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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Native Vegetation Planting Guidelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Native Vegetation Planting Guidelines Based on Sustainability Goals for the Macquarie Campus #12.................................................................................................................................10 4.2.5 Shale-Sandstone soil transition...................................................................................................................................11 #12;3 1. Purpose This document provides a guideline for specific grounds management procedures

Wang, Yan

2

Native Tallgrass Prairie Remnants as "Living Museums": Landscape Context, Metacommunity Dynamics, and Private Management Practices of Native Prairie Hay Meadows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In fragmented tallgrass prairie remnants within eastern Kansas, smaller patch area, greater isolation, and poorer matrix quality are predicted to result in (1) decreased species richness, (2) decreased site `quality,' and (3) decreased presence...

Kilroy Mollmann, Hayley A.

2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

3

Final Report for DOE Project: Climate Effects on Plant Range Distributions and Community Structure of Pacific Northwest Prairies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest (PNW) prairies are an imperiled ecosystem that contain a large number of plant species with high fidelity to this habitat. The few remaining high-quality PNW prairies harbor a number of sensitive, rare, and endangered plant species that may be further at-risk with climate change. Thus, PNW prairies are an excellent model system to examine how climate change will affect the distribution of native plant species in grassland sites. Our experimental objectives were to determine: (i) how climate change will affect the range distribution of native plant species; (ii) what life history stages are most sensitive to climate change in a group of key indicator native species; (iii) the robustness of current restoration techniques and suites of species to changing climate, and in particular, the relative competitiveness of native species versus exotic invasive species; and (iv) the effects of climate change on carbon and nutrient cycling and soil-microbial-plant feedbacks. We addressed these objectives by experimentally increasing temperature 2.5 to 3.0 șC above ambient with overhead infrared lamps and increasing wet-season precipitation by 20% above ambient in three upland prairie sites in central-western Washington, central-western Oregon, and southwestern Oregon from fall 2010 through 2012. Additional precipitation was applied within 2 weeks of when it fell so precipitation intensity was increased, particularly during the winter rainy season but with minimal additions during the summer dry season. These three sites also represent a 520-km natural climate gradient of increasing degree of severity of Mediterranean climate from north to south. After removing the extant vegetation, we planted a diverse suite of 12 native species that have their northern range limit someplace within the PNW in each experimental plot. An additional 20 more wide-spread native species were also planted into each plot. We found that recruitment of plant species within their ranges was negatively impacted by increased temperatures, but for species planted north of their current range, increased temperature was neutral. However, for surviving plants climate treatments and site-specific factors (e.g., nutrient availability) were the strongest predictors of plant growth and seed set. When recruitment and plant growth are considered together, increased temperatures are negative within a species current range but beyond this range they become positive. Germination was the most critical stage for plant response across all sites and climate treatments. Our results underscore the importance of including plant vital rates into models that are examining climate change effects on plant ranges. Warming altered plant community composition, decreased diversity, and increased total cover, with warmed northern communities over time becoming more like ambient communities further south. In particular, warming increased the cover of annual introduced species, suggesting that the observed biogeographic pattern of increasing invasion by this plant functional group in US West Coast prairies as one moves further south is at least in part due to climate. Our results suggest that with the projected increase in drought severity with climate change, Pacific Northwest prairies may face an increase of invasion by annuals, similar to what has been observed in California, resulting in novel species assemblages and shifts in functional composition, which in turn may alter ecosystem function. Warming generally increased nutrient availability and plant productivity across all sites. The seasonality of soil respiration responses to heating were strongly dependent on the Mediterranean climate gradient in the PNW, with heating responses being generally positive during periods of adequate soil moisture and becoming neutral to negative during periods of low soil moisture. The asynchrony between temperature and precipitation may make soils less sensitive to warming. Precipitation effects were minimal for all measured responses indicating the importance of increased temperature

Bridgham, Scott D. [University of Oregon; Johnson, Bart [University of Oregon

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

4

Go Native!How to use native plants in your home landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and interest with less maintenance than a landscape made up of non-native and exotic plants. Not onlyGo Native!How to use native plants in your home landscape Pineapple Sage (Salvia elegans) Goldenrod when planted in masses. Below: Pink Muhly Grass (Muhlenbergia capillaris) in the Native Plant Landscape

Hutcheon, James M.

5

australian native plant: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

unknown authors 2010-01-01 52 O:CSUEHorticultureNative Plant Masters20132013 NPM Application.doc432013 Colorado State University Extension 2009 Geosciences Websites...

6

Vegetation dynamics of a native haymeadow, a grazed meadow, and an oldfield within the San Antonio Prairie of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

successional areas. Few relict prairies areas remain since most land is under cultivation or used for livestock grazing. Secondary succession traditionally has been studied by analyzing sites of different ages with known histories of disturbance. Few studies... for intensive study. A tallgrass prairie remnant encompasses 13. 8 ha and is used for hay and limited winter grazing by cattle and occasionally sheep. It has never been cultivated. Topography of the entire remnant varies from 122. 5 to 112 m in elevation...

Hightower, Terry Paul

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Methods of propagation for selected native Texas woody plant species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. vation. Native plants placed in a common, static contrived design which does not relate to the region or site amounts to mere substitution oi' plant material. With this idea in mind, the design of' a nedge or windbreak can not only respond to the site.... quadrifidur. Lyon'a. spp. Magnolia spp. Mimosa spp. Morus sop. 112 -"1 s 118 12j 122 j24 125 133 136 144 14~ 147 152 1"4 1"5 lwP, 160 162 158 171 j7@ 'l 7 180 184 1. 88 193 199 200 202 205 213 n14 217 219 222 223 22"- 228 P...

Senior, Jill Ellen

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Selection of Native Wetland Plants for Water Treatment of Urban Runoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UC Davis KEYWORDS: Wetlands, Water Treatment, Urban Runoff,of Native Wetland Plants for Water Treatment of UrbanValley Wetlands Biomass Response to Heavy Metal Treatment

Rejmankova, Eliska; Bayer, David E

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

USE OF HERBICIDES TO CONTROL ALLIGATORWEED AND RESTORE NATIVE PLANTS IN MANAGED MARSHES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Station Auburn, Alabama, USA 36849 Abstract: Marsh management is used to improve the quality of wetland alligatorweed and restoring native plants. In the year of treatment, imazapyr controlled alligatorweed better of treatment, application of triclopyr amine resulted in greater native plant biomass than imazapyr. High

Gray, Matthew

10

Woody plant and wintering grassland bird responses to summer prescribed burning in grazed and ungrazed Texas Mid-Coastal Prairies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wintering habitat affinities and shifts in community organization among grassland birds are shaped by responses to summer fire and grazing management. Summer prescribed burns are thought to sustain remaining prairie parcels by deterring woody species...

Marx, Damion E.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Developing and Testing a Trafficability Index for Planting Corn and Cotton in the Texas Blackland Prairie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, three workable soil moisture regimes were recreated in no-tillage and conventional tillage plots at the Stiles Farm Foundation in Thrall, Texas. The index nomenclature included: "Dry-Workable", "Optimal" and "Wet-Workable". After planting corn and cotton...

Helms, Adam J.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

12

Plant Nutrition and Fertilizer Management for Winter Wheat Production in the Blackland Prairie.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

limited soil moisture, larger winter wheat plants that are de veloped due to excessive rates of fertilizer which stimulated early season growth may experience severe moisture stress, resulting in lower grain yield than wheat fertilized at sufficient... (Fe), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), boron (B), mo lybdenum (Mo), and chlorine (Cl), are required in trace amounts for optimum plant growth plus maximum grain yield, but can be toxic at even slightly excessive levels. Soil levels...

Knowles, Tim C.; Hipp, Billy W.; Marshall, David S.; Sutton, Russelll L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

La Jolla workshop Native plant restoration working group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of nutrients. Lab versus field studies (Todd Chadwell study). We still need to know which species are more provides refugia for other organisms (Dibble). b. Higher diversity increases the success of planting

14

PLANT-ANIMAL INTERACTIONS -ORIGINAL PAPER Fungal endophytes of native grasses decrease insect herbivore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PLANT-ANIMAL INTERACTIONS - ORIGINAL PAPER Fungal endophytes of native grasses decrease insect March 2010 / Accepted: 2 June 2010 Ó Springer-Verlag 2010 Abstract Endophytic fungal symbionts of studies on endophyte­ grass symbioses have been conducted on economically important, agricultural species

Rudgers, Jennifer

15

The Prairie- Our Heartland: Particles and Prairies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a...

16

This presentation was given to the Native Plant Society, Siskiyou Chapter, Southern Oregon University, 21 Oct. 2010.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This presentation was given to the Native Plant Society, Siskiyou Chapter, Southern Oregon of continents, roughly between 30 and 40 degrees latitude, where cold offshore ocean current is present [1

Muir, Patricia

17

Argonne Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Data from Batavia Prairie and Agricultural Sites  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Carbon dioxide fluxes and stocks in terrestrial ecosystems are key measurements needed to constrain quantification of regional carbon sinks and sources and the mechanisms controlling them. This information is required to produce a sound carbon budget for North America. This project examines CO2 and energy fluxes from agricultural land and from restored tallgrass prairie to compare their carbon sequestration potentials. The study integrates eddy covariance measurements with biometric measurements of plant and soil carbon stocks for two systems in northeastern Illinois: 1) long-term cultivated land in corn-soybean rotation with conventional tillage, and 2) a 15 year-old restored prairie that represents a long-term application of CRP conversion of cultivated land to native vegetation. The study contributes to the North American Carbon Program (NACP) by providing information on the magnitude and distribution of carbon stocks and the processes that control carbon dynamics in cultivated and CRP-restored land in the Midwest. The prairie site has been functioning since October 2004 and the agricultural site since July 2005. (From http://www.atmos.anl.gov/ FERMI/index.html)

Matamala, Roser (ANL); Jastrow, Julie D.; Lesht, Barry (ANL); Cook, David (ANL); Pekour, Mikhail (ANL); Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A. (University of Illinois at Chicago); Katul, Gabriel G. (Duke University)

18

Native Plant Uptake Model for Radioactive Waste Disposal Areas at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report defines and defends the basic framework, methodology, and associated input parameters for modeling plant uptake of radionuclides for use in Performance Assessment (PA) activities of Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). PAs are used to help determine whether waste disposal configurations meet applicable regulatory standards for the protection of human health, the environment, or both. Plants adapted to the arid climate of the NTS are able to rapidly capture infiltrating moisture. In addition to capturing soil moisture, plant roots absorb nutrients, minerals, and heavy metals, transporting them within the plant to the above-ground biomass. In this fashion, plant uptake affects the movement of radionuclides. The plant uptake model presented reflects rooting characteristics important to plant uptake, biomass turnover rates, and the ability of plants to uptake radionuclides from the soil. Parameters are provided for modeling plant uptake and estimating surface contaminant flux due to plant uptake under both current and potential future climate conditions with increased effective soil moisture. The term ''effective moisture'' is used throughout this report to indicate the soil moisture that is available to plants and is intended to be inclusive of all the variables that control soil moisture at a site (e.g., precipitation, temperature, soil texture, and soil chemistry). Effective moisture is a concept used to simplify a number of complex, interrelated soil processes for which there are too little data to model actual plant available moisture. The PA simulates both the flux of radionuclides across the land surface and the potential dose to humans from that flux. Surface flux is modeled here as the amount of soil contamination that is transferred from the soil by roots and incorporated into aboveground biomass. Movement of contaminants to the surface is the only transport mechanism evaluated with the model presented here. Parameters necessary for estimating surface contaminant flux due to native plants expected to inhabit the NTS RWMSS are developed in this report. The model is specific to the plant communities found at the NTS and is designed for both short-term (<1,000 years) and long-term (>1,000 years) modeling efforts. While the model has been crafted for general applicability to any NTS PA, the key radionuclides considered are limited to the transuranic (TRU) wastes disposed of at the NTS.

BROWN,THERESA J.; WIRTH,SHARON

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

HOW DO INVASIVE EXOTIC PLANTS AFFECT NATIVE PLANTS, BIRDS AND MAMMALS IN GREENWAYS?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Vidra What are exotic plant species? Perhaps you have noticed huge thickets of kudzu vine along, it grows _ inch per hour! Kudzu is one example of an exotic plant species. In North Carolina, exotics change the structure of the forest, as kudzu does when it covers every surface. Exotics may also

Hess, George

20

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Prairie Island  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prairie Island" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Spatial distribution of non-native invasive plants following large-scale wind damage at LaRue Pine Hills - Otter Pond Research Natural Area, Union County, Illinois.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of this study was to determine if a large-scale wind disturbance facilitated the invasion of forest interiors by non-native invasive plant species. The… (more)

Romano, Anthony John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Relationships of exotic plant communities with native vegetation, environmental factors, disturbance, and landscape ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ecosystems in numerous ways. Theories on relation- ships of exotic species invasions with native vegetation strongly related to the eco- system classification. For example, mean exotic cover ranged from

Abella, Scott R.

23

SEASONALITY OF ANNUAL PLANT ESTABLISHMENT INFLUENCES THE INTERACTIONBETWEEN THE NON-NATIVE ANNUAL GRASS BROMUS MADRITENSIS SSP. RUBENS AND MOJAVE DESERT PERENNIALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Competition between native and non-native species can change the composition and structure of plant communities, but in deserts the timing of non-native plant establishment can modulate their impacts to native species. In a field experiment, we varied densities of the non-native annual grass Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens around individuals of three native perennials--Larrea iridentata, Achnatherum hymenoides, and Pleuraphis rigida--in either winter or spring. Additional plots were prepared for the Same perennial species and seasons, but with a mixture of native annual species. Relative growth rates of perennial shoots (RGRs) declined with increasing Bromus biomass when Bromus that was established in winter had 2-3 mo of growth and high water use before perennial growth began. However, this high water use did not significantly reduce water potentials for the perennials, suggesting Bromus that established earlier depleted other soil resources, such as N, otherwise used by perennial plants. Spring-established Bromus had low biomass even at higher densities and did not effectively reduce RGRs, resulting in an overall lower impact to perennials than when Bromus was established in winter. Similarly, growth and reproduction of perennials with mixed annuals as neighbors did not differ from those with Bromus neighbors of equivalent biomass, but densities of these annuals did not support the high biomass necessary to reduce perennial growth. Thus, impacts of native Mojave Desert annuals to perennials are expected to be lower than those of Bromus because seed dormancy and narrow requirements for seedling survivorship produce densities and biomass lower than those achieved by Bromus. In comparing the effects of Bromus among perennial species, the impact of increased Bromus biomass on RGR was lower for Larrea than for the two perennial grasses, probably because Lurrea maintains low growth rates throughout the year, even after Bromus has completed its life cycle. This contrasts with the perennial grasses, whose phenology overlaps completely with (Achnatherum) or closely follows (Pleuraphis) that of Bromus.

L A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; R. S. NOWAK

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

A Guide to Starting and Operating a Nursery for Native and Traditional Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thomas D. Landis Diane L. Haase Brian F. Daley R. Kasten Dumroese #12;The use of trade or firm names and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, maritalAgriculture,NaturalResourcesConservationService PLANTS (Plant List of Accepted Nomenclature, Taxonomy, and Symbols) database (2008). http

25

Sustainable design for a subtropical green roof with local, recyclable substrates and native plant species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with compost, expanded shale with compost, and recycled crushed concrete with compost. The boxes were further subdivided into four plots with plantings of Lenophyllum texanum (coastal stonecrop), Buchloe dactyloides (buffalograss), and Bouteloua gracilis (blue...

Huerta, Angelica

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

26

Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%–85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.

De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

O:\\CSUE\\Horticulture\\Native Plant Masters\\2013\\2013 NPM Application.doc4/3/2013 Colorado State University Extension 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

O:\\CSUE\\Horticulture\\Native Plant Masters\\2013\\2013 NPM Application.doc4/3/2013 © Colorado State: ___________________________ The following items are very important for communication with your trainer and NPM staff: Your Mailing Address\\2013\\2013 NPM Application.doc4/3/2013 © Colorado State University Extension 2009 2 SECTION B: (All

Stephens, Graeme L.

28

November 2008 www.aznps.org The Plant Press ARIZONA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY 13 Introduction to fungal endophytes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

endophytes When first introduced in 1866, "endophyte" was used broadly to refer to any organism found within, but modern mycologists generally agree that endophytes are organisms that colonize internal plant tissues without causing apparent harm to their host. Research in my group (http://www.endophytes.org) focuses

Arnold, A. Elizabeth

29

Phenology of Agromyzid (Diptera) leafminers and their natural enemies on selected Texas native plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the leaf-mining agromyzid fly, Liriomyza sativae began in late March on L. texensis and April on L. subcarnosus. Mining activity was unaffected by mean numbers of leaves per plant or leaf surface area. Few L. sativae mines were found on Lupinus texensis... begins flowering at the time of leaf emergence. An unidentified agromyzid gall maker utilized branchlet bases. Gall formation and leaf mining activity began shortly after leaf emergence. Leaf mining occurred mainly in April when leaf condition...

Praetorius, Richard Leonhardt

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Prairie County Secondary Data Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prevalence (Heart Attack) 5.5% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 472.3 455.5 543.2 1 Community Health Data, MT. Heart Disease, Cancer 2. CLRD* 3. Unintentional Injuries** 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Prairie County Secondary Data Analysis July 23, 2012 2

Maxwell, Bruce D.

31

Forty years of landscape change in Attwater's Prairie Chicken habitat within the Coastal Prairie of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Gulf Coastal Prairie is one of the most intensively utilized natural region,-in Texas. Agricultural development, urbanization, mining (oil and natural gas) and their infrastructure have served as agents of prairie destruction and fragmentation...

McKinney, Lloyd B.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Effects of non-native Spartina patens on plant and sediment organic matter carbon incorporation into the local invertebrate community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

western Europe with Phragmites australis reported as a hostora) over the native Phragmites australis in a salt marsh in1999) Expansion of Phragmites australis into tidal wetlands

Page, Henry M.; Lastra, Mariano; Rodil, Iván F.; Briones, María Jesús; Garrido, Josefina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Building Green in Greensburg: Prairie Pointe Townhomes  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Prairie Pointe Townhomes in Greensburg, Kansas.

34

PreservingthePrairie Whynativelandremainsimportant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DepartmentofAppliedEconomics DepartmentHead:BrianBuhr Division of Bioresources and Bioenergy DepartmentofHead:KateVandenBosch DepartmentofPlantPathology DepartmentHead:CarolIshimaru Department of Agricultural Education (jointlywithCollegeofEducationand

Weiblen, George D

35

Pocahontas Prairie | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru:Job Corp Jump to:PismoPlatinaSmartPrairie Jump

36

F R E M O N T I A 1V O L U M E 3 7 : 4 / 3 8 : 1 , O C T O B E R 2 0 0 9 / J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 0 THE COVER: An image from each of our nine featured public gardens of California native plants conveys the beauty and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Kings Canyon. Could it still be found there? MARTHA WALKER CALIFORNIA NATIVE HABITAT GARDEN: CELEBRATING CONTENTS THE COVER: An image from each of our nine featured public gardens of California native plants is the alkaline rain pool, home to some of our rarest Atriplex species. THE ART AND SCIENCE OF CALIFORNIA NATIVE

Parker, V. Thomas

37

The response of Attwater's prairie chicken to petroleum develpment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chicks (~T h s ~c ido tt ate i) is an endemic member of the family Tetraonidae found in the gulf coastal prairies of Texas. Once co(mnon in the prairies from about Rockport, Texas, to near Abbeville in southwestern Louisiana, Attwater's prairie...

Lutz, Robert Scott

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

38

Some effects of date of planting, depth of planting, and fertilization on the performance of five important native grasses of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was given a numerical value, The factors considered wex ex number of plants per square foot; distribution~ or the evenness wi. th which the plants wexe spaoed; vigor as indicated by siss, colox, spread, etc. for the pax'ticular stage of plant growth... to four different dates of planting A one foot border on the ends and a three foot border on each side of the outside plots were maintain- ed free of vegetation. he arrangement and. dimensions of the plots are illustrated in . igures 1 and 2, ~rr er t...

Anderson, James Edward

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Beauty and Charm...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a...

40

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Insects at Work...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Biology Institute...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a...

42

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a...

43

The Prairie- Our Heartland: Phriendly Physics | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a...

44

Post-Project Evaluation of Channel Morphology, Invasive Plant Species, and Native Fish Habitat in Putah Creek in Winters, CA Six Years After Channel Relocation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

land floodplains of the Yolo Bypass through channelizationhabitat conditions in the Yolo Bypass, but may compromisefor Native Fish in the Yolo Bypass. Accessed December 2011.

Blackledge, Gina; Boisrame, Gabrielle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Endophytic and canker-associated Botryosphaeriaceae occurring on non-native Eucalyptus and native Myrtaceae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Endophytic and canker-associated Botryosphaeriaceae occurring on non-native Eucalyptus and native to identify the Botryosphaeriaceae species present as endophytes or associated with cankers in both introduced is a very diverse group of fungi that includes endophytes and plant pathogens of trees and plants (Alves et

46

EIS-0418: PrairieWinds Project, South Dakota  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to approve the interconnection request from PrairieWinds for their South Dakota PrairieWinds Project, a 151.5-megawatt (MW) nameplate capacity wind powered generation facility, including 101 General Electric 1.5-MW wind turbine generators, electrical collector lines, collector substation, transmission line, communications system, and wind turbine service access roads.

47

Prairie Island Indian Community | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6DepartmentOutages Update:FleetEnergy -Prairie

48

Prairie Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru:Job CorpPowerVerde Inc formerlyPowerspanPrairie

49

Map of mixed prairie grassland vegetation, Rocky Flats, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A color vegetation map at the scale of 1:12,000 of the area surrounding the Rocky Flats, Rockwell International Plant near Boulder, Colorado, provides a permanent record of baseline data which can be used to monitor changes in both vegetation and environment and thus to contribute to future land management and land-use policies. Sixteen mapping units based on species composition were identified, and characterized by two 10-m/sup 2/ vegetation stands each. These were grouped into prairie, pasture, and valley side on the basis of their species composition. Both the mapping units and these major groups were later confirmed by agglomerative clustering analysis of the 32 vegetation stands on the basis of species composition. A modified Bray and Curtis ordination was used to determine the environmental factor complexes controlling the distribution of vegetation at Rocky flats. Recommendations are made for future policies of environmental management and predictions of the response to environmental change of the present vegetation at the Rocky Flats site.

Clark, S J.V.; Webber, P J; Komarkova, V; Weber, W A

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie- Our Heartland: Physics Institutes (second session)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a...

51

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Chemistry Institutes...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemistry Institutes Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Chemistry Institutes June 17, 2013 7:15PM EDT to June 21, 2013 9:15PM EDT Fermilab What was the Midwest like 200...

52

The propagation of the Attwater prairie chicken in captivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to near Brownsville, Texas. These birds were reported to exist in the hundreds of thousands, even to the point of menacing crop production. The first reliable sur- vey was made in 1937 in which 8, 700 prairie chickens were reported to exist. Thirty... years later the same researcher reported the number of birds to be only 1, 070. The Attwater prairie chicken no longer exists in Louisiana and occurs only in small disjunct popu- lations between Houston and Victoria, Texas. Thus, The following...

Watkins, Roy Michael

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Extensive investigation of reticuloendotheliosis virus in the endangered Attwater's prairie chicken  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the repopulation of the Attwater's prairie chicken. Several aspects of virus infection were investigated. Reagents capable of recognizing prairie chicken IgY and viral gag polypeptides were developed for use in assays for detection of antibody responses...

Bohls, Ryan Lanier

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

54

A decrease of circulating CD4? T cells in Attwater's prairie chickens infected with reticuloendotheliosis virus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

antibodies (mAb) was screened for reactivity to prairie chicken leukocytes using indirect fluorescent labeling and bow cytometry analysis. Monoclonal antibodies reactive to prairie chicken leukocytes were used to characterize white blood cells...

Ferro, Pamela Joyce Bloomer

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

Remnant plant communities of the Fayette Prairie, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-axis posi- 18 Figure 3. Stand position from ordination with surface soil textural fractions for sand and clay. 19 PERCENT SAND 57 Upland C/ay 58 20 9 14 ~ ~ ~ ~ 11 ~ 26 13 ~ '6 ~ ~ 24 10 57 Upland Clay Loam 10 10 I I I I 46 53 36 30... organic matter content. 21 pH Upland Clay 5. 6 7. 7 7. 1 7. 0 7 3 ~ ~ ~ ~ 7 2 ~ 7. 6 7. 8 ~ ~ 7. 5 74 . '74 7. 1 5. 6 Upland Clay Loam Lowland C/ay 7. 7 I I I I 6. 6 5. 8 6. 0 '5. 4 6 1 7. 7 7. 7 6. 8 7. 0 Pi 7. 7 PERCENT ORGANIC...

Diamond, David Daniel

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Native Grass Community Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land managers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in East Tennessee are restoring native warm-season grasses and wildflowers to various sites across the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Some of the numerous benefits to planting native grasses and forbs include improved habitat quality for wildlife, improved aesthetic values, lower long-term maintenance costs, and compliance with Executive Order 13112 (Clinton 1999). Challenges to restoring native plants on the ORR include the need to gain experience in establishing and maintaining these communities and the potentially greater up-front costs of getting native grasses established. The goals of the native grass program are generally outlined on a fiscal-year basis. An overview of some of the issues associated with the successful and cost-effective establishment and maintenance of native grass and wildflower stands on the ORR is presented in this report.

Ryon, Michael G [ORNL; Parr, Patricia Dreyer [ORNL; Cohen, Kari [ORNL

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Selective broadcast of fenoxycarb bait on fire ant infested prairie: effect on native ant community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Sample sites within managemmzt units are numbered. Letters indicate where treatment plot samples were located (PI = infested, PM = managed, PU = uninfested). 23 100 o IL COLLECTION LITE 10 12 13 14 " 16 CLYMER MEADOW Fig. 2. Distribution...

Morris, John Robert

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Prairie Fruit Summary, 2010 Some key considerations for the homeowner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Prairie Fruit Summary, 2010 Some key considerations for the homeowner by Bob Bors The following list highlights some key positive (+), negative (-) and variable ( ± ) attributes for growing fruit into account. For more info visit: www.fruit.usask.ca Haskap/Blue Honeysuckle: - All varieties are very cold

Peak, Derek

59

Restoring Native Grasslands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Brian Hays, Matthew Wagner, Fred Smeins and R. Neal Wilkins* Native Restoring Grasslands 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Figure 1. Much of the native grassland in Texas has been converted to improved pas- tures (left) or cropland (right...

Hays, K. Brian; Wagner, Matthew; Smeins, Fred; Wilkins, Neal

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

60

Natively probabilistic computation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I introduce a new set of natively probabilistic computing abstractions, including probabilistic generalizations of Boolean circuits, backtracking search and pure Lisp. I show how these tools let one compactly specify ...

Mansinghka, Vikash Kumar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary 1. We investigated the impacts of wind power development on the demography, movements, and population genetics of Greater Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus cupido) at three sites in northcentral and eastern Kansas for a 7-year period. Only 1 of 3 sites was developed for wind power, the 201MW Meridan Way Wind Power Facility at the Smoky Hills site in northcentral Kansas. Our project report is based on population data for prairie chickens collected during a 2-year preconstruction period (2007-2008), a 3-year postconstruction period (2009-2011) and one final year of lek surveys (2012). Where relevant, we present preconstruction data from our field studies at reference sites in the northern Flint Hills (2007-2009) and southern Flint Hills (2006-2008). 2. We addressed seven potential impacts of wind power development on prairie chickens: lek attendance, mating behavior, use of breeding habitat, fecundity rates, natal dispersal, survival rates, and population numbers. Our analyses of pre- and postconstruction impacts are based on an analysis of covariance design where we modeled population performance as a function of treatment period, distance to eventual or actual site of the nearest wind turbine, and the interaction of these factors. Our demographic and movement data from the 6-year study period at the Smoky Hills site included 23 lek sites, 251 radio-marked females monitored for 287 bird-years, and 264 nesting attempts. Our genetic data were based on genotypes of 1,760 females, males and chicks that were screened with a set of 27 microsatellite markers that were optimized in the lab. 3. In our analyses of lek attendance, the annual probability of lek persistence during the preconstruction period was ~0.9. During the postconstruction period, distance to nearest turbine did not have a significant effect on the probability of lek persistence. However, the probability of lek persistence increased from 0.69 at 0 m to 0.89 at 30 km from turbines, and most abandoned lek sites were located <5 km from turbines. Probability of lek persistence was significantly related to habitat and number of males. Leks had a higher probability of persistence in grasslands than agricultural fields, and increased from ~0.2 for leks of 5 males, to >0.9 for leks of 10 or more males. Large leks in grasslands should be a higher priority for conservation. Overall, wind power development had a weak effect on the annual probability of lek persistence. 3. We used molecular methods to investigate the mating behavior of prairie chickens. The prevailing view for lek-mating grouse is that females mate once to fertilize the clutch and that conspecific nest parasitism is rare. We found evidence that females mate multiple times to fertilize the clutch (8-18% of broods, 4-38% of chicks) and will parasitize nests of other females during egg-laying (~17% of nests). Variable rates of parentage were highest in the fragmented landscapes at the Smoky Hills field site, and were lower at the Flint Hills field site. Comparisons of the pre- and postconstruction periods showed that wind energy development did not affect the mating behaviors of prairie chickens. 4. We examined use of breeding habitats by radio-marked females and conducted separate analyses for nest site selection, and movements of females not attending nests or broods. The landscape was a mix of native prairie and agricultural habitats, and nest site selection was not random because females preferred to nest in grasslands. Nests tended to be closer to turbines during the postconstruction period and there was no evidence of behavioral avoidance of turbines by females during nest site selection. Movements of females not attending nests or broods showed that females crossed the site of the wind power development at higher rates during the preconstruction period (20%) than the postconstruction period (11%), and that movements away from turbines were more frequent during the postconstruction period. Thus, wind power development appears to affect movements in breeding habitats but not nest site s

Sandercock, Brett K. [Kansas State University

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

62

La Prairie, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 ThrottledInformationparticipants <Palma, California:La Prairie is a

63

La Prairie, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 ThrottledInformationparticipants <Palma, California:La Prairie is

64

Independent External Peer Review of the Limited Reevaluation Report Design Deficiency Corrections, Prairie du Pont and Fish Lake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Prairie du Pont and Fish Lake St. Clair and Monroe Counties, Illinois Contract No. W912HQ-11-R-0002 6 September 2012 #12;Independent External Peer Review Report ­ Prairie du Pont and Fish Lake 6 September 2012) in Water Resources Projects 2 2 Prairie du Pont and Fish Lake LRR Project Description 2 3 IEPR Process 5 3

US Army Corps of Engineers

65

Extractable soil phosphorus in Blackland Prairie soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Texas Agricultural Extension Service (TAEX) Soil Testing Laboratory currently utilizes a single phosphorus (P) extractant consisting of 1.43 M NH4OAc, 1. 0 M HCl, and 0.025 M EDTA-PH 4.2 to estimate plant available P for all soils in Texas...

Byrd, Robert Claude

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

66

Impact of prescribed burning on endophytic insect communities of prairie perennials (Asteraceae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of prescribed burning on endophytic insect communities of prairie perennials (Asteraceae be threatened. Because they inhabit the `fuel layer' of prairies, endophytic insects would seem particularly susceptible to this management tactic. In this paper, we assess the impact of prescribed burning on endophytic

Hanks, Lawrence M.

67

WOOD DUCK BROOD MOVEMENTS AND HABITAT USE ON PRAIRIE RIVERS IN SOUTH DAKOTA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WOOD DUCK BROOD MOVEMENTS AND HABITAT USE ON PRAIRIE RIVERS IN SOUTH DAKOTA DIANE A. GRANFORS.'·2. SD 57007. USA ~ .· Absfm£'f: Wood duck (Air SI)0/1.5O) populations have been increasing in the Central Flyway. but little is known about wood duck brood rearing in prairie e

68

IMPACTS OF OIL AND NATURAL GAS ON PRAIRIE GROUSE: CURRENT KNOWLEDGE AND RESEARCH NEEDS1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPACTS OF OIL AND NATURAL GAS ON PRAIRIE GROUSE: CURRENT KNOWLEDGE AND RESEARCH NEEDS1 Jeffrey L and natural gas development on grouse populations and habitats. The purpose of this review is to summarize current knowledge on the effects of oil and gas development and production on prairie grouse based

Beck, Jeffrey L.

69

Summary of Oil and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse September 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary of Oil and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse September 2006 Jeffrey L. Beck Independent Avenue Grand Junction, CO 81505 Please cite as: Beck, J. L. 2006. Summary of oil and natural gas and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse 2 disturbances such as oil and gas development

Beck, Jeffrey L.

70

Blazing and grazing: influences of fire and bison on tallgrass prairie stream water quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blazing and grazing: influences of fire and bison on tallgrass prairie stream water quality Danelle for maintaining and managing tallgrass prairie, but we know little about their influences on water-quality dynamics in streams. We analyzed 2 y of data on total suspended solids (TSS), total N (TN), and total P (TP

Dodds, Walter

71

EIS-0485: Interconnection of the Grande Prairie Wind Farm, Holt County, Nebraska  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of interconnecting the proposed Grande Prairie Wind Farm, in Holt County, near O’Neill, Nebraska, to Western’s power transmission system. The project website is http://www.wapa.gov/ugp/Environment/GrandePrairie.htm.

72

NEW ZEALAND'S NATIVE GREEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEW ZEALAND'S NATIVE GREEN MISTLETOES What can you do to help? Many green mistletoe populations Zealand mistletoe species grow very slowly and take many years to replace lost branches. Why are green destruction and over-collecting are the biggest threats to green mistletoes. What can be done to save

Canterbury, University of

73

Mima mound grasslands of the upper coastal prairie of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

21 28 31 34 44 47 49 52 55 57 71 74 76 79 87 94 LlST OF TABLES Table Physical and chemical soil characteristics for topographic variations within 3 soil complexes of the upper Coastal Prairie, Texas Page 27 Average absolute... ~ ' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ O O 8 z z O V) CO iU CC LU O D IZ 31 The landscape had less slope than on Aris-like stands. Intermounds on Crowley/Edna-like soils appear nearly level. Results of physical and chemical analysis were very similar to Aris-like soils...

Butler, Arlene Camille

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Varieties of Cotton in the Red Prairies of Northwest Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. NORTHCUTT. JR., B. S.. Feed Inspedor SIDNEY D. REYNOLDS. JR.. Feed Inspector P. A. MOORE, Feed Inspector SUBSTATIONS No. 1 Beerille, Bee County: R. A. HALL, B. S.. Superintendent o. 10. Ftsdfng and Breeding Station. near College Station. Brazos Connty... OF COTTON IN THE RED PRAIRIES OF NORTH- WEST TEXAS Substation No. 12 of the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station is located in the eastern part of Hardeman County southwest of Chilli- cothe about midway between the Red and Pease Rivers, and in the seo...

Quinby, John Roy

1927-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Dell Prairie, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump to:52c8ff988c1 No38e4011f618bDeer Park,Dell Prairie, Wisconsin: Energy

76

Prairie County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug Power IncPowder River EnergyCubePractical ActionCityPrairie

77

Evaluation of Desmanthus illinoensis (Michx.) MacM. for sod- seeding on blackland prairie soils in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. is browsed by all classes of livestock and wildlife, and also provides cover and seed as food for wildlife. Plant tops have llf crude protein which is 47$ digestible. Illinois bundleflower seeds were evaluated for germination character- istics at water... by oven-dry weight of the native pasture sampled before sod-seeding (Mar. 1984) at Caldwell. . Plant density (plants/m of row) of sod-seeded Illinois bundleflower during the first growing season (1984) for untreated control, disked, and herbicide...

Msiska, Harry Darius Chandiwira

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

78

Assessment of lesser prairie-chicken lek density relative to landscape characteristics in Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

My 2.5-yr Master'Â?s project accomplished the objectives of estimating lesser prairie-chicken (LPC) lek density and abundance in the Texas occupied range and modeling anthropogenic and landscape features associated with lek density by flying helicopter lek surveys for 2 field seasons and employing a line-transect distance sampling method. This project was important for several reasons. Firstly, wildlife managers and biologists have traditionally monitored LPC populations with road-based surveys that may result in biased estimates and do not provide access to privately-owned or remote property. From my aerial surveys and distance sampling, I was able to provide accurate density and abundance estimates, as well as new leks and I detected LPCs outside the occupied range. Secondly, recent research has indicated that energy development has the potential to impact LPCs through avoidance of tall structures, increased mortality from raptors perching on transmission lines, disturbance to nesting hens, and habitat loss/fragmentation. Given the potential wind energy development in the Texas Panhandle, spatial models of current anthropogenic and vegetative features (such as transmission lines, roads, and percent native grassland) influencing lek density were needed. This information provided wildlife managers and wind energy developers in Texas with guidelines for how change in landscape features could impact LPCs. Lastly, LPC populations have faced range-wide declines over the last century and they are currently listed as a candidate species under the Endangered Species Act. I was able to provide timely information on LPC populations in Texas that will be used during the listing process.

Jennifer Timmer; Matthew Butler; Warren Ballard; Clint Boal; Heather Whitlaw

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

The effects of shinnery oak removal on lesser prairie chicken survival, movement, and reproduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The lesser prairie chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus; LPC) has declined in numbers since the late 1800s. Reasons for this decline have been attributed to habitat degradation (decreased forb and grass cover and increased woody cover...

Leonard, John Peter

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

The expansion of woody riparian vegetation, and subsequent stream restoration, influences the metabolism of prairie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The expansion of woody riparian vegetation, and subsequent stream restoration, influences, the restoration allowed recovery of some features of open-canopy prairie streams. Woody expansion apparently. Keywords: macroalgae, microalgae, primary production, restoration, streams Introduction North American

Dodds, Walter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Estimating and controlling Gulf Coast ticks, Amblyomma maculatum Koch, on the coastal prairie of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESTIMATING AND CONTROLLING GULF COAST TICKS, AMBLYOMMA MACULATUM KOCH, ON THE COASTAL PRAIRIE OF TEXAS. A THESIS by SEKOUBA BENGALY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major Subject: Entomology ESTIMATING AND CONTROLLING GULF COAST TICKS, AMBLYOMMA MACULATUM KOCH, ON THE COASTAL PRAIRIE OF TEXAS. A Thesis by SEKOUBA BENGALY P te D. Teel (C i an of Committee) son Dar...

Bengaly, Sekouba

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Lesser prairie-chicken demographics in Texas: survival, reproduction, and population viability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Remaining lesser prairie-chicken habitat is in areas occupied by soils unsuitable for cultivation such as Brownfield-Tivoli fine sands (Dittemore and Hyde 1960). Changing land use practices (Fig. 1.4) such as land conversion from prairie to cropland have...). The study was conducted on private land in northern Yoakum and southern Cochran County, Texas. Soils were consistent with the Brownfield-Tivoli association, which produced deep undulating sands (Dittemore and Hyde 1960). Topology of the study site...

Lyons, Eddie Keith

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

High resolution ion Doppler spectroscopy at Prairie View Rotamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fast ion Doppler spectroscopy (IDS) diagnostic system is installed on the Prairie View Rotamak to measure ion temperature and plasma flow. The diagnostic employs a single channel photomultiplier tube and a Jarrell-Ash 50 monochromator with a diffraction grating line density of 1180 lines/mm, which allows for first order spectra of 200-600 nm. The motorized gear of the monochromator allows spectral resolution of 0.01 nm. Equal IDS measurements are observed for various impurity emission lines of which carbon lines exhibit stronger intensities. Furthermore, the diagnostics is examined in an experiment where plasma experiences sudden disruption and quick recovery. In this case, the IDS measurements show {approx}130% increase in ion temperature. Flow measurements are shown to be consistent with plasma rotation.

Houshmandyar, Saeid; Yang Xiaokang [Solar Observatory Department, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, Texas 77446 (United States); Magee, Richard [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Genetic conservation of native trees  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genetic conservation of native trees Scott McG. Wilson1 and C. J. A. Samuel Over recent years, the genetic conservation of British native tree populations has become an increasingly important part policy-makers in the genetic basis of forest biodiversity conservation, both at the UK and, more

85

New Ceratocystis species infecting coffee, cacao, citrus and native trees in Colombia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Ceratocystis species infecting coffee, cacao, citrus and native trees in Colombia M. Van Wyk a large number of plant and especially tree pathogens. In Colombia, isolates of this fungus cause, cacao and native trees in Colombia, based on morphology and DNA-sequences for three gene regions. Host

86

Aurapex penicillata gen. sp. nov. from native Miconia theaezans and Tibouchina spp. in Colombia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aurapex penicillata gen. sp. nov. from native Miconia theaezans and Tibouchina spp. in Colombia in Colombia. Fruiting structures of the fungus could be distinguished from those of C. cubensis by their distinctly orange conidiomatal necks. This fungus also was found on several plant species native to Colombia

87

Species invasions and extinction: The future of native biodiversity on islands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Species invasions and extinction: The future of native biodiversity on islands Dov F. Sax, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 Predation by exotic species has caused the extinction these scenarios have for the future retention or extinction of native plant species. Finally, we identify invasion

Sax, Dov

88

Inventory and Ventilation Efficiency of Nonnative and Native Phragmites australis (Common Reed) in Tidal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOTE Inventory and Ventilation Efficiency of Nonnative and Native Phragmites australis (Common Reed: 3 July 2012 # Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation 2012 Abstract Nonnative Phragmites is among the most in- vasive plants in the U.S. Atlantic coast tidal wetlands, whereas the native Phragmites has

89

Potential for endophyte symbiosis to increase resistance of the native grass Poa alsodes to invasion by the non-native  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential for endophyte symbiosis to increase resistance of the native grass Poa alsodes grass, Poa alsodes, and a fungal endophyte (Neotyphodium sp.) improved the grass's ability to compete naturally endophyte-symbiotic and experi- mentally endophyte-free P. alsodes plants with the invader

Whitney, Kenneth

90

Rainwater Harvesting & Other “LEEDing” Strategies at BRIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

restored more than 76%. Prairie Restoration LIVING ROOF Our living roof is carpeted with plants that reduce cooling/heating needs as well as rainwater runoff. It also improves durability and provides a habitat for native plants, butterflies...

Gunn, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Native American CDFI Assistance Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of the Treasury is accepting applications for the Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI) Fund. The CDFI Fund makes award of up to $750,000 to certified Native CDFIs.

92

Geology of the Roan's Prairie-West area, Grimes County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the area of overlap between the Carlos East area and the Roan's Prairie-West area. The photograph of the Catahoula Prairie (pl. II) wes taken by Nr. ED G. Rolfs who aided the writer by' contributing 1nformation on the structural and stratigraphio... as found in that area, The Carlos-East area is immediately west of the thesis area and overlaps it. This overlap consists of a band about two thirds of a mile wide extending north?south. Rolf (1958) studied the Gakville-Catahoula contact in the Anderson...

Pedrotti, Daniel Anthony

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

93

Prairie View A&M University Whole Campus Energy Report Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the April 1990 savings level continues for the duration of the period. Confidence intervals to indicate the uncertainty of the estimates were also calculated. Texas A&M University February 1992 -Update Report DRAFT Prairie View A&M Campus Energy Study p. 22...). A 12-monlh moving average was used for both coincident and non-coincident peak electric demand. Texas A&M University February 1992 -Update Report ::; 'A DRAFT Prairie View A&M Campus Energy Study p. 24 A.4. Campus Square Footage Next, the annual...

Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee Rare Plant Symposium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: 4th Annual Rare Plant Symposium Sponsored by: Colorado Native Plant Society University of Colorado Herbarium US Fish and Wildlife Service Colorado: G2G3/S2S3 Global distribution: Colorado (Larimer and Boulder counties). Possibly extending

95

Technical Note Field Test of Digital Photography Biomass Estimation Technique in Tallgrass Prairie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Note Field Test of Digital Photography Biomass Estimation Technique in Tallgrass Prairie unmeasured because of the time required to clip plots and process samples, as well as limited access or proximity to a drying oven. We tested the digital photography biomass estimation technique for measuring

Morrison, Lloyd W.

96

Space use by female Greater Prairie-Chickens in response to wind energy development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space use by female Greater Prairie-Chickens in response to wind energy development V. L. WINDER,1-Chickens in response to wind energy development. Ecosphere 5(1):3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ ES13-00206.1 Abstract. Wind energy development is targeted to meet 20% of U.S. energy demand by 2030. In Kansas, optimal sites

Sandercock, Brett K.

97

Effects of wind energy development on survival of female greater prairie-chickens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of wind energy development on survival of female greater prairie-chickens Virginia L of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA Summary 1. The potential effects of wind energy development on wildlife have received increased attention over the past decade. In Kansas, optimal sites for wind energy

Sandercock, Brett K.

98

BLACK-TAILED PRAIRIE DOG SURVEYS IN CROWLEY, OTERO, PUEBLO AND EASTERN HUERFANO COUNTIES, COLORADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BLACK-TAILED PRAIRIE DOG SURVEYS IN CROWLEY, OTERO, PUEBLO AND EASTERN HUERFANO COUNTIES, COLORADO A Report to the Bureau of Land Management, Canon City Office By The Colorado Natural Heritage Program Colorado State University January 2003 John R Sovell Colorado Natural Heritage Program Colorado State

99

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: Colorado Rare Plant Symposium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: 5th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium September 5, 2008 Montrose, Colorado Sponsored by: Colorado Rare Plant Technical CommitteeColorado Rare Plant Technical Committee Colorado Native Plant Society University of Colorado Herbarium US Fish

100

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: 2nd Annual Rare Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: 2nd Annual Rare Plant Symposium Friday, September 16th, 2005 8am-noon: 2nd Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium (Discuss G1 species) 6:30-7:30pm with the Colorado Native Plant Society's Annual Meeting Sponsored by: #12;The Second Annual Colorado Rare Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A Heart Health Alaska Natives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Honoring the Gift of Heart Health A Heart Health Educator's Manual for Alaska Natives U . S . D E Health Service Office of Prevention, Education, and Control #12;Honoring the Gift of Heart Health A Heart National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and Indian Health Service NIH Publication No. 06-5218 Revised

Bandettini, Peter A.

102

Burning for Improvement of Macartney Rose-Infested Coastal Prairie.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Scifres * A native of China and Formosa, Macartney rose bracteata Wend!. ) was introduced into the United in the early 1800's as hedge rows. It escaped culti Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana. Also as "Cherokee" and "rose hedge," Macartney rose...). The exclo sures, constructed from lO-gauge welded wire with 10- by 10-centimeter openings, were approximately 1.5 meters tall and 1 meter in diameter. The term "forage utilization" will be used herein to relate net forage loss - the combination...

Gordon, R.A.; Scifres, C.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

2013 Alaska Federation of Natives Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. Delegates are elected on a population formula of one...

104

Alaska Federation of Natives Annual Convention  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. Delegates are elected on a population formula of one...

105

Nativism Is Alive and Thriving in America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fit for Our Society: Immigration and Nativism in America by Peter Schrag, University of California Press. ”Fit for Our Society: Immigration and Nativism in America, Peter Schrag, University of California Press,

Paul, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens Associated with Feral Swine in Edwards Plateau and Gulf Prairies and Marshes Ecoregions of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TICKS AND TICK-BORNE PATHOGENS ASSOCIATED WITH FERAL SWINE IN EDWARDS PLATEAU AND GULF PRAIRIES AND MARSHES ECOREGIONS OF TEXAS A Dissertation by DAVID M. SANDERS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M... Plateau and Gulf Prairies and Marshes Ecoregions of Texas Copyright 2011 David M. Sanders TICKS AND TICK-BORNE PATHOGENS ASSOCIATED WITH FERAL SWINE IN EDWARDS PLATEAU AND GULF PRAIRIES AND MARSHES ECOREGIONS OF TEXAS A Dissertation...

Sanders, David M.

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

107

Generating Textures of New Zealand Native Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Generating Textures of New Zealand Native Wood Jack Wang Abstract - This report explores algorithms for computer generated textures simulating New Zealand native wood, we out line procedural and Ray tracing. The main goal of this research is to study New Zealand native wood in depth and to gather

Goodman, James R.

108

The distribution and genesis of calcic horizons in some soils of the Texas Coast Prairie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1937; Hillel, 1971; Jenny, 1941). Lateral redistribution of carbonates within a landscape has been postulated to explain carbonate enrichment of soils; this is a secondary concentration mechanism which has been invoked on a large and small scale...THE DISTRIBUTION AND GENESIS OF CALCIC HORIZONS IN SOME SOILS OF THE TEXAS COAST PRAIRIE A Thesis by TERRENCE MICHAEL SOBECRI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Sobecki, Terrence Michael

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: 3rd Annual Rare Plant Symposium Sponsored by: Colorado Native Plant Society University of Colorado Herbarium US Fish and Wildlife Service Colorado and Eastern Colorado (Las Animas, Weld, Kit Carson, Huerfano, Pueblo, Otero, Prowers, Fremont, and El Paso

110

Peanut Growing in the Gulf Coast Prairie of Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No. 1, Beeville, Bee County: No. 9, Balmorhea. Reeves County: R. A. Hall. B. S., Superintendent J. J. Bayles, B. S., Superintendent No. 2, Tyler, Smith County: No. 10, College Station. Brazos County: P. R. Johnson. M. S., Superintendent R. &I...., Veterinarial C. H. Rogers, Ph. D.. Plant Pathologist 0. L. Carpenter, Shepherd H. E. Rea, B. S., Agronomist **O. G. Babcock, B. S., Asst. Entomolc **E. B. Deeter, B. S., Soil Erosion No. 15. Weslaco. Ridalgo County: **P. L. Hopkins, B. S., Junior Civil...

Stansel, R. H. (Roy Harrison)

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Climax vegetation and soils of the Blackland Prairie of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. I. o? Service whose personnel located potenI! al study sitcrs atrd us I sted with p! ant identif'ication and profile c!escripi iona. Mt. Dnn pard. 'I e- ton and Mr. Gordon McKee are ac:knowledged for. providing tnchr, rr al guidance. on plant... odlged for hi; ano, 'st. - an!e 'n the ii. "'' 1 p!tave of th'e t'ud, ' Mr. . snd Mxt . Te% Co11irs ere grat 1 ui1y aof! owleoged f!? choir moral aou finar! ial support nf this proj cr t! wi thout which th& o study could not have been completed...

Collins, Odell Brown

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Performance Evaluation on Open Source Native XML DBMSs 92 10400,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@biotec.or.th*** , nuwee.w@pcd.go.th**** Abstract Native XML Database Management System (Native XML DBMS) is designed storage manager and query engines. Choosing an appropriate Native XML DBMS to manage a large and complex DBMS, Performance Evaluation, Benchmark Native XML Database Management System (Native XML DBMS

Runapongsa, Kanda

113

Native Fish Society Molalla, OR 97308  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Native Fish Society PO Box 568 Molalla, OR 97308 Conserving biological diversity of native fish are the state, federal and tribal fish management agencies that have limited authority over habitat conditions in the basin. That authority resides with other agencies, but the fish management agencies can certainly

114

Species of Mycosphaerellaceae and Teratosphaeriaceae on native Myrtaceae in Uruguay: evidence of fungal host jumps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Species of Mycosphaerellaceae and Teratosphaeriaceae on native Myrtaceae in Uruguay: evidence Proteccion Vegetal, Facultad de Agronomia, Universidad de la Republica, Uruguay b Forestry and Agricultural Agropecuaria (INIA), Uruguay d Department of Plant Pathology, University of Minnesota, USA a r t i c l e i n f

Blanchette, Robert A.

115

Activity and reproduction of the black-tailed jackrabbit in the Coastal Cordgrass Prairie of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

County and the study area. Fig. ] BOUNDARY OF ARANSAS COUNTY gg STUDY AREA in the Coastal Bend Area of Texas. This area of Texas is noted for its prairie grassland association as well as its cattle, oil, and gas production. Tne ranch consists of 55.... The 'term "form sitting" is used with the same con- notation as that described by Vorhies and Taylor (l)5)) . In thi- position the hare employed cover such as brush, grass or cactus as some sort of protection (Fig. 18) ~C g Fig. 17. "Open sitti ng...

Haug, Joseph Carroll

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Prairie View A&M University | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medical point ofPowerSaver LoanPrairie View A&M

117

Height Replacement of Selected Woody Plants Following Burning or Shredding.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for effectively suppressing w e y plants to levels which allow im- proved forage responses from pastures. Although few woody plants are killed by cool-season burns, the live topgrowth is usu- ally r e d u d to near ground level and forage production... descriptions by site. The Claypan Prairie range site is typified by. kparita soils on nemly levd to gerrtlp&loping up- lands in claw p x b i t y to small d r d n a ~ e s . ' Slopes p ubally less than f krceiitt but -On- ally inmeam to-3 m e h t . Wfls...

Hamilton, W.T.; Kitchen, L.M.; Scifres, C.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Evaluation of methods for restoration of tallgrass prairie in the Blackland Prairie region of North Central Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

=C, low=L, medium=M high=H), mulch (mulch=M, no-mulch=NM) and soil compaction by wheel traffic (track=T, NT=no-track), compared to mulched and untreated controls. . . . . . . . . . . 128 Density (plants/m2) and foliar cover ((t) of ~Sh t f eff t f... (track=T, NT=no-track), compared to mulched and untreated controls. . . . . . . . . . . 135 TABLE Page Density (pits/m2) and foliar cover (0) of ~Sb( ~fd *ff t f 't (summit, backslope, footslope), seeding rate (low, medium, high), mulch, soil...

Eidson, James Arthur

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

April 2, 2013 Dear Native Plant Master Potential Participant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Master (NPM) Program is offering two courses in 2013: § Tuesday, June 4th , Monday, June 10th, July 20th and Tuesday, July 23rd from 8:00am to 12:00pm at Roxborough State Park NPM classes are held. There are two options for enrolling in an NPM course ­ as a PARTICIPANT or a VOLUNTEER. Please indicate your

Stephens, Graeme L.

120

California Desert Native Plants Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais3: Crystalline RockCaldera2 2013CalhounControlWebpage|

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

California Native Plant Protection Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais3: CrystallineOpen Energy Information University

122

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: Colorado Rare Plant Symposium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: 6th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium September 11, 2009 Loveland, Colorado Sponsored by:Sponsored by: Colorado Native Plant Society University of Colorado Herbarium US Fish and Wildlife Service Colorado Natural Heritage Program USDA Forest Service #12

123

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: Colorado Rare Plant Symposium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: 7th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium September 10, 2010 Denver, Colorado Sponsored by: Colorado Native Plant Society University of Colorado Herbarium US Fish and Wildlife Service Colorado Natural Heritage Program USDA Forest Service #12;#12;Aletes

124

DOE Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Project Development...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Project Development Workshop DOE Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Project Development Workshop March 30, 2015 9:00AM AKDT to April 1,...

125

DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small...

126

White House Launches the Generation Indigenous Native Youth Challenge...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

White House Launches the Generation Indigenous Native Youth Challenge White House Launches the Generation Indigenous Native Youth Challenge February 17, 2015 - 12:06pm Addthis On...

127

March 2004 / Vol. 54 No. 3 BioScience 205 Prairie streams and rivers historically formed a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a critical part of Great Plains ecosystems. However, such streams have received less attention from that are well suited to survival in such habitats (Lytle 2002). Understanding the ecology of Great Plains watershed. Most areas of the Great Plains that were formerly prairie are now heavily affected by agriculture

Gido, Keith B.

128

The Prairie Naturalist 43(1/2):3844; June 2011 Corresponding author email address: carol.johnston@sdstate.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.johnston@sdstate.edu Phragmites australis in South Dakota: Historical Distribution and Environment CAROL A. JOHNSTON1 AND KAYLA I 57007, USA (CAJ, KIM) ABSTRACT Common reed, Phragmites australis, has long been a component of Northern, stock dam, Prairie Coteau, Black Hills Common reed, Phragmites australis [(Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. (syn

129

Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presented by the DOE Office of Indian Energy and Tribal Energy Program, this workshop is designed to help Alaska Native villages and corporations understand the range of energy efficiency and...

130

DOE Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program are offering a 2-day workshop for Alaska Native...

131

Advancing Efforts to Energize Native Alaska (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This brochure describes key programs and initiatives of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs to advance energy efficiency, renewable energy, and energy infrastructure projects in Alaska Native villages.

Not Available

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Native American Studies at West Virginia University: Continuing the Interactions of Native and Appalachian People  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Native American Studies at West Virginia University: Continuing the Interactions of Native and Appalachian People Ellesa Clay High and Daniel W. McNeil In the heart of Appalachia, Native American Studies has been growing for almost two decades.... West Virginia is the only state totally encompassed by the Appalachian region, the mountains of which stretch from Maine to Georgia. About the size of the Navajo Nation, "wild and wonderful" West Virginia is a place of intricate ridges, hollows...

High, Ellesa Clay; McNeil, Daniel W.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Expression of multiple proteins in transgenic plants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for the production of multiple proteins in transgenic plants. A DNA construct for introduction into plants includes a provision to express a fusion protein of two proteins of interest joined by a linking domain including plant ubiquitin. When the fusion protein is produced in the cells of a transgenic plant transformed with the DNA construction, native enzymes present in plant cells cleave the fusion protein to release both proteins of interest into the cells of the transgenic plant. Since the proteins are produced from the same fusion protein, the initial quantities of the proteins in the cells of the plant are approximately equal.

Vierstra, Richard D. (Madison, WI); Walker, Joseph M. (Madison, WI)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Implications of Canada, snow, and white-fronted geese and Northern bobwhite as disease reservoirs for the Attwater's prairie-chicken  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 10 Canada (Branta canadensis), 24 snow (Chen caerulescens), and 22 white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons) were examined for endoparasites. Northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) (n = 62), the closest relative of Attwater's prairie...

Purvis, Jonny Ray

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

135

Agron. Sustain. Dev. 27 (2007) 112 1 c INRA, EDP Sciences, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of native prairie species offer biomass feedstocks that may yield greater net energy gains than monoculture

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

136

Successful restoration of plant communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of restoration failure if seed source is incorrect #12;Unexpected results... Penstemon deustus (hot rock miles NEVADA UTAH IDAHOOREGON #12;Plant-focused restoration efforts Disturbed Site Cheatgrass (49%) Rock/Bare Ground (50%) Shrub (0.8%) Native Grass (0.7%) Cattle Dung (0.2%) Undisturbed Site Cheatgrass (0.7%) Rock

Fant, Jeremie

137

REVIEWS AND SYNTHESIS Biotic interactions and plant invasions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as in abiotic conditions, may explain the demographic success of the introduced plant populations relative and competitors from their native ranges, and gain interactions with new species, under new abiotic conditions to conspecifics in their native range. Within invaded communities, the new interactions and conditions experienced

Crews, Stephen

138

2013 Plant Sale Featuring a variety of trees, shrubs,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for growing in Happy Valley, such as hard-to-find Pennsylvania natives, some of the best performers in the H1 2013 Plant Sale Featuring a variety of trees, shrubs, and perennials ideal for growing in Happy Valley, such as hard-to-find Pennsylvania natives, some of the best performers in the H.O. Smith Botanic

Omiecinski, Curtis

139

The botanical and nutritive composition of winter diets of cattle grazing prairie on the Texas Gulf Coast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an inadequate nutrient supply. Although adequate forage may be available in the region, managerial or environ- mental factors may limit the amount and quality of' that actually utilized by grazing animals. Such limited utilization is especially detrimental...THE BOTANICAL AND NUTRITIVE COMPOSITION OF WINTER DIETS OF CATTLE GRAZING PRAIRIE ON THE TEXAS GUIF COAST A THESIS by ALBERT JOHNSON DURHAM, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Durham, Albert Johnson

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

California Native American Day9th Celebration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Resource Management and Planning, Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, Student Educational:30­8pm Cross-Cultural Center, Comunidad Room Native American Graduate School Information Workshop & Dinner Hosted by Office of Graduate Studies (OGS) Thursday, November 6 · 5­7pm Cross-Cultural Center

Buckingham, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Power Plant Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) 2 Nevada Geodetic LaboratoryStillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area

Tingley, Joseph V.

142

Native American Studies 493: Yup'ik Culture & History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Estimated cost of the trip, including airfare, is $1,675.00, excluding meals. Please contact the Native

Mohaghegh, Shahab

143

Native point defects in GaSb  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have applied positron annihilation spectroscopy to study native point defects in Te-doped n-type and nominally undoped p-type GaSb single crystals. The results show that the dominant vacancy defect trapping positrons in bulk GaSb is the gallium monovacancy. The temperature dependence of the average positron lifetime in both p- and n-type GaSb indicates that negative ion type defects with no associated open volume compete with the Ga vacancies. Based on comparison with theoretical predictions, these negative ions are identified as Ga antisites. The concentrations of these negatively charged defects exceed the Ga vacancy concentrations nearly by an order of magnitude. We conclude that the Ga antisite is the native defect responsible for p-type conductivity in GaSb single crystals.

Kujala, J.; Segercrantz, N.; Tuomisto, F.; Slotte, J. [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 14100, FI-00076 AALTO (Finland)

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

144

Enrollment by Major Native American Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enrollment by Major Native American Students Agricultural Business 1 1 0 0 2 0 1 3 2 1 Agricultural Education 1 1 2 1 3 2 3 2 1 4 Agricultural Operations Technology 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 American Studies 1 Horticulture 1 2 Environmental Science 4 4 6 1 0 1 2 3 4 4 Family an Consumer Sciences 4 8 8 Film

Dyer, Bill

145

Enrollment by Major Native American Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enrollment by Major Native American Students Addiction Counselor 1 Agricultural Business 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 1 3 2 1 2 5 Agricultural Education 2 1 1 2 1 3 2 3 2 1 4 5 2 Agricultural Operations Technology Film and Photography 5 10 6 8 5 Fish and Wildlife Management 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Food

Maxwell, Bruce D.

146

Survival, seasonal movements, and cover use by lesser prairie chickens in the Texas Panhandle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and fragmentation of habitats. Until my study, no telemetry-based research on LPC has been conducted in the Rolling Plains of the Texas Panhandle. I radio-tagged and monitored LPCs in 2001 (spring??winter) and 2002 (spring) at a stable population in a native...

Toole, Benjamin Edwin

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Depositional and dissolutional processes and their resulting thinning patterns within the Middle Devonian Prairie Formation, Williston basin, North Dakota and Montana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the Williston basin, thickness variations of the Prairie Formation are common and are interpreted to originate by two processes: differential accumulation of salt during deposition and differential removal of salt by dissolution. Unambiguous evidence for each process is rare because the Prairie/Winnipegosis interval is seldom cored within the US portion of the basin. Therefore, indirect methods, using well logs, provide the principal method for identifying characteristics of the two processes. The results of this study indicate that the two processes can be distinguished using correlations within the Prairie Formation. Several regionally correlative brining-upward and probably shoaling-upward sequences occur within the Prairie Formation. Near the basin center, the lowermost sequence is transitional with the underlying Winnipegosis Formation. This transition is characterized by thinly laminated basal carbonates that become increasingly interbedded with anhydrites of the basin-centered Ratner member. The remainder of the sequence progresses up through halite and culminates in the halite-dominated Esterhazy potash beds. Two overlying sequences also brine upward; however, these sequences lack the basal anhydrite and instead begin with halite and culminate in the Belle Plaine and Mountrail potash members, respectively. A fourth sequence is indicated by several feet of halite capping the Mountrail member in some parts of the basin. Subsequent erosion or dissolution prior to burial may have removed the upper portion of this sequence. Cross sections show that the lower Prairie gradually decreases in thickness from the basin to its margins. This thickens variation is most simply explained by decreasing accommodation potential due to decreased basin topography away from the basin depocenter and by depositional onlap of the Prairie toward the basin margins.

Oglesby, C.A.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Native American companies receive economic development grants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Library of Energy2015 | JeffersonNations WorkNative

149

Prairie Canal Well No. 1, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. Volume 1. Completion and testing. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Prairie Canal Company, Inc. Well No. 1, approximately 8 miles south of the city of Lake Charles, Louisiana, was tested through the annulus between 5-1/2 inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. The interval tested was from 14,782 to 14,820 feet. The geological section was the Hackberry Sand, a member of the Oligocene Frio formation. Produced water was injected into a disposal well which was perforated in several Miocene Sands from 3070 to 4600 feet. Original plans were to test a section of the Hackberry sand from 14,976 to 15,024 feet. This primary zone, however, produced a large amount of sand, shale, gravel, and rocks during early flow periods and was abandoned in favor of the secondary zone. Four pressure drawdown flow tests and three pressure buildup tests were conducted during a 12-day period. A total of 36,505 barrels of water was produced. The highest sustained flow rate was approximately 7100 BWPD. The gas-to-water ratio, measured during testing, ranged from 41 to 50 SCF/BBL. There is disagreement as to the saturation value of the reservoir brine, which may be between 43.3 and 49.7 SCF/BBL. The methane content of the flare line gas averaged 88.4 mole percent. The CO/sub 2/ content averaged 8.4 mole percent. Measured values of H/sub 2/S in the gas were between 12 and 24 ppM.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Biodiversity in Planted Forests 1 Overmature Sitka spruce: a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity in Planted Forests 1 Overmature Sitka spruce: a natural reserve to encourage differ as to the potential value of these `new forests' for biodiversity. Attention has often been drawn to compare the biodiversity of planted forests with that of native or semi-natural woodlands. With continuing

151

Ecophysiological Responses of C3 Forbs and C4 Grasses to Drought and Rain on a Tallgrass Prairie in Northeastern Kansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecophysiological responses to drought and a 3-cm rain were measured in seven C3 forb and five C4 grass species on a tallgrass prairie in northeastern Kansas. In general, midday leaf water potentials and conductances increased after rain to a greater...

Martin, Craig E.; Harris, Fred S.; Norman, Frank J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Native American Heritage Month Celebration at the DOE Headquarters...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and religions were banned as part of a forced assimilation policy that attacked the political, social, and cultural identities of Native Americans in the United States. Through...

153

Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

students. The NNSA program also includes funding for NAU to put on a "Summer High School Youth Symposium." This summer, the Native American student researchers had an...

154

Socioeconomic profiles of native American communities: Duckwater Shoshone Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents socioeconomic aspects of Native Americans of the Duckwater Shoshone Reservation. A survey is included concerning their views on the proposed Yucca Mountain waste repository. (CBS)

Hamby, M. [Cultural Resources Consultants Ltd., Reno, NV (United States)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

village councils to regional housing authorities and Native corporations and nonprofits. "Rural Alaska is facing an energy crisis that makes rural community and regional economic...

156

DOE to Host Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alaska Native villages, the workshop agenda will cover topics such as: Strategic energy planning Clean energy project development and financing Technology updates Energy...

157

Native American Training Program in Petroleum Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines a comprehensive training program for members of Native American tribes whose lands have oil and gas resources. The program has two components: short courses and internships. Programs are proposed for: (1) adult tribes representatives who are responsible for managing tribal mineral holdings, setting policy, or who work in the oil and gas industry; (2) graduate and undergraduate college students who are tribal members and are studying in the appropriate fields; and (3) high school and middle school teachers, science teachers. Materials and program models already have been developed for some components of the projects. The plan is a coordinated, comprehensive effort to use existing resources to accomplish its goals. Partnerships will be established with the tribes, the BIA, tribal organizations, other government agencies, and the private sector to implement the program.

Ho, Winifred M.; Kokesh, Judith H.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

158

9 Towards Adaptive Management of Native Vegetation in Regional Landscapes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management remains widely cited as the most logical and elegant frame- work for continuous improvement9 Towards Adaptive Management of Native Vegetation in Regional Landscapes David H Duncan1 of the `adaptive management' paradigm to natural resource man- agement, using regional management of native

Burgman, Mark

159

alaska native people: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alaska native people First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Alaska Native People Shaping...

160

Restoration of Native Woodland on Ancient Woodland Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this Practice Guide should be addressed to: HMSO, Licensing Division, St Clements House, 2­16 Colegate, Norwich networks, habitat action plans, landscape ecology, native woodlands, restoration ecology. Printed-natural woodland 3 The ecological effects of plantations on ancient woodland sites 4 Native woodland Habitat Action

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Market Perceptions and Opportunities for Native  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adapted native plant materials (NPM) in the southwestern United States. Currently, there is a minimal initiate a regional market. We used web- based surveys to identify and analyze current and future NPM needs and purchase of NPM. From a demand perspective, lack of availability and cost of NPM has kept purchas- ing

162

Introduction Potato Types and Uses The potato is native to the Andean region of South Potato varieties vary according to shape, flesh color  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Potato Types and Uses The potato is native to the Andean region of South Potato, tuber type similar to the following examples: potatoes are the fourth most important food crop are planted each year for commercial production. The LongIWhite Skin: White Rose, Shepody potato is a member

Douches, David S.

163

Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Creek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Control and Reclamation ActSurface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977of 1977 Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000)Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000) BackgroundBackground Fish populations in Coal Creek

Gray, Matthew

164

Native American Initiative Short Course Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A training program is outlined for members of Native American tribes having an interest in working in the oil and gas industry. Also, the program will assist tribes whose lands have oil and gas resources to become more familiar with the industry and technology necessary to develop their resources. The proposed program will contribute to meeting the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Domestic Oil and Gas Initiative to help Native American tribes become more self-sufficient in developing and managing their resources through training in cost-effective, improved technologies for hydrocarbon production that will meet environmental regulations. The training program outlined is for adult tribal representatives who are responsible for managing tribal mineral holdings or setting policy, or who work in the oil and gas industry. The course content is in response to a survey that was developed by BDM-Oklahoma and sent in the spring of 1995 to 26 tribes or tribal agencies which were identified through previous contact with DOE. Tribes were asked to indicate course content needs, levels, preferred time of year, and location. Six tribes responded with specific recommendations and needs. These tribes include the Osage, Creek, Pueblo, Cherokee, St. Regis Mohawk, Northern Arapaho, and Ute Mountain Ute. The results of the survey are included in a table.The training will be conducted at various locations by BDM-Oklahoma technical staff, which , includes geologists, exploration and drilling specialists, oil and gas production specialists, environmental policy specialists, and contract specialists. The proposed training schedule offers three workshops per year and includes those courses identified in the survey by the tribes. The schedule initially proposed in April 1995 has been modified in order to offer training identified by the tribes in the most cost-effective manner. Participants will be able to take two courses, and travel costs will be minimized. A schedule is included in Table 2-1. Contracts have been initiated with several tribes to schedule a training workshop at various tribal locations. Currently, discussions are underway with the Hopi, Ute, Apache, and Osage tribes. Each of the tribal leaders are presenting the training program to their respective councils. The training offered will be a continuation of the workshop started in October, 1996. Modifications to the course content will be integrated into the presentations to meet specific tribal needs. These special technology needs will be identified through discussions with tribal leaders and council members.

Carroll, H.B.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

165

Energy Department Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Energy Department Makes 2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes to Develop Renewable Energy Resources Energy Department Makes 2.5 Million Available for Native American...

166

Water budgets of north Texas native grasslands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were present. A positive correlation had been shown to exist between standing crop and infiltration rates (Dortignac and Love 1960, Tromble et al. 1974, Gaither and Buckhouse 1983). Leithead (1959) reported that as range condition deteriorated... in the interspaces between herbaceous plants (Brock et al. 1982). It was also reported that rates in the shortgrass dominated interspaces were significantly less than in the midgrass dominated interspaces. Conversely, Tromble et al. (1974) showed infiltration...

Wright, Thomas Alan

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Internalizing Native American History: Comprehending Cherokee and Muscogulge Identities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indigenous societies to be used as models to interpret history from the native point of view. The example used here involves the reconstruction of Cherokee and Muscogulge societies by examining the center of their socio-political systems, the clan...

Haggard, Dixie Ray

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Native Village of Teller Addresses Heating Fuel Shortage, Improves...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The combination of the Native Village of Tellers limited fuel storage capacity and a harsh winter led to a supply shortage. Photo by Alexander Dane, NREL The combination of...

169

Alaska Native People Shaping Health Care 2011Malcolm Baldrige  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optometry Pediatrics Outpatient Physical Therapy Radiology Valley Native Primary Care Center Screening and Genecology Pediatrics Inpatient Pharmacy Rural Anchorage Service Unit Operational Support Office Primary Care Automated Annual Planning Tool AAPP All Alaska Pediatric Partnership ACE Advancing Customer Excellence AFN

Magee, Joseph W.

170

Native Learning Center's 6th Annual Summer Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Save the Date for Native Learning Center’s (NLC's) 6th Annual Summer Conference. NLC partners with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to offer tuition-FREE courses and trainings...

171

Celebrating National Native American Heritage Month at the Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

best Indian taco. A series of three-minute videos - Spelling Bee, Airplane, Earl Smith, and Mom n' Me - traced the roots of Native language and its current stigmas and uses....

172

Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Project Development Workshop...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Dillingham Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Project Development Workshop in Dillingham March 26, 2015 8:00AM AKDT to March 27, 2015 5:00PM AKDT Dillingham, Alaska University...

173

Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Project Development Workshop...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Bethel Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Project Development Workshop in Bethel March 23, 2015 8:00AM AKDT to March 25, 2015 5:00PM AKDT Bethel, Alaska University of Alaska...

174

Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Project Development Workshop...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Juneau Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Project Development Workshop in Juneau March 30, 2015 8:00AM AKDT to April 1, 2015 5:00PM AKDT Juneau, Alaska University of Alaska...

175

Granting Java Native Interface Developers Their Wishes Martin Hirzel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

also recon- ciling productivity, safety, portability, and efficiency. This paper presents Jeannie interface. By combining the two languages' syntax and semantics, Jean- nie eliminates verbose boiler legacy libraries, and improve efficiency. For example, most Java programs execute native code, since

Grimm, Robert

176

Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center Indian Housing Training Conference  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

To register for the conference and see a preliminary agenda, visit the Native Learning Center website.

177

Kalispel Non-Native Fish Suppression Project 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-native salmonids are impacting native salmonid populations throughout the Pend Oreille Subbasin. Competition, hybridization, and predation by non-native fish have been identified as primary factors in the decline of some native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) populations. In 2007, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Kalispel Nonnative Fish Suppression Project. The goal of this project is to implement actions to suppress or eradicate non-native fish in areas where native populations are declining or have been extirpated. These projects have previously been identified as critical to recovering native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout (WCT). Lower Graham Creek was invaded by non-native rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) after a small dam failed in 1991. By 2003, no genetically pure WCT remained in the lower 700 m of Graham Creek. Further invasion upstream is currently precluded by a relatively short section of steep, cascade-pool stepped channel section that will likely be breached in the near future. In 2008, a fish management structure (barrier) was constructed at the mouth of Graham Creek to preclude further invasion of non-native fish into Graham Creek. The construction of the barrier was preceded by intensive electrofishing in the lower 700 m to remove and relocate all captured fish. Westslope cutthroat trout have recently been extirpated in Cee Cee Ah Creek due to displacement by brook trout. We propose treating Cee Cee Ah Creek with a piscicide to eradicate brook trout. Once eradication is complete, cutthroat trout will be translocated from nearby watersheds. In 2004, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) proposed an antimycin treatment within the subbasin; the project encountered significant public opposition and was eventually abandoned. However, over the course of planning this 2004 project, little public involvement or education was conducted prior to the planned implementation. Therefore, in 2007 we implemented an extensive process to provide public education, address public concerns and provide opportunity for public involvement in implementing piscicides and other native fish recovery actions in the subbasin.

Wingert, Michele; Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

178

Developer Installed Treatment Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-installed treatment plants. These treatment plants are more commonly known as package wastewater treatment plants. 1

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Direct Measurement of Mercury Reactions In Coal Power Plant Plumes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent field and pilot-scale results indicate that divalent mercury emitted from power plants may rapidly transform to elemental mercury within the power plant plumes. Simulations of mercury chemistry in plumes based on measured rates to date have improved regional model fits to Mercury Deposition Network wet deposition data for particular years, while not degrading model verification fits for remaining years of the ensemble. The years with improved fit are those with simulated deposition in grid cells in the State of Pennsylvania that have matching MDN station data significantly less than the model values. This project seeks to establish a full-scale data basis for whether or not significant reduction or oxidation reactions occur to mercury emitted from coal-fired power plants, and what numerical redox rate should apply for extension to other sources and for modeling of power plant mercury plumes locally, regionally, and nationally. Although in-stack mercury (Hg) speciation measurements are essential to the development of control technologies and to provide data for input into atmospheric fate and transport models, the determination of speciation in a cooling coal combustion plume is more relevant for use in estimating Hg fate and effects through the atmosphere. It is mercury transformations that may occur in the plume that determine the eventual rate and patterns of mercury deposited to the earth's surface. A necessary first step in developing a supportable approach to modeling any such transformations is to directly measure the forms and concentrations of mercury from the stack exit downwind to full dispersion in the atmosphere. As a result, a study was sponsored by EPRI and jointly funded by EPRI, the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), and the Wisconsin Department of Administration. The study was designed to further our understanding of plume chemistry. The study was carried out at the We Energies Pleasant Prairie Power Plant, Pleasant Prairie, Wisconsin, just west of Kenosha. Aircraft and ground measurements support the occurrence of a reduction in the fraction of reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) (with a corresponding increase in elemental mercury) as part of the Total Gaseous Mercury (TGM) emitted from the Pleasant Prairie stack. This occurrence is based on comparison of the RGM concentrations in the plume (at standard conditions) compared to the RGM in the stack. There was found to be a 44% drop in the fraction of RGM between the stack exit and the first sampling arc and a 66% reduction from the stack to the 5-mile sampling arc, with no additional drop between the 5- and 10-mile arcs. Smaller-scale experiments in both test chambers and pilot-scale coal combustor exhaust streams have indicated the presence of rapid and relatively complete reduction reactions converting divalent into elemental mercury within power plant plumes prior to full dispersion in the atmosphere. These measurements, however, have been unable to identify whether the reactions occur during plume rise from physical to virtual stack height (during positive thermal buoyancy). The presence, rate, completeness, ubiquity, and dependence on source characteristics of these reactions, however, must be demonstrated in plume environments associated with fully operational power plants. That requirement, to capture either the reactions or the reaction products of chemistry that may be occurring very close to stack exits in highly turbulent environments, constrains the precision and reproducibility with which such full-scale experiments can be carried out. The work described here is one of several initial steps required to test whether, and in what direction, such rapid mercury redox reactions might be occurring in such plumes.

Leonard Levin

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

2014 Plant Sale Featuring a variety of trees, shrubs,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of trees, shrubs, and perennials ideal for growing in Happy Valley, such as hard-to-find Pennsylvania1 2014 Plant Sale Featuring a variety of trees, shrubs, and perennials ideal for growing in Happy Valley, such as hard-to-find Pennsylvania natives, some of the best performers in the H.O. Smith Botanic

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Plant reestablishment after soil disturbance: Effects of soils, treatment, and time  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory examined plant growth and establishment on 16 sites where severe land disturbance had taken place. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relative effectiveness of the different methods in term of their effects on establishment of native and alien plants. Disturbances ranged from 1 to 50 years in age. Revegetation using native plants had been attempted at 14 of the sites; the remainder were abandoned without any further management. Revegetation efforts variously included seeding, fertilizer application, mulching with various organic sources, compost application, application of Warden silt loam topsoil over sand and gravel soils, and moderate irrigation.

Brandt, C.A.; Alford, K.; McIlveny, G.; Tijerina, A.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Partitioning the effects of plant biomass and litter on Andropogon gerardi in old-field vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examined the effects of living plant neighbors and litter on the performance of a native C4 grass, Andropogon gerardi, at five old-field sites that differ in community biomass and soil fertility. We used plant removal experiments in which both...

Foster, Bryan L.; Gross, Katherine L.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

RESEARCH ARTICLE Rural housing is related to plant invasions in forests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of invasive non-native plants in temperate forests of the Midwestern US. In the Baraboo Hills, Wisconsin, we be discouraged. Keywords Baraboo Hills Á Forest fragmentation Á Landscaping Á Midwestern forests Á NonRESEARCH ARTICLE Rural housing is related to plant invasions in forests of southern Wisconsin, USA

Radeloff, Volker C.

184

Role of domestic animals as bloodmeal sources for mosquitoes in the Texas coastal prairies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

animal sera, was run in a system maintaining an 8. 0% NaCl concentration according to the con- ditions of maximum precipitation (Goodman et al. 1951). The setup involved 2 rows of tubes, 10 x 75 mm, 6 in the front row and 7 in the second row... County, Texas. 14 the number of years out of cultivation and season of the year. An unpublished survey of the plant communities in the fallow fields on the riceland study site made during the study period indi- cates that, through the spring and mid...

Kuntz, Karl Justin

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY REACTIONS IN COAL POWER PLANT PLUMES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-02NT41422 and specifically addresses Program Area of Interest: No.5--Environmental and Water Resources. The project team includes the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) as the contractor and the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and Frontier Geosciences as subcontractors. Wisconsin Energies and its Pleasant Prairie Power Plant acted as host for the field-testing portion of the research. The project is aimed at clarifying the role, rates, and end results of chemical transformations that may occur to mercury that has been emitted from elevated stacks of coal-fired electric power plants. Mercury emitted from power plants emerges in either its elemental, divalent, or particulate-bound form. Deposition of the divalent form is more likely to occur closer to the source than that of the other two forms, due to its solubility in water. Thus, if chemical transformations occur in the stack emissions plume, measurements in the stack may mischaracterize the fate of the material. Initial field and pilot plant measurements have shown significant and rapid chemical reduction of divalent to elemental mercury may occur in these plumes. Mercury models currently assume that the chemical form of mercury occurring in stacks is the same as that which enters the free atmosphere, with no alteration occurring in the emissions plume. Recent data indicate otherwise, but need to be evaluated at full operating scale under field conditions. Prestbo and others have demonstrated the likelihood of significant mercury chemical reactions occurring in power plant plumes (Prestbo et al., 1999; MDNR-PPRP, 2000; EERC, 2001). This experiment will thus increase our understanding of mercury atmospheric chemistry, allowing informed decisions regarding source attribution. The experiment was carried out during the period August 22-September 5, 2003. The experimental site was the Pleasant Prairie Power Plant in Pleasant Prairie, Wisconsin, just west of Kenosha. The experiment involved using an aircraft to capture emissions and document chemistry changes in the plume. While using the airplane for sampling, supplemental fast-response sensors for NOx, connected to data loggers, were used to gauge entry and exit times and transect intervals through plume emissions material. The Frontier Geosciences Static Plume Dilution Chamber (SPDC) was employed simultaneously adjacent to the stack to correlate its findings with the aircraft sampling, as well as providing evaluation of the SPDC as a rapid, less costly sampler for mercury chemistry. A complementary stack plume method, the Dynamic Plume Dilution (DPD) was used in the latter portion of the experiment to measure mercury speciation to observe any mercury reduction reaction with respect to both the reaction time (5 to 30 seconds) and dilution ratio. In addition, stack sampling using the ''Ontario Hydro'' wet chemistry method and continuous mercury monitors (CMM) were used to establish the baseline chemistry in the stack. Comparisons among stack, SPDC, DPD and aircraft measurements allow establishment of whether significant chemical changes to mercury occur in the plume, and of the verisimilitude of the SPDC and DPD methods. This progress report summarizes activities during a period of results review from the stack/aircraft subcontractor, data analysis and synthesis, and preparation and presentation of preliminary results to technical and oversight meetings.

Leonard Levin

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Plant Succession at the Edges of Two Abandoned Cultivated Fields on the Arid Lands Ecology Reserve  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

How vegetation recovers from disturbances is an important question for land managers. We examined 500 m2 plots to determine the progress made by native herbaceous plant species in colonizing the edges of abandoned cultivated fields at different elevations and microclimates, but with similar soils in a big sagebrush/bluebunch wheatgrass steppe. Alien species, especially cheatgrass and cereal rye, were the major competitors to the natives. The native species with best potential for restoring steppe habitats were sulphur lupine, hawksbeard, bottlebrush squirreltail, needle-and-thread grass, Sandberg's bluegrass, and several lomatiums.

Simmons, Sally A. (OFFICE OF FELLOWSHIP PROG); Rickard, William H. (OFFICE OF FELLOWSHIP PROG)

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

None

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

188

Neofusicoccum eucalyptorum, a Eucalyptus pathogen, on native Myrtaceae in Uruguay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neofusicoccum eucalyptorum, a Eucalyptus pathogen, on native Myrtaceae in Uruguay C. A. Pe. Cassinoni', Ruta 3, km 363, PaysanduÂŽ, Uruguay; c Department of Genetics, Forestry and Agricultural InvestigacioÂŽn Agropecuaria (INIA), Ruta 48, km 10, Canelones, Uruguay Neofusicoccum eucalyptorum is a canker

189

Alaska Native Community Energy Planning and Projects (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information on the Alaska Native villages selected to receive assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy 2013 Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, which provides technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects on tribal lands.

Not Available

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

imported for the exotic pet trade. In their native range,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the ultimate source of the African Rock Pythons is escapes or releases of animals that were T h e I n v a d e rimported for the exotic pet trade. In their native range, African Rock Pythons in- habit somewhat survey suggests that another species of large constrictor snake, the Northern African Rock Python, may

Jawitz, James W.

191

Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

193

Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Responses of native grasses to soil applications of fenuron (3-phenyl-1, 1-dimethylurea) and T B A (2,3,6-trichlorobenzoic acid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1957 to June 1, 1958 in 1nches at Rmterwood Airport, College Station, Texas Mean total density of pe~ herbaceous vegetation in var1ous fenurcm and TBA. treatment plots as of June 1, 1958 on the prairie upland site. . . . . . . . . . . ~ . 14... Analysis of variance for total density on the prairie upland site and a sepsamtion of significant amans. ~ ~. . . . ~ 1, 5 5 ~ Tuitial an4 termLnsl densities aud percentage change in three 4omtnmts of the prairie upland site for the period, December 15...

Hughes, Eugene Earl

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

195

THE NATIVE AND NONNATIVE PROCESSING OF NUMBER AND GENDER AGREEMENT IN SPANISH: AN ERP INVESTIGATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present study utilizes EEG to examine the processing of number and gender agreement in Spanish by native speakers and adult English-speaking learners. With respect to native processing, the study focuses on how different ...

Aleman Banon, Jose

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center Webinar: Grant Writing Essentials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Native Learning Center (NLC) offers tuition FREE courses and trainings to Native Americans and indigenous people with an emphasis on the educational needs of tribal members and their...

197

Effects of hay management and native species sowing on grassland community structure, biomass, and restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abandoned HILD hay field in eastern Kansas to evaluate effects of fertilization, haying, and native species sowing on community dynamics, biomass, and potential for restoration to native LIHD hay meadow. Fertilized plots maintained dominance by introduced...

Foster, Brian L.; Kindscher, Kelly; Houseman, Greg R.; Murphy, Cheryl A.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

EPIDEMIOLOGIC TRANSITION AMONG A NATIVE AMERICAN COMMUNITY IN KANSAS DURING THE 20TH CENTURY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to work directly for the tribe as the diabetes project manager at the Prairie Band Potawatomi Health Center. Primary duties of the position included coordinating grant funded initiatives aimed at reducing the incidence and impact of diabetes... disease in 2007 and 2008, respectively. Two small grants from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment allowed for the establishment of Chronic Disease Electronic Management Systems (CDEMS) for diabetes and hypertension. CDEMS is a software...

Corbett, Steve

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Contrasting nutrient stocks and litter decomposition in stands of native and invasive species in a sub-tropical estuarine marsh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alterniflora Phragmites australis Cyperus malaccensis Alien invasive species Native aggressive species Biomass invasive species (Spartina alterniflora, smooth cordgrass) and a native aggressive species (Phragmites australis, common reed) as they have expanded into the native Cyperus malaccensis (shichito matgrass

Gauci, Vincent

200

HollyMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Native resident fish persisted after  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HollyMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Native resident fish persistedMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Surveys document increase in walleye and decrease in native fish abundance Native fish populations affected Sanpoil: wildkokanee and redband trout populations depressed Columbia

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Nest Defense Behaviors of Native Cavity-Nesting Birds to European Starlings1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

457 Nest Defense Behaviors of Native Cavity- Nesting Birds to European Starlings1 Rodney G. Olsen,2 for nest sites and the extent to which European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) are seen as a threat by native of aggressive behavior of four species of native cavity-nesting birds to starlings at active nests in trees

Standiford, Richard B.

202

Native Hydrogen Bonds in a Molten Globule: The Apoflavodoxin Thermal Intermediate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Native Hydrogen Bonds in a Molten Globule: The Apoflavodoxin Thermal Intermediate MarÔ�a P. Iru�n1 in surface- exposed hydrogen bonds connecting secondary-structure elements in the native protein. All hydrogen bonds analysed are formed in the molten globule intermediate, either with native strength

Sancho, Javier

203

Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs on drastically disturbed lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs (WSNGs) has been viewed by landowners, agronomists, natural resource managers and reclamation specialists as being too expensive and difficult, especially for reclamation, which requires early stand closure and erosion control. Natural resource managers have learned a great deal about establishing WSNGs since the implementation of the 1985 Farm Bill`s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Reclamation specialists must begin to use this information to improve reclamation success. Quality control of seed equipment and planting methods has been proven to be the crucial first step in successful establishment. Seedling germination, growth and development of WSNGs are different from that of introduced cool-season grasses and legumes. Specialized seed drills and spring planting periods are essential. Because shoot growth lags far behind root growth the first two seasons, WSNGs often are rejected for reclamation use. Usually, the rejection is based on preconceived notions that bare ground will erode and on reclamation specialists` desire for a closed, uniform, grassy lawn. WSNG`s extensive root systems inhibit rill and gully erosion by the fall of the first season. Planting a weakly competitive, short-lived nurse crop such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) at low rates with the WSNG mixture can reduce first-season sheet and rill erosion problems and give an appearance of a closed stand. Benefits of WSNGs in soil building and their acid-tolerance make them ideal species for reclamation of drastically disturbed lands. WSNGs and forbs enhance wildlife habitat and promote natural succession and the invasion of the reclamation site by other native species, particularly hardwood trees, increasing diversity and integrating the site into the local ecosystem. This is perhaps their most important attribute. Most alien grasses and legumes inhibit natural succession, slowing the development of a stable mine soil ecosystem. This paper outlines one successful methodology to establish warm-season grasses and forbs on abandoned mine lands in Missouri. The methodology can be successfully adapted for reclamation of all drastically disturbed lands including Title V lands under the Surface Mining Control Reclamation Act of 1977 (PL95-87) to promote ecosystem diversity and stability.

Miller, S. [Missouri Dept. of Natural Resources, Jefferson City, MO (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

Weevils successfully destroy acres of lake-invading plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

28 tx H2O Fall 2012 Story by Kathy Wythe Through a statewide giant salvinia management program, a weevil that feeds exclusively on giant salvinia successfully destroyed about #28;#18;#29; acres of the invasive plant on B.A. Steinhagen Lake...Life Extension Service and Texas Weevils successfully destroy acres of lake-invading plant A&M AgriLife Research are working in Texas to control giant salvinia, a free-#23;oating aquatic fern native to South America. #31;e plant has invaded #28;#14; Texas...

Wythe, Kathy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Alien Species and Evolution: The Evolutionary Ecology of Exotic Plants, Animals, Microbes and Interacting Native Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: Alien Species and Evolution: The EvolutionaryGermany George W. Cox. Alien Species and Evolution: TheRecycled, acid-free paper. Alien Species and Evolution leads

Nehrbass, Nana

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Woody and Herbaceous Plants Native to Haiti For use in Miami-Dade Landscapes1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occupies the western one third of the island of Hispaniola with the Dominican Republic the remainder. Of all the islands within the Caribbean basin Hispaniola possesses the most varied flora after

Jawitz, James W.

207

Rotenone, a natural chemical produced by legumi-nous plants native to Southeast Asia and South  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

commonly used on household pets and gardens,and in agri- culture and animal husbandry.Information about for determining any long-term effects on humans produced by consumption of rotenone- exposed fishes are unlikely

Bermingham, Eldredge

208

Salinity: effect on germination of native plants and leaching in clay soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 49 50 52 60 67 70 76 76 105 107 120 vii LIST OF TABLES Page Origin of grasses and forbs tested for germination in single and mixed salt solutions. Chemical concentrations, osmotic tensions, and conductivity of solutions used... of NaC1 and CaC1 based on seed germination. , 61 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1, Relative germination of least snoutbean Pi%1 1881 achieved over several periods of time and osmotic tensions developed with NaC1. 19 2. Relative gcz'minntion of alkali...

Neighbors, James Olen

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

EARN A STIPEND: Develop inquirybased lessons & activities about native, nonnative or invasive plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Doing a demonstration? Asking a series of whole-class questions? Showing a film clip? · Middle school discussion questions in a lesson plan, list specific questions to ask and provide sample acceptable answers://www.spice.centers.ufl.edu/ TITLE: Make it catchy and convey the topic of the lesson. KEY QUESTION(S): Identify key question

Watson, Craig A.

210

Consequences of forest fragmentation in an understory plant community: extensive range expansion of native  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-6711, Japan, Graduate School of Environmental Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810, Japan, and Department of Agro-Environmental Science, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro 080-8555, Japan Abstract Understory bamboo species are important and influential components

Tomimatsu,, Hiroshi

211

Umatilla Tribes to Grow Native Plants for Hanford | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject is on Track| DepartmentPinakin Patel /

212

Native roadside perennial grasses persist a decade after planting in the Sacramento Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation Handbook. Yolo County Resource ConservationWF. 1972. Soil Survey of Yolo County, Cali- fornia. USDA,Conservation Handbook. Yolo County Resource Conservation

O'Dell, Ryan; Young, Steve L; Claassen, Vic

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

A work bibliography on native food consumption, demography and lifestyle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a bibliography for the Native American tribe participants in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project to use. The HEDR Project's primary objective is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Eight Native American tribes are responsible for estimating daily and seasonal consumption of traditional foods, demography, and other lifestyle factors that could have affected the radiation dose received by tribal members. This report provides a bibliography of recorded accounts that tribal researchers may use to verify their estimates. The bibliographic citations include references to information on the specific tribes, Columbia River plateau ethnobotany, infant feeding practices and milk consumption, nutritional studies and radiation, tribal economic and demographic characteristics (1940--1970), research methods, primary sources from the National Archives, regional archives, libraries, and museums.

Murray, C.E.; Lee, W.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Visual Power: 21st Century Native American Artists/Intellectuals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

artists Joe Fedderson (Colville Confederated Tribes), Rose Powhatan (Pamunkey), Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (Flathead Salish/Con- federated Salish and Kootenai Nation), Kay Walking Stick (Cherokee), and Carm Little Turtle (Apache.... No matter what style, most Na tive American art from this generation emphasized beauty, balance, and har mony. The 1960s may be considered the turning point when Native American artists began to break away from the so-called White-influenced, (D. Dunn...

Farris, Phoebe

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Native American Housing: Obstacles and Opportunities | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment, SafetyWaterMary LandrieuNEETEnergy NationalBusinesses |Native American

216

Migration and oil industry employment of north slope Alaska natives. Technical report (Final)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study has two purposes: To find out why people migrate to and within the North Slope; To find out if working for the oil industry at Prudhoe Bay or Kuparuk makes North Slope Natives more likely to migrate. This is the first study of Alaska Native migration based on interviews of Alaska North Slope Native migrants, of non-Native migrants, and of Alaska North Slope Natives who are oil industry employees. It has two major chapters: one on household migration and the other on oil industry employment. The report is based on interviews conducted in March 1992.

Marshall, D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Plants & Animals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We sample many plants and animals, including wild and domestic crops, game animals, fish, and food products from animals, as well as...

218

Transgenic plants that exhibit enhanced nitrogen assimilation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a method for producing plants with improved agronomic and nutritional traits. Such traits include enhanced nitrogen assimilatory and utilization capacities, faster and more vigorous growth, greater vegetative and reproductive yields, and enriched or altered nitrogen content in vegetative and reproductive parts. More particularly, the invention relates to the engineering of plants modified to have altered expression of key enzymes in the nitrogen assimilation and utilization pathways. In one embodiment of the present invention, the desired altered expression is accomplished by engineering the plant for ectopic overexpression of one of more the native or modified nitrogen assimilatory enzymes. The invention also has a number of other embodiments, all of which are disclosed herein.

Coruzzi, Gloria M. (New York, NY); Brears, Timothy (Durham, NC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Transgenic plants that exhibit enhanced nitrogen assimilation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a method for producing plants with improved agronomic and nutritional traits. Such traits include enhanced nitrogen assimilatory and utilization capacities, faster and more vigorous growth, greater vegetative and reproductive yields, and enriched or altered nitrogen content in vegetative and reproductive parts. More particularly, the invention relates to the engineering of plants modified to have altered expression of key enzymes in the nitrogen assimilation and utilization pathways. In one embodiment of the present invention, the desired altered expression is accomplished by engineering the plant for ectopic overexpression of one of more the native or modified nitrogen assimilatory enzymes. The invention also has a number of other embodiments, all of which are disclosed herein.

Coruzzi, Gloria M. (New York, NY); Brears, Timothy (Durham, NC)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Transgenic plants that exhibit enhanced nitrogen assimilation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a method for producing plants with improved agronomic and nutritional traits. Such traits include enhanced nitrogen assimilatory and utilization capacities, faster and more vigorous growth, greater vegetative and reproductive yields, and enriched or altered nitrogen content in vegetative and reproductive parts. More particularly, the invention relates to the engineering of plants modified to have altered expression of key enzymes in the nitrogen assimilation and utilization pathways. In one embodiment of the present invention, the desired altered expression is accomplished by engineering the plant for ectopic overexpression of one of more the native or modified nitrogen assimilatory enzymes. The invention also has a number of other embodiments, all of which are disclosed herein.

Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Brears, Timothy

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

2015 Native Women's Leadership Forum | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems Engineering ResearchServices4/08VirginiaOsuna-32014Regional2015 ForumNative Women's

222

94-A13 Native American Initiative Short Course Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A training program conducted in Bartlesville by BDM-Oklahoma technical staff, which included geologists, geophysicists, exploration and drilling specialists, and environmental policy experts. The proposed training schedule offered four courses per year and included those coursed identified by the tribes in the survey. The training program was outlined for members of Native American Tribes whose lands have oil and gas resources. The proposed program contributed to meeting the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Domestic Oil and Gas Initiative to help Native American tribes become more self-sufficient in developing and managing their resources through training in cost-effective, improved technologies for hydrocarbon production that will meet environmental regulations. The training program outlined was for adult tribal representatives who are responsible for managing tribal mineral holdings or setting policy, or who work in the oil and gas industry. The course content is in response to a survey that was developed by BDM-Oklahoma and sent in the Spring of 1995 to 26 tribal agencies identified through previous contact with DOE. Tribes were asked to indicate course content needs, levels, preferred time of year, and location. Six tribes responded with specific recommendations and needs. These tribes, were the Creek, Pueblo, Cherokee, St. Regis Mohawk, Northern Arapho, and Ute Mountain Ute.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.; Kokesh, Judith H.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

223

E-Print Network 3.0 - alaska native women Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 National Center for Education Statistics IPEDS Data Center Summary: Women Nonresident alien Black, non-Hispanic American IndianAlaska Native AsianPacific Islander... Total men...

224

E-Print Network 3.0 - alaska natives gocadan Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

as food, sharing... for personal or family consumption as food, or for customary trade. Alaska Native Tribe means, for purposes... of the subsistence fishery for Pacific...

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - australian native species Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: australian native species Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Freshwater fish resources in the Snowy River, Victoria. Freshwater fish resources in the Snowy Summary:...

226

Native American Housing Stakeholder Meeting- Tribal Data: Building the Bridge to New Capital  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hosted by the Housing Assistance Council, the Native American Housing Stakeholder Meeting will discuss effective strategies for tribally led data collection, ways to access and leverage new capital...

227

Energy Project Development and Financing Strategy for Native Alaska (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This DOE Office of Indian Energy fact sheet describes the energy project development process with a focus on Alaska Native villages and regional corporations.

Not Available

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult native americans Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Edward D. Castillo California Indian Culture and History, American Indian Religion & Philosophy, Native... American Education and North American History Gregory ... Source:...

229

Native defects in MBE-grown CdTe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deep-level traps in both n- and p-type CdTe layers, grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaAs substrates, have been investigated by means of deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Four of the traps revealed in the DLTS spectra, which displayed exponential kinetics for capture of charge carriers into the trap states, have been assigned to native point defects: Cd interstitial, Cd vacancy, Te antisite defect and a complex formed of the Te antisite and Cd vacancy. Three further traps, displaying logarithmic capture kinetics, have been ascribed to electron states of treading dislocations generated at the mismatched interface with the substrate and propagated through the CdTe layer.

Olender, Karolina; Wosinski, Tadeusz; Makosa, Andrzej; Tkaczyk, Zbigniew; Kolkovsky, Valery; Karczewski, Grzegorz [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

230

Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

231

Bagdad Plant  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope ChangeL-01-06Hot-Humid- EngineB2Bagdad Plant 585 Silicon

232

Native Predators Do Not Influence Invasion Success of Pacific Lionfish on Caribbean Reefs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Native Predators Do Not Influence Invasion Success of Pacific Lionfish on Caribbean Reefs Serena whether biotic resistance by native predators on Caribbean coral reefs has influenced the invasion success of the Caribbean. We recorded protection status of the reefs, and abiotic variables including depth, habitat type

Miller, Thomas E.

233

Differences in germination and seedling establishment of alien and native Impatiens species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Differences in germination and seedling establishment of alien and native Impatiens species RozdĂ­ly., JarosĂ­k V. & Pysek P. (2009): Differences in germi- nation and seedling establishment of alien and native design. In this study seed and seedling traits of three congeneric alien species in Europe, differing

KratochvĂ­l, Lukas

234

Climate Change Vulnerability of Native and Alien Freshwater Fishes of California: A Systematic Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Vulnerability of Native and Alien Freshwater Fishes of California: A Systematic and climate change vulnerability scores were derived for 121 native and 43 alien fish species. The two scores baseline and greater climate change vulnerability than did alien species. Fifty percent of California

235

Scale dependence of native and alien species richness in North American floras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scale dependence of native and alien species richness in North American floras Vliv mítka studia na of native and alien species richness in North American flo- ras. ­ Preslia 78: 427­436. I analyzed data from and alien diversity vary as a function of spatial grain. Moving window multi- ple regression revealed

Minnesota, University of

236

Power and Performance of Native and Java Benchmarks on 130nm to 32nm Process Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power and Performance of Native and Java Benchmarks on 130nm to 32nm Process Technologies Hadi with chip power reduc- tions. This paper examines how well process technology and mi- croarchitecture delivered on this assumption. This paper evalu- ates power and performance of native and Java workloads

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

237

Plant Operational Status - Pantex Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome to theNews & Blog »Physics PhysicsWeek »Plant

238

CONSUMPTION OF NATIVE AND NONNATIVE FISHES BY INTRODUCED LARGEMOUTH BASS (MICROPTERUS SALMOIDES) IN THE SAN JUAN RIVER,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSUMPTION OF NATIVE AND NONNATIVE FISHES BY INTRODUCED LARGEMOUTH BASS (MICROPTERUS SALMOIDES native fishes. Introduced largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) in the San Juan River, New Mexico. The disproportional abundance of native fishes in the diet of juvenile largemouth bass suggests greater susceptibility

Gido, Keith B.

239

Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump to:52c8ff988c1 No38e4011f618bDeer Park,Dell Prairie,DeltaDemandDemarest,

240

Successful tree planting techniques for drastically disturbed lands: A case study of the propagation planting of container-grown oak and nut trees in Missouri  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful tree seedling establishment on drastically disturbed lands is contingent on seven major variables: (1) selection of proper native species, (2) purchase of the best quality planting stock, (3) correct handling of planting stock, (4) correct planting techniques, (5) effective control of competing vegetation, (6) proper soil conditions and preparation, (7) weather. Exotic species should not be planted to avoid past mistakes such as kudzu, Japanese honeysuckle, sericea lespedeza and chestnut blight. A major concern of reclamation specialists and ecosystem restorationists is obtaining high-quality plant materials with the correct provenance. Ecosystem restorationists, reclamation specialists, park managers and private landowners can easily and cheaply propagate native oak or other hardwood species from local parent stock using Whitcomb bottomless containers. Proper seed collection, storage and preparation techniques as well as propagation methods are critical for seedling growth and development into quality air-pruned planting stock. Air-pruned seedlings of local provenance can be outplanted in the fall after one growing season with little transplanting shock while developing extensive root systems prior to soil freezing in winter. Establishment success of container-grown seedlings greatly exceeds that of spring-planted bare-root seedlings. Fall-planted, container-grown seedlings have a decided advantage since their roots continue to grow throughout the fall and much of the winter, enabling them to better withstand summer drought and weedy competitors. Container-grown seedlings also allow a five- to six-month planting season compared to bare-root seedlings` four to six weeks. Since propagation costs are minimal, planters who grow their own save money on the planting stock. Because the quality is higher, home-grown seedlings have greater establishment success, saving labor, time and money. With better survival rates, far fewer trees need be planted as compared to bare-root seedlings.

Miller, S. [Missouri Dept. of Natural Resources, Jefferson City, MO (United States). Land Reclamation Program

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

242

Patterns in the Use of a Restored California Floodplain by Native and Alien Fishes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

became iso- The * indicates alien species. No samples wereby larvae of native and alien fishes. Pages 125-140 inK, Mount, JF. 2003. Alien fishes in natural streams: fish

Moyle, Peter B; Crain, Patrick K; Whitener, Keith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

New species of Mycosphaerella from Myrtaceae in plantations and native forests in eastern Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New species of Mycosphaerella from Myrtaceae in plantations and native forests in eastern Australia, New South Wales 2119, Australia Treena I. Burgess School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Murdoch University, Perth, WA 6150, Australia Vyrna Beilharz Primary Industries Research Victoria

244

Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy; November 16-17, 1996; Bartlesville, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thirty-three Native American tribal members, council members, and other interested parties gathered in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, to attend the Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy on October 16 and 17 1996, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Tribes represented at the workshop included the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Hopi, Jicarilla Apache, Osage, Seminole, and Ute. Representatives of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and the Minerals Management Service (MMS) also attended. BDM-Oklahoma developed and organized the Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy to help meet the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Domestic Gas and Oil Initiative to help Native American Tribes become more self-sufficient in developing and managing petroleum resources.

NONE

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

245

Native Learning Center Training for Building Sustainable Communities in Indian Country  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center (NLC) will host this training on Building Sustainable Communities in Indian Country. Topics will include, but are not limited to: sustainable...

246

Native capillary isoelectric focusing for the separation of protein complex isoforms and subcomplexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we report the use of capillary isoelectric focusing under native conditions for the separation of protein complex isoforms and subcomplexes. Using biologically relevant HIS-tag and FLAG-tag purified protein complexes, ...

Fonslow, Bryan R.

247

Online Processing of Wh-Dependencies in English by Native Speakers of Spanish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study investigated if, Spanish-speaking learners of English are capable of processing wh-dependencies incrementally and observing the grammatical constraints that regulate wh-extraction in English, similar to native ...

Canales, Alonso Jose

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

EA-1932: Bass Lake Native Fish Restoration, Eureka, Lincoln County, Montana  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA was initiated to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a BPA proposal to fund Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks to help restore native fish populations to the Tobacco River and Lake Koocanusa. The project has been cancelled.

249

An Analysis of Price Behavior for both Native and Improved Pecans: 1974-1989  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

October crop estimates than revised final pecan production data during the period 1974-1989. When the influence of the large forecast error of 1986 was accounted for, the model improved significantly. In fact, with a dummy variable inserted for 1987... period. USDA October crop estimate errors were much less for I improved pecans than for native pecans during 1974-1989. Although the crop estimates for improved pecans were better than the estimates for native pecans, both groups of producers may...

Collins, Steven Farnham

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Native American Demographic and Tribal Survival into the Twenty-first Century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

States may be found in Grounds, Tinker, and Wilkins, eds. (2003) and Moore (2003); see also Adams (1995); Meyer (1994); Lyden and Legters (1992); McDonnell (1991); Hoxie (1984); Legters (1988). Works Cited Adams, David Wallace. (1995). Education... Indians and Alaska Natives." Demography 30: 635-652. Grounds, Richard A., George E. Tinker, and David E. Wilkins, editors (2003). Native Voices: American Indian Identity and Resistance. Lawrence: Uni versity Press of Kansas. Hagan, William T. (1985...

Thornton, Russell

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

A Longitudinal Study of Hope in Native American Children and Adolescents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Children Appendix E: The Hope Scale……………………………………………….……….52 Appendix F: Native American Acculturation Scale…………………………………54 vi List of Tables Table 1. Mean (SD) for Variables at Time 1 and Time 2……………………………18 Table 2. Inter... less hope for the future. In other words, these Native American individuals may not have perceived their lives as harmonious which may have put them more at-risk for negative mental health outcomes. Hope Garrett and Wilbur (1999) asserted that...

Mashunkashey-Shadlow, Joanna

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

252

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics: Swedish Nuclear Powe

Pázsit, Imre

253

Ethylene insensitive plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nucleic acid and polypeptide sequences are described which relate to an EIN6 gene, a gene involved in the plant ethylene response. Plant transformation vectors and transgenic plants are described which display an altered ethylene-dependent phenotype due to altered expression of EIN6 in transformed plants.

Ecker, Joseph R. (Carlsbad, CA); Nehring, Ramlah (La Jolla, CA); McGrath, Robert B. (Philadelphia, PA)

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

254

Plant fatty acid hydroxylases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); Broun, Pierre (Burlingame, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Lexington, KY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Technology Data for Energy Plants June 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................... 79 13 Centralised Biogas Plants

256

Plant Phenotype Characterization System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

257

Interactive effects of global warming and `global worming' on the initial establishment of native and exotic herbaceous plant species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modeling allowed us to address possible mechanisms: direct effects of earthworms primarily affected exotic, chemical and physical properties of many ecosystems, yet little is known about their potential interactive, endogeic, epigeic, or all three together) and 4°C warming on soil water content, litter turnover

Weiblen, George D

258

Interactive effects of global warming and `global worming' on the initial establishment of native and exotic herbaceous plant species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modeling allowed us to address possible mechanisms: direct effects of earthworms primarily affected exotic and physical properties of many ecosystems, yet little is known about their potential interactive effects. We, epigeic, or all three together) and 4°C warming on soil water content, litter turnover and seedling

Minnesota, University of

259

PART OF A SPECIAL ISSUE ON PLANT MATING SYSTEMS Variation in inbreeding depression and plasticity across native  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

architectural traits measured. The absolute value of plasticity showed the most marked difference between home research has demonstrated that a wide range of envir- onmental factors influence inbreeding depression (e

Dudash, Michele R.

260

.\\m. Midi. Nat. 159:55-66 Do Non-native Plant Species Affect the Shape of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a Kurt Kotrschal c Rui F. Oliveira a, b a Eco-Ethology Research Unit, ISPA ­ Instituto Universitårio is the relation- ship between spatial ability requirements and the relative Key Words Blennies Spatial behavior Published online: February 16, 2011 Silvia Costa Eco-Ethology Research Unit, ISPA Rua Jardim do Tabaco 34 PT

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Combined effects of precipitation and nitrogen deposition on native and invasive winter annual production in California deserts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

native forb spe- cies (Beatley 1974; Brooks 1999; Lundholmannual production (Noy-Meir 1973; Beatley 1974; Patten 1978;temperature requirements (Beatley 1974; Gutterman 1994; Salo

Rao, Leela E.; Allen, Edith B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach, Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Del Mar, CA); Jin, RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO); Keith, Kevin (Three Forks, MT); Copenhaver, Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

263

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, RongGuan (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

264

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Keith, Kevin; Copenhaver, Gregory; Preuss, Daphne

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

265

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, James (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

266

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach; Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL), Zieler; Helge (Del Mar, CA), Jin; RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO), Keith; Kevin (Three Forks, MT), Copenhaver; Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC), Preuss; Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

267

Vegetation component of geothermal EIS studies: Introduced plants, ecosystem stability, and geothermal development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper contributes new information about the impacts from introduced plant invasions on the native Hawaiian vegetation as consequences of land disturbance and geothermal development activities. In this regard, most geothermal development is expected to act as another recurring source of physical disturbance which favors the spread and maintenance of introduced organisms throughout the region. Where geothermal exploration and development activities extend beyond existing agricultural and residential development, they will become the initial or sole source of disturbance to the naturalized vegetation of the area. Kilauea has a unique ecosystem adapted to the dynamics of a volcanically active landscape. The characteristics of this ecosystem need to be realized in order to understand the major threats to the ecosystem and to evaluate the effects of and mitigation for geothermal development in Puna. The native Puna vegetation is well adapted to disturbances associated with volcanic eruption, but it is ill-adapted to compete with alien plant species in secondary disturbances produced by human activities. Introduced plant and animal species have become a major threat to the continued presence of the native biota in the Puna region of reference.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Poisonous Plant Management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Carefully examine plants being grazed. Generally, a Significant quantity of toxic plant must be consumed to be lethaL Many times these plants are readily identified in the field by evidence of grazing. Also helpful at this time is a rumen sample... poisonous plants were most severe at heavy stocking rates, while few losses occurred at light stocking levels. Death ? losses were also directly related to kinds or combinations of livestock being grazed. When combinations of cattle, sheep and goats...

McGinty, Allan

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Plant design: Integrating Plant and Equipment Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Like power plant engineers, process plant engineers must design generating units to operate efficiently, cleanly, and profitably despite fluctuating costs for raw materials and fuels. To do so, they increasingly create virtual plants to enable evaluation of design concepts without the expense of building pilot-scale or demonstration facilities. Existing computational models describe an entire plant either as a network of simplified equipment models or as a single, very detailed equipment model. The Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) project (Figure 5) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) seeks to bridge the gap between models by integrating plant modeling and equipment modeling software. The goal of the effort is to provide greater insight into the performance of proposed plant designs. The software integration was done using the process-industry standard CAPE-OPEN (Computer Aided Process Engineering–Open), or CO interface. Several demonstration cases based on operating power plants confirm the viability of this co-simulation approach.

Sloan, David (Alstrom Power); Fiveland, Woody (Alstrom Power); Zitney, S.E.; Osawe, Maxwell (Ansys, Inc.)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

NUCLEAR PLANT AND CONTROL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: software require- ments, safety analysis, formal for the digital protection systems of a nuclear power plant. When spec- ifying requirements for software and CRSA processes are described using shutdown system 2 of the Wolsong nuclear power plants as the digital

272

Native American Technical Assistance and Training for Renewable Energy Resource Development and Electrical Generation Facilities Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) will facilitate technical expertise and training of Native Americans in renewable energy resource development for electrical generation facilities, and distributed generation options contributing to feasibility studies, strategic planning and visioning. CERT will also provide information to Tribes on energy efficiency and energy management techniques.This project will provide facilitation and coordination of expertise from government agencies and private industries to interact with Native Americans in ways that will result in renewable energy resource development, energy efficiency program development, and electrical generation facilities management by Tribal entities. The intent of this cooperative agreement is to help build capacity within the Tribes to manage these important resources.

A. David Lester

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

273

Types of red cell potassium in seven Spanish native breeds Paquita GONZALEZ Maria Jess TUON M. VALLEJO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Note Types of red cell potassium in seven Spanish native breeds of cattle Paquita GONZALEZ Maria Madrid, Spain Summary The distribution of red-cell potassium was studied in seven Spanish native breeds-equiv/1. For HK animals the means ranged from 50.8 to 66.1 m-equiv/1. Key word : red cell potassium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

274

Agronomy Journal Volume 103, Issue 2 2011 509 Native Perennial Grassland Species for Bioenergy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as next generation biofuels, perennial grasses have received the most research attention (McBiofuels Agronomy Journal · Volume 103, Issue 2 · 2011 509 Native Perennial Grassland Species the environmental impact and economic viability of corn grain ethanol has prompted many to advocate for "second

Minnesota, University of

275

Oligomeric Assembly of Native-like Precursors Precedes Amyloid Formation by -2 Microglobulin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intermediates suggest that this protein forms fibrils by structural domain swapping. Amyloid fibers are highlyOligomeric Assembly of Native-like Precursors Precedes Amyloid Formation by -2 MicroglobulinVed January 29, 2004; ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed March 19, 2004 ABSTRACT: The deposition of -2-microglobulin

Miranker, Andrew

276

Discrimination of Near-Native Protein Structures From Misfolded Models by Empirical Free Energy Functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discrimination of Near-Native Protein Structures From Misfolded Models by Empirical Free Energy University, Boston, Massachusetts ABSTRACT Free energy potentials, combining molecular mechanics of discrimination that in- clude the correlation coefficient between RMSD and free energy, and a new measure labeled

Vajda, Sandor

277

International Scientific Conference Computer Science'2008 Near-Native Protein Folding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Scientific Conference Computer Science'2008 61 Near-Native Protein Folding Stefka: The protein folding problem is a fundamental problem in computational molecular biology. The high resolution 3. After that the folding problem is de- fined like optimization problem. Keywords: Protein folding

Fidanova, Stefka

278

Some Small Native Freshwater Fish Recommended for Mosquito and Midge Control in Ornamental Ponds1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENY-670 Some Small Native Freshwater Fish Recommended for Mosquito and Midge Control in Ornamental fish, and supplying water for wildlife, the potential for new mosquito breeding sites is increasing. Small insectivorous fish are a valuable tool in controlling mosquitoes and midges ("blind mosquitoes

Watson, Craig A.

279

Regulations Pertaining to Non-native Fish in Florida Aquaculture1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FA-121 Regulations Pertaining to Non-native Fish in Florida Aquaculture1 Jeffrey E. Hill2 1 of a wide variety of warm-water and tropical species of ornamental, food, bait, and sport fish. In 2012, the farm-gate value of Florida aquaculture was US$69 million, with 40% of that value in ornamental fish

Watson, Craig A.

280

Ontogenetic and Seasonal Variation of Young Non-Native Fish Energy Densities in Lake Michigan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-specific trade-offs between energy allocation to different tissue-types (low energy density, structural tissueOntogenetic and Seasonal Variation of Young Non-Native Fish Energy Densities in Lake Michigan Overview Energy content is a useful metric of physiological status of fishes and may help elucidate spatial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Rows of ATP Synthase Dimers in Native Mitochondrial Inner Membranes Nikolay Buzhynskyy,* Pierre Sens,y  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rows of ATP Synthase Dimers in Native Mitochondrial Inner Membranes Nikolay Buzhynskyy,* Pierre Marseille, France ABSTRACT The ATP synthase is a nanometric rotary machine that uses a transmembrane electrochemical gradient to form ATP. The structures of most components of the ATP synthase are known, andtheir

Sens, Pierre

282

Non-native grasses alter evapotranspiration and energy balance in Great Basin sagebrush communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-native grasses alter evapotranspiration and energy balance in Great Basin sagebrush communities Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, United States Received 19 April 2006; accepted 23 August 2006 Abstract Over key ecosystem processes in the Great Basin, including hydrology and energy balance. To determine how

DeLucia, Evan H.

283

A Review of Thin Film Crystalline Silicon for Solar Cell Applications. Part 1 : Native Substrates.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Review of Thin Film Crystalline Silicon for Solar Cell Applications. Part 1 : Native Substrates. Michelle J. Mc Cann, Kylie R. Catchpole, Klaus J. Weber and Andrew W. Blakers Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems Engineering Department, The Australian National University, ACT 0200, Australia. Email : michelle

284

Study of the acarofauna of native bumblebee species (Bombus) from Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study of the acarofauna of native bumblebee species (Bombus) from Argentina Matias MAGGI 1 y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes, 3350, 7600, Mar del Plata, Argentina 2 DivisiĂłn EntomologĂ­a, Museo de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque, 1900, La Plata, Argentina 3 CONICET, Consejo

285

Seven new species of the Botryosphaeriaceae from baobab and other native trees in Western Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seven new species of the Botryosphaeriaceae from baobab and other native trees in Western Australia region of north- western Australia. Members of the Botryosphaeria- ceae were predominantly endophytes endemic to Australia and is restricted to the north- western part of the country (Crisp et al 2004

286

Merriam's Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo merriami) is native to the forested mountains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Merriam's Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo merriami) is native to the forested mountains. 2010). Hunted nearly to extinction by the early 20th century, Wild Turkey populations have experienced for Wild Turkeys (Rumble et al. 2003, Hughes et al. 2005, Lehman et al. 2005), al- though other animals (e

287

Generation in Transition: Youth Transistions among Native-Born Descendants of Immigrants from Turkey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turkey E. Keskiner Delgen #12;English Summary English Summary The current study aimed to explore the youth transition experience of native-born descendants of immigrants from Turkey living in Amsterdam parents have arrived in these cities or in the host countries as immigrants from Turkey. First of all

van Rooij, Robert

288

AN ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN FOLDING BY DECODING THE HIERARCHY OF NATIVE-STATE STRUCTURAL INTERACTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN FOLDING BY DECODING THE HIERARCHY OF NATIVE-STATE STRUCTURAL INTERACTIONS and Department of Physics and Astronomy 2002 #12;ABSTRACT AN ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN FOLDING BY DECODING by which proteins fold is one of the most intensely studied prob- lems in science. Here, an analysis

Thorpe, Michael

289

Protocol for Appraisal of Petroleum Producing Properties on Native American Tribal Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum is currently produced on Native American Tribal Lands and has been produced on some of these lands for approximately 100 years. As these properties are abandoned at a production level that is considered the economic limit by the operator, Native American Tribes are considering this an opportunity to assume operator status to keep the properties producing. In addition to operating properties as they are abandoned, Native American Tribes also are assuming liabilities of the former operator(s) and ownership of equipment left upon abandonment. Often, operators are assumed by Native American Tribes without consideration of the liabilities left by the former operators. The purpose of this report is to provide protocols for the appraisal of petroleum producing properties and analysis of the petroleum resource to be produced after assuming operations. The appraisal protocols provide a spreadsheet for analysis of the producing property and a checklist of items to bring along before entering the property for onsite appraisal of the property. The report will provide examples of some environmental flags that may indicate potential liabilities remaining on the property left unaddressed by previous operators. It provides a starting point for appraisal and analysis of a property with a basis to make the decision to assume operations or to pursue remediation and/or closure of the liabilities of previous operators.

NONE

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

290

Transcriptome divergence between introduced and native populations of Canada thistle, Cirsium arvense  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-by-range effect. Among them was an overrepresentation of loci involved in stimulus and stress responses. Cirsium that do may impose substantial losses in agriculture, irrevocably threaten native bio- diversity., 1994), precipitation rate, drought (Broennimann et al., 2007) and/or day length (Godoy et al., 2009

Rieseberg, Loren

291

early 800 native fish species in 36 families inhabit the freshwater rivers, streams, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

N early 800 native fish species in 36 families inhabit the freshwater rivers, streams, and lakes of the United States and Canada. North America has the most diverse temperate freshwater fish fauna in the world. Only about 5 percent of these are the familiar sport or game fishes like trout and bass. The remaining

Liskiewicz, Maciej

292

Efficacy of Imazapyr and Glyphosate in the Control of Non-Native Phragmites australis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficacy of Imazapyr and Glyphosate in the Control of Non-Native Phragmites australis Thomas J reed (Phragmites australis) has been expanding into previously unoccupied wetland habitats throughout, phragmites, wetlands. Introduction The common reed (Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. Ex Steud.) has been

McGlathery, Karen

293

NATIVE MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI WITH ASPEN ON SMELTER-IMPACTED SITES IN THE NORTHERN ROCKY MOUNTAINS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by extensive aspen stands on the East Ridge of Butte, MT (inactive copper smelter), adjacent to the smelter stack at Anaconda, MT (inactive copper smelter), at the (removed) lead smelter at Kellogg, ID, and alongNATIVE MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI WITH ASPEN ON SMELTER- IMPACTED SITES IN THE NORTHERN ROCKY MOUNTAINS

Cripps, Cathy

294

DOI 10.1007/s00442-006-0477-1 PLANT ANIMAL INTERACTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

signiW- cant positive eVects on grazed areas via their role in enhancing nutrient recycling concentration of regrowth. For example, moderate clipping of a mixed grass prairie led to signiWcant increases

Marsh, Helene

295

Conditional sterility in plants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure provides methods, recombinant DNA molecules, recombinant host cells containing the DNA molecules, and transgenic plant cells, plant tissue and plants which contain and express at least one antisense or interference RNA specific for a thiamine biosynthetic coding sequence or a thiamine binding protein or a thiamine-degrading protein, wherein the RNA or thiamine binding protein is expressed under the regulatory control of a transcription regulatory sequence which directs expression in male and/or female reproductive tissue. These transgenic plants are conditionally sterile; i.e., they are fertile only in the presence of exogenous thiamine. Such plants are especially appropriate for use in the seed industry or in the environment, for example, for use in revegetation of contaminated soils or phytoremediation, especially when those transgenic plants also contain and express one or more chimeric genes which confer resistance to contaminants.

Meagher, Richard B. (Athens, GA); McKinney, Elizabeth (Athens, GA); Kim, Tehryung (Taejeon, KR)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

296

PHYSICAL PLANT POLICY & PROCEDURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL PLANT POLICY & PROCEDURE TITLE PHYSICAL PLANT HIGH VOLTAGE PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE OBJECTIVE AND PURPOSE To establish a consistent policy of performing Preventive Maintenance on high voltage by the G.S.A. Preventive Maintenance sections E- 29 (high voltage oil circuit breaker), E-32 (high voltage

Fernandez, Eduardo

297

Plant fatty acid hydroxylase  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to the identification of nucleic acid sequences and constructs, and methods related thereto, and the use of these sequences and constructs to produce genetically modified plants for the purpose of altering the composition of plant oils, waxes and related compounds.

Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Lexington, KY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Modulating lignin in plants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

299

Plant Ecology An Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Plant Ecology An Introduction Ecology as a Science Study of the relationships between living and causes of the abundance and distribution of organisms Ecology as a Science We'll use the perspective of terrestrial plants Basic ecology - ecological principles Applied ecology - application of principles

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

300

RESEARCH ARTICLE PLANT GENETICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relative) in the Brassicaceae plant family is determined by the genotype of the plant at the self-incompatibility-locus phenotype in a self-incompatible Arabidopsis species. Selection has created a dynamic repertoire of s of regulation among alleles. S porophytic self-incompatibility (SI) is a genetic system that evolved in hermaph

Napp, Nils

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed absorption cross-section behavior. Consequently, if NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;Demazière

Demazière, Christophe

302

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper- ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed. Consequently, if*E-mail: demaz@nephy.chalmers.se NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 140 NOV. 2002 147 #12;high-burnup fuel

Pázsit, Imre

303

SCHROTH INTERPRETIVE TRAIL DEMONSTRATION PRAIRIE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(SCULPTURE) KEY 3.0 mi/68 min 2.4 mi/53 min 2.2 mi/49 min 1.1 mi/25 min 2.1 mi/48 min 2.6 mi/59 min 0.8 mi/19 min Total 14.2 mi/5.5 hrs approximate distance/time HIKING TRAILS MAP Named one of the 7 Wonders

Frank, Thomas D.

304

<GrandPrairie>  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience hands-onASTROPHYSICSHe ÎČ- DecayBe GeneralHeating DegreeGrande

305

Prairie Rose | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru:Job CorpPowerVerde Inc

306

Behavior of introduced red drum and habitat-use overlap with largemouth bass in a power-plant cooling reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences BEHAVIOR OF INTRODUCED RED DRUM AND HABITAT-USE OVERLAP WITH LARGEMOUTH BASS IN A POWER-P~ COOLING RESERVOIR A Thesis by ROBERT CLAYTON SMITH Approved... Power-Plant Cooling Reservoir (December 1989) Robert Clayton Smith, B. S. , Loyola University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Brian R. Murphy The introduction of a non-native species into an aquatic community is a fisheries management practice...

Smith, Robert Clayton

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Top 10 plant pathogenic bacteria in molecular plant pathology.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plants are being closely grouped together, for example pv.oryzae pv. oryzae AvrXa21 and implications for plant innatePseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in Tanzania. Plant Dis. 91,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Alaska Native Weatherization Training and Jobs Program First Steps Toward Tribal Weatherization – Human Capacity Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Alaska Native Weatherization Training and Jobs Project expanded weatherization services for tribal members’ homes in southeast Alaska while providing weatherization training and on the job training (OJT) for tribal citizens that lead to jobs and most probably careers in weatherization-related occupations. The program resulted in; (a) 80 Alaska Native citizens provided with skills training in five weatherization training units that were delivered in cooperation with University of Alaska Southeast, in accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy Core Competencies for Weatherization Training that prepared participants for employment in three weatherizationrelated occupations: Installer, Crew Chief, and Auditor; (b) 25 paid OJT training opportunities for trainees who successfully completed the training course; and (c) employed trained personnel that have begun to rehab on over 1,000 housing units for weatherization.

Wiita, Joanne

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

Palacios and Kitten : high performance operating systems for scalable virtualized and native supercomputing.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Palacios and Kitten are new open source tools that enable applications, whether ported or not, to achieve scalable high performance on large machines. They provide a thin layer over the hardware to support both full-featured virtualized environments and native code bases. Kitten is an OS under development at Sandia that implements a lightweight kernel architecture to provide predictable behavior and increased flexibility on large machines, while also providing Linux binary compatibility. Palacios is a VMM that is under development at Northwestern University and the University of New Mexico. Palacios, which can be embedded into Kitten and other OSes, supports existing, unmodified applications and operating systems by using virtualization that leverages hardware technologies. We describe the design and implementation of both Kitten and Palacios. Our benchmarks show that they provide near native, scalable performance. Palacios and Kitten provide an incremental path to using supercomputer resources that is not performance-compromised.

Widener, Patrick (University of New Mexico); Jaconette, Steven (Northwestern University); Bridges, Patrick G. (University of New Mexico); Xia, Lei (Northwestern University); Dinda, Peter (Northwestern University); Cui, Zheng.; Lange, John (Northwestern University); Hudson, Trammell B.; Levenhagen, Michael J.; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

A work bibliography on native food consumption, demography and lifestyle. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a bibliography for the Native American tribe participants in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project to use. The HEDR Project`s primary objective is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Eight Native American tribes are responsible for estimating daily and seasonal consumption of traditional foods, demography, and other lifestyle factors that could have affected the radiation dose received by tribal members. This report provides a bibliography of recorded accounts that tribal researchers may use to verify their estimates. The bibliographic citations include references to information on the specific tribes, Columbia River plateau ethnobotany, infant feeding practices and milk consumption, nutritional studies and radiation, tribal economic and demographic characteristics (1940--1970), research methods, primary sources from the National Archives, regional archives, libraries, and museums.

Murray, C.E.; Lee, W.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Native American Studies in the Program in American Culture, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Native American Studies in the Program in American Culture, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor1 Gregory Evans Dowd Background and Goals The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, has a long, uneven history with American Indians. Today... the university publicly avows that its veiy origins lie in a land grant obtained in Article 16 of the Treaty of Fort Meigs (1817). Yet in the last quarter of the twentieth century, even as Michigan emerged as a leading national proponent of diversity...

Dowd, Gegory Evans

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Red imported fire ant impact on native ants and litter removal in the post oak savannah of central Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I examined the impacts of the invasive red imported fire ant (RIFA, Solenopsis invicta) on native ants (Monomorium minimum, Paratrechina sp., S. krockowi, Pheidole metallescens, Forelius pruinosus, and Camponotus americanus) and litter removal in a...

Bedford, Theresa Louise

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

313

Calibration of Cotton Planting Mechanisms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

per foot. To obtain a perfect stand of one plant to Foot, a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 11 plants per foot wonld have to be thinned out. The number for picker wheel- drop planting mechanisms ranged from a minimum of 2 to a maxi- mum of 27 plants... per foot, requiring the removal of from 1 to 26 nlants per foot to leave one plant per foot. CONTENTS Introduction History of cotton planter development ------------.---------------------------------- Cottonseed planting mechanisms Requirements...

Smith, H. P. (Harris Pearson); Byrom, Mills H. (Mills Herbert)

1936-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

315

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

316

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

317

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

318

California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

319

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

320

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

322

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

323

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

324

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

325

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

326

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

327

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

328

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

329

Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

330

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

331

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

332

Nuclear Power Plant Design Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Power Plant Design Project A Response to the Environmental and Economic Challenge Of Global.............................................................................................................. 4 3. Assessment of the Issues and Needs for a New Plant

333

A review of "Paper Sovereigns: Anglo-Native Treaties and the Law of Nations, 1604-1664" by Jeffrey Glover  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

258 seventeenth-century news Jeffrey Glover. Paper Sovereigns: Anglo-Native Treaties and the Law of Nations, 1604-1664. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014. ix + 312 pp. $59.95. Review by william j. scheick, university of texas... at austin. In Paper Sovereigns Jeffrey Glover necessarily acknowledges the obvious fact that settler-instigated treaties tended to work against Native American interests, often with dire consequences. Neverthe- less, Glover also finds that not all treaties...

Scheick, William J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Physica B 340342 (2003) 933938 EPR and electrical studies of native point defects in ZnSiP2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physica B 340­342 (2003) 933­938 EPR and electrical studies of native point defects in ZnSiP2 Abstract We present the first detection of native defects in ZnSiP2. Similar to p-type ZnGeP2, the EPR lattice sites is reflected in the differences of the EPR parameters in both lattices. In both materials, V

Nabben, Reinhard

335

Plant Vascular Biology 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

Ding, Biao

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

336

Geothermal Demonstration Plant  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

a 50 W e binary conversion plant at Heber was initiated and is presented herein. Chevron Oil Company (the field operator) predicts that the reservoir i ill decline from an initial...

337

Plant Operations Executive Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Campus North Campus Recycling Operations Materials Human Resources Payroll Misc Svs Special Projects Planning Spray Shop Glass Shop Upholstery Shop Plant IT Painting Services G. Weincouff Human Resources Business Services Estimating Shutdown Coordination Scheduling L. Rastique Human Resources 67398 M

Awtar, Shorya

338

B Plant facility description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buildings 225B, 272B, 282B, 282BA, and 294B were removed from the B Plant facility description. Minor corrections were made for tank sizes and hazardous and toxic inventories.

Chalk, S.E.

1996-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

339

Plant Site Refrigeration Upgrade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayer Corporation operates a multi-division manufacturing facility in Bushy Park, South Carolina. Low temperature refrigeration (-4°F) is required by many of the chemical manufacturing areas and is provided by a Plant Site Refrigeration System...

Zdrojewski, R.; Healy, M.; Ramsey, J.

340

Grassland carbon and nitrogen dynamics: effects of seasonal fire and clipping in a mixed-grass prairie of the southern great plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

influenced by climate. They may also be modulated by the timing and intensity of disturbances such as fire and clipping. We assessed the relative influence of climate and disturbance on plant community and soil C and N dynamics. Combined effects of fire...

Harris, Wylie Neal

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Species coexistence in restored grassland plant communities: trait-based recruitment, niche-neutral assembly, and heterogeneous management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation examines multiple facets of recruitment in restored tallgrass prairies to address basic ecological questions with implications for enhancing the diversity of tallgrass restorations. In the first chapter, ...

Long, Quinn

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

342

GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

Boyd, Tonya

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

LM Meets with Native Village of Point Hope, Alaska | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington, DCKickoffLDV5-CE-14022)Meets with Native

344

In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Probing of Native Oxide and Artificial Layers on Silicon Nanoparticles for Lithium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface modification of silicon nanoparticle via molecular layer deposition (MLD) has been recently proved to be an effective way for dramatically enhancing the cyclic performance in lithium ion batteries. However, the fundamental mechanism as how this thin layer of coating function is not known, which is even complicated by the inevitable presence of native oxide of several nanometers on the silicon nanoparticle. Using in-situ TEM, we probed in detail the structural and chemical evolution of both uncoated and coated silicon particles upon cyclic lithiation/delithation. We discovered that upon initial lithiation, the native oxide layer converts to crystalline Li2O islands, which essentially increases the impedance on the particle, resulting in ineffective lithiation/delithiation, and therefore low coulombic efficiency. In contrast, the alucone MLD coated particles show extremely fast, thorough and highly reversible lithiation behaviors, which are clarified to be associated with the mechanical flexibility and fast Li+/e- conductivity of the alucone coating. Surprisingly, the alucone MLD coating process chemically changes the silicon surface, essentially removing the native oxide layer and therefore mitigates side reaction and detrimental effects of the native oxide. This study provides a vivid picture of how the MLD coating works to enhance the coulombic efficiency and preserve capacity and clarifies the role of the native oxide on silicon nanoparticles during cyclic lithiation and delithiation. More broadly, this work also demonstrated that the effect of the subtle chemical modification of the surface during the coating process may be of equal importance as the coating layer itself.

He, Yang; Piper, Daniela M.; Gu, Meng; Travis, Jonathan J.; George, Steven M.; Lee, Se-Hee; Genc, Arda; Pullan, Lee; Liu, Jun; Mao, Scott X.; Zhang, Jiguang; Ban, Chunmei; Wang, Chong M.

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

345

Value of Duplex Ultrasound Assistance for Thromboaspiration and Dilation of Thrombosed Native Arterio-Venous Fistulae  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the value of duplex ultrasound assistance during thromboaspiration of thrombosed arteriovenous fistulae for haemodialysis. Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 54 thrombosed native fistulae (23 with total thrombosis and 31 with partial thrombosis), in which we performed manual thromboaspiration guided by ultrasonography associated with fluoroscopy. Results: The fistulae were located in the forearm (n = 39) or in the upper arm (n = 15) of 46 patients. Mean patient age was 65 years, and hypertension was the most common risk factor (74 %). Mean access age was 928 days (range 69-2,290), and most fistulae were on the left side (41 cases, 75.92 %). The success rate was 83 % in the total thrombosis group and 100 % in the partial thrombosis group. Including initial failures, the respective primary patency rates in the total thrombosis group and the partial thrombosis group were, respectively, 83 {+-} 8 % (n = 20) and 87 {+-} 6 % (n = 28) at 1 month, 39 {+-} 10 % (n = 10) and 61 {+-} 8 % (n = 20) at 6 months, and 17 {+-} 8 % (n = 5) and 26 {+-} 8 % (n = 9) at 1 year. The mean decrease of fluoroscopy time with ultrasound was 3 min (range 1-5). The mean decrease of radiation dose was 2.6 Gy cm Superscript-Two (range 0.9-4.3]. Conclusion: Ultrasound is a feasible and useful tool in the management of thrombosed native fistulae, thus decreasing radiation exposure, and has no detrimental effect on success rates.

Garcia-Medina, J., E-mail: josegmedina57@gmail.com [Reina Sophia University Hospital, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of Radiology (Spain)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Pinellas Plant facts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pinellas Plant, near St. Petersburg, Florida, is wholly owned by the United States Government. It is operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by GE Aerospace, Neutron Devices (GEND). This plant was built in 1956 to manufacture neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. The neutron generators built at Neutron Devices consist of a miniaturized linear ion accelerator assembled with the pulsed electrical power supplies required for its operation. Production of these devices has necessitated the development of several uniquely specialized areas of competence and supporting facilities. The ion accelerator, or neutron tube, requires ultra clean, high vacuum technology; hermetic seals between glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic, and metal materials; plus high voltage generation and measurement technology. The existence of these capabilities at Neutron Devices has led directly to the assignment of other weapon application products: the lightning arrester connector, specialty capacitor, vacuum switch, and crystal resonator. Other product assignments such as active and reserve batteries and the radioisotopically-powered thermoelectric generator evolved from the plant`s materials measurement and controls technologies which are required to ensure neutron generator life.

NONE

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Alex Benson Cement Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with steel balls which grind mix into a fine powder -> Final Cement Product Associated Air Pollution: o From health effects Relative News; o "EPA Clamps down on Cement Plant Pollution" http.4 million dollars for violating the Clean Air Act and 2 million dollars for pollution controls #12

Toohey, Darin W.

348

B Plant hazards assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning Activities for B Plant on the Hanford Site. The document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE Order 5500.3A. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific , Emergency Action Levels and the Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated.

Broz, R.E.

1994-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

349

Steam Plant, 6% Irrigation,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Rainwater Storage Cisterns on Campus 150,000 gallons* Total Acres of Campus (Modeled for Stormwater Analysis% Chilled Water Plant, 26% Academics, 16% Washington Duke Inn, 3% Water & Stormwater Management Sustainability Facts Overview Existing Sustainability Initiatives Stormwater Regulation Duke University obtains

Zhou, Pei

350

Technology Data for Electricity and Heat Generating Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................................................................63 13 Centralised Biogas Plants

351

Ecology of Plants and Light CAM plants have thick,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

orientation to maximize light exposure. Species Adaptations-Sun Solar tracking by leaves increases light1 Ecology of Plants and Light CAM plants have thick, succulent tissues to allow for organic acid and Light Some CAM plants not obligated to just CAM Can use C3 photosynthesis during day if conditions

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

352

Valuation of environmental quality and eco-cultural attributes in Northwestern Idaho: Native Americans are more concerned than Caucasians  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Valuation of features of habitats and ecosystems usually encompasses the goods and services that ecosystems provide, but rarely also examine how people value ecological resources in terms of eco-cultural and sacred activities. The social, sacred, and cultural aspects of ecosystems are particularly important to Native Americans, but western science has rarely examined the importance of eco-cultural attributes quantitatively. In this paper I explore differences in ecosystem evaluations, and compare the perceptions and evaluations of places people go for consumptive and non-consumptive resource use with evaluations of the same qualities for religious and sacred places. Qualities of ecosystems included goods (abundant fish and crabs, butterflies and flowers, clean water), services (complexity of nature, lack of radionuclides that present a health risk), and eco-cultural attributes (appears unspoiled, scenic horizons, noise-free). Native Americans and Caucasians were interviewed at a Pow Wow at Post Falls, Idaho, which is in the region with the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, known for its storage of radioactive wastes and contamination. A higher percentage of Native American subjects engaged in consumptive and religious activities than did Caucasians. Native Americans engaged in higher rates of many activities than did Caucasians, including commune with nature, pray or meditate, fish or hunt, collect herbs, and conduct vision quests or other ceremonies. For nearly all attributes, there was no difference in the relative ratings given by Native Americans for characteristics of sites used for consumption/non-consumptive activities compared to religious/sacred places. However, Caucasians rated nearly all attributes lower for religious/sacred places than they did for places where they engaged in consumptive or non-consumptive activities. Native Americans were less concerned with distance from home for consumptive/non-consumptive activities, compared to religious activities. - Research Highlights: {yields} A higher percentage of Native Americans engaged in consumptive and religious activities than did Caucasians interviewed. {yields} Caucasians rated environmental attributes as more important for consumptive and non-consumptive activities than they did for places where they engaged in religious/cultural ones. {yields} Native Americans rated environmental attributes as equally important regardless of the activities performed. {yields} Eco-cultural attributes (such as 'appears unspoiled') were rated as high as ecosystem services (e.g. unpolluted water).

Burger, Joanna, E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu [Division of Life Sciences, Nelson Biological Laboratory, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States) [Division of Life Sciences, Nelson Biological Laboratory, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

354

Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby Machine Tool Lab Children's Center Rogers N

Thomas, Andrew

355

Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby Machine Tool Lab Children's Center Rogers N S Estabrooke Memorial Gym Stevens

Thomas, Andrew

356

Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Oceanographic Operations 1 2 8 5 3 4 7 6 AMC Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby

Thomas, Andrew

357

Gene encoding plant asparagine synthetase  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The identification and cloning of the gene(s) for plant asparagine synthetase (AS), an important enzyme involved in the formation of asparagine, a major nitrogen transport compound of higher plants is described. Expression vectors constructed with the AS coding sequence may be utilized to produce plant AS; to engineer herbicide resistant plants, salt/drought tolerant plants or pathogen resistant plants; as a dominant selectable marker; or to select for novel herbicides or compounds useful as agents that synchronize plant cells in culture. The promoter for plant AS, which directs high levels of gene expression and is induced in an organ specific manner and by darkness, is also described. The AS promoter may be used to direct the expression of heterologous coding sequences in appropriate hosts.

Coruzzi, Gloria M. (New York, NY); Tsai, Fong-Ying (New York, NY)

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

358

Assessment of Native Salmonids Above Hells Canyon Dam, Idaho, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the western United States, exotic brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis frequently have a deleterious effect on native salmonids, and biologists often attempt to remove brook trout in streams using electrofishing. Although the success of electrofishing removal projects typically is low, few studies have assessed the underlying mechanisms of failure, especially in terms of compensatory responses. We evaluated the effectiveness of a three-year removal project in reducing brook trout and enhancing native salmonids in 7.8 km of an Idaho stream and looked for brook trout compensatory responses such as decreased natural mortality, increased growth, increased fecundity at length, or earlier maturation. Due to underestimates of the distribution of brook trout in the first year and personnel shortages in the third year, the multiagency watershed advisory group that performed the project fully treated the stream (i.e. multipass removals over the entire stream) in only one year. In 1998, 1999, and 2000, a total of 1,401, 1,241, and 890 brook trout were removed, respectively. For 1999 and 2000, an estimated 88 and 79% of the total number of brook trout in the stream were removed. For the section of stream that was treated in all years, the abundance of age-1 and older brook trout decreased by 85% from 1998 to 2003. In the same area, the abundance of age-0 brook trout decreased 86% from 1998 to 1999 but by 2003 had rebounded to near the original abundance. Abundance of native redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss decreased for age-1 and older fish but did not change significantly for age-0 fish. Despite high rates of removal, total annual survival rate for brook trout increased from 0.08 {+-} 0.02 in 1998 to 0.20 {+-} 0.04 in 1999 and 0.21 {+-} 0.04 in 2000. Growth of age-0 brook trout was significantly higher in 2000 (the year after their abundance was lowest) compared to other years, and growth of age-1 and age-2 brook trout was significantly lower following the initial removal years but recovered by 2003. Few other brook trout demographic parameters changed appreciably over the course of the project. Electrofishing removals required 210 person-days of effort. Despite experiencing slight changes in abundance, growth, and survival, brook trout in Pikes Fork appeared little affected by three years of intensive removal efforts, most likely because mortality within the population was high prior to initiation of the project such that the removal efforts merely replaced natural mortality with exploitation.

Meyer, Kevin A.; Lamansky, Jr., James A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Effects of Anthropogenic Nutrient Enrichment on Exotic and Restored Native Aquatic Vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nutrient decline for both tributaries. This study will provide water quality resource managers guidance on the development of total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) for water bodies impaired by high nutrient loading and the implementation of wetland plants...

Parnell, Allison

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

360

Regulating nutrient allocation in plants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides coding and promoter sequences for a VS-1 and AP-2 gene, which affects the developmental process of senescence in plants. Vectors, transgenic plants, seeds, and host cells comprising heterologous VS-1 and AP-2 genes are also provided. Additionally provided are methods of altering nutrient allocation and composition in a plant using the VS-1 and AP-2 genes.

Udvardi, Michael; Yang, Jiading; Worley, Eric

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS A Workshop on "NUCLEAR ENERGY RENAISSANCE" Addressing WAS DEEPLY INVOLVED IN ALMOST EVERY ASPECT OF BUILDING THE PLANTS THROUGH · Quality Assurance · Nuclear IN CONSTRUCTION OF ST. LUCIE-2 #12;LESSONS LEARNED FROM St. Lucie-2 NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS CAN BE BUILT

362

Integrated turbomachine oxygen plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes a turbomachine and an air separation unit. One or more compressor pathways flow compressed air from a compressor through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. An air separation unit is operably connected to the one or more compressor pathways and is configured to separate the compressed air into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air. A method of air separation in an integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes compressing a flow of air in a compressor of a turbomachine. The compressed flow of air is flowed through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander of the turbomachine to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. The compressed flow of air is directed to an air separation unit and is separated into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air.

Anand, Ashok Kumar; DePuy, Richard Anthony; Muthaiah, Veerappan

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

363

Jennings Demonstration PLant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

Russ Heissner

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Minority Summer Research Program in the Plant Sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gutierrez and Larcom (2000) suggest that ''According to the National Science Foundation/Division of Science Resources Studies in 1997, the percentage distribution of scientists and engineers in the labor force by race/ethnicity changed little between 1993 and 1997''. According to this report, Black, non-Hispanic went from 3.6 in 1993 to 3.4 in 1997. Hispanic went from 3.0 in 1993 to 3.1 in 1997; and American Indian/Alaskan Native stayed the same at 0.3 during the same period. The only exceptions were a slight increase in the percentage of Asian from 9.2 in 1993 to 10.4 in 1997, while a slight decrease in percentage White from 83.9 in 1993 to 82.8 in 1997. Overall, no major changes in minorities were present in the science and engineering fields during that period. These data shows that major efforts are needed in order to improve and achieve better results for diversity in the workplace (Gutierrez & Larcom, 2000). This does not mean that major steps have not been taken over this period. For example, the Minority Summer Research Program in Plant Sciences (also funded in part by NSF under the title, ''Undergraduate Researchers in Plant Sciences Program'') was established in an effort to enhance the diversity of the plant science community. The Minority Summer Research Program in Plant Sciences was designed to encourage members of underrepresented groups to seek career opportunities in the plant sciences. To achieve this end, the program contained several components with the primary focus on mentored research for undergraduate students. The research experience was provided during the summer months on the campus of Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan. At the end of the summer experience, each participant presented an oral report on their research, and submitted a written paper on the same topic. This was deliberately designed to mimic the plant science professions in which research leads to presentations in the form of reports, papers, etc. In addition to the program's research component, the participants met twice each week with the co-coordinators, William Gordon and Ken Poff, for an ''enrichment''. One ''enrichment'' each week was dedicated to a seminar or field experience designed to broaden the participants views of the plant sciences. The second ''enrichment'' was designed to teach strategies for successfully crossing cultural barriers, and to develop the skills necessary for success in admissions to and successful completion of graduate school. During the eleven-year duration of the program, participants have included students from underrepresented populations at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), an Hispanic Serving Institution (MSI), and a Native American transfer student from a Tribal College (Table I).

Poff, Kenneth L.

2004-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

365

Final Project Report, Bristol Bay Native Corporation Wind and Hydroelectric Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC) grant project focused on conducting nine wind resource studies in eight communities in the Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska and was administered as a collaborative effort between BBNC, the Alaska Energy Authority, Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Nushagak Electric Cooperative (NEC), Naknek Electric Association (NEA), and several individual village utilities in the region. BBNC’s technical contact and the project manager for this study was Douglas Vaught, P.E., of V3 Energy, LLC, in Eagle River, Alaska. The Bristol Bay region of Alaska is comprised of 29 communities ranging in size from the hub community of Dillingham with a population of approximately 3,000 people, to a few Native Alaska villages that have a few tens of residents. Communities chosen for inclusion in this project were Dillingham, Naknek, Togiak, New Stuyahok, Kokhanok, Perryville, Clark’s Point, and Koliganek. Selection criteria for conduction of wind resource assessments in these communities included population and commercial activity, utility interest, predicted Class 3 or better wind resource, absence of other sources of renewable energy, and geographical coverage of the region. Beginning with the first meteorological tower installation in October 2003, wind resource studies were completed at all sites with at least one year, and as much as two and a half years, of data. In general, the study results are very promising for wind power development in the region with Class 6 winds measured in Kokhanok; Class 4 winds in New Stuyahok, Clark’s Point, and Koliganek; Class 3 winds in Dillingham, Naknek, and Togiak; and Class 2 winds in Perryville. Measured annual average wind speeds and wind power densities at the 30 meter level varied from a high of 7.87 meters per second and 702 watts per square meter in Kokhanok (Class 6 winds), to a low of 4.60 meters per second and 185 watts per square meter in Perryville (Class 2 winds).

Vaught, Douglas J.

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Hexavalent Chromium Reduction under Fermentative Conditions with Lactate Stimulated Native Microbial Communities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in-situ is a plausible bioremediation strategy in electron-acceptor limited environments. However, higher [Cr(VI)] may impose stress on syntrophic communities and impact community structure and function. The study objectives were to understand the impacts of Cr(VI) concentrations on community structure and on the Cr(VI)-reduction potential of groundwater communities at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were used to grow native communities enriched with lactate (30 mM) and continuously amended with Cr(VI) at 0.0 (No-Cr), 0.1 (Low-Cr) and 3.0 (High-Cr) mg/L. Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI), 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) levels were below detection from week 1 until week 15. With lactate enrichment, native bacterial diversity substantially decreased as Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., became the dominant groups, but did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. The Archaea diversity also substantially decreased after lactate enrichment from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%). Methane production was lower in High-Cr reactors suggesting some inhibition of methanogens. Several key functional genes were distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant microbes, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not impact the overall bacterial community structure.

Somenahally, Anil C [ORNL] [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL] [ORNL; Yuan, Tong [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL] [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL] [ORNL; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL] [ORNL; Hazen, Terry C [ORNL] [ORNL; Arkin, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL] [ORNL; Van Nostrand, Dr. Joy D. [Oklahoma University; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Durability of metals from archaeological objects, metal meteorites, and native metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal durability is an important consideration in the multi-barrier nuclear waste storage concept. This study summarizes the ancient metals, the environments, and factors which appear to have contributed to metal longevity. Archaeological and radiochemical dating suggest that human use of metals began in the period 6000 to 7000 BC. Gold is clearly the most durable, but many objects fashioned from silver, copper, bronze, iron, lead, and tin have survived for several thousand years. Dry environments, such as tombs, appear to be optimum for metal preservation, but some metals have survived in shipwrecks for over a thousand years. The metal meteorites are Fe-base alloys with 5 to 60 wt% Ni and minor amounts of Co, I, and S. Some meteoritic masses with ages estimated to be 5,000 to 20,000 years have weathered very little, while other masses from the same meteorites are in advanced stages of weathering. Native metals are natural metallic ores. Approximately five million tonnes were mined from native copper deposits in Michigan. Copper masses from the Michigan deposits were transported by the Pleistocene glaciers. Areas on the copper surfaces which appear to represent glacial abrasion show minimal corrosion. Dry cooling tower technology has demonstrated that in pollution-free moist environments, metals fare better at temperatures above than below the dewpoint. Thus, in moderate temperature regimes, elevated temperatures may be useful rather than detrimental for exposures of metal to air. In liquid environments, relatively complex radiolysis reactions can occur, particularly where multiple species are present. A dry environment largely obviates radiolysis effects.

Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Francis, B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

2005 Plant Metabolic Engineering Gordon Conference - July 10-15, 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The post-genomic era presents new opportunities for manipulating plant chemistry for improvement of plant traits such as disease and stress resistance and nutritional qualities. This conference will provide a setting for developing multidisciplinary collaborations needed to unravel the dynamic complexity of plant metabolic networks and advance basic and applied research in plant metabolic engineering. The conference will integrate recent advances in genomics, with metabolite and gene expression analyses. Research discussions will explore how biosynthetic pathways interact with regard to substrate competition and channeling, plasticity of biosynthetic enzymes, and investigate the localization, structure, and assembly of biosynthetic metabolons in native and nonnative environments. The meeting will develop new perspectives for plant transgenic research with regard to how transgene expression may influence cellular metabolism. Incorporation of spectroscopic approaches for metabolic profiling and flux analysis combined with mathematical modeling will contribute to the development of rational metabolic engineering strategies and lead to the development of new tools to assess temporal and subcellular changes in metabolite pools. The conference will also highlight new technologies for pathway engineering, including use of heterologous systems, directed enzyme evolution, engineering of transcription factors and application of molecular/genetic techniques for controlling biosynthetic pathways.

Eleanore T. Wurtzel

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

The Geology of North America as Illustrated by Native American Stories by Robert G. McWilliams 1 The Geology of North America as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Geology of North America as Illustrated by Native American Stories by Robert G. McWilliams 1 The Geology of North America as Illustrated by Native American Stories Robert G. McWilliams Professor Emeritus Department of Geology Miami University Oxford, Ohio 45056 mcwillrg@muohio.edu #12;The Geology of North

Lee Jr., Richard E.

370

Voltage-dependent calcium channels and currents in native neurons and other cells have been divided into high voltage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Voltage-dependent calcium channels and currents in native neurons and other cells have been divided than one subtype of channel. A new subfamily of voltage-dependent calcium channel ĂĄ1 subunit genes. 1999), having four domains, each with a voltage sensor and a pore-forming P loop. However

Dolphin, Annette C.

371

Analyzing Tradeoffs Between the Threat of Invasion by Brook Trout and Effects of Intentional Isolation for Native Westslope Cutthroat Trout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

who fund these projects. A consistent decision process would include an analysis of the relative risks or exacerbate the other. A consistent decision process would include a systematic analysis of when and where) as a tool for such analyses. We focused on native westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi

372

Figure 2. Urban lawns have ~ 2x the microbial biomass of native and/or cultivated areas. Viable microbial biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 2. Urban lawns have ~ 2x the microbial biomass of native and/or cultivated areas. Viable and fertilized Corn: flood irrigated and fertilized Wheat-Fallow: a dryland winter wheat cropping system C and N mineralization rates (data not shown) than other ecosystems, suggesting that energy

Hall, Sharon J.

373

Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pinellas Plant has been part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) nuclear weapons complex since the plant opened in 1957. In March 1995, the DOE sold the Pinellas Plant to the Pinellas County Industry Council (PCIC). DOE has leased back a large portion of the plant site to facilitate transition to alternate use and safe shutdown. The current mission is to achieve a safe transition of the facility from defense production and prepare the site for alternative uses as a community resource for economic development. Toward that effort, the Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report (EBR) discusses the current and past environmental conditions of the plant site. Information for the EBR is obtained from plant records. Historical process and chemical usage information for each area is reviewed during area characterizations.

Not Available

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Texas Plant Diseases Handbook.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the lesion turns brown. With age, 1 es ions en 1 arge and coa 1 esce. The ent i re 1 eaf fi na 11 y drops. Stem lesions appear as long, reddish colored spots. When the plant begins to set fruit, lesions are formed at the nodes \\'Jhich girdle the stem... gi v i ng the 1 eaf a "shot-ho 1 e" appearance, simi 1 ar to those caused by anthracnose. Spots on fruit are usua lly sma 11 er and circul ar in shape. Bacteria overwinter in crop residue and on seed. Hard rains splash the bacteria to stems...

Horne, C. Wendell; Amador, Jose M.; Johnson, Jerral D.; McCoy, Norman L.; Philley, George L.; Lee, Thomas A. Jr.; Kaufman, Harold W.; Jones, Roger K.; Barnes, Larry W.; Black, Mark C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Propagation of Ornamental Plants.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is well filled with roots. In the other types of layering, select shooi 1 of young growth that bend easily. It usuall: is advisable to wound the stem where it is covered with soil. This cut limits free movemen: ! of food materials and induces root... cuttings. lecent research findings have taken much of uesswork out of this type of propagation t now can be done for many plants with rlrative ease by the home gardener. Some alants remain difficult to propagate by any ' method, but most...

DeWerth, A. F.

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Plants & Animals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006Photovoltaic Theory and ModelingPinkand Results Plans,Plants &

377

B Plant - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone byDearTechnicalAwards recognizeStatutes i TableAugustPlant

378

T Plant - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout »LabSustainabilitySynthetic fuelT Plant Projects

379

Installation restoration program: Hydrologic measurements with an estimated hydrologic budget for the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant, Joliet, Illinois. [Contains maps of monitoring well locations, topography and hydrologic basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrologic data were gathered from the 36.8-mi{sup 2} Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP) located in Joliet, Illinois. Surface water levels were measured continuously, and groundwater levels were measured monthly. The resulting information was entered into a database that could be used as part of numerical flow model validation for the site. Deep sandstone aquifers supply much of the water in the JAAP region. These aquifers are successively overlain by confining shales and a dolomite aquifer of Silurian age. This last unit is unconformably overlain by Pleistocene glacial tills and outwash sand and gravel. Groundwater levels in the shallow glacial system fluctuate widely, with one well completed in an upland fluctuating more than 17 ft during the study period. The response to groundwater recharge in the underlying Silurian dolomite is slower. In the upland recharge areas, increased groundwater levels were observed; in the lowland discharge areas, groundwater levels decreased during the study period. The decreases are postulated to be a lag effect related to a 1988 drought. These observations show that fluid at the JAAP is not steady-state, either on a monthly or an annual basis. Hydrologic budgets were estimated for the two principal surface water basins at the JAAP site. These basins account for 70% of the facility's total land area. Meteorological data collected at a nearby dam show that total measured precipitation was 31.45 in. and total calculated evapotranspiration was 23.09 in. for the study period. The change in surface water storage was assumed to be zero for the annual budget for each basin. The change in groundwater storage was calculated to be 0.12 in. for the Grant Creek basin and 0. 26 in. for the Prairie Creek basin. Runoff was 7.02 in. and 7.51 in. for the Grant Creek and Prairie Creek basins, respectively. The underflow to the deep hydrogeologic system in the Grant Creek basin was calculated to be negligible. 12 refs., 17 figs., 15 tabs.

Diodato, D.M.; Cho, H.E.; Sundell, R.C.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Nuclear Plant/Hydrogen Plant Safety: Issues and Approaches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, through its agents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, is working on developing the technologies to enable the large scale production of hydrogen using nuclear power. A very important consideration in the design of a co-located and connected nuclear plant/hydrogen plant facility is safety. This study provides an overview of the safety issues associated with a combined plant and discusses approaches for categorizing, quantifying, and addressing the safety risks.

Steven R. Sherman

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

In the field. Pilot project uses innovative process to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot project at We Energies' Pleasant Prairie Power Plant uses chilled ammonia to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. 3 photos.

NONE

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Issues for New Nuclear Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to produce heavy components and nuclear-grade equipment - Transportation of heavy components - Constructionoperation workforce - Cost of new plants Cooling Technology...

383

Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Joint Information Center Emergency Manager Offsite Interface Coordinator DOE Technical Advisor Emergency Press Center Radiation Safety Figure 1. Pantex Plant Emergency Response...

384

Owners of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Power Plant Modeling and Simulation  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and Development provides open source tools and expetise for modeling and simulating power plants and carbon sequestration technologies.

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

386

DIFFERENTIAL RESPONSES OF INVASIVE CELASTRUS ORBICULATUS (CELASTRACEAE) AND NATIVE C. SCANDENS TO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, they not only experience reduced light quantity, but light quality in lowered red : far red light (R : FR : FR light treatments. Celastrus orbiculatus showed an increase in height, aboveground biomass both the effect of both the quantity and quality of light. Lianas and other plants that are under

Silander Jr., John A.

387

Distinct Bradyrhizbium communities nodulate legumes native to temperate and tropical monsoon Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Australia Tomasz Stepkowski a, , Elizabeth Watkin b , Alison McInnes c,1 , Dorota Gurda a , Joanna Gracz, Perth, Australia c School of Natural Sciences, University of Western Sydney, Hawkesbury Campus, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith South DC, NSW 1797, Australia d Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology

388

Oldest Botanical Journal in the Western Hemisphere Phenological niche separation from native species increases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

61790-4120 USA ENGELHARDT, M. J. AND R. C. ANDERSON (School of Biological Sciences, Behavior, Ecology. We measured maximum photosynthetic rates (Amax) in early (13­14 April) and late (22­26 May) spring production than shaded plants only during the Early interval. Greatest Amax occurred in early spring (13

Anderson, Roger C.

389

Plant Importation Importing "Plant Material" From Outside Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plant Importation Importing "Plant Material" From Outside Canada 1) Determine whether) If a permit is required from the CFIA* (a division of Agriculture Canada), please go to the CFIA website Agency Canada (PHAC) or the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). #12;

390

Managing plant symbiosis: fungal endophyte genotype alters plant community composition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Managing plant symbiosis: fungal endophyte genotype alters plant community composition Jennifer A hosts the foliar endophytic fungus, Neotypho- dium coenophialum. We quantified vegetation development of the endophyte (KY-31, AR-542) in two tall fescue cultivars (Georgia-5, Jesup). The KY-31 endophyte produces

Rudgers, Jennifer

391

(Photosynthesis in intact plants)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in the two years since the last renewal application has been excellent. We have made substantial contributions on both main fronts of the projects, and are particularly happy with the progress of our research on intact plants. The approach of basing our field work on a sound foundation of laboratory studies has enabled is to use methods which provide unambiguous assays of well characterized reactions. We have also made excellent progress in several laboratory studies which will have direct applications in future field work, and have introduced to the laboratory a range of molecular genetics techniques which will allow us to explore new options in the attempt to understand function at the level of molecular structure.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Native defects in tetradymite Bi2(TexSe3-x) topological insulators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Formation energies of native defects in Bi2(TexSe3-x), with comparison to ideal Bi2Te2S, are calculated in density-functional theory to assess transport properties. Bi2Se3 is found to be n type for both Bi- and Se-rich growth conditions, while Bi2Te3 changes from n to p type going from Te- to Bi-rich conditions, as observed. Bi2Te2Se and Bi2Te2S are generally n type, explaining observed heavily doped n-type behavior in most samples. A (0/-) transition level at 16 meV above valence-band maximum for Bi on Te antisites in Bi2Te2Se is related to the observed thermally active transport gap causing a p-to-n transition at low temperature. Bi2(TexSe3-x) with x>2 are predicted to have high bulk resistivity due to effective carrier compensation when approaching the n-to-p crossover. Predicted behaviors are confirmed from characterization of our grown single crystals.

Wang, Lin-Lin [Ames Laboratory; Huang, Mianliang [South Dakota School of Mines; Thimmaiah, Srinivasa [Ames Laboratory; Alam, Aftab [Ames Laboratory; Budko, Sergey L. [Ames Laboratory; Kaminski, Adam [Ames Laboratory; Lograsso, Thomas A. [Ames Laboratory; Canfield, Paul [Ames Laboratory; Johnson, Duane D. [Ames Laboratory

2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

393

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

CO2 EFFECTS ON MOJAVE DESERT PLANT INTERACTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seasonal and interannual droughts characteristic of deserts have the potential to modify plant interactions as atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations continue to rise. At the Nevada Desert FACE (free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment) facility in the northern Mojave Desert, the effects of elevated atmospheric C02 (550 vs. ambient {approx}360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) on plant interactions were examined during two years of high and low rainfall. Results suggest that CO{sub 2} effects on the interaction between native species and their understory herbs are dependent on the strength of competition when rainfall is plentiful, but are unimportant during annual drought. Seasonal rainfall for 1999 was 23% the long-term average for the area, and neither elevated CO{sub 2} nor the low production of herbaceous neighbors had an effect on relative growth rate (RGR, d{sup -1}) and reproductive effort (RE, number of flowers g{sup -1}) for Achnatherum hymenoides (early season perennial C{sub 3} grass), Pleuraphis rigida (late season perennial C{sub 4} grass), and Larrea tridentata (evergreen C{sub 3} shrub). In contrast, 1998 received 213% the average rainfall. Consequently, the decrease in RGR and increase in RE for Achnatherum, whose period of growth overlaps directly with that of its neighbors, was exaggerated at elevated CO{sub 2}. However, competitive effects of neighbors on Eriogonum trichopes (a winter annual growing in shrub interspaces), Pleuraphis and Larrea were not affected by elevated CO{sub 2}, and possible explanations are discussed. Contrary to expectations, the invasive annual neighbor Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens had little influence on target plant responses because densities in 1998 and 1999 at this site were well below those found in other studies where it has negatively affected perennial plant growth. The extent that elevated CO{sub 2} reduces the performance of Achnatherum in successive years to cause its loss from the plant community depends more on future pressure from herbaceous neighbors and less on the extent that CO{sub 2} enhances Achnatherum growth during periods of severe drought.

L. A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; S. D. SMITH; R. S. NOWAK

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Demonstration of the economic feasibility of plant tissue culture for jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) and Euphorbia spp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The economic feasibility of plant tissue culture was demonstrated as applied to two plants: jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) and Euphorbia spp. The gopher weed (Euphorbia lathyris) was selected as the species of Euphorbia to research due to the interest in this plant as a potential source of hydrocarbon-like compounds. High yield female selections of jojoba were chosen from native stands and were researched to determine the economic feasibility of mass producing these plants via a tissue culture micropropagation program. The female jojoba selection was successfully mass produced through tissue culture. Modifications in initiation techniques, as well as in multiplication media and rooting parameters, were necessary to apply the tissue culture system, which had been developed for juvenile seedling tissue, to mature jojobas. Since prior attempts at transfer of tissue cultured plantlets were unsuccessful, transfer research was a major part of the project and has resulted in a system for transfer of rooted jojoba plantlets to soil. Euphorbia lathyris was successfully cultured using shoot tip cultures. Media and procedures were established for culture initiation, multiplication of shoots, callus induction and growth, and root initiation. Well-developed root systems were not attained and root initiation percentages should be increased if the system is to become commercially feasible.

Sluis, C.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Comparison of growth at six years of four native and three exotic timber species planted on abandoned pasture land in Costa Rica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into a new environment. As stated by Liang and Gan (1988), "species can perform in unexpected ways when introduced to new locations. " All one has to do is imagine the countryside in parts of the southeastern U. s. covered with the escaped kudzu vine...

Bir, John Andrew

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Refinery, petrochemical plant injuries decline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Petroleum Refiners Association (NPRA) reports a 7% reduction in workplace injury and illness incidence rates for refineries in 1993, and a 21% decrease for petrochemical plants. The report summarizes data from 135 of the 162 US member refineries, and 117 of the 172 US member petrochemical plants. This paper summarizes the report findings.

Not Available

1994-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

398

Do Plants Sweat? Core Content  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the bright sun and others are grouped together and are regularly sprinkled with water. You begin to wonder plant distribution where you see this principle in action? -Can you predict the effect of seasons data/graph] Three plants are grown in the same greenhouse with the same air temperature, amount

Kessler, Bruce

399

Dramatic change at T Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

T Plant (221-T) was the first and largest of the early chemical separations plants at the Hanford Engineer Works (HEW), the name for the Hanford Site during World War II. Officially designated as a Cell Building by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) of the Army Corps of Engineers (agency responsible for HEW), T Plant served as the headquarters of chemical processing operations at Hanford from its construction until the opening of the Reduction-Oxidation (REDOX) Plant in January 1952. T Plant performed the third step in plutonium production operations, following the steps of uranium fuel manufacture and then irradiation in defense production reactors. The fissionable core (plutonium) used in the world`s first atomic explosion, the Trinity bomb test held at Alamogordo, New Mexico, on July 16, 1945, was processed in T Plant. Likewise, the fissionable core of the weapon dropped over Nagasaki, Japan, on August 9, 1945, was processed in T Plant. Because it formed a crucial link in the first full-scale plutonium production operations in world history, T Plant meets criteria established in the National Historic Preservation Act of 19661 as a Historic Place.

Gerber, M.S.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The distribution and interaction of red imported fire ants and native ants across ecotones in a Post Oak Savanna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Appendix A. ~ I ~ I I ~ I ~ I ' I I I I I I I I I II I I ' I KKRKKRCZKRKK~RK~KREKMEEER aM~IIIWII~ IBM~ I I I I ~ \\ I I ~ ~ I ~ ~ I' 'I' I ~ ~ ~ I I MJ'IA i"\\ i:l'4b; I I 29 native ant genera for all 7 ecotones (Tables 3-9). The most...

Meegan, Rebecca Pharr

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Patterns of intended and actual fertility among subgroups of foreign-born and native-born Latinas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PATTERNS OF INTENDED AND ACTUAL FERTILITY AMONG SUBGROUPS OF FOREIGN-BORN AND NATIVE-BORN LATINAS A Thesis by BRANDI NICOLE BALLARD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: ___________________________________ Rogelio Saenz...

Ballard, Brandi Nicole

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

402

The association of selected soil properties with the distribution of native vegetation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

procedure, and (2) a logistic regression approach. The 2 methods gave similar results, but the logistic regression approach better addressed the problem of soil property intercorrelations. Clay or CEC, with Na, appears to have utility as ancillary data...-square values from contingency tables . 19 Order of soil property selection for a stepwise logistic regression for each of 37 plant species. 20 Nean value of summary statistics for 37 logistic regressions for 8 different soil property sets or subsets. 22...

Yantis, James H

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Plant maintenance and plant life extension issue, 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of the March-April issue is on plant maintenance and plant life extension. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Three proposed COLs expected in 2007, by Dale E. Klein, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Delivering behaviors that our customers value, by Jack Allen, Westinghouse Electric Company; Facilitating high-level and fuel waste disposal technologies, by Malcolm Gray, IAEA, Austria; Plant life management and long-term operation, by Pal Kovacs, OECD-NEA, France; Measuring control rod position, by R. Taymanov, K. Sapozhnikova, I. Druzhinin, D.I. Mendeleyev, Institue for Metrology, Russia; and, 'Modernization' means higher safety, by Svetlana Genova, Kozluduy NPP plc, Bulgaria.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Differential parasitism of seed-feeding Cydia (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) by native and alien wasp species relative to elevation in subalpine Sophora  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1 Differential parasitism of seed-feeding Cydia (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) by native and alien 2004. Key words: Alien species, Biological control, Elevation gradient, Moth conservation, Non-target, Para- sitism Abstract Alien parasitic wasps, including accidental introductions and purposefully

Silver, Whendee

405

Reduction of native oxides on InAs by atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin high-{kappa} oxide films on InAs, formed by atomic layer deposition, are the key to achieve high-speed metal-oxide-semiconductor devices. We have studied the native oxide and the interface between InAs and 2 nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or HfO{sub 2} layers using synchrotron x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Both films lead to a strong oxide reduction, obtaining less than 10% of the native As-oxides and between 10% and 50% of the native In-oxides, depending on the deposition temperature. The ratio of native In- to As-oxides is determined to be 2:1. The exact composition and the influence of different oxidation states and suboxides is discussed in detail.

Timm, R.; Fian, A.; Hjort, M.; Thelander, C.; Lind, E.; Andersen, J. N.; Wernersson, L.-E.; Mikkelsen, A. [Department of Physics, Nanometer Structure Consortium, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, 22 100 Lund (Sweden)

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

406

Investigation of the kinetics of protein folding and the ensemble of conformations in non-native states of proteins by liquid NMR spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For a complete description of protein folding dynamics and the structure of the folded state, of unfolded and of non-native states of proteins and the kinetics of protein folding from the unfolded state to the folded state ...

Wirmer, Julia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Assessment of Native Salmonids Above Hells Canyon Dam, Idaho, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We assessed the relationships between specific stream attributes and Yellowstone cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri distribution and biomass at 773 stream reaches (averaging 100 m in length) throughout the Upper Snake River Basin in Idaho, in an effort to identify possible limiting factors. Because limiting factors were expected to vary across the range of cutthroat trout distribution in Idaho, separate logistic and multiple regression models were developed for each of the nine major river drainages to relate stream conditions to occurrence and biomass of cutthroat trout. Adequate stream flow to measure fish and habitat existed at 566 sites, and of those, Yellowstone cutthroat trout were present at 322 sites, while rainbow trout O. mykiss (or rainbow x cutthroat hybrids) and brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis occurred at 108 and 181 sites, respectively. In general, cutthroat trout presence at a specific site within a drainage was associated with a higher percentage of public property, higher elevation, more gravel and less fine substrate, and more upright riparian vegetation. However, there was much variation between drainages in the direction and magnitude of the relationships between stream characteristics and Yellowstone cutthroat trout occurrence and biomass, and in model strength. This was especially true for biomass models, in which we were able to develop models for only five drainages that explained more than 50% of the variation in cutthroat trout biomass. Sample size appeared to affect the strength of the biomass models, with a higher explanation of biomass variation in drainages with lower sample sizes. The occurrence of nonnative salmonids was not strongly related to cutthroat trout occurrence, but their widespread distribution and apparent ability to displace native cutthroat trout suggest they may nevertheless pose the largest threat to long-term cutthroat trout persistence in the Upper Snake River Basin.

Meyer, Kevin A.; Lamansky, Jr., James A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Early Entrance Coproduction Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objectives of Phase I were to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan for implementation in Phase II; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The work performed under Phase II will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation.

Mushtaq Ahmed; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Troy Raybold; Lalit S. Shah; Kenneth A. Yackly

2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

409

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objectives of Phase I were to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan for implementation in Phase II; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The work performed under Phase II will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation.

Mushtaq Ahmed; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Troy Raybold; Lalit S. Shah; Kenneth A. Yackly

2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

410

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstock. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing Plan (RD and T) for implementation in Phase II. The objective of Phase II is to implement the RD and T as outlined in the Phase I RD and T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The project will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and other feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

John S. Abughazaleh; Mushtaq Ahmed; Ashok Anand; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Fred D. Brent; Thomas E. Chance; William K. Davis; Raymond F. Drnevich; Larry Hall; Ming He; Stephen A. Lang; Jimmy O. Ong; Sarah J. Patel; George Potoczniak; Adela G. Sanchez; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; Phil J. Shires; Rae Song

2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

411

Aquatic plant control research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest region of the United States contains extensive canal systems that transport water for hydropower generation. Nuisance plants, including algae, that grow in these systems reduce their hydraulic capacity through water displacement and increased surface friction. Most control methods are applied in an ad hoc fashion. The goal of this work is to develop cost-effective, environmentally sound, long-term management strategies to prevent and control nuisance algal growth. This paper reports on a multi-year study, performed in collaboration with the Pacific Gas & Electric Company, to investigate algal growth in their canal systems, and to evaluate various control methodologies. Three types of controls, including mechanical, biological and chemical treatment, were selected for testing and evaluation. As part of this study, water quality data were collected and algal communities were sampled from numerous stations throughout the distribution system at regular intervals. This study resulted in a more comprehensive understanding of conditions leading to the development of nuisance algal growth, a better informed selection of treatment plans, and improved evaluation of the effectiveness for the control strategies selected for testing.

Pryfogle, P.A.; Rinehart, B.N. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ghio, E.G. [Pacific Gas & Electric Company, San Francisco, CA (United States). Hydro Generation Engineering

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing Plan (RD and T) for implementation in Phase II. The objective of Phase II is to implement the RD and T as outlined in the Phase I RD and T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The project will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

John S. Abughazaleh; Mushtaq Ahmed; Ashok Anand; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Fred D. Brent; Thomas E. Chance; William K. Davis; Raymond F. Drnevich; Larry Hall; Ming He; Stephen A. Lang; Jimmy O. Ong; Sarah J. Patel; George Potoczniak; Adela G. Sanchez; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; Phil J. Shires; Rae Song

2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three-phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) that produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: Electric power (or heat); Fuels; and Chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or some other carbonaceous feedstock, such as petroleum coke. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD and T) Plan for implementation in Phase II. This objective has now been accomplished. A specific site, Motiva Refinery in Port Arthur, Texas, has been selected as the location best suited for the EECP. The accomplishments of Phase I are discussed in detail in this Phase I Concept Report. A RD and T Plan and a preliminary project financing plan have been developed and are submitted separately from this report.

John S. Abughazaleh; Mushtaq Ahmed; Ashok Anand; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Fred D. Brent; Thomas E. Chance; William K. Davis; Raymond F. Drnevich; Larry Hall; Ming He; Stephen A. Lang; David Mintner; Wendy Moore; Jimmy O. Ong; George Potoczniak; Adela G. Sanchez; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; Kalapi D. Sheth; Phil J. Shires; Rae Song

2001-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

414

Selective depredation of planted hardwood seedlings by wild pigs in a wetland restoration area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the planting of several thousand hardwood seedlings in a 69-ha wetland restoration area in west-central South Carolina, wild pigs (Sus scrofa) depredated a large percentage of the young trees. This planting was undertaken as part of a mitigation effort to restore a bottomland hardwood community in the corridor and delta of a third order stream that had been previously impacted by the discharge of heated nuclear reactor effluent. The depredated restoration areas had been pretreated with both herbicide and control burning prior to planting the hardwood seedlings. After discovery of the wild pig damage, these areas were surveyed on foot to assess the magnitude of the depredation on the planted seedling crop. Foraging by the local wild pigs in the pretreatment areas selectively impacted only four of the nine hardwood species used in this restoration effort. Based on the surveys, the remaining five species did not appear to have been impacted at all. A variety of reasons could be used to explain this phenomenon. The pretreatment methodology is thought to have been the primary aspect of the restoration program that initially led the wild pigs to discover the planted seedlings. In addition, it is possible that a combination of other factors associated with odor and taste may have resulted in the selective depredation. Future wetland restoration efforts in areas with wild pigs should consider pretreatment methods and species to be planted. If pretreatment methods and species such as discussed in the present study must be used, then the prior removal of wild pigs from surrounding lands will help prevent depredations by this non-native species.

Mayer, J.J.

1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

415

Molecular organization in the native state of woody tissue: Studies of tertiary structure using the Raman microprobe solid state 13C NMR and biomimetic tertiary aggregates. Progress report, July 1, 1989--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have previously shown that all relatively pure plant and bacterial celluloses are, in their native states, composites of two lattice forms, I{sub {alpha}} and I{sub {beta}}, and that the two forms possess molecular chains in the same conformations but with different hydrogen bonding patterns. In the current period we have demonstrated that in higher plant cell wall matrices, the hemicelluloses are likely to have a regulatory function during the aggregation of cellulose. Different hemicelluloses appear to influence the aggregation in different ways. We have also developed preliminary evidence indicating the hemicelluloses may have a protective function against the action of some cellulolytic enzymes. The specific accomplishments during the current period are detailed. Demonstration that hemicelluloses present during biogenesis can transform bacterial cellulose into a cellulose typical of higher plant celluloses, and that each hemicellulose has a different effect on the pattern of aggregation. Evidence is presented that the hemicelluloses may limit the action of certain cellulolytic enzymes, suggesting that their function may go beyond regulation to include passive resistance to cellulolytic pathogens. Enhancing the potential of the Raman microprobe technique for mapping variability of lignin in the cell wall by identifying the contribution of the different substructures of lignin to the intensity of the key band in the Raman spectrum of lignin. Mapping of the variability of lignin across two cell wall sections. The mappings have convoluted within them both composition and concentration, but they demonstrate the potential of the method and point to the improvements we are now making so as to distinguish between variability of concentration and variability of composition.

Atalla, R.H.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Determination of the structural changes by Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy on native corn starch with plasticizers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The plasticizing - antiplasticizing effect of water and glycerol contents on native corn starch samples is investigated by FT-Raman and {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. The presence of both amorphous and crystalline structural phases was evidenced in pure native corn starch and also in the samples containing plasticizers. Among the crystalline starch structures, the A- and V- types were suggested by CP/MAS NMR spectra.

Cozar, O. [Academy of Romanian Scientists, Splaiul Independentei 54, 050094, Bucharest, Romania and National Institute of Research-Development for Machines and Installations Designed to Agriculture and Food Industry - INMA Bucure?ti - Cluj-Napoca Branch (Romania)] [Academy of Romanian Scientists, Splaiul Independentei 54, 050094, Bucharest, Romania and National Institute of Research-Development for Machines and Installations Designed to Agriculture and Food Industry - INMA Bucure?ti - Cluj-Napoca Branch (Romania); Filip, C.; Tripon, C. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cioica, N.; Co?a, C.; Nagy, E. M. [National Institute of Research-Development for Machines and Installations Designed to Agriculture and Food Industry - INMA Bucure?ti - Cluj-Napoca Branch, RO-400458 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute of Research-Development for Machines and Installations Designed to Agriculture and Food Industry - INMA Bucure?ti - Cluj-Napoca Branch, RO-400458 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

417

Plant Energy Cost Optimization Program (PECOP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Plant Energy Cost Optimization Program (PECOP) is a Management System designed to reduce operating cost in a continuous operating multi product plant by reviewing all cost factors and selecting plant wide production schedules which are most...

Robinson, A. M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Fate of Radionuclides in Wastewater Treatment Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

due to the Fukushima nuclear plant accident. Journal of21 3. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS……………………………………………….. 23 3.1-25 3.2- WASTES FROM NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS………………………… 28 4.

Shabani Samgh Abadi, Farzaneh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

ASSESSING PLANTING STOCK QUALITY Comprehensive assessments of planting stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for cold storage, and to evaluate effects of traditional and proposed nursery cultural practices on field and Jenkinson 1970, 1971) just after lifting and after cold storage to spring planting time · Field survival

Standiford, Richard B.

420

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Gasification Technologies and Transportation Fuels and Chemicals programs, DOE and Texaco are partners through Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40658 to determine the feasibility of developing, constructing and operating an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP). The overall objective of the project is the three-phase development of an EECP that produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: Electric power (or heat); Fuels; and Chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or some other carbonaceous feedstock, such as petroleum coke. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD and T) Plan for implementation in Phase II. This objective has now been accomplished. A specific site, Motiva Refinery in Port Arthur, Texas, has been selected as the location best suited for the EECP. The specific work requirements of Phase I included: Prepare an EECP Preliminary Concept Report covering Tasks 2-8 specified in the Cooperative Agreement; Develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD and T) Plan as specified in Task 9 of the Cooperative Agreement for implementation in Phase II; and Develop a Preliminary Project Financing Plan for the EECP Project as specified in Task 10 of the Cooperative Agreement. This document is the Preliminary Project Financing Plan for the design, construction, and operation of the EECP at the Motiva Port Arthur Refinery.

John H. Anderson; William K. Davis; Thomas W. Sloop

2001-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Can dispersal mode predict corridor effects on plant parasites?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Habitat corridors, a common management strategy for increasing connectivity in fragmented landscapes, have experimentally validated positive influences on species movement and diversity. However, long-standing concerns that corridors could negatively impact native species by spreading antagonists, such as disease, remain largely untested. Using a large-scale, replicated experiment, we evaluated whether corridors increase the incidence of plant parasites. We found that corridor impacts varied with parasite dispersal mode. Connectivity provided by corridors increased incidence of biotically dispersed parasites (galls on Solidago odora) but not of abiotically dispersed parasites (foliar fungi on S. odora and three Lespedeza spp.). Both biotically and abiotically dispersed parasites responded to edge effects, but the direction of responses varied across species. Although our results require additional tests for generality to other species and landscapes, they suggest that, when establishing conservation corridors, managers should focus on mitigating two potential negative effects: the indirect effects of narrow corridors in creating edges and direct effects of corridors in enhancing connectivity of biotically dispersed parasites.

Sullivan, Lauren, L.; Johnson, Brenda, L.; Brudvig, Lars, A.; Haddad, Nick, M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

423

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

424

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

425

New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

426

GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

POWER GENERATION PLANT GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT Project objectives: Drilling a deep geothermal well on the Oregon Institute of Technology campus, Klamath Falls,...

427

Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Summary Report - August 2002 Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Summary Report - August...

428

Natural Gas Processing Plant- Sulfur (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This regulation establishes sulfur emission standards for natural gas processing plants. Standards are stated for both existing and new plants. There are also rules for stack height requirements,...

429

Oversight Reports - Pantex Plant | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Pantex Plant - November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Pantex Plant August 8, 2012 Independent Activity Report, Pantex...

430

Oversight Reports - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - December 2007 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Carlsbad Field Office and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant October 2, 2002 Independent Oversight...

431

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Plutonium Finishing Plant - May 2012 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant - May 2012 May 2012 Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Hanford...

432

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Wolf Creek Generating Station Unit 1","1,160","9,556",100.0,"Wolf Creek Nuclear Optg Corp" "1 Plant 1 Reactor","1,160","9,556",100.0...

433

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Vermont Yankee Unit 1",620,"4,782",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",620,"4,782",100.0...

434

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(percent)","Owner" "Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station Unit 1",685,"5,918",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Generation Co" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",685,"5,918",100.0 "Note: Totals may not equal...

435

Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selection and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.

Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Fiberglass plastics in power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fiberglass reinforced plastics (FRPs) are replacing metal in FGDs, stacks, tanks, cooling towers, piping and other plant components. The article documents the use of FRP in power plants since the 1970s. The largest volume of FRP in North American power plants is for stack liners and ductwork. Absorber vessel shells and internal components comprise the third largest use. The most common FRP absorber vessels are known as jet bubbling reactors (JBRs). One of the largest JBRs at a plant on the Ohio River removes 99% of sulphur dioxide from high sulphur coal flue gas. FRPs last twice as long as wood structures when used for cooling towers and require less maintenance. 1 tab., 2 photos.

Kelley, D. [Ashland Performance Materials (United States)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Description Plants ESIS ESD FSGD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological Site Description Plants ESIS ESD FSGD ESI Forestland ESI Rangeland Data Access > Return CHARACTERISTICS Site Type: Rangeland Site Name: Red Sandy Loam 25-32" PZ Site ID: R082AY369TX Major Land Resource

438

Issues for New Nuclear Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to Explore * Idaho's energy picture * Nuclear power in the U.S. * Potential for a nuclear power plant in Idaho 0 5 10 15 20 25 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 Million Megawatt-Hours Total...

439

Foote Hydroelectric Plant spillway rehabilitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1993 the spillway of the 9 MW Foote Hydroelectric Plant located on the AuSable River, near Oscoda, Michigan was rehabilitated. The Foote Plant, built in 1917, is owned and operated by Consumers Power Company. In the 76 years of continuous operation the spillway had deteriorated such that much of the concrete and associated structure needed to be replaced to assure safety of the structure. The hydro station includes an earth embankment with concrete corewall, a concrete spillway with three tainter gates and a log chute, a penstock structure and a steel and masonry powerhouse. The electric generation is by three vertical shaft units of 3,000 KW each. A plan of the plant with spillway and an elevation of the spillway section is shown. This paper describes the evaluation and repair of the plant spillway and associated structure.

Sowers, D.L. [Consumers Power Co., Jackson, MI (United States); Hasan, N.; Gertler, L.R. [Raytheon Infrastructures Services, New York, NY (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop jointly a licensing strategy for the Next Generation Nuclear plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Should that prove to be impractical (e.g. due to excessive heat loss in the intermediate heat transfer loop), an earthen berm separating the two plants may be a suitable...

442

Water Filtration Using Plant Xylem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective point-of-use devices for providing safe drinking water are urgently needed to reduce the global burden of waterborne disease. Here we show that plant xylem from the sapwood of coniferous trees – a readily available, ...

Boutilier, Michael Stephen Ha

443

Mixtec plant nomenclature and classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capsicum pubescens L. , SOLANACEAE yutu tuya’a kuán: la matade chile amarillo (PIN) tuya’a: chili plants (JAM) chá’a:nika’ndi ya’a: chilar (CAB) tuya’a (COI) Clethra mexicana

de Avila, Alejandro

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these organisms to environmental factors (e .g. , temperature and solar radiation). Actual field data have been compared with simulation output with encouraging results. Starting biomass of the plants and numbers

US Army Corps of Engineers

445

A neighborhood alternative energy plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A design that proposes the redefinition of the role of a power plant facility within a community by creating a humane environment for recreation, education, community gathering, living, and energy production; rather than ...

Brooks, Douglas James

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Gym Lot Corbett Lot Greenhouse Patch Oceanographic Operations 1 2 8 5 3 4 7 6 AMC Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam

Thomas, Andrew

447

COKEMASTER: Coke plant management system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To keep coke utilization in ironmaking as competitive as possible, the potential to improve the economics of coke production has to be utilized. As one measure to meet this need of its customers, Krupp Koppers has expanded its existing ECOTROL computer system for battery heating control to a comprehensive Coke Plant Management System. Increased capacity utilization, lower energy consumption, stabilization of plant operation and ease of operation are the main targets.

Johanning, J.; Reinke, M. [Krupp Koppers GmbH, Essen (Germany)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

Computer Control of Unattended Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPUTER CONTROL OF UNATTENDED PLANTS David R. Vinson, Nirma1 Chatterjee ? Ai r Products and Chemi ca 1s, Inc. Allentown, Pennsylvania Providing a cost-effective and reliable computer monitori ng, control, and optimization package is a greater... the last decade, energy costs in some air separation plants are now more than half the total product cost. Starting in 1975, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. began implementing a program to retrofit existing major energy consuming facili ties...

Vinson, D. R.; Chatterjee, N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Researching power plant water recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A range of projects supported by NETl under the Innovations for Existing Plant Program are investigating modifications to power plant cooling systems for reducing water loss, and recovering water from the flue gas and the cooling tower. This paper discusses two technologies showing particular promise condense water that is typically lost to evaporation, SPX technologies' Air2Air{sup trademark} condenses water from a cooling tower, while Lehigh University's process condenses water and acid in flue gas. 3 figs.

NONE

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Density of bunches of native bluebunch wheatgrass and alien crested wheatgrass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The density of bunches of bluebunch wheatgrass in a natural undisturbed stand averaged 3.28 per m/sup 2/ as compared to 2.96 per m/sup 2/ for a nearby stand of crested wheatgrass that was planted 30 years ago. Bunch density was similar in both stands indicating that spacing is a response to an environment deficient in soil water. Bunches of crested wheatgrass on the average weighed 3.5 times more than bunches of bluebunch wheatgrass and they also produced a greater weight of seedheads.

Rickard, W.H.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

EM's New Project of the Month Focuses on Tribes' Work with Native  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005Department ofDOEDisabilityContractorsRecoveryOperations |Plants for

452

SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

JOHN C WALKER

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The potential technical and economic risks to the EECP from Task 2.5 can be mitigated by demonstrating that the end-use products derived from the upgrading of the F-T synthesis total liquid product can meet or exceed current specifications for the manufacture of ethylene and propylene chemicals from F-T naphtha, for the generation of hydrogen from F-T naphtha to power fuel cells, for direct blending of F-T diesels into transportation fuels, for the conversion of F-T heavy product wax to transportation fuels, and the conversion of F-T Heavy product wax to a valuable high melting point food-grade specialty wax product. Product evaluations conducted under Task 2.5 of Phase II successfully mitigated the above technical and economic risks to the EECP with the development of product yields and product qualities for the production of chemicals, transportation fuels, and specialty food-grade waxes from the F-T synthesis products.

Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; Ming He; James F. Stevens; Centha A. Davis; Michael Henley; Jerome Mayer; Harry Tsang; Jimell Erwin; Jennifer Adams; Michael Tillman; Chris Taylor; Marjan J. Roos; Robert F. Earhart

2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

454

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, Inc., GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I, a design basis for the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis section was developed based on limited experience with the specified feed gas and operating conditions. The objective of this Task in Phase II RD&T work was to confirm the performance of the F-T reactor at the set design conditions. Although much of the research, development, and testing work were done by TES outside of this project, several important issues were addressed in this phase of the project. They included Rejuvenation/Regeneration of the Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst, online Catalyst Withdrawal and Addition from the synthesis reactor, and the Fischer-Tropsch Design Basis Confirmation. In Phase III the results from these RD&T work will be incorporated in developing the engineering design package. This Topical Report documents the Phase II RD&T work that was completed for this task.

David Storm; Govanon Nongbri; Steve Decanio; Ming He; Lalit Shah; Charles Schrader; Earl Berry; Peter Ricci; Belma Demirel; Charles Benham; Mark Bohn

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

455

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1999, the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a Cooperative Agreement to Texaco Energy Systems Inc. to provide a preliminary engineering design of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP). Since the award, continuous and diligent work has been undertaken to achieve the design of an economical facility that makes strides toward attaining the goal of DOE's Vision 21 Program. The objective of the EECP is to convert coal and/or petroleum coke to power while coproducing transportation fuels, chemicals, and useful utilities such as steam. This objective is being pursued in a three-phase effort through the partnership of the DOE with prime contractor Texaco Energy Systems, LLC. (TES), the successor to Texaco Energy Systems, Inc. The key subcontractors to TES include General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown and Root. ChevronTexaco provided gasification technology and Rentech Inc.'s Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology that has been developed for non-natural gas sources. GE provided gas turbine technology for the combustion of low energy content gas. Praxair provided air separation technology and KBR provided engineering to integrate the facility. A conceptual design was completed in Phase I and the report was accepted by the DOE in May 2001. The Phase I work identified risks and critical research, development, and testing that would improve the probability of technical success of the EECP. The objective of Phase II was to mitigate the risks by executing research, development, and testing. Results from the Phase II work are the subject of this report. As the work of Phase II concluded, it became evident that sufficient, but not necessarily complete, technical information and data would be available to begin Phase III - Preliminary Engineering Design. Work in Phase II requires additional technical development work to correctly apply technology at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The decision to proceed with Phase III centers on locating a new site and favorable commercial and economic factors.

John Anderson; Charles Schrader

2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

456

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 identified as potential technical risks to the EECP the fuel/engine performance and emissions of the F-T diesel fuel products. Hydrotreating the neat F-T diesel product reduces potentially reactive olefins, oxygenates, and acids levels and alleviates corrosion and fuel stability concerns. Future coproduction plants can maximize valuable transportation diesel by hydrocracking the F-T Synthesis wax product to diesel and naphtha. The upgraded neat F-T diesel, hydrotreater F-T diesel, and hydrocracker F-T diesel products would be final blending components in transportation diesel fuel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully carried out fuel lubricity property testing, fuel response to lubricity additives, and hot-start transient emission tests on a neat F-T diesel product, a hydrocracker F-T diesel product, a blend of hydrotreater and hydrocracker F-T diesel products, and a Tier II California Air Resources Board (CARB)-like diesel reference fuel. Only the neat F-T diesel passed lubricity inspection without additive while the remaining three fuel candidates passed with conventional additive treatment. Hot-start transient emission tests were conducted on the four fuels in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Federal Test Procedure (FTP) specified in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 86, and Subpart N on a rebuilt 1991 Detroit Diesel Corporation Series 60 heavy-duty diesel engine. Neat F-T diesel fuel reduced oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), total particulate (PM), hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and the Soluble Organic Fraction (SOF) by 4.5%, 31%, 50%, 29%, and 35%, respectively, compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The hydrocracker F-T diesel product and a blend of hydrocracker and hydrotreater F-T diesel products also reduced NO{sub x}, PM, HC, CO and SOF by 13%, 16% to 17%, 38% to 63%, 17% to 21% and 21% to 39% compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The fuel/engine performance and emissions of the three F-T diesel fuels exceed the performance of a Tier II CARB-like diesel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully met the lubricity property testing and F-T diesel fuel hot-start transient emissions test objectives. The results of the testing help mitigate potential economic risks on obtaining a premium price for the F-T diesel fuel

Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; J. Erwin; Matthew G. Banks; Terry L. Ullman

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

457

Transcriptome Analysis of Drought-Tolerant CAM plants Agave deserti and Agave tequilana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Agaves are succulent monocotyledonous plants native to hot and arid environments of North America. Because of their adaptations to their environment, including crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM, a water-efficient form of photosynthesis) and existing technologies for ethanol production, agaves have gained attention both as potential lignocellulosic bioenergy feedstocks and models for exploring plant responses to abiotic stress. However, the lack of comprehensive Agave sequence datasets limits the scope of investigations into the molecular-genetic basis of Agave traits. Here, we present comprehensive, high quality de novo transcriptome assemblies of two Agave species, A. tequilana and A. deserti, from short-read RNA-seq data. Our analyses support completeness and accuracy of the de novo transcriptome assemblies, with each species having approximately 35,000 protein-coding genes. Comparison of agave proteomes to those of additional plant species identifies biological functions of gene families displaying sequence divergence in agave species. Additionally, we use RNA-seq data to gain insights into biological functions along the A. deserti juvenile leaf proximal-distal axis. Our work presents a foundation for further investigation of agave biology and their improvement for bioenergy development.

Gross, Stephen M.; Martin, Jeffrey A.; Simpson, June; Wang, Zhong; Visel, Axel

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

458

MAGGIE Component 1: Identification and Purification of Native and Recombinant Multiprotein Complexes and Modified Proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Virtualy all cellular processes are carried out by dynamic molecular assemblies or multiprotein complexes (PCs), the composition of which is largely unknown. Structural genomics efforts have demonstrated that less than 25% of the genes in a given prokaryotic genome will yield stable, soluble proteins when expressed using a one-ORF-at-a-time approach. We proposed that much of the remaining 75% of the genes encode proteins that are part of multiprotein complexes or are modified post-translationally, for example, with metals. The problem is that PCs and metalloproteins (MPs) cannot be accurately predicted on a genome-wide scale. The only solution to this dilemma is to experimentally determine PCs and MPs in biomass of a model organism and to develop analytical tools that can then be applied to the biomass of any other organism. In other words, organisms themselves must be analyzed to identify their PCs and MPs: “native proteomes” must be determined. This information can then be utilized to design multiple ORF expression systems to produce recombinant forms of PCs and MPs. Moreover, the information and utility of this approach can be enhanced by using a hyperthermophile, one that grows optimally at 100°C, as a model organism. By analyzing the native proteome at close to 100 °C below the optimum growth temperature, we will trap reversible and dynamic complexes, thereby enabling their identification, purification, and subsequent characterization. The model organism for the current study is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows optimally at 100°C. It is grown up to 600-liter scale and kg quantities of biomass are available. In this project we identified native PCs and MPs using P. furiosus biomass (with MS/MS analyses to identify proteins by component 4). In addition, we provided samples of abundant native PCs and MPs for structural characterization (using SAXS by component 5). We also designed and evaluated generic bioinformatics and experimental protocols for PC and MP production in other prokaryotes of DOE interest. The research resulted in ten peer-reviewed publications including in Nature and Nature Methods.

Adams, Michael W. [University of Georgia] [University of Georgia; W. W. Adams, Michael

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

459

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I the team identified several potential methods to reduce or minimize the environmental impact of the proposed EECP. The EECP Project Team identified F-T catalyst disposal, beneficial gasifier slag usage (other than landfill), and carbon dioxide recovery for the gas turbine exhaust for study under this task. Successfully completing the Task 2.10 RD&T provides additional opportunities for the EECP to meet the goals of DOE's Vision 21 Program. The gasification section offers several opportunities to maximize the environmental benefits of an EECP. The spent F-T catalyst can be sent to landfills or to the gasification section. Testing in Phase II shows that the spent F-T catalyst with a small wax coating can safely meet federal landfill requirements. As an alternative to landfilling, it has been proposed to mix the spent F-T catalyst with the petroleum coke and feed this mixture to the gasification unit. Based on ChevronTexaco's experience with gasification and the characteristics of the spent F-T catalyst this appears to be an excellent opportunity to reduce one potential waste stream. The slag from the gasification unit can be commercially marketed for construction or fuel (such as cement kiln fuel) uses. The technical and economic benefits of these options must be reviewed for the final EECP before incorporating a specific alternative into the design basis. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions, particularly carbon dioxide, is an important goal of the EECP. The Texaco gasification process provides opportunities to capture high purity streams of carbon dioxide. For Phase II, a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) was tested to determine its potential to remove high purity carbon dioxide from the exhaust of a gas turbine. Testing on with a simulated gas turbine exhaust shows that the CFCMS is able to remove high purity carbon dioxide from the exhaust. However, more development is required to optimize the system.

John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Earl R. Berry; Ming He; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; O.O. Omatete; T.D. Burchell

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

460

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC (TES), a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco, General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, Inc. GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems were assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified catalyst/wax separation as a potential technical and economic risk. To mitigate risks to the proposed EECP, Phase II RD&T included tests of an alternative (to Rentech's Dynamic Settler) primary catalyst/wax separation device and secondary catalyst/wax separation systems. The team evaluated multiple technologies for both primary and secondary catalyst/wax separation. Based on successful testing at Rentech (outside of DOE funding) and difficulties in finalizing a contract to demonstrate alternative primary catalyst/wax separation technology (using magnetic separation technology), ChevronTexaco has selected the Rentech Dynamic Settler for primary catalyst/wax separation. Testing has shown the Dynamic Settler is capable of producing filtrate exceeding the proposed EECP primary catalyst/wax separation goal of less than 0.1 wt%. The LCI Scepter{reg_sign} Microfiltration system appeared to be best suited for producing a filtrate that met the EECP secondary catalyst/wax separation standards of 10 parts per million (weight) [ppmw]. The other technologies, magnetic separation and electrostatic separation, were promising and able to reduce the solids concentrations in the filtrate. Additional RD&T will be needed for magnetic separation and electrostatic separation technologies to obtain 10 ppmw filtrate required for the proposed EECP. The Phase II testing reduces the technical and economic risks and provides the information necessary to proceed with the development of an engineering design for the EECP Fischer-Tropsch catalyst/wax separation system.

John Anderson; Mark Anselmo; Earl Berry; Mark Bohn; Roko Bujas; Ming He; Ken Kwik; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit Shah; Dennis Slater; Donald Todd; Don Wall

2003-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to its detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC (TES) (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR). The work was under cooperative agreements with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing the gasification technology and the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech Inc., GE is providing the combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing the air separation technology, and KBR is providing overall engineering. Each of the EECP's subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers in Phase I. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified catalyst/wax separation as a potential technical and economic risk. To mitigate risks to the proposed EECP concept, Phase II RD&T included tests for secondary catalyst/wax separation systems as part of Task 2.3--Catalyst/Wax Separation. The LCI Scepter{reg_sign} Microfiltration system was determined to be best suited for producing a filtrate that met the EECP secondary catalyst/wax separation standards of producing F-T wax containing less than10 ppmw solids. As part of task 2.3, micro-filtration removal efficiencies and production rates for two FT feeds, Rentech Inc. bubble column reactor (BCR) product and LaPorte Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) product, were evaluated. Based on comparisons between the performances of these two materials, the more readily available LaPorte AFDU material was judged an acceptable analog to the BCR material that would be produced in a larger-scale F-T synthesis. The present test was initiated to obtain data in an extended range of concentration for use in the scale-up design of the secondary catalyst/wax separation system that would be operating at the EECP capacity.

John Anderson; Mark Anselmo; Earl Berry; Mark Bohn; Ming He; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit Shah; Donald Todd; Robert Schavey

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

462

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using petroleum coke and ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC. (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ChevronTexaco is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems were assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified F-T reactor scale-up as a potential technical risk. The objective of Task 2.3 was to confirm engineering models that allow scale-up to commercial slurry phase bubble column (SPBC) reactors operating in the churn-turbulent flow regime. In developmental work outside the scope of this project, historical data, literature references, and a scale-up from a 1 1/2-in. (3.8 cm) to 6-ft (1.8 m) SPBC reactor have been reviewed. This review formed the background for developing scale-up models for a SPBC reactor operating in the churn-turbulent flow regime. The necessary fundamental physical parameters have been measured and incorporated into the mathematical catalyst/kinetic model developed from the SPBC and CSTR work outside the scope of this EECP project. The mathematical catalyst/kinetic model was used to compare to experimental data obtained at Rentech during the EECP Fischer-Tropsch Confirmation Run (Task 2.1; reported separately). The prediction of carbon monoxide (CO) conversion as a function of days on stream compares quite closely to the experimental data.

Randy Roberts

2003-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

463

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I the team identified the integration of the water produced in the F-T synthesis section with the gasification section as an area of potential synergy. By utilizing the F-T water in the petroleum coke slurry for the gasifier, the EECP can eliminate a potential waste stream and reduce capital costs. There is a low technical risk for this synergy, however, the economic risk, particularly in regards to the water, can be high. The economic costs include the costs of treating the water to meet the locally applicable environmental standards. This option may require expensive chemicals and treatment facilities. EECP Phase II included tests conducted to confirm the viability of integrating F-T water in the slurry feed for the gasifier. Testing conducted at ChevronTexaco's Montebello Technology Center (MTC) included preparing slurries made using petroleum coke with F-T water collected at the LaPorte Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The work included bench scale tests to determine the slurry ability of the petroleum coke and F-T water. The results of the tests show that F-T water does not adversely affect slurries for the gasifier. There are a few cases where in fact the addition of F-T water caused favorable changes in viscosity of the slurries. This RD&T task was executed in Phase II and results are reported herein.

Abdalla H. Ali; Raj Kamarthi; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah

2003-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

464

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1999 U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) award to Texaco Energy Systems Inc. (presently Texaco Energy Systems LLC, a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco) was made to provide a Preliminary Engineering Design of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP). Since the award presentation, work has been undertaken to achieve an economical concept design that makes strides toward the DOE Vision 21 goal. The objective of the EECP is to convert coal and/or petroleum coke to electric power plus transportation fuels, chemicals and useful utilities such as steam. The use of petroleum coke was added as a fuel to reduce the cost of feedstock and also to increase the probability of commercial implementation of the EECP concept. This objective has been pursued in a three phase effort through the partnership of the DOE with prime contractor Texaco Energy Systems LLC and subcontractors General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown and Root (KBR). ChevronTexaco is providing gasification technology and Rentech's Fischer-Tropsch technology that has been developed for non-natural gas feed sources. GE is providing gas turbine technology for the combustion of low energy content gas. Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering to integrate the facility. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. Phase I Preliminary Concept Report was completed in 2000. The Phase I Preliminary Concept Report was prepared based on making assumptions for the basis of design for various technologies that are part of the EECP concept. The Phase I Preliminary Concept Report was approved by the DOE in May 2001. The Phase I work identified technical and economic risks and critical research, development, and testing that would improve the probability of the technical and economic success of the EECP. The Project Management Plan (Task 1) for Phase II was approved by the DOE in 2001. The results of RD&T efforts for Phase II are expected to improve the quality of assumptions made in Phase I for basis of design for the EECP concept. The RD&T work plan (Task 2 and 3) for Phase II has been completed. As the RD&T work conducted during Phase II concluded, it became evident that sufficient, but not necessarily complete, technical information and data would be available to begin Phase III - Basic Engineering Design. Also due to the merger of Chevron and Texaco, the proposed refinery site for the EECP was not available. It became apparent that some additional technical development work would be needed to correctly apply the technology at a specific site. The objective of Task 4 of Phase II is to update the concept basis of design produced during Phase I. As part of this task, items that will require design basis changes and are not site dependent have been identified. The team has qualitatively identified the efforts to incorporate the impacts of changes on EECP concept. The design basis has been modified to incorporate those changes. The design basis changes for those components of EECP that are site and feedstock dependent will be done as part of Phase III, once the site has been selected.

Charles Benham; Mark Bohn; John Anderson; Earl Berry; Fred Brent; Ming He; Randy Roberts; Lalit Shah; Marjan Roos

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Waste Treatment Plant - 12508  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will immobilize millions of gallons of Hanford's tank waste into solid glass using a proven technology called vitrification. The vitrification process will turn the waste into a stable glass form that is safe for long-term storage. Our discussion of the WTP will include a description of the ongoing design and construction of this large, complex, first-of-a-kind project. The concept for the operation of the WTP is to separate high-level and low-activity waste fractions, and immobilize those fractions in glass using vitrification. The WTP includes four major nuclear facilities and various support facilities. Waste from the Tank Farms is first pumped to the Pretreatment Facility at the WTP through an underground pipe-in-pipe system. When construction is complete, the Pretreatment Facility will be 12 stories high, 540 feet long and 215 feet wide, making it the largest of the four major nuclear facilities that compose the WTP. The total size of this facility will be more than 490,000 square feet. More than 8.2 million craft hours are required to construct this facility. Currently, the Pretreatment Facility is 51 percent complete. At the Pretreatment Facility the waste is pumped to the interior waste feed receipt vessels. Each of these four vessels is 55-feet tall and has a 375,000 gallon capacity, which makes them the largest vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. These vessels contain a series of internal pulse-jet mixers to keep incoming waste properly mixed. The vessels are inside the black-cell areas, completely enclosed behind thick steel-laced, high strength concrete walls. The black cells are designed to be maintenance free with no moving parts. Once hot operations commence the black-cell area will be inaccessible. Surrounded by black cells, is the 'hot cell canyon'. The hot cell contains all the moving and replaceable components to remove solids and extract liquids. In this area, there is ultrafiltration equipment, cesium-ion exchange columns, evaporator boilers and recirculation pumps, and various mechanical process pumps for transferring process fluids. During the first phase of pretreatment, the waste will be concentrated using an evaporation process. Solids will be filtered out, and the remaining soluble, highly radioactive isotopes will be removed using an ion-exchange process. The high-level solids will be sent to the High-Level Waste (HLW) Vitrification Facility, and the low activity liquids will be sent to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility for further processing. The high-level waste will be transferred via underground pipes to the HLW Facility from the Pretreatment Facility. The waste first arrives at the wet cell, which rests inside a black-cell area. The pretreated waste is transferred through shielded pipes into a series of melter preparation and feed vessels before reaching the melters. Liquids from various facility processes also return to the wet cell for interim storage before recycling back to the Pretreatment Facility. (authors)

Harp, Benton; Olds, Erik [US DOE (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Method of identifying plant pathogen tolerance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for identifying a plant having disease tolerance comprising administering to a plant an inhibitory amount of ethylene and screening for ethylene insensitivity, thereby identifying a disease tolerant plant, is described. Plants identified by the foregoing process are also described. 7 figs.

Ecker, J.R.; Staskawicz, B.J.; Bent, A.F.; Innes, R.W.

1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

467

Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant capabilities and resources at NREL.

Not Available

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Pilot Plant Options for the MFE Roadmap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pilot Plant Options for the MFE Roadmap Hutch Neilson Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory International Workshop MFE Roadmapping for the ITER Era Princeton, NJ 10 September 2011 #12;Outline 2 · Pilot plant ­ mission, motivation, and description. · Role of pilot plants on the Roadmap to Demo. Pilot Plant

469

PHYSICAL PLANT OPERATING POLICY AND PROCEDURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in this technology. REVIEW This Physical Plant Operating Policy/Procedure (PP/OP) will be reviewed in March of each Plant. Physical Plant's intention is to provide each employee reasonable access to the technology Plant technology will be a prime consideration. Requests for non-standard products will not be approved

Gelfond, Michael

470

HYDROCARBONS FROM PLANTS: ANALYTICAL METHODS AND OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

petrochemical industry,· The methanol residue is substantially all fermentable to ethanol. There are other plants

Calvin, Melvin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

The Water Circuit of the Plants - Do Plants have Hearts ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is a correspondence between the circulation of blood in all higher animals and the circulation of sap in all higher plants - up to heights h of 140 m - through the xylem and phloem vessels. Plants suck in water from the soil, osmotically through the roothair zone, and subsequently lift it osmotically again, and by capillary suction (via their buds, leaves, and fruits) into their crowns. In between happens a reverse osmosis - the endodermis jump - realized by two layers of subcellular mechanical pumps in the endodermis walls which are powered by ATP, or in addition by two analogous layers of such pumps in the exodermis. The thus established root pressure helps forcing the absorbed ground water upward, through the whole plant, and often out again, in the form of guttation, or exudation.

Wolfgang Kundt; Eva Gruber

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

472

Plants having modified response to ethylene  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype. 67 figs.

Meyerowitz, E.M.; Chang, C.; Bleecker, A.B.

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

473

Rangeland -- Plant responses to elevated CO sub 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several broad conclusions which can be drawn from the work that was accomplished during the first 3-year phase of the study is described. In prairie ecosystems dominated by C{sub 4} grasses, it is likely that elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} will increase ecosystem level productivity, with a greater increase in belowground productivity. The increased productivity will primarily result from increased water use efficiency due to the anti-transpirant action of CO{sub 2}. Fumigation chambers are directly confounded with elevated CO{sub 2} effects, in that both reduce evapotranspiration. The reduced evapotranspiration of the fumigation chamber is primarily through reduced wind speeds and reduced radiation. In very dry years, fumigation chamber effects are negligible, but in years with normal precipitation, chamber effects and elevated CO{sub 2} effects are essentially equal with respect to reduced evapotranspiration effects. Increased production under elevated CO{sub 2} results in reduced nitrogen concentration in the herbage and increased fiber concentrations. Consequently, digestibility of the herbage is reduced, and microbial degradation of surface litter and soil organic matter is slowed. On the negative side, ruminant productivity will likely be reduced substantially, but increased carbon storage in the soil may buffer against future rise in atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Tallgrass prairie will not likely change greatly in botanical composition, since the C{sub 4} dominants responded to elevated CO{sub 2} more than the C{sub 3} subdominants.

Owensby, C.E.; Coyne, P.I.; Ham, J.M.; Parton, W.; Rice, C.; Auen, L.M.; Adam, N.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

State power plant productivity programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The findings of a working group formed to review the status of efforts by utilities and utility regulators to increase the availability and reliability of generating units are presented. Representatives from nine state regulatory agencies, NRRI, and DOE, participated on the Working Group. The Federal government has been working cooperatively with utilities, utility organizations, and with regulators to encourage and facilitate improvements in power plant productivity. Cooperative projects undertaken with regulatory and energy commissions in California, Illinois, New York, Ohio, Texas, North Carolina and Mighigan are described. Following initiation of these cooperative projects, DOE funded a survey to determine which states were explicitly addressing power plant productivity through the regulatory process. The Working Group was formed following completion of this survey. The Working Group emphasized the need for those power plant productivity improvements which are cost effective. The cost effectiveness of proposed availability improvement projects should be determined within the context of opportunities for operating and capital improvements available to an entire utility. The Working Group also identified the need for: allowing for plant designs that have a higher construction cost, but are also more reliable; allowing for recovery and reducing recovery lags for productivity-related capital expenditures; identifying and reducing disincentives in the regulatory process; ascertaining that utilities have sufficient money available to undertake timely maintenance; and support of EPRI and NERC to develop a relevant and accurate national data base. The DOE views these as extremely important aspects of any regulatory program to improve power plant productivity.

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Plant Science Graduates Spring 2011 Bachelor of Science in Plant Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plant Science Graduates Spring 2011 Bachelor of Science in Plant Sciences Joshua Paul Baker, Old Dale Wallace, Centerville Master of Science Reginald Jason Millwood, Plant Sciences Kara Lee Warwick, Plant Sciences Undergraduate Degrees, Summer Term 2011 Henry Joseph Cope, III, Plant Sciences David

Tennessee, University of

476

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems were assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified petroleum coke characteristics as a potential technical risk. The composition of petroleum coke varies from one refinery to another. Petroleum coke characteristics are a function of the crude oil slate available at the refinery and the coker operating parameters. The specific petroleum coke characteristics at a refinery affect the design of the Gasification and Acid Gas Removal (AGR) subsystems. Knowing the petroleum coke composition provides the necessary data to proceed to the EECP Phase III engineering design of the gasification process. Based on ChevronTexaco's experience, the EECP team ranked the technical, economic, and overall risks of the petroleum coke composition related to the gasification subsystem as low. In Phase I of the EECP Project, the Motiva Port Arthur Refinery had been identified as the potential EECP site. As a result of the merger between Texaco and Chevron in October 2001, Texaco was required to sell its interest in the Motiva Enterprises LLC joint venture to Shell Oil Company and Saudi Refining Inc. To assess the possible impact of moving the proposed EECP host site to a ChevronTexaco refinery, samples of petroleum coke from two ChevronTexaco refineries were sent to MTC for bench-scale testing. The results of the analysis of these samples were compared to the Phase I EECP Gasification Design Basis developed for Motiva's Port Arthur Refinery. The analysis confirms that if the proposed EECP is moved to a new refinery site, the Phase I EECP Gasification Design Basis would have to be updated. The lower sulfur content of the two samples from the ChevronTexaco refineries indicates that if one of these sites were selected, the Sulfur Recovery Unit (SRU) might be sized smaller than the current EECP design. This would reduce the capital expense of the SRU. Additionally, both ChevronTexaco samples have a higher hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio than the Motiva Port Arthur petroleum coke. The higher hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio could give a slightly higher F-T products yield from the F-T Synthesis Reactor. However, the EECP Gasification Design Basis can not be updated until the site for the proposed EECP site is finalized. Until the site is finalized, the feedstock (petroleum coke) characteristics are a low risk to the EECP project.

Abdalla H. Ali; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah

2003-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

477

Assessment of the Species Composition, Densities, and Distribution of Native Freshwater Mussels along the Benton County Shoreline of the Hanford Reach, Columbia River, 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Reach of the Columbia River is the last unimpounded section of the river and contains substrate characteristics (cobble, gravel, sand/silt) suitable for many of the native freshwater mussels known to exist in the Pacific Northwest. Information concerning the native mussel species composition, densities, and distributions in the mainstem of the Columbia River is limited. Under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted an assessment of the near-shore habitat on the Hanford Reach. Surveys conducted in 2004 as part of the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance project documented several species of native mussels inhabiting the near-shore habitat of the Hanford Reach. Findings reported here may be useful to resource biologists, ecologists, and DOE-RL to determine possible negative impacts to native mussels from ongoing near-shore remediation activities associated with Hanford Site cleanup. The objective of this study was to provide an initial assessment of the species composition, densities, and distribution of the freshwater mussels (Margaritiferidae and Unionidae families) that exist in the Hanford Reach. Researchers observed and measured 201 live native mussel specimens. Mussel density estimated from these surveys is summarized in this report with respect to near-shore habitat characteristics including substrate size, substrate embeddedness, relative abundance of aquatic vegetation, and large-scale geomorphic/hydrologic characteristics of the Hanford Reach.

Mueller, Robert P.; Tiller, Brett L.; Bleich, Matthew D.; Turner, Gerald; Welch, Ian D.

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

478

Ecology and Greater Prairie-Chicken  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mortality and Competition _______________ 5 Wind Power Generation ___________________________ 5 Habitat

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

479

Prairie Creek Branch Public Library, Dallas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? intelligent landscaping ? efficient MEP systems ? 53 well geothermal / heat pump system ? greywater recapture and reuse ? 7.7 kw photovoltaic array key sustainability overview - energy and water ? compliance with City of Dallas iSWM program ? raised...

Meckfessel, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

ARM - Who is PI Prairie Dog?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre the Effects of Global Warming? Outreach Home Outreach

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plants" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Prairie Winds ND I | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru:Job CorpPowerVerde IncStar (07) Wind FarmND I

482

Prairie Winds Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru:Job CorpPowerVerde IncStar (07) Wind FarmND

483

Prairie City Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug Power IncPowder River EnergyCubePractical ActionCity Biomass

484

Prairie Creek Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug Power IncPowder River EnergyCubePractical

485

Prairie Power, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug Power IncPowder River EnergyCubePracticalPower, Inc Place:

486

Prairie Power, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug Power IncPowder River EnergyCubePracticalPower, Inc

487

Prairie Wind Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug Power IncPowder River EnergyCubePracticalPower,Wind Energy

488

Press Pass - Press Release - prairie quadrat study  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for medicalSecurityPresident'sCongressman Bill6 Aug.7-11

489

Power plants development in Romania  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Romanian PV research program initiated in 1980 has as its aim the development of the Romanian own PV network from solar cells production to demonstration projects and commercial applications. Concerning the PV grid connected systems the Romanian research program is financed by the Romanian Ministry for Research and Technology. Setting out the main objectives and the related stages of this project, in the paper are presented aspects concerning the plant configuration, its component characteristics and preliminary achieved results. The aspects which are going to be developed in the following stages of the grid-connected PV plant implementation in Romania are also underlined.

Tanasescu, F.T. [Ministry of Research and Technology, Bucharest (Romania); Olariu, N. [Univ. Targoviste (Romania). Energy and Environment Research Dept.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

490

Plant and Soil An International Journal on Plant-Soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on growth responses, membrane transport, stomatal function, and paradigms of ion accumulation toxicity. Ion transport . Potassium Introduction Sodium is the sixth most abundant element in earth's crust+ ) is one of the most intensely researched ions in plant biology and has attained a repu- tation for its

Kronzucker, Herbert J.

491

Balance of Plant Requirements for a Nuclear Hydrogen Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the requirements for the components and systems that support the hydrogen production portion of a 600 megawatt thermal (MWt) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). These systems, defined as the "balance-of-plant" (BOP), are essential to operate an effective hydrogen production plant. Examples of BOP items are: heat recovery and heat rejection equipment, process material transport systems (pumps, valves, piping, etc.), control systems, safety systems, waste collection and disposal systems, maintenance and repair equipment, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), electrical supply and distribution, and others. The requirements in this document are applicable to the two hydrogen production processes currently under consideration in the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. These processes are the sulfur iodide (S-I) process and the high temperature electrolysis (HTE) process. At present, the other two hydrogen production process - the hybrid sulfur-iodide electrolytic process (SE) and the calcium-bromide process (Ca-Br) -are under flow sheet development and not included in this report. While some features of the balance-of-plant requirements are common to all hydrogen production processes, some details will apply only to the specific needs of individual processes.

Bradley Ward

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Plant Population Viability and Restoration Potential for Rare Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar developments in the Mojave and Sonoran deserts of California will significantly impact plants to be affected by utilityscale solar energy Mojave Desert wildflowers in California's Mojave National the biological impacts of solar projects within the Mojave and Colorado deserts of California. Population

493

Thermodynamics -2 A cogeneration plant (plant which provides both electricity and thermal energy) executes a cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermodynamics - 2 A cogeneration plant (plant which provides both electricity and thermal energy] Determine the rate of heat addition in the steam generator. Now consider an ideal, reversible cogeneration 1 2 3 45 6 Cogeneration Plant Boundary #12;

Virginia Tech

494

Integrated Toxic Plant Management Handbook: Livestock Poisoning Plants of the Trans-Pecos Region of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photographs, plant descriptions, and symptoms of poisoning help ranchers identify toxic plants that may be harmful to their livestock in West Texas. There is also information on grazing, livestock management, and toxic plant control....

Hart, Charles R.; McGinty, Allan; Carpenter, Bruce B.

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

495

Methodology for Scaling Fusion Power Plant Availability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Normally in the U.S. fusion power plant conceptual design studies, the development of the plant availability and the plant capital and operating costs makes the implicit assumption that the plant is a 10th of a kind fusion power plant. This is in keeping with the DOE guidelines published in the 1970s, the PNL report1, "Fusion Reactor Design Studies - Standard Accounts for Cost Estimates. This assumption specifically defines the level of the industry and technology maturity and eliminates the need to define the necessary research and development efforts and costs to construct a one of a kind or the first of a kind power plant. It also assumes all the "teething" problems have been solved and the plant can operate in the manner intended. The plant availability analysis assumes all maintenance actions have been refined and optimized by the operation of the prior nine or so plants. The actions are defined to be as quick and efficient as possible. This study will present a methodology to enable estimation of the availability of the one of a kind (one OAK) plant or first of a kind (1st OAK) plant. To clarify, one of the OAK facilities might be the pilot plant or the demo plant that is prototypical of the next generation power plant, but it is not a full-scale fusion power plant with all fully validated "mature" subsystems. The first OAK facility is truly the first commercial plant of a common design that represents the next generation plant design. However, its subsystems, maintenance equipment and procedures will continue to be refined to achieve the goals for the 10th OAK power plant.

Lester M. Waganer

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

496

Design and simulation of a plant control system for a GCFR demonstration plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A plant control system is being designed for a 300 MW(e) Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) demonstration plant. Control analysis is being performed as an integral part of the plant design process to ensure that control requirements are satisfied as the plant design evolves. Plant models and simulations are being developed to generate information necessary to further define control system requirements for subsequent plant design iterations.

Estrine, E.A.; Greiner, H.G.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Plant Level Energy Performance Benchmarking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(# of Employees) + C3 x Ln(Degree Days) + C 4 x (Ice Cream) + Csx (Packaged) Ln(E$/HR) = Co + C 1 x Ln(Effective Shipment Value) + C 2 x Ln(Degree Days) + C 3 x Ln(Plant Hours} + C 4 x (Ice Cream) + C s x (Packaged) Table-S. E$OR and E$/HR Regression...

Hicks, T. W.

498

Systemic Signalling in Plant Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

develop continuously throughout their life cycle, constantly initiating new or- gans. They doSystemic Signalling in Plant Development David Jackson, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring to the production of systemic signals that control the development of distant organs and tissues. Introduction

Jackson, David

499

Ram Village South Chiller Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Winston Ram Village South Chiller Plant Dental Craige Campus Alumni Swain Stacy Thermal Student Planetarium Ackland Art Museum Research Chiller D 114 Chase Ave. APCF- Grounds Medical Morehead Stalling- Evans Sports Medicine Center Cobb Hall Ernie School Old Hospital Chiller Hanes Art Coker Wilson Battle

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

500

Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abdel-Aal, Radwan E. - Computer Engineering Department, King Fahd University of...