National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for native prairie plant

  1. A FAUNISTIC SURVEY OF NATIVE BEES IN THE MISSISSIPPI BLACK BELT PRAIRIE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    A FAUNISTIC SURVEY OF NATIVE BEES IN THE MISSISSIPPI BLACK BELT PRAIRIE SURVEY OF NATIVE BEES IN THE MISSISSIPPI BLACK BELT PRAIRIE By Beverly A. McGee Smith of Study: A FAUNISTIC SURVEY OF NATIVE BEES IN THE MISSISSIPPI BLACK BELT

  2. Valuable Plants Native to Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parks, Harris Braley

    1937-01-01

    . WALTON, President FIGURE 1: FLORAL AREAS OF TEXAS 1. Pine Forest Region 4. Blackland Prairie 2. Gulf Coast Prairie 4a. Western Hardwood Forest 3. Rrush Country 4b. Eastern Hardwood Forest 5. Edwards Plateau 6. Trans-Pecos Region 7. High Plains 7a..., this information will be supplied whenever it is at hand. e Adiant~cm Capillus-ueneri's L. Venus Hair Fern. A delicate fern with shiny black stems, light green leaflets; native to sections 7A, 4A, 4, 4B, 1, 2, 5, and will grow in the remainder of the floral...

  3. Native Tallgrass Prairie Remnants as "Living Museums": Landscape Context, Metacommunity Dynamics, and Private Management Practices of Native Prairie Hay Meadows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilroy Mollmann, Hayley A.

    2010-08-27

    In fragmented tallgrass prairie remnants within eastern Kansas, smaller patch area, greater isolation, and poorer matrix quality are predicted to result in (1) decreased species richness, (2) decreased site `quality,' and ...

  4. Native Plants and PollinatorsNative Plants and PollinatorsNative Plants and PollinatorsNative Plants and Pollinators of Loney Meadowof Loney Meadowof Loney Meadowof Loney Meadow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Native Plants and PollinatorsNative Plants and PollinatorsNative Plants and PollinatorsNative Plants and Pollinators of Loney Meadowof Loney Meadowof Loney Meadowof Loney Meadow A walk with Dr.footwear. No dogs please.footwear. No dogs please. For more information please call: Kathy Van Zuuk, PlantFor more

  5. Final Report for DOE Project: Climate Effects on Plant Range Distributions and Community Structure of Pacific Northwest Prairies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridgham, Scott D.; Johnson, Bart

    2013-09-26

    Pacific Northwest (PNW) prairies are an imperiled ecosystem that contain a large number of plant species with high fidelity to this habitat. The few remaining high-quality PNW prairies harbor a number of sensitive, rare, and endangered plant species that may be further at-risk with climate change. Thus, PNW prairies are an excellent model system to examine how climate change will affect the distribution of native plant species in grassland sites. Our experimental objectives were to determine: (i) how climate change will affect the range distribution of native plant species; (ii) what life history stages are most sensitive to climate change in a group of key indicator native species; (iii) the robustness of current restoration techniques and suites of species to changing climate, and in particular, the relative competitiveness of native species versus exotic invasive species; and (iv) the effects of climate change on carbon and nutrient cycling and soil-microbial-plant feedbacks. We addressed these objectives by experimentally increasing temperature 2.5 to 3.0 ºC above ambient with overhead infrared lamps and increasing wet-season precipitation by 20% above ambient in three upland prairie sites in central-western Washington, central-western Oregon, and southwestern Oregon from fall 2010 through 2012. Additional precipitation was applied within 2 weeks of when it fell so precipitation intensity was increased, particularly during the winter rainy season but with minimal additions during the summer dry season. These three sites also represent a 520-km natural climate gradient of increasing degree of severity of Mediterranean climate from north to south. After removing the extant vegetation, we planted a diverse suite of 12 native species that have their northern range limit someplace within the PNW in each experimental plot. An additional 20 more wide-spread native species were also planted into each plot. We found that recruitment of plant species within their ranges was negatively impacted by increased temperatures, but for species planted north of their current range, increased temperature was neutral. However, for surviving plants climate treatments and site-specific factors (e.g., nutrient availability) were the strongest predictors of plant growth and seed set. When recruitment and plant growth are considered together, increased temperatures are negative within a species current range but beyond this range they become positive. Germination was the most critical stage for plant response across all sites and climate treatments. Our results underscore the importance of including plant vital rates into models that are examining climate change effects on plant ranges. Warming altered plant community composition, decreased diversity, and increased total cover, with warmed northern communities over time becoming more like ambient communities further south. In particular, warming increased the cover of annual introduced species, suggesting that the observed biogeographic pattern of increasing invasion by this plant functional group in US West Coast prairies as one moves further south is at least in part due to climate. Our results suggest that with the projected increase in drought severity with climate change, Pacific Northwest prairies may face an increase of invasion by annuals, similar to what has been observed in California, resulting in novel species assemblages and shifts in functional composition, which in turn may alter ecosystem function. Warming generally increased nutrient availability and plant productivity across all sites. The seasonality of soil respiration responses to heating were strongly dependent on the Mediterranean climate gradient in the PNW, with heating responses being generally positive during periods of adequate soil moisture and becoming neutral to negative during periods of low soil moisture. The asynchrony between temperature and precipitation may make soils less sensitive to warming. Precipitation effects were minimal for all measured responses indicating the importance of increased temperature

  6. AVIAN NEST DENSITIES AND SUCCESS IN INTRODUCED COOL-SEASON GRASS-LEGUME PLANTINGS VERSUS WARM-SEASON NATIVE GRASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of prairie and idle grassland. Studies indicate that warm-season native grass plantings (WSN) generally provide good winter cover. Recently a trend favoring WSN has emerged, but limited information exists on nesting density and success of cool-season grass-legume plantings (dense nesting cover [DNC]) versus WSN

  7. Alien Species and Evolution: The Evolutionary Ecology of Exotic Plants, Animals, Microbes and Interacting Native Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nehrbass, Nana

    2005-01-01

    of Exotic Plants, Animals, Microbes and Interacting Nativeof Exotic Plants, Animals, Microbes, and Interacting Native

  8. Vegetation dynamics of a native haymeadow, a grazed meadow, and an oldfield within the San Antonio Prairie of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hightower, Terry Paul

    1987-01-01

    rcl es represent position of the community within the ordination. 8 ~Sti a leucotricha (a) and Diodia tricocca (b) foliar cover across 6 sample dates for the non-defoliated and defoliated samples within the oldfield, grazed meadow and haymeadow... of the Fort Worth Prairie. The prairie was classified as a grazing disclimax, with S~ti a leucotricha and Bothriochloa saccharoides the major dominants. 5 sion in a g I d occ rr d h S~chizach ri s~i 1 re sed and ecological retrogression was indicated...

  9. Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    and absorb carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas associated with global warming. Wetland plants improve water quality by remov- ing fertilizers such as nitrogen and phosphorus and, by doing so, help control algal in Florida and spread extensively into natural areas. Non-native plants that spread into natural areas

  10. Oklahoma Native Plant Record Volume 11, December 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Michael W.

    Oklahoma Native Plant Record Volume 11, December 2011 Linneman, J. S., et al. 43 THE EFFECTS OF REMOVAL OF JUNIPERUS VIRGINIANA L. TREES AND LITTER FROM A CENTRAL OKLAHOMA GRASSLAND Jerad S. Linneman1 1 153, 5D-06G mike.palmer@okstate.edu Riverdale, MD 20737-1228 2 Oklahoma State University Department

  11. Outdoor Water Use Conservation through Native Plants Shapiro, Chan, Carson, Tayag Outdoor Water Use Conservation through Native Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    Outdoor Water Use Conservation through Native Plants Shapiro, Chan, Carson, Tayag Outdoor Water Use, the front lawn is one of the greatest consumers of outdoor water use. Because of population growth, water is becoming scarcer every year and thus it is important to find ways to change our water consumption so

  12. Showdown on the PrairieShowdown on the Prairie: Use of bison and cattle to restore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Showdown on the PrairieShowdown on the Prairie: Use of bison and cattle to restore native ­ Current perspectives of grazing ­ Grazing effects Diff b t bi d ttl· Differences between bison and cattle and sedges Cattle Eat grasses and forbs and sedges Foraging differencesForaging differences Bison tend

  13. Proceedings of the Sudden Oak Death Third Science Symposium Comparative Susceptibility of Plants Native

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @science.oregonstate.edu. #12;GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW-GTR-214 384 Some knowledge of the relative susceptibility of eastern native plant species would be extremely useful to inspectors, and could be a basis for management

  14. Field trials identify more native plants suited to urban landscaping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, S. Karrie; Oki, Lorence R

    2008-01-01

    developed All-Stars plant lists to help visitors identifyat arboretum plant sales. From the All-Stars list as well as

  15. Strategies for Restoring Native Riparian Understory Plants Along the Sacramento River: Timing, Shade, Non-Native Control, and Planting Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Prairie L.; Holl, Karen D.; Wood, David M.

    2011-01-01

    riparian restoration on the Sacramento River. San Franciscoforest on the middle Sacramento River [Masters]. Chico (CA):Understory Plants Along the Sacramento River: Timing, Shade,

  16. Sept/Oct 2008 ListProc Newsletter CSBA 2008 Convention Field Trials of Native Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Sept/Oct 2008 ________________________________________________________________________________ ListProc Newsletter CSBA 2008 Convention Field Trials of Native Plants Apiary Board Active 2009 4-H Essay topic Bee the list, then you do the same thing, but instead of sub, you use unsub or signoff, then the name

  17. Scott Valley Native Plants and Pollinators Walk You are invited to join botanists and biologists for two easy, short hikes ob-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Scott Valley Native Plants and Pollinators Walk You are invited to join botanists and biologists for two easy, short hikes ob- serving hummingbirds, butterflies, bees and native plants that occur in high in pollinating native plants in our mountains. We will also discuss pollinator life histories, the state of polli

  18. Interactive effects of global warming and `global worming' on the initial establishment of native and exotic herbaceous plant species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    1 Interactive effects of global warming and `global worming' on the initial establishment of native, epigeic, or all three together) and 4°C warming on soil water content, litter turnover and seedling establishment of four native and four exotic herbaceous plant species. Warming and worming exerted independent

  19. SYNTHESIS A meta-analysis of impacts of alien vs. native plants on pollinator visitation and reproductive success of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traveset, Anna

    REVIEW AND SYNTHESIS A meta-analysis of impacts of alien vs. native plants on pollinator visitation@uib.es Abstract Alien plant species can alter pollinator visitation and, in turn, the sexual reproduction of 40 studies, we evaluated the effect of alien neighbour plant species (aliens) on visitation

  20. Argonne Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Data from Batavia Prairie and Agricultural Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Matamala, Roser [ANL; Jastrow, Julie D.; Lesht, Barry [ANL; Cook, David [ANL; Pekour, Mikhail [ANL; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A. [University of Illinois at Chicago

    Carbon dioxide fluxes and stocks in terrestrial ecosystems are key measurements needed to constrain quantification of regional carbon sinks and sources and the mechanisms controlling them. This information is required to produce a sound carbon budget for North America. This project examines CO2 and energy fluxes from agricultural land and from restored tallgrass prairie to compare their carbon sequestration potentials. The study integrates eddy covariance measurements with biometric measurements of plant and soil carbon stocks for two systems in northeastern Illinois: 1) long-term cultivated land in corn-soybean rotation with conventional tillage, and 2) a 15 year-old restored prairie that represents a long-term application of CRP conversion of cultivated land to native vegetation. The study contributes to the North American Carbon Program (NACP) by providing information on the magnitude and distribution of carbon stocks and the processes that control carbon dynamics in cultivated and CRP-restored land in the Midwest. The prairie site has been functioning since October 2004 and the agricultural site since July 2005. (From http://www.atmos.anl.gov/ FERMI/index.html)

  1. JEPSON PRAIRIE Self Guided Nature Trail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    . Mounds emerge from the prairie like islands with their tops fringed with grasses that sway and rustle of October and March. The cool moist winter and spring are followed by summer heat and drought the plants to flower and ripen their seed before the heat and drought of summer. The animal residents also

  2. Native Plant Uptake Model for Radioactive Waste Disposal Areas at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROWN,THERESA J.; WIRTH,SHARON

    1999-09-01

    This report defines and defends the basic framework, methodology, and associated input parameters for modeling plant uptake of radionuclides for use in Performance Assessment (PA) activities of Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). PAs are used to help determine whether waste disposal configurations meet applicable regulatory standards for the protection of human health, the environment, or both. Plants adapted to the arid climate of the NTS are able to rapidly capture infiltrating moisture. In addition to capturing soil moisture, plant roots absorb nutrients, minerals, and heavy metals, transporting them within the plant to the above-ground biomass. In this fashion, plant uptake affects the movement of radionuclides. The plant uptake model presented reflects rooting characteristics important to plant uptake, biomass turnover rates, and the ability of plants to uptake radionuclides from the soil. Parameters are provided for modeling plant uptake and estimating surface contaminant flux due to plant uptake under both current and potential future climate conditions with increased effective soil moisture. The term ''effective moisture'' is used throughout this report to indicate the soil moisture that is available to plants and is intended to be inclusive of all the variables that control soil moisture at a site (e.g., precipitation, temperature, soil texture, and soil chemistry). Effective moisture is a concept used to simplify a number of complex, interrelated soil processes for which there are too little data to model actual plant available moisture. The PA simulates both the flux of radionuclides across the land surface and the potential dose to humans from that flux. Surface flux is modeled here as the amount of soil contamination that is transferred from the soil by roots and incorporated into aboveground biomass. Movement of contaminants to the surface is the only transport mechanism evaluated with the model presented here. Parameters necessary for estimating surface contaminant flux due to native plants expected to inhabit the NTS RWMSS are developed in this report. The model is specific to the plant communities found at the NTS and is designed for both short-term (<1,000 years) and long-term (>1,000 years) modeling efforts. While the model has been crafted for general applicability to any NTS PA, the key radionuclides considered are limited to the transuranic (TRU) wastes disposed of at the NTS.

  3. Two decades of prairie restoration at Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betz, R.F.; Lootens, R.J.; Becker, M.K.

    1996-12-31

    Successional Restoration is the method being used to restore the prairie at Fermilab on the former agricultural fields. This involves an initial planting, using aggressive species that have wide ecological tolerances which will grow well on abandoned agricultural fields. Collectively, these species are designated as the prairie matrix. The species used for this prairie matrix compete with and eventually eliminate most weedy species. They also provide an adequate fuel load capable of sustaining a fire within a few years after a site has been initially planted. Associated changes in the biological and physical structure of the soil help prepare the way for the successful introduction of plants of the later successional species. Only after the species of the prairie matrix are well established, is the species diversity increased by introducing species with narrower ecological tolerances. These species are thus characteristic of the later successional stages.

  4. HOW DO INVASIVE EXOTIC PLANTS AFFECT NATIVE PLANTS, BIRDS AND MAMMALS IN GREENWAYS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hess, George

    to recognize that only a small percentage of exotic species are invasive. Many exotic plants that are featured of all, they are located primarily in urban areas, where many gardens include some of the most invasive species. These gardens provide seeds of exotics that can enter the greenway by being blown in by wind

  5. Interactive effects of global warming and `global worming' on the initial establishment of native and exotic herbaceous plant species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    1121 Interactive effects of global warming and `global worming' on the initial establishment, endogeic, epigeic, or all three together) and 4°C warming on soil water content, litter turnover and seedling establishment of four native and four exotic herbaceous plant species. Warming and worming exerted

  6. Blooming Prairie Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    per technology Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Blooming Prairie Public Utilities Website http:www.SaveEnergyInBloomingPrairie.com State Minnesota Program Type...

  7. Report of Energy Efficiency Study and Metering/Utilities Profile for Electricity Deregulation at Prairie View A&M University (PVAMU) Prairie View, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Y.; Claridge, D. E.; Giebler, T.; Abushakra, B.; Turner, W. D.

    1999-01-01

    The physical plant director and staff at Prairie View A&M University (PVAMU) do a good job of maintaining PVAMU facilities and keeping expenses down. During our visit, however, we were able to identify several opportunities ...

  8. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Prairie Island

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Prairie Island" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  9. Pasture Improvement in the Gulf Coast Prairie of Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner); Stansel, R. H. (Roy Harrison); Jones, John H.

    1939-01-01

    , carpet, and Angleton grasses, California bur clover (toothed bur clover), White Dutch clover, and common lespedez ?commended for permanent pastures in the region. Adequate drair wing to control weeds, and the seeding of desirable and nuapbcu pasture... grasses and clovers in a permanent pasture, and with- stands heavy grazing. This grass is recommended in any mixture for permanent pasture in the Gulf Coast Prairie. Bahia grass, Paspalum notaturn, is a native of the West Indies and South America...

  10. Agricultural and biofuel implications of a species diversity experiment with native perennial grassland plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Agricultural and biofuel implications of a species diversity experiment with native perennial-negative biofuels. Fertilized mono- cultures of Panicum virgatum (one of the species in the Tilman et al., 2006a). An important question to now consider is whether biofuel crop breeding programs should also be initiated

  11. EPIDEMIOLOGIC TRANSITION AMONG A NATIVE AMERICAN COMMUNITY IN KANSAS DURING THE 20TH CENTURY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbett, Steve

    2014-05-31

    This dissertation is an examination of the mortality patterns of Native Americans during the 20th century, particularly the Prairie Band Potawatomi Reservation and surrounding communities in Kansas. Shifts in mortality ...

  12. SEASONALITY OF ANNUAL PLANT ESTABLISHMENT INFLUENCES THE INTERACTIONBETWEEN THE NON-NATIVE ANNUAL GRASS BROMUS MADRITENSIS SSP. RUBENS AND MOJAVE DESERT PERENNIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Competition between native and non-native species can change the composition and structure of plant communities, but in deserts the timing of non-native plant establishment can modulate their impacts to native species. In a field experiment, we varied densities of the non-native annual grass Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens around individuals of three native perennials--Larrea iridentata, Achnatherum hymenoides, and Pleuraphis rigida--in either winter or spring. Additional plots were prepared for the Same perennial species and seasons, but with a mixture of native annual species. Relative growth rates of perennial shoots (RGRs) declined with increasing Bromus biomass when Bromus that was established in winter had 2-3 mo of growth and high water use before perennial growth began. However, this high water use did not significantly reduce water potentials for the perennials, suggesting Bromus that established earlier depleted other soil resources, such as N, otherwise used by perennial plants. Spring-established Bromus had low biomass even at higher densities and did not effectively reduce RGRs, resulting in an overall lower impact to perennials than when Bromus was established in winter. Similarly, growth and reproduction of perennials with mixed annuals as neighbors did not differ from those with Bromus neighbors of equivalent biomass, but densities of these annuals did not support the high biomass necessary to reduce perennial growth. Thus, impacts of native Mojave Desert annuals to perennials are expected to be lower than those of Bromus because seed dormancy and narrow requirements for seedling survivorship produce densities and biomass lower than those achieved by Bromus. In comparing the effects of Bromus among perennial species, the impact of increased Bromus biomass on RGR was lower for Larrea than for the two perennial grasses, probably because Lurrea maintains low growth rates throughout the year, even after Bromus has completed its life cycle. This contrasts with the perennial grasses, whose phenology overlaps completely with (Achnatherum) or closely follows (Pleuraphis) that of Bromus.

  13. COMPARISON OF THE POPULATIONS OF COMMON WOOD-NYMPH BUTTERFLIES IN BURNED PRAIRIE, UNBURNED PRAIRIE AND OLD FIELD GRASSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, M.; Walton, R.

    2007-01-01

    Common wood-nymph butterfl ies are found throughout the United States and Canada. However, not much is known about how they overwinter or their preferences for particular grasses and habitats. In this study, the impact of prairie management plans on the abundance of the wood-nymph population was assessed, as well as the preference of these butterfl ies for areas with native or non-native grasses. The abundance of common wood-nymph butterfl ies was determined using Pollard walks; more common wood-nymph butterfl ies were found in the European grasses than were found in the burned and unburned prairie sites. The majority of the vegetation at each of the three sites was identifi ed and documented. Using a 1 X 3 ANOVA analysis, it was determined there were signifi cantly more butterfl ies in the European grasses than in the burned and unburned prairie sites (p < 0.0005). There was no signifi cant difference between the burned and unburned treatments of the prairie on the common wood-nymph population. A multiple variable linear regression model described the effect of temperature and wind speed on the number of observed common wood-nymph butterfl ies per hour (p = 0.026). These preliminary results need to be supplemented with future studies. Quadrat analysis of the vegetation from all three sites should be done to search for a correlation between common wood-nymph butterfl y abundance per hour and the specifi c types or quantity of vegetation at each site. The effect of vegetation height and density on the observer’s visual fi eld should also be assessed.

  14. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

    2007-12-01

    Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%–85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.

  15. SEASONAL SURVIVAL, REPRODUCTION, AND USE OF WILDFIRE AREAS BY LESSER PRAIRIE CHICKENS IN THE NORTHEASTERN TEXAS PANHANDLE 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Ryan S.

    2010-07-14

    (Artemisia filifolia) vegetation type as compared to the shinnery oak (Quercus harvardii) type (40%). I also evaluated post-burn habitat alterations and plant succession (1 year and 2 years after burning) as potential lesser prairie chicken habitat. After...

  16. Rudbeckia laciniata? (Native) 2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    Honey bees, Apis mellifera, play an important role in many ecosystems, pollinating a wide variety of native, agricultural, and exotic plants. The recent decline in the number of feral and managed honey bee colonies in North America, as well...

  17. The Prairie Naturalist 43(1/2):3844; June 2011 Corresponding author email address: carol.johnston@sdstate.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; Phragmites in unglaciated western South Dakota usually occurred on creeks and stock dams, stock dam, Prairie Coteau, Black Hills Common reed, Phragmites australis [(Cav.) Trin. ex Steud. (syn Dakota to list the non-native P. australis haplotype M as a noxious weed (South Dakota Rules §12

  18. EIS-0485: Interconnection of the Grande Prairie Wind Farm, Holt...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5: Interconnection of the Grande Prairie Wind Farm, Holt County, Nebraska EIS-0485: Interconnection of the Grande Prairie Wind Farm, Holt County, Nebraska SUMMARY DOE's Western...

  19. Building Green in Greensburg: Prairie Pointe Townhomes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Prairie Pointe Townhomes in Greensburg, Kansas.

  20. Pocahontas Prairie | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue MountainSchoolPrairie Jump to: navigation, search

  1. The Prairie- Our Heartland: Phriendly Physics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a...

  2. ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Station","Coal","Wisconsin Electric Power Co",1268 2,"Point Beach Nuclear Plant","Nuclear","NextEra Energy Point Beach LLC",1197 3,"Pleasant Prairie","Coal","Wisconsin...

  3. Extractable soil phosphorus in Blackland Prairie soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd, Robert Claude

    1995-01-01

    crop P response, evaluate crop response to P fertilizer placement and rate, and compare extractable P levels from TAEX, Bray 1, Olsen, TAEX 1, TAEX 2, and TAEX 3 in selected Blackland Prairie soils. Five field locations were established with replicated...

  4. Prairie Technologies User's Manual 1. Preface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yavuz, Deniz

    . If water gets into a system component, discontinue use of the system, turn off power, and contact Prairie Technologies. Warning Labels Used on the Ultima Multiphoton Microscopy System Warning label on beam cover and light box Warning label on interlocked components Warning label for defeated interlocks (on interlock

  5. Prairie View A&M University Whole Campus Energy Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

    1991-01-01

    Prairie View A&M University started a large scale energy management program in 1987 and 1988. This report presents an analysis of whole-campus energy consumption at the Prairie View A&M Campus where whole-campus indices were developed that normalize...

  6. South Dakota PrairieWinds Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing You the MoneySolarSound Oil Company PrairieWinds Project

  7. Fermilab Workshop for Prairie- Our Heartland: Physics Institutes (second session)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a...

  8. Fermilab Workshop for Prairie- Our Heartland: Biology Institute

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a...

  9. Fermilab Workshop for Prairie- Our Heartland: Chemistry Institutes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a...

  10. Plant and Soil 240: 213223, 2002. 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant and Soil 240: 213­223, 2002. © 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. 213 Response of soil CO2 efflux to water manipulation in a tallgrass prairie ecosystem Xiaozhong Liu1 2002 Key words: root-free soil, soil moisture, soil CO2 efflux, Tallgrass Prairie, water additions

  11. Experimental warming increases CO2 saturation in a shallow prairie pond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flanagan, Kyla M.; McCauley, Edward

    2010-01-01

    in a shallow prairie pond Kyla M. Flanagan • Edward McCauleydynamics of lakes and ponds in order to assess contributionsin a shallow prairie pond. We outline and test three

  12. Native Women's Leadership Forum

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The 11th Annual Native Women's Leadership Forum & Enduring Spirit Awards will feature keynote speakers, workshops, and education forums.

  13. Spatial variation in keystone effects: small mammal diversity associated with black-tailed prairie dog colonies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collinge, Sharon K.

    Spatial variation in keystone effects: small mammal diversity associated with black-tailed prairie composition have earned them status as a keystone species. We examined the impact of black-tailed prairie dogs the species' geographic range. We posed 2 nested hypotheses: 1) prairie dogs function as a keystone species

  14. Native Grass Community Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryon, Michael G [ORNL; Parr, Patricia Dreyer [ORNL; Cohen, Kari [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    Land managers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in East Tennessee are restoring native warm-season grasses and wildflowers to various sites across the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Some of the numerous benefits to planting native grasses and forbs include improved habitat quality for wildlife, improved aesthetic values, lower long-term maintenance costs, and compliance with Executive Order 13112 (Clinton 1999). Challenges to restoring native plants on the ORR include the need to gain experience in establishing and maintaining these communities and the potentially greater up-front costs of getting native grasses established. The goals of the native grass program are generally outlined on a fiscal-year basis. An overview of some of the issues associated with the successful and cost-effective establishment and maintenance of native grass and wildflower stands on the ORR is presented in this report.

  15. Selective broadcast of fenoxycarb bait on fire ant infested prairie: effect on native ant community 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, John Robert

    1994-01-01

    , fenoxycarb, was selectively broadcast to control the fire ant. To assess effects, ant species richness' abundance and diversity were measured in two separate experiments. In the first experiment (conducted in 1992 and 1993), ants were sampled from fire ant...

  16. Varieties of Cotton in the Red Prairies of Northwest Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinby, John Roy

    1927-01-01

    ......................................... Results in 1924 12 ......................................... ResuTts in 1925 13 .......................................... Resnlts in 1926 14 BULLETIN NO. 366 - NOVEMBER, 1927 VARIETIES OF COTTON IN THE RED PRAIRIES OF NORTH- WEST TEXAS Substation No..... ............... Durango. ................. Sunshine.. ................ Rowden.. ................. Snowflake.. ............... Summerour & Co Vernon Texas Summerour & SO; ~erno; Texas R. E. Hudson, ~uhurn, AI;. Cris Reuter, New Orleans, La. Texas Substat~on No.. 12...

  17. Vulnerability of crops and native grasses to summer drying in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Raz-Yaseef, Naama; Billesbach, Dave P.; Fischer, Marc L.; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Gunter, Stacey A.; Bradford, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2015-08-31

    The Southern Great Plains are characterized by a fine-scale mixture of different land-cover types, predominantly winter-wheat and grazed pasture, with relatively small areas of other crops, native prairie, and switchgrass. Recent droughts and predictions of increased drought in the Southern Great Plains, especially during the summer months, raise concern for these ecosystems. We measured ecosystem carbon and water fluxes with eddy-covariance systems over cultivated cropland for 10 years, and over lightly grazed prairie and new switchgrass fields for 2 years each. Growing-season precipitation showed the strongest control over net carbon uptake for all ecosystems, but with a variable effect: grassesmore »(prairie and switchgrass) needed at least 350 mm of precipitation during the growing season to become net carbon sinks, while crops needed only 100 mm. In summer, high temperatures enhanced evaporation and led to higher likelihood of dry soil conditions. Therefore, summer-growing native prairie species and switchgrass experienced more seasonal droughts than spring-growing crops. For wheat, the net reduction in carbon uptake resulted mostly from a decrease in gross primary production rather than an increase in respiration. Flux measurements suggested that management practices for crops were effective in suppressing evapotranspiration and decomposition (by harvesting and removing secondary growth), and in increasing carbon uptake (by fertilizing and conserving summer soil water). In light of future projections for wetter springs and drier and warmer summers in the Southern Great Plains, our study indicates an increased vulnerability in native ecosystems and summer crops over time.« less

  18. Multichannel Confocal User Guide Note: for more details see the Prairie user manual at http://www.prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yavuz, Deniz

    @wisc.edu) Turning on the instrument 1. 2. 3. Turn on laser launches (on the right side of the computer cart). Let turn on main power (behind the monitor) 5. Turn on the computer (open panel on from of computer tower to find the power button). 6. Turn on the power behind the microscope (on the right side) 7. Open Prairie

  19. Prairies and Savannas of Wisconsin: References Cochrane, T. S. and H. H. Iltis. 2000. Atlas of the Wisconsin prairie and savanna flora.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emshwiller, Eve

    of the Wisconsin prairie and savanna flora. Department of Natural Resources and University of Wisconsin-Madison Herbarium, Madison, Wisconsin. Available from info/EcoNatRes.Aldo> (accessed December 2005). Ladd, D.M. 1995. Tallgrass prairie wildflowers: a field guide. The Nature

  20. Native Veterans Summit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Hosted by the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, this free event is for Native veterans. All meals will be provided. The Summit includes talking circles, support meeting, veterans' benefit...

  1. Helicobacter marmotae and novel Helicobacter and Campylobacter species isolated from the livers and intestines of prairie dogs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beisele, Maike

    Prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are used to study the aetiology and prevention of gallstones because of the similarities of prairie dog and human bile gallstone composition. Epidemiological and experimental studies ...

  2. Pretty Prairie, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)Energy Technology Jump to:PresidioPrairie, Kansas: Energy

  3. Status of Plant Materials at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Jane E.

    vegetation, beach and dune plant associations, and barrier island complexes is essential to the health Nicholls State University Farm Annual Report 2010 Natural grassland ecosystems from coastal prairie, pineland forest, to coastal wetlands have experienced significant reductions in habitat over time. Expanses

  4. Prairie View A&M University Whole Campus Energy Report Update 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

    1992-01-01

    Prairie View A&M University started a large scale energy management program in 1987 and 1988. This updated report presents an analysis of whole-campus energy consumption at the Prairie View A&M Campus where whole-campus indices were developed...

  5. IMPACTS OF OIL AND NATURAL GAS ON PRAIRIE GROUSE: CURRENT KNOWLEDGE AND RESEARCH NEEDS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Jeffrey L.

    IMPACTS OF OIL AND NATURAL GAS ON PRAIRIE GROUSE: CURRENT KNOWLEDGE AND RESEARCH NEEDS1 Jeffrey L current knowledge on the effects of oil and gas development and production on prairie grouse based to impacts from oil and gas development or (ii) correlative studies evaluating cause and effect relationships

  6. A decrease of circulating CD4? T cells in Attwater's prairie chickens infected with reticuloendotheliosis virus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferro, Pamela Joyce Bloomer

    2001-01-01

    of this project was to develop a method to monitor CD4? and CD8? T cells in prairie chickens and to determine if there was an alteration in the number of circulating T cells associated with REV infection in prairie chickens. A panel of anti-chicken monoclonal...

  7. The Vascular Flora of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Osage County, Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Michael W.

    The Vascular Flora of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Osage County, Oklahoma Michael W. Palmer* Department of Botany, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-3013 ABSTRACT The 15,410 ha Tallgrass Prairie Preserve (Osage County, Oklahoma), managed by The Nature Conservancy, consists

  8. Keystone rodent interactions: prairie dogs and kangaroo rats structure the biotic composition of a desertified grassland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Ana

    Keystone rodent interactions: prairie dogs and kangaroo rats structure the biotic composition. Keystone rodent interactions: prairie dogs and kangaroo rats structure the biotic composition of a desertified grass- land. Á Ecography 29: 755Á765. Understanding the interactive effects of multiple keystone

  9. PLANT DISEASES IN SOUTH CAROLINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    INDEX OF PLANT DISEASES IN SOUTH CAROLINA James H. Blake, Ed.D. Director, Home & Garden Information to compile a list of plant diseases occurring on cultivated and native plants in South Carolina. The data or conclusive list of the diseases of plants in South Carolina. New plants as well as new plant pathogens

  10. Dell Prairie, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi: EnergyS4263135°,Delbuoy JumpDell Prairie,

  11. North Prairie, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNew Hampshire:source History ViewLittlePerry,Prairie, Wisconsin:

  12. South Dakota PrairieWinds Project Executive Summary Executive Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowing You the MoneySolarSound Oil Company PrairieWinds

  13. Eden Prairie, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the NationalDynetekofEcogeo MeiotheEcoprogettiPrairie,

  14. Assessment of lesser prairie-chicken lek density relative to landscape characteristics in Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennifer Timmer; Matthew Butler; Warren Ballard; Clint Boal; Heather Whitlaw

    2012-08-31

    My 2.5-yr Master'Â?s project accomplished the objectives of estimating lesser prairie-chicken (LPC) lek density and abundance in the Texas occupied range and modeling anthropogenic and landscape features associated with lek density by flying helicopter lek surveys for 2 field seasons and employing a line-transect distance sampling method. This project was important for several reasons. Firstly, wildlife managers and biologists have traditionally monitored LPC populations with road-based surveys that may result in biased estimates and do not provide access to privately-owned or remote property. From my aerial surveys and distance sampling, I was able to provide accurate density and abundance estimates, as well as new leks and I detected LPCs outside the occupied range. Secondly, recent research has indicated that energy development has the potential to impact LPCs through avoidance of tall structures, increased mortality from raptors perching on transmission lines, disturbance to nesting hens, and habitat loss/fragmentation. Given the potential wind energy development in the Texas Panhandle, spatial models of current anthropogenic and vegetative features (such as transmission lines, roads, and percent native grassland) influencing lek density were needed. This information provided wildlife managers and wind energy developers in Texas with guidelines for how change in landscape features could impact LPCs. Lastly, LPC populations have faced range-wide declines over the last century and they are currently listed as a candidate species under the Endangered Species Act. I was able to provide timely information on LPC populations in Texas that will be used during the listing process.

  15. Grassland carbon and nitrogen dynamics: effects of seasonal fire and clipping in a mixed-grass prairie of the southern great plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Wylie Neal

    2006-08-16

    Plant production and soil microbial biomass (SMB) in grassland ecosystems are linked by flows of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) between the two groups of organisms. In native mixed grasslands of the southern Great Plains, these cycles are strongly...

  16. From "Sea of Grass" to "Wire and Rail": Melville's Evolving Perspective on the Prairies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultz, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    , commerce, and greed explicitly brought on by Euroamericans. While Melville’s metaphorical use of prairie images in his early writings may, in Buell’s terms, appear anthropocentric, in Moby-Dick as well as in his later work, Clarel and John Marr and Other... and the mystic of the prairie landscape. In Mardi, Melville recalls that the prairie may be as still as “an August noon” (M 567); in Moby-Dick, he refers to its “placidity” (MD 335), and later in John Marr and Other Poems, he writes that “Blank stillness would...

  17. Lesser prairie-chicken demographics in Texas: survival, reproduction, and population viability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Eddie Keith

    2009-05-15

    , survival, reproduction, and population viability were lower in the shinnery oak compared to the sand sagebrush vegetation type. Lesser prairie-chicken survival differed between breeding and non-breeding periods. I estimated annual survival of lesser...

  18. RESEARCH ARTICLE Connectivity of prairie dog colonies in an altered landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collinge, Sharon K.

    experienced extensive habitat alter- ation, fragmenting populations of species such as black- tailed prairie), agriculture (Levy et al. 2010) and dams (Beneteau et al. 2009). Furthermore, landscape chan- ges can alter

  19. The effects of shinnery oak removal on lesser prairie chicken survival, movement, and reproduction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, John Peter

    2009-05-15

    The lesser prairie chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus; LPC) has declined in numbers since the late 1800s. Reasons for this decline have been attributed to habitat degradation (decreased forb and grass cover and increased woody cover...

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon in soil and shallow groundwater, Konza Prairie LTER Site, NE Kanas, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsypin, Mikhail

    2011-12-31

    Sources and seasonal trends of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in a shallow limestone aquifer were studied for 1 year at the Konza Prairie LTER (Long-Term Ecological Research) Site in northeastern Kansas, from spring 2010 to spring 2011. Annual...

  1. EIS-0485: Interconnection of the Grande Prairie Wind Farm, Holt County, Nebraska

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration prepared an EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of interconnecting the proposed Grande Prairie Wind Farm, in Holt County, near O’Neill, Nebraska, to Western’s power transmission system.

  2. Fermilab Workshop for Prairie- Our Heartland: Insects at Work in Our World

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a...

  3. Pastures to Prairies to Pools: An Update on Natural Resource Damages Settlement Projects at the Fernald Preserve - 13198

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Jane [Fernald Preserve Site Manager, DOE Office of Legacy Management, Harrison, Ohio (United States)] [Fernald Preserve Site Manager, DOE Office of Legacy Management, Harrison, Ohio (United States); Schneider, Tom [Fernald Project Manager, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, Dayton, Ohio (United States)] [Fernald Project Manager, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, Dayton, Ohio (United States); Hertel, Bill [Project Manager, S.M. Stoller Corporation, Harrison, Ohio (United States)] [Project Manager, S.M. Stoller Corporation, Harrison, Ohio (United States); Homer, John [Environmental Scientist, S.M. Stoller Corporation, Harrison, Ohio (United States)] [Environmental Scientist, S.M. Stoller Corporation, Harrison, Ohio (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The DOE Office of Legacy Management oversees implementation and monitoring of two ecological restoration projects at the Fernald Preserve, Fernald, Ohio, that are funded through a CERCLA natural resource damage settlement. Planning and implementation of on-property ecological restoration projects is one component of compensation for natural resource injury. The Paddys Run Tributary Project involves creation of vernal pool wetland habitat with adjacent forest restoration. The Triangle Area Project is a mesic tall-grass prairie establishment, similar to other efforts at the Fernald Preserve. The goal of the Fernald Natural Resource Trustees is to establish habitat for Ambystomatid salamander species, as well as grassland birds. Field implementation of these projects was completed in May 2012. Herbaceous cover and woody vegetation survival was determined in August and September 2012. Results show successful establishment of native vegetation. Additional monitoring will be needed to determine whether project goals have been met. As with the rest of the Fernald Preserve, ecological restoration has helped turn a DOE liability into a community asset. (authors)

  4. habitat (Native) 18 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    Shelby County Sewer Service and Water Supply Corporation proposes to install a waste water treatment plant and a series of sewer lines in central Shelby County, Texas. No previous investigations by professional archaeologists have been conducted...

  5. Native Village of Eyak- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Native Village of Eyak will conduct a Wind Energy Resource Assessment on Alaska Native Lands in the Cordova Region of Prince William Sound.

  6. Native American Finance Officers Association Conference | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Native American Finance Officers Association Conference Native American Finance Officers Association Conference March 5, 2012 - 5:50pm Addthis This event will take place on March...

  7. Chickaloon Native Village- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chickaloon Native Village's (CNV's) Uk'e koley Project will conduct a feasibility study to assess the potential of producing green energy to heat and power all tribally owned buildings.

  8. Yucca louisianensis (Native) 4 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    , at http://AgriLifeBookstore.org). References and further reading Bogran, C., and S. Ludwig. 2006. The agave weevil, a pest of ornamental yucca and agave. TNLA Green, July, 42. Drees, B. M., and C. Bogran. Genista caterpillar on Texas mountain laurel...Wise plants 1 Red yucca (Hesperaloe parviflora) Adam?s needle yucca (Yucca filamentosa) Soft-tip yucca (Yucca gloriosa) Pendula yucca (Yucca recurviflora) Texas sage (Leucophylum frutescens) Cactus varieties 2 Prickly pear (Opuntia sp.) Wild variety...

  9. habitat (Native) 22 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    ., Superintendent No. 2. Tyler. Smith County: No. 10. College Station, Rrazos County: P. R. Johnson, M. S., Superintendent R. M. Sherwood, M. S., In Charge **B. H. Hendrickson, B. S., Sci. in Soil Erosion L. J. McCall, Farm Superintendent "R. W. Baird, M. S...., Veterinarian Clarice Mixson, B. A.. Secretary **I". P. Mathews, D. V. M., M. S., Veterinarian M. P. Holleman, Chief Clerk Plant Pathology and Physiology.: D. R. McDonald, Asst. Chief Clerk J. J. Taubenhaus. Ph. D., Ch~ef Chester Higgs, Executive Assistant W...

  10. Effects of hay management and native species sowing on grassland community structure, biomass, and restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Bryan L.; Kindscher, Kelly; Houseman, Greg R.; Murphy, Cheryl A.

    2009-10-01

    Prairie hay meadows are important reservoirs of grassland biodiversity in the tallgrass prairie regions of the central United States and are the object of increasing attention for conservation and restoration. In addition, there is growing interest...

  11. Making the Grade? Idiom processing by native and non-native speakers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Elizabeth

    2012-11-28

    This paper is investigating the processing of idioms by native and non-native speakers. In particular, it seeks to discover whether there is a processing bias, either literally or figuratively, and whether native speakers ...

  12. Technical Note Field Test of Digital Photography Biomass Estimation Technique in Tallgrass Prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Lloyd W.

    on a linear transformation (i.e., regressing dry clipped weights against percent digital obstruction). We usedTechnical Note Field Test of Digital Photography Biomass Estimation Technique in Tallgrass Prairie or proximity to a drying oven. We tested the digital photography biomass estimation technique for measuring

  13. Summary of Oil and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse September 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Jeffrey L.

    Summary of Oil and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse September 2006 Jeffrey L. Beck Independent Avenue Grand Junction, CO 81505 Please cite as: Beck, J. L. 2006. Summary of oil and natural gas). These statistics suggest oil and gas development is rapidly increasing in the West, propelled by national

  14. Effects of wind energy development on survival of female greater prairie-chickens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Effects of wind energy development on survival of female greater prairie-chickens Virginia L of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA Summary 1. The potential effects of wind energy development on wildlife have received increased attention over the past decade. In Kansas, optimal sites for wind energy

  15. Space use by female Greater Prairie-Chickens in response to wind energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Space use by female Greater Prairie-Chickens in response to wind energy development V. L. WINDER,1-Chickens in response to wind energy development. Ecosphere 5(1):3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ ES13-00206.1 Abstract. Wind energy development is targeted to meet 20% of U.S. energy demand by 2030. In Kansas, optimal sites

  16. Extensive investigation of reticuloendotheliosis virus in the endangered Attwater's prairie chicken 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohls, Ryan Lanier

    2007-09-17

    ........................................................................................... 82 V FLOW CYTOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF REV INFECTION IN CD4 + AND CD8 + T CELLS...................................................................................... 84 Introduction... ................................................................................................ 81 15. Comparison of CD4 + and CD8 + T cell percentages in REV infected and uninfected Attwater’s prairie chickens.................................................................... 90 ix 16. Histograms showing percentage of cells...

  17. Geothermal research project sets sights on Grande Prairie By Jenny Oatway May 20, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hao "Howard"

    off between the cost of drilling that deep and also much less is known about the reservoirs Geothermal research project sets sights on Grande Prairie By Jenny Oatway May 20, 2015 City Council is excited about an opportunity to explore the potential for harnessing geothermal energy

  18. LANDSCAPE IMPACTS ON FISH COMMUNITY STRUCTURE AND FOOD CHAIN LENGTH IN PRAIRIE AND OZARK RIVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desotelle, Micaleila D.

    2008-03-28

    in Ozark streams. The bass and sunfish family Centrarchidae was the second most abundant taxa, but less so in prairie rivers. Suckers in the family Catostomidae were important in all rivers, but were a smaller percentage. Most rivers sampled had a small...

  19. 13www.wildlife.org The Wildlife Society Nesting Prairie-Chickens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    The growing wind energy industry in the Great Plains may not have as strong an impact on greater prairie range. As demand for wind power grows--slated to meet 20 percent of U.S. energy needs by 2030 and after the development of a new wind energy facility in Kansas. The researchers tracked nest site

  20. Marketing Native Objects, Visualizing Native Bodies: New Deal Photography and the Sherman Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Chelsea

    2014-01-01

    Valdes-Dapena, Antonia. “Marketing the Exotic: Creating theCALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Marketing Native Objects, VisualizingOne: Creating and Marketing the Native Art Object……… 15

  1. A Heart Health Alaska Natives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jun

    Honoring the Gift of Heart Health A Heart Health Educator's Manual for Alaska Natives U . S . D E Health Service Office of Prevention, Education, and Control #12;Honoring the Gift of Heart Health A Heart National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and Indian Health Service NIH Publication No. 06-5218 Revised

  2. Quantification of Impurities in Prairie Snowpacks and Evaluation and Assessment of Measuring Snow Parameters from MODIS Images 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Jennifer Nicole

    2012-10-19

    Extensive research on soot in snow and snow grain size has been carried out in the Polar Regions. However, North American prairie snowpacks lack observations of soot in snow on snow albedo which adds uncertainty to the overall global effect...

  3. Prairie Island Nuclear Station Spent Filter Processing for Direct Disposal - 12333

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, H. Michael [WMG, Inc., 16 Bank Street, Peekskill, NY 10566 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper will discuss WMG's filter processing experience within the commercial nuclear power industry, specifically recent experience processing high activity spent filters generated by Xcel Energy's Prairie Island Nuclear Station (Prairie Island), located in Welch, MN. WMG processed for disposal eighty-four 55-gallon drums filled with varying types of high activity spent filters. The scope of work involved characterization, packaging plan development, transport to the WMG's Off-Site Processing location, shredding the filter contents of each drum, cement solidifying the shredded filter material, and finally shipping the solidified container of shredded filter material to Clive, Utah where the container was presented to EnergySolutions Disposal site for disposal in their Containerised Waste Facility. This sequence of events presented in this paper took place a total of nine (9) times over a period of four weeks. All 1294 filters were successfully solidified into nine (9) -WMG 142 steel liners, and each was successfully disposed of as Class A Waste at EnergySolutions Disposal Site in Clive, Utah. Prairie Island's waste material was unique in that all its filters were packaged in 55-gallon drums; and since the station packaged its filters in drums it was much easier to develop packaging plans for such a large volume of legacy filters. For this author, having over 20-years of waste management experiences, storing and shipping waste material in 55-gallon drums is not immediately thought of as a highly efficient method of managing its waste material. However, Prairie Island's use of 55-gallon drums to store and package its filters provided a significant advantage. Drums could be mixed and matched to provide the most efficient processing method while still meeting the Waste Class A limits required for disposal. (author)

  4. Cotton Production: On the Blackland Prairies of Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1961-01-01

    . 12. The broadcast-type rotary hoe is an effectire weed control tool when cotton and weeds are small. Fig. 1.9. Cultivator mounted rotary hoe "floats" inside the front sweeps. Sweeps should he new type, low crown, broad, low wings for high... of rotary hoes. Tnis type has proved hignly satisfactory. ,115 controls small weeds in the drill if a slight c is maintained at tlie base of the plants. Figure 16.) nical emergence Treatment Pre-emergence chemical treatment at planting , is popular...

  5. Plant Nutrition and Fertilizer Management for Winter Wheat Production in the Blackland Prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, Tim C.; Hipp, Billy W.; Marshall, David S.; Sutton, Russelll L.

    1995-01-01

    include wheat, oats, grain sorghum, corn, cotton, forage sorghum, and legumes. About half of the region is rangeland with pasture crops consisting primarily of Coastal bermudagrass, clover, alfalfa, wheat, oats, and na tive grasses such as bluestem..., and Shickluna, 1983). Intelligent crop management demands a working knowledge of these relationships depicted in Figure 5. Soil?N gains and transforma tions include fertilizer or manure applications, fixa tion of atmospheric N2 by legumes (clover, alfalfa...

  6. Native Village of Unalakleet- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Native Village of Unalakleet (NVU) project is a feasibility study for a retrofit of a tribally owned three-story 14-apartment complex, located in Unalakleet, Alaska.

  7. Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Download a draft agenda for the Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop scheduled for October 21-23, 2013, in Fairbanks, Alaska.

  8. Fire-grazing interactions in a mixed grass prairie 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, John Andrew

    2004-09-30

    experiment investigated the potential effects of these disturbances on above and belowground plant productivity, patch dynamics, and soil respiration over a 2-year period characterized by drought (1998) and normal (1999) rainfall. Spring burning... and mowing had interactive effects on aboveground net primary production (ANPP). Consistent with published single factor studies, burning without mowing doubled ANPP, whereas mowing in the absence of burning had neutral effects. However, subsequent...

  9. Performance Evaluation on Open Source Native XML DBMSs 92 10400,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Runapongsa, Kanda

    @biotec.or.th*** , nuwee.w@pcd.go.th**** Abstract Native XML Database Management System (Native XML DBMS) is designed storage manager and query engines. Choosing an appropriate Native XML DBMS to manage a large and complex DBMS, Performance Evaluation, Benchmark Native XML Database Management System (Native XML DBMS

  10. Grays Prairie, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New Pages RecentPlantMagma EnergyGooglePrograms

  11. Native Fish Society Molalla, OR 97308

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Native Fish Society PO Box 568 Molalla, OR 97308 Conserving biological diversity of native fish are the state, federal and tribal fish management agencies that have limited authority over habitat conditions in the basin. That authority resides with other agencies, but the fish management agencies can certainly

  12. SYMBIOSIS (2009) 47, 2333 2009 Balaban, Philadelphia/Rehovot ISSN 0334-5114 Diazotrophic endophytes of native black cottonwood and willow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    2009-01-01

    . The presence of these diazotrophic microorganisms may help explain the ability of these pioneering tree species. Introduction Most plants in their native environments depend on symbioses with microorganisms tolerance, pathogen resistance, seed germination, seedling length, and aiding in phytoremediation

  13. Evaluation of methods for restoration of tallgrass prairie in the Blackland Prairie region of North Central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eidson, James Arthur

    1996-01-01

    =C, low=L, medium=M high=H), mulch (mulch=M, no-mulch=NM) and soil compaction by wheel traffic (track=T, NT=no-track), compared to mulched and untreated controls. . . . . . . . . . . 128 Density (plants/m2) and foliar cover ((t) of ~Sh t f eff t f... (track=T, NT=no-track), compared to mulched and untreated controls. . . . . . . . . . . 135 TABLE Page Density (pits/m2) and foliar cover (0) of ~Sb( ~fd *ff t f 't (summit, backslope, footslope), seeding rate (low, medium, high), mulch, soil...

  14. DOE to Host Three Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Three Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Project Development Workshops in March DOE to Host Three Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Project Development Workshops in March...

  15. Energy Department Selects Five Native American Communities to...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Selects Five Native American Communities to Receive Technical Assistance for Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development Energy Department Selects Five Native American...

  16. Project Reports for Native Village of Eyak- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Native Village of Eyak will conduct a Wind Energy Resource Assessment on Alaska Native Lands in the Cordova Region of Prince William Sound.

  17. Helping Alaska Native Communities Reduce Their Energy Costs ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Helping Alaska Native Communities Reduce Their Energy Costs Helping Alaska Native Communities Reduce Their Energy Costs May 3, 2013 - 12:50pm Addthis The Energy Department is...

  18. 2013 AnnuAl report Prairie StriPS and row CroPS Prairie Fish lAndScAping with nAtiVe SmAll treeS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to a lesson learned the hard way. The Dust Bowl of the 1930s resulted from a devastating drought that increased wind erosion, carrying fertile topsoil from the Midwest to as far away as Washington, D

  19. California Desert Native Plants Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine:Kansas: EnergyCalendarCalhounWebpage | Open

  20. California Native Plant Protection Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine:Kansas: EnergyCalendarCalhounWebpage |Open

  1. Fifty-five year changes in species composition on dry prairie remnants in south-central Wisconsin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waller, Donald M.

    of habitat specialists has declined (from 27.4 to 21.7) contributing to declines in floristic quality and management since the arrival of European settlers in the early to mid 1800s decimated these grasslands. These included converting prairies into farm fields, fragmenting grass- lands by roads (Henderson 1981), and sup

  2. STRATEGIC PLAN 2013-2018 Role of the Prairie Research Institute in Meeting the Needs of Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    STRATEGIC PLAN 2013-2018 JULY 2013 Role of the Prairie Research Institute in Meeting the Needs and services.This five-year strategic plan identifies immediate and longer-term measures that maintain's needs Implementation of this Strategic Plan will be a concerted effort across Institute management

  3. SMALL MAMMALS ASSOCIATED WITH COLONIES OF BLACK-TAILED PRAIRIE DOGS (CYNOMYS LUDOVICIANUS) IN THE SOUTHERN HIGH PLAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    common species among the types of sites. Prairie dogs are touted as a keystone species) often are touted as a keystone species within the Great Plains ecosys- tem. If adhering to the definition of a keystone species as one whose impact on its c

  4. USE OF NATURAL VEGETATIVE BARRIERS TO LIMIT BLACK-TAILED PRAIRIE DOG TOWN EXPANSION IN WESTERN SOUTH DAKOTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for solutions to difficult problems and went out of there way to let prairie dogs stay on their property during as the company on the long drives, and hot summer days in the field. Many of graduate students at South Dakota stimulation. Lastly I would like to thank my family. The value of their support is immeasurable. I thank my

  5. Advancing Efforts to Energize Native Alaska (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-04-01

    This brochure describes key programs and initiatives of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs to advance energy efficiency, renewable energy, and energy infrastructure projects in Alaska Native villages.

  6. Optimizing Native Files in Energy.gov

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For native files in Energy.gov, following these best practices will result in better search results in commercial search engines. To learn how to optimize PDFs, see the PDF requirements.

  7. Expression of multiple proteins in transgenic plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vierstra, Richard D. (Madison, WI); Walker, Joseph M. (Madison, WI)

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the production of multiple proteins in transgenic plants. A DNA construct for introduction into plants includes a provision to express a fusion protein of two proteins of interest joined by a linking domain including plant ubiquitin. When the fusion protein is produced in the cells of a transgenic plant transformed with the DNA construction, native enzymes present in plant cells cleave the fusion protein to release both proteins of interest into the cells of the transgenic plant. Since the proteins are produced from the same fusion protein, the initial quantities of the proteins in the cells of the plant are approximately equal.

  8. Power Plant Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area Lakeview Geothermal Area Raft River Geothermal Area Cove Fort Power Plant Roosevelt Power Plant Borax Lake

  9. Agron. Sustain. Dev. 27 (2007) 112 1 c INRA, EDP Sciences, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2007-01-01

    of native prairie species offer biomass feedstocks that may yield greater net energy gains than monoculture

  10. Marc Prensky Digital Natives Digital Immigrants 2001 Marc Prensky Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cassell, Justine

    Marc Prensky Digital Natives Digital Immigrants ©2001 Marc Prensky _____________________________________________________________________________ 1 Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants By Marc Prensky From On the Horizon (MCB University Press, Vol. 9 No. 5, October 2001) © 2001 Marc Prensky It is amazing to me how in all the hoopla and debate

  11. Marc Prensky Digital Natives Digital Immigrants 2001 Marc Prensky Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants, Part II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knaust, Helmut

    Marc Prensky Digital Natives Digital Immigrants ©2001 Marc Prensky _____________________________________________________________________________ Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants, Part II: Do They Really Think Differently? By Marc Prensky From On the Horizon (NCB University Press, Vo 6, December 2001)l. 9 No. © 2001 Marc Prensky Different kinds

  12. Marc Prensky Digital Natives Digital Immigrants 2001 Marc Prensky Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knaust, Helmut

    Marc Prensky Digital Natives Digital Immigrants ©2001 Marc Prensky _____________________________________________________________________________ Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants By Marc Prensky From On the Horizon (NCB University Press, Vol. 9 No. 5, October 2001) © 2001 Marc Prensky It is amazing to me how in all the hoopla and debate these days

  13. Endophytic and canker-associated Botryosphaeriaceae occurring on non-native Eucalyptus and native Myrtaceae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endophytic and canker-associated Botryosphaeriaceae occurring on non-native Eucalyptus and native associated with stem cankers on plantation-grown Eucalyptus globulus. Howev- er, very little is known their relationship is to those species infecting Eucalyptus in plantations. The objectives of this study were

  14. Native American Support Programs Task Force Changing Winds: Service to Native American Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    and Communities in Montana Final Report of the MSU Native American Support Programs Task Force Submitted To Shelly Hogan #12;Native American Support Programs Task Force Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY TO STUDENT SUCCESS 12 FIGURE 6 WAYS TO ACHIEVE PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT 12 FIGURE 7 EMERGING THEMES: WHAT

  15. Prevention and Management of Aquatic Invasive Plants in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgerton, Elizabeth A

    2014-12-04

    Determining which non-native aquatic plants have the greatest potential to invade a new area and prohibiting those species prior to their introduction is the key to preventing future injurious invasions. Once introduced ...

  16. Synergy between pathogen release and resource availability in plant invasion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    Synergy between pathogen release and resource availability in plant invasion Dana Blumenthala,1, increased resource availability and enemy release, may more effectively explain invasion if they favor levels of available resources in their native range are particularly susceptible to enemies

  17. Height Replacement of Selected Woody Plants Following Burning or Shredding. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, W.T.; Kitchen, L.M.; Scifres, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    Selected Woody Plants Following Burning or Shredding CONTENTS ...................................... Summary . - i ,.z;.., s * ' ............................ a ,, Jntroduction.. v ~ ~ ~ z z . . 4 *- e -- .d 5- . ..... ...... .. * 2 $$escription... of Selected Woody Plants Following Burning or Shredding SUMMARY Woody plant reinvasion of tame pastures and native rangeland is a ' severe problem on the South Texas Plains. Shredding and/or pre- scribed burning may be employed as lowcost methods...

  18. Prairie View 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 APPENDIX C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 APPENDIX D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 APPENDIX E...-pair. Here subscripts ij are omitted from piijQ, piijA and piijB. Prob. = Probability. . . . 46 III Interval estimates of ??Q by piA, piB,?A and ?B, for the flanking markers separated by ?AB = 20 cM under Haldane?s mapping function...

  19. Evaluation of Desmanthus illinoensis (Michx.) MacM. for sod- seeding on blackland prairie soils in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Msiska, Harry Darius Chandiwira

    1986-01-01

    as to style and content by: Chri topher A. Call (Chair of Committee William (Bill) R. Ocumpau ( ber) Fred E. Smeins (Member) oseph L. Schuster (Head of Department) August 1986 ABSTRACT Evaluation of Desmanthus illinoensis (Nichx. ) NacN. for Sod... on the Blackland Prairie soils. 4 Monthly rainfall and long term mean monthly rainfall for Caldwell (extrapolated from Brenham, Cameron, and College Station) during the study period (Mar. 1984? Aug. 1985). . 5 Monthly rainfall and long term monthly mean...

  20. Silviculture of upland native Recognition of the value of native woodlands, particularly Ancient Woodlands, has been

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of such natural habitats was emphasised at the Rio Earth Summit in 1992 and in the resolutions of the Ministerial of timber. · Traditionally, upland native woodlands were used to shelter low numbers of livestock (usually

  1. The Management of Semi-natural Woodlands 7. Native Pinewoods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Management of Semi-natural Woodlands 7. Native Pinewoods P R A C T I C E G U I D E #12;#12;The Management of Semi-natural Woodlands 7. Native Pinewoods Practice Guide Forestry Commission: Edinburgh #12;ii 3 FORESTRY COMMISSION (1994). The management of semi-natural woodlands: 7. Native pinewoods

  2. Survival, seasonal movements, and cover use by lesser prairie chickens in the Texas Panhandle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toole, Benjamin Edwin

    2005-11-01

    and fragmentation of habitats. Until my study, no telemetry-based research on LPC has been conducted in the Rolling Plains of the Texas Panhandle. I radio-tagged and monitored LPCs in 2001 (spring??winter) and 2002 (spring) at a stable population in a native...

  3. Social organization and group dynamics of white-tailed deer on brush-free coastal prairie in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Wendy Margaret

    1981-01-01

    more unusual. Hawkins and Klimstra (1970) and Hardin et al. (1976) stated that yearling bucks rarely, if ever, rejoin their dams after the breeding season. Among white-tailed deer studied thus far, this again seems to be unique to Texas populations...SOCIAL ORGANIZATION AND GROUP DYNAMICS OF WHITE-TAILED DEER ON BRUSH-FREE COASTAL PRAIRIE IN TEXAS A Thesis by WENDY MARGARET BROWN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

  4. Woody plant and wintering grassland bird responses to summer prescribed burning in grazed and ungrazed Texas Mid-Coastal Prairies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marx, Damion E.

    2003-01-01

    . . 108 112 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page Graphical comparison of two regression models described in Table 2 . . . . . 16 Changes in percent shrub cover among unburned control and burned sites. . . . . 21 Changes in density of small shrubs among... unburned control and burned sites . . . 23 Changes in density of large shrubs among unburned control and burned sites . . . . . 25 Comparison of fire-induced mortality in areas dominated by baccharis with areas dominated by honey mesquite . . 27...

  5. Fungi Inventory Endemic Plants of Yellowstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Scott

    Monitoring Yellowstone's Bumble Bees · Microbial Diversity in Non-sulfur and Iron Geothermal Steam VentsFungi Inventory Endemic Plants of Yellowstone Restoration of Native Vegetation in Gardiner Basin v o l u m e 2 0 · i s s u e 1 · 2 0 1 2 Yellowstone Vegetation #12;F or two decades, Yellowstone

  6. Native American companies receive economic development grants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolar Photovoltaic SolarLab Programs NationalNations WorkNative American

  7. Alaska Native Villages | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I Due Date Adv. FossilMethodsDepartment»ofAlaska Native

  8. Alaska Native Communities Receive Technical Assistance for Local...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Village of Minto will receive assistance to identify energy efficiency, biomass, and solar energy opportunities. Native Village of Shishmaref will receive assistance with...

  9. Celebrating our work with Native American Students in STEM During...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    We especially want to increase access to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) programs for American Indians and Alaska Natives, offering hands-on...

  10. The Economic and Educational Impact of Native American Art Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wray, Taylor Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Institute of American Indian Arts: Modernism and U.S. Indianand Charlotte Klonk. Art History: A Critical Introduction toCompany and Native American Art. Flagstaff, AZ: Northland

  11. President Obama Proclaims November National Native American Heritage...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Native American Heritage Month Proclamation Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga, center, speaks with Pilar Thomas, deputy director of the Office of Indian...

  12. Alaska Native Village to Become a Model for Sustainable Northern...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    a Model for Sustainable Northern Communities Alaska Native Village to Become a Model for Sustainable Northern Communities June 30, 2015 - 5:47pm Addthis Karen Petersen Karen...

  13. White House Launches the Generation Indigenous Native Youth Challenge...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the White House Domestic Policy Council Cecilia Muoz announced the launch of the Generation Indigenous Native Youth Challenge at the 2015 United National Indian Tribal Youth...

  14. Project Reports for Native Village of Unalakleet- 2011 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Native Village of Unalakleet (NVU) project is a feasibility study for a retrofit of a tribally owned three-story 14-apartment complex, located in Unalakleet, Alaska.

  15. Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    housing authorities and Native corporations and nonprofits. "Rural Alaska is facing an energy crisis that makes rural community and regional economic development very...

  16. Math and Science Academy helps Native American schools empower...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Math and Science Academy helps Native American schools empower teachers Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:...

  17. Precipitation timing and grazer performance in a tallgrass prairie Joseph M. Craine, E. Gene Towne, Doug Tolleson and Jesse B. Nippert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nippert, Jesse

    EV-1 Precipitation timing and grazer performance in a tallgrass prairie Joseph M. Craine, E. Gene Resources, Univ. of Arizona, Cottonwood, AZ 86326, USA. Changes in precipitation amount and variability have in the timing of precipitation might affect grasslands. Here, we analyze long-term records from a tallgrass

  18. Natural succession impeded by smooth brome (Bromus inermis) and intermediate wheatgrass (Agropyron intermedium) in an abandoned agricultural field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, J.K.

    1997-11-01

    In 1975, an abandoned agricultural field at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) that had been cultivated for more than 38 years, was seeded with smooth brome (Bromus inermis) and intermediate wheatgrass (Agropyron intermedium). Although these species are commonly planted in reclamation and roadside seed mixtures, few studies have documented their impact on the re-establishment of native plant communities. In 1994, species richness, cover, and biomass were sampled in the agricultural field and compared to the surrounding mixed-grass prairie at the Site. The agricultural field contained only 61 plant species (62% native), compared to 143 species (81% native) in the surrounding mixed-grass prairie. Community similarity based on species presence/absence was 0.47 (Sorensen coefficient of similarity). Basal vegetative cover was 11.2% in the agricultural field and 29.1% in the mixed-grass prairie. Smooth brome and intermediate wheatgrass accounted for 93% of the relative foliar cover and 96% of the biomass in the agricultural field. The aggressive nature of these two planted species has impeded the natural succession of the agricultural field to a more native prairie community. Studies of natural succession on abandoned fields and roads in northeastern Colorado have indicated that if left alone, fields would return to their native climax state in approximately 50 years and would be approaching their native state after 20--25 years. Based on the results of this study, this agricultural field may take more than 100 years to return to a native mixed-grass prairie state and it may never achieve a native state without human intervention.

  19. Urban Forestry & Urban Greening 7 (2008) 195206 Nitrogen fertilization during planting and establishment of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    2008-01-01

    Urban Forestry & Urban Greening 7 (2008) 195­206 Nitrogen fertilization during planting forest increasingly consists of planted trees, especially as native forest fragments yield to urban little for the first few years after planting. Stressful urban sites exacerbate this effect and many

  20. Native American Training Program in Petroleum Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, Winifred M.; Kokesh, Judith H.

    1999-04-27

    This report outlines a comprehensive training program for members of Native American tribes whose lands have oil and gas resources. The program has two components: short courses and internships. Programs are proposed for: (1) adult tribes representatives who are responsible for managing tribal mineral holdings, setting policy, or who work in the oil and gas industry; (2) graduate and undergraduate college students who are tribal members and are studying in the appropriate fields; and (3) high school and middle school teachers, science teachers. Materials and program models already have been developed for some components of the projects. The plan is a coordinated, comprehensive effort to use existing resources to accomplish its goals. Partnerships will be established with the tribes, the BIA, tribal organizations, other government agencies, and the private sector to implement the program.

  1. Native Americans and state and local governments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusco, E.R.

    1991-10-01

    Native Americans` concerns arising from the possibility of establishment of a nuclear repository for high level wastes at Yucca Mountain fall principally into two main categories. First, the strongest objection to the repository comes from traditional Western Shoshones. Their objections are based on a claim that the Western Shoshones still own Yucca Mountain and also on the assertion that putting high level nuclear wastes into the ground is a violation of their religious views regarding nature. Second, there are several reservations around the Yucca Mountain site that might be affected in various ways by building of the repository. There is a question about how many such reservations there are, which can only be decided when more information is available. This report discusses two questions: the bearing of the continued vigorous assertion by traditionalist Western Shoshones of their land claim; and the extent to which Nevada state and local governments are able to understand and represent Indian viewpoints about Yucca Mountain.

  2. Granting Java Native Interface Developers Their Wishes Martin Hirzel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimm, Robert

    , Sun's original FFI for Java, the Native Method In- terface [52, 53] (NMI), directly exposed Java. Furthermore, it constrains garbage collectors and just- in-time compilers, since changes to the data representation may break native code. In fact, NMI required a conserva- tive garbage collector because direct

  3. 9 Towards Adaptive Management of Native Vegetation in Regional Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgman, Mark

    in the approach to defining management objectives and specifying assumptions behind vegetation change models9 Towards Adaptive Management of Native Vegetation in Regional Landscapes David H Duncan1 of the `adaptive management' paradigm to natural resource man- agement, using regional management of native

  4. Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Control and Reclamation ActSurface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977of 1977 Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000)Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000) BackgroundBackground Fish populations in Coal Creek

  5. Investigating Negotiation and Successful Communication in non-Native Directed Speech 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Jean

    2013-03-13

    An abundance of research has been conducted on interactions between native speakers (NS) and non-native speakers (NNS), which has demonstrated that native speakers make conversational adjustments depending on whether they ...

  6. Fire history of a prairie/forest boundary: more than 250 years of frequent fire in a North American tallgrass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Michael W.

    can be large for biological systems, and may result in a loss of biodiversity, alteration of ecosystem, primarily from being traditionally used by Native Americans to being managed for cattle production

  7. Singlet and Triplet State Transitions of Carotenoids in the Antenna Complexes of Higher-Plant Photosystem I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romeo, Alessandro

    Singlet and Triplet State Transitions of Carotenoids in the Antenna Complexes of Higher-Plant -carotene was found to be associated only with the native LHCI preparation and recombinant Lhca3. In the native complexes, the main lutein absorption bands are located at 492 and 510 nm. It is shown

  8. Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Pacific Region Conference...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Montana Kwa-Taq-Nuk Casino Resort 49708 US-93 Polson, MT 59860 The Native American Fish and Wildlife Society is hosting a two-day conference featuring tribal roundtables on...

  9. ORIGINAL PAPER Colony social structure in native and invasive populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodisman, Michael

    damage in their invaded habitats (Beggs et al. 2011; Holway et al. 2002; Kenis et al. 2009; Lowe et al differ in their native and introduced ranges (Beggs et al. 2011; Holway et al. 2002; Leniaud et al. 2009

  10. 2014 Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Resources for Alaska Native Villages April 29-30, 2014 Anchorage, Alaska Dena'ina Convention Center The Office of Indian Energy and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

  11. Celebrating National Native American Heritage Month at the Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and scholars, and our debt to them is immense. Yesterday we kicked off a three-part film series for Native American Heritage Month, co-presented by the Smithsonian's National...

  12. Project Reports for Chickaloon Native Village- 2010 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Chickaloon Native Village's (CNV's) Uk'e koley Project will conduct a feasibility study to assess the potential of producing green energy to heat and power all tribally owned buildings.

  13. DOE to Host Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and the Tribal Energy Program will present a workshop on Alaska Native village energy project development on April 29-30 at the Dena'ina Convention Center in Anchorage, Alaska....

  14. Ninth Annual Native American Economic Development, Diversification & Energy Projects Conference

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The 9th Annual Native American Economic Development, Diversification & Energy Projects Conference featuring the Inaugural Leaders of Tomorrow Workshop  will be held June 15th and 16th, 2015 at...

  15. Native Village of Teller Addresses Heating Fuel Shortage, Improves...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    combination of the Native Village of Tellers limited fuel storage capacity and a harsh winter led to a supply shortage. Photo by Alexander Dane, NREL The combination of the...

  16. A Contrastive Study of Reporting in Master’s Theses in Native Chinese and in Native English 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaoli

    2008-12-04

    Previous studies mainly focus on reporting practices of English-language writing either by native-speakers-of-English or second-language learners of English. This study investigates similarities and differences of reporting ...

  17. Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center Indian Housing Training Conference

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    To register for the conference and see a preliminary agenda, visit the Native Learning Center website.

  18. Cuscuta obtusiflora var. glandulosa (Native) 2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert W. Corbett

    2011-08-02

    are minute, slender-bodied insects that taper at both ends. Adults of the thrips species that attack onions are less than 1 /8 inch long and range in color from light tan or yellow to nearly black. Adult thrips have four long, slender wings fringed with long... mandible. They are generally thought to be sucking or rasping-sucking insects, but microscopic examination of damage shows that thrips actually pierce plant tissue and Figure 1. Adult (l) and immature (r) thrips. Figure 2. Onion leaf damaged by thrips...

  19. Plant reestablishment after soil disturbance: Effects of soils, treatment, and time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, C.A.; Alford, K.; McIlveny, G.; Tijerina, A.

    1993-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory examined plant growth and establishment on 16 sites where severe land disturbance had taken place. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relative effectiveness of the different methods in term of their effects on establishment of native and alien plants. Disturbances ranged from 1 to 50 years in age. Revegetation using native plants had been attempted at 14 of the sites; the remainder were abandoned without any further management. Revegetation efforts variously included seeding, fertilizer application, mulching with various organic sources, compost application, application of Warden silt loam topsoil over sand and gravel soils, and moderate irrigation.

  20. 20 Kombination von C++ und Java 20.1 Java Native Interface (JNI) 20-3 (364) 20.1 Java Native Interface (JNI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arndt, Holger

    20 Kombination von C++ und Java 20.1 Java Native Interface (JNI) 20-3 (364) 20.1 Java Native Interface (JNI) Der Standardweg zur Kombination von C++ und Java ist das Java Native Interface (JNI), das Bestandteil des JDK ist. 20.1.1 C++-Funktionen aus Java aufrufen · Gegeben sei die folgende kleine C

  1. 20 Kombination von C++ und Java 20.1 Java Native Interface (JNI) 20-3(378) 20.1 Java Native Interface (JNI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arndt, Holger

    20 Kombination von C++ und Java 20.1 Java Native Interface (JNI) 20-3(378) 20.1 Java Native Interface (JNI) Der Standardweg zur Kombination von C++ und Java ist das Java Native Interface (JNI), das Bestandteil des JDK ist. 20.1.1 C++-Funktionen aus Java aufrufen · Gegeben sei die folgende kleine C

  2. 20 Kombination von C++ und Java 20.1 Java Native Interface (JNI) 20-3 (360) 20.1 Java Native Interface (JNI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arndt, Holger

    20 Kombination von C++ und Java 20.1 Java Native Interface (JNI) 20-3 (360) 20.1 Java Native Interface (JNI) Der Standardweg zur Kombination von C++ und Java ist das Java Native Interface (JNI), das Bestandteil des JDK ist. 20.1.1 C++-Funktionen aus Java aufrufen · Gegeben sei die folgende kleine C

  3. Partitioning the effects of plant biomass and litter on Andropogon gerardi in old-field vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Bryan L.; Gross, Katherine L.

    1997-10-01

    We examined the effects of living plant neighbors and litter on the performance of a native C4 grass, Andropogon gerardi, at five old-field sites that differ in community biomass and soil fertility. We used plant removal experiments in which both...

  4. Press Pass - Press Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of these native prairies. The native grasses' deep roots help prevent erosion, trap rainwater and preserve the area's groundwater aquifers. Every year volunteers, users and...

  5. Influence of Cropping Systems On Cotton and Corn Yields on the Gulf Coast Prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeter, B. E.; Smith, J. C.; Whiteley, E. L.

    1962-01-01

    and better stands of cotton were obtained. The main disadvantage of this system was that two planting operations a year were re- quired. Cropping systems containing Dallisgrass and White clover are more highly recommended than all other systems tested... clover can cause bloat in cattle; (3) 2 years are needed to obtain high forage yields and (4) it is difficult to obtain a good seedbed for corn or cotton when the land goes out of forage production. Dallisgrass and White clover produced higher...

  6. Direct Measurement of Mercury Reactions In Coal Power Plant Plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard Levin

    2005-12-31

    Recent field and pilot-scale results indicate that divalent mercury emitted from power plants may rapidly transform to elemental mercury within the power plant plumes. Simulations of mercury chemistry in plumes based on measured rates to date have improved regional model fits to Mercury Deposition Network wet deposition data for particular years, while not degrading model verification fits for remaining years of the ensemble. The years with improved fit are those with simulated deposition in grid cells in the State of Pennsylvania that have matching MDN station data significantly less than the model values. This project seeks to establish a full-scale data basis for whether or not significant reduction or oxidation reactions occur to mercury emitted from coal-fired power plants, and what numerical redox rate should apply for extension to other sources and for modeling of power plant mercury plumes locally, regionally, and nationally. Although in-stack mercury (Hg) speciation measurements are essential to the development of control technologies and to provide data for input into atmospheric fate and transport models, the determination of speciation in a cooling coal combustion plume is more relevant for use in estimating Hg fate and effects through the atmosphere. It is mercury transformations that may occur in the plume that determine the eventual rate and patterns of mercury deposited to the earth's surface. A necessary first step in developing a supportable approach to modeling any such transformations is to directly measure the forms and concentrations of mercury from the stack exit downwind to full dispersion in the atmosphere. As a result, a study was sponsored by EPRI and jointly funded by EPRI, the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), and the Wisconsin Department of Administration. The study was designed to further our understanding of plume chemistry. The study was carried out at the We Energies Pleasant Prairie Power Plant, Pleasant Prairie, Wisconsin, just west of Kenosha. Aircraft and ground measurements support the occurrence of a reduction in the fraction of reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) (with a corresponding increase in elemental mercury) as part of the Total Gaseous Mercury (TGM) emitted from the Pleasant Prairie stack. This occurrence is based on comparison of the RGM concentrations in the plume (at standard conditions) compared to the RGM in the stack. There was found to be a 44% drop in the fraction of RGM between the stack exit and the first sampling arc and a 66% reduction from the stack to the 5-mile sampling arc, with no additional drop between the 5- and 10-mile arcs. Smaller-scale experiments in both test chambers and pilot-scale coal combustor exhaust streams have indicated the presence of rapid and relatively complete reduction reactions converting divalent into elemental mercury within power plant plumes prior to full dispersion in the atmosphere. These measurements, however, have been unable to identify whether the reactions occur during plume rise from physical to virtual stack height (during positive thermal buoyancy). The presence, rate, completeness, ubiquity, and dependence on source characteristics of these reactions, however, must be demonstrated in plume environments associated with fully operational power plants. That requirement, to capture either the reactions or the reaction products of chemistry that may be occurring very close to stack exits in highly turbulent environments, constrains the precision and reproducibility with which such full-scale experiments can be carried out. The work described here is one of several initial steps required to test whether, and in what direction, such rapid mercury redox reactions might be occurring in such plumes.

  7. Physical Plant Power Plant - 32 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30

    Historically, a fixed cooling concept is used in the design of evaporative heat rejection systems for process and power plants. In the fixed cooling mode, a plant is designed for maximum output at the design summer wet bulb temperature...

  8. Plant Succession at the Edges of Two Abandoned Cultivated Fields on the Arid Lands Ecology Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Sally A. (OFFICE OF FELLOWSHIP PROG); Rickard, William H. (OFFICE OF FELLOWSHIP PROG)

    2002-12-01

    How vegetation recovers from disturbances is an important question for land managers. We examined 500 m2 plots to determine the progress made by native herbaceous plant species in colonizing the edges of abandoned cultivated fields at different elevations and microclimates, but with similar soils in a big sagebrush/bluebunch wheatgrass steppe. Alien species, especially cheatgrass and cereal rye, were the major competitors to the natives. The native species with best potential for restoring steppe habitats were sulphur lupine, hawksbeard, bottlebrush squirreltail, needle-and-thread grass, Sandberg's bluegrass, and several lomatiums.

  9. Visual Power: 21st Century Native American Artists/Intellectuals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farris, Phoebe

    2006-10-01

    to include ex hibits reflecting such diverse cultures as African American Quilts, Ester Hernandez: The Art of Provocation, and Co-Madres Artistas: Voces de laMujer, while still maintaining a strong Native American presence. His own work uses pop culture... art. Visual Power is an outgrowth of a 2003 College Art Association panel that I chaired titled Native American Artists/Intellectuals: Speaking for Ourselves in the 21st Century and a concurrent art exhibition of the same title that I guest curated...

  10. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY REACTIONS IN COAL POWER PLANT PLUMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard Levin

    2006-06-01

    This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-02NT41422 and specifically addresses Program Area of Interest: No.5--Environmental and Water Resources. The project team includes the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) as the contractor and the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and Frontier Geosciences as subcontractors. Wisconsin Energies and its Pleasant Prairie Power Plant acted as host for the field-testing portion of the research. The project is aimed at clarifying the role, rates, and end results of chemical transformations that may occur to mercury that has been emitted from elevated stacks of coal-fired electric power plants. Mercury emitted from power plants emerges in either its elemental, divalent, or particulate-bound form. Deposition of the divalent form is more likely to occur closer to the source than that of the other two forms, due to its solubility in water. Thus, if chemical transformations occur in the stack emissions plume, measurements in the stack may mischaracterize the fate of the material. Initial field and pilot plant measurements have shown significant and rapid chemical reduction of divalent to elemental mercury may occur in these plumes. Mercury models currently assume that the chemical form of mercury occurring in stacks is the same as that which enters the free atmosphere, with no alteration occurring in the emissions plume. Recent data indicate otherwise, but need to be evaluated at full operating scale under field conditions. Prestbo and others have demonstrated the likelihood of significant mercury chemical reactions occurring in power plant plumes (Prestbo et al., 1999; MDNR-PPRP, 2000; EERC, 2001). This experiment will thus increase our understanding of mercury atmospheric chemistry, allowing informed decisions regarding source attribution. The experiment was carried out during the period August 22-September 5, 2003. The experimental site was the Pleasant Prairie Power Plant in Pleasant Prairie, Wisconsin, just west of Kenosha. The experiment involved using an aircraft to capture emissions and document chemistry changes in the plume. While using the airplane for sampling, supplemental fast-response sensors for NOx, connected to data loggers, were used to gauge entry and exit times and transect intervals through plume emissions material. The Frontier Geosciences Static Plume Dilution Chamber (SPDC) was employed simultaneously adjacent to the stack to correlate its findings with the aircraft sampling, as well as providing evaluation of the SPDC as a rapid, less costly sampler for mercury chemistry. A complementary stack plume method, the Dynamic Plume Dilution (DPD) was used in the latter portion of the experiment to measure mercury speciation to observe any mercury reduction reaction with respect to both the reaction time (5 to 30 seconds) and dilution ratio. In addition, stack sampling using the ''Ontario Hydro'' wet chemistry method and continuous mercury monitors (CMM) were used to establish the baseline chemistry in the stack. Comparisons among stack, SPDC, DPD and aircraft measurements allow establishment of whether significant chemical changes to mercury occur in the plume, and of the verisimilitude of the SPDC and DPD methods. This progress report summarizes activities during a period of results review from the stack/aircraft subcontractor, data analysis and synthesis, and preparation and presentation of preliminary results to technical and oversight meetings.

  11. STRUCTURAL VIROLOGY X-ray crystal structures of native

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    STRUCTURAL VIROLOGY X-ray crystal structures of native HIV-1 capsid protein reveal conformational) hexamers that shield the viral genome and proteins have been elusive. We report crystal structures-binding site. Inherent structural plasticity, hydration layer rearrangement, and effector binding affect capsid

  12. Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. Neofusicoccum eucalyptorum, a Eucalyptus pathogen, on native Myrtaceae in Uruguay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neofusicoccum eucalyptorum, a Eucalyptus pathogen, on native Myrtaceae in Uruguay C. A. Pe-associated fungus apparently highly specialized on Eucalyptus. However, in sur- veys of the microbial population. The possible occurrence of N. eucalyptorum on hosts other than Eucalyptus prompted further investigation

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Puccinia psidii infecting cultivated Eucalyptus and native

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Puccinia psidii infecting cultivated Eucalyptus and native myrtaceae in Uruguay Mycological Society and Springer 2010 Abstract Eucalyptus or guava rust caused by Puccinia psidii is a serious disease of Eucalyptus and other Myrtaceae. In Uruguay, it has been previously found on Eucalyptus globulus

  15. Alaska Native Community Energy Planning and Projects (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-06-01

    This fact sheet provides information on the Alaska Native villages selected to receive assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy 2013 Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, which provides technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects on tribal lands.

  16. Race, Ethnic, and Nativity Differences in Intergenerational Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yahirun, Jenjira

    2012-01-01

    Germany and the Netherlands encouraged the large scale recruitment of guestworkers from Southern Europe, Eastern Europe and Turkey.Turkey; second-generation immigrants are those who were born in GermanyTurkey; natives are defined as those who were born in Germany

  17. Optimizing Native Files in Energy.gov for Search Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For native files in Energy.gov on Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) websites, follow these best practices to help them rank higher in commercial search engine results. To learn how to optimize PDFs, see the PDF requirements.

  18. Gold Binding by Native and Chemically Modified Hops Biomasses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    López, M. Laura; Gardea-Torresdey, J. L.; Peralta-Videa, J. R.; de la Rosa, G.; Armendáriz, V.; Herrera, I.; Troiani, H.; Henning, J.

    2005-01-01

    Heavy metals from mining, smelting operations and other industrial processing facilities pollute wastewaters worldwide. Extraction of metals from industrial effluents has been widely studied due to the economic advantages and the relative ease of technical implementation. Consequently, the search for new and improved methodologies for the recovery of gold has increased. In this particular research, the use of cone hops biomass ( Humulus lupulus ) was investigated as a new option for gold recovery. The results showed that the gold binding to native hops biomass was pH dependent from pH 2 to pH 6, with a maximum percentage bindingmore »at pH 3. Time dependency studies demonstrated that Au(III) binding to native and modified cone hops biomasses was found to be time independent at pH 2 while at pH 5, it was time dependent. Capacity experiments demonstrated that at pH 2, esterified hops biomass bound 33.4 mg Au/g of biomass, while native and hydrolyzed hops biomasses bound 28.2 and 12.0 mg Au/g of biomass, respectively. However, at pH 5 the binding capacities were 38.9, 37.8 and 11.4 mg of Au per gram of native, esterified and hydrolyzed hops biomasses, respectively. « less

  19. Effective Access to Justice: Applying the Parens Patriae Standing Doctrine to Climate Change-Related Claims Brought by Native Nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kronk, Elizabeth Ann

    2011-01-01

    Because of the unique character of Native Nations, these communities are more likely to be impacted by climate change. First, because Native Nations are often tied to specific areas of land, such as reservations, it is impossible for Natives...

  20. THE NATIVE AND NONNATIVE PROCESSING OF NUMBER AND GENDER AGREEMENT IN SPANISH: AN ERP INVESTIGATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleman Banon, Jose

    2012-08-31

    The present study utilizes EEG to examine the processing of number and gender agreement in Spanish by native speakers and adult English-speaking learners. With respect to native processing, the study focuses on how different ...

  1. Making History : : The Role of History in Contemporary Native American Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cluff, Leah Diane

    Native North American Art. Oxford: Oxford University Press,Star. ” In Native American Art in the Twentieth Century,Cultural Value(s) of the Art Object. ” Journal of Material

  2. Energy Department Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Makes 2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes to Develop Renewable Energy Resources Energy Department Makes 2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes to Develop...

  3. 9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History University of Oklahoma Elder Voices, Youth Choices from the Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair! We are pleased

  4. Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center Webinar: Grant Writing Essentials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Native Learning Center (NLC) offers tuition FREE courses and trainings to Native Americans and indigenous people with an emphasis on the educational needs of tribal members and their...

  5. Review: Who’s asking? Native Science, Western Science and Science Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    Review: Who’s asking? Native Science,Western Scienceand Science Education By Douglas L. Medin and Megan Bang

  6. HollyMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Native resident fish persisted after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HollyMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Native resident fish persistedMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Surveys document increase in walleye and decrease in native fish abundance Native fish populations affected Sanpoil: wildkokanee and redband trout populations depressed Columbia

  7. Native Hydrogen Bonds in a Molten Globule: The Apoflavodoxin Thermal Intermediate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sancho, Javier

    Native Hydrogen Bonds in a Molten Globule: The Apoflavodoxin Thermal Intermediate MarõÂa P. IruÂn1 in surface- exposed hydrogen bonds connecting secondary-structure elements in the native protein. All hydrogen bonds analysed are formed in the molten globule intermediate, either with native strength

  8. Functional differences between native and alien species: a global-scale comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Ian

    Functional differences between native and alien species: a global-scale comparison Alejandro, a synthetic view of multi-trait differences between alien and native species is not yet available. 2. We separately, co-occurring native and alien species significantly differed in their traits. These differences

  9. Are native bluebells (Hyacinthoides non-scripta) at risk from alien congenerics? Evidence from distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Spencer C.H.

    Are native bluebells (Hyacinthoides non-scripta) at risk from alien congenerics? Evidence from distribution of its native bluebell, Hyacin- thoides non-scripta (Liliaceae), and the prevalence of alien for competitive and hybridis- ing interactions between natives and alien taxa in the UK, we quantified abundance

  10. Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs on drastically disturbed lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, S. [Missouri Dept. of Natural Resources, Jefferson City, MO (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Establishment of warm-season native grasses and forbs (WSNGs) has been viewed by landowners, agronomists, natural resource managers and reclamation specialists as being too expensive and difficult, especially for reclamation, which requires early stand closure and erosion control. Natural resource managers have learned a great deal about establishing WSNGs since the implementation of the 1985 Farm Bill`s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). Reclamation specialists must begin to use this information to improve reclamation success. Quality control of seed equipment and planting methods has been proven to be the crucial first step in successful establishment. Seedling germination, growth and development of WSNGs are different from that of introduced cool-season grasses and legumes. Specialized seed drills and spring planting periods are essential. Because shoot growth lags far behind root growth the first two seasons, WSNGs often are rejected for reclamation use. Usually, the rejection is based on preconceived notions that bare ground will erode and on reclamation specialists` desire for a closed, uniform, grassy lawn. WSNG`s extensive root systems inhibit rill and gully erosion by the fall of the first season. Planting a weakly competitive, short-lived nurse crop such as perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) at low rates with the WSNG mixture can reduce first-season sheet and rill erosion problems and give an appearance of a closed stand. Benefits of WSNGs in soil building and their acid-tolerance make them ideal species for reclamation of drastically disturbed lands. WSNGs and forbs enhance wildlife habitat and promote natural succession and the invasion of the reclamation site by other native species, particularly hardwood trees, increasing diversity and integrating the site into the local ecosystem. This is perhaps their most important attribute. Most alien grasses and legumes inhibit natural succession, slowing the development of a stable mine soil ecosystem. This paper outlines one successful methodology to establish warm-season grasses and forbs on abandoned mine lands in Missouri. The methodology can be successfully adapted for reclamation of all drastically disturbed lands including Title V lands under the Surface Mining Control Reclamation Act of 1977 (PL95-87) to promote ecosystem diversity and stability.

  11. Transgenic plants that exhibit enhanced nitrogen assimilation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coruzzi, Gloria M. (New York, NY); Brears, Timothy (Durham, NC)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for producing plants with improved agronomic and nutritional traits. Such traits include enhanced nitrogen assimilatory and utilization capacities, faster and more vigorous growth, greater vegetative and reproductive yields, and enriched or altered nitrogen content in vegetative and reproductive parts. More particularly, the invention relates to the engineering of plants modified to have altered expression of key enzymes in the nitrogen assimilation and utilization pathways. In one embodiment of the present invention, the desired altered expression is accomplished by engineering the plant for ectopic overexpression of one of more the native or modified nitrogen assimilatory enzymes. The invention also has a number of other embodiments, all of which are disclosed herein.

  12. Transgenic plants that exhibit enhanced nitrogen assimilation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Brears, Timothy

    2005-03-08

    The present invention relates to a method for producing plants with improved agronomic and nutritional traits. Such traits include enhanced nitrogen assimilatory and utilization capacities, faster and more vigorous growth, greater vegetative and reproductive yields, and enriched or altered nitrogen content in vegetative and reproductive parts. More particularly, the invention relates to the engineering of plants modified to have altered expression of key enzymes in the nitrogen assimilation and utilization pathways. In one embodiment of the present invention, the desired altered expression is accomplished by engineering the plant for ectopic overexpression of one of more the native or modified nitrogen assimilatory enzymes. The invention also has a number of other embodiments, all of which are disclosed herein.

  13. Transgenic plants that exhibit enhanced nitrogen assimilation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coruzzi, Gloria M. (New York, NY); Brears, Timothy (Durham, NC)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for producing plants with improved agronomic and nutritional traits. Such traits include enhanced nitrogen assimilatory and utilization capacities, faster and more vigorous growth, greater vegetative and reproductive yields, and enriched or altered nitrogen content in vegetative and reproductive parts. More particularly, the invention relates to the engineering of plants modified to have altered expression of key enzymes in the nitrogen assimilation and utilization pathways. In one embodiment of the present invention, the desired altered expression is accomplished by engineering the plant for ectopic overexpression of one of more the native or modified nitrogen assimilatory enzymes. The invention also has a number of other embodiments, all of which are disclosed herein.

  14. Sustainable design for a subtropical green roof with local, recyclable substrates and native plant species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huerta, Angelica

    2011-01-11

    As sustainable development becomes the norm, such innovations as the green roof are becoming more commonplace around the world. However, designs tailored for specific climatic regions are still in their infancy. Vegetation and substrate are elements...

  15. Alien Species and Evolution: The Evolutionary Ecology of Exotic Plants, Animals, Microbes and Interacting Native Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nehrbass, Nana

    2005-01-01

    Review: Alien Species and Evolution: The EvolutionaryGermany George W. Cox. Alien Species and Evolution: TheRecycled, acid-free paper. Alien Species and Evolution leads

  16. Salinity: effect on germination of native plants and leaching in clay soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neighbors, James Olen

    1974-01-01

    studies. NaC1 Solutions Osmotic Tension (bars) NaC1 g/1 CaC12 g/1 Conductivity (mmhos/cm) 3. 0 7. 0 10. 0 4. 0 10. 1 13. 5 6. 6 16. 0 NaC1 and CaC1 Mixed Salt Solutions 3. 00 7. 00 10. 00 2. 80 6. 44 9. 00 1. 40 3, 22 4. 50 6...-disulfide) to control pathogens. Treated seeds of each species were distributed evenly over 2 sheets of No. 3 [&hetman filter paper moistened with 5. 5 ml of the appropriate salinity solution in closed 9. 0 cm diameter Petri dishes. Germination tests were conducted...

  17. Adirondack Park GIS interactive non-native invasive plant species project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oles, Hilary; Falge, John; Frantz, Ed; Spada, Dan; Kogut, Ken; Maloney, Susanne

    2003-01-01

    Presentations ADIRONDACK PARK GIS INTERACTIVE NON-NATIVEDemonstrate the interactive GIS database that has beena management plan with a GIS database to test control

  18. Umatilla Tribes to Grow Native Plants for Hanford | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutoryin the Nation's,USDA &Ultra-DeepwaterCatalysts

  19. Native Services Grant Writing 101 Webinar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014Department of Energy Nationwide: EERE ProgramNative

  20. Physical Plant Power Plant - 43 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30

    with higher efficiency / R&D Climate friendly Power Plants Build coal fired Power Plants with CCS-technology 4 B a c k u p va W GGEHEN ESL-IC-08-10-27 Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Berlin, Germany..., October 20-22, 2008 RWE Energy / Energieeffizienz bei Immobilien / U. K?nig / ICEBO '08 SEITE 9 Electricity Production: All Energy Sources have to be included! Lignite Power Plant (BoA) produces 8,8 TWh = appr. 12% of the annual demand for electricity...

  1. Native American educational conference Nov. 13-14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolar Photovoltaic SolarLab Programs NationalNations WorkNative

  2. Six Native American companies receive economic development grants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 UnlimitedShiftwater vaporRisks:Sitesix truckSix Native

  3. Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolarOpen5 - Applications JumpPermitsOpen Energy|Native Claims

  4. NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group; Summer 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-09-01

    The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. The Wind Powering America program engages Native Americans in wind energy development, and as part of that effort, the NAWIG newsletter informs readers of events in the Native American/wind energy community.

  5. Primitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koptur, Suzanne

    appeared at this time. Both of these groups of plants had life cycles, involving two generations. One of the year these mosses will produce tiny sporophytes. Prior to this generation, the tiny plants producedPrimitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS These are the plants that were present soon after

  6. Native American Housing Stakeholder Meeting- Tribal Data: Building the Bridge to New Capital

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Hosted by the Housing Assistance Council, the Native American Housing Stakeholder Meeting will discuss effective strategies for tribally led data collection, ways to access and leverage new capital...

  7. Intracellular Tracking of Single Native Molecules with Electroporation-Delivered Quantum Dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Chang

    Intracellular Tracking of Single Native Molecules with Electroporation-Delivered Quantum Dots Chen Sun, Zhenning Cao, Min Wu, and Chang Lu*,,§ School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia

  8. Energy Project Development and Financing Strategy for Native Alaska (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01

    This DOE Office of Indian Energy fact sheet describes the energy project development process with a focus on Alaska Native villages and regional corporations.

  9. Engineering Building- Prairie View 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Experiment 1 evaluated sorghum-soybean meal diets containing the NRC (1988) levels of available P (.52,.47,.41% total P from 25 to 50, 50 to 80, and 80 to 118 kg, respectively) and diets containing either 125% (.58,.52, .44% total P) or 75% (.47...

  10. Landscape Plants: Fertilizing & Watering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Landscape Plants: Fertilizing & Watering Landscape Plants: Fertilizing & Watering Prevent runoff and shrubs, either through directly killing plants or making them more prone to disease. Fertilizer runoff into storm drains pollutes waterways. Maintain plant health and protect water quality by fertilizing

  11. Native defects in MBE-grown CdTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olender, Karolina; Wosinski, Tadeusz; Makosa, Andrzej; Tkaczyk, Zbigniew; Kolkovsky, Valery; Karczewski, Grzegorz

    2013-12-04

    Deep-level traps in both n- and p-type CdTe layers, grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaAs substrates, have been investigated by means of deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Four of the traps revealed in the DLTS spectra, which displayed exponential kinetics for capture of charge carriers into the trap states, have been assigned to native point defects: Cd interstitial, Cd vacancy, Te antisite defect and a complex formed of the Te antisite and Cd vacancy. Three further traps, displaying logarithmic capture kinetics, have been ascribed to electron states of treading dislocations generated at the mismatched interface with the substrate and propagated through the CdTe layer.

  12. Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

    1999-04-27

    To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

  13. Discrimination of the Native from Misfolded Protein Models with an Energy Function Including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazaridis, Themis

    Discrimination of the Native from Misfolded Protein Models with an Energy Function Including for theoretical protein structure prediction is an energy function that can discriminate the native from non by the widespread belief that they are superior for such discrimination to physics-based energy functions

  14. Favorable Climate Change Response Explains Non-Native Species' Success in Thoreau's Woods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Charles

    Favorable Climate Change Response Explains Non-Native Species' Success in Thoreau's Woods Charles G Invasive species have tremendous detrimental ecological and economic impacts. Climate change may exacerbate species invasions across communities if non-native species are better able to respond to climate changes

  15. Internet Native Banner (INB) Finance Last Revised: 03/5/2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Internet Native Banner (INB) ­ Finance Last Revised: 03/5/2014 1 #12;Table of Contents · Overview ................................................................................................. Page 37 2 #12;Overview: Internet Native Banner (INB) is a fully featured client for real-time access: Closing this window will close both. The `behind the scenes' control window in the internet browser. 3 #12

  16. Folding Trp-Cage to NMR Resolution Native Structure Using a Coarse-Grained Protein Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buldyrev, Sergey

    Folding Trp-Cage to NMR Resolution Native Structure Using a Coarse-Grained Protein Model Feng Ding molecular dynamics folding simulations of a small 20-residue protein--Trp-cage--from a fully extended is not necessary to reach the native state of a protein. Our results also suggest that the success of folding Trp

  17. Differences in germination and seedling establishment of alien and native Impatiens species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    Differences in germination and seedling establishment of alien and native Impatiens species Rozdíly., Jarosík V. & Pysek P. (2009): Differences in germi- nation and seedling establishment of alien and native design. In this study seed and seedling traits of three congeneric alien species in Europe, differing

  18. Scale dependence of native and alien species richness in North American floras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Michael W.

    Scale dependence of native and alien species richness in North American floras Vliv mítka studia na of native and alien species richness in North American flo- ras. ­ Preslia 78: 427­436. I analyzed data from and alien diversity vary as a function of spatial grain. Moving window multi- ple regression revealed

  19. Table 2. Ten largest plants by generation capacity, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Creek Station","Natural gas","Basin Electric Power Coop",290 7,"Buffalo Ridge II LLC","Wind","Iberdrola Renewables Inc",210 8,"Prairie Winds SD1","Wind","Basin Electric Power...

  20. Table 2. Ten largest plants by generation capacity, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8,"Greater Des Moines","Natural gas","MidAmerican Energy Co",492.6 9,"Rolling Hills Wind Farm","Wind","MidAmerican Energy Co",443.9 10,"Pioneer Prairie Wind...

  1. Colonial Order and the Origins of California Native Women’s Mass Incarceration: California Missions and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teran, Jacquelyn

    2015-01-01

    points out, “if a Native man rapes someone, he subscribes toNative values, because rape is not an Indian tradition. ” 15Exploring the Intersection of Rape Law Reform and Federal

  2. 20 Kombination von C++ und Java 20.1 Java Native Interface (JNI) 20-4(368) Die C++-Funktion muss in Java als native deklariert werden. Geladen werden soll sie aus einer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arndt, Holger

    20 Kombination von C++ und Java 20.1 Java Native Interface (JNI) 20-4(368) · Die C++-Funktion muss in Java als native deklariert werden. Geladen werden soll sie aus einer dynamischen Bibliothek libcppfunctions.so. SprachMix/JNI/C++fromJava/Main.java 7 public class Main 8 { 9 public native static double

  3. Plant Operational Status - Pantex Plant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid youOxygen Generation | Center for GasPhysics Physics PrintPicturePlant

  4. Calystegia sepium (Both native and introduced forms exist) 2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugh D. Wilson

    2011-08-10

    not graze treated cotton fields or feed forage to livestock within 8 weeks of ap- plication. Table 3. Preplant Incorporated Weeds controlled Product Product rate/A broadcast Herbicide common name Spray volume per acre broadcast Time to apply Remarks Many... with perennial weeds because of the way they propa- gate (by seed and root tissue). Be careful when plowing perennial weeds so that you don?t spread plant parts to other areas of the field. ? Use weed-free planting seed to protect against weed infestations...

  5. Transforming Native American Youths' Concepts of Geoscience Through a Connection to Culture, Nature and Community 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricci, Jamie Leigh

    2014-05-07

    This qualitative study examines the experience of twelve Native American youth who participated in culturally appropriate geoscience summer programs throughout California. These programs have been shown to change participating ...

  6. Pacifically Possessed : : Scientific Production and Native Hawaiian Critique of the "Almost White" Polynesian Race

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arvin, Maile Renee

    Hawaiian Genome Project (HGP) and the response it elicitedpoint I wish to make about the HGP and the Native Hawaiianimpact of the protests of the HGP on those researchers who

  7. EA-1932: Bass Lake Native Fish Restoration, Eureka, Lincoln County, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA was initiated to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a BPA proposal to fund Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks to help restore native fish populations to the Tobacco River and Lake Koocanusa. The project has been cancelled.

  8. Native California soils are selective reservoirs for multidrug-resistant bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachs, Joel

    Native California soils are selective reservoirs for multidrug-resistant bacteria Amanda C of antibiotic resistance in Bradyrhizobium (alphaproteobacteria). Bradyrhizobium are cosmopolitan bacteria bacteria can exhibit extensive antibiotic re- sistomes and act as reservoirs of important antibiotic

  9. Body pigmentation pattern to assess introgression by hatchery stocks in native Salmo trutta from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García-Berthou, Emili

    ´tica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-27002 Lugo, Spain (Received 10 August 2004, Accepted 4 April 2005' genetic diversity (Berrebi et al., 2000). Native brown trout distributed across rivers draining from Mediterranean rivers and their differenc

  10. Sporendocladia bactrospora associated with wounds on native broadleaved trees in Norway and Sweden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sporendocladia bactrospora associated with wounds on native broadleaved trees in Norway and Sweden and Landscape Institute, As, Norway; 3 E-mail: jolanda.roux@fabi.up.ac.za (for correspondence) Summary A survey

  11. Online Processing of Wh-Dependencies in English by Native Speakers of Spanish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canales, Alonso Jose

    2012-08-31

    This study investigated if, Spanish-speaking learners of English are capable of processing wh-dependencies incrementally and observing the grammatical constraints that regulate wh-extraction in English, similar to native ...

  12. Biomechanics of the Lens Capsule from Native to After Cataract Surgery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedrigi, Ryan M.

    2010-01-16

    quasispherical morphology to change focus from distant to near objects. Given its highly mechanical nature, it is prudent to study the native lens capsule from the perspective of biomechanics for such applications as understanding the mechanism of accommodation...

  13. Native File Formats and PDFs on Websites Outside of the Energy.gov Drupal Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Websites and applications outside the Energy.gov Drupal environment should follow these requirements when linking to non-HTML resources or native files like PDFs or Word, Excel, and PowerPoint files.

  14. Native capillary isoelectric focusing for the separation of protein complex isoforms and subcomplexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fonslow, Bryan R.

    Here we report the use of capillary isoelectric focusing under native conditions for the separation of protein complex isoforms and subcomplexes. Using biologically relevant HIS-tag and FLAG-tag purified protein complexes, ...

  15. Interference of Greek learners' native language in their written performance of English verb tenses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papadimitriou, Assimina

    The main focus of this study is on depicting, classifying and evaluating instances of contextually erroneous verb tense use in the English language as a result of negative transfer from the native language (Modern Greek). ...

  16. A Review of Thin Film Crystalline Silicon for Solar Cell Applications. Part 1 : Native Substrates.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 5.5 Epilift process - Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems, ANU Systems Engineering Department, The Australian National University, ACT 0200, Australia. Email : michelleA Review of Thin Film Crystalline Silicon for Solar Cell Applications. Part 1 : Native Substrates

  17. Investigating Asexual Propagation, Container Production, Drought Tolerance, and Marketing Strategies of Five Native Texas Groundcovers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Andrew

    2015-05-06

    landscapes are a primary target of such restrictions. Selection of drought tolerant native Texas groundcovers began in College Station, TX in 2009. Species included Borrichia frutescens (L.) DC., Erigeron procumbens (Houst. ex Mill.) G.L. Nesom., Mimosa...

  18. Patterns in the Use of a Restored California Floodplain by Native and Alien Fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moyle, Peter B; Crain, Patrick K; Whitener, Keith

    2007-01-01

    became iso- The * indicates alien species. No samples wereby larvae of native and alien fishes. Pages 125-140 inK, Mount, JF. 2003. Alien fishes in natural streams: fish

  19. Waste Treatment Plant Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

  20. Growing plants on atoll soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, E L; Migvar, L; Robison, W L

    2000-02-16

    Many years ago people living on atolls depended entirely on foods gathered from the sea and reefs and grown on land. Only a few plants, such as coconut (ni), Pandanus (bob), and arrowroot (mok-mok), could be grown on the lower rainfall atolls, although adequate groundwater conditions also allowed taro (iaraj, kotak, wot) to be cultivated. On higher rainfall atolls, breadfruit (ma) was a major food source, and banana (binana, kepran), lime (laim), and taros (iaraj, kotak, wot) could be grown. The early atoll populations were experts in growing plants that were vital to sustaining their nutrition requirements and to providing materials for thatch, basketry, cordage, canoe construction, flowers, and medicine. They knew which varieties of food plants grew well or poorly on their atolls, how to propagate them, and where on their atoll they grew best. They knew the uses of most native plants and what the various woods were well suited for. Many varieties of Pandanus (bob) and breadfruit (ma) grew well with high rainfall, but only a few produced well on drier atolls. Such information had been passed down through the generations although some of it has been lost in the last century. Today there are new plants and new varieties of existing plants that can be grown on atolls. There are also new materials and information on how to grow both the old and new plants more effectively. However, there are also introduced weeds and pests to control. Today, there is also an acute need to grow more of the useful plants adapted to atolls. Increasing numbers of people living on an atoll without an equal increase in income or food production stretches the available food supplies. Much has been written about the poor conditions for plant growth on atolls. As compared with many places in the world where crops are grown, however, atolls can provide some highly favorable conditions. For instance, the driving force for plant growth is sunlight, and on atolls light is abundant throughout the year. Except on the driest of atolls, air temperature and humidity range only within limits set by the surrounding sea. There are no cold seasons, no frosts, no cold soils, no dry winds, and no periodic plagues of insects or diseases moving from miles away. Problems of soil drainage or salinity are few and easily recognized. Nor are there problems with acid soils, soil crusting, or erosion that challenge cultivators in many other areas. On the contrary, some of the black soils at the center of wide islands rank with the best soils of Russia and the American Midwest, except for their shortage of potassium and the uncertainties of rainfall. Some of these atoll soils contain more total nitrogen than many of the world's most productive agricultural soils and, in some, the total phosphorus content is so high as to be almost unbelievable--two to five tons of the element per acre. Certainly, problems exist in growing plants on atolls. There are also some special concerns not encountered in other environments, such as the wind and salt spray near shore. The two major physical limitations, however, are inadequate rainfall in some years and in many places, and soil fertility limitations. The alkaline or ''limy'' make-up of atoll soils means that a few plant nutrients, especially iron, limit growth of many introduced plants, and this is difficult to correct. As elsewhere in the world, many--but not all--atoll soils lack enough nitrogen and/or phosphorus for high yield, and all lack sufficient potassium. There is no practical way of overcoming drought except by use of tolerant plants such as coconut (ni) and Pandanus (bob), plus collection and careful use of whatever water is available. There are opportunities to overcome nutritional limitations mentioned above, first, by intensive use of all organic debris and household wastes in small gardens and, second, by use of commercial fertilizers. Imported fertilizers are expensive, certainly, but much less so on a family basis than the equivalent costs of imported food.

  1. Polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srienc, Friedrich (Lake Elmo, MN); Somers, David A. (Roseville, MN); Hahn, J. J. (New Brighton, MN); Eschenlauer, Arthur C. (Circle Pines, MN)

    2000-01-01

    Novel transgenic plants and plant cells are capable of biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA). Heterologous enzymes involved in PHA biosynthesis, particularly PHA polymerase, are targeted to the peroxisome of a transgenic plant. Transgenic plant materials that biosynthesize short chain length monomer PHAs in the absence of heterologous .beta.-ketothiolase and acetoacetyl-CoA reductase are also disclosed.

  2. Ethylene insensitive plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Joseph R. (Carlsbad, CA); Nehring, Ramlah (La Jolla, CA); McGrath, Robert B. (Philadelphia, PA)

    2007-05-22

    Nucleic acid and polypeptide sequences are described which relate to an EIN6 gene, a gene involved in the plant ethylene response. Plant transformation vectors and transgenic plants are described which display an altered ethylene-dependent phenotype due to altered expression of EIN6 in transformed plants.

  3. Population and community ecology of the rare plant amsinckia grandiflora

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsen, T.M.

    1996-11-01

    Research was conducted between the fall of 1992 and the spring on the population and community ecology of the rare annual plant, Amsinckia glandiflora (Gray) Kleeb. ex Greene (Boraginaceae). The research goal was to investigate the causes of the species rarity, data useful to restorative efforts. The work focused on the examination of competitive suppression by exotic annual grasses; comparisons with common, weedy congener; and the role of litter cover and seed germination and seedling establishment. Annual exotic grasses reduced A. grandiflora reproductive output to a greater extent than did the native perennial bunch grass.

  4. Poisonous Plant Management. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan

    1985-01-01

    range specialist, The Texas A&M University System . 2 DIAGNOSING POISONOOS PLANT PROBLEMS Accurate diagnosis of poisonous plant problems can be extremely difficult. Many cases of livestock poisoning by plants have been improperly diagnosed... Agricultural Extension Service ~-P~,IJ& H~iN!/ P~,IJ&--------------- poisonous Plant ___ Management_ ..... Texas Agricultural Extension Service. The Texas A&M University System. College Station, Texas POISONO(]S PLANT MANAGEMENT Allan McGinty* Poisonous...

  5. Plant fatty acid hydroxylases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); Broun, Pierre (Burlingame, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Lexington, KY)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  6. Vegetation component of geothermal EIS studies: Introduced plants, ecosystem stability, and geothermal development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-10-01

    This paper contributes new information about the impacts from introduced plant invasions on the native Hawaiian vegetation as consequences of land disturbance and geothermal development activities. In this regard, most geothermal development is expected to act as another recurring source of physical disturbance which favors the spread and maintenance of introduced organisms throughout the region. Where geothermal exploration and development activities extend beyond existing agricultural and residential development, they will become the initial or sole source of disturbance to the naturalized vegetation of the area. Kilauea has a unique ecosystem adapted to the dynamics of a volcanically active landscape. The characteristics of this ecosystem need to be realized in order to understand the major threats to the ecosystem and to evaluate the effects of and mitigation for geothermal development in Puna. The native Puna vegetation is well adapted to disturbances associated with volcanic eruption, but it is ill-adapted to compete with alien plant species in secondary disturbances produced by human activities. Introduced plant and animal species have become a major threat to the continued presence of the native biota in the Puna region of reference.

  7. Department of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Crop Science Option The challenge for crop scientists is to implement crop and soil management systems, weed science, and entomology. Graduates find careers in farming and ranching; as crop productionDepartment of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology Unique, hands-on study programs for students

  8. Plant Phenotype Characterization System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

    2005-09-09

    This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

  9. NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group, Spring 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranowski, R.

    2008-03-01

    The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. The Wind Powering America program engages Native Americans in wind energy development, and as part of that effort, the NAWIG newsletter informs readers of events in the Native American/wind energy community. This issue features an interview with Steven J. Morello, director of DOE's newly formed Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, and a feature on the newly installed Vestas V-47 turbine at Turtle Mountain Community College.

  10. Landscape corridors can increase invasion by an exotic species and reduce diversity of native species.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resasco, Julian; et al,

    2014-04-01

    Abstract. Landscape corridors are commonly used to mitigate negative effects of habitat fragmentation, but concerns persist that they may facilitate the spread of invasive species. In a replicated landscape experiment of open habitat, we measured effects of corridors on the invasive fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, and native ants. Fire ants have two social forms: polygyne, which tend to disperse poorly but establish at high densities, and monogyne, which disperse widely but establish at lower densities. In landscapes dominated by polygyne fire ants, fire ant abundance was higher and native ant diversity was lower in habitat patches connected by corridors than in unconnected patches. Conversely, in landscapes dominated by monogyne fire ants, connectivity had no influence on fire ant abundance and native ant diversity. Polygyne fire ants dominated recently created landscapes, suggesting that these corridor effects may be transient. Our results suggest that corridors can facilitate invasion and they highlight the importance of considering species’ traits when assessing corridor utility.

  11. From drought to deluge : responses of native and exotic Southern California plant species to experimental variation in rainfall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashbacher, Angelita Consuelo de Dios

    2012-01-01

    traits: revisiting the Holy Grail", Functional Ecology, vol.2008, "Testing the Holy Grail framework: using functional

  12. Effects of non-native Spartina patens on plant and sediment organic matter carbon incorporation into the local invertebrate community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, Henry M.; Lastra, Mariano; Rodil, Iván F.; Briones, María Jesús; Garrido, Josefina

    2010-01-01

    of 13 C-enrichment in the Spar- tina zone was evident in theof invading populations of Spar- tina densi?ora Brong. in

  13. Effects of non-native Spartina patens on plant and sediment organic matter carbon incorporation into the local invertebrate community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, Henry M.; Lastra, Mariano; Rodil, Iván F.; Briones, María Jesús; Garrido, Josefina

    2010-01-01

    Haines B, Haines E (1979) Insect food preferences analysedbetween detritivore and insect herbivore food web pathways.between detritivore and insect herbivore food web pathways.

  14. Rangeland Watershed Management for Texans: Know Your Plants to Protect Your Watershed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rector, Barron S.

    2000-10-30

    ,? ?Texas virgins-bower,? ?old man?s beard,? ?love in the mist,? ?goat beard,? ?bar- bas de chivato,? and other common names in different parts of Texas. Some native plants have dozens of com- mon names. When you use common names, be sure they are accurate...-rooted perennial grasses create a more stable environment than do short- rooted grasses. Without good litter cover on the soil, the soil surface is exposed to full sunlight, higher temperatures, and higher soil water evaporation rates. Fewer plants can com- pete...

  15. Geothermal Demonstration Plant

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    configuration by the preparation of process flow diagrams for the initial plant operating condition and the 1-2 mid-range plant operating condition. have been revised and expanded...

  16. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mach; Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL), Zieler; Helge (Del Mar, CA), Jin; RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO), Keith; Kevin (Three Forks, MT), Copenhaver; Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC), Preuss; Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2011-11-22

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  17. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, James (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2006-06-26

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  18. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mach, Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Del Mar, CA); Jin, RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO); Keith, Kevin (Three Forks, MT); Copenhaver, Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2011-08-02

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  19. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, RongGuan (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

    2007-06-05

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  20. Plant centromere compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keith, Kevin; Copenhaver, Gregory; Preuss, Daphne

    2006-10-10

    The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

  1. HYDROCARBONS & ENERGY FROM PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemethy, E.K.

    2011-01-01

    LBL-8596 itr-t C,d.. HYDROCARBONS & ENERGY FROM PLANTS jmethods of isolating the hydrocarbon-like material from I.privatelyownedrights. HYDROCARBONS AND ENERGY FROM PLANTS

  2. Plant evolution The Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Plant evolution The Evolution of Plants by Kathy J. Willis and Jenny C. McElwain. Oxford University Press, 2002. $40.00/£22.99 pbk (378 pages) ISBN 0 19 850065 3 Developmental Genetics and Plant Evolution is observed for treatments of evolution and development. Titles of major monographs on the subject imply

  3. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

    2012-07-01

    This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

  4. NUCLEAR PLANT AND CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: software require- ments, safety analysis, formal for the digital protection systems of a nuclear power plant. When spec- ifying requirements for software and CRSA processes are described using shutdown system 2 of the Wolsong nuclear power plants as the digital

  5. Compact Beta Particle/Positron Imager for Plant Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisenberger, Andrew; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Xi, Wenze; Zorn, Carl; Stolin, Alexander; Majewski, Stan; Majewski, Stanislaw; Howell, Calvin; Crowell, Alec

    2011-06-01

    The 11CO2 tracer is used to facilitate plant biology research towards optimization of plant productivity, biofuel development and carbon sequestration in biomass. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to study carbon transport in live plants using 11CO2. Plants typically have very thin leaves resulting in little medium for the emitted positrons to undergo an annihilation event. For the emitted positron from 11C decay approximately 1mm of water equivalent material is needed for positron annihilation. Thus most of the positrons do not annihilate inside the leaf, resulting in limited sensitivity for PET imaging. To address this problem we have developed a compact beta-positive beta-minus particle (BPBM) imager for 11CO2 leaf imaging. The detector is based on a Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tube optically coupled via optical grease and a 3mm thick glass plate to a 0.5mm thick Eljin EJ-212 plastic scintillator. The detector is equipped with a flexible arm to allow its placement and orientation on the leaf of the plant of interest while maintaining the leaf's original orientation. We are planning to utilize the imaging device at the Duke University Phytotron to investigate dynamic carbon transport differences between invasive and native species.

  6. Electrical characterization of native-oxide InAlPGaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor heterostructures using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electrical characterization of native-oxide InAlPÕGaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor heterostructures 8 December 2003; accepted 20 January 2004 InAIP native oxide/GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor MOS of Schottky gates can lead to excessive gate leakage current and also restrict the forward gate bias to only

  7. Effects of microstructure on native oxide scale development and electrical characteristics of eutectic CuCu6La alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    , and the characteristics of the native oxide scales lead to contact resistances orders of magnitude higher than thoseEffects of microstructure on native oxide scale development and electrical characteristics atomic force microscopy techniques have been used to study the microstructure, oxide scale development

  8. Simulation Modeling of Plants and Plant Przemyslaw Prusinkiewicz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw

    Simulation Modeling of Plants and Plant Ecosystems Przemyslaw Prusinkiewicz Reference Przemyslaw Prusinkiewicz: Simulation Modeling of Plants and Plant Ecosystems. Communications of the ACM vol. 43 no. 7, pp The modeling of plants and plant ecosystems has the captivating appeal of reproducing the visual beauty

  9. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY USE AMONG AMERICAN INDIAN/ALASKAN NATIVES WITH MILD DISABILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, Perry Robert

    2014-13-31

    ABSTRACT This descriptive study explores the reasons why American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) students with mild disabilities are likely to have a difficult transition into adulthood and why assistive technology (AT) is not playing as large of a...

  10. University of Hawai`i System Native Hawaiian Student Programs Directory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegner, Tracy N.

    --West Hawaii Center 14 Kauai Island Kauai Community College 15 Lnai Island Lnai High & Elementary School1 University of Hawai`i System Native Hawaiian Student Programs Directory 2011 Initiative of Contents Purpose and Function of the Pkoa Council 3 University of Hawai`i System Scholarship Opportunities

  11. Introduction The Strawberry Weevil is known as the "Strawberry Clipper". It is a native of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Introduction The Strawberry Weevil is known as the "Strawberry Clipper". It is a native of North by the Strawberry Weevil. Don't confuse strawberry weevil with the strawberry root weevil, a different species on the wing covers. The larvae of the Strawberry Weevil are glassy white legless grubs and are usually found

  12. Regulations Pertaining to Non-native Fish in Florida Aquaculture1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FA-121 Regulations Pertaining to Non-native Fish in Florida Aquaculture1 Jeffrey E. Hill2 1 of a wide variety of warm-water and tropical species of ornamental, food, bait, and sport fish. In 2012, the farm-gate value of Florida aquaculture was US$69 million, with 40% of that value in ornamental fish

  13. Effect of Level and Frequency of Protein Supplementation on Utilization of Native South Texas Grass Hay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monson, Greta 1988-

    2011-04-20

    was to quantify forage utilization when grade levels of protein were delivered infrequently. Five ruminally cannulated Angus × Hereford steers (BW = 410 ± 43 kg) were used in a 5 × 4 incomplete Latin square. Steers were provided ad libitum access to native grass...

  14. International Scientific Conference Computer Science'2008 Near-Native Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fidanova, Stefka

    International Scientific Conference Computer Science'2008 61 Near-Native Protein Folding Stefka: The protein folding problem is a fundamental problem in computational molecular biology. The high resolution 3. After that the folding problem is de- fined like optimization problem. Keywords: Protein folding

  15. The Chinese brake fern (Pteris vittata L.), native to China, is widely naturalized in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    The Chinese brake fern (Pteris vittata L.), native to China, is widely naturalized in many areas and anatomical aspects of Chinese brake fern (Pteris vittata; Pteridaceae) Bhaskar Bondada1, Cong Tu, and Lena Ma-0290, U.S.A.; e-mail: lqma@ifas.ufl.edu). Sur- face structure and anatomical aspects of Chinese brake fern

  16. early 800 native fish species in 36 families inhabit the freshwater rivers, streams, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    N early 800 native fish species in 36 families inhabit the freshwater rivers, streams, and lakes of the United States and Canada. North America has the most diverse temperate freshwater fish fauna in the world. Only about 5 percent of these are the familiar sport or game fishes like trout and bass. The remaining

  17. Protocol for Appraisal of Petroleum Producing Properties on Native American Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-27

    Petroleum is currently produced on Native American Tribal Lands and has been produced on some of these lands for approximately 100 years. As these properties are abandoned at a production level that is considered the economic limit by the operator, Native American Tribes are considering this an opportunity to assume operator status to keep the properties producing. In addition to operating properties as they are abandoned, Native American Tribes also are assuming liabilities of the former operator(s) and ownership of equipment left upon abandonment. Often, operators are assumed by Native American Tribes without consideration of the liabilities left by the former operators. The purpose of this report is to provide protocols for the appraisal of petroleum producing properties and analysis of the petroleum resource to be produced after assuming operations. The appraisal protocols provide a spreadsheet for analysis of the producing property and a checklist of items to bring along before entering the property for onsite appraisal of the property. The report will provide examples of some environmental flags that may indicate potential liabilities remaining on the property left unaddressed by previous operators. It provides a starting point for appraisal and analysis of a property with a basis to make the decision to assume operations or to pursue remediation and/or closure of the liabilities of previous operators.

  18. Some Small Native Freshwater Fish Recommended for Mosquito and Midge Control in Ornamental Ponds1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    ENY-670 Some Small Native Freshwater Fish Recommended for Mosquito and Midge Control in Ornamental fish, and supplying water for wildlife, the potential for new mosquito breeding sites is increasing. Small insectivorous fish are a valuable tool in controlling mosquitoes and midges ("blind mosquitoes

  19. AN ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN FOLDING BY DECODING THE HIERARCHY OF NATIVE-STATE STRUCTURAL INTERACTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorpe, Michael

    AN ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN FOLDING BY DECODING THE HIERARCHY OF NATIVE-STATE STRUCTURAL INTERACTIONS and Department of Physics and Astronomy 2002 #12;ABSTRACT AN ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN FOLDING BY DECODING by which proteins fold is one of the most intensely studied prob- lems in science. Here, an analysis

  20. Palacios and Kitten: New High Performance Operating Systems For Scalable Virtualized and Native Supercomputing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinda, Peter A.

    of Energy's National Nuclear Security Adminis- tration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. · providing access and the University of New Mexico that enables applications executing in a virtualized environment to achieve scalable-featured virtualized environ- ments alongside Kitten's lightweight native environment. Pala- cios supports existing

  1. STUDIES IN MYCOLOGY 50: 343358. 2004. Speciation and distribution of Botryosphaeria spp. on native and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . on native and introduced Eucalyptus trees in Australia and South Africa Bernard Slippers1* , Gerda Fourie1-back pathogens that affect Eucalyptus spp. They also occur endophytically in Eucalyptus leaves and stems. For the purpose of this study, Botryosphaeria strains were isolated from diseased and symptomless Eucalyptus

  2. Non-native grasses alter evapotranspiration and energy balance in Great Basin sagebrush communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Non-native grasses alter evapotranspiration and energy balance in Great Basin sagebrush communities key ecosystem processes in the Great Basin, including hydrology and energy balance. To determine how) and energy fluxes using the Bowen ratio-energy balance method with measurements of normalized difference

  3. Distribution of Y Chromosomes Among Native North Americans: A Study of Athapaskan Population History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Brian M.

    -Champaign, IL 2 Departmento de Biologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico 3; mitochondrial DNA; founder effect; european contact; native American; migration; diffusion ABSTRACT and to test the Southern Athapaskan migration hypothesis. The results suggest that European admixture has

  4. Seedling insensitivity to ozone for three conifer species native to Great Smoky Mountains National Park$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, Howard S.

    Seedling insensitivity to ozone for three conifer species native to Great Smoky Mountains National concentrations of ozone had little eect on seedlings of three species of conifers commonly found in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Abstract Field symptoms typical of ozone injury have been observed on several

  5. Improved recognition of native-like protein structures using a family of designed sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koehl, Patrice

    Improved recognition of native-like protein structures using a family of designed sequences Patrice on computational protein design. The model structure is used as input to design a family of low free energy Koehl* and Michael Levitt Department of Structural Biology, Fairchild Building, Stanford University

  6. Controlling protein molecular dynamics: How to accelerate folding while preserving the native state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nerukh, Dmitry

    Controlling protein molecular dynamics: How to accelerate folding while preserving the native state state of the protein and at the same time, reduce the folding time in the simulation. We investigate 2008; accepted 14 October 2008; published online 11 December 2008 The dynamics of peptides and proteins

  7. Discrimination of Near-Native Protein Structures From Misfolded Models by Empirical Free Energy Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    Discrimination of Near-Native Protein Structures From Misfolded Models by Empirical Free Energy University, Boston, Massachusetts ABSTRACT Free energy potentials, combining molecular mechanics of discrimination that in- clude the correlation coefficient between RMSD and free energy, and a new measure labeled

  8. Shell decay rates of native and alien freshwater bivalves and implications for habitat engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shell decay rates of native and alien freshwater bivalves and implications for habitat engineering by the alien Corbicula and Dreissena may have little effect on standing stocks of spent shells, unless the aliens invade sites where unionids are scarce or absent. Keywords: aragonite, calcite, calcium carbonate

  9. COMMUNITY AND ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY Phenology and Spatial Distribution of Native and Exotic Tetropium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heard, Stephen B.

    , invasive T. fuscum and native T. cinnamopterum (TF and TC, respectively), provides a model system- come invasive pests because they kill trees in urban landscapes, spread to natural forests, threaten, usually on mor- ibund or recently killed trees (Þre killed or wind- blown) (Richmond and Lejeune 1945

  10. Summer Internship Program for American Indian and Native Alaska College Students

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19

    Argonne National Laboratory's Summer Internship Program for American Indian & Native Alaska College Students. Supported by the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development (IEED) in partnership with the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. Energy Density of Introduced Round Goby Compared with Four Native Fishes in a Lake Michigan Tributary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Density of Introduced Round Goby Compared with Four Native Fishes in a Lake Michigan Ambloplites rupestris. We found positive linear relationships between energy density and the percent dry energy density. Energy density was lower in spring and summer than in fall. The spatial variation

  12. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Naval Industrial Reserve Ordnance Plant, Fridley, MN. (First remedial action), September 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The 82.6-acre Naval Industrial Reserve Ordnance Plant (NIROP) site is a weapons system manufacturing facility in Fridley, Minnesota, which began operations in 1940. The site is a government-owned, contractor-operated, plant located just north of the FMC Corp. During the 1970s, paint sludge and chlorinated solvents were disposed of onsite in pits and trenches. In 1981, State investigations identified TCE in onsite water supply wells drawing from the Prairie DuChien/Jordan aquifer, and the wells were shut down. In 1983, EPA found drummed waste in the trenches or pits at the northern portion of the site, and as a result, during 1983 and 1984, the Navy authorized an installation restoration program, during which approximately 1,200 cubic yards of contaminated soil and 42 drums were excavated and landfilled offsite. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the remediation of a shallow ground water operable unit. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including PCE, TCE, toluene, and xylene.

  13. Comparison of buccal and blood-derived canine DNA, either native or whole genome amplified, for array-based genome-wide association studies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    of buccal and blood- derived canine DNA, either native orof buccal and blood-derived canine DNA, either native orthe utility of buccal-derived DNA as well as whole genome

  14. Conditional sterility in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meagher, Richard B. (Athens, GA); McKinney, Elizabeth (Athens, GA); Kim, Tehryung (Taejeon, KR)

    2010-02-23

    The present disclosure provides methods, recombinant DNA molecules, recombinant host cells containing the DNA molecules, and transgenic plant cells, plant tissue and plants which contain and express at least one antisense or interference RNA specific for a thiamine biosynthetic coding sequence or a thiamine binding protein or a thiamine-degrading protein, wherein the RNA or thiamine binding protein is expressed under the regulatory control of a transcription regulatory sequence which directs expression in male and/or female reproductive tissue. These transgenic plants are conditionally sterile; i.e., they are fertile only in the presence of exogenous thiamine. Such plants are especially appropriate for use in the seed industry or in the environment, for example, for use in revegetation of contaminated soils or phytoremediation, especially when those transgenic plants also contain and express one or more chimeric genes which confer resistance to contaminants.

  15. Native Chemical Ligation at Asx-Cys, Glx-Cys: Chemical Synthesis and High-Resolution Xray Structure of ShK Toxin by Racemic Protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bezanilla, Francisco

    Native Chemical Ligation at Asx-Cys, Glx-Cys: Chemical Synthesis and High-Resolution Xray Structure Supporting Information ABSTRACT: We have re-examined the utility of native chemical ligation at -Gln- mercaptophenylacetic acid (MPAA), native chemical ligation could be performed at -Gln-Cys- and Asn-Cys- sites without

  16. SC Johnson Waxdale Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-01

    This is a combined heat and power (CHP) project profile on a 6.4 MW CHP application at SC Johnson Waxdale Plant in Racine, Wisconsin.

  17. HYDROCARBONS & ENERGY FROM PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemethy, E.K.

    2011-01-01

    17 harvest was 19 rainfall contributed 5.6" water. Harvest.harvest 29 Aug~st, when plants began to flower, approximately 15 irrigation water

  18. Prairie Rose | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, BluePoulsen Hybrid, LLCBiofuelsEthanol LLC Jump to:Rose

  19. Modulating lignin in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

    2013-01-29

    Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

  20. Plant pathogen resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Jean T; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

    2012-11-27

    Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

  1. Plant fatty acid hydroxylase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Lexington, KY)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to the identification of nucleic acid sequences and constructs, and methods related thereto, and the use of these sequences and constructs to produce genetically modified plants for the purpose of altering the composition of plant oils, waxes and related compounds.

  2. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed of Reactor Physics SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden GABOR PÓR Budapest University of Technology and Economics H

  3. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: moderator temper- ature coefficient, reactivity co reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed of Reactor Physics SE-41296 Gothenburg, Sweden GABOR PÓR Budapest University of Technology and Economics H

  4. Palacios and Kitten : high performance operating systems for scalable virtualized and native supercomputing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widener, Patrick (University of New Mexico); Jaconette, Steven (Northwestern University); Bridges, Patrick G. (University of New Mexico); Xia, Lei (Northwestern University); Dinda, Peter (Northwestern University); Cui, Zheng.; Lange, John (Northwestern University); Hudson, Trammell B.; Levenhagen, Michael J.; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2009-09-01

    Palacios and Kitten are new open source tools that enable applications, whether ported or not, to achieve scalable high performance on large machines. They provide a thin layer over the hardware to support both full-featured virtualized environments and native code bases. Kitten is an OS under development at Sandia that implements a lightweight kernel architecture to provide predictable behavior and increased flexibility on large machines, while also providing Linux binary compatibility. Palacios is a VMM that is under development at Northwestern University and the University of New Mexico. Palacios, which can be embedded into Kitten and other OSes, supports existing, unmodified applications and operating systems by using virtualization that leverages hardware technologies. We describe the design and implementation of both Kitten and Palacios. Our benchmarks show that they provide near native, scalable performance. Palacios and Kitten provide an incremental path to using supercomputer resources that is not performance-compromised.

  5. Alaska Native Weatherization Training and Jobs Program First Steps Toward Tribal Weatherization – Human Capacity Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiita, Joanne

    2013-07-30

    The Alaska Native Weatherization Training and Jobs Project expanded weatherization services for tribal members’ homes in southeast Alaska while providing weatherization training and on the job training (OJT) for tribal citizens that lead to jobs and most probably careers in weatherization-related occupations. The program resulted in; (a) 80 Alaska Native citizens provided with skills training in five weatherization training units that were delivered in cooperation with University of Alaska Southeast, in accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy Core Competencies for Weatherization Training that prepared participants for employment in three weatherizationrelated occupations: Installer, Crew Chief, and Auditor; (b) 25 paid OJT training opportunities for trainees who successfully completed the training course; and (c) employed trained personnel that have begun to rehab on over 1,000 housing units for weatherization.

  6. Voice-Onset-Time in the Perception of Foreign Accent by Native Listeners of Spanish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez-Bueno, Manuela

    1997-01-01

    of phonetic parameters measured in the speech of second language learners are often intermediate to those typical of monolingual speakers of the native and target language" (Pinkerton 1972, Suomi 1976, Flege 1980). An acceptable pronunciation of Spanish... and Fred D. Brandt 1987. Burst and Transition Cues to Voicing Perception for Spoken Initial Stops by Impaired and Normal- Hearing Listeners. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 30, 3: 311. Suomi, K. 1976. English Voiceless and Voiced Stops...

  7. An Analysis of Price Behavior for both Native and Improved Pecans: 1974-1989 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Steven Farnham

    1991-01-01

    & Tree Nuts-Situation & Outlook teleport' Source OSN: NASS. USDA '(Pop Production' Figure 1. Native Pecans: October Estimates v. Final Production, 1974-1989. IMPROVED PECANS October Estimate v. Final Production M I L L I 0 N 160 100 60... 1974 1976 1978 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 YEARS USQI ~ OEI Source USQL MASS, USDA 'Fruit lk Tree Nuts-Sttuotion tk Outlook teleport' Source OSI: NASS. USDA 'Crop Productton' Figure 2. Improved Pecans: October Estimates v. Final Production, 1974...

  8. Modeling plant growth and development Przemyslaw Prusinkiewicz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw

    Modeling plant growth and development Przemyslaw Prusinkiewicz Department of Computer Science plant models or "virtual plants" are increasingly seen as a useful tool for comprehending complex relationships between gene function, plant physiology, plant development, and the resulting plant form

  9. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Photosynthesis: Plants Making...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photosynthesis: Plants Making Fuel BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Photosynthesis: Plants Making Fuel BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Photosynthesis: Plants Making Fuel...

  10. The Influence of Cultural Schema on L2 Production: Analysis of Native Russian Speakers' English Personal Narratives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Mary

    2012-10-19

    The present study focuses on 24 personal narratives told by eight highly proficient bilingual L1-Russian, L2-English speakers (NRS) in comparison to 24 personal narratives told by eight native English speakers (NES) in an ...

  11. Red imported fire ant impact on native ants and litter removal in the post oak savannah of central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedford, Theresa Louise

    2006-08-16

    I examined the impacts of the invasive red imported fire ant (RIFA, Solenopsis invicta) on native ants (Monomorium minimum, Paratrechina sp., S. krockowi, Pheidole metallescens, Forelius pruinosus, and Camponotus americanus) and litter removal in a...

  12. Plant Phenotype Characterization System | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plant Phenotype Characterization System Plant Phenotype Characterization System New X-Ray Technology Accelerates Plant Research The ability to analyze plant root structure and...

  13. Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  14. Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  15. Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  16. Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  17. Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  18. Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  19. Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  20. Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  1. Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  2. Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  3. Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  4. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  5. Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  6. Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  7. Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  8. California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  9. Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  10. Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  11. Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  12. Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  13. Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  14. Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  15. Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  16. Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  17. Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  18. Marine Invaders in the Northeast: Rapid Assessment Survey of Non-native and Native Marine Species of Floating Dock Communities, August 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pederson, Judith

    2005-01-01

    In his seminal book on The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants, Elton (1958) laid the foundation for the science of biological invasions. He identified the importance of human-mediated vectors as means of transporting ...

  19. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Drilling a deep geothermal well on the Oregon Institute of Technology campus, Klamath Falls, OR. Constructing a geothermal power plant on the Oregon Institute of Technology campus.

  20. Plant Site Refrigeration Upgrade 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zdrojewski, R.; Healy, M.; Ramsey, J.

    1999-01-01

    Bayer Corporation operates a multi-division manufacturing facility in Bushy Park, South Carolina. Low temperature refrigeration (-4°F) is required by many of the chemical manufacturing areas and is provided by a Plant Site Refrigeration System...

  1. HYDROCARBONS & ENERGY FROM PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemethy, E.K.

    2011-01-01

    categories: I. Methods of extraction of the dried plants.d) Processing methods: optimum extraction procedures;is the traditional method of extraction for rUbber-pr~duci

  2. Heating Plant Emergency Instructions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Leon, Alex R.

    Heating Plant Emergency Instructions In the event of an EMERGENCY dial 403-220-5333 for Campus room, closet or hallway (ground floor, if possible) Stay away from outside walls, windows and doors

  3. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  4. & Immobilization Plant Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and monitoring challenges at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) in Hanford. The "black cell" design concept and the use of Power Fluidic Pulse Jet Mixer technology on which WTP is...

  5. Native American Children and Their Reports of Hope: A Factor Analytic Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mashunkashey-Shadlow, Joanna

    2007-12-27

    and secondary coder and kappa coefficients were used to check for reliability of category representation. Chi-square analyses were further used to examine categorical differences. Third, to analyze the intercorrelations of the Children’s Hope Scale questions....38 Question 4 3.81 1.37 Question 5 4.10 1.38 Question 6 4.11 1.30 Kappa Coefficients and Chi-square analyses To understand Native American children’s perception of hope in relation to Snyder’s Hope Theory, themes on the children’s Hope...

  6. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Tonya

    2013-12-01

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  7. Geothermal Plant Capacity Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Mines; Jay Nathwani; Christopher Richard; Hillary Hanson; Rachel Wood

    2015-01-01

    The capacity factors recently provided by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) indicated this plant performance metric had declined for geothermal power plants since 2008. Though capacity factor is a term commonly used by geothermal stakeholders to express the ability of a plant to produce power, it is a term frequently misunderstood and in some instances incorrectly used. In this paper we discuss how this capacity factor is defined and utilized by the EIA, including discussion on the information that the EIA requests from operations in their 923 and 860 forms that are submitted both monthly and annually by geothermal operators. A discussion is also provided regarding the entities utilizing the information in the EIA reports, and how those entities can misinterpret the data being supplied by the operators. The intent of the paper is to inform the facility operators as the importance of the accuracy of the data that they provide, and the implications of not providing the correct information.

  8. In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Probing of Native Oxide and Artificial Layers on Silicon Nanoparticles for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Yang; Piper, Daniela M.; Gu, Meng; Travis, Jonathan J.; George, Steven M.; Lee, Se-Hee; Genc, Arda; Pullan, Lee; Liu, Jun; Mao, Scott X.; Zhang, Jiguang; Ban, Chunmei; Wang, Chong M.

    2014-11-25

    Surface modification of silicon nanoparticle via molecular layer deposition (MLD) has been recently proved to be an effective way for dramatically enhancing the cyclic performance in lithium ion batteries. However, the fundamental mechanism as how this thin layer of coating function is not known, which is even complicated by the inevitable presence of native oxide of several nanometers on the silicon nanoparticle. Using in-situ TEM, we probed in detail the structural and chemical evolution of both uncoated and coated silicon particles upon cyclic lithiation/delithation. We discovered that upon initial lithiation, the native oxide layer converts to crystalline Li2O islands, which essentially increases the impedance on the particle, resulting in ineffective lithiation/delithiation, and therefore low coulombic efficiency. In contrast, the alucone MLD coated particles show extremely fast, thorough and highly reversible lithiation behaviors, which are clarified to be associated with the mechanical flexibility and fast Li+/e- conductivity of the alucone coating. Surprisingly, the alucone MLD coating process chemically changes the silicon surface, essentially removing the native oxide layer and therefore mitigates side reaction and detrimental effects of the native oxide. This study provides a vivid picture of how the MLD coating works to enhance the coulombic efficiency and preserve capacity and clarifies the role of the native oxide on silicon nanoparticles during cyclic lithiation and delithiation. More broadly, this work also demonstrated that the effect of the subtle chemical modification of the surface during the coating process may be of equal importance as the coating layer itself.

  9. Co-Designing Sustainable Communities: The Identification and Incorporation of Social Performance Metrics in Native American Sustainable Housing and Renewable Energy System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelby, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Big refrigerators Exercise and Human Power Generation NativeWarmer Floors (No Wood) Human Power Generation Buildingdevelopment by having human power generation Preserve

  10. Co-Designing Sustainable Communities: The Identification and Incorporation of Social Performance Metrics in Native American Sustainable Housing and Renewable Energy System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shelby, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    renewable energy power generation from wind power to provideExercise and Human Power Generation Native Shrubs in theFloors (No Wood) Human Power Generation Building Materials

  11. Prefibrillar transthyretin oligomers and cold stored native tetrameric transthyretin are cytotoxic in cell culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soergjerd, Karin; Klingstedt, Therese [IFM- Department of Chemistry, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Lindgren, Mikael [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Kagedal, Katarina [Division of Experimental Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping University, S-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden); Hammarstroem, Per [IFM- Department of Chemistry, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden)], E-mail: perha@ifm.liu.se

    2008-12-26

    Recent studies suggest that soluble, oligomeric species, which are intermediates in the fibril formation process in amyloid disease, might be the key species in amyloid pathogenesis. Soluble oligomers of human wild type transthyretin (TTR) were produced to elucidate oligomer properties. Employing ThT fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy of pyrene-labeled TTR, chemical cross-linking, and electron microscopy we demonstrated that early formed soluble oligomers (within minutes) from A-state TTR comprised on the average 20-30 TTR monomers. When administered to neuroblastoma cells these early oligomers proved highly cytotoxic and induced apoptosis after 48 h of incubation. More mature fibrils (>24 h of fibrillation) were non-toxic. Surprisingly, we also found that native tetrameric TTR, when purified and stored under cold conditions (4 deg. C) was highly cytotoxic. The effect could be partially restored by increasing the temperature of the protein. The cytotoxic effects of native tetrameric TTR likely stems from a hitherto unexplored low temperature induced rearrangement of the tetramer conformation that possibly is related to the conformation of misfolded TTR in amyloigogenic oligomers.

  12. REESTABLISHMENT OF NATIVE RIPARIAN SPECIES AT AN ALTERED HIGH ELEVATION SITE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This hydro facility adds more than a million kilowatts of electric generation ca- pacity to the Pacific Gas, California. 2 Consulting Horticulturist and Senior Statistician, respectively, Pacific Gas and Electric of plants; use of a qualified contractor; and applying ecological principles in planting techniques

  13. NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics, localization algorithm LOCALIZATION OF A VIBRATING CONTROL ROD PIN IN PRESSURIZED WATER REACTORS USING. The possibility of the localization of a vibrating control rod pin in a pressurized water reactor control assembly

  14. Mechanisms in Plant Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hake, Sarah

    2013-08-21

    This meeting has been held every other year for the past twenty-two years and is the only regularly held meeting focused specifically on plant development. Topics covered included: patterning in developing tissues; short and long distance signaling; differentiation of cell types; the role of epigenetics in development; evolution; growth.

  15. Top 10 plant pathogenic bacteria in molecular plant pathology.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Foster, G.D. (2012) The top 10 fungal pathogens in molecularBLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD Top 10 plant pathogenic bacteriaC. and Foster, G.D. (2011) Top 10 plant viruses in molecular

  16. Valuation of environmental quality and eco-cultural attributes in Northwestern Idaho: Native Americans are more concerned than Caucasians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, Joanna, E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu [Division of Life Sciences, Nelson Biological Laboratory, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States) [Division of Life Sciences, Nelson Biological Laboratory, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Valuation of features of habitats and ecosystems usually encompasses the goods and services that ecosystems provide, but rarely also examine how people value ecological resources in terms of eco-cultural and sacred activities. The social, sacred, and cultural aspects of ecosystems are particularly important to Native Americans, but western science has rarely examined the importance of eco-cultural attributes quantitatively. In this paper I explore differences in ecosystem evaluations, and compare the perceptions and evaluations of places people go for consumptive and non-consumptive resource use with evaluations of the same qualities for religious and sacred places. Qualities of ecosystems included goods (abundant fish and crabs, butterflies and flowers, clean water), services (complexity of nature, lack of radionuclides that present a health risk), and eco-cultural attributes (appears unspoiled, scenic horizons, noise-free). Native Americans and Caucasians were interviewed at a Pow Wow at Post Falls, Idaho, which is in the region with the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, known for its storage of radioactive wastes and contamination. A higher percentage of Native American subjects engaged in consumptive and religious activities than did Caucasians. Native Americans engaged in higher rates of many activities than did Caucasians, including commune with nature, pray or meditate, fish or hunt, collect herbs, and conduct vision quests or other ceremonies. For nearly all attributes, there was no difference in the relative ratings given by Native Americans for characteristics of sites used for consumption/non-consumptive activities compared to religious/sacred places. However, Caucasians rated nearly all attributes lower for religious/sacred places than they did for places where they engaged in consumptive or non-consumptive activities. Native Americans were less concerned with distance from home for consumptive/non-consumptive activities, compared to religious activities. - Research Highlights: {yields} A higher percentage of Native Americans engaged in consumptive and religious activities than did Caucasians interviewed. {yields} Caucasians rated environmental attributes as more important for consumptive and non-consumptive activities than they did for places where they engaged in religious/cultural ones. {yields} Native Americans rated environmental attributes as equally important regardless of the activities performed. {yields} Eco-cultural attributes (such as 'appears unspoiled') were rated as high as ecosystem services (e.g. unpolluted water).

  17. Assessment of Native Salmonids Above Hells Canyon Dam, Idaho, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Kevin A.; Lamansky, Jr., James A.

    2005-08-01

    In the western United States, exotic brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis frequently have a deleterious effect on native salmonids, and biologists often attempt to remove brook trout in streams using electrofishing. Although the success of electrofishing removal projects typically is low, few studies have assessed the underlying mechanisms of failure, especially in terms of compensatory responses. We evaluated the effectiveness of a three-year removal project in reducing brook trout and enhancing native salmonids in 7.8 km of an Idaho stream and looked for brook trout compensatory responses such as decreased natural mortality, increased growth, increased fecundity at length, or earlier maturation. Due to underestimates of the distribution of brook trout in the first year and personnel shortages in the third year, the multiagency watershed advisory group that performed the project fully treated the stream (i.e. multipass removals over the entire stream) in only one year. In 1998, 1999, and 2000, a total of 1,401, 1,241, and 890 brook trout were removed, respectively. For 1999 and 2000, an estimated 88 and 79% of the total number of brook trout in the stream were removed. For the section of stream that was treated in all years, the abundance of age-1 and older brook trout decreased by 85% from 1998 to 2003. In the same area, the abundance of age-0 brook trout decreased 86% from 1998 to 1999 but by 2003 had rebounded to near the original abundance. Abundance of native redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss decreased for age-1 and older fish but did not change significantly for age-0 fish. Despite high rates of removal, total annual survival rate for brook trout increased from 0.08 {+-} 0.02 in 1998 to 0.20 {+-} 0.04 in 1999 and 0.21 {+-} 0.04 in 2000. Growth of age-0 brook trout was significantly higher in 2000 (the year after their abundance was lowest) compared to other years, and growth of age-1 and age-2 brook trout was significantly lower following the initial removal years but recovered by 2003. Few other brook trout demographic parameters changed appreciably over the course of the project. Electrofishing removals required 210 person-days of effort. Despite experiencing slight changes in abundance, growth, and survival, brook trout in Pikes Fork appeared little affected by three years of intensive removal efforts, most likely because mortality within the population was high prior to initiation of the project such that the removal efforts merely replaced natural mortality with exploitation.

  18. Production of virus resistant plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, William G. (Philomath, OR); Lindbo, John A. (Kent, WA)

    1996-01-01

    A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection.

  19. Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  20. Production of virus resistant plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, W.G.; Lindbo, J.A.

    1996-12-10

    A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection. 9 figs.

  1. Gene encoding plant asparagine synthetase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coruzzi, Gloria M. (New York, NY); Tsai, Fong-Ying (New York, NY)

    1993-10-26

    The identification and cloning of the gene(s) for plant asparagine synthetase (AS), an important enzyme involved in the formation of asparagine, a major nitrogen transport compound of higher plants is described. Expression vectors constructed with the AS coding sequence may be utilized to produce plant AS; to engineer herbicide resistant plants, salt/drought tolerant plants or pathogen resistant plants; as a dominant selectable marker; or to select for novel herbicides or compounds useful as agents that synchronize plant cells in culture. The promoter for plant AS, which directs high levels of gene expression and is induced in an organ specific manner and by darkness, is also described. The AS promoter may be used to direct the expression of heterologous coding sequences in appropriate hosts.

  2. Getting Inside Plants | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ability to use additional CO2, how plants pass on additional CO2 to bacteria in the soil (carbon sequestration), and in what ways potential biofuel-producing plants can be...

  3. Independent Oversight Evaluation, Pantex Plant - November 2000...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evaluation, Pantex Plant - November 2000 Independent Oversight Evaluation, Pantex Plant - November 2000 November 2000 Evaluation of the Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise...

  4. Fate of Radionuclides in Wastewater Treatment Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shabani Samgh Abadi, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    21 3. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS……………………………………………….. 23 3.1-25 3.2- WASTES FROM NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS………………………… 28 4.radionuclides 3. Nuclear Power Plants, which includes some

  5. Fate of Radionuclides in Wastewater Treatment Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shabani Samgh Abadi, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    concerns about nuclear power plants safety after the Threedoubts regarding nuclear power plants safety. 3.1- Nuclearof nuclear power plants in order to meet safety requirements

  6. US prep plant census 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-10-15

    Each year Coal Age conducts a fairly comprehensive survey of the industry to produce the US coal preparation plant survey. This year's survey shows how many mergers and acquisitions have given coal operators more coal washing capacity. The plants are tabulated by state, giving basic details including company owner, plant name, raw feed, product ash %, quality, type of plant builder and year built. 1 tab., 1 photo.

  7. Minority Summer Research Program in the Plant Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poff, Kenneth L.

    2004-08-12

    Gutierrez and Larcom (2000) suggest that ''According to the National Science Foundation/Division of Science Resources Studies in 1997, the percentage distribution of scientists and engineers in the labor force by race/ethnicity changed little between 1993 and 1997''. According to this report, Black, non-Hispanic went from 3.6 in 1993 to 3.4 in 1997. Hispanic went from 3.0 in 1993 to 3.1 in 1997; and American Indian/Alaskan Native stayed the same at 0.3 during the same period. The only exceptions were a slight increase in the percentage of Asian from 9.2 in 1993 to 10.4 in 1997, while a slight decrease in percentage White from 83.9 in 1993 to 82.8 in 1997. Overall, no major changes in minorities were present in the science and engineering fields during that period. These data shows that major efforts are needed in order to improve and achieve better results for diversity in the workplace (Gutierrez & Larcom, 2000). This does not mean that major steps have not been taken over this period. For example, the Minority Summer Research Program in Plant Sciences (also funded in part by NSF under the title, ''Undergraduate Researchers in Plant Sciences Program'') was established in an effort to enhance the diversity of the plant science community. The Minority Summer Research Program in Plant Sciences was designed to encourage members of underrepresented groups to seek career opportunities in the plant sciences. To achieve this end, the program contained several components with the primary focus on mentored research for undergraduate students. The research experience was provided during the summer months on the campus of Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan. At the end of the summer experience, each participant presented an oral report on their research, and submitted a written paper on the same topic. This was deliberately designed to mimic the plant science professions in which research leads to presentations in the form of reports, papers, etc. In addition to the program's research component, the participants met twice each week with the co-coordinators, William Gordon and Ken Poff, for an ''enrichment''. One ''enrichment'' each week was dedicated to a seminar or field experience designed to broaden the participants views of the plant sciences. The second ''enrichment'' was designed to teach strategies for successfully crossing cultural barriers, and to develop the skills necessary for success in admissions to and successful completion of graduate school. During the eleven-year duration of the program, participants have included students from underrepresented populations at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), an Hispanic Serving Institution (MSI), and a Native American transfer student from a Tribal College (Table I).

  8. Old-field plant succession on the Pajarito Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foxx, T.; Mullen, M.; Salisbury, M.; Tierney, G.

    1997-10-01

    Eight fallow historic fields of the ponderosa pine and pinon-juniper cover types were surveyed to determine species composition and distribution. The purpose of the study was to understand plant succession on old fields as related to mechanically manipulated sites such as material disposal areas (MDAs). Additionally, the authors wanted a listing of species on disturbed lands of the Pajarito Plateau to aide in the reclamation planning of MDAs using native species. They also wanted to determine if any species could be used as an indicator of disturbance. The eight historic fields were all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, and had been abandoned in 1943. Two sites were within the boundaries of Los Alamos National Laboratory and were studied both in 1982 and 1993. The study provides a description of each of the field sites, historic information about the homesteads from patent applications, a photographic record of some of the sites, and a listing of species found within each field. The study showed that there were 78 different plant species found on disturbed sites. Of these 78 species, 23 were found to be dominant on one or more of the MDAs or old fields. Although, the disturbance history of each site is imperfectly known, the study does provide an indication of successional processes within disturbed sites of the Pajarito Plateau. Additionally, it provides a listing of species that will invade disturbed sites, species that may be used in site reclamation.

  9. Regulating nutrient allocation in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Udvardi, Michael; Yang, Jiading; Worley, Eric

    2014-12-09

    The invention provides coding and promoter sequences for a VS-1 and AP-2 gene, which affects the developmental process of senescence in plants. Vectors, transgenic plants, seeds, and host cells comprising heterologous VS-1 and AP-2 genes are also provided. Additionally provided are methods of altering nutrient allocation and composition in a plant using the VS-1 and AP-2 genes.

  10. Plant Microbiology Lab SYLLABUS 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    of beneficial microorganisms on plants. Assays will include colonization of the plants, N stress alleviation for sequencing Mon Mar 3 Measure seedlings (5 wk data). Other plant phys expts? Early in the week: your sequencing results will be emailed to you Fri Mar 7 Lab write-up #2 on Strai

  11. North City Water Reclamation Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    -Site Cogeneration Methane Power Plant Methane piped in from: Miramar LandfillMiramar Landfill Metropolitan BiosolidsNorth City Water Reclamation Plant Maja Caroee Diana Lee Niko Salvador #12;What is Water% for plant operation 25% sold to local power grid #12;Technical Issues & Innovations COMNET Clean water

  12. Mercury Emission Measurement at a CFB Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Lucinda Hamre

    2009-02-28

    In response to pending regulation to control mercury emissions in the United States and Canada, several projects have been conducted to perform accurate mass balances at pulverized coal (pc)-fired utilities. Part of the mercury mass balance always includes total gaseous mercury as well as a determination of the speciation of the mercury emissions and a concentration bound to the particulate matter. This information then becomes useful in applying mercury control strategies, since the elemental mercury has traditionally been difficult to control by most technologies. In this instance, oxidation technologies have proven most beneficial for increased capture. Despite many years of mercury measurement and control projects at pc-fired units, far less work has been done on circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) units, which are able to combust a variety of feedstocks, including cofiring coal with biomass. Indeed, these units have proven to be more problematic because it is very difficult to obtain a reliable mercury mass balance. These units tend to have very different temperature profiles than pc-fired utility boilers. The flexibility of CFB units also tends to be an issue when a mercury balance is determined, since the mercury inputs to the system come from the bed material and a variety of fuels, which can have quite variable chemistry, especially for mercury. In addition, as an integral part of the CFB operation, the system employs a feedback loop to circulate the bed material through the combustor and the solids collection system (the primary cyclone), thereby subjecting particulate-bound metals to higher temperatures again. Despite these issues, CFB boilers generally emit very little mercury and show good native capture. The Energy & Environmental Research Center is carrying out this project for Metso Power in order to characterize the fate of mercury across the unit at Rosebud Plant, an industrial user of CFB technology from Metso. Appropriate solids were collected, and flue gas samples were obtained using the Ontario Hydro method, mercury continuous emission monitors, and sorbent trap methods. In addition, chlorine and fluorine were determined for solids and in the flue gas stream. Results of this project have indicated a very good mercury mass balance for Rosebud Plant, indicating 105 {+-} 19%, which is well within acceptable limits. The mercury flow through the system was shown to be primarily in with the coal and out with the flue gas, which falls outside of the norm for CFB boilers.

  13. Integrated turbomachine oxygen plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; DePuy, Richard Anthony; Muthaiah, Veerappan

    2014-06-17

    An integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes a turbomachine and an air separation unit. One or more compressor pathways flow compressed air from a compressor through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. An air separation unit is operably connected to the one or more compressor pathways and is configured to separate the compressed air into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air. A method of air separation in an integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes compressing a flow of air in a compressor of a turbomachine. The compressed flow of air is flowed through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander of the turbomachine to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. The compressed flow of air is directed to an air separation unit and is separated into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air.

  14. Renewable Energy Feasibility Study Leading to Development of the Native Spirit Solar Energy Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carolyn Stewart; Tracey LeBeau

    2008-01-31

    DOE-funded renewable energy feasibility study conducted by Red Mountain Tribal Energy on behalf of the Southwest Tribal Energy Consortium (SWTEC). During the course of the study, SWTEC members considered multiple options for the organization structure, selected a proposed organization structure, and drafted a Memorandum of Understanding for the SWTEC organization. High-level resource assessments for SWTEC members were completed; surveys were developed and completed to determine each member’s interest in multiple participation options, including on-reservation projects. With the survey inputs in mind, multiple energy project options were identified and evaluated on a high-level basis. That process led to a narrowing of the field of technology options to solar generation, specifically, utility-scale Concentrating Solar-Powered Generation projects, with a specific, tentative project location identified at the Fort Mojave Indian Reservation -- the Native Spirit Solar Energy Facility.

  15. The Chemistry, Archaeology, and Ethnography of a Native American Insect Resin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stacey, Rebecca J; Heron, Carl; Sutton, Mark Q

    1998-01-01

    Sutton, Mark Q. 1988 Insects as Food: Aboriginal EntomophagyFriedrich S. 1951 Insects as Human Food. The Hague: W. Junk.of die food plant as of the difference between the insects

  16. The Geology of North America as Illustrated by Native American Stories by Robert G. McWilliams 1 The Geology of North America as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    The Geology of North America as Illustrated by Native American Stories by Robert G. McWilliams 1 The Geology of North America as Illustrated by Native American Stories Robert G. McWilliams Professor Emeritus Department of Geology Miami University Oxford, Ohio 45056 mcwillrg@muohio.edu #12;The Geology of North

  17. Table S1. Native American populations included in this study, and the coordinates used for their sampling locations. Population name in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Noah

    Table S1. Native American populations included in this study, and the coordinates used at 66.08ºN 76.5ºE. #12;Table S2. Languages of the Native American populations included in this study

  18. Fron%ers in Biological Sciences Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and greenhouse gas emission. However, study of soil microorganisms is challenging because of the soil microbial native prairie soils. In Alaska, we looked at a site undergoing a natural thaw transition and thaw caused there were dramatic changes in microbial community composition and function with thaw. In the prairie we

  19. Grasses and Forage Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittuck, B. C.

    1898-01-01

    State. A large number of the grasses, including many of the common culti? vated clovers and legumes, and many rare hay plants, on our experi? mental plots during 1897, were gathered and supplied by special agents of the United States Agricultural...), Trifolium hybridum (Alsike Clover), Large Red Clover, Trifolium repens (White Dutch Clover), suffered from the drouth and sun, but have made better growth at this place than during previous years. SPOROBOLUS. 8. wrighti*?Perennial. Germinated April 2...

  20. Doping against the native propensity of MoS?: Degenerate hole doping by cation substitution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suh, Joonki; Park, Tae-Eon; Lin, Der-Yuh; Fu, Deyi; Park, Joonsuk; Jung, Hee Joon; Chen, Yabin; Ko, Changhyun; Jang, Chaun; Sun, Yinghui; Sinclair, Robert; Chang, Joonyeon; Tongay, Sefaattin; Wu, Junqiao

    2014-12-10

    Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) draw much attention as the key semiconducting material for two-dimensional electrical, optoelectronic, and spintronic devices. For most of these applications, both n- and p-type materials are needed to form junctions and support bipolar carrier conduction. However, typically only one type of doping is stable for a particular TMD. For example, molybdenum disulfide (MoS?) is natively an n-type presumably due to omnipresent electron-donating sulfur vacancies, and stable/controllable p-type doping has not been achieved. The lack of p-type doping hampers the development of charge-splitting p–n junctions of MoS?, as well as limits carrier conduction to spin-degenerate conduction bands instead of the more interesting, spin-polarized valence bands. Traditionally, extrinsic p-type doping in TMDs has been approached with surface adsorption or intercalation of electron-accepting molecules. However, practically stable doping requires substitution of host atoms with dopants where the doping is secured by covalent bonding. In this work, we demonstrate stable p-type conduction in MoS? by substitutional niobium (Nb) doping, leading to a degenerate hole density of ~3 × 10¹? cm?³. Structural and X-ray techniques reveal that the Nb atoms are indeed substitutionally incorporated into MoS? by replacing the Mo cations in the host lattice. van der Waals p–n homojunctions based on vertically stacked MoS? layers are fabricated, which enable gate-tunable current rectification. A wide range of microelectronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic devices can be envisioned from the demonstrated substitutional bipolar doping of MoS?. From the miscibility of dopants with the host, it is also expected that the synthesis technique demonstrated here can be generally extended to other TMDs for doping against their native unipolar propensity.

  1. Final Project Report, Bristol Bay Native Corporation Wind and Hydroelectric Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaught, Douglas J.

    2007-03-31

    The Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC) grant project focused on conducting nine wind resource studies in eight communities in the Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska and was administered as a collaborative effort between BBNC, the Alaska Energy Authority, Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Nushagak Electric Cooperative (NEC), Naknek Electric Association (NEA), and several individual village utilities in the region. BBNC’s technical contact and the project manager for this study was Douglas Vaught, P.E., of V3 Energy, LLC, in Eagle River, Alaska. The Bristol Bay region of Alaska is comprised of 29 communities ranging in size from the hub community of Dillingham with a population of approximately 3,000 people, to a few Native Alaska villages that have a few tens of residents. Communities chosen for inclusion in this project were Dillingham, Naknek, Togiak, New Stuyahok, Kokhanok, Perryville, Clark’s Point, and Koliganek. Selection criteria for conduction of wind resource assessments in these communities included population and commercial activity, utility interest, predicted Class 3 or better wind resource, absence of other sources of renewable energy, and geographical coverage of the region. Beginning with the first meteorological tower installation in October 2003, wind resource studies were completed at all sites with at least one year, and as much as two and a half years, of data. In general, the study results are very promising for wind power development in the region with Class 6 winds measured in Kokhanok; Class 4 winds in New Stuyahok, Clark’s Point, and Koliganek; Class 3 winds in Dillingham, Naknek, and Togiak; and Class 2 winds in Perryville. Measured annual average wind speeds and wind power densities at the 30 meter level varied from a high of 7.87 meters per second and 702 watts per square meter in Kokhanok (Class 6 winds), to a low of 4.60 meters per second and 185 watts per square meter in Perryville (Class 2 winds).

  2. Durability of metals from archaeological objects, metal meteorites, and native metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Francis, B.

    1980-01-01

    Metal durability is an important consideration in the multi-barrier nuclear waste storage concept. This study summarizes the ancient metals, the environments, and factors which appear to have contributed to metal longevity. Archaeological and radiochemical dating suggest that human use of metals began in the period 6000 to 7000 BC. Gold is clearly the most durable, but many objects fashioned from silver, copper, bronze, iron, lead, and tin have survived for several thousand years. Dry environments, such as tombs, appear to be optimum for metal preservation, but some metals have survived in shipwrecks for over a thousand years. The metal meteorites are Fe-base alloys with 5 to 60 wt% Ni and minor amounts of Co, I, and S. Some meteoritic masses with ages estimated to be 5,000 to 20,000 years have weathered very little, while other masses from the same meteorites are in advanced stages of weathering. Native metals are natural metallic ores. Approximately five million tonnes were mined from native copper deposits in Michigan. Copper masses from the Michigan deposits were transported by the Pleistocene glaciers. Areas on the copper surfaces which appear to represent glacial abrasion show minimal corrosion. Dry cooling tower technology has demonstrated that in pollution-free moist environments, metals fare better at temperatures above than below the dewpoint. Thus, in moderate temperature regimes, elevated temperatures may be useful rather than detrimental for exposures of metal to air. In liquid environments, relatively complex radiolysis reactions can occur, particularly where multiple species are present. A dry environment largely obviates radiolysis effects.

  3. Hexavalent Chromium Reduction under Fermentative Conditions with Lactate Stimulated Native Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somenahally, Anil C; Mosher, Jennifer J; Yuan, Tong; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Brown, Steven D; Yang, Zamin Koo; Hazen, Terry C; Arkin, Adam; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Van Nostrand, Dr. Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong; Elias, Dwayne A

    2013-01-01

    Microbial reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in-situ is a plausible bioremediation strategy in electron-acceptor limited environments. However, higher [Cr(VI)] may impose stress on syntrophic communities and impact community structure and function. The study objectives were to understand the impacts of Cr(VI) concentrations on community structure and on the Cr(VI)-reduction potential of groundwater communities at Hanford, WA. Steady state continuous flow bioreactors were used to grow native communities enriched with lactate (30 mM) and continuously amended with Cr(VI) at 0.0 (No-Cr), 0.1 (Low-Cr) and 3.0 (High-Cr) mg/L. Microbial growth, metabolites, Cr(VI), 16S rRNA gene sequences and GeoChip based functional gene composition were monitored for 15 weeks. Temporal trends and differences in growth, metabolite profiles, and community composition were observed, largely between Low-Cr and High-Cr bioreactors. In both High-Cr and Low-Cr bioreactors, Cr(VI) levels were below detection from week 1 until week 15. With lactate enrichment, native bacterial diversity substantially decreased as Pelosinus spp., and Sporotalea spp., became the dominant groups, but did not significantly differ between Cr concentrations. The Archaea diversity also substantially decreased after lactate enrichment from Methanosaeta (35%), Methanosarcina (17%) and others, to mostly Methanosarcina spp. (95%). Methane production was lower in High-Cr reactors suggesting some inhibition of methanogens. Several key functional genes were distinct in Low-Cr bioreactors compared to High-Cr. Among the Cr resistant microbes, Burkholderia vietnamiensis, Comamonas testosterone and Ralstonia pickettii proliferated in Cr amended bioreactors. In-situ fermentative conditions facilitated Cr(VI) reduction, and as a result 3.0 mg/L Cr(VI) did not impact the overall bacterial community structure.

  4. The association of selected soil properties with the distribution of native vegetation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yantis, James H

    1991-01-01

    (CEC) had the strongest association with the most plant species, but was not significantly different from percent clay (clay), extractable calcium (Ca), or percent sand (sand); all were highly intercorrelated within the study area. Extractable... sodium (Na) was relatively independent of the previous 4 soil properties and was useful in combination with CEC or clay in explaining some of the variation in plant distributions. Neither pH, extractable potassium (K), or extractable magnesium (Ng...

  5. A review of "Paper Sovereigns: Anglo-Native Treaties and the Law of Nations, 1604-1664" by Jeffrey Glover 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheick, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Sovereigns: Anglo-Native Treaties and the Law of Nations, 1604-1664. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014. ix + 312 pp. $59.95. Review by william j. scheick, university of texas at austin. In Paper Sovereigns Jeffrey Glover necessarily...

  6. Structural Analysis of a Chimeric Bacterial R-Amylase. High-Resolution Analysis of Native and Ligand Complexes,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Structural Analysis of a Chimeric Bacterial R-Amylase. High-Resolution Analysis of Native ReceiVed April 26, 2000 ABSTRACT: Several chimeric R-amylases genes were constructed by an in vivo amylases (hereafter BA2), consisting of residues 1-300 from B. amyloliquefaciens and 301-483 from B

  7. 19Agrociencia (2008) Vol XII N 2 pg. 19 -30 Botryosphaeriaceae from Eucalyptus and Native Myrtaceae in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    19Agrociencia (2008) Vol XII N° 2 pág. 19 - 30 Botryosphaeriaceae from Eucalyptus and Native on plantation grown Eucalyptus globulus. These fungi also exist as endophytes in healthy Eucalyptus leaves that species of the Botryosphaeriaceae, other than those previously reported, could cause cankers on Eucalyptus

  8. Yukon, Oklahoma native Bryan Buster was a national merit scholar in high school and earned degrees in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    HOME Yukon, Oklahoma native Bryan Buster was a national merit scholar in high school and earned degrees in chemistry and math from the University of Oklahoma ­ both with honors. While an undergrad of Oklahoma College of how physicians look at illness and health." Medicine and selected . OU SUMMER INSTITUTE

  9. Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1997-06-01

    The Pinellas Plant has been part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) nuclear weapons complex since the plant opened in 1957. In March 1995, the DOE sold the Pinellas Plant to the Pinellas County Industry Council (PCIC). DOE has leased back a large portion of the plant site to facilitate transition to alternate use and safe shutdown. The current mission is to achieve a safe transition of the facility from defense production and prepare the site for alternative uses as a community resource for economic development. Toward that effort, the Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report (EBR) discusses the current and past environmental conditions of the plant site. Information for the EBR is obtained from plant records. Historical process and chemical usage information for each area is reviewed during area characterizations.

  10. HYDROCARBONS FROM PLANTS: ANALYTICAL METHODS AND OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvin, Melvin

    2013-01-01

    the green plant to capture and store solar energy, is Brazilsolar energy capturing machine we know, namely, the green plant,

  11. COURSE INFORMATION Plant Diversity and Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    and experimental tools used to understand plant diversity. 4. "Vocabulary" of plant description (see list list) 7. Distinctive features of land plant diversity 8. The history of land plants through time #12COURSE INFORMATION Fall 2009 Plant Diversity and Evolution (11:704:411) and Advanced Plant

  12. Propagation of Ornamental Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWerth, A. F.

    1955-01-01

    . Whenever possible, sow the seed of most After the seed have germinated, place th~ Texas ornamentals in flats or pots than container where the seedlings will get an abw directly in the open ground. dance of light. If kept in a shady location, leg...!! weak plants will result. Be sure there are cracks or holes in the bot- tom of the flat or that the hole in the bottom - Water from below whenever the soil becomP of the flower pot is kept open to allow excess water to pass quickly out of the soil...

  13. Nuclear Plant Data Bank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, C.P.; Turner, M.R.; Spore, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Data Bank (NPDB) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to assist analysts in the rapid and accurate creation of input decks for reactor transient analysis. The NPDB will reduce the time and cost of the creation or modification of a typical input deck. This data bank will be an invaluable tool in the timely investigation of recent and ongoing nuclear reactor safety analysis. This paper discusses the status and plans for the NPDB development and describes its anticipated structure and capabilities.

  14. Propagation of Ornamental Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWerth, A. F.

    1955-01-01

    '~ihtenecl with a fine mist spray of water, since an important factor in rooting cuttings is to keep the cuttings moist. There are many advantages in the use of mist by the home gardener. A cutting continues to lose water by transpiration after... it is removed from the parent plant. It is impossible for the cuttings to take up sufficient water to replace that lost by rapid transpiration until new roots are formed. The mist system prevents ex- cessive loss of water by the cutting. Maintain- ing...

  15. Better Buildings, Better Plants:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p uBUSEnergy|| Department ofBuildings, Better Plants: AMO

  16. Gasification Plant Databases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)ForthcomingGENERALProblems I n QEstimatesPlant Databases

  17. Plants & Animals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/OPerformancePi Day Pi Day Pi Day isPlanning forPlants &

  18. Installation restoration program: Hydrologic measurements with an estimated hydrologic budget for the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant, Joliet, Illinois. [Contains maps of monitoring well locations, topography and hydrologic basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diodato, D.M.; Cho, H.E.; Sundell, R.C.

    1991-07-01

    Hydrologic data were gathered from the 36.8-mi{sup 2} Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP) located in Joliet, Illinois. Surface water levels were measured continuously, and groundwater levels were measured monthly. The resulting information was entered into a database that could be used as part of numerical flow model validation for the site. Deep sandstone aquifers supply much of the water in the JAAP region. These aquifers are successively overlain by confining shales and a dolomite aquifer of Silurian age. This last unit is unconformably overlain by Pleistocene glacial tills and outwash sand and gravel. Groundwater levels in the shallow glacial system fluctuate widely, with one well completed in an upland fluctuating more than 17 ft during the study period. The response to groundwater recharge in the underlying Silurian dolomite is slower. In the upland recharge areas, increased groundwater levels were observed; in the lowland discharge areas, groundwater levels decreased during the study period. The decreases are postulated to be a lag effect related to a 1988 drought. These observations show that fluid at the JAAP is not steady-state, either on a monthly or an annual basis. Hydrologic budgets were estimated for the two principal surface water basins at the JAAP site. These basins account for 70% of the facility's total land area. Meteorological data collected at a nearby dam show that total measured precipitation was 31.45 in. and total calculated evapotranspiration was 23.09 in. for the study period. The change in surface water storage was assumed to be zero for the annual budget for each basin. The change in groundwater storage was calculated to be 0.12 in. for the Grant Creek basin and 0. 26 in. for the Prairie Creek basin. Runoff was 7.02 in. and 7.51 in. for the Grant Creek and Prairie Creek basins, respectively. The underflow to the deep hydrogeologic system in the Grant Creek basin was calculated to be negligible. 12 refs., 17 figs., 15 tabs.

  19. Java interface programming: Everything off the best website I've ever found: http://www-lia.deis.unibo.it/Misc/SW/Java/tutorial/html/native1.1/implementing/index.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nourbakhsh, Illah

    Java interface programming: Everything off the best website I've ever found: http://www-lia.deis.unibo.it/Misc/SW/Java/tutorial/html/native1.1/implementing/index.html Table of Contents Java Native Interface Programming The JDK1.1 supports the Java Native Interface (JNI). On one hand, the JNI defines a standard naming and calling convention so

  20. Perspectives on plant vulnerabilities & other plant and containment improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaChance, J.; Kolaczkowski, A.; Kahn, J. [and others

    1996-01-01

    The primary goal of the Individual Plant Examination (IPE) Program was for licensees to identify plant-unique vulnerabilities and actions to address these vulnerabilities. A review of these vulnerabilities and plant improvements that were identified in the IPEs was performed as part of the IPE Insights Program sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The purpose of this effort was to characterize the identified vulnerabilities and the impact of suggested plant improvements. No specific definition for {open_quotes}vulnerability{close_quotes} was provided in NRC Generic Letter 88-20 or in the subsequent NRC IPE submittal guidance documented in NUREG-1335. Thus licensees were left to use their own definitions. Only 20% of the plants explicitly stated that they had vulnerabilities. However, most licensees identified other plant improvements to address issues not explicitly classified as vulnerabilities, but pertaining to areas in which overall plant safety could potentially be increased. The various definitions of {open_quotes}vulnerability{close_quotes} used by the licensees, explicitly identified vulnerabilities, proposed plant improvements to address these vulnerabilities, and other plant improvements are summarized and discussed.

  1. Plant–herbivore interactions mediated by plant toxicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-03-25

    Dec 17, 2007 ... O. Box 249118, Coral Gables, FL 33124, United States. .... Per capital death rate of herbivore unrelated to plant toxicity. 2. Analysis of the ...

  2. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visiting Scholars Program - deadline is Aug. 31 Prescription safety eyewear Fermilab bicycle commuters Web page has moved Fermilab prairie plant survey Users Center entrance...

  3. The SONATRACH jumbo LPG plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed Khodja, A.; Bennaceur, A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors aim is to give to the 17 TH world gas conference a general idea on SONATRACH LPG PLANT which is located in the ARZEW area. They develop this communication as follows: general presentation of LPG plant: During the communication, the author's will give the assistance all the information concerning the contractions the erection's date and the LPG PLANT process, start-up of the plant: In this chapter, the authors's will describe the start-up condition, the performance test result, the flexibility test result and the total mechanical achievement of the plant; operation by SONATRACH: After the success that obtained during the mechanical achievement and performance test, the contractor handed over the plant to SONATRACH.

  4. Plant Physiology: Manipulating Plant Growth with Solar Radiation Dennis Decoteau, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decoteau, Dennis R.

    Plant Physiology: Manipulating Plant Growth with Solar Radiation Dennis Decoteau, Ph.D. Department of light that surrounds the plant. Light ­ Radiant Energy All light is made up of energy. Light to plants (Villee, 1977). Plant Uses Of Radiant Energy And Plant "Vision" Plants utilize specialized pigments

  5. CO2 EFFECTS ON MOJAVE DESERT PLANT INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; S. D. SMITH; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Seasonal and interannual droughts characteristic of deserts have the potential to modify plant interactions as atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations continue to rise. At the Nevada Desert FACE (free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment) facility in the northern Mojave Desert, the effects of elevated atmospheric C02 (550 vs. ambient {approx}360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) on plant interactions were examined during two years of high and low rainfall. Results suggest that CO{sub 2} effects on the interaction between native species and their understory herbs are dependent on the strength of competition when rainfall is plentiful, but are unimportant during annual drought. Seasonal rainfall for 1999 was 23% the long-term average for the area, and neither elevated CO{sub 2} nor the low production of herbaceous neighbors had an effect on relative growth rate (RGR, d{sup -1}) and reproductive effort (RE, number of flowers g{sup -1}) for Achnatherum hymenoides (early season perennial C{sub 3} grass), Pleuraphis rigida (late season perennial C{sub 4} grass), and Larrea tridentata (evergreen C{sub 3} shrub). In contrast, 1998 received 213% the average rainfall. Consequently, the decrease in RGR and increase in RE for Achnatherum, whose period of growth overlaps directly with that of its neighbors, was exaggerated at elevated CO{sub 2}. However, competitive effects of neighbors on Eriogonum trichopes (a winter annual growing in shrub interspaces), Pleuraphis and Larrea were not affected by elevated CO{sub 2}, and possible explanations are discussed. Contrary to expectations, the invasive annual neighbor Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens had little influence on target plant responses because densities in 1998 and 1999 at this site were well below those found in other studies where it has negatively affected perennial plant growth. The extent that elevated CO{sub 2} reduces the performance of Achnatherum in successive years to cause its loss from the plant community depends more on future pressure from herbaceous neighbors and less on the extent that CO{sub 2} enhances Achnatherum growth during periods of severe drought.

  6. Better Buildings, Better Plants Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-08

    The Better Buildings, Better Plants Program is part of a national leadership initiative calling on business leaders and others to create American jobs through energy efficiency.

  7. Power Plant Modeling and Simulation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and Development provides open source tools and expetise for modeling and simulating power plants and carbon sequestration technologies.

  8. MHD plant turn down considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lineberry, J.T.; Chapman, J.N.

    1991-01-01

    The topic of part load operation of the MHD power plant is assessed. Current and future planned MHD research is reviewed in terms of addressing topping and bottoming cycle integration needs. The response of the MHD generator to turn up and down scenarios is reviewed. The concept of turning the MHD power to met changes in plant load is discussed. The need for new ideas and focused research to study MHD plant integration and problems of plant turn down and up is cited. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Better Plants | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Partners and welcomed more than 20 manufacturers into the program at the World Energy Engineering Congress on October 2, 2014. Read more Better Plants Program Logo Leading...

  10. Nuclear Power Plant Design Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuclear Power Plant Design Project A Response to the Environmental and Economic Challenge Of Global) .................................................................... 14 4.4 High Temperature Gas Reactor

  11. Power Plant Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-07-21

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and Development provides open source tools and expetise for modeling and simulating power plants and carbon sequestration technologies.

  12. Planting and Mulching Trees and Shrubs Selecting healthy plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Planting and Mulching Trees and Shrubs Selecting healthy plants Take a step back to examine swollen nodules at the container edge, rather than circling like in a plastic container. The nodules store with soil or mulch ­ ignore these and find the first permanent woody root growing radially out from

  13. Potentialities of ecological engineering strategy based on native arbuscular mycorrhizal community for improving afforestation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thioulouse, Jean

    recently the products derived from the carob pods (pulp and seed) have also been considered in human food of ameliorants (e.g., organic mulch), soil amendments with organic wastes and industrial by-products (e.g., compost). Another rehabilitation strategy could be based on the management of plant-microbe symbioses

  14. Ownership Change, Incentives and Plant Efficiency: The Divestiture of U.S. Electric Generation Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, James B.; Wolfram, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    ciency of Electric Generating Plants: A Stochastic Frontierthe existing stock of electricity generating plants. Betweenover 300 electric generating plants in the US, accounting

  15. Master Plant List for Texas Range and Pasture Plant Identification Contests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragsdale, Bobby

    2000-05-03

    Entrants in range and pasture plant identification contests will find this reference useful. It includes explanations of plant characteristics and a master list of plants....

  16. Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1995-09-01

    A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

  17. Properties of soil pore space regulate pathways of plant residue decomposition and community structure of associated bacteria

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Negassa, Wakene C.; Guber, Andrey K.; Kravchenko, Alexandra N.; Marsh, Terence L.; Hildebrandt, Britton; Rivers, Mark L.

    2015-07-01

    Physical protection of soil carbon (C) is one of the important components of C storage. However, its exact mechanisms are still not sufficiently lucid. The goal of this study was to explore the influence of soil structure, that is, soil pore spatial arrangements, with and without presence of plant residue on (i) decomposition of added plant residue, (ii) CO? emission from soil, and (iii) structure of soil bacterial communities. The study consisted of several soil incubation experiments with samples of contrasting pore characteristics with/without plant residue, accompanied by X-ray micro-tomographic analyses of soil pores and by microbial community analysis ofmore »amplified 16S–18S rRNA genes via pyrosequencing. We observed that in the samples with substantial presence of air-filled well-connected large (>30 µm) pores, 75–80% of the added plant residue was decomposed, cumulative CO? emission constituted 1,200 µm C g?¹ soil, and movement of C from decomposing plant residue into adjacent soil was insignificant. In the samples with greater abundance of water-filled small pores, 60% of the added plant residue was decomposed, cumulative CO? emission constituted 2,000 µm C g?¹ soil, and the movement of residue C into adjacent soil was substantial. In the absence of plant residue the influence of pore characteristics on CO? emission, that is on decomposition of the native soil organic C, was negligible. The microbial communities on the plant residue in the samples with large pores had more microbial groups known to be cellulose decomposers, that is, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes, while a number of oligotrophic Acidobacteria groups were more abundant on the plant residue from the samples with small pores. This study provides the first experimental evidence that characteristics of soil pores and their air/water flow status determine the phylogenetic composition of the local microbial community and directions and magnitudes of soil C decomposition processes.« less

  18. Effects of Native Language and Training on Speaker Normalization on Lexical Tone Perception: A Behavioral and ERP Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wayland, Ratree; Kaan, Edith; Bao, Mingzhen; Barkley, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Effects of Native Language and Training on Speaker Normalization on Lexical Tone Perception: A Behavioral and ERP Study Ratree Wayland 1 , Edith Kaan 1 , Mingzhen Bao 1 and Christopher Barkley 2 1 University of Florida and 2 University.... In the current study, in addition to attentive behavioral investigation, the pre-attentive discrimination of lexical tones and the effect of language background and training was investigated using Event-Related brain Potentials (ERPs). ERPs can be recorded...

  19. Refinery, petrochemical plant injuries decline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-25

    The National Petroleum Refiners Association (NPRA) reports a 7% reduction in workplace injury and illness incidence rates for refineries in 1993, and a 21% decrease for petrochemical plants. The report summarizes data from 135 of the 162 US member refineries, and 117 of the 172 US member petrochemical plants. This paper summarizes the report findings.

  20. Do Plants Sweat? Core Content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Bruce

    in the bright sun and others are grouped together and are regularly sprinkled with water. You begin to wonder plant distribution where you see this principle in action? -Can you predict the effect of seasons data/graph] Three plants are grown in the same greenhouse with the same air temperature, amount

  1. CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS A Workshop on "NUCLEAR ENERGY RENAISSANCE" Addressing OF ST. LUCIE-2 at FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY · Robert E. Uhrig 1974-1986 ­ Vice President, Nuclear IN CONSTRUCTION OF ST. LUCIE-2 #12;LESSONS LEARNED FROM St. Lucie-2 NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS CAN BE BUILT

  2. Overview of enrichment plant safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swindle, D.W. Jr.; Wheeler, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship of enrichment plant safeguards to US nonproliferation objectives and to the operation and management of enrichment facilities is reviewed. During the review, the major components of both domestic and international safeguards systems for enrichment plants are discussed. In discussing domestic safeguards systems, examples of the technology currently in use to support nuclear materials accountability are described including the measurement methods, procedures and equipment used for weighing, sampling, chemical and isotopic analyses and nondestructive assay techniques. Also discussed is how the information obtained as part of the nuclear material accountancy task is useful to enrichment plant operations. International material accountancy verification and containment/surveillance concepts for enrichment plants are discussed, and the technologies presently being developed for international safeguards in enrichment plants are identified and the current development status is reported.

  3. Graduate Programs in Plant Biology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    not re- biochemistry, cell and molecular biology (B22). pmb.berkeley.edu Plant&Microbial Biology #12;The to the environment will continue to fuel the expansion of plant research well into the future. The plant biology program focuses on contemporary ba- sic plant research, design of biotechnologies, and plant-microbe

  4. NRES 725 PLANT PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    1 NRES 725 ­ PLANT PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY Spring 2006 Reading List ­ Water Balance of Plants I) Water Balance of Plants A) Water potential B) Soil, plant, air continuum C) Physiological control 1 Kramer & Boyer (95) pp 16-41 & 42-83 Kramer & Boyer (95) pp 201-256 *Steudle (01) Ann Rev Plant Phy Mol

  5. Acquisition of Tense-Aspect Morphology in English by Native Speakers of Costa Rican Spanish: The Case of Simple Present and Present Progressive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canales, Alonso Jose

    2010-12-16

    This study investigated whether native speakers of Costa Rican Spanish are capable of acquiring a series of typical and atypical meanings associated with the English Simple Present and Present Progressive. Given the ...

  6. Investigation of the kinetics of protein folding and the ensemble of conformations in non-native states of proteins by liquid NMR spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirmer, Julia

    2005-01-01

    For a complete description of protein folding dynamics and the structure of the folded state, of unfolded and of non-native states of proteins and the kinetics of protein folding from the unfolded state to the folded state ...

  7. Selective depredation of planted hardwood seedlings by wild pigs in a wetland restoration area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, J.J.

    1999-12-17

    Following the planting of several thousand hardwood seedlings in a 69-ha wetland restoration area in west-central South Carolina, wild pigs (Sus scrofa) depredated a large percentage of the young trees. This planting was undertaken as part of a mitigation effort to restore a bottomland hardwood community in the corridor and delta of a third order stream that had been previously impacted by the discharge of heated nuclear reactor effluent. The depredated restoration areas had been pretreated with both herbicide and control burning prior to planting the hardwood seedlings. After discovery of the wild pig damage, these areas were surveyed on foot to assess the magnitude of the depredation on the planted seedling crop. Foraging by the local wild pigs in the pretreatment areas selectively impacted only four of the nine hardwood species used in this restoration effort. Based on the surveys, the remaining five species did not appear to have been impacted at all. A variety of reasons could be used to explain this phenomenon. The pretreatment methodology is thought to have been the primary aspect of the restoration program that initially led the wild pigs to discover the planted seedlings. In addition, it is possible that a combination of other factors associated with odor and taste may have resulted in the selective depredation. Future wetland restoration efforts in areas with wild pigs should consider pretreatment methods and species to be planted. If pretreatment methods and species such as discussed in the present study must be used, then the prior removal of wild pigs from surrounding lands will help prevent depredations by this non-native species.

  8. Plant maintenance and plant life extension issue, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2007-03-15

    The focus of the March-April issue is on plant maintenance and plant life extension. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Three proposed COLs expected in 2007, by Dale E. Klein, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Delivering behaviors that our customers value, by Jack Allen, Westinghouse Electric Company; Facilitating high-level and fuel waste disposal technologies, by Malcolm Gray, IAEA, Austria; Plant life management and long-term operation, by Pal Kovacs, OECD-NEA, France; Measuring control rod position, by R. Taymanov, K. Sapozhnikova, I. Druzhinin, D.I. Mendeleyev, Institue for Metrology, Russia; and, 'Modernization' means higher safety, by Svetlana Genova, Kozluduy NPP plc, Bulgaria.

  9. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalit S. Shah; William K. Davis

    2000-05-01

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal or coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Test Plan (RD and T) for implementation in Phase II. The objective of Phase II is to conduct RD and T as outlined in the Phase I RD and T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of Coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The project will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and other feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

  10. Plant Energy Cost Optimization Program (PECOP) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    The Plant Energy Cost Optimization Program (PECOP) is a Management System designed to reduce operating cost in a continuous operating multi product plant by reviewing all cost factors and selecting plant wide production schedules which are most...

  11. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofof the Thesis SOLAR POWER PLANT DESIGN , Study Guidelines a.Reference Solar Power Plant Design e. Power Plant

  12. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    storage can provide solar power plant energy storage for aconfiguration for a solar power plant without energy storagefor a solar power plant greatly influences the plant energy

  13. Enterprise Assessments Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant -...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Enterprise Assessments Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - December 2014 Enterprise Assessments Review, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - December 2014 December, 2014 Review of the...

  14. Independent Oversight Inspection, Pantex Plant - August 2005...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    August 2005 Independent Oversight Inspection, Pantex Plant - August 2005 August 2005 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Pantex Site Office and the Pantex Plant This report...

  15. New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  16. New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  17. North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

  18. South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  19. New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (nw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

  20. Pre-In-Plant Training Webinar (Steam)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This pre-In-Plant training webinar for the Better Plants Program covers how to find energy savings in steam systems.

  1. Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    January 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - January 2013 January 2013 Review of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Work Planning and Control...

  2. Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - August 2011 Independent Activity Report, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - August 2011 August 2011 Orientation Visit to the Portsmouth...

  3. HYDROCARBONS FROM PLANTS: ANALYTICAL METHODS AND OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvin, Melvin

    2013-01-01

    molecular weights of various hydrocarbon materials for fuelof oil and alcohol from hydrocarbon-producing plants. Into Die Naturwissenschaften HYDROCARBONS FROM PLANTS: METHODS

  4. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John H. Anderson; William K. Davis; Thomas W. Sloop

    2001-03-21

    As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Gasification Technologies and Transportation Fuels and Chemicals programs, DOE and Texaco are partners through Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40658 to determine the feasibility of developing, constructing and operating an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP). The overall objective of the project is the three-phase development of an EECP that produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: Electric power (or heat); Fuels; and Chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or some other carbonaceous feedstock, such as petroleum coke. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD and T) Plan for implementation in Phase II. This objective has now been accomplished. A specific site, Motiva Refinery in Port Arthur, Texas, has been selected as the location best suited for the EECP. The specific work requirements of Phase I included: Prepare an EECP Preliminary Concept Report covering Tasks 2-8 specified in the Cooperative Agreement; Develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD and T) Plan as specified in Task 9 of the Cooperative Agreement for implementation in Phase II; and Develop a Preliminary Project Financing Plan for the EECP Project as specified in Task 10 of the Cooperative Agreement. This document is the Preliminary Project Financing Plan for the design, construction, and operation of the EECP at the Motiva Port Arthur Refinery.

  5. Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2014-06-01

    Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selection and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.

  6. The Annual Growth In Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courtright, J. E.

    1903-01-01

    KU ScholarWorks | The University of Kansas Pre-1923 Dissertations and Theses Collection The Annual Growth In Plants 1903 by J. E. Courtright This work was digitized by the Scholarly Communications program staff in the KU Libraries’ Center...

  7. Water Filtration Using Plant Xylem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutilier, Michael Stephen Ha

    Effective point-of-use devices for providing safe drinking water are urgently needed to reduce the global burden of waterborne disease. Here we show that plant xylem from the sapwood of coniferous trees – a readily available, ...

  8. USF PHYSICAL PLANT VEHICLE MAINTENANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    USF PHYSICAL PLANT VEHICLE MAINTENANCE TELEPHONE NO. 974-2500 GAS PUMP AUTHORIZATION FORM PLEASE. _____ THE FOLLOWING PERSONNEL ARE AUTHORIZED BY THIS DOCUMENT TO PUMP GASOLINE/DIESEL FUEL FOR OUR USF OWNED VEHICLES

  9. A neighborhood alternative energy plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Douglas James

    1982-01-01

    A design that proposes the redefinition of the role of a power plant facility within a community by creating a humane environment for recreation, education, community gathering, living, and energy production; rather than ...

  10. Computer Control of Unattended Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinson, D. R.; Chatterjee, N.

    1984-01-01

    Providing a cost-effective and reliable computer monitoring, control, and optimization package is a greater challenge for small, unattended plants than for large energy intensive facilities. This paper describes the successful application of a...

  11. Development of BWR plant analyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Lekach, S.V.; Stritar, A.; Mallen, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    The BWR Plant Analyzer has been developed for realistic and accurate simulations of normal and severe abnormal transients in BWR power plants at high simulation speeds, low capital and operating costs and with outstanding user conveniences. The simulation encompasses neutron kinetics, heat conduction in fuel structures, nonequilibrium, nonhomogeneous coolant dynamics, steam line acoustics, and the dynamics of turbines, condensers, feedwater pumps and heaters, of the suppression pool, the control systems and the plant protection systems. These objectives have been achieved. Advanced modeling, using extensively analytical integration and dynamic evaluation of analytical solutions, has been combined with modern minicomputer technology for high-speed simulation of complex systems. The High-Speed Interactive Plant Analyzer code HIPA-BWR has been implemented on the AD10 peripheral parallel processor.

  12. Morris Plant Energy Efficiency Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betczynski, M. T.

    2004-01-01

    to existing operating practices. Plant management also takes an active role in recognizing accomplishments and holding personnel accountable for continued improvement in energy efficiency. The control systems group at Equistar has integrated an Aspen...

  13. Upgrading coal plant damper drives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hood, N.R.; Simmons, K. [Alamaba Power (United States)

    2009-11-15

    The replacement of damper drives on two coal-fired units at the James H. Miller Jr. electric generating plant by Intelligent Contrac electric rotary actuators is discussed. 2 figs.

  14. Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2014-06-01

    Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selectionmore »and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.« less

  15. Scale Insects on Ornamental Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muegge, Mark A.; Merchant, Michael E.

    2000-08-21

    Scale insects damage landscape plants, shrubs and trees. This publication explains how to control scale insects economically without damaging the environment, including sampling for scale crawlers, using natural enemies and applying pesticides....

  16. COKEMASTER: Coke plant management system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johanning, J.; Reinke, M. [Krupp Koppers GmbH, Essen (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    To keep coke utilization in ironmaking as competitive as possible, the potential to improve the economics of coke production has to be utilized. As one measure to meet this need of its customers, Krupp Koppers has expanded its existing ECOTROL computer system for battery heating control to a comprehensive Coke Plant Management System. Increased capacity utilization, lower energy consumption, stabilization of plant operation and ease of operation are the main targets.

  17. Researching power plant water recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2008-04-01

    A range of projects supported by NETl under the Innovations for Existing Plant Program are investigating modifications to power plant cooling systems for reducing water loss, and recovering water from the flue gas and the cooling tower. This paper discusses two technologies showing particular promise condense water that is typically lost to evaporation, SPX technologies' Air2Air{sup trademark} condenses water from a cooling tower, while Lehigh University's process condenses water and acid in flue gas. 3 figs.

  18. Common Aquatic Plants -- Identification, Control. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klussmann, Wallace G. (Wallace Glenn); Lowman, Fred G.

    1964-01-01

    root. Duckweed float freely and are moved by wind current. Often they can be removed mechanically by net or similar device when plants are crowded against the shore by a strong wind. Use Chemical Control No.8. FLOATING PLANTS WATER STAR GRASS.... The genus Potamogeton J commonly called pond weeds, includes many species common to Texas waters. Group characteristics include alternate leaves with flowers and fruits in spikes or heads. Many have two kinds of leaves: (1) floating and firm textured and (2...

  19. Controlling Diseases on Ornamental Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horne, C. Wendell; Johnson, Jerral D.; Walla, Walter J.

    1979-01-01

    on elms and other shade trees. Mushroom-type fu ngal growths appear on trunk, limbs or roots near the soil surface. Rots may be present for several years before mushrooms ap pear. Tree becomes sus ceptible to wi nd damage. Plants may die back..., irises, lilies, narcissus and tulips. ROOT DISEASES Disease Cotton root rot (fungi) Crown gall Mushroom root rot Symptoms Small flowering plants die within a few days. Shrubs and trees die more slowly. Large trees may die within several...

  20. Structural Insight into pH-Induced Conformational Changes within the Native Human Transthyretin Tetramer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palaninathan, Satheesh K.; Mohamedmohaideen, Nilofar N.; Snee, William C.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Sacchettini, James C. (TAM); (Scripps)

    2008-09-18

    Acidification of the transthyretin (TTR) tetramer facilitates dissociation and conformational changes in the protein, allowing alternatively folded monomers to self-assemble into insoluble amyloid fibers by a downhill polymerization mechanism in vitro. To investigate the influence of acidification on the quaternary and tertiary structures of TTR, crystal structures of wild-type human TTR at pH 4.0 and pH 3.5 have been determined to 1.7 {angstrom} resolution. The acidic pH crystals are isomorphous to most of the previously reported TTR structures, containing two subunits in the asymmetric unit (the so-called A and B subunits) but forming a tetramer through crystallographic symmetry. The pH 4.0 crystal structure reveals that the native fold of the tetramer remains mostly undisturbed. In particular, subunit A of the TTR pH 4.0 structure is very similar to the wild-type TTR pH 7.4 structure with an r.m.s.d. of 0.38 {angstrom}. In contrast, subunit B of the TTR pH 4.0 structure exhibits several significant changes. The EF-helix (residues 75-81) and the adjacent EF-loop (residues 82-90) show an r.m.s.d. greater than 2.0 {angstrom}. The acidic residues within this region (Glu72, Asp74, Glu89, and Glu92) undergo significant conformational changes that instigate movement of the EF helix-loop region and make residues Lys70, Lys76, His88, and His90 orient their side chains toward these acidic residues. In particular, Glu89 undergoes a maximum deviation of 5.6 {angstrom}, occupying Phe87's initial position in the wild-type TTR pH 7.4 structure, and points its side chain into a hydrophobic pocket of the neighboring subunit. In the pH 3.5 structure, the EF helix-loop region is completely disordered. These results demonstrate that acidic conditions increase the susceptibility of the EF helix-loop region of the TTR B subunit to undergo conformational changes and unfold, likely destabilizing the tetramer and identifying at least the initial conformational changes likely occurring within the tetramer that leads to the amyloidogenic monomer.

  1. Density of bunches of native bluebunch wheatgrass and alien crested wheatgrass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rickard, W.H.

    1985-10-01

    The density of bunches of bluebunch wheatgrass in a natural undisturbed stand averaged 3.28 per m/sup 2/ as compared to 2.96 per m/sup 2/ for a nearby stand of crested wheatgrass that was planted 30 years ago. Bunch density was similar in both stands indicating that spacing is a response to an environment deficient in soil water. Bunches of crested wheatgrass on the average weighed 3.5 times more than bunches of bluebunch wheatgrass and they also produced a greater weight of seedheads.

  2. Energy Department Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLfor Innovative Solar Power Plant |Projects |of

  3. Transcriptome Analysis of Drought-Tolerant CAM plants Agave deserti and Agave tequilana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gross, Stephen M.; Martin, Jeffrey A.; Simpson, June; Wang, Zhong; Visel, Axel

    2013-03-25

    Agaves are succulent monocotyledonous plants native to hot and arid environments of North America. Because of their adaptations to their environment, including crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM, a water-efficient form of photosynthesis) and existing technologies for ethanol production, agaves have gained attention both as potential lignocellulosic bioenergy feedstocks and models for exploring plant responses to abiotic stress. However, the lack of comprehensive Agave sequence datasets limits the scope of investigations into the molecular-genetic basis of Agave traits. Here, we present comprehensive, high quality de novo transcriptome assemblies of two Agave species, A. tequilana and A. deserti, from short-read RNA-seq data. Our analyses support completeness and accuracy of the de novo transcriptome assemblies, with each species having approximately 35,000 protein-coding genes. Comparison of agave proteomes to those of additional plant species identifies biological functions of gene families displaying sequence divergence in agave species. Additionally, we use RNA-seq data to gain insights into biological functions along the A. deserti juvenile leaf proximal-distal axis. Our work presents a foundation for further investigation of agave biology and their improvement for bioenergy development.

  4. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; Ming He; James F. Stevens; Centha A. Davis; Michael Henley; Jerome Mayer; Harry Tsang; Jimell Erwin; Jennifer Adams; Michael Tillman; Chris Taylor; Marjan J. Roos; Robert F. Earhart

    2004-01-27

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The potential technical and economic risks to the EECP from Task 2.5 can be mitigated by demonstrating that the end-use products derived from the upgrading of the F-T synthesis total liquid product can meet or exceed current specifications for the manufacture of ethylene and propylene chemicals from F-T naphtha, for the generation of hydrogen from F-T naphtha to power fuel cells, for direct blending of F-T diesels into transportation fuels, for the conversion of F-T heavy product wax to transportation fuels, and the conversion of F-T Heavy product wax to a valuable high melting point food-grade specialty wax product. Product evaluations conducted under Task 2.5 of Phase II successfully mitigated the above technical and economic risks to the EECP with the development of product yields and product qualities for the production of chemicals, transportation fuels, and specialty food-grade waxes from the F-T synthesis products.

  5. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Anderson; Charles Schrader

    2004-01-26

    In 1999, the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a Cooperative Agreement to Texaco Energy Systems Inc. to provide a preliminary engineering design of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP). Since the award, continuous and diligent work has been undertaken to achieve the design of an economical facility that makes strides toward attaining the goal of DOE's Vision 21 Program. The objective of the EECP is to convert coal and/or petroleum coke to power while coproducing transportation fuels, chemicals, and useful utilities such as steam. This objective is being pursued in a three-phase effort through the partnership of the DOE with prime contractor Texaco Energy Systems, LLC. (TES), the successor to Texaco Energy Systems, Inc. The key subcontractors to TES include General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown and Root. ChevronTexaco provided gasification technology and Rentech Inc.'s Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology that has been developed for non-natural gas sources. GE provided gas turbine technology for the combustion of low energy content gas. Praxair provided air separation technology and KBR provided engineering to integrate the facility. A conceptual design was completed in Phase I and the report was accepted by the DOE in May 2001. The Phase I work identified risks and critical research, development, and testing that would improve the probability of technical success of the EECP. The objective of Phase II was to mitigate the risks by executing research, development, and testing. Results from the Phase II work are the subject of this report. As the work of Phase II concluded, it became evident that sufficient, but not necessarily complete, technical information and data would be available to begin Phase III - Preliminary Engineering Design. Work in Phase II requires additional technical development work to correctly apply technology at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The decision to proceed with Phase III centers on locating a new site and favorable commercial and economic factors.

  6. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Storm; Govanon Nongbri; Steve Decanio; Ming He; Lalit Shah; Charles Schrader; Earl Berry; Peter Ricci; Belma Demirel; Charles Benham; Mark Bohn

    2004-01-12

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, Inc., GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I, a design basis for the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis section was developed based on limited experience with the specified feed gas and operating conditions. The objective of this Task in Phase II RD&T work was to confirm the performance of the F-T reactor at the set design conditions. Although much of the research, development, and testing work were done by TES outside of this project, several important issues were addressed in this phase of the project. They included Rejuvenation/Regeneration of the Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst, online Catalyst Withdrawal and Addition from the synthesis reactor, and the Fischer-Tropsch Design Basis Confirmation. In Phase III the results from these RD&T work will be incorporated in developing the engineering design package. This Topical Report documents the Phase II RD&T work that was completed for this task.

  7. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; J. Erwin; Matthew G. Banks; Terry L. Ullman

    2004-01-12

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 identified as potential technical risks to the EECP the fuel/engine performance and emissions of the F-T diesel fuel products. Hydrotreating the neat F-T diesel product reduces potentially reactive olefins, oxygenates, and acids levels and alleviates corrosion and fuel stability concerns. Future coproduction plants can maximize valuable transportation diesel by hydrocracking the F-T Synthesis wax product to diesel and naphtha. The upgraded neat F-T diesel, hydrotreater F-T diesel, and hydrocracker F-T diesel products would be final blending components in transportation diesel fuel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully carried out fuel lubricity property testing, fuel response to lubricity additives, and hot-start transient emission tests on a neat F-T diesel product, a hydrocracker F-T diesel product, a blend of hydrotreater and hydrocracker F-T diesel products, and a Tier II California Air Resources Board (CARB)-like diesel reference fuel. Only the neat F-T diesel passed lubricity inspection without additive while the remaining three fuel candidates passed with conventional additive treatment. Hot-start transient emission tests were conducted on the four fuels in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Federal Test Procedure (FTP) specified in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 86, and Subpart N on a rebuilt 1991 Detroit Diesel Corporation Series 60 heavy-duty diesel engine. Neat F-T diesel fuel reduced oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), total particulate (PM), hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and the Soluble Organic Fraction (SOF) by 4.5%, 31%, 50%, 29%, and 35%, respectively, compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The hydrocracker F-T diesel product and a blend of hydrocracker and hydrotreater F-T diesel products also reduced NO{sub x}, PM, HC, CO and SOF by 13%, 16% to 17%, 38% to 63%, 17% to 21% and 21% to 39% compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The fuel/engine performance and emissions of the three F-T diesel fuels exceed the performance of a Tier II CARB-like diesel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully met the lubricity property testing and F-T diesel fuel hot-start transient emissions test objectives. The results of the testing help mitigate potential economic risks on obtaining a premium price for the F-T diesel fuel

  8. MAGGIE Component 1: Identification and Purification of Native and Recombinant Multiprotein Complexes and Modified Proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Michael W. [University of Georgia] [University of Georgia; W. W. Adams, Michael

    2014-01-07

    Virtualy all cellular processes are carried out by dynamic molecular assemblies or multiprotein complexes (PCs), the composition of which is largely unknown. Structural genomics efforts have demonstrated that less than 25% of the genes in a given prokaryotic genome will yield stable, soluble proteins when expressed using a one-ORF-at-a-time approach. We proposed that much of the remaining 75% of the genes encode proteins that are part of multiprotein complexes or are modified post-translationally, for example, with metals. The problem is that PCs and metalloproteins (MPs) cannot be accurately predicted on a genome-wide scale. The only solution to this dilemma is to experimentally determine PCs and MPs in biomass of a model organism and to develop analytical tools that can then be applied to the biomass of any other organism. In other words, organisms themselves must be analyzed to identify their PCs and MPs: “native proteomes” must be determined. This information can then be utilized to design multiple ORF expression systems to produce recombinant forms of PCs and MPs. Moreover, the information and utility of this approach can be enhanced by using a hyperthermophile, one that grows optimally at 100°C, as a model organism. By analyzing the native proteome at close to 100 °C below the optimum growth temperature, we will trap reversible and dynamic complexes, thereby enabling their identification, purification, and subsequent characterization. The model organism for the current study is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows optimally at 100°C. It is grown up to 600-liter scale and kg quantities of biomass are available. In this project we identified native PCs and MPs using P. furiosus biomass (with MS/MS analyses to identify proteins by component 4). In addition, we provided samples of abundant native PCs and MPs for structural characterization (using SAXS by component 5). We also designed and evaluated generic bioinformatics and experimental protocols for PC and MP production in other prokaryotes of DOE interest. The research resulted in ten peer-reviewed publications including in Nature and Nature Methods.

  9. Silverside Diets and Potential Competition in the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway: The Invasive Menidia audens versus the Native Labidesthes sicculus. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strongin, Kyle

    2010-07-14

    prior to impoundment (Sisk & Stephens 1964) and was the only silverside in the reservoir until 1953 (Moore & Buck 1953; Riggs & Dowell 1956). The inland silverside was first discovered in the Red River drainage in 1949 (Moore & Cross 1950) and in Lake... Texoma in 1953 (Riggs & Bonn 1959), but was not common in the lake until the summer of 1954 (Riggs & Dowell 1956). By 1955, the native brook silverside was found only in Lake Texoma?s tributaries (Riggs & Dowell 1956; Saunders 11 1959). Samples...

  10. Pilot Plant Options for the MFE Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilot Plant Options for the MFE Roadmap Hutch Neilson Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory International Workshop MFE Roadmapping for the ITER Era Princeton, NJ 10 September 2011 #12;Outline 2 · Pilot plant ­ mission, motivation, and description. · Role of pilot plants on the Roadmap to Demo. Pilot Plant

  11. Fate of Radionuclides in Wastewater Treatment Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shabani Samgh Abadi, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    nuclear facility accident was the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi power plant accident in Japan, following the tsunami.

  12. Plant Pathology 290 Graduate Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Plant Pathology 290 Graduate Seminar Series Fall 2014 CRN: 57411 Mondays 9:00-10:00am 115 Hutchison Storer Seminar Speaker Professor, Plant Pathology University of Wisconsin-Madison Multi-gene copy number Detection of plant diseases by smell. October 27 Jeremy Warren, PhD Candidate, Plant Pathology Exit Seminar

  13. Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-06-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant capabilities and resources at NREL.

  14. Method of identifying plant pathogen tolerance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Joseph R. (Erial, NJ); Staskawicz, Brian J. (Castro Valley, CA); Bent, Andrew F. (Piedmont, CA); Innes, Roger W. (Bloomington, IN)

    1997-10-07

    A process for identifying a plant having disease tolerance comprising administering to a plant an inhibitory amount of ethylene and screening for ethylene insensitivity, thereby identifying a disease tolerant plant, is described. Plants identified by the foregoing process are also described.

  15. Method of identifying plant pathogen tolerance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, J.R.; Staskawicz, B.J.; Bent, A.F.; Innes, R.W.

    1997-10-07

    A process for identifying a plant having disease tolerance comprising administering to a plant an inhibitory amount of ethylene and screening for ethylene insensitivity, thereby identifying a disease tolerant plant, is described. Plants identified by the foregoing process are also described. 7 figs.

  16. Fate of Radionuclides in Wastewater Treatment Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shabani Samgh Abadi, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    by Aerobic Treatment. Journal (Water Pollution ControlWastewater Treatment Plants. Journal (Water Pollution

  17. Waste Treatment Plant - 12508

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harp, Benton; Olds, Erik

    2012-07-01

    The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will immobilize millions of gallons of Hanford's tank waste into solid glass using a proven technology called vitrification. The vitrification process will turn the waste into a stable glass form that is safe for long-term storage. Our discussion of the WTP will include a description of the ongoing design and construction of this large, complex, first-of-a-kind project. The concept for the operation of the WTP is to separate high-level and low-activity waste fractions, and immobilize those fractions in glass using vitrification. The WTP includes four major nuclear facilities and various support facilities. Waste from the Tank Farms is first pumped to the Pretreatment Facility at the WTP through an underground pipe-in-pipe system. When construction is complete, the Pretreatment Facility will be 12 stories high, 540 feet long and 215 feet wide, making it the largest of the four major nuclear facilities that compose the WTP. The total size of this facility will be more than 490,000 square feet. More than 8.2 million craft hours are required to construct this facility. Currently, the Pretreatment Facility is 51 percent complete. At the Pretreatment Facility the waste is pumped to the interior waste feed receipt vessels. Each of these four vessels is 55-feet tall and has a 375,000 gallon capacity, which makes them the largest vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. These vessels contain a series of internal pulse-jet mixers to keep incoming waste properly mixed. The vessels are inside the black-cell areas, completely enclosed behind thick steel-laced, high strength concrete walls. The black cells are designed to be maintenance free with no moving parts. Once hot operations commence the black-cell area will be inaccessible. Surrounded by black cells, is the 'hot cell canyon'. The hot cell contains all the moving and replaceable components to remove solids and extract liquids. In this area, there is ultrafiltration equipment, cesium-ion exchange columns, evaporator boilers and recirculation pumps, and various mechanical process pumps for transferring process fluids. During the first phase of pretreatment, the waste will be concentrated using an evaporation process. Solids will be filtered out, and the remaining soluble, highly radioactive isotopes will be removed using an ion-exchange process. The high-level solids will be sent to the High-Level Waste (HLW) Vitrification Facility, and the low activity liquids will be sent to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility for further processing. The high-level waste will be transferred via underground pipes to the HLW Facility from the Pretreatment Facility. The waste first arrives at the wet cell, which rests inside a black-cell area. The pretreated waste is transferred through shielded pipes into a series of melter preparation and feed vessels before reaching the melters. Liquids from various facility processes also return to the wet cell for interim storage before recycling back to the Pretreatment Facility. (authors)

  18. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdalla H. Ali; Raj Kamarthi; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah

    2003-04-16

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I the team identified the integration of the water produced in the F-T synthesis section with the gasification section as an area of potential synergy. By utilizing the F-T water in the petroleum coke slurry for the gasifier, the EECP can eliminate a potential waste stream and reduce capital costs. There is a low technical risk for this synergy, however, the economic risk, particularly in regards to the water, can be high. The economic costs include the costs of treating the water to meet the locally applicable environmental standards. This option may require expensive chemicals and treatment facilities. EECP Phase II included tests conducted to confirm the viability of integrating F-T water in the slurry feed for the gasifier. Testing conducted at ChevronTexaco's Montebello Technology Center (MTC) included preparing slurries made using petroleum coke with F-T water collected at the LaPorte Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The work included bench scale tests to determine the slurry ability of the petroleum coke and F-T water. The results of the tests show that F-T water does not adversely affect slurries for the gasifier. There are a few cases where in fact the addition of F-T water caused favorable changes in viscosity of the slurries. This RD&T task was executed in Phase II and results are reported herein.

  19. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randy Roberts

    2003-04-25

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using petroleum coke and ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC. (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ChevronTexaco is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems were assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified F-T reactor scale-up as a potential technical risk. The objective of Task 2.3 was to confirm engineering models that allow scale-up to commercial slurry phase bubble column (SPBC) reactors operating in the churn-turbulent flow regime. In developmental work outside the scope of this project, historical data, literature references, and a scale-up from a 1 1/2-in. (3.8 cm) to 6-ft (1.8 m) SPBC reactor have been reviewed. This review formed the background for developing scale-up models for a SPBC reactor operating in the churn-turbulent flow regime. The necessary fundamental physical parameters have been measured and incorporated into the mathematical catalyst/kinetic model developed from the SPBC and CSTR work outside the scope of this EECP project. The mathematical catalyst/kinetic model was used to compare to experimental data obtained at Rentech during the EECP Fischer-Tropsch Confirmation Run (Task 2.1; reported separately). The prediction of carbon monoxide (CO) conversion as a function of days on stream compares quite closely to the experimental data.

  20. The Water Circuit of the Plants - Do Plants have Hearts ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Kundt; Eva Gruber

    2006-03-17

    There is a correspondence between the circulation of blood in all higher animals and the circulation of sap in all higher plants - up to heights h of 140 m - through the xylem and phloem vessels. Plants suck in water from the soil, osmotically through the roothair zone, and subsequently lift it osmotically again, and by capillary suction (via their buds, leaves, and fruits) into their crowns. In between happens a reverse osmosis - the endodermis jump - realized by two layers of subcellular mechanical pumps in the endodermis walls which are powered by ATP, or in addition by two analogous layers of such pumps in the exodermis. The thus established root pressure helps forcing the absorbed ground water upward, through the whole plant, and often out again, in the form of guttation, or exudation.