle~, Manager, Oak Ridge Operations

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    oh&- 1) +9-y l "UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT S. R. Sapirle~, Manager, Oak Ridge Operations NOVEMBER 2.3 1954 S : J. C. Clarke, Acting Manager, New York . . SUBJXT: REQUEST FOR URMWJM TEm-CHLORIDE SYMBOL: AM:% "& ATTENTION: Mr.N. Woodruff The Frankford Arsenal, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania has under date .of October 26, 1954; requested that we arrange for the shipment of approximately one kilogram of normal uranium tetra-chloride, preferably anhydrous to Mr. C. C> Fawcett, S. F.

  12. TO : S. R. Sapirie, Manager C&c Ridge Operations Office FROM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3@ceW emdtid#m . UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT TO : S. R. Sapirie, Manager C&c Ridge Operations Office FROM SULtJECTC TESTING OF SARPLR GF THORITE 'XRXX3lTRATE Symbol: RMtCWT ' .. DATE November 21r, 19% W&have received several inquirie s recently from mine owners and operators'in the western states, principally Colorado, who are potential producers of thorite concentrates. Upon the basis of preliminary data presently available there is a possibility that significant quantities of thorium may

  13. TO I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    . PBOM t SUBJBCT: D. Sturges, Chief, Operations Division, Banford Operations Offloe, Bichland, Washington B. J. Smith, Chief, Operations Branoh, Production Divisioh, Eew York operations offlce mmm ~mucmoB LETTER . I. - IACBY TO BEICBABDDAlED OX~ES 15, 1950 SYMBOL1 P01llJS:hb . sTiTEs GOVERNMENT ICT. I ) DATE: Hov~bsr 0,19So ~TEBTIOB:'-.B.E.L. Stanford [Ae appreciate very much having,moeived the subjeqt lettei beoause of its signifioa@ bearing on our am-rent fabrioation de$eloInr+s. The

  14. TO I Ppi B. Harris, Chief, Industrial Rygiene Branah

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ppi B. Harris, Chief, Industrial Rygiene Branah DATE: .' hpt Health and Safe i-?iSiOll FROM .t A. 3. Breslin 8v SUBJECT: URBHNad ROD DR&RG,TEST AILTWYCKoFF STEZL COO SYMBOL: RSHG%JB:~O On September 6, the m iter accompanied M re Fe Stroke to the Steel Co. in Bewark to witness the trial drawing of l-1/2 i diameter uranium rods* !l'w rods, about four feet in length, were used in the test. just dipped in an 6% solution of hot sulfurio acid, rinsed and ooated in a hot Ca(OH)2 bathe !fhey were D

  15. May Also Be Used U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORIZATION

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5 (06-93) 05-90 Edition May Also Be Used U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORIZATION OMB Control No. 1910-1700 OMB Burden Disclosure Statement on Back 1. Control Number 2a. Organizational Unit and Routing Symbol 2b. Departmental Organization Contractor Organization 3a. Volume On Hand (Cu. Ft.) 3b. Volume Accumulated Annually (Estimate Cu. Ft.) 4. Record Dates (From/To) 5. Identification of Filing Unit (Include type of record, function performed, security

  16. DOEIET5-0064

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOEIET5-0064 uc-z,11 Final Environmental lmpact (Final Statement to ERDA Statement 1545-Dl R(rcky Fhts Phnt slte Goldeh, Jeffetson Gounty, Golorado Ruth C. Clusen Assistant .Secretary for Environrnent U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, D,C. 20585 APRIL 1980 Volume 3 of 3 RESPONSES TO PUBLIC GOMMENTS Responsible Official ,// 4-*q, ll;{ru:l-r,. SUMMARY OF CONTENTS VOLUI'{E I Table of Contents List of Tables List of Figures Abbreviations, Symbols and Acronyns Glossary Metric to English

  17. System for conversion between the boundary representation model and a constructive solid geometry model of an object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christensen, Noel C. (Kansas City, MO); Emery, James D. (Kansas City, MO); Smith, Maurice L. (Kansas City, MO)

    1988-04-05

    A system converts from the boundary representation of an object to the constructive solid geometry representation thereof. The system converts the boundary representation of the object into elemental atomic geometrical units or I-bodies which are in the shape of stock primitives or regularized intersections of stock primitives. These elemental atomic geometrical units are then represented in symbolic form. The symbolic representations of the elemental atomic geometrical units are then assembled heuristically to form a constructive solid geometry representation of the object usable for manufacturing thereof. Artificial intelligence is used to determine the best constructive solid geometry representation from the boundary representation of the object. Heuristic criteria are adapted to the manufacturing environment for which the device is to be utilized. The surface finish, tolerance, and other information associated with each surface of the boundary representation of the object are mapped onto the constructive solid geometry representation of the object to produce an enhanced solid geometry representation, particularly useful for computer-aided manufacture of the object.

  18. System for conversion between the boundary representation model and a constructive solid geometry model of an object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christensen, N.C.; Emery, J.D.; Smith, M.L.

    1985-04-29

    A system converts from the boundary representation of an object to the constructive solid geometry representation thereof. The system converts the boundary representation of the object into elemental atomic geometrical units or I-bodies which are in the shape of stock primitives or regularized intersections of stock primitives. These elemental atomic geometrical units are then represented in symbolic form. The symbolic representations of the elemental atomic geometrical units are then assembled heuristically to form a constructive solid geometry representation of the object usable for manufacturing thereof. Artificial intelligence is used to determine the best constructive solid geometry representation from the boundary representation of the object. Heuristic criteria are adapted to the manufacturing environment for which the device is to be utilized. The surface finish, tolerance, and other information associated with each surface of the boundary representation of the object are mapped onto the constructive solid geometry representation of the object to produce an enhanced solid geometry representation, particularly useful for computer-aided manufacture of the object. 19 figs.

  19. Lattice dynamics in the Kondo insulator YbB{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemkovski, K.S. . E-mail: kirnem@isssph.kiae.ru; Alekseev, P.A.; Mignot, J.-M.; Iga, F.; Takabatake, T.; Shitsevalova, N.Yu.; Paderno, Yu.B.; Lazukov, V.N.; Nefeodova, E.V.; Tiden, N.N.; Sadikov, I.P.

    2006-09-15

    The phonon dispersion in the Kondo-insulator YbB{sub 12} and its structure analogue LuB{sub 12} has been studied in a wide energy range (up to 55 meV) by means of inelastic neutron scattering. The specific shape of phonon dispersion curves for low-frequency lattice vibrations could be described on the basis of a strong hierarchy suggested for the interactions between boron and rare-earth (RE) atoms: B-B>>B-RE>>RE-RE. - Graphical abstract: Energy dispersion of phonons in the Kondo insulator YbB{sub 12} (open symbols) and its structure analogue LuB{sub 12} (closed symbols). Circles: longitudinal branches; triangles: transverse branches. Lines represent the result of the model calculation based on assumption of a strong hierarchy of the interactions between boron and rare-earth (RE) atoms: B-B>>B-RE>>RE-RE. Irreducible representations of phonon branches are given in the Bouckaert-Smoluchowski-Wigner notation.

  20. Chart of the Nuclides

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-03-23

    Nucleus is an interactive PC-based graphical viewer of NUBASE nuclear property data. NUBASE contains experimentally known nuclear properties, together with some values that have been estimated from extrapolation of experimental data for 3010 nuclides. NUBASE also contains data on those isomeric states that have half-lives greater than 1 millisecond; there are 669 such nuclides of which 58 have more than one isomeric state. The latest version of NUCLEUS-CHART has been corrected to include the namesmore » and the chemical symbols of the elements 104 to 109 that have been finally adopted by the Commission on Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry (CNIC) of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). They differ from those recommended by the same commission a few years before and that were widely used in the evaluations AME''95 and NUBASE''97. It results in some shuffling of the names and symbols, that may cause confusion in the near future. At AMDC we''ll be as careful as possible to try to avoid such confusion. In advance we apologize if any will occur in the future and recommend the user to always double check these few names.« less

  1. Addendum for the Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0 (page changes)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McCord

    2007-05-01

    This document, which makes changes to Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, S-N/99205--077, Revision 0 (June 2006), was prepared to address review comments on this final document provided by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated August 4, 2006. The document includes revised pages that address NDEP review comments and comments from other document users. Change bars are included on these pages to identify where the text was revised. In addition to the revised pages, the following clarifications are made for the two plates inserted in the back of the document: • Plate 4: Disregard the repeat of legend text ‘Drill Hole Name’ and ‘Drill Hole Location’ in the lower left corner of the map. • Plate 6: The symbol at the ER-16-1 location (white dot on the lower left side of the map) is not color-coded because no water level has been determined. The well location is included for reference. • Plate 6: The symbol at the ER-12-1 location (upper left corner of the map), a yellow dot, represents the lower water level elevation. The higher water level elevation, represented by a red dot, was overprinted.

  2. Synthesis, Crystal and Electronic Structures of the Pnictides AE3TrPn3 (AE = Sr, Ba; Tr = Al, Ga; Pn = P, As)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stoyko, Stanislav; Voss, Leonard; He, Hua; Bobev, Svilen

    2015-09-24

    New ternary arsenides AE3TrAs3 (AE = Sr, Ba; Tr = Al, Ga) and their phosphide analogs Sr3GaP3 and Ba3AlP3 have been prepared by reactions of the respective elements at high temperatures. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that Sr3AlAs3 and Ba3AlAs3 adopt the Ba3AlSb3-type structure (Pearson symbol oC56, space group Cmce, Z = 8). This structure is also realized for Sr3GaP3 and Ba3AlP3. Likewise, the compounds Sr3GaAs3 and Ba3GaAs3 crystallize with the Ba3GaSb3-type structure (Pearson symbol oP56, space group Pnma, Z = 8). Both structures are made up of isolated pairs of edge-shared AlPn4 and GaPn4 tetrahedra (Pn = pnictogen, i.e.,more » P or As), separated by the alkaline-earth Sr2+ and Ba2+ cations. In both cases, there are no homoatomic bonds, hence, regardless of the slightly different atomic arrangements, both structures can be rationalized as valence-precise [AE2+]3[Tr3+][Pn3-]3, or rather [AE2+]6[Tr2Pn6]12-, i.e., as Zintl phases.« less

  3. Characterizing system dynamics with a weighted and directed network constructed from time series data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiaoran; School of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009 ; Small, Michael; Zhao, Yi; Xue, Xiaoping

    2014-06-15

    In this work, we propose a novel method to transform a time series into a weighted and directed network. For a given time series, we first generate a set of segments via a sliding window, and then use a doubly symbolic scheme to characterize every windowed segment by combining absolute amplitude information with an ordinal pattern characterization. Based on this construction, a network can be directly constructed from the given time series: segments corresponding to different symbol-pairs are mapped to network nodes and the temporal succession between nodes is represented by directed links. With this conversion, dynamics underlying the time series has been encoded into the network structure. We illustrate the potential of our networks with a well-studied dynamical model as a benchmark example. Results show that network measures for characterizing global properties can detect the dynamical transitions in the underlying system. Moreover, we employ a random walk algorithm to sample loops in our networks, and find that time series with different dynamics exhibits distinct cycle structure. That is, the relative prevalence of loops with different lengths can be used to identify the underlying dynamics.

  4. REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

    2013-09-09

    This is the first of three papers (in addition to an introductory summary) aimed at providing a framework for evaluating future reductions or modifications of the U.S. nuclear force, first by considering previous instances in which nuclear-force capabilities were eliminated; second by looking forward into at least the foreseeable future at the features of global and regional deterrence (recognizing that new weapon systems currently projected will have expected lifetimes stretching beyond our ability to predict the future); and third by providing examples of past or possible undesirable outcomes in the shaping of the future nuclear force, as well as some closing thoughts for the future. This paper examines the circumstances and consequences of the elimination of ? The INF-range Pershing II ballistic missile and Gryphon Ground-Launched Cruise Missile (GLCM), deployed by NATO under a dual-track strategy to counter Soviet intermediate-range missiles while pursuing negotiations to limit or eliminate all of these missiles. ? The Short-Range Attack Missile (SRAM), which was actually a family of missiles including SRAM A, SRAM B (never deployed), and SRAM II and SRAM T, these last two cancelled during an over-budget/behind-schedule development phase as part of the Presidential Nuclear Initiatives of 1991 and 1992. ? The nuclear-armed version of the Tomahawk Land-Attack Cruise Missile (TLAM/N), first limited to shore-based storage by the PNIs, and finally eliminated in deliberations surrounding the 2010 Nuclear Posture Review Report. ? The Missile-X (MX), or Peacekeeper, a heavy MIRVed ICBM, deployed in fixed silos, rather than in an originally proposed mobile mode. Peacekeeper was likely intended as a bargaining chip to facilitate elimination of Russian heavy missiles. The plan failed when START II did not enter into force, and the missiles were eliminated at the end of their intended service life. ? The Small ICBM (SICBM), or Midgetman, a road-mobile, single-warhead missile for which per-unit costs were climbing when it was eliminated under the PNIs. Although there were liabilities associated with each of these systems, there were also unique capabilities; this paper lays out the pros and cons for each. Further, we articulate the capabilities that were eliminated with these systems.

  5. Two lead(II) 2,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-5-carboxylate complexes exhibiting different topologies and fluorescent properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Zilu; Yan Jiehua; Xing Huihui; Zhang Zhong; Liang Fupei

    2011-05-15

    The reactions of PbCl{sub 2} with 2,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-5-carboxylic acid (H{sub 3}iso) gave two complexes [Pb(H{sub 2}iso){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (1) and [Pb(Hiso)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (2), which were characterized by IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, powder X-ray diffraction and single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The two complexes display different topologies. 1 shows a three-dimensional framework with the Schlaefli symbol (4.8{sup 5})(4.8{sup 2}) no matter if the weak Pb-O bonds are included or not. However, 2 presents a 3,3-connected two-dimensional sheet with the Schlaefli symbol (4.8{sup 2})(4.8{sup 2}) based on the calculation of only the normal Pb-O bonds and a 5,5-connected 3D network with the Schlaefli symbol (4{sup 15}.6{sup 4})(4{sup 4}.6{sup 8}.8{sup 2}) when the weak Pb-O bonds are also included. The fluorescent studies reveal an emission attributed to intraligand emission for 1 and an emission assigned to LMCT for 2. -- Graphical abstract: The reactions of PbCl{sub 2} with 2,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-5-carboxylic acid (H{sub 3}iso) gave two complexes [Pb(H{sub 2}iso){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (1) and [Pb(Hiso)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (2), which display different topologies and fluorescent properties. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} Two Pb(II) complexes were prepared from the reactions of PbCl{sub 2} with the same ligand. {yields} The two title complexes display different topologies. {yields} Both normal and weak Pb-O bonds are discussed in the manuscript.{yields} The title two complexes show different fluorescent properties.

  6. The RELi{sub x}Sn{sub 2} (RE=La–Nd, Sm, and Gd; 0?x<1) series revisited. Synthesis, crystal chemistry, and magnetic susceptibilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makongo, Julien P.A.; Suen, Nian-Tzu; Guo, Shengping; Saha, Shanta; Greene, Richard; Paglione, Johnpierre; Bobev, Svilen

    2014-03-15

    This study is concerned with the ternary compounds RELi{sub x}Sn{sub 2} (RE=La–Nd, Sm, and Gd; 0?x<1), which have been previously thought to be the stoichiometric RELiSn{sub 2} phases. These materials crystallize with the base-centered orthorhombic space group Cmcm (No. 63), and can be formally assigned with the CeNiSi{sub 2} structure type (Pearson symbol oC16). Our systematic single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies revealed substantial Li-deficiencies in all cases, with SmSn{sub 2} (space group Cmmm, ZrGa{sub 2} structure type, Pearson symbol oC12) and GdSn{sub 2} (space group Cmcm, ZrSi{sub 2} structure type, Pearson symbol oC12) being completely lithium-free. The structure refinements also uncovered positional disorder on the Sn site neighboring the vacancies. The Sn-disorder and the Li-deficiency correlate, and vary monotonically with the decreased size of the rare-earth atoms in the order RE=La–Nd. The SmSn{sub 2} and GdSn{sub 2} structures are devoid of any disorder. Temperature-dependent studies of the magnetic response of the title compounds are also presented and discussed. -- Graphical abstract: RELi{sub x}Sn{sub 2} (RE=La–Nd, 0?x<1) crystallize in a defect variants of the CeNiSi{sub 2} structure type (a). The Sn-disorder and the Li-deficiency correlate, and vary monotonically with the decreased size of the rare-earth atoms in the order RE=La–Nd. The SmSn{sub 2} (b) and GdSn{sub 2} (c) structures are devoid of any disorder. Highlights: • The crystal structures of the RELi{sub x}Sn{sub 2} (RE=La–Nd, 0?x<1) compounds are revised using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. • The structure is a filled derivative of the ZrSi{sub 2} structure type or defect variant of the CeNiSi{sub 2} structure type. • SmSn{sub 2} is isotypic with the ZrGa{sub 2} structure, while RESn{sub 2} (RE=Gd–Lu) are isotypic with the ZrSi{sub 2} structure.

  7. Fuel cell stack monitoring and system control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2005-01-25

    A control method for monitoring a fuel cell stack in a fuel cell system in which the actual voltage and actual current from the fuel cell stack are monitored. A preestablished relationship between voltage and current over the operating range of the fuel cell is established. A variance value between the actual measured voltage and the expected voltage magnitude for a given actual measured current is calculated and compared with a predetermined allowable variance. An output is generated if the calculated variance value exceeds the predetermined variance. The predetermined voltage-current for the fuel cell is symbolized as a polarization curve at given operating conditions of the fuel cell. Other polarization curves may be generated and used for fuel cell stack monitoring based on different operating pressures, temperatures, hydrogen quantities.

  8. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-01

    Report IV, Volume 4, provides descriptions, data, and drawings pertaining to the Gas Plant (Plant 7). The Gas Plant (Plant 7) receives feed gas streams from various process plants. The Gas Plant compresses, treats, and fractionates the gas streams into intermediate and final products. The following information is included for the plant described in this volume: a description of the plant's process design, including the utility balance, catalysts and chemicals usage, and process flow diagrams; an equipment list, including item numbers and descriptions; data sheets and sketches for major plant components; and pertinent engineering drawings. An appendix contains: an overall site plan showing the locations of all plants; and the symbols and legend for the piping and instrument diagrams included in this volume.

  9. RAIS PDA Application

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-10-06

    The Regulatory Authority Information System (RAIS) is a management tool for information related to the regulatory control of radioactive sealed sources developed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The RAIS PDA Application extends the functionality of the RAIS database by allowinig users to download radioactive sealed source data from the RAIS database to a portable PDA equipped with a barcode scanner. This allows users to verify radioactive sealed source data, gather radioactive sealed sourcemore » audit information, and upload audit data to the RAIS database in the field. The application was developed for a tested on the Symbol Model SPT 1800 PDA with PalmOS version 4.1 and a built-in barcode scanner.« less

  10. Compression embedding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T. (Los Alamos, NM); Handel, Theodore G. (Los Alamos, NM); Bradley, Jonathan N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method.

  11. Summary for Policymakers IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, WorkingGroup III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, Terry; Bashmakov, Igor; Bernstein, Lenny; Bogner,Jean; Bosch, Peter; Dave, Rutu; Davidson, Ogunlade; Fisher, Brian; Grubb,Michael; Gupta, Sujata; Halsnaes, Kirsten; Heij, Bertjan; Kahn Ribeiro,Suzana; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Levine, Mark; Martino, Daniel; MaseraCerutti, Omar; Metz, Bert; Meyer, Leo; Nabuurs, Gert-Jan; Najam, Adil; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Rogner, Hans Holger; Roy, Joyashree; Sathaye,Jayant; Schock, Robert; Shukla, Priyaradshi; Sims, Ralph; Smith, Pete; Swart, Rob; Tirpak, Dennis; Urge-Vorsatz, Diana; Zhou, Dadi

    2007-04-30

    A. Introduction 1. The Working Group III contribution to theIPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) focuses on new literature on thescientific, technological, environmental, economic and social aspects ofmitigation of climate change, published since the IPCC Third AssessmentReport (TAR) and the Special Reports on COB2B Capture and Storage (SRCCS)and on Safeguarding the Ozone Layer and the Global Climate System (SROC).The following summary is organised into six sections after thisintroduction: - Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission trends, - Mitigation in theshort and medium term, across different economic sectors (until 2030), -Mitigation in the long-term (beyond 2030), - Policies, measures andinstruments to mitigate climate change, - Sustainable development andclimate change mitigation, - Gaps in knowledge. References to thecorresponding chapter sections are indicated at each paragraph in squarebrackets. An explanation of terms, acronyms and chemical symbols used inthis SPM can be found in the glossary to the main report.

  12. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Tin Tin Symbol: Sn Atomic Number: 50 Atomic Weight (Average): 118.6125 Mass (amu) 111.904823 113.902781 114.903344 115.901744 116.902954 117.901607 118.903310 119.902199 121.903440 123.905271 Abundance 1.00000 0.70000 0.40000 14.70000 7.70000 24.3000 8.60000 32.40000 4.60000 5.60000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-7 atomic fraction Analysis Range <1.E+2 nm RBS (Rutherford BackScattering) Sensitivity >1.E-4 atomic fraction

  13. Discriminating chaotic and stochastic dynamics through the permutation spectrum test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulp, C. W.; Zunino, L.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new heuristic symbolic tool for unveiling chaotic and stochastic dynamics: the permutation spectrum test. Several numerical examples allow us to confirm the usefulness of the introduced methodology. Indeed, we show that it is robust in situations in which other techniques fail (intermittent chaos, hyperchaotic dynamics, stochastic linear and nonlinear correlated dynamics, and deterministic non-chaotic noise-driven dynamics). We illustrate the applicability and reliability of this pragmatic method by examining real complex time series from diverse scientific fields. Taking into account that the proposed test has the advantages of being conceptually simple and computationally fast, we think that it can be of practical utility as an alternative test for determinism.

  14. Complete fourth-order relativistic many-body calculations for atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, Caleb C.; Derevianko, Andrei

    2004-03-01

    We report, to our knowledge, the first relativistic calculation for many-electron atoms complete through the fourth order of many-body perturbation theory. Owing to an overwhelmingly large number of underlying diagrams, the calculations are aided by our suite of symbolic algebra tools. We augment all-order single-double excitation method with 1648 omitted fourth-order diagrams and compute amplitudes of principal transitions in Na. The resulting ab initio relativistic electric dipole amplitudes are in an excellent agreement with 0.05%-accurate experimental values. Analysis of previously unmanageable classes of diagrams provides a useful guide to a design of even more accurate, yet practical, many-body methods.

  15. Three-dimensional dust-ion-acoustic rogue waves in a magnetized dusty pair-ion plasma with nonthermal nonextensive electrons and opposite polarity dust grains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Shimin Mei, Liquan

    2014-08-15

    Dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) rogue waves are investigated in a three-dimensional magnetized plasma containing nonthermal electrons featuring Tsallis distribution, both positive and negative ions, and immobile dust grains having both positive and negative charges. Via the reductive perturbation method, a (3?+?1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation is derived to govern the dynamics of the DIA wave packets. The modulation instability of DIA waves described by the (3?+?1)-dimensional NLS equation is investigated. By means of the similarity transformation and symbolic computation, both the first- and second-order rogue wave solutions of the (3?+?1)-dimensional NLS equation are constructed in terms of rational functions. Moreover, the dynamics properties and the effects of plasma parameters on the nonlinear structures of rogue waves are discussed in detail. The results could be useful for understanding the physical mechanism of rogue waves in laboratory experiments where pair-ion plasmas with electrons and dust grains can be found.

  16. Supercomputer debugging workshop `92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, J.S.

    1993-02-01

    This report contains papers or viewgraphs on the following topics: The ABCs of Debugging in the 1990s; Cray Computer Corporation; Thinking Machines Corporation; Cray Research, Incorporated; Sun Microsystems, Inc; Kendall Square Research; The Effects of Register Allocation and Instruction Scheduling on Symbolic Debugging; Debugging Optimized Code: Currency Determination with Data Flow; A Debugging Tool for Parallel and Distributed Programs; Analyzing Traces of Parallel Programs Containing Semaphore Synchronization; Compile-time Support for Efficient Data Race Detection in Shared-Memory Parallel Programs; Direct Manipulation Techniques for Parallel Debuggers; Transparent Observation of XENOOPS Objects; A Parallel Software Monitor for Debugging and Performance Tools on Distributed Memory Multicomputers; Profiling Performance of Inter-Processor Communications in an iWarp Torus; The Application of Code Instrumentation Technology in the Los Alamos Debugger; and CXdb: The Road to Remote Debugging.

  17. Synchrotron Radiation Wake in Free Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC

    2011-08-31

    In this paper, we derive the transverse radiation force of a bunch of ultrarelativistic charged particles coherently radiating in free space assuming that the bending radius is much larger than the beam dimensions. In contrast to a similar recent study, where the authors decompose the total transverse force and find only a part that is responsible for the distortion of the beam orbit, we derive a full expression for the force and leave the issues of the beam dynamics for a separate consideration. Another approach to the calculation of the transverse force has been previously developed. In many cases considered in this paper, the calculations are extremely cumbersome; they were systematically performed with the use of symbolic engine of the computer program MATHEMATICA.

  18. Annual Site Environmental Report Paducah Site

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report Paducah Site 2011 PAD-REG-1012 BACK TABLE OF CONTENTS FORWARD Fractions and Multiples of Units Multiple Decimal Equivalent Prefix Symbol Engineering Format 10 6 1,000,000 mega- M E+06 10 3 1,000 kilo- k E+03 10 2 100 hecto- h E+02 10 10 deka- da E+01 10 -1 0.1 deci- d E-01 10 -2 0.01 centi- c E-02 10 -3 0.001 milli- m E-03 10 -6 0.000001 micro- ÎĽ E-06 10 -9 0.000000001 nano- n E-09 10 -12 0.000000000001 pico- P E-12 10 -15 0.000000000000001 femto- F E-15 10 -18 0.000000000000000001 atto-

  19. Compression embedding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-03-10

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique is disclosed. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method. 11 figs.

  20. DISCLAIMER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NXO-3071 ON ANGULAR MOAfENTUM ' 1 . I n t r o d u c t i o n One of t h e methods of t r e a t i n g a general angular mo- mentum i n quantum mechanics is t o regard i t - a s the euper- popition of a number of elementary "epins", o r angular molrenta w i t h 3 = 1/2. a Rose-Einateln system, can h e u s e f u l l y discussed by t h e method o f second quantization. cedure u n i t e s t h e compact symbolism o f t h e group t h e o r e t i c a l approach with t h e e x p l i c i t

  1. l

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    o s a l a m o s s c i e n c e a n d t e c h n o l o g y m a g a z i n e n o v e m b e r 2 0 1 3 Twitter Vision Human Genome 10 Years Later Super-strange Superconductors Good News from Glaciers About Our Name: During World War II, all that the outside world knew of Los Alamos and its top-secret laboratory was the mailing address-P . O. Box 1663, Santa Fe, New Mexico. That box number, still part of our address, symbolizes our historic role in the nation's service. About the Logo: Laboratory

  2. Methods for improved forewarning of condition changes in monitoring physical processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, Lee M.

    2013-04-09

    This invention teaches further improvements in methods for forewarning of critical events via phase-space dissimilarity analysis of data from biomedical equipment, mechanical devices, and other physical processes. One improvement involves objective determination of a forewarning threshold (U.sub.FW), together with a failure-onset threshold (U.sub.FAIL) corresponding to a normalized value of a composite measure (C) of dissimilarity; and providing a visual or audible indication to a human observer of failure forewarning and/or failure onset. Another improvement relates to symbolization of the data according the binary numbers representing the slope between adjacent data points. Another improvement relates to adding measures of dissimilarity based on state-to-state dynamical changes of the system. And still another improvement relates to using a Shannon entropy as the measure of condition change in lieu of a connected or unconnected phase space.

  3. BLOT II Ver.1.39

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-06-03

    BLOT II is a graphic program for post-processing finite element analyses output in the EXODUS II database format. It is command driven with free-format input and can drive graphics devices supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. BLOT produces mesh plots of the analysis output variables including deformed mesh plots, line contours, filled (painted) contours, vector plots of two/three variables (velocity vectors), and symbol plots of scalar variables (discrete cracks). Features include pathlines of analysis variables drawn on the mesh, element selection by material, element birth and death, multiple views combining several displays on each plot, symmetry mirroring, and node and element numbering. X-Y plots of the analysis variables include time vs. variable plots or variable vs. variable plots, and distance vs. variable plots at selected time stips where distance is the accumulated distance between pairs of nodes or element centers.

  4. DARHT Delivers Cibola Takes Flight Plutonium Superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    663 DARHT Delivers Cibola Takes Flight Plutonium Superconductivity Not for the Birds l o S a l a m o S N a T i o N a l l a B o r a T o r y loS alamoS SCieNCe aND TeChNology magaziNe may 2007 1 663 From Terry Wallace About Our Name: During World War II, all that the outside world knew of Los Alamos and its top-secret laboratory was the mailing address-P . O. Box 1663, Santa Fe, New Mexico. That box number, still part of our address, symbolizes our historic role in the nation's service. Located on

  5. FASTPLOT: An interface to Microsoft{reg_sign} FORTRAN graphics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, R.C.

    1994-03-01

    Interface routines to the Microsoft{reg_sign} FORTRAN graphics library (GRAPHICS.LIB) are provided to facilitate development of graphics codes. These routines are collected into the FASTPLOT library (FASTPLOT.LIB). The FASTPLOT routines simplified the development of applications utilizing graphics and add capabilities not available in GRAPHICS.LIB such as plotting histograms, splines, symbols, and error bars. Specifically, these routines were utilized in the development of the mortality data viewing code, MORTVIEW, for the US Environmental Protection Agency. Routines for color imaging, developed for use with the X-ray Computer Tomography (XCT) imaging code, and examples are also provided in the FASTPLOT library. Many example uses of FASTPLOT.LIB are contained in this document to facilitate applications development. The FASTPLOT.LIB library, source, and applications programs are supplied on the accompanying FASTPLOT diskette.

  6. An object-oriented extension for debugging the virtual machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pizzi, R.G. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    A computer is nothing more then a virtual machine programmed by source code to perform a task. The program`s source code expresses abstract constructs which are compiled into some lower level target language. When a virtual machine breaks, it can be very difficult to debug because typical debuggers provide only low-level target implementation information to the software engineer. We believe that the debugging task can be simplified by introducing aspects of the abstract design and data into the source code. We introduce OODIE, an object-oriented extension to programming languages that allows programmers to specify a virtual environment by describing the meaning of the design and data of a virtual machine. This specification is translated into symbolic information such that an augmented debugger can present engineers with a programmable debugging environment specifically tailored for the virtual machine that is to be debugged.

  7. Supercomputer debugging workshop '92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains papers or viewgraphs on the following topics: The ABCs of Debugging in the 1990s; Cray Computer Corporation; Thinking Machines Corporation; Cray Research, Incorporated; Sun Microsystems, Inc; Kendall Square Research; The Effects of Register Allocation and Instruction Scheduling on Symbolic Debugging; Debugging Optimized Code: Currency Determination with Data Flow; A Debugging Tool for Parallel and Distributed Programs; Analyzing Traces of Parallel Programs Containing Semaphore Synchronization; Compile-time Support for Efficient Data Race Detection in Shared-Memory Parallel Programs; Direct Manipulation Techniques for Parallel Debuggers; Transparent Observation of XENOOPS Objects; A Parallel Software Monitor for Debugging and Performance Tools on Distributed Memory Multicomputers; Profiling Performance of Inter-Processor Communications in an iWarp Torus; The Application of Code Instrumentation Technology in the Los Alamos Debugger; and CXdb: The Road to Remote Debugging.

  8. BLOT II Ver.1.39

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-06-03

    BLOT II is a graphic program for post-processing finite element analyses output in the EXODUS II database format. It is command driven with free-format input and can drive graphics devices supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. BLOT produces mesh plots of the analysis output variables including deformed mesh plots, line contours, filled (painted) contours, vector plots of two/three variables (velocity vectors), and symbol plots of scalar variables (discrete cracks). Features include pathlines of analysismore » variables drawn on the mesh, element selection by material, element birth and death, multiple views combining several displays on each plot, symmetry mirroring, and node and element numbering. X-Y plots of the analysis variables include time vs. variable plots or variable vs. variable plots, and distance vs. variable plots at selected time stips where distance is the accumulated distance between pairs of nodes or element centers.« less

  9. Methods for consistent forewarning of critical events across multiple data channels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, Lee M.

    2006-11-21

    This invention teaches further method improvements to forewarn of critical events via phase-space dissimilarity analysis of data from biomedical equipment, mechanical devices, and other physical processes. One improvement involves conversion of time-serial data into equiprobable symbols. A second improvement is a method to maximize the channel-consistent total-true rate of forewarning from a plurality of data channels over multiple data sets from the same patient or process. This total-true rate requires resolution of the forewarning indications into true positives, true negatives, false positives and false negatives. A third improvement is the use of various objective functions, as derived from the phase-space dissimilarity measures, to give the best forewarning indication. A fourth improvement uses various search strategies over the phase-space analysis parameters to maximize said objective functions. A fifth improvement shows the usefulness of the method for various biomedical and machine applications.

  10. Microsoft Word - S07121_CY2010 Annual Rpt

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    66 0.100 1.000 10.000 100.000 1/1/2000 7/1/2000 12/31/2000 7/1/2001 12/31/2001 7/2/2002 12/31/2002 7/2/2003 12/31/2003 7/1/2004 12/31/2004 7/1/2005 12/31/2005 7/1/2006 12/31/2006 7/2/2007 12/31/2007 7/1/2008 12/30/2008 7/1/2009 12/31/2009 7/1/2010 12/31/2010 Sample Date U Concentration (ug/L) 0.001 0.01 0.1 1 10 100 Nitrate Concentration (mg/L as N) 37405 U 37505 U 37705 U 37405 N 37505 N 37705 N White-filled symbols represent U-qualified results. Notes: U data include results for U-mass and

  11. Neurobehavioural effects of industrial mixed solvent exposure in Chinese printing and paint workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, T.P.; Ong, S.G.; Lam, W.K.; Jones, G.M. )

    1990-11-01

    Neurobehavioural symptoms and performance tests were evaluated in a group of 78 workers exposed to mixed organic solvents (printers, paint sprayers and paint production workers) and a referent group of 145 unexposed subjects (nonproduction factory workers and volunteer postal workers). Both groups were administered a structured symptoms questionnaire and eight neurobehavioural tests for psycho-motor function, visual and auditory memory. An excess of symptoms of fatigue, irritability, depression, poor memory, sleep disturbances and symptoms suggestive of autonomic dysfunction was found in the exposed group. Neurobehavioural test performance was generally worse, and performance on tests of psycho-motor function (choice reaction test and digit symbol) and auditory memory (digit span and associate learning) was significantly poorer in the exposed group. The findings support the view that apparently healthy and actively employed workers exposed to mixed solvents show neurobehavioural deficits.

  12. Paducah Site Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2012

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Paducah Site Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2012 Fractions and Multiples of Units Multiple Decimal Equivalent Prefix Symbol Engineering Format 10 6 1,000,000 mega- M E+06 10 3 1,000 kilo- k E+03 10 2 100 hecto- h E+02 10 10 deka- da E+01 10 -1 0.1 deci- d E-01 10 -2 0.01 centi- c E-02 10 -3 0.001 milli- m E-03 10 -6 0.000001 micro- ÎĽ E-06 10 -9 0.000000001 nano- n E-09 10 -12 0.000000000001 pico- P E-12 10 -15 0.000000000000001 femto- F E-15 10 -18 0.000000000000000001 atto-

  13. REFHRYO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    REFHRYO 4 .* f c g c ,. 3 -2/L $q - 2 -. & ,.::c.l I HUNTER:C,~~ :. I/X / ., 1' s ; ( 1 'n,. ._ . .yL , j',' -, A*. ["',i 1, C'/ I S.R.Syririr,Dirsotor of PWduotion~ JGly 28, 194rQ m&-ah mk =4P 3. P, Hiorgen, Aid&ant Dfr#rtor, Produatian D;CPirioa, 6oew Yorlc operationa Offitle UiW'?ItM OXIDE SCRAP / '\ M,ti' ~W:/JbS $' ( && ) SYMBOL& PUtDH \ / / ' :o,.:?:* ,I Attention: U. 0. tullw / xz Pleuae shi.ptherrolrpoovrredinyotPIrPslPorlandtnDoftiy Bby sealud freight tot

  14. Energy Information Directory, April 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-04-01

    The National Energy Information Center (NEIC), as part of its mission, provides energy information and referral assistance to federal, state, and local governments, the academic community, business and industrial organizations, and the general public. The two principal functions related to this task are (1) operating a general access telephone line and (2) responding to energy-related correspondence addressed to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). To assist the NEIC staff, as well as other Department of Energy (DOE) staff, in directing inquiries to the proper office within DOE or other federal agencies, the Energy Information Directory was developed. This directory is a list of many of the government offices that are involved in energy matters. The offices are classified according to their specialities. For the purposes of this publication, each office has been given an alphanumeric identification symbol (A-01, A-02, etc.). The subject index uses these identification symbols instead of page numbers in referring the reader to relevant entries. If you should encounter difficulties in reaching anyone listed in the directory or if you are requesting information from EIA, call the NEIC at (202) 252-8800. The DOE employee locator number is (202) 252-5000. If you encounter a problem in receiving a timely or responsive answer to an inquiry, please contact John E. Daniels, Director, National Energy Information Center, (202) 252-2363. This directory is published semiannually, with each issue superseding the previous issue. The publication is free and can be obtained from NEIC. We welcome your comments on the appropriateness and accuracy of the entries in this publication.

  15. Computers as tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eriksson, I.V.

    1994-12-31

    The following message was recently posted on a bulletin board and clearly shows the relevance of the conference theme: {open_quotes}The computer and digital networks seem poised to change whole regions of human activity -- how we record knowledge, communicate, learn, work, understand ourselves and the world. What`s the best framework for understanding this digitalization, or virtualization, of seemingly everything? ... Clearly, symbolic tools like the alphabet, book, and mechanical clock have changed some of our most fundamental notions -- self, identity, mind, nature, time, space. Can we say what the computer, a purely symbolic {open_quotes}machine,{close_quotes} is doing to our thinking in these areas? Or is it too early to say, given how much more powerful and less expensive the technology seems destinated to become in the next few decades?{close_quotes} (Verity, 1994) Computers certainly affect our lives and way of thinking but what have computers to do with ethics? A narrow approach would be that on the one hand people can and do abuse computer systems and on the other hand people can be abused by them. Weli known examples of the former are computer comes such as the theft of money, services and information. The latter can be exemplified by violation of privacy, health hazards and computer monitoring. Broadening the concept from computers to information systems (ISs) and information technology (IT) gives a wider perspective. Computers are just the hardware part of information systems which also include software, people and data. Information technology is the concept preferred today. It extends to communication, which is an essential part of information processing. Now let us repeat the question: What has IT to do with ethics? Verity mentioned changes in {open_quotes}how we record knowledge, communicate, learn, work, understand ourselves and the world{close_quotes}.

  16. Integrated analysis of breast cancer cell lines reveals unique signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser, Laura M.; Wang, Nicholas J.; Talcott, Carolyn L.; Laderoute, Keith R.; Knapp, Merrill; Guan, Yinghui; Hu, Zhi; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Weber, Barbara L.; Laquerre, Sylvie; Jackson, Jeffrey R.; Wooster, Richard F.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.

    2009-03-31

    Cancer is a heterogeneous disease resulting from the accumulation of genetic defects that negatively impact control of cell division, motility, adhesion and apoptosis. Deregulation in signaling along the EGFR-MAPK pathway is common in breast cancer, though the manner in which deregulation occurs varies between both individuals and cancer subtypes. We were interested in identifying subnetworks within the EGFR-MAPK pathway that are similarly deregulated across subsets of breast cancers. To that end, we mapped genomic, transcriptional and proteomic profiles for 30 breast cancer cell lines onto a curated Pathway Logic symbolic systems model of EGFR-MEK signaling. This model was comprised of 539 molecular states and 396 rules governing signaling between active states. We analyzed these models and identified several subtype specific subnetworks, including one that suggested PAK1 is particularly important in regulating the MAPK cascade when it is over-expressed. We hypothesized that PAK1 overexpressing cell lines would have increased sensitivity to MEK inhibitors. We tested this experimentally by measuring quantitative responses of 20 breast cancer cell lines to three MEK inhibitors. We found that PAK1 over-expressing luminal breast cancer cell lines are significantly more sensitive to MEK inhibition as compared to those that express PAK1 at low levels. This indicates that PAK1 over-expression may be a useful clinical marker to identify patient populations that may be sensitive to MEK inhibitors. All together, our results support the utility of symbolic system biology models for identification of therapeutic approaches that will be effective against breast cancer subsets.

  17. COMPLEXITY&APPROXIMABILITY OF QUANTIFIED&STOCHASTIC CONSTRAINT SATISFACTION PROBLEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, H. B.; Marathe, M. V.; Stearns, R. E.

    2001-01-01

    Let D be an arbitrary (not necessarily finite) nonempty set, let C be a finite set of constant symbols denoting arbitrary elements of D, and let S and T be an arbitrary finite set of finite-arity relations on D. We denote the problem of determining the satisfiability of finite conjunctions of relations in S applied to variables (to variables and symbols in C) by SAT(S) (by SATc(S).) Here, we study simultaneously the complexity of decision, counting, maximization and approximate maximization problems, for unquantified, quantified and stochastically quantified formulas. We present simple yet general techniques to characterize simultaneously, the complexity or efficient approximability of a number of versions/variants of the problems SAT(S), Q-SAT(S), S-SAT(S),MAX-Q-SAT(S) etc., for many different such D,C ,S, T. These versions/variants include decision, counting, maximization and approximate maximization problems, for unquantified, quantified and stochastically quantified formulas. Our unified approach is based on the following two basic concepts: (i) strongly-local replacements/reductions and (ii) relational/algebraic represent ability. Some of the results extend the earlier results in [Pa85,LMP99,CF+93,CF+94O]u r techniques and results reported here also provide significant steps towards obtaining dichotomy theorems, for a number of the problems above, including the problems MAX-&-SAT( S), and MAX-S-SAT(S). The discovery of such dichotomy theorems, for unquantified formulas, has received significant recent attention in the literature [CF+93,CF+94,Cr95,KSW97

  18. COMPLEXITY & APPROXIMABILITY OF QUANTIFIED & STOCHASTIC CONSTRAINT SATISFACTION PROBLEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. B. HUNT; M. V. MARATHE; R. E. STEARNS

    2001-06-01

    Let D be an arbitrary (not necessarily finite) nonempty set, let C be a finite set of constant symbols denoting arbitrary elements of D, and let S and T be an arbitrary finite set of finite-arity relations on D. We denote the problem of determining the satisfiability of finite conjunctions of relations in S applied to variables (to variables and symbols in C) by SAT(S) (by SATc(S).) Here, we study simultaneously the complexity of decision, counting, maximization and approximate maximization problems, for unquantified, quantified and stochastically quantified formulas. We present simple yet general techniques to characterize simultaneously, the complexity or efficient approximability of a number of versions/variants of the problems SAT(S), Q-SAT(S), S-SAT(S),MAX-Q-SAT(S) etc., for many different such D,C,S,T. These versions/variants include decision, counting, maximization and approximate maximization problems, for unquantified, quantified and stochastically quantified formulas. Our unified approach is based on the following two basic concepts: (i) strongly-local replacements/reductions and (ii) relational/algebraic representability. Some of the results extend the earlier results in [Pa85,LMP99,CF+93,CF+94] Our techniques and results reported here also provide significant steps towards obtaining dichotomy theorems, for a number of the problems above, including the problems MAX-Q-SAT(S), and MAX-S-SAT(S). The discovery of such dichotomy theorems, for unquantified formulas, has received significant recent attention in the literature [CF+93, CF+94, Cr95, KSW97]. Keywords: NP-hardness; Approximation Algorithms; PSPACE-hardness; Quantified and Stochastic Constraint Satisfaction Problems.

  19. Nonproliferation, arms control and disarmament and extended deterrence in the new security environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph F

    2009-01-01

    With the end of the Cold War, in a dramatically changed security environment, the advances in nonnuclear strategic capabilities along with reduced numbers and roles for nuclear forces has altered the calculus of deterrence and defense, at least for the United States. For many, this opened up a realistic possibility of a nuclear-free world. It soon became clear that the initial post-Cold War hopes were exaggerated. The world did change fundamentally, but it did not become more secure and stable. In place of the old Soviet threat, there has been growing concern about proliferation and terrorism involving nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction (WMD), regional conflicts, global instability and increasingly serious new and emerging threats, including cyber attacks and attacks on satellites. For the United States at least, in this emerging environment, the political rationales for nuclear weapons, from deterrence to reassurance to alliance management, are changing and less central than during the Cold War to the security of the United States, its friends and allies. Nuclear weapons remain important for the US, but for a far more limited set of roles and missions. As the Perry-Schlesinger Commission report reveals, there is a domestic US consensus on nuclear policy and posture at the highest level and for the near term, including the continued role of nuclear arms in deterring WMD use and in reassuring allies. Although the value of nuclear weapons has declined for the United States, the value of these weapons for Russia, China and so-called 'rogue' states is seen to be rising. The nuclear logic of NATO during Cold War - the need for nuclear weapons to counter vastly superior conventional capabilities of the Soviet Union and the Warsaw Pact - is today heard from Russians and even some proliferants. Moreover, these weapons present a way for rogues to achieve regional hegemony and possibly to deter interventions by the United States or others. While the vision of a nuclear-free world is powerful, both existing nuclear powers and proliferators are unlikely to forego nuclear weapons entirely in a world that is dangerous and uncertain. And the emerging world would not necessarily be more secure and stable without nuclear weapons. Even if nuclear weapons were given up by the United States and other nuclear-weapon states, there would continue to be concerns about the proliferation of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons, which would not disappear and could worsen. WMD terrorism would remain a concern that was largely unaffected by US and other nuclear-weapon decisions. Conventional capabilities would not disappear and the prospects for warfare could rise. In addition, new problems could arise if rogue states or other non-status-quo powers attempted to take advantage of moves toward disarmament, while friends and allies who are not reassured as in the past could reconsider their options if deterrence declined. To address these challenges, non- and counter-proliferation and counterterrorismincluding defenses and consequence management-are priorities, especially in light of an anticipated 'renaissance' in civil nuclear power. The current agenda of the United States and others includes efforts to: (1) Strengthen International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its safeguards system; (2) Strengthen export controls, especially for sensitive technologies, by limiting the development of reprocessing and enrichment technologies and by requiring the Additional Protocol as a condition of supply; (3) Establish a reliable supply regime, including the possibility of multilateral or multinational ownership of fuel cycle facilities, as a means to promote nuclear energy without increasing the risks of proliferation or terrorism; (4) Implement effectively UN Security Council Resolution 1540; and (5) Strengthen and institutionalize the Proliferation Security Initiative and the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism. These and other activities are important in themselves, and are essential to maintaining and strengthening the Nonproliferati

  20. Storage and turnover of organic matter in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torn, M.S.; Swanston, C.W.; Castanha, C.; Trumbore, S.E.

    2008-07-15

    Historically, attention on soil organic matter (SOM) has focused on the central role that it plays in ecosystem fertility and soil properties, but in the past two decades the role of soil organic carbon in moderating atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations has emerged as a critical research area. This chapter will focus on the storage and turnover of natural organic matter in soil (SOM), in the context of the global carbon cycle. Organic matter in soils is the largest carbon reservoir in rapid exchange with atmospheric CO{sub 2}, and is thus important as a potential source and sink of greenhouse gases over time scales of human concern (Fischlin and Gyalistras 1997). SOM is also an important human resource under active management in agricultural and range lands worldwide. Questions driving present research on the soil C cycle include: Are soils now acting as a net source or sink of carbon to the atmosphere? What role will soils play as a natural modulator or amplifier of climatic warming? How is C stabilized and sequestered, and what are effective management techniques to foster these processes? Answering these questions will require a mechanistic understanding of how and where C is stored in soils. The quantity and composition of organic matter in soil reflect the long-term balance between plant carbon inputs and microbial decomposition, as well as other loss processes such as fire, erosion, and leaching. The processes driving soil carbon storage and turnover are complex and involve influences at molecular to global scales. Moreover, the relative importance of these processes varies according to the temporal and spatial scales being considered; a process that is important at the regional scale may not be critical at the pedon scale. At the regional scale, SOM cycling is influenced by factors such as climate and parent material, which affect plant productivity and soil development. More locally, factors such as plant tissue quality and soil mineralogy affect decomposition pathways and stabilization. These factors influence the stability of SOM in part by shaping its molecular characteristics, which play a fundamental role in nearly all processes governing SOM stability but are not the focus of this chapter. We review here the most important controls on the distribution and dynamics of SOM at plot to global scales, and methods used to study them. We also explore the concepts of controls, processes, and mechanisms, and how they operate across scales. The concept of SOM turnover, or mean residence time, is central to this chapter and so it is described in some detail. The Appendix details the use of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C), a powerful isotopic tool for studying SOM dynamics. Much of the material here was originally presented at a NATO Advanced Study Institute on 'Soils and Global Change: Carbon Cycle, Trace Gas Exchange and Hydrology', held June 16-27, 1997, at the Chateau de Bonas, France.

  1. 2D?3D polycatenated and 3D?3D interpenetrated metal–organic frameworks constructed from thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylate and rigid bis(imidazole) ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erer, Hakan; Ye?ilel, Okan Zafer; Ar?c?, Mürsel; Keskin, Seda; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2014-02-15

    Hydrothermal reactions of rigid 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)benzene (dib) and 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)-2,5-dimethylbenzene (dimb) with deprotonated thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}tdc) in the presence of Zn(II) and Cd(II) salts in H{sub 2}O produced three new metal–organic frameworks, namely, [Zn(µ-tdc)(H{sub 2}O)(µ-dib)]{sub n} (1), [Cd(µ-tdc)(H{sub 2}O)(µ-dib)]{sub n} (2), and ([Cd{sub 2}(µ{sub 3}-tdc){sub 2}(µ-dimb){sub 2}]·(H{sub 2}O)){sub n}(3). These MOFs were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, elemental, thermal (TG, DTA, DTG and DSC), and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Isomorphous complexes 1 and 2 reveal polycatenated 2D+2D?3D framework based on an undulated (4,4)-sql layer. Complex 3 exhibits a new 4-fold interpenetrating 3D framework with the point symbol of 6{sup 6}. Molecular simulations were used to assess the potentials of the complexes for H{sub 2} storage application. Moreover, these coordination polymers exhibit blue fluorescent emission bands in the solid state at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: In this study, hydrothermal reactions of rigid 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)benzene (dib) and 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)-2,5-dimethylbenzene (dimb) with deprotonated thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}tdc) in the presence of Zn(II) and Cd(II) salts in H{sub 2}O produced three new metal–organic frameworks. Isomorphous complexes 1 and 2 reveal polycatenated 2D+2D?3D framework based on an undulated (4,4)-sql layer. Complex 3 exhibits a new 4-fold interpenetrating 3D framework with the point symbol of 6{sup 6}. Molecular simulations were used to assess the potentials of the complexes for H{sub 2} storage application. These coordination polymers exhibit blue fluorescent emission bands in the solid state at room temperature. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Complexes 1 and 2 display polycatenated 2D+2D?3D framework. • Complex 3 exhibits a new 4-fold interpenetrating 3D framework. • Complex 1 adsorbs the highest amount of H{sub 2} at 100 bar and 298 K. • Complexes display blue fluorescent emission bands.

  2. Computer_Vision

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-10-04

    The Computer_Vision software performs object recognition using a novel multi-scale characterization and matching algorithm. To understand the multi-scale characterization and matching software, it is first necessary to understand some details of the Computer Vision (CV) Project. This project has focused on providing algorithms and software that provide an end-to-end toolset for image processing applications. At a high-level, this end-to-end toolset focuses on 7 coy steps. The first steps are geometric transformations. 1) Image Segmentation. Thismore » step essentially classifies pixels in foe input image as either being of interest or not of interest. We have also used GENIE segmentation output for this Image Segmentation step. 2 Contour Extraction (patent submitted). This takes the output of Step I and extracts contours for the blobs consisting of pixels of interest. 3) Constrained Delaunay Triangulation. This is a well-known geometric transformation that creates triangles inside the contours. 4 Chordal Axis Transform (CAT) . This patented geometric transformation takes the triangulation output from Step 3 and creates a concise and accurate structural representation of a contour. From the CAT, we create a linguistic string, with associated metrical information, that provides a detailed structural representation of a contour. 5.) Normalization. This takes an attributed linguistic string output from Step 4 and balances it. This ensures that the linguistic representation accurately represents the major sections of the contour. Steps 6 and 7 are implemented by the multi-scale characterization and matching software. 6) Multi scale Characterization. This takes as input the attributed linguistic string output from Normalization. Rules from a context free grammar are applied in reverse to create a tree-like representation for each contour. For example, one of the grammar’s rules is L -> (LL ). When an (LL) is seen in a string, a parent node is created that points to the four child symbols ‘(‘ , ‘L’ , ‘L’, and ‘)‘ . Levels in the tree can then be thought of as coarser (towards the root) or finer (towards the leaves) representations of the same contours. 7.) Multi scale Matching. Having a multi-scale characterization allows us to compare objects at a coarser level before matching at finer levels of detail. Matching at a coarser level not only increases the speed of the matching process (you’re comparing fewer symbols) , but also increases accuracy since small variations along contours do not significantly detract from two objects’ similarity.« less

  3. Gas adsorption/separation properties of metal directed self-assembly of two coordination polymers with 5-nitroisophthalate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ar?c?, Mürsel; Ye?ilel, Okan Zafer; Keskin, Seda; ?ahin, Onur

    2014-02-15

    Two new coordination polymers, namely, [Co(µ-nip)(µ-bpe)]{sub n} (1) and [Zn(µ-nip)(µ-bpe)]{sub n} (2) (nip: 5-nitroisophthalate, bpe: 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane) were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and thermal analysis. Moreover, atomically detailed simulation studies of complex 2 for CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} adsorption and separation were performed. Complex 1 consists of two dimensional (2D) (4,4) grid networks with the point symbol of 4{sup 4}.6{sup 2}. Complex 2 exhibits a 3-fold interpenetrating 3D framework with 6{sup 5}.8-dmp topology. Thermal properties of the complexes showed that both complexes were stable over 320 °C. Simulation studies demonstrated that complex 2 can separate CO{sub 2} from CH{sub 4} at low pressures at 273 K. - Graphical abstract: In this study, two new coordination polymers, namely, [Co(µ-nip)(µ-bpe)]{sub n} (1) and [Zn(µ-nip)(µ-bpe)]{sub n} (2) (nip: 5-nitroisophthalate, bpe: 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane) were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and thermal analysis. Moreover, atomically detailed simulation studies of complex 2 for CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} adsorption and separation were performed. Complex 1 consists of two dimensional (2D) (4,4) grid networks with the point symbol of 4{sup 4}.6{sup 2}. Complex 2 exhibits a 3-fold interpenetrating 3D framework with 6{sup 5}.8-dmp topology. Simulation studies demonstrated that complex 2 can separate CO{sub 2} from CH{sub 4} at low pressures at 273 K. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Two new coordination polymers with 5-nitroisophthalate and 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane. • Atomically detailed simulation studies of the complexes. • Complex 2 can be proposed as molecular sieve to separate CO{sub 2} from CH{sub 4} at low pressures.

  4. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Editors: Carol A. Phillips; Anthony R. DeMeo

    2004-08-23

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights report provides a summary of the activities at the Laboratory for the fiscal year--1 October 2002 through 30 September 2003. The report includes the Laboratory's Mission and Vision Statements, a message ''From the Director,'' summaries of the research and engineering activities by project, and sections on Technology Transfer, the Graduate and Science Education Programs, Awards and Honors garnered by the Laboratory and the employees, and the Year in Pictures. There is also a listing of the Laboratory's publications for the year and a section of the abbreviations, acronyms, and symbols used throughout the report. In the PDF document, links have been created from the Table of Contents to each section. You can also return to the Table of Contents from the beginning page of each section. The PPPL Highlights for fiscal year 2003 is also available in hardcopy format. To obtain a copy e-mail Publications and Reports at: pub-reports@pppl.gov. Be sure to include your complete mailing address

  5. Nickel deficiency in RENi2-xP2 (RE=La, Ce, Pr). Combined crystallographic and physical property studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Eric D; Ronning, Filip; Thompson, Joe D; Sarrao, John L; Bobev, S; Xia, S

    2008-01-01

    Large single crystals from RENi{sub 2-x}P{sub 2} (RE = La, Ce, Pr) were synthesized from the pure elements using Sn as a metal flux, and their structures were established by X-ray crystallography. The title compounds were confirmed to crystallize in the body-centered tetragonal ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2} structure type (space group I4/mmm (No. 139); Pearson's symbol tI10), but with a significant stoichiometry breadth with respect to the transition metal. Systematic synthetic work, coupled with accurate structure refinements indicated strong correlation between the degree of Ni-deficiency and the reaction conditions. For four different PrNi{sub 2-x}P{sub 2} (x {le} 0.5) samples, temperature dependent dc magnetization measurements indicated typical local moment 4f-magnetism and a stable Pr{sup 3+} ground state. Field-dependent heat capacity data confirmed a ferromagnetic order at low temperature, and the variations of T{sub c} with the concentration of Ni defects are discussed. LaNi{sub 2-x}P{sub 2}, as expected was found to be Pauli-like paramagnetic in the studied temperature regime, while the Ce-analog CeNi{sub 2-x}P{sub 2} (x = 0.28(1)) showed the characteristics of a mixed valent Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+} system with a possible Kondo temperature on the order of 230 K.

  6. Nuclear Fuels: Promise and Limitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold F. McFarlane

    2012-03-01

    From 1950 through 1980, scientists, engineers and national leaders confidently predicted an early twenty-first century where fast breeder reactors and commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing were commonplace. Such a scenario seemed necessary for a world with the more than 1000 GWe of nuclear energy needed to meet such an ever-increasing thirst for energy. Thirty years later uranium reserves are increasing on pace with consumption, the growth of nuclear power has been slowed, commercial breeder reactors have yet to enter the marketplace, and less than a handful of commercial reprocessing plants operate. As Nobel Laureate Niels Bohr famously said, “Prediction is very difficult, especially if it’s about the future.” The programme for IChemE’s 2012 conference on the nuclear fuel cycle features a graphic of an idealized nuclear fuel cycle that symbolizes the quest for a closed nuclear fuel cycle featuring careful husbanding of precious resources while minimizing the waste footprint. Progress toward achieving this ideal has been disrupted by technology innovations in the mining and petrochemical industries, as well as within the nuclear industry.

  7. Science into art: A study of the creative process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchant, M.; Sesko, S.C.

    1997-03-14

    Objective was to examine the creative process, demonstrated by 5 student participants in a class at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena CA, from the germ of the creative idea through the final creative product. The students, drawn from classes sponsored by LLNL, were assigned the problem of representing ``big`` science, as practiced at LLNL, in a graphic, artistic, or multimedia product. As a result of this study, it was discovered that the process of creativity with these students was not linear in nature, nor did it strictly follow the traditional creativity 5-step schema of preparation, incubation, insight, evaluation, and elaboration. Of particular interest were several emergent themes of the creative process: spontaneous use of metaphor to describe the Laboratory; a general lack of interest in ``school`` science or mathematics by the American art students; a well developed sense of conscience; and finally, the symbolism inherent in the repeated use of a single artistic element. This use of the circle revealed a continuity of thinking and design perhaps related to the idealistic bias mentioned above.

  8. Compression embedding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T. (Los Alamos, NM); Handel, Theodore G. (Los Alamos, NM); Bradley, Jonathan N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%.

  9. National Energy Strategy: A compilation of public comments; Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    This Report presents a compilation of what the American people themselves had to say about problems, prospects, and preferences in energy. The Report draws on the National Energy Strategy public hearing record and accompanying documents. In all, 379 witnesses appeared at the hearings to exchange views with the Secretary, Deputy Secretary, and Deputy Under Secretary of Energy, and Cabinet officers of other Federal agencies. Written submissions came from more than 1,000 individuals and organizations. Transcripts of the oral testimony and question-and-answer (Q-and-A) sessions, as well as prepared statements submitted for the record and all other written submissions, form the basis for this compilation. Citations of these sources in this document use a system of identifying symbols explained below and in the accompanying box. The Report is organized into four general subject areas concerning: (1) efficiency in energy use, (2) the various forms of energy supply, (3) energy and the environment, and (4) the underlying foundations of science, education, and technology transfer. Each of these, in turn, is subdivided into sections addressing specific topics --- such as (in the case of energy efficiency) energy use in the transportation, residential, commercial, and industrial sectors, respectively. 416 refs., 44 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Environment and energy in Iceland: A comparative analysis of values and impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorhallsdottir, Thora Ellen . E-mail: theth@hi.is

    2007-08-15

    Within an Icelandic framework plan for energy, environmental values and impacts were estimated in multicriteria analyses for 19 hydroelectric and 22 geothermal developments. Four natural environment classes were defined (geology + hydrology, species, ecosystems + soils, landscape + wilderness) with cultural heritage as the fifth class. Values and impacts were assessed through 6 agglomerated attributes: richness/diversity, rarity, size/continuity/pristineness, information/symbolic value, international responsibility and visual value. The project offers a unique opportunity for comparing environmental values and impacts within a large sample of sites and energy alternatives treated within a common methodological framework. Total values were higher in hydroelectric than in geothermal areas. Hydroelectric areas scored high for cultural heritage (particularly in rarity and information value), landscape and wilderness. Geothermal areas had high bedrock and hydrological diversity and information values, and a high landscape visual value but little cultural heritage. High values were correlated among some classes of the natural environment, all of which are likely to reflect functional relationships. In contrast, cultural heritage values were not related to natural environment values. Overall, landscape and wilderness had the highest mean value and were also most affected by energy development. Over 40% of the hydroelectric development had a predicted mean impact value of > 4 (out of a maximum of 10), compared with 10% of the geothermal projects. Excluding two outsized hydropower options, there was a significant correlation between plant capacity and impact on geology and hydrology but not with other environmental variables.

  11. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-01

    Report IV, Volume 6 provides descriptions, data, and drawings pertaining to Gasification and Purification (Plant 12). Gasification and Purification (Plant 12) produces makeup hydrogen for H-COAL Preheating and Reaction (Plant 3), and produces a medium Btu fuel gas for consumption in fired heaters. The following information is included: a description of the plant's process design, including the utility balance, catalysts and chemicals usage, and a process flow diagram; an equipment list, including item numbers and descriptions; data sheets and sketches for major plant components; and pertinent engineering drawings. An appendix contains: an overall site plan showing the locations of all plants; and the symbols and legend for the piping and instrument diagrams included in this volume. Gasification and Purification (Plant 12) utilizes process technology from three licensors: gasification of vacuum bottoms using the Texaco process, shift conversion using the Haldor Topsoe process, and purification of fuel gas and shifted gas using the Allied Chemical Selexol process. This licensed technology is proprietary in nature. As a result, this volume does not contain full disclosure of these processes although a maximum of information has been presented consistent with the confidentiality requirements. Where data appears incomplete in this volume, it is due to the above described limitations. Full data concerning this plant are available for DOE review at the Houston offices of Bechtel Petroleum, Inc.

  12. Pyomo : Python Optimization Modeling Objects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siirola, John; Laird, Carl Damon; Hart, William Eugene; Watson, Jean-Paul

    2010-11-01

    The Python Optimization Modeling Objects (Pyomo) package [1] is an open source tool for modeling optimization applications within Python. Pyomo provides an objected-oriented approach to optimization modeling, and it can be used to define symbolic problems, create concrete problem instances, and solve these instances with standard solvers. While Pyomo provides a capability that is commonly associated with algebraic modeling languages such as AMPL, AIMMS, and GAMS, Pyomo's modeling objects are embedded within a full-featured high-level programming language with a rich set of supporting libraries. Pyomo leverages the capabilities of the Coopr software library [2], which integrates Python packages (including Pyomo) for defining optimizers, modeling optimization applications, and managing computational experiments. A central design principle within Pyomo is extensibility. Pyomo is built upon a flexible component architecture [3] that allows users and developers to readily extend the core Pyomo functionality. Through these interface points, extensions and applications can have direct access to an optimization model's expression objects. This facilitates the rapid development and implementation of new modeling constructs and as well as high-level solution strategies (e.g. using decomposition- and reformulation-based techniques). In this presentation, we will give an overview of the Pyomo modeling environment and model syntax, and present several extensions to the core Pyomo environment, including support for Generalized Disjunctive Programming (Coopr GDP), Stochastic Programming (PySP), a generic Progressive Hedging solver [4], and a tailored implementation of Bender's Decomposition.

  13. Compression embedding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  14. SURFACE CHEMKIN-III: A Fortran package for analyzing heterogeneous chemical kinetics at a solid-surface - gas-phase interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coltrin, M.E.; Kee, R.J.; Rupley, F.M.; Meeks, E.

    1996-05-01

    This document is the user`s manual for the SURFACE CHEMKIN-III package. Together with CHEMKIN-III, this software facilitates the formation, solution, and interpretation of problems involving elementary heterogeneous and gas-phase chemical kinetics in the presence of a solid surface. The package consists of two major software components: an Interpreter and a Surface Subroutine Library. The Interpreter is a program that reads a symbolic description of a user-specified chemical reaction mechanism. One output from the Interpreter is a data file that forms a link to the Surface Subroutine Library, which is a collection of about seventy modular Fortran subroutines that may be called from a user`s application code to return information on chemical production rates and thermodynamic properties. This version of SURFACE CHEMKIN-III includes many modifications to allow treatment of multi-fluid plasma systems, for example modeling the reactions of highly energetic ionic species with a surface. Optional rate expressions allow reaction rates to depend upon ion energy rather than a single thermodynamic temperature. In addition, subroutines treat temperature as an array, allowing an application code to define a different temperature for each species. This version of SURFACE CHEMKIN-III allows use of real (non-integer) stoichiometric coefficients; the reaction order with respect to species concentrations can also be specified independent of the reaction`s stoichiometric coefficients. Several different reaction mechanisms can be specified in the Interpreter input file through the new construct of multiple materials.

  15. Operational health physics training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-06-01

    The initial four sections treat basic information concerning atomic structure and other useful physical quantities, natural radioactivity, the properties of {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, x rays and neutrons, and the concepts and units of radiation dosimetry (including SI units). Section 5 deals with biological effects and the risks associated with radiation exposure. Background radiation and man-made sources are discussed next. The basic recommendations of the ICRP concerning dose limitations: justification, optimization (ALARA concepts and applications) and dose limits are covered in Section seven. Section eight is an expanded version of shielding, and the internal dosimetry discussion has been extensively revised to reflect the concepts contained in the MIRD methodology and ICRP 30. The remaining sections discuss the operational health physics approach to monitoring radiation. Individual sections include radiation detection principles, instrument operation and counting statistics, health physics instruments and personnel monitoring devices. The last five sections deal with the nature of, operation principles of, health physics aspects of, and monitoring approaches to air sampling, reactors, nuclear safety, gloveboxes and hot cells, accelerators and x ray sources. Decontamination, waste disposal and transportation of radionuclides are added topics. Several appendices containing constants, symbols, selected mathematical topics, and the Chart of the Nuclides, and an index have been included.

  16. BLOT Ver. 1.65

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-03-24

    BLOT is a graphic program for post-processing finite element analyses output in the EXODUS II database format. It is command driven with free-format input and can drive graphics devices supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. BLOT produces mesh plots of the analysis output variables including deformed mesh plots, line contours, filled (painted) contours, vector plots of two/three variables (velocity vectors), and symbol plots of scalar variables (discrete cracks). Features include pathlines of analysis variablesmore » drawn on the mesh, element selection by material, element birth and death, multiple views combining several displays on each plot, symmetry mirroring, and node and element numbering. X-Y plots of the analysis variables include time vs. variable plots or variable vs. variable plots, and distance vs. variable plots at selected time steps where distance is the accumulated distance between pairs of nodes or element centers. BLOT is written in as portable a form as possible. Fortran code is written in ANSI Standard FORTRAN-77. Machine-specific routines are limited in number and are grouped together to minimize the time required to adapt them to a new system. SEACAS codes have been ported to several Unix systems« less

  17. Energy information directory 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    The National Energy Information Center (NEIC), as part of its mission, provides energy information and referral assistance to Federal, state, and local governments, the academic community, business and industrial organizations, and the general public. The two principal functions related to this task are: (1) operating a general access telephone line, and (2) responding to energy-related correspondence addressed to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The Energy Information Directory was developed to assist the NEIC staff, as well as other Department of Energy (DOE) staff, in directing inquiries to the proper offices within DOE, other Federal agencies, or energy-related trade associations. The Directory lists some of the Government offices and trade associations that are involved in energy matters. It includes those DOE offices which deal with the public or public information. For the purposes of this publication, each entry has been given a numeric identification symbol. The index found in the back of this publication uses these identification numbers to refer the reader to relevant entries.

  18. An efficient implementation of the Chebyshev Rational Approximation Method (CRAM) for solving the burnup equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pusa, M.; Leppaenen, J.

    2012-07-01

    The Chebyshev Rational Approximation Method (CRAM) has been recently introduced by the authors for solving the burnup equations with excellent results. This method has been shown to be capable of simultaneously solving an entire burnup system with thousands of nuclides both accurately and efficiently. The method was prompted by an analysis of the spectral properties of burnup matrices and it can be characterized as the best rational approximation on the negative real axis. The coefficients of the rational approximation are fixed and have been reported for various approximation orders. In addition to these coefficients, implementing the method only requires a linear solver. This paper describes an efficient method for solving the linear systems associated with the CRAM approximation. The introduced direct method is based on sparse Gaussian elimination where the sparsity pattern of the resulting upper triangular matrix is determined before the numerical elimination phase. The stability of the proposed Gaussian elimination method is discussed based on considering the numerical properties of burnup matrices. Suitable algorithms are presented for computing the symbolic factorization and numerical elimination in order to facilitate the implementation of CRAM and its adoption into routine use. The accuracy and efficiency of the described technique are demonstrated by computing the CRAM approximations for a large test case with over 1600 nuclides. (authors)

  19. PHYSLIB: A C++ tensor class library

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budge, K.G.

    1991-10-09

    C++ is the first object-oriented programming language which produces sufficiently efficient code for consideration in computation-intensive physics and engineering applications. In addition, the increasing availability of massively parallel architectures requires novel programming techniques which may prove to be relatively easy to implement in C++. For these reasons, Division 1541 at Sandia National Laboratories is devoting considerable resources to the development of C++ libraries. This document describes the first of these libraries to be released, PHYSLIB, which defines classes representing Cartesian vectors and (second-order) tensors. This library consists of the header file physlib.h, the inline code file physlib.inl, and the source file physlib.C. The library is applicable to both three-dimensional and two-dimensional problems; the user selects the 2-D version of the library by defining the symbol TWO D in the header file physlib.h and recompiling physlib.C and his own code. Alternately, system managers may wish to provide duplicate header and object modules of each dimensionality. This code was produced under the auspices of Sandia National Laboratories, a federally-funded research center administered for the United States Department of Energy on a non-profit basis by AT T. This code is available to US citizens, and institutions under research, government use and/or commercial license agreements.

  20. Distributed resource management: garbage collection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagherzadeh, N.

    1987-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a great interest in designing high-performance distributed symbolic-processing computers. These architectures have special needs for resource management and dynamic reclamation of unused memory cells and objects. The memory management or garbage-collection aspects of these architectures are studied. Also introduced is a synchronous distributed algorithm for garbage collection. A special data structure is defined to handle the distributed nature of the problem. The author formally expresses the algorithm and shows the results of a synchronous garbage-collection simulation and its effect on the interconnection-network message to traffic. He presents an asynchronous distributed garbage collection to handle the resource management for a system that does not require a global synchronization mechanism. The distributed data structure is modified to include the asynchronous aspects of the algorithm. This method is extended to a multiple-mutator scheme, and the problem of having several processors share portion of a cyclical graph is discussed. Two models for the analytical study of the garbage-collection algorithms discussed are provided.

  1. Introducing PAP: a plasma apprentice program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mynick, H.E.

    1986-04-01

    Although current capabilities of symbolic computation and artificial intelligence are not adequate to do all the types of thinking a physicist does in solving physics problems, much of what the human theorist does can be effectively imitated by a computer. This paper describes an early stage of implementation of an apprentice program for aiding plasma theorists in developing plasma physics theory, by performing some of those tasks which the theorist normally must do, but which are now amenable to machine imitation. The apprentice has a ''knowledge base'' containing its understanding of plasma theory, which can be accessed by the human user for pedagogic purposes, as well as by the apprentice itself, and some ability to do the kinds of qualitative or heuristic reasoning necessary to the human theorist in solving problems. These facilities enable the apprentice itself to do plasma calculations, informing the user of the progress of the calculation, and prompting him when a decision is needed which the apprentice is not equipped to handle. Some extensions planned for the future are discussed.

  2. Consumption, Not CO2 emissions: Reframing Perspectives on Climate Change and Sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harriss, Robert; Shui, Bin

    2010-12-01

    A stunning documentary film titled “Mardi Gras: Made in China” provides an insightful and engaging perspective on the globalization of desire for material consumption. Tracing the life cycle of Mardi Gras beads from a small factory in Fuzhou, China to the streets of the Mardi Gras celebration in New Orleans the viewer grasps the near universal human desire to strive for an affluent lifestyle. David Redmon, an independent film maker, follows the beads' genealogy back to the industrial town of Fuzhou, China, to the factory that is the world's largest producer of Mardi Gras beads and related party trinkets. He explores how these frivolous and toxic products affect the people who make them and those who consume them. Redmon captures the daily reality of a Chinese manufacturing facility. It’s workforce of approximately 500 teenage girls, and a handful of boys, live like prisoners in a fenced-in compound. These young people, often working 16-hour days, are constantly exposed to styrene, a chemical known to cause cancer — all for about 10 cents an hour. In addition to indoor pollution, the decrepit coal-fired manufacturing facilities are symbolic of China’s fast rise to the world’s top producer of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions.1 The process of industrialization and modernization in China is happening at an unprecedented rate and scale.

  3. The CD36, CLA-1(CD36L1), and LIMPII (CD36L2) gene family: Cellular distribution, chromosomal location, and genetic evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvo, D.; Vega, M.A.; Dopazo, J.

    1995-01-01

    CD36, CLA-1, and LIMPII are single polypeptide membrane glycoproteins, and the genes encoding them constitute a recently described gene family. In the present paper, a cDNA encoding the human lysosomal membrane protein LIMPII was used to determine its expression pattern in cells of various lineages. Like CLA-1, and in contrast with the restricted expression of CD36, the expression of LIMPII is widespread. Mapping of the human LIMPII and CLA-1 genes (gene symbols CD36L2 and CD36L1, respectively) to specific chromosomes revealed that CLA-1, LIMPII, and CD36 do not form a gene cluster, but are found dispersed on chromosomes 12, 4, and 7, respectively. These data, together with the phylogenetic analysis carried out for the members of this family, indicate that the LIMPII, CIA-1, and CD36 genes diverged early in evolution from an ancestor gene, possibly before the divergence between the arthropods and the vertebrates. 48 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Case report: Profound neurobehavioral deficits in an oil field worker overcome by hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilburn, K.H. )

    1993-11-01

    A 24-year-old oil well tester was rendered semiconscious by hydrogen sulfide (H2S). He received oxygen and was hospitalized but released in 30 minutes. The next day, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and incontinence of urine and stool led to rehospitalization. These problems and leg shaking, dizziness, sweating, trouble sleeping, and nightmares prevented his return to work. A physical examination, chest x-ray, and pulmonary function tests were normal 39 months after the episode but vibration sense was diminished. Two choice visual reaction times were delayed. Balance was highly abnormal (5 to 6 cm/sec) with eyes closed. Blink reflex latency was slow (R-1 17.5 msec versus normal 14.3 msec). Numbers written on finger tips were not recognized. Verbal and visual recall were impaired but overlearned memory was intact. Cognitive functions measured by Culture Fair, block design, and digit symbol were impaired. Perceptual motor was slow. Scores for confusion, tension-anxiety, depression, and fatigue were elevated and vigor was reduced. Forty-nine months after exposure his reaction time, sway speed, and color vision had not improved. His recall and his cognitive, constructional, and psychomotor speeds had improved but remained abnormal. These deficits are most likely due to H2S. Similar testing of other survivors is recommended.

  5. Changes in Russia's Military and Nuclear Doctrine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolkov, Benjamin M.; Balatsky, Galya I.

    2012-07-26

    In 1993, the Russian Federation set out a new military doctrine that would determine the direction of its armed forces until President Putin set out the next doctrine in 2000. The Russian Federation creating the doctrine was new; the USSR had recently collapsed, Gorbachev - the creator of the predecessor to this doctrine in 1987 - was out of office, and the new Russian military had only been formed in May, 1992.1 The analysis of the 1993 doctrine is as follows: a definition of how doctrine is defined; a short history of Russian military doctrine leading up to the 1993 doctrine (officially the Basic Provisions of the Military Doctrine of the Russian Federation); and finally, what the doctrine established. An overview of the 1993 doctrine is: (1) Russia's 1993 doctrine was a return to older, more aggressive doctrine as a result of stability concerns surrounding the recent collapse of the USSR; (2) Russia turned from Gorbachev's 'defensive defense' in the 1987 doctrine to aggressive defense with the option of preempting or striking back against an aggressor; (3) Russia was deeply concerned about how nationalism would affect the former Soviet Republics, particularly in respect to the ethnic Russians still living abroad; and (4) Nuclear doctrine pledged to not be the first to use nuclear weapons but provided for the potential for escalation from a conventional to a nuclear war. The 2000 doctrine (officially the Russian Federation Military Doctrine) was created in a more stable world than the 1993 doctrine was. The Russian Federation had survived independence and the 'threat of direct military aggression against the Russian Federation and its allies' had diminished. It had secured all of the nuclear weapons from its neighbors Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan, and had elected a new president, Vladimir Putin, to replace Boris Yeltsin. Yet, even as the doctrine took more defensive tones than the 1993 doctrine, it expanded its nuclear options. Below are a new definition of what doctrine meant in 2000 and an outline of the 2000 doctrine. An overview of the 2000 doctrine is: (1) The 2000 doctrine was a return to a more defensive posture; the threat of nuclear retaliation, rather than that of preemptive force, would be its deterrence; (2) In order to strengthen its nuclear deterrence, Russia extended and redefined the cases in which nuclear weapons could be used to include a wider range of conflict types and a larger spectrum of attackers; and (3) Russia's threats changed to reflect its latest fear of engaging in a limited conflict with no prospect of the use of nuclear deterrence. In 2006, the defense minister and deputy prime minister Sergei Ivanov announced that the government was starting on a draft of a future doctrine. Four years later, in 2010, the Military Doctrine of the Russian Federation was put into effect with the intent of determining Russian doctrine until 2020. The 2010 doctrine, like all previous doctrines, was a product of the times in which it was written. Gone were many of the fears that had followed Russia for the past two decades. Below are an examination of the 2010 definition of doctrine as well as a brief analysis of the 2010 doctrine and its deviations from past doctrines. An overview of the 2010 doctrine is: (1) The new doctrine emphasizes the political centralization of command both in military policy and the use of nuclear weapons; (2) Nuclear doctrine remains the same in many aspects including the retention of first-use; (3) At the same time, doctrine was narrowed to using nuclear weapons only when the Russian state's existence is in danger; to continue strong deterrence, Russia also opted to follow the United States by introducing precision conventional weapons; (4) NATO is defined as Russia's primary external threat because of its increased global presence and its attempt to recruit states that are part of the Russian 'bloc'; and (5) The 2000 doctrine's defensive stance was left out of the doctrine; rumored options for use of nuclear weapons in local wars and in preemptive strikes were also left out.

  6. Two new pyridine-2,3-dicarboxylate coordination polymers prepared from zerovalent metal precursor: Syntheses, luminescent and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Semerci, Fatih; Ye?ilel, Okan Zafer; Soylu, Mustafa Serkan; Yerli, Yusuf; Dal, Hakan

    2014-02-15

    Two new K{sup +}/Cu(II) and Zn(II) coordination polymers with pyridine-2,3-dicarboxylate (pydc), (K{sub 2}[Cu(?-pydc){sub 2}]·3H{sub 2}O){sub n} (1) and ([Zn(µ-pydc)(H{sub 2}O)(4-mim)]·H{sub 2}O){sub n} (2) (4-mim=4-methylimidazole) have been synthesized from zerovalent metal and characterized by IR, EPR spectroscopy, thermal analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. In the sandwiched 3D anionic framework of 1, pydc ligands exhibit hexadentate coordination; tridentate coordination bond with Cu(II) and tridentate ionic interaction with K{sup +} ions. (K{sub 2}[Cu(?-pydc){sub 2}]·3H{sub 2}O){sub n} shows a rare topology consists of three dimensional (3,4,5)-connected network with the point symbol of (4{sup 2}.6){sub 2}(4{sup 2}.8{sup 4})(4{sup 3}.6.8{sup 6}){sub 2}. The distorted square pyramidal geometry of 2 is completed with an nitrogen atom from 4-mim and aqua ligand to form a 1D polynuclear structure. The hydrogen bonds link the 1D chains into 3D architecture. The temperature dependent magnetic property of complex 1 has been studied. Complex 2 exhibits unusual yellow luminescence in the solid state at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Two new K{sup +}/Cu(II) and Zn(II) coordination polymers with pyridine-2,3-dicarboxylate (pydc), (K{sub 2}[Cu(?-pydc){sub 2}]·3H{sub 2}O){sub n} (1) and ([Zn(µ-pydc)(H{sub 2}O)(4-mim)]·H{sub 2}O){sub n} (2) (4-mim=4-methylimidazole) have been synthesized from zerovalent metal and characterized by IR, EPR spectroscopy, thermal analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The water soluble (K{sub 2}[Cu(?-pydc){sub 2}]·3H{sub 2}O){sub n} shows three dimensional a rare 3,4,5-connected network with the point symbol of (4{sup 2}.6){sub 2}(4{sup 2}.8{sup 4})(4{sup 3}.6.8{sup 6}){sub 2}. The temperature dependent magnetic property of complex 1 has been studied. Complex 2 exhibits unusual yellow luminescence in the solid state at room temperature. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Water-soluble (K{sub 2}[Cu(?-pydc){sub 2}]·3H{sub 2}O){sub n} has synthesized. • Zerovalent metal precursors are utilized. • The temperature dependent magnetic properties have been studied.

  7. Dynamic Simulation Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-03-03

    DSNP (Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power-Plants) is a system of programs and data files by which a nuclear power plant, or part thereof, can be simulated. The acronym DSNP is used interchangeably for the DSNP language, the DSNP libraries, the DSNP precompiler, and the DSNP document generator. The DSNP language is a special-purpose, block-oriented, digital-simulation language developed to facilitate the preparation of dynamic simulations of a large variety of nuclear power plants. It is amore » user-oriented language that permits the user to prepare simulation programs directly from power plant block diagrams and flow charts by recognizing the symbolic DSNP statements for the appropriate physical components and listing these statements in a logical sequence according to the flow of physical properties in the simulated power plant. Physical components of nuclear power plants are represented by functional blocks, or modules. Many of the more complex components are represented by several modules. The nuclear reactor, for example, has a kinetic module, a power distribution module, a feedback module, a thermodynamic module, a hydraulic module, and a radioactive heat decay module. These modules are stored in DSNP libraries in the form of a DSNP subroutine or function, a block of statements, a macro, or a combination of the above. Basic functional blocks such as integrators, pipes, function generators, connectors, and many auxiliary functions representing properties of materials used in nuclear power plants are also available. The DSNP precompiler analyzes the DSNP simulation program, performs the appropriate translations, inserts the requested modules from the library, links these modules together, searches necessary data files, and produces a simulation program in FORTRAN.« less

  8. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-01

    Report V, Volume 1 provides descriptions, data, and drawings pertaining to Flare System (Plant 19), Tankage (Plant 20), Interconnecting Piping (Plant 21), River Facilities (Plant 22), Rail, Truck, Pipeline (Plant 23), and Electrical Distribution (Plant 30). Flare System (Plant 19) provides primary and auxiliary flare systems for safe collection and disposal of overpressure relief discharges, and operational and emergency venting of flammable vapors and liquids from the various processing plants and loading facilities. Tankage (Plant 20) provides storage for propane and heavier liquid hydrocarbon products, as well as for by-product ammonia, phenols, and liquid sulfur. Interconnecting Piping (Plant 21) includes the fuel gas blending and distribution system and the interconnecting process and utility piping between process plants and offsites. River Facilities (Plant 22) provides the loading of liquid products and by-products into barges for marine surface transportation, and the unloading of coal from barges. Rail, Truck, Pipeline (Plant 23) provides loading and unloading of products shipped by either rail or truck. Electrical Distribution (Plant 30) receives main utility power from the Big River Electric Corporation and distributes the power to the other plants. The following information is included for each of the six plants: a description of the plant's design, including the utility balance, catalysts and chemicals usage, and process flow diagrams, as applicable; an equipment list, including item numbers and descriptions; data sheets and sketches for major plant components; and pertinent engineering drawings. An appendix contains: an overall site plan showing the locations of all plants; and the symbols and legend for piping and instrument diagrams.

  9. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-01

    Report IV, Volume 3, provides descriptions, data, and drawings pertaining to H-COAL Recycle Slurry Preparation (Plant 5), H-COAL Recycle Hydrogen Compression (Plant 6), and H-COAL Distillate Separation (Plant 17). H-COAL Recycle Slurry Preparation (Plant 5) receives a slurry stream from H-COAL Primary Separation (Plant 4), and then pumps the slurry through hydrocyclones, producing two slurry streams. One, dilute in solids is recycled back to the reactor. The other, concentrated in solids, is further processed to recover liquid products and is then transferred to Gasification and Purification (Plant 12). H-COAL Recycle Hydrogen Compression (Plant 6) compresses and recycles back to the reactor system hydrogen-rich vapor from H-COAL Primary Separation (Plant 4). This recycling maintains a hydrogen partial pressure and gas flow through the reactor vessel. H-COAL Distillate Separation (Plant 17) processes products from H-COAL Primary Separation (Plant 4) and H-COAL Recycle Slurry Preparation to produce light naphtha for the Gas Plant (Plant 7), middle and heavy distillates for tank farms, and heavy naphtha for Naphtha Hydrotreating and Reforming (Plant 18). The following information is included for each of the three plants: a description of the plant's process design, including the utility balance, heat and material balance (if applicable), and a process flow diagram; an equipment list, including item numbers and descriptions; data sheets and sketches for major plant components; and pertinent engineering drawings. An appendix contains: an overall site plan showing the locations of all plants; and the symbols and legend for the piping and instrument diagrams included in this volume.

  10. High temperature thermoelectric properties of the solid-solution zintl phase Eu??Cd6-xZnxSb??

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazem, Nasrin; Hurtado, Antonio; Sui, Fan; Ohno, Saneyuki; Zevalkink, Alexandra; Snyder, Jeffrey G.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2015-08-24

    Solid-solution Zintl compounds with the formulaEu??Cd6-xZnxSb?? have been synthesized from the elements as single crystals using a tin flux according to the stoichiometry Eu:Cd:Zn:Sb:Sn of 11:6–xp:xp:12:30 with xp = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, where xp is the preparative amount of Zn employed in the reaction. The crystal structures and the compositions were established by single-crystal as well as powder X-ray diffraction and wavelength-dispersive X-ray analysis measurements. The title solid-solution Zintl compounds crystallize isostructurally in the centrosymmetric monoclinic space group C 2/m (No. 12, Z = 2) as the Sr??Cd?Sb?? structure type (Pearson symbol mC58). There is a miscibility gap at 3 ? xp ? 4 where the major product crystallizes in a disordered structure related to the Ca?Mn?Bi? structure type; otherwise, for all other compositions, the Sr??Cd?Sb?? structure is the majority phase. Eu??Cd?Sb?? shows lower lattice thermal conductivity relative to Eu??Zn?Sb?? consistent with its higher mean atomic weight, and as anticipated, the solid-solution samples of Eu??Cd6–xZnxSb?? have effectively reduced lattice thermal conductivities relative to the end member compounds. Eu?????(1)Cd????(2)Zn????(2)Sb?????(1) exhibits the highest zT value of >0.5 at around 800 K which is twice as large as the end member compounds.

  11. Morpho-Hawk

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-09-10

    Morpho-Hawk applies projectional mathematical morphology in a fundamentally new way. Morpho-Hawk extracts object information from digital images by filtering with simple geometrical figures such as rectangles or simple curves. Two core algorithms are used to accomplish this: 1) Object Detection and Feature Extraction from Images: Using projectional morphology, Morpho-Hawk finds features of interest within an image, such as contours, shapes, colors, infrared spectra, and more. Because Morpho-Hawk identifies features based on shape or form, themore » method can uniquely handle different image or object conditions and directions. MorphoHawk can evaluate all possible images of the analyzed scene using the same transformations that are applied just to one image of that scene. Hence, recognizing a defect within an image or part of an image provides information to assist in recognizing other objects in the image. In addition, known background image information can be morphologically subtracted out in order to focus on the appearance or disappearance of the features of interest. 2) Object Analysis: Upon detection of an object of interest, Morpho-Hawk can analyze the object based learned information from prior images or end-user defined criteria for certain object of special interest by selecting feature (e.g., color, size, shape, apparent volume) and/or symbol (e.g., letter, number). The novel algorithm can analyze targeted objects, even as conditions of such as illumination, shadows, and spectral regions change strongly in following images as compared to the original image. This enables robust recognition, interpolation and prediction. As the analysis shows the presence of these features in the optical signal, the algorithm can make a determination based on user defined probability. The object information can be stored for later analysis using simple morphological data compression methods and/or retention of the original optical images.« less

  12. SU-E-J-126: Respiratory Gating Quality Assurance: A Simple Method to Achieve Millisecond Temporal Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, B; Wiersma, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Low temporal latency between a gating on/off signal and a linac beam on/off during respiratory gating is critical for patient safety. Although, a measurement of temporal lag is recommended by AAPM Task Group 142 for commissioning and annual quality assurance, there currently exists no published method. Here we describe a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method to precisely measure gating lag at millisecond resolutions. Methods: A Varian Real-time Position Management™ (RPM) gating simulator with rotating disk was modified with a resistive flex sensor (Spectra Symbol) attached to the gating box platform. A photon diode was placed at machine isocenter. Output signals of the flex sensor and diode were monitored with a multichannel oscilloscope (Tektronix™ DPO3014). Qualitative inspection of the gating window/beam on synchronicity were made by setting the linac to beam on/off at end-expiration, and the oscilloscope's temporal window to 100 ms to visually examine if the on/off timing was within the recommended 100-ms tolerance. Quantitative measurements were made by saving the signal traces and analyzing in MatLab™. The on and off of the beam signal were located and compared to the expected gating window (e.g. 40% to 60%). Four gating cycles were measured and compared. Results: On a Varian TrueBeam™ STx linac with RPM gating software, the average difference in synchronicity at beam on and off for four cycles was 14 ms (3 to 30 ms) and 11 ms (2 to 32 ms), respectively. For a Varian Clinac™ 21EX the average difference at beam on and off was 127 ms (122 to 133 ms) and 46 ms (42 to 49 ms), respectively. The uncertainty in the synchrony difference was estimated at ±6 ms. Conclusion: This new gating QA method is easy to implement and allows for fast qualitative inspection and quantitative measurements for commissioning and TG-142 annual QA measurements.

  13. Geometric perturbation theory and plasma physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omohundro, S.M.

    1985-04-04

    Modern differential geometric techniques are used to unify the physical asymptotics underlying mechanics, wave theory and statistical mechanics. The approach gives new insights into the structure of physical theories and is suited to the needs of modern large-scale computer simulation and symbol manipulation systems. A coordinate-free formulation of non-singular perturbation theory is given, from which a new Hamiltonian perturbation structure is derived and related to the unperturbed structure. The theory of perturbations in the presence of symmetry is developed, and the method of averaging is related to reduction by a circle group action. The pseudo-forces and magnetic Poisson bracket terms due to reduction are given a natural asymptotic interpretation. Similar terms due to changing reference frames are related to the method of variation of parameters, which is also given a Hamiltonian formulation. These methods are used to answer a question about nearly periodic systems. The answer leads to a new secular perturbation theory that contains no ad hoc elements. Eikonal wave theory is given a Hamiltonian formulation that generalizes Whitham's Lagrangian approach. The evolution of wave action density on ray phase space is given a Hamiltonian structure using a Lie-Poisson bracket. The relationship between dissipative and Hamiltonian systems is discussed. A new type of attractor is defined which attracts both forward and backward in time and is shown to occur in infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems with dissipative behavior. The theory of Smale horseshoes is applied to gyromotion in the neighborhood of a magnetic field reversal and the phenomenon of reinsertion in area-preserving horseshoes is introduced. The central limit theorem is proved by renormalization group techniques. A natural symplectic structure for thermodynamics is shown to arise asymptotically from the maximum entropy formalism.

  14. CHEMKIN-III: A FORTRAN chemical kinetics package for the analysis of gas-phase chemical and plasma kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kee, R.J.; Rupley, F.M.; Meeks, E.; Miller, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    This document is the user`s manual for the third-generation CHEMKIN package. CHEMKIN is a software package whose purpose is to facilitate the formation, solution, and interpretation of problems involving elementary gas-phase chemical kinetics. It provides a flexible and powerful tool for incorporating complex chemical kinetics into simulations of fluid dynamics. The package consists of two major software components: an Interpreter and a Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. The Interpreter is a program that reads a symbolic description of an elementary, user-specified chemical reaction mechanism. One output from the Interpreter is a data file that forms a link to the Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. This library is a collection of about 100 highly modular FORTRAN subroutines that may be called to return information on equations of state, thermodynamic properties, and chemical production rates. CHEMKIN-III includes capabilities for treating multi-fluid plasma systems, that are not in thermal equilibrium. These new capabilities allow researchers to describe chemistry systems that are characterized by more than one temperature, in which reactions may depend on temperatures associated with different species; i.e. reactions may be driven by collisions with electrons, ions, or charge-neutral species. These new features have been implemented in such a way as to require little or no changes to CHEMKIN implementation for systems in thermal equilibrium, where all species share the same gas temperature. CHEMKIN-III now has the capability to handle weakly ionized plasma chemistry, especially for application related to advanced semiconductor processing.

  15. Morpho-Hawk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-09-10

    Morpho-Hawk applies projectional mathematical morphology in a fundamentally new way. Morpho-Hawk extracts object information from digital images by filtering with simple geometrical figures such as rectangles or simple curves. Two core algorithms are used to accomplish this: 1) Object Detection and Feature Extraction from Images: Using projectional morphology, Morpho-Hawk finds features of interest within an image, such as contours, shapes, colors, infrared spectra, and more. Because Morpho-Hawk identifies features based on shape or form, the method can uniquely handle different image or object conditions and directions. MorphoHawk can evaluate all possible images of the analyzed scene using the same transformations that are applied just to one image of that scene. Hence, recognizing a defect within an image or part of an image provides information to assist in recognizing other objects in the image. In addition, known background image information can be morphologically subtracted out in order to focus on the appearance or disappearance of the features of interest. 2) Object Analysis: Upon detection of an object of interest, Morpho-Hawk can analyze the object based learned information from prior images or end-user defined criteria for certain object of special interest by selecting feature (e.g., color, size, shape, apparent volume) and/or symbol (e.g., letter, number). The novel algorithm can analyze targeted objects, even as conditions of such as illumination, shadows, and spectral regions change strongly in following images as compared to the original image. This enables robust recognition, interpolation and prediction. As the analysis shows the presence of these features in the optical signal, the algorithm can make a determination based on user defined probability. The object information can be stored for later analysis using simple morphological data compression methods and/or retention of the original optical images.

  16. Analytic Result for the Two-loop Six-point NMHV Amplitude in N = 4 Super Yang-Mills Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, Lance J.; Drummond, James M.; Henn, Johannes M.; /Humboldt U., Berlin /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study

    2012-02-15

    We provide a simple analytic formula for the two-loop six-point ratio function of planar N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory. This result extends the analytic knowledge of multi-loop six-point amplitudes beyond those with maximal helicity violation. We make a natural ansatz for the symbols of the relevant functions appearing in the two-loop amplitude, and impose various consistency conditions, including symmetry, the absence of spurious poles, the correct collinear behavior, and agreement with the operator product expansion for light-like (super) Wilson loops. This information reduces the ansatz to a small number of relatively simple functions. In order to fix these parameters uniquely, we utilize an explicit representation of the amplitude in terms of loop integrals that can be evaluated analytically in various kinematic limits. The final compact analytic result is expressed in terms of classical polylogarithms, whose arguments are rational functions of the dual conformal cross-ratios, plus precisely two functions that are not of this type. One of the functions, the loop integral {Omega}{sup (2)}, also plays a key role in a new representation of the remainder function R{sub 6}{sup (2)} in the maximally helicity violating sector. Another interesting feature at two loops is the appearance of a new (parity odd) x (parity odd) sector of the amplitude, which is absent at one loop, and which is uniquely determined in a natural way in terms of the more familiar (parity even) x (parity even) part. The second non-polylogarithmic function, the loop integral {tilde {Omega}}{sup (2)}, characterizes this sector. Both {Omega}{sup (2)} and {tilde {Omega}}{sup (2)} can be expressed as one-dimensional integrals over classical polylogarithms with rational arguments.

  17. Thermostat Interface and Usability: A Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, Alan; Peffer, Therese; Pritoni, Marco; Aragon, Cecilia

    2010-09-04

    This report investigates the history of thermostats to better understand the context and legacy regarding the development of this important tool, as well as thermostats' relationships to heating, cooling, and other environmental controls. We analyze the architecture, interfaces, and modes of interaction used by different types of thermostats. For over sixty years, home thermostats have translated occupants' temperature preferences into heating and cooling system operations. In this position of an intermediary, the millions of residential thermostats control almost half of household energy use, which corresponds to about 10percent of the nation's total energy use. Thermostats are currently undergoing rapid development in response to emerging technologies, new consumer and utility demands, and declining manufacturing costs. Energy-efficient homes require more careful balancing of comfort, energy consumption, and health. At the same time, new capabilities will be added to thermostats, including scheduling, control of humidity and ventilation, responsiveness to dynamic electricity prices, and the ability to join communication networks inside homes. Recent studies have found that as many as 50percent of residential programmable thermostats are in permanent"hold" status. Other evaluations found that homes with programmable thermostats consumed more energy than those relying on manual thermostats. Occupants find thermostats cryptic and baffling to operate because manufacturers often rely on obscure, and sometimes even contradictory, terms, symbols, procedures, and icons. It appears that many people are unable to fully exploit even the basic features in today's programmable thermostats, such as setting heating and cooling schedules. It is important that people can easily, reliably, and confidently operate thermostats in their homes so as to remain comfortable while minimizing energy use.

  18. Synthesis, structural characterization and magnetic properties of RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=rare-earth metal)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suen, Nian-Tzu; Tobash, Paul H.; Bobev, Svilen

    2011-11-15

    A series of rare-earth metal-magnesium-germanides RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) has been synthesized by reactions of the corresponding elements at high temperature. Their structures have been established by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction and belong to the Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2} structure type (space group P4/mbm (No. 127), Z=2; Pearson symbol tP10). Temperature dependent DC magnetization measurements indicate Curie-Weiss paramagnetism in the high-temperature regime for all members of the family, excluding Y{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}, Sm{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}, and Lu{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}. At cryogenic temperatures (ca. 60 K and below), most RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} phases enter into an antiferromagnetic ground-state, except for Er{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} and Tm{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}, which do not undergo magnetic ordering down to 5 K. The structural variations as a function of the decreasing size of the rare-earth metals, following the lanthanide contraction, and the changes in the magnetic properties across the series are discussed as well. - Graphical Abstract: The structure of RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) can be best viewed as 2-dimensional slabs of Mg and Ge atoms (anionic sub-lattice), and layers of rare-earth metal atoms (cationic sub-lattice) between them. Within this description, one should consider the Ge-Ge dumbbells (formally Ge{sup 6-}{sub 2}), interconnected with square-planar Mg atom as forming flat [MgGe{sub 2}] layers (z=0), stacked along the c-axis with the layers at z=1/2, made of rare-earth metal cations (formally RE{sup 3+}). Highlights: > RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) are new ternary germanides. > Their structures can be recognized as a 1:1 intergrowth of CsCl- and AlB{sub 2}-like slabs. > Ge atoms are covalently bound into Ge{sub 2} dumbbells. > Most RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} phases are antiferromagnetically ordered at cryogenic temperatures.

  19. GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM APPROACH FOR PLAY PORTFOLIOS TO IMPROVE OIL PRODUCTION IN THE ILLINOIS BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beverly Seyler; John Grube

    2004-12-10

    Oil and gas have been commercially produced in Illinois for over 100 years. Existing commercial production is from more than fifty-two named pay horizons in Paleozoic rocks ranging in age from Middle Ordovician to Pennsylvanian. Over 3.2 billion barrels of oil have been produced. Recent calculations indicate that remaining mobile resources in the Illinois Basin may be on the order of several billion barrels. Thus, large quantities of oil, potentially recoverable using current technology, remain in Illinois oil fields despite a century of development. Many opportunities for increased production may have been missed due to complex development histories, multiple stacked pays, and commingled production which makes thorough exploitation of pays and the application of secondary or improved/enhanced recovery strategies difficult. Access to data, and the techniques required to evaluate and manage large amounts of diverse data are major barriers to increased production of critical reserves in the Illinois Basin. These constraints are being alleviated by the development of a database access system using a Geographic Information System (GIS) approach for evaluation and identification of underdeveloped pays. The Illinois State Geological Survey has developed a methodology that is being used by industry to identify underdeveloped areas (UDAs) in and around petroleum reservoirs in Illinois using a GIS approach. This project utilizes a statewide oil and gas Oracle{reg_sign} database to develop a series of Oil and Gas Base Maps with well location symbols that are color-coded by producing horizon. Producing horizons are displayed as layers and can be selected as separate or combined layers that can be turned on and off. Map views can be customized to serve individual needs and page size maps can be printed. A core analysis database with over 168,000 entries has been compiled and assimilated into the ISGS Enterprise Oracle database. Maps of wells with core data have been generated. Data from over 1,700 Illinois waterflood units and waterflood areas have been entered into an Access{reg_sign} database. The waterflood area data has also been assimilated into the ISGS Oracle database for mapping and dissemination on the ArcIMS website. Formation depths for the Beech Creek Limestone, Ste. Genevieve Limestone and New Albany Shale in all of the oil producing region of Illinois have been calculated and entered into a digital database. Digital contoured structure maps have been constructed, edited and added to the ILoil website as map layers. This technology/methodology addresses the long-standing constraints related to information access and data management in Illinois by significantly simplifying the laborious process that industry presently must use to identify underdeveloped pay zones in Illinois.

  20. Synthesis, structures and properties of a family of four two-dimensional coordination polymers constructed from 5-hydroxyisophthalate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Kou-Lin; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Jing, Chu-Yue; Zhang, Lei; Walton, Richard I.; Zhu, Peizhi; Ng, Seik Weng

    2014-03-15

    Four 2D coordination polymers (CPs) with different structures containing the multifunctional ligand 5-hydroxyisophthalate (5-OH-BDC{sup 2?}), [Zn(5-OH-BDC)(btb)]·2H{sub 2}O (1), [Cd(5-OH-BDC)(btp)(H{sub 2}O)]·3H{sub 2}O (2), [Cd(5-OH-BDC)(bth){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]·H{sub 2}O (3) and [Pb(5-OH-BDC)]·H{sub 2}O (4) [btp=1, 3-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)propane, btb=1,4-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)butane, bth=1, 6-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)hexane] were obtained. 1–3 were synthesised hydrothermally, while 4 was obtained under ambient condition. The adjacent (2D?2D) polycatenated 2D layers of 1 polythread in a parallel manner to form an unusual 2D?3D polythreaded framework. 2 contains an undulated 2D (4, 4) network and further extends into an “embracing” double-layer structure through the C–H···? and ?···? stacking interactions. 3 exhibits a non-interpenetrating 2D (4, 4)-network. 4 exhibits a 2D double-layered binodal (4, 4)-net containing oblong nanochannels with symbol (4{sup 3}6{sup 3}){sub 2}. Reversible dehydration–rehydration is observed in 1, 2 and 4, which fall within the category of “recoverable collapsing” and “guest-induced re-formation” frameworks, while 3 exhibits irreversible dehydration–rehydration behaviour. The solid state fluorescent properties of 1–4 have been investigated. -- Graphical abstract: Among four 2D CPs reported, 1 is an unusual 2D?3D polythreaded framework. 4 exhibits 2D double-layered binodal (4, 4)-net containing nanochannels. Reversible dehydration–rehydration is observed in 1, 2 and 4. Highlights: • Four 2D CPs based on 5-hydroxyisophthalate with d{sup 10} and Pb(II) ions were reported. • 1 is an unusual 2D?3D polythreaded framework. • 4 shows a binodal (4, 4)-connected 2D double-layer network with nanochannels. • The materials 1, 2 and 4 show reversible dehydration–rehydration behaviours. • Solid state fluorescent properties were investigated.

  1. High-Temperature Thermoelectric Properties of the Solid–Solution Zintl Phase Eu11Cd6Sb12–xAsx (x < 3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazem, Nasrin; Xie, Weiwei; Ohno, Saneyuki; Zevalkink, Alexandra; Miller, Gordon J; Snyder, G Jeffrey; Kauzlarich, Susan M

    2014-02-11

    Zintl phases are compounds that have shown promise for thermoelectric applications. The title solid–solution Zintl compounds were prepared from the elements as single crystals using a tin flux for compositions x = 0, 1, 2, and 3. Eu11Cd6Sb12–xAsx (x < 3) crystallize isostructurally in the centrosymmetric monoclinic space group C2/m (no. 12, Z = 2) as the Sr11Cd6Sb12 structure type (Pearson symbol mC58). Efforts to make the As compositions for x exceeding ?3 resulted in structures other than the Sr11Cd6Sb12 structure type. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction indicates that As does not randomly substitute for Sb in the structure but is site specific for each composition. The amount of As determined by structural refinement was verified by electron microprobe analysis. Electronic structures and energies calculated for various model structures of Eu11Cd6Sb10As2 (x = 2) indicated that the preferred As substitution pattern involves a mixture of three of the six pnicogen sites in the asymmetric unit. In addition, As substitution at the Pn4 site opens an energy gap at the Fermi level, whereas substitution at the other five pnicogen sites remains semimetallic with a pseudo gap. Thermoelectric properties of these compounds were measured on hot-pressed, fully densified pellets. Samples show exceptionally low lattice thermal conductivities from room temperature to 775 K: 0.78–0.49 W/mK for x = 0; 0.72–0.53 W/mK for x = 1; and 0.70–0.56 W/mK for x = 2. Eu11Cd6Sb12 shows a high p-type Seebeck coefficient (from +118 to 153 ? V/K) but also high electrical resistivity (6.8 to 12.8 m?·cm). The value of zT reaches 0.23 at 774 K. The properties of Eu11Cd6Sb12–xAsx are interpreted in discussion with the As site substitution.

  2. Crystal structure and chemical bonding of novel Li-containing polar intermetallic compound La{sub 11}Li{sub 12}Ge{sub 16}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Yaho; Nam, Gnu; Jeon, Jieun; Kim, Youngjo; You, Tae-Soo

    2012-12-15

    A novel Li-containing polar intermetallic compound La{sub 11}Li{sub 12}Ge{sub 16} has been synthesized using the high-temperature reaction method and characterized by both powder and single-crystal X-ray diffractions. The title compound crystallized in the orthorhombic crystal system (space group Immm, Z=2, Pearson symbol oI78) with fifteen crystallographically unique atomic positions in the asymmetric unit, and the lattice parameters are refined as a=4.5244(4) A, b=6.9932(6) A, and c=53.043(5) A. The complex crystal structure of the title compound can be described as a 2:1 intergrowth of two closely related compounds: La{sub 2}Li{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (Ce{sub 2}Li{sub 2}Ge{sub 3}-type) and La{sub 3}Li{sub 4}Ge{sub 4} (Zr{sub 3}Cu{sub 4}Si{sub 4}-type) acting like 'building-blocks' along the c-axis. Six La sites are categorized into three distinct types based on the local coordination environment showing the coordination numbers of 12-14. Three unique Li sites are placed in the centers of local tetrahedra formed by four Ge atoms which eventually construct Ge{sub 2} dimers or 1-dimensional cis-/trans-Ge chains. Theoretical investigations using the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) method provide rationales for an improved structural stability and for unique local coordination geometries established by anionic elements including [LiGe{sub 4}] tetrahedra, cis-/trans-Ge chain and Ge{sub 2} dimers. - Graphical abstract: Reported is a novel ternary Li-containing polar intermetallic compound La{sub 11}Li{sub 12}Ge{sub 16}. The complex crystal structure can be viewed as a simple combination of two closely related known compounds acting as 'building-blocks', La{sub 2}Li{sub 2}G{sub 3} and La{sub 3}Li{sub 4}Ge{sub 4}, in a 2:1 stoichiometric ratio. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel Li-containing polar intermetallic compound La{sub 11}Li{sub 12}Ge{sub 16} was synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The complex crystal structure was easily explained as a combination of two known compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theoretical calculations indicated that the Fermi level was located near the pseudogap.

  3. From the ternary Eu(Au/In)2 and EuAu4(Au/In)2 with remarkable Au/In distributions to a new structure type: The gold-rich Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 structure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Steinberg, Simon; Card, Nathan; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-08-13

    The ternary Eu(Au/In)2 (EuAu0.46In1.54(2)) (I), EuAu4(Au/In)2 (EuAu4+xIn2–x with x = 0.75(2) (II), 0.93(2), and 1.03(2)), and Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au17.29In4.71(3)) (III) have been synthesized, and their structures were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. I and II crystallize with the CeCu2-type (Pearson Symbol oI12; Imma; Z = 4; a = 4.9018(4) Å; b = 7.8237(5) Å; c = 8.4457(5) Å) and the YbAl4Mo2-type (tI14; I4/mmm; Z = 2; a = 7.1612(7) Å; c = 5.5268(7) Å) and exhibit significant Au/In disorder. I is composed of an Au/In-mixed diamond-related host lattice encapsulating Eu atoms, while the structure of II features ribbons of distorted, squaredmore » Au8 prisms enclosing Eu, Au, and In atoms. Combination of these structural motifs leads to a new structure type as observed for Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au17.29In4.71(3)) (oS108; Cmcm; Z = 4; a = 7.2283(4) Å; b = 9.0499(6) Å; c = 34.619(2) Å), which formally represents a one-dimensional intergrowth of the series EuAu2–“EuAu4In2”. The site preferences of the disordered Au/In positions in II were investigated for different hypothetical “EuAu4(Au/In)2” models using the projector-augmented wave method and indicate that these structures attempt to optimize the frequencies of the heteroatomic Au–In contacts. Furthermore, a chemical bonding analysis on two “EuAu5In” and “EuAu4In2” models employed the TB-LMTO-ASA method and reveals that the subtle interplay between the local atomic environments and the bond energies determines the structural and site preferences for these systems.« less

  4. Fish Tales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLerran, L.

    2010-07-06

    This talk is about fishing and the friendships that have resulted in its pursuit. It is also about theoretical physics, and the relationship of imagination and fantasy to the establishment of ideas about nature. Fishermen, like theoretical physicists, are well known for their inventive imaginations. Perhaps neither are as clever as sailors, who conceived of the mermaid. If one doubts the power of this fantasy, one should remember the ghosts of the many sailors who drowned pursuing these young nymphs. An extraordinary painting by J. Waterhouse is shown as Fig. 1. The enchantment of a mermaid must reflect an extraordinary excess of imagination on the part of the sailor, perhaps together with an impractical turn of mind. A consummated relationship with a mermaid is after all, by its very nature a fantasy incapable of realization. To a theoretical physicist, she is symbolic of many ideas we develop. There are many truths known to fisherman in which one might also find parallels to the goals of scientists: (1) A fish is the only animal that keeps growing after its death; (2) Nothing makes a fish bigger than almost being caught; (3) ''...of all the liars among mankind, the fisherman is the most trustworthy.'' (William Sherwood Fox, in Silken Lines and Silver Hooks); and (4) Men and fish are alike. They both get into trouble when they open their mouths. These quotes may be interpreted as reflecting skepticism regarding the honesty of fisherman, and probably do not reflect adequate admiration for a creative imagination. Is it fair to criticize a person for believing a falsehood that he or she sincerely believes to be true? The fisherman simultaneously invents the lie, and believes in it himself. The parallel with theoretical physics is perhaps only approximate, although we physicists may invent stories that we come to believe, on some rare occasions our ideas actually correspond to a more or less true descriptions of nature. These minor philosophical differences are not really the central issue, however. It is more to the point that both fishermen and scientists enjoy creating a good story, and we also enjoy a story well told. The correct mixture of truth, lie, fantasy and excitement is a witches brew.

  5. Semiconductor Nanotechnology: Novel Materials and Devices for Electronics, Photonics, and Renewable Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodnick, Stephen; Korkin, Anatoli; Krstic, Predrag S; Mascher, Peter; Preston, John; Zaslavsky, Alex

    2010-03-01

    Electronic and photonic information technology and renewable energy alternatives, such as solar energy, fuel cells and batteries, have now reached an advanced stage in their development. Cost-effective improvements to current technological approaches have made great progress, but certain challenges remain. As feature sizes of the latest generations of electronic devices are approaching atomic dimensions, circuit speeds are now being limited by interconnect bottlenecks. This has prompted innovations such as the introduction of new materials into microelectronics manufacturing at an unprecedented rate and alternative technologies to silicon CMOS architectures. Despite the environmental impact of conventional fossil fuel consumption, the low cost of these energy sources has been a long-standing economic barrier to the development of alternative and more efficient renewable energy sources, fuel cells and batteries. In the face of mounting environmental concerns, interest in such alternative energy sources has grown. It is now widely accepted that nanotechnology offers potential solutions for securing future progress in information and energy technologies. The Canadian Semiconductor Technology Conference (CSTC) forum was established 25 years ago in Ottawa as an important symbol of the intrinsic strength of the Canadian semiconductor research and development community, and the Canadian semiconductor industry as a whole. In 2007, the 13th CSTC was held in Montreal, moving for the first time outside the national capital region. The first three meetings in the series of Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics NGCM2002 in Moscow, NGCM2004 in Krakow, and NGC2007 in Phoenix were focused on interdisciplinary research from the fundamentals of materials science to the development of new system architectures. In 2009 NGC2009 and the 14th Canadian Semiconductor Technology Conference (CSTC2009) were held as a joint event, hosted by McMaster University (10 14 August, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada) and the scope was expanded to include renewable energy research and development. This special issue of Nanotechnology is devoted to a better understanding of the function and design of semiconductor devices that are relevant to information technology (both electronics and photonics based) and renewable energy applications. The papers contained in this special issue are selected from the NGC/CSTC2009 symposium. Among them is a report by Ray LaPierre from McMaster University and colleagues at the University of Waterloo in Canada on the ability to manipulate single spins in nanowire quantum bits. The paper also reports the development of a testbed of a few qubits for general quantum information processing tasks [1]. Lower cost and greater energy conversion efficiency compared with thin film devices have led to a high level of activity in nanowire research related to photovoltaic applications. This special issue also contains results from an impedance spectroscopy study of core shell GaAs nanowires to throw light on the transport and recombination mechanisms relevant to solar cell research [2]. Information technology research and renewable energy sources are research areas of enormous public interest. This special issue addresses both theoretical and experimental achievements and provides a stimulating outlook for technological developments in these highly topical fields of research. References [1] Caram J, Sandoval C, Tirado M, Comedi D, Czaban J, Thompson D A and LaPierre R R 2010 Electrical characteristics of core shell p-n GaAs nanowire structures with Te as the n-dopant Nanotechnology 21 134007 [2] Baugh J, Fung J S and LaPierre R R 2010 Building a spin quantum bit register using semiconductor nanowires Nanotechnology 21 134018

  6. Study of the production of the sigma b*+- with the CDF detector at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calancha Paredes, Constantino; /Madrid, CIEMAT /Madrid U.

    2011-02-01

    The composition of matter is a topic in which the man has been interested throughout History. Since the introduction of the atom by Democritus in the 5th century BC until the establishment of the Standard Model, our successful theory that contains our current knowledge on the matter and their interactions, it has come a long way trying to solve this fundamental question. The efforts of many of the greatest minds to perform crucial experiments and develop theoretical models have helped to get deeper insight into the origin of the matter. Today we know that indivisible atoms postulated by Democritus are no longer true, and they are actually composed of a nucleus made of protons and neutrons (nucleons) with orbiting electrons through electromagnetic interactions. Also the nucleons are not fundamental particles but are composed of more fundamental ones called quarks. According to the present state of our knowledge, matter is composed of two types of particles: quarks and leptons. Leptons are believed to be fundamental particles and can occur freely in nature. Quarks are also fundamental particles, and there are no free in nature, but are confined to form hadrons. The hadrons may consist of a quark and an antiquark (mesons) or three quarks or three antiquarks (baryons). These quarks and leptons interact through the exchange of particles called bosons. Figure 1.1 summary the elementary particles in the Standard Model. Despite its enormous success we know that the Standard Model is incomplete. Some of the issues left unresolved by the Standard Model are the mechanism for electroweak symmetry breaking, the mass spectrum of the Standard Model or that the Universe is much more matter than antimatter. That means that it should exist a more general theory which include the Standard Model as a valid approximation for low energy. This more general theory must give answers to the previous unresolved questions. Accumulate more experimental information is crucial to get a deeper understanding of the Standard Model and its limitations. In particular, it is very important the measurement of those observables which they are not able to be calculated from theory by perturbation theory. Particle accelerators have played and play nowadays a major role for past and new physics discoverements and has been for many years the source of many precision measurements. Unprecedent discoveries have been made and are yet to come. These measurements allow to select the models that best fit the results and also they can be used as input for those models to get further predictions. Tevatron has been for many years the highest energy particle collider operational in the world. It is located in the high energy physics laboratory Fermilab in Batavia, in the State of Illinois (USA). Tevatron produce proton-antiproton collisions with an energy of 1.96 TeV at the center of the mass. This thesis is based on the data taken by the CDF II detector, one of the two multipurpose detectors located in the two interaction points at Tevatron. In this thesis a precise measurement of the mass and width of four heavy baryon states are performed. These states are described together by the symbol {Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*){+-}}. They are built by two light quarks and one heavy b quark as it is shown in Fig. 1.2. Baryons containing one bottom quark and two light quarks are described by Heavy Quark Effective Theories (HQET).

  7. Modeling Reluctance-Assisted PM Motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otaduy, P.J.

    2006-01-13

    This report contains a derivation of the fundamental equations used to calculate the base speed, torque delivery, and power output of a reluctance-assisted PM motor which has a saliency ratio greater than 1 as a function of its terminal voltage, current, voltage-phase angle, and current-phase angle. The equations are applied to model Motor X using symbolically-oriented methods with the computer tool Mathematica to determine: (1) the values of current-phase angle and voltage-phase angle that are uniquely determined once a base speed has been selected; (2) the attainable current in the voltage-limited region above base speed as a function of terminal voltage, speed, and current-phase angle; (3) the attainable current in the voltage-limited region above base speed as a function of terminal voltage, speed, and voltage-phase angle; (4) the maximum-power output in the voltage-limited region above base speed as a function of speed; (5) the optimal voltage-phase angle in the voltage-limited region above base speed required to obtain maximum-power output; (6) the maximum-power speed curve which was linear from rest to base speed in the current limited region below base speed; (7) the current angle as a function of saliency ratio in the current-limited region below base speed; and (8) the torque as a function of saliency ratio which is almost linear in the current-limited region below base speed. The equations were applied to model Motor X using numerically-oriented methods with the computer tool LabVIEW. The equations were solved iteratively to find optimal current and voltage angles that yield maximum power and maximum efficiency from rest through the current-limited region to base speed and then through the voltage-limited region to high-rotational speeds. Currents, voltages, and reluctance factors were all calculated and external loops were employed to perform additional optimization with respect to PM pitch angle (magnet fraction) and with respect to magnet strength. The conclusion was that the optimal-magnet fraction for Motor X is 0.72 which corresponds to a PM pitch angle of 130{sup o}, a value close to the maximum-saliency ratio in a plot of saliency ratio versus PM pitch angle. Further, the strength of Motor X magnets may be lowered to 80% of full strength without significantly impacting motor performance for PM pitch angles between the peak saliency (130{sup o}) and peak-characteristic current (160{sup o}). It is recommended that future research involve maximizing a driving-cycle-weighted efficiency based on the Federal Urban Driving Cycle and the Federal Highway Driving Cycle as criteria for selecting the final optimal-PM fraction and magnet strength for this inset PM motor. Results of this study indicate that the reduction in PM torque due to reduced-magnet fraction will be more than compensated by the reluctance torque resulting from the higher saliency ratio. It seems likely that the best overall performance will require saliency; consequently, we think the best motor will be a reluctance-assisted PM motor. This should be explored for use with other types of PM motors, such as fractional-slot motors with concentrated windings.

  8. The CO-OP Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-08-16

    You are at D0, the newest and most advanced experiment at Fermilab. Its goal is to find the 'top quark', nicknamed 'truth'. theoretically one of the six fundamental building blocks of matter. Combinations of the six quarks are said to make up electrons, protons and neutrons. Your group at D0 is the cryogenic division. Its goal is to provide and maintain a cryogenic system which ultimately supplies and controls the liquid argon used in the giant cryostats for the experiment. The high purity liquid argon is needed to keep the detector modules inside the cryostats cold, so that they will operate properly. Your job at D0 is to be a co-op for the research and development group of the cryogenics division. Your goals are dependent on the needs of the cryo group. D0 is where you will spend most of your time. The co-op office is located on what is known as the 3rd floor, but is actually on the ground floor. The floor directly above the 3rd floor is the 5th floor, which contains your immediate superiors and the D0 secretary. The 6th and top floor is above that, and contains the D0 secretary for official and important business. On the other side of the D0 assembly building is the cryo control room. This is where the cryogenic piping system is remotely monitored and controlled. Other important sites at D0 include the trailer city on the north parking lot, which has the D0 secretary who handles all the payroll matters (among other duties), and the portakamp in the south parking lot. Besides D0, which is named for its location on the particle accelerator ring. the most important place is Wilson Hall. That is the large building shaped like a big Atact symbol. It contains various important people such as the safety group. the personnel department (which you have already encountered. being hired), the minor stock room, the cafeteria, the Fermi library. Ramsey Auditorium. etc. Behind Wilson Hall is the Booster Ring, which accelerates particles before they are injected into the main ring. Inside the booster ring are the East and West Booster towers, which contain cryogenic support groups. The D0 cryo group offices used to be in the West Booster Portakamps. Away from Wilson Hall, there are various buildings strewn about the Fermilab property that have important functional uses to D0. One such example is Lab A. This is where the now unused bubble chamber resides. which was used to take pictures of particle motion. Many of our group is from the bubble chamber, and occasionally stories from the 'bubble chamber days' can be heard as someone waxes nostalgic. Lab A has a machine shop and many technicians. All three of the cryostats used in the D0 experiment went through Lab A for preparation and installation work. Lab A is located directly up the road from the front of Wilson Hall (north-east). Its unmistakable dark geodesic dome makes it easy to find. The Feynman Computer building, located east and just a little bit north of Wilson Hall, houses the computer repair people. If any of the computers used in our group crash and burn, we must take them to the third floor of Feynman to be fixed or exchanged. On one side is the Prep department, which handles the VAX mainframe computers, and on the other is personal computer repair, which handles Fermi Macs and IBMs. Directly north of Wilson Hall is Site 38. This site is the location of many important Fermilab facilities, such as the Fermi fire department, the carpenter's shop, the Fermi gas pumps, the main stock room, and shipping and receiving. Lastly, but perhaps most significantly, is the Fermilab Village. In addition to the machine shops, the cut shop, welding facilities, and the garishly painted physicist dorms, there are such things as a gym, a pool and other facilities to take the edge off a weary mind. The village is located just north off Batavia road on the east side of Fermilab. The village barn is the first and most notable building as one approaches.

  9. Water Security Toolkit User Manual Version 1.2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klise, Katherine A.; Siirola, John Daniel; Hart, David; Hart, William E.; Phillips, Cynthia A.; Haxton, Terranna; Murray, Regan; Janke, Robert; Taxon, Thomas; Laird, Carl; Seth, Arpan; Hackebeil, Gabriel; McGee, Shawn; Mann, Angelica

    2014-08-01

    The Water Security Toolkit (WST) is a suite of open source software tools that can be used by water utilities to create response strategies to reduce the impact of contamination in a water distribution network . WST includes hydraulic and water quality modeling software , optimizati on methodologies , and visualization tools to identify: (1) sensor locations to detect contamination, (2) locations in the network in which the contamination was introduced, (3) hydrants to remove contaminated water from the distribution system, (4) locations in the network to inject decontamination agents to inactivate, remove, or destroy contaminants, (5) locations in the network to take grab sample s to help identify the source of contamination and (6) valves to close in order to isolate contaminate d areas of the network. This user manual describes the different components of WST , along w ith examples and case studies. License Notice The Water Security Toolkit (WST) v.1.2 Copyright c 2012 Sandia Corporation. Under the terms of Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000, there is a non-exclusive license for use of this work by or on behalf of the U.S. government. This software is distributed under the Revised BSD License (see below). In addition, WST leverages a variety of third-party software packages, which have separate licensing policies: Acro Revised BSD License argparse Python Software Foundation License Boost Boost Software License Coopr Revised BSD License Coverage BSD License Distribute Python Software Foundation License / Zope Public License EPANET Public Domain EPANET-ERD Revised BSD License EPANET-MSX GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) v.3 gcovr Revised BSD License GRASP AT&T Commercial License for noncommercial use; includes randomsample and sideconstraints executable files LZMA SDK Public Domain nose GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) v.2.1 ordereddict MIT License pip MIT License PLY BSD License PyEPANET Revised BSD License Pyro MIT License PyUtilib Revised BSD License PyYAML MIT License runpy2 Python Software Foundation License setuptools Python Software Foundation License / Zope Public License six MIT License TinyXML zlib License unittest2 BSD License Utilib Revised BSD License virtualenv MIT License Vol Common Public License vpykit Revised BSD License Additionally, some precompiled WST binary distributions might bundle other third-party executables files: Coliny Revised BSD License (part of Acro project) Dakota GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) v.2.1 PICO Revised BSD License (part of Acro project) i Revised BSD License Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met: * Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer. * Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution. * Neither the name of Sandia National Laboratories nor Sandia Corporation nor the names of its con- tributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without specific prior written permission. THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS %22AS IS%22 AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IM- PLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL SANDIA CORPORATION BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUD- ING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE. ii Acknowledgements This work was supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through its Office of Research and Development (Interagency Agreement %23 DW8992192801). The material in this document has been subject to technical and policy review by the U.S. EPA, and approved for publication. The views expressed by individual authors, however, are their own, and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Mention of trade names, products, or services does not convey official U.S. EPA approval, endorsement, or recommendation. The Water Security Toolkit is an extension of the Threat Ensemble Vulnerability Assessment-Sensor Place- ment Optimization Tool (TEVA-SPOT), which was also developed with funding from the U.S. Environ- mental Protection Agency through its Office of Research and Development (Interagency Agreement %23 DW8992192801). The authors acknowledge the following individuals for their contributions to the devel- opment of TEVA-SPOT: Jonathan Berry (Sandia National Laboratories), Erik Boman (Sandia National Laboratories), Lee Ann Riesen (Sandia National Laboratories), James Uber (University of Cincinnati), and Jean-Paul Watson (Sandia National Laboratories). iii Acronyms ATUS American Time-Use Survey BLAS Basic linear algebra sub-routines CFU Colony-forming unit CVAR Conditional value at risk CWS Contamination warning system EA Evolutionary algorithm EDS Event detection system EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EC Extent of Contamination ERD EPANET results database file GLPK GNU Linear Programming Kit GRASP Greedy randomized adaptive sampling process HEX Hexadecimal HTML HyperText markup language INP EPANET input file LP Linear program MC Mass consumed MILP Mixed integer linear program MIP Mixed integer program MSX Multi-species extension for EPANET NFD Number of failed detections NS Number of sensors NZD Non-zero demand PD Population dosed PE Population exposed PK Population killed TAI Threat assessment input file TCE Tailed-conditioned expectation TD Time to detection TEC Timed extent of contamination TEVA Threat ensemble vulnerability assessment TSB Tryptic soy broth TSG Threat scenario generation file TSI Threat simulation input file VAR Value at risk VC Volume consumed WST Water Security Toolkit YML YAML configuration file format for WST iv Symbols Notation Definition Example %7B , %7D set brackets %7B 1,2,3 %7D means a set containing the values 1,2, and 3. [?] is an element of s [?] S means that s is an element of the set S . [?] for all s = 1 [?] s [?] S means that the statement s = 1 is true for all s in set S . P summation P n i =1 s i means s 1 + s 2 + * * * + s n . %5C set minus S %5C T means the set that contains all those elements of S that are not in set T . %7C given %7C is used to define conditional probability. P ( s %7C t ) means the prob- ability of s occurring given that t occurs. %7C ... %7C cardinality Cardinality of a set is the number of elements of the set. If set S = %7B 2,4,6 %7D , then %7C S %7C = 3. v