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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

prairie plant list  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

List of Native Prairie Plant Illustrations List of Native Prairie Plant Illustrations Select the common name of the plant you want to view. Common Name Scientific Name Grasses BIG BLUESTEM Andropogon gerardii INDIAN GRASS Sorghastrum nutans LITTLE BLUESTEM Andropogon scoparius SWITCH GRASS Panicum virgatum CORD GRASS Spartina pectinata NEEDLEGRASS Stipa spartea PRAIRIE DROPSEED Sporobolus pectinata SIDE-OATS GRAMA Bouteloua curtipendula FORBS ROSINWEED Silphium integrifolium SAW-TOOTHED SUNFLOWER Helianthus grossesserratus WILD BERGAMOT Monarda fistulosa YELLOW CONEFLOWER Ratibida pinnata BLACK-EYED SUSAN Rudbeckia hirta COMPASS PLANT Silphium lactiniatum CUP PLANT Silphium perfoliatum NEW ENGLAND ASTER Aster novae-angilae PRAIRIE DOCK Silphium terebinthinaceum RATTLESNAKE MASTER Eryngium yuccifolium STIFF GOLDENROD Solidaga rigida

2

prairie restoration plant ident  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Identification Plant Identification Once your restoration is started and plants begin to germinate, the next issue you are faced with is the identification of what is growing. From my experience, the seeds you planted should start germinating after about a week to ten days. Of course, this is dependent on the weather conditions and the amount of moisture in the soil. If you are watering regularly, you will get growth much more quickly than if you are just waiting for nature to take its course. Identifying prairie plants as they germinate is very difficult. If you are an experienced botanist or an expert on prairie plants, your identification will still be a little more than an educated guess. In other words identifying prairie species from non-native species will take some time.

3

Fermilab Prairie Plant Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crack the Quadrat* Code! Crack the Quadrat* Code! compass plasnt * What is a Quadrat? It's a one-meter square plot. Plants in the quadrat are identified and counted. Fermilab quadrat specialists can! Attention Citizen Scientists Are you a prairie enthusiast? Learn scientific plant monitoring techniques while enjoying our beautiful prairie. Join a unique science program open to the public, adult groups, families, scouts and more Â…. Become a prairie quadrat specialist and do real science at Fermilab! In the Fermilab Prairie Plant Survey you will learn how to identify prairie plants, map a prairie plot and track restoration progress along with our experts. Use our Website to contribute data you collect. Come once or come back two or three times to see how the prairie changes. Keep an eye on this prairie for years to come!

4

prairie restoration planting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planting Planting The most common method of planting is to broadcast spread your seeds. This is usually done by hand, but you can also use a lawn-type spreader. After you have spread your seeds, rake the area over lightly. For seeds to germinate correctly they need to have good seed to soil contact, but you also don't want to bury the seeds too deeply. The general rule is to cover seeds to a depth no deeper than twice the seed's size. For example, if a seed is 4 mm in size, you would not want to bury it any deeper than 8 mm. The seeds commonly found in a prairie matrix are usually small enough, that raking over the spread seed to mix and cover them with a thin layer of soil, is adequate. If you are involving large numbers of people in the planting, a plastic cup

5

Native Prairie Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

preferably destroyed by fire or placed in plastic bags out in the hot sun or in a hot compost pile in order to kill the seed. (you can use composted or sterilized material for...

6

The Prairie  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prairie Prairie Nature Bulletin No. 30 September 1, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation THE PRAIRIE We call this the season of Purple-and-Gold. Particularly is this descriptive of those few remnants of native prairie that still persist. Just now they have a striking characteristic. There is a high level of yellow bloom, a low level of golden bloom and, rising above the lower level, a broad band of purple that thrills you with its vibrant beauty. The high level is made up of the flowers of Rosin-weed, the Compass Plant and the Prairie Dock. The low level is Goldenrod and Brown- eyed Susan. The purple band is Prairie Blazing Star. The prairie is ever-changing. Fifteen days ago the Yellow Coneflower was dominant, with the Prairie Bush-clover supplying low staccato dots of reddish purple. In July your eye was struck by magenta islands of Purple Coneflower, pink islands of Prairie Phlox, the deep orange of the Butterfly-weed, and rare daubs of the red of lilies.

7

prairie restoration index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purpose Purpose This is the first section of a "How to" guide designed for those individuals interested in restoring an area of land back to native prairie. To better facilitate your search for specific information, select one or all of the main topics associated with prairie parcel restoration listed below. Index History/Introduction of Prairie Restoration Selecting a Site Starting/Planning Seedbed Preparation. Seed (Amount, Acquiring and Preparation) Planting Watering General Identification (Grasses, Forbs, Flowers, Keeping Track) Burning - Enriching Reference Materials, Burning Permit and Seed Sources Information Identification Keys - Grasses and Forbs Illustrated Guide to Native Prairie Species Watch List for Native Prairie Plants This report was written by Lawrence Cwik as part of his participation in

8

Effects of prescribed burning on undesirable plant species and soil physical properties on tallgrass prairies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Prescribed burning has been a common conservation practice on native prairie dating back to the days of pioneer settlement. Advantages include increased forage quality, reduction… (more)

Ungerer, James L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

prairie restoration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History and Introduction In pre-settlement times the State of Illinois included more than 22 million acres of native prairie habitat. Today there is only about 2000 acres of this...

10

SUBJECT: PRAIRIE ISLAND NUCLEAR GENERATING PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generating Plant. The enclosed report documents the inspection findings which were discussed on February 22, 2001, with you and other members of your staff. This inspection examined activities conducted under your license as they relate to safety and compliance with the Commission’s rules and regulations and with the conditions of your license. The inspectors reviewed selected procedures and records, observed activities, and interviewed personnel. Based on the results of this inspection, the inspectors identified two issues of very low safety significance (Green). One of these issues was determined to involve a violation of NRC requirements. However, because of its very low safety significance and because it has been entered into your corrective action program, the NRC is treating the issue as a non-cited violation, in accordance with Section VI.A.1 of the NRC’s Enforcement Policy. If you deny the non-cited violation, you should provide a response with the basis for your denial, within 30 days of the date of this inspection report, to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, ATTN: Document Control Desk, Washington DC 20555-0001; with copies to the Regional Administrator,

Dear Mr. Sorensen; Roger D. Lanksbury

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Fermilab - Prairie Interpretive Trail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prairie Interpretive Trail In some areas of the Midwest, among them Fermilab, efforts have begun to retrieve some of the awesome beauty of the native tallgrass prairies, as well as...

12

Pleasant Prairie Power Plant air quality control upgrade project, Pleasant Praire, Wisconsin  

SciTech Connect

We Energies recently completed a multiyear project at its Pleasant Prairie Power Plant to add a selective catalytic reduction system to one of its two units and a scrubber to both. These projects are described. 7 figs., 1 tab.

Gebhart, S.; Pennline, D.; Brodsky, I.; Bichler, D. [Washington Group International (United States)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Simply Prairie Homepage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

about native and reconstructed prairies using quadrat data. Students become apprentice scientists in our multi-state quadrat study. Bob Lootens, Fermilab Join us Check...

14

prairie restoration starting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

warm for prairie seeds to germinate. Thinking of the prairie plants as a summer garden crop, for those of you that plant gardens annually, may give you a better perspective on all...

15

Spatial and temporal effects of burning on plant community characteristics and composition in a fescue prairie .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Conserving structural and compositional diversity in Fescue Prairie requires reintroducing natural disturbances according to their historic regime. Fire is an important natural process that may… (more)

Gross, Dale

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Prairie Grasses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grasses Grasses Prairie Resources - Exhibit Home "What is it about prairies? What fascinates us so about the grasslands that gird our continent? Other landscapes certainly offer more spectacular scenery such as the Rockies, the canyons, the deserts, the ocean coastlines. By contrast, the prairies seem, well, flat - flat and somewhat monotonous-undeniably vast but not as picturesque as a redwood forest or a mountain stream. "Yet the prairie holds a rightful place in American popular culture as one of our most distinctive and defining landscapes. Writers from Washington Irving to Willa Cather to Carl Sandburg have celebrated the prairie in prose and verse. Our national songs refer to the 'endless prairie' and 'the fruited plain.' Illinois, where only one-hundredth of 1 percent of its

17

Virtual Prairie  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visualizing a Real Prairie: Visualizing a Real Prairie: Tools to Represent Your Data Site Index for ( Quadrat Study Project - Prairie Advocates Project - Online Prairie Data) You may use the virtual prairies you create in your presentation. You will need to save the screen or browser window to save the images you create. On the Macintosh, you type open apple-shift-3 to make a Picture file on the hard drive. You can edit these files with Adobe Photoshop or other image editing applications and put them in your report. On a PC with Windows 95, you can type the key combination of "print screen" and the alt key to save what you have displayed in the browser window to the clipboard and then paste it into an image editing application or directly into your report. Create a Quadrat Using Real Data.

18

prairie restoration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amount of Seed Amount of Seed Before you can restore your parcel, you must obtain seed. The amount of seed you will need is directly related to the size of your parcel. When our school did its restoration, the area available to us was a bit larger than a full sized tennis court, about 15 meters by 40 meters. When seed was spread, each square meter of soil needed, by volume, about 500 cubic centimeters of seed to cover it adequately. This is roughly equivalent to a full 8-ounce plastic cup of seed for each square meter quadrat.(A quadrat is a term used in field studies meaning a measured off square of conveniently sized dimensions.) All together the total amount of prairie matrix (a mixture of all types of prairie seeds) we needed, fit easily into about 2 large plastic trash can liners (30-gallon size). For another

19

Virtual Prairie: Going Green with Volunteer Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Multi-species prairie composed primarily of clonal plants can achieve different ecological functions. They can be a good source of biofuel, a mean of water purification in agriculture or a biodiversity guardian. The goal of the Virtual Prairie project ...

Malek Smaoui; Marc Garbey; Cendrine Mony

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Native Plants for Optimizing Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Lands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Native Plants for Optimizing Carbon Sequestration in Native Plants for Optimizing Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Lands Pat J. Unkefer (punkefer@lanl.gov; 505-665-2554) Biosciences Division (B-S1), Mail Stop E529 Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 Michael H. Ebinger (mhe@lanl.gov; 505-667-3147) Environmental Dynamics and Spatial Analysis Group (EES-10), Mail Stop J495 Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 David D. Breshears (daveb@lanl.gov; 505-665-2803) Environmental Dynamics and Spatial Analysis Group (EES-10), Mail Stop J495 Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 Thomas J. Knight (tknight@usm.maine.edu; 207-780-4577) Biological Sciences Department, 96 Falmouth Ave. University of Southern Maine Portland, ME 04103 Christopher L. Kitts (ckitts@calpoly.edu; 805-756-2949)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Mercury Reactions in Power Plant Plumes: Pleasant Prairie Experiment and Compliance Scenario Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent technical results indicate that divalent mercury emitted from power plants may rapidly transform to elemental mercury within power plant plumes. Simulations of mercury plume reduction based on these results have improved regional model fits with wet deposition data for particular years, while maintaining model-data fits for remaining archive years. Determining speciation changes occurring in a dispersing stack plume is essential for properly estimating atmospheric mercury fate and deposition patte...

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

Prairie Project Rubric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

about the prairie and local development. Other project rubrics assess other research skills. Student Name Exceeds Expectations Meets...

23

NPP Grassland: Konza Prairie, U.S.A. [Kansas]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Konza Prairie, U.S.A., 1984-1990 Konza Prairie, U.S.A., 1984-1990 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Knapp, A. K., and D. Ojima. 1996. NPP Grassland: Konza Prairie, U.S.A., 1984-1990. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Productivity of a humid temperate tall-grass prairie was determined at the Konza Prairie Natural Research Area from 1975 to the present. Monthly dynamics of above-ground plant biomass have been monitored since 1984, and estimates of above-ground plant production have been made since 1975. The Konza Prairie was the site of the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment (FIFE), an intensive

24

Foliar herbivory and its effects on plant growth in native and exotic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

species with a Chi-square independence test. Greenhouse experiments. To evaluate the effects of foliar herbivory on plant growth in exotic and native species ...

25

Prairie State begins development work  

SciTech Connect

Lively Grove will be a state-of-the-art super section mine which will supply 6.7 million tons of bituminous coal per annum to a 1,600 MWS supercritical plant which is expected to begin generation electricity in 2011/2012. The projected cost of Prairie State Energy Campus is over $4 billion. The power plant will be 15% more efficient that similar sized plants and could be a model plant for the industry. The article describes the development plans which are 10% complete. 2 photos.

Buchsbaum, L.

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Electric Transmission Right-of-Way Invasive Non-Native Woody Plant Species Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Invasive non-native woody plant species are a significant issue in the United States. Invasive woody plants are a particular concern for electric transmission right-of-way (ROW) managers. While invasive non-native woody plants have beneficial usesincluding erosion control, wildlife food and cover, and use as ornamentalsthey also have a notably negative impact on electric transmission ROWs. Negative impacts include reducing line clearance, reliability, and accessibility, and increasing vegetation manageme...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

27

Evaluation of methods for restoration of tallgrass prairie in the Blackland Prairie region of North Central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this investigation was to initiate the restoration process of a facsimile prairie. Specific objectives were to evaluate the effects of time, topography/soil, seeding rate, mulch treatments and soil compaction on-the establishment phase of the restoration in a split-split-split plot experimental design. Three 24mx3Om replicate plots were established on summit, backslope and footslope positions. Each plot was subdivided into four treatment subplots which were planted with locally collected seed at rates of .3, .6, and .9 kg/ha pure live seed (PLS) (based on Sorghastrum avenaceum PLS). The fourth subplot was a control. One-half of each subplot was mulched with mechanically shredded seed hay. Subplots were further split into areas of soil compaction created by the wheel traffic of planting equipment. Across time, native perennial grass densities decreased and cover increased, while native annual forb density increased as canopy dominance decreased. Native perennial grass establishment was best within the summit and poorest within the footslope positions. Higher levels of soil compaction were deleterious to establishment of native perennial species, especially within the first growing season. Sorghastrum avneaceum plants successfully established under mulch-only applications, while other native perennial grasses had greater cover on mulched than on unmulched plots. Annual forb densities were less on mulched plots. Further, interactions with topographic positions and soil compaction often modified or nullified other treatment effects. For example, S. avenaceum densities for mulch treatments on compacted soils were not different than unmulched plots, regardless of compaction.

Eidson, James Arthur

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Response of C3 and C4 plants to middle-Holocene climatic variation near the prairie-forest ecotone of Minnesota, U.S.A.  

SciTech Connect

Paleorecords of the middle Holocene (MH) from the North American midcontinent can offer insights into ecological responses to pervasive drought that may accompany future climatic warming. We analyzed MH sediments from West Olaf Lake (WOL) and Steel Lake (SL) in Minnesota to examine the effects of warm/dry climatic conditions on prairie-woodland ecosystems. Mineral composition and carbonate {delta}{sup 18}O were used to determine climatic variations, whereas pollen assemblages, charcoal {delta}{sup 13}C, and charcoal accumulation rates were used to reconstruct vegetation composition, C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} plant abundance, and fire. The ratio of aragonite:calcite at WOL and {delta}{sup 18}O at SL suggest that pronounced droughts occurred during the MH but that drought severity decreased with time. From charcoal {delta}{sup 13}C data we estimated that the MH abundance of C{sub 4} plants averaged 50% at WOL and 43% at SL. At WOL C{sub 4} abundance was negatively correlated with aragonite:calcite, suggesting that severe moisture deficits suppressed C{sub 4} plants in favor of weedy C{sub 3} plants (e.g., Ambrosia). As climate ameliorated C{sub 4} abundance increased (from {approx}33 to 66%) at the expense of weedy species, enhancing fuel availability and fire occurrence. In contrast, farther east at SL climate was cooler and wetter than at WOL, and C{sub 4} abundance showed no correlation with {delta}{sup 18}O-inferred aridity. Woody C{sub 3} plants (e.g., Quercus) were more abundant, biomass flammability lower, and fires less important at SL than at WOL. Our results suggest that C{sub 4} plants are adapted to warm/dry climatic conditions, but not to extreme droughts, and that the fire regime is controlled by biomass-climate interactions.

Tian, J; Brown, T A; Hu, F S; Stefanova, I; Nelson, D M

2003-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

29

Prairie newspaper article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

family-oriented theme park featuring Hootsie the Owl and his prairie friends. Dino-matic Oil Refinery A fossil fuel finishing factory focusing on fine fuel for factories....

30

Particles and Prairies: Credits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particles and Prairies Video Sponsors: Funding for this program was provided in part by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Research, Illinois State Board of Education's...

31

Argonne Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Data from Batvia Prairie and Agricultural Sites  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide fluxes and stocks in terrestrial ecosystems are key measurements needed to constrain quantification of regional carbon sinks and sources and the mechanisms controlling them. This information is required to produce a sound carbon budget for North America. This project examines CO2 and energy fluxes from agricultural land and from restored tallgrass prairie to compare their carbon sequestration potentials. The study integrates eddy covariance measurements with biometric measurements of plant and soil carbon stocks for two systems in northeastern Illinois: 1) long-term cultivated land in corn-soybean rotation with conventional tillage, and 2) a 15 year-old restored prairie that represents a long-term application of CRP conversion of cultivated land to native vegetation. The study contributes to the North American Carbon Program (NACP) by providing information on the magnitude and distribution of carbon stocks and the processes that control carbon dynamics in cultivated and CRP-restored land in the Midwest. The prairie site has been functioning since October 2004 and the agricultural site since July 2005. (From http://www.atmos.anl.gov/ FERMI/index.html)

Matamala, Roser [ANL; Jastrow, Julie D.; Lesht, Barry [ANL; Cook, David [ANL; Pekour, Mikhail [ANL; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A. [University of Illinois at Chicago

32

The Prairie - Our Heartland Sampler  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

was Illinois like 200 years ago? Illinois, called the "Prairie State," was once covered by 40,000 square miles of tall grass prairie. This ecosystem was home to grasses, forbs and...

33

The Prairie Chicken  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prairie Chicken Prairie Chicken Nature Bulletin No. 99 January 18, 1947 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation THE PRAIRIE CHICKEN In late January the prairie chicken cocks begin to "boom". Feeble and infrequent at first, booming increases as winter merges into spring and continues until June. The cocks gather in groups, regularly, before sunrise and again at sunset, on open ridges or slight rises in the prairie. Year after year they come to the same locations where each male establishes a "territory" which he defends fiercely. Fights are frequent. As a prelude to booming, the cock runs forward a short distance, stops, stamps his feet rapidly and pivots in a half or full circle. As he dances, the two brilliant orange air sacs -- one on each side of his neck -- are inflated, his long horn-like neck feathers are erected, the fleshy orange eyebrows are also inflated and his tail spread fanwise, snaps with a loud click. Then comes the boom.

34

Prairie newspaper article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prairie Plot to be Considered for Commercial Use Prairie Plot to be Considered for Commercial Use Proposed sale of forty acres By Bill Fraccaro, Larry Cwik, Pat Franzen and Chris Schwarz SUNNY TIMES CORRESPONDENTS SMALLVILLE, USA - The town of Smallville will vote at next month's town council meeting on the proposed sale of forty acres of the existing 100-acre prairie west of the Otter River. Several companies have offered to develop the land for commercial or multifamily residential use. Smallville is interested in potential windfall profits that will be realized with the sale of the property. Due to a lack of industry in town, the tax base is relatively small limiting the town budgets for police, fire protection, schools, and maintenance, etc. The town is adjacent to a large industrial area, and most of the town's adult residents

35

Umatilla Tribes to Grow Native Plants for Hanford | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Umatilla Tribes to Grow Native Plants for Hanford Umatilla Tribes to Grow Native Plants for Hanford Umatilla Tribes to Grow Native Plants for Hanford January 2, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation’s field station, located in Mission, Ore., will be home to one-of-a-kind research and development for revegetation efforts. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation's field station, located in Mission, Ore., will be home to one-of-a-kind research and development for revegetation efforts. Tribal construction workers stand in front of the hexagonal greenhouse dome structure that will house the seeds for revegetation efforts. Tribal construction workers stand in front of the hexagonal greenhouse dome structure that will house the seeds for revegetation efforts.

36

The field test was conducted in the Prairie  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

field test was conducted in the Prairie Pothole Region - an area field test was conducted in the Prairie Pothole Region - an area that stretches from central Iowa into Northern Alberta, Canada, and contains thousands of shallow wetlands formed by retreating glaciers approximately 10,000 years ago. Terrestrial carbon capture and storage (CCS) involves plant removal of CO 2 from the atmosphere using photosynthesis and storing the greenhouse gas (GHG) in biomass

37

Oklahoma Native Plant Record Volume 11, December 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USDA Matthew S. Allen2 Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service Michael W. Palmer2 4700 River Rd., Unit) and the United States (Petranka and McPherson 1979, Callaway and Aschehoug 2000, Fitch et al. 2001, Briggs et al

Palmer, Michael W.

38

Temporal changes in C and N stocks of restored prairie: implications for C sequestration strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recovery of ecosystem C and N dynamics after disturbance can be a slow process. Chronosequence approaches offer unique opportunities to use space-for-time substitution to quantify the recovery of ecosystem C and N stocks and estimate the potential of restoration practices for C sequestration. We studied the distribution of C and N stocks in two chronosequences that included long-term cultivated lands, 3- to 26-year-old prairie restorations, and remnant prairie on two related soil series. Results from the two chronosequences did not vary significantly and were combined. Based on modeling predictions, the recovery rates of different ecosystem components varied greatly. Overall, C stocks recovered faster than N stocks, but both C and N stocks recovered more rapidly for aboveground vegetation than for any other ecosystem component. Aboveground C and N reached 95% of remnant levels in only 13 years and 21 years, respectively, after planting to native vegetation. Belowground plant C and N recovered several decades later, while microbial biomass C, soil organic C (SOC), and total soil N recovered on a century timescale. In the cultivated fields, SOC concentrations were depleted within the surface 25 cm, coinciding with the depth of plowing, but cultivation apparently led to redistribution of soil C, increasing SOC stocks deeper in the soil profile. The restoration of prairie vegetation was effective at rebuilding soil organic matter (SOM) in the surface soil. Accrual rates were maintained at 43 g C {center_dot} m{sup -2} {center_dot} yr{sup -1} and 3 g N {center_dot} m{sup -2} {center_dot} yr{sup -1} in the surface 0.16 Mg/m{sup 2} soil mass during the first 26 years of restoration and were predicted to reach 50% of their storage potential (3500 g C/m{sup 2}) in the first 100 years. We conclude that restoration of tallgrass prairie vegetation can restore SOM lost through cultivation and has the potential to sequester relatively large amounts of SOC over a sustained period of time. Whether restored prairies can retain the C apparently transferred to the subsoil by cultivation practices remains to be seen.

Matamala, Roser [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Jastrow, Julie D [ORNL; Miller, Raymond M [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Temporal changes in C and N stocks of restored prairie : implications for C sequestration strategies.  

SciTech Connect

The recovery of ecosystem C and N dynamics after disturbance can be a slow process. Chronosequence approaches offer unique opportunities to use space-for-time substitution to quantify the recovery of ecosystem C and N stocks and estimate the potential of restoration practices for C sequestration. We studied the distribution of C and N stocks in two chronosequences that included long-term cultivated lands, 3- to 26-year-old prairie restorations, and remnant prairie on two related soil series. Results from the two chronosequences did not vary significantly and were combined. Based on modeling predictions, the recovery rates of different ecosystem components varied greatly. Overall, C stocks recovered faster than N stocks, but both C and N stocks recovered more rapidly for aboveground vegetation than for any other ecosystem component. Aboveground C and N reached 95% of remnant levels in only 13 years and 21 years, respectively, after planting to native vegetation. Belowground plant C and N recovered several decades later, while microbial biomass C, soil organic C (SOC), and total soil N recovered on a century timescale. In the cultivated fields, SOC concentrations were depleted within the surface 25 cm, coinciding with the depth of plowing, but cultivation apparently led to redistribution of soil C, increasing SOC stocks deeper in the soil profile. The restoration of prairie vegetation was effective at rebuilding soil organic matter (SOM) in the surface soil. Accrual rates were maintained at 43 g C {center_dot} m{sup -2} {center_dot} yr{sup -1} and 3 g N {center_dot} m{sup -2} {center_dot} yr{sup -1} in the surface 0.16 Mg/m{sup 2} soil mass during the first 26 years of restoration and were predicted to reach 50% of their storage potential (3500 g C/m{sup 2}) in the first 100 years. We conclude that restoration of tallgrass prairie vegetation can restore SOM lost through cultivation and has the potential to sequester relatively large amounts of SOC over a sustained period of time. Whether restored prairies can retain the C apparently transferred to the subsoil by cultivation practices remains to be seen.

Matamala, R.; Jastrow, J. D.; Miller, R. M.; Garten, C. T.; Biosciences Division; ORNL

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Prairie Island  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prairie Island" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Impact of prescribed burning on endophytic insect communities of prairie perennials (Asteraceae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of prescribed burning on endophytic insect communities of prairie perennials (Asteraceae, Eurytomidae, Fire, Mordellidae, Population dynamics Abstract. Prescribed burning currently is used to preserve changes in plant communities brought about by burning, other species that are endemic to prairies may

Hanks, Lawrence M.

42

Patterns of Plant Invasions: A Case Example in Native Species Hotspots and Rare Habitats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land managers require landscape-scale information on where exotic plant species have successfully established, to better guide research, control, and restoration efforts. We evaluated the vulnerability of various habitats to invasion by exotic plant species in a 100,000 ha area in the southeast corner of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah. For the 97 0.1-ha plots in 11 vegetation types, exotic species richness (log 10 ) was strongly negatively correlated to the cover of cryptobiotic soil crusts (r =-0.47, P<0.001), and positively correlated to native species richness (r = 0.22, P<0.03), native species cover (r = 0.23, P<0.05), and total nitrogen in the soil (r = 0.40, P<0.001). Exotic species cover was strongly positively correlated to exotic species richness (r = 0.68, P<0.001). Only 6 of 97 plots did not contain at least one exotic species. Exotic species richness was particularly high in locally rare, mesic vegetation types and nitrogen rich soils. Dry, upland plots (n = 51) had less than half of the exotic species richness and cover compared to plots (n = 45) in washes and lowland depressions that collect water intermittently. Plots dominated by trees had significantly greater native and exotic species richness compared to plots dominated by shrubs. For the 97 plots combined, 33% of the variance in exotic species richness could be explained by a positive relationship with total plant cover, and negative relationships with the cover of cryptobiotic crusts and bare ground. There are several reasons for concern: (1) Exotic plant species are invading hot spots of native plant diversity and rare/unique habitats. (2) The foliar cover of exotic species was greatest in habitats that had been invaded by several exotic species. (3) Continued distu...

Thomas J. Stohlgren; Yuka Otsuki; Cynthia A. Villa; Michelle Lee; Jayne Belnap

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Particles and Prairies |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Particles and Particles and Prairies Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Particles and Prairies July 22, 2013 3:30PM EDT to July 26, 2013 4:30PM EDT Fermilab What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a professional development workshop for teachers. Tens of thousands of square miles of glorious color, waves of grass, and diverse animal populations inhabited what we now call home. How-and why-has this amazing ecosystem changed? Using observation, experience, inquiry, and critical thinking, convey the story of the prairie and westward expansion to your students. This program incorporates science, language arts, mathematics, social science, and more!

44

Prairie Power, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Soyland Power Coop Inc) (Redirected from Soyland Power Coop Inc) Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie Power, Inc Place Illinois Utility Id 40307 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location Gateway NERC SERC Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Prairie_Power,_Inc&oldid=41229

45

Pocahontas Prairie | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pocahontas Prairie Pocahontas Prairie Jump to: navigation, search Name Pocahontas Prairie Facility Pocahontas Prairie Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Algonquin Power Developer Gamesa Energy Purchaser Merchant Location Pomeroy IA Coordinates 42.62183365°, -94.6978569° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.62183365,"lon":-94.6978569,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

46

Prairie Birds of the Cornbelt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prairie Birds of the Cornbelt Prairie Birds of the Cornbelt Nature Bulletin No. 305 May 5, 1984 Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation PRAIRIE BIRDS OF THE CORNBELT The Ideal way to get acquainted with the birds of the open fields and prairies is to take a team of horses and raise a crop of corn. Birds are not afraid of horses and a farmer or his boy can watch them, close up, day after day. Unlike tractors, horses guide themselves most of the time and the driver has plenty of chances to look and listen -- especially while plowing. The small animal life uncovered by a freshly turned furrow offers a free lunch for birds. Several sorts of typical ground-nesting birds are loined by blackbirds, cowbirds, robins, and even the wary crows, from nearby hedgerows, farmsteads and woodlands to form a flying, running, hopping parade behind the plow. They and the prairie birds rush to grab earthworms. cutworms, white grubs, beetles and ants.

47

<GrandPrairie>  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grande Praire Wind Farm, O'Neill, NE Grande Praire Wind Farm, O'Neill, NE The Western Area Power Administration (Western), an agency of the Department of Energy (DOE), intends to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) on the proposed interconnection of the Grande Prairie Wind Farm (Project) in Holt County, near the city of O'Neill, Nebraska. Grande Prairie Wind, LLC (Grande Prairie), a subsidiary of Midwest Wind Energy Development Group, LLC, has applied to Western to interconnect their proposed Project to Western's power transmission system. Western is issuing this notice to inform the public and interested parties about Western's intent to prepare an EIS, conduct a public scoping process, and invite the public to comment on the scope, proposed action, alternatives, and other issues to be addressed in the EIS.

48

Prairie Creek Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Creek Ethanol LLC Creek Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie Creek Ethanol LLC Place Goldfield, Iowa Zip 50542 Product Prairie Creek Ethanol, LLC had planned to build a 55m gallon (208m litre) per year ethanol plant in Wesley, Iowa, but, as of 23 May 2008, the board of directors voted to recommend to the members of the company to dissolve the company as soon as possible. Coordinates 37.707559°, -117.233459° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.707559,"lon":-117.233459,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

49

Particles and Prairies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Reasons Where Examples How Seed Collection and Planting First Results Burning History Prehistory Early Inhabitants White Settlers Twentieth Century Ecology Biotics...

50

Prairie Rose | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rose Rose Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie Rose Facility Prairie Rose Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Geronimo Wind Energy Developer Geronimo Wind Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Jasper MN Coordinates 43.78671052°, -96.32091522° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.78671052,"lon":-96.32091522,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

51

Constraints on the utilisation of the invasive Chinese tallow tree Sapium sebiferum by generalist native  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraints on the utilisation of the invasive Chinese tallow tree Sapium sebiferum by generalist prairie vegetation and a seedling of either introduced Sapium sebiferum (Chinese tallow tree) or native

Siemann, Evan

52

City of Blooming Prairie, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blooming Prairie Blooming Prairie Place Minnesota Utility Id 1871 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png All Electric Commercial AEC Commercial All Electric Residential AER Commercial City Electric Commercial Commerical CE Commercial Demand DE Commercial Farm Light Lighting Residential Electric RE Residential School Electric Commercial Security Light Lighting Average Rates Residential: $0.1050/kWh Commercial: $0.1000/kWh References

53

Native Orchids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Orchids Orchids Nature Bulletin No. 527-A Aprilo 27, 1974 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation NATIVE ORCHIDS Do orchids grow wild in Cook County? Yes! To those of us who have seen only those elegant white. mauve and shell-pink creations that come out of hothouses and are sold in florists' shops, this is amazing. Yet it is true. Thirty kinds are native to the Chicago area. Orchids are the aristocrats of the world of flowers and make up one of our largest plant families with nearly 20,000 known kinds. They include some of the most beautiful and highly prized flowers known to man. The seed pods of two tropical climbing species yield the vanilla of commerce. Most kinds are found in the tropics where many grow like air plants on the trunks of trees. However, all of our native species grow directly from the ground, preferring acid soils rich in peat, such as cool sphagnum bogs, along with pitcher plant, sundew, swamp blueberry and cranberry. They are difficult to grow, partly because the seeds are as fine as dust -- the smallest in the plant kingdom.

54

Precipitation Trends on the Canadian Prairies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Canadian prairies are a major producer of grain, much of which is produced under rain-fed agriculture. The amount and timing of precipitation are critical to grain production. Information on the precipitation trend is therefore vital to this ...

O. O. Akinremi; S. M. McGinn; H. W. Cutforth

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

High-value renewable energy from prairie grasses  

SciTech Connect

Projected economic benefits of renewable energy derived from a native prairie grass, switchgrass, include nonmarket values that can reduce net fuel costs to near zero. At a farm gate price of $44.00/dry Mg, an agricultural sector model predicts higher profits for switchgrass than conventional crops on 16.9 million hectares (ha). Benefits would include an annual increase of $6 billion in net farm returns, a $1.86 billion reduction in government subsidies, and displacement of 44-159 Tg/year (1 Tg = 10{sup 12} g) of greenhouse gas emissions. Incorporating these values into the pricing structure for switchgrass bioenergy could accelerate commercialization and provide net benefits to the U.S. economy.

McLaughlin Jr, Samuel B [ORNL; De La Torre Ugarte, D. [University of Tennessee; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Lynd, L. [Dartmouth College; Sanderson, M. [USDA ARS; Tolbert, Virginia R [ORNL; Wolf, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech)

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Phriendly Physics...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Phriendly Physics Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Phriendly Physics July 29, 2013 3:30PM EDT to August 2, 2013 4:45PM...

57

Building Green in Greensburg: Prairie Pointe Townhomes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prairie Pointe Townhomes Prairie Pointe Townhomes After a tornado destroyed most of Greensburg, Kansas, in 2007, the residents needed affordable housing. Prairie Pointe Townhomes is a low-income rental development that was completed in July 2008. Eight of the 16 units in this townhome complex were awarded the first residential U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED ® ) Platinum rating in Kansas and are estimated to use about 50% less energy than similar buildings built to existing building codes. ENERGY EFFICIENCY FEATURES * Well-insulated 2 x 6 walls use blown-in cellulose insulation with an R-Value of 22.5 to prevent heat loss and save energy * Well-insulated roof with an R-value of R-38 prevents heat loss through the roof and helps keep building cool in summer

58

Prairie City Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City Biomass Facility City Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie City Biomass Facility Facility Prairie City Sector Biomass Owner D.R. Johnson Location Prairie City, Oregon Coordinates 44.4632135°, -118.7099477° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.4632135,"lon":-118.7099477,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

59

"1. Pleasant Prairie","Coal","Wisconsin Electric Power Co",1190  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin" "1. Pleasant Prairie","Coal","Wisconsin Electric Power Co",1190 "2. South Oak Creek","Coal","Wisconsin Electric Power Co",1135 "3. Columbia","Coal","Wisconsin Power &...

60

Prairie Winds ND I | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winds ND I Winds ND I Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie Winds ND I Facility Prairie Winds ND I Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Basin Electric Developer Basin Electric Power Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Location Ward County ND Coordinates 48.022462°, -101.292365° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.022462,"lon":-101.292365,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Prairie Winds Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prairie Winds Wind Farm Prairie Winds Wind Farm Facility Prairie Winds Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Basin Electric Power Coop/Central Power Electric Coop Developer Basin Electric Power Coop/Central Power Electric Coop Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Power Coop/Central Power Electric Coop Location Near Minot ND Coordinates 48.022927°, -101.291435° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.022927,"lon":-101.291435,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

62

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: June 17, 2013 3:15PM EDT to June 19, 2013 5:15PM EDT Fermilab What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a professional development workshop for teachers. Tens of thousands of square miles of glorious color, waves of grass, and diverse animal populations inhabited what we now call home. How-and why-has this amazing ecosystem changed? Using observation, experience, inquiry, and critical thinking, convey the story of the prairie and westward expansion to your students. This program incorporates science, language arts, mathematics, social science, and more!

63

Arthropod Biodiversity of Urban Prairies and Turf Landscapes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arthropod Biodiversity of Urban Prairies and Turf Landscapes Arthropod Biodiversity of Urban Prairies and Turf Landscapes Armando Mireles 1 , Karel Jacobs 2 , Susan Kirt Alterio 2 1 Undergraduate Student, 2 Faculty, Department of Biological Sciences, Chicago State University, Chicago, IL 60628 Our hypothesis is that arthropod species diversity and similarity indices for the CSU prairie will be less than the established GM prairie and greater than the CSU turfgrass landscape. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: Research supported by a CSU CTRE grant and student stipend from the LSAMPS program. Summer 2012 research was supported by DOE Visiting Faculty Program at Argonne National Laboratory, and Prairie Biotic, Inc. Thank you to CSU Geography Prof. Jason Biller for creating GIS maps and Dr. Andrew Maselli for aiding microscopic procedures.!

64

Blooming Prairie Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Blooming Prairie Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Blooming Prairie Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Blooming Prairie Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate Maximum of 100,000 per customer location, per year, per technology Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting Equipment: varies widely Replacement Motors: $15 - $2,700, varies by HP and efficiency Variable Speed Drives: $60 - $3,600, varies by HP and intended use

65

Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie View Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Facility Prairie View Gas Recovery Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location St. Joseph County, Indiana Coordinates 41.6228085°, -86.3376761° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6228085,"lon":-86.3376761,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

66

Pretty Prairie High School Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pretty Prairie High School Wind Project Pretty Prairie High School Wind Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Pretty Prairie High School Wind Project Facility Pretty Prairie High School Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Location KS Coordinates 37.78093°, -98.017822° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.78093,"lon":-98.017822,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

67

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Physics Institutes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a...

68

EIS-0485: Interconnection of the Grande Prairie Wind Farm, Holt...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prairie Wind Farm, in Holt County, near the city of O'Neill, Nebraska, to Western's power transmission system. The proposed wind energy generation project would include up to...

69

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Physics Institutes (second session)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a...

70

Prairie Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol LLC Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie Ethanol LLC Place Loomis, South Dakota Product Farmer owned bioethanol project development and managment team. Coordinates 48.82192°, -119.636004° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.82192,"lon":-119.636004,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

71

Prairie Wind Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy LLC Wind Energy LLC Place Lamar, Colorado Zip 81052 Sector Wind energy Product Developer and owner of Prairie wind farm. Coordinates 34.17099°, -80.064784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.17099,"lon":-80.064784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

72

Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Executive Summary 1. We investigated the impacts of wind power development on the demography, movements, and population genetics of Greater Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus cupido) at three sites in northcentral and eastern Kansas for a 7-year period. Only 1 of 3 sites was developed for wind power, the 201MW Meridan Way Wind Power Facility at the Smoky Hills site in northcentral Kansas. Our project report is based on population data for prairie chickens collected during a 2-year preconstruction period (2007-2008), a 3-year postconstruction period (2009-2011) and one final year of lek surveys (2012). Where relevant, we present preconstruction data from our field studies at reference sites in the northern Flint Hills (2007-2009) and southern Flint Hills (2006-2008). 2. We addressed seven potential impacts of wind power development on prairie chickens: lek attendance, mating behavior, use of breeding habitat, fecundity rates, natal dispersal, survival rates, and population numbers. Our analyses of pre- and postconstruction impacts are based on an analysis of covariance design where we modeled population performance as a function of treatment period, distance to eventual or actual site of the nearest wind turbine, and the interaction of these factors. Our demographic and movement data from the 6-year study period at the Smoky Hills site included 23 lek sites, 251 radio-marked females monitored for 287 bird-years, and 264 nesting attempts. Our genetic data were based on genotypes of 1,760 females, males and chicks that were screened with a set of 27 microsatellite markers that were optimized in the lab. 3. In our analyses of lek attendance, the annual probability of lek persistence during the preconstruction period was ~0.9. During the postconstruction period, distance to nearest turbine did not have a significant effect on the probability of lek persistence. However, the probability of lek persistence increased from 0.69 at 0 m to 0.89 at 30 km from turbines, and most abandoned lek sites were located 0.9 for leks of 10 or more males. Large leks in grasslands should be a higher priority for conservation. Overall, wind power development had a weak effect on the annual probability of lek persistence. 3. We used molecular methods to investigate the mating behavior of prairie chickens. The prevailing view for lek-mating grouse is that females mate once to fertilize the clutch and that conspecific nest parasitism is rare. We found evidence that females mate multiple times to fertilize the clutch (8-18% of broods, 4-38% of chicks) and will parasitize nests of other females during egg-laying (~17% of nests). Variable rates of parentage were highest in the fragmented landscapes at the Smoky Hills field site, and were lower at the Flint Hills field site. Comparisons of the pre- and postconstruction periods showed that wind energy development did not affect the mating behaviors of prairie chickens. 4. We examined use of breeding habitats by radio-marked females and conducted separate analyses for nest site selection, and movements of females not attending nests or broods. The landscape was a mix of native prairie and agricultural habitats, and nest site selection was not random because females preferred to nest in grasslands. Nests tended to be closer to turbines during the postconstruction period and there was no evidence of behavioral avoidance of turbines by females during nest site selection. Movements of females not attending nests or broods showed that females crossed the site of the wind power development at higher rates during the preconstruction period (20%) than the postconstruction period (11%), and that movements away from turbines were more frequent during the postconstruction period. Thus, wind power development appears to affect movements in breeding habitats but not nest site s

Sandercock, Brett K. [Kansas State University

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

73

Health Consultation Des Moines (Ex) Ordnance Site Landfill and Lagoon Complex Prairie Trail Development Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This letter has been prepared as a consultation to evaluate human health impacts that will remain in a commercial and residential area within Ankeny, Iowa known as the Prairie Trail Development Site. The Iowa Department of Public Health’s priority is to ensure the Ankeny community has the best information possible to safeguard its health. That information is included in the following paragraphs. Background and Statement of Issues The Prairie Trail Development Area is located in the southern portion of Ankeny, Iowa. This development area is located in an area that was formally occupied by the Des Moines Ordnance Plant. The Des Moines Ordnance Plant was constructed for the production and testing of small arms munitions for use during World War II. The Landfill and Lagoon Complex was utilized for disposal of wastes from the ordnance plant and also from various entities that utilized the site property until 1991. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is overseeing the cleanup of the Landfill and Lagoon Complex. A portion of the remainder of the site property had been used for burning of scrap explosives, the storage and disposal of chemicals, a disposal pond, testing of products, and various munitions manufacturing activities. The Iowa Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) is overseeing the cleanup of this remaining portion of the site property.

Terry E. Branstad; Kim Reynolds

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

A Meteorological Analysis of Important Contributors to the 1999–2005 Canadian Prairie Drought  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drought is a complex natural hazard that is endemic to the Canadian prairies. The 1999–2005 Canadian prairie drought, which had great socioeconomic impacts, was meteorologically unique in that it did not conform to the traditional persistent ...

Lisa M. Hryciw; Eyad H. Atallah; Shawn M. Milrad; John R. Gyakum

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Native Evergreens  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evergreens Evergreens Nature Bulletin No. 173-A December 12, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation NATIVE EVERGREENS There are few native evergreens in this region. Your Christmas tree -- unless it is one of those glistening imitations -- is likely to be a young spruce, balsam fir, or Scotch pine from Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota or Canada, perhaps a Douglas fir from the northwest. Long years ago, at Christmas time in many parts of rural Illinois, it was customary to search the hillsides and pastures for a well-shaped young cedar to be brought home as a Christmas tree. Or, if there was none, a young oak. They were decorated with strings of popcorn, cranberries and tinsel, chains of colored paper, and lighted with candles wired to the branches.

76

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Chemistry Institutes |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chemistry Institutes Chemistry Institutes Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Chemistry Institutes June 17, 2013 3:15PM EDT to June 21, 2013 5:15PM EDT Fermilab What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a professional development workshop for teachers. Tens of thousands of square miles of glorious color, waves of grass, and diverse animal populations inhabited what we now call home. How-and why-has this amazing ecosystem changed? Using observation, experience, inquiry, and critical thinking, convey the story of the prairie and westward expansion to your students. This program incorporates science, language arts, mathematics, social science, and more!

77

PrairieFire BioFuels Cooperative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PrairieFire BioFuels Cooperative PrairieFire BioFuels Cooperative Jump to: navigation, search Name PrairieFire BioFuels Cooperative Place Madison, Wisconsin Zip 53704 Product A member-owned cooperative which produces and distributes vegetable oil-based biodiesel. Coordinates 43.07295°, -89.386694° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.07295,"lon":-89.386694,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

78

Blooming Prairie Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Blooming Prairie Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Blooming Prairie Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Blooming Prairie Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: See program website Room A/C: $25, plus $25 for recycling an old, working unit Central A/C: $100 - $200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Air Source Heat Pump:$100 - $200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Geothermal Heat Pump:$200/ton, plus $25/ton for every 1 EER above minimum

79

Prairie Star (07) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prairie Star (07) Wind Farm Prairie Star (07) Wind Farm Facility Prairie Star (07) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer Horizon Wind Energy Energy Purchaser Great River Energy Location Mower County MN Coordinates 43.685955°, -92.626777° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.685955,"lon":-92.626777,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

80

Prairie Star (08) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prairie Star (08) Wind Farm Prairie Star (08) Wind Farm Facility Prairie Star (08) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Developer Horizon Energy Purchaser Great River Energy Location Mower County MN Coordinates 43.685955°, -92.626777° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.685955,"lon":-92.626777,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Sun Prairie Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sun Prairie Water & Light Comm Sun Prairie Water & Light Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Sun Prairie Water & Light Comm Place Wisconsin Utility Id 18312 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Area Lighting 1000w Halide existing poles Lighting Area Lighting 1000w Halide provided poles Lighting Area Lighting 100w HPS existing poles Lighting Area Lighting 100w HPS provided poles Lighting Area Lighting 150w HPS existing poles Lighting

82

Pioneer Prairie II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prairie II Wind Farm Prairie II Wind Farm Facility Pioneer Prairie II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer Horizon Wind Energy Location Northeastern IA IA Coordinates 43.450321°, -92.551074° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.450321,"lon":-92.551074,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

83

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Biology Institute |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biology Institute Biology Institute Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Biology Institute June 24, 2013 3:30PM EDT to June 28, 2013 5:30PM EDT Fermilab What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a professional development workshop for teachers. Tens of thousands of square miles of glorious color, waves of grass, and diverse animal populations inhabited what we now call home. How-and why-has this amazing ecosystem changed? Using observation, experience, inquiry, and critical thinking, convey the story of the prairie and westward expansion to your students. This program incorporates science, language arts, mathematics, social science, and more!

84

Native Sparrows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sparrows Sparrows Nature Bulletin No. 525 April 12, 1958 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist NATIVE SPARROWS The commonest bird of our cities and towns, or about buildings in rural regions, is the English Sparrow. This much cussed and discussed immigrant was brought from Europe to America. about a century ago and quickly followed man across the continent. It builds large trashy nests of grass and straw, lined with feathers, under the eaves or roofs of garages, barns, sheds and porches, as well as in birdhouses. It is quarrelsome and they sang together to drive out songbirds. Sometimes it is called the House Sparrow but, strictly speaking, it is one of the Weaver Finches which build nests with a side entrance. It is not a sparrow.

85

Demonstration of Life Cycle Management Planning for Systems, Structures, and Components: With Pilot Applications at Oconee and Prairie Island Nuclear Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, interest is growing in life cycle management (LCM) of nuclear plants over their remaining operating life. This report describes a process and software tools for identifying the most effective and economical way to manage the aging and obsolescence of important systems, structures, and components -- thereby enhancing their long-term reliability, availability, and value. Also described are pilot LCM planning studies at Oconee and Prairie Island nucle...

2001-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

86

Blooming Prairie, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blooming Prairie, Minnesota: Energy Resources Blooming Prairie, Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.870241°, -93.054684° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.870241,"lon":-93.054684,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

87

MHK Projects/Little Prairie Bend Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Little Prairie Bend Project Little Prairie Bend Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.2522,"lon":-89.657,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

88

Pioneer Prairie II (09) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

09) Wind Farm 09) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Pioneer Prairie II (09) Wind Farm Facility Pioneer Prairie II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer Horizon Wind Energy Energy Purchaser Ameren Location Northeastern IA IA Coordinates 43.450321°, -92.551074° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.450321,"lon":-92.551074,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

89

Eden Prairie, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prairie, Minnesota: Energy Resources Prairie, Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 44.8546856°, -93.470786° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.8546856,"lon":-93.470786,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

90

Dell Prairie, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dell Prairie, Wisconsin: Energy Resources Dell Prairie, Wisconsin: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.6948225°, -89.7567693° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.6948225,"lon":-89.7567693,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

91

Strongs Prairie, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Strongs Prairie, Wisconsin: Energy Resources Strongs Prairie, Wisconsin: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 44.0613558°, -89.9759616° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.0613558,"lon":-89.9759616,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

92

Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary 1. We investigated the impacts of wind power development on the demography, movements, and population genetics of Greater Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus cupido) at three sites in northcentral and eastern Kansas for a 7-year period. Only 1 of 3 sites was developed for wind power, the 201MW Meridan Way Wind Power Facility at the Smoky Hills site in northcentral Kansas. Our project report is based on population data for prairie chickens collected during a 2-year preconstruction period (2007-2008), a 3-year postconstruction period (2009-2011) and one final year of lek surveys (2012). Where relevant, we present preconstruction data from our field studies at reference sites in the northern Flint Hills (2007-2009) and southern Flint Hills (2006-2008). 2. We addressed seven potential impacts of wind power development on prairie chickens: lek attendance, mating behavior, use of breeding habitat, fecundity rates, natal dispersal, survival rates, and population numbers. Our analyses of pre- and postconstruction impacts are based on an analysis of covariance design where we modeled population performance as a function of treatment period, distance to eventual or actual site of the nearest wind turbine, and the interaction of these factors. Our demographic and movement data from the 6-year study period at the Smoky Hills site included 23 lek sites, 251 radio-marked females monitored for 287 bird-years, and 264 nesting attempts. Our genetic data were based on genotypes of 1,760 females, males and chicks that were screened with a set of 27 microsatellite markers that were optimized in the lab. 3. In our analyses of lek attendance, the annual probability of lek persistence during the preconstruction period was ~0.9. During the postconstruction period, distance to nearest turbine did not have a significant effect on the probability of lek persistence. However, the probability of lek persistence increased from 0.69 at 0 m to 0.89 at 30 km from turbines, and most abandoned lek sites were located <5 km from turbines. Probability of lek persistence was significantly related to habitat and number of males. Leks had a higher probability of persistence in grasslands than agricultural fields, and increased from ~0.2 for leks of 5 males, to >0.9 for leks of 10 or more males. Large leks in grasslands should be a higher priority for conservation. Overall, wind power development had a weak effect on the annual probability of lek persistence. 3. We used molecular methods to investigate the mating behavior of prairie chickens. The prevailing view for lek-mating grouse is that females mate once to fertilize the clutch and that conspecific nest parasitism is rare. We found evidence that females mate multiple times to fertilize the clutch (8-18% of broods, 4-38% of chicks) and will parasitize nests of other females during egg-laying (~17% of nests). Variable rates of parentage were highest in the fragmented landscapes at the Smoky Hills field site, and were lower at the Flint Hills field site. Comparisons of the pre- and postconstruction periods showed that wind energy development did not affect the mating behaviors of prairie chickens. 4. We examined use of breeding habitats by radio-marked females and conducted separate analyses for nest site selection, and movements of females not attending nests or broods. The landscape was a mix of native prairie and agricultural habitats, and nest site selection was not random because females preferred to nest in grasslands. Nests tended to be closer to turbines during the postconstruction period and there was no evidence of behavioral avoidance of turbines by females during nest site selection. Movements of females not attending nests or broods showed that females crossed the site of the wind power development at higher rates during the preconstruction period (20%) than the postconstruction period (11%), and that movements away from turbines were more frequent during the postconstruction period. Thus, wind power development appears to affect movements in breeding habitats but not nest site s

Sandercock, Brett K. [Kansas State University

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

93

IMPACTS OF OIL AND NATURAL GAS ON PRAIRIE GROUSE: CURRENT KNOWLEDGE AND RESEARCH NEEDS1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IMPACTS OF OIL AND NATURAL GAS ON PRAIRIE GROUSE: CURRENT KNOWLEDGE AND RESEARCH NEEDS1 Jeffrey L and natural gas development on grouse populations and habitats. The purpose of this review is to summarize current knowledge on the effects of oil and gas development and production on prairie grouse based

Beck, Jeffrey L.

94

Summary of Oil and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse September 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of Oil and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse September 2006 Jeffrey L. Beck Independent Avenue Grand Junction, CO 81505 Please cite as: Beck, J. L. 2006. Summary of oil and natural gas and Natural Gas Development Impacts on Prairie Grouse 2 disturbances such as oil and gas development

Beck, Jeffrey L.

95

Prairie View A&M University | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prairie View A&M University Prairie View A&M University Prairie View A&M University, Historically Black College and University (HBCU) Professor Tian-sen Huang The Prairie View Plasma Lab (PVPL) is the only fusion plasma lab operated at an HBCU, and a major research and education laboratory at Prairie View A&M University (PVAMU). The lab has two rotamak devices supported by two 500kHz/400 kW rf generators to operate a rotating magnetic field drive-FRC plasma. Since PVPL 2001, PPPL/OSUR provided significant technical and material support during the lab's construction, and assisted in the installation and initial operation of the rotomak FRC plasma device. Because there is no engineering support service at PVAMU, PPPL organized an engineering team that gave the PVPL team assistance in assembling the

96

Assessment of lesser prairie-chicken lek density relative to landscape characteristics in Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

My 2.5-yr Master'Â?s project accomplished the objectives of estimating lesser prairie-chicken (LPC) lek density and abundance in the Texas occupied range and modeling anthropogenic and landscape features associated with lek density by flying helicopter lek surveys for 2 field seasons and employing a line-transect distance sampling method. This project was important for several reasons. Firstly, wildlife managers and biologists have traditionally monitored LPC populations with road-based surveys that may result in biased estimates and do not provide access to privately-owned or remote property. From my aerial surveys and distance sampling, I was able to provide accurate density and abundance estimates, as well as new leks and I detected LPCs outside the occupied range. Secondly, recent research has indicated that energy development has the potential to impact LPCs through avoidance of tall structures, increased mortality from raptors perching on transmission lines, disturbance to nesting hens, and habitat loss/fragmentation. Given the potential wind energy development in the Texas Panhandle, spatial models of current anthropogenic and vegetative features (such as transmission lines, roads, and percent native grassland) influencing lek density were needed. This information provided wildlife managers and wind energy developers in Texas with guidelines for how change in landscape features could impact LPCs. Lastly, LPC populations have faced range-wide declines over the last century and they are currently listed as a candidate species under the Endangered Species Act. I was able to provide timely information on LPC populations in Texas that will be used during the listing process.

Jennifer Timmer; Matthew Butler; Warren Ballard; Clint Boal; Heather Whitlaw

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Impacts of Land–Atmosphere Feedbacks on Deep, Moist Convection on the Canadian Prairies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to focus on how anomalies in the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI; a proxy for soil moisture) over the Canadian Prairies can condition the convective boundary layer (CBL) so as to inhibit or facilitate ...

Julian C. Brimelow; John M. Hanesiak; William R. Burrows

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

An Empirical Blowing Snow Forecast Technique for the Canadian Arctic and the Prairie Provinces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blowing snow has a major impact on transportation and public safety. The goal of this study is to provide an operational technique for forecasting high-impact blowing snow on the Canadian arctic and the Prairie provinces using historical ...

David G. Baggaley; John M. Hanesiak

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Effects of nutrient loading and extreme rainfall events on coastal tallgrass prairies: invasion intensity, vegetation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

herbivory on the ability of Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum) to invade coastal prairie to determine of extreme rainfall events. Keywords: biological invasions, carbon, Chinese tallow tree, climate change

Siemann, Evan

100

The Tree-Ring Record of Drought on the Canadian Prairies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ring-width data from 138 sites in the Canadian Prairie Provinces and adjacent regions are used to estimate summer drought severity during the past several hundred years. The network was divided into five regional groups based on geography, tree ...

Scott St. George; David M. Meko; Martin-Philippe Girardin; Glen M. MacDonald; Erik Nielsen; Greg T. Pederson; David J. Sauchyn; Jacques C. Tardif; Emma Watson

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Comparative Evaluation of an Eulerian CFD and Gaussian Plume Models Based on Prairie Grass Dispersion Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical and statistical comparison of a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model with two Gaussian plume models is proposed on the Prairie Grass data field experiment for neutral conditions, using both maximum arcwise ...

E. Demael; B. Carissimo

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Village of Prairie Du Sac, Wisconsin (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Du Sac, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Du Sac, Wisconsin (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Village of Prairie Du Sac Place Wisconsin Utility Id 15312 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cp-1 Small Power Service Industrial Cp-1 Small Power Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service with Parallel Generation(20kW or less) Industrial Cp-1 TOD Small Power Optional Time-of-Day Service Industrial Cp-2 Large Power Time-of-Day Service Industrial

103

Prairie Land Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Coop Inc Electric Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie Land Electric Coop Inc Place Kansas Utility Id 13799 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png CONTROLLED PRIVATE AREA LIGHTING: HPS 150 W Lighting CONTROLLED PRIVATE AREA LIGHTING: HPS 175W Lighting CONTROLLED PRIVATE AREA LIGHTING: HPS 200 W Lighting CONTROLLED PRIVATE AREA LIGHTING: HPS 400W Lighting CONTROLLED PRIVATE AREA LIGHTING: MV 1000W Flood Lighting CONTROLLED PRIVATE AREA LIGHTING: MV 175W Lighting

104

Native American Heritage Month  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This month, we celebrate the rich heritage and myriad contributions of American Indians and Alaska Natives, and we rededicate ourselves to supporting tribal sovereignty, tribal self-determination,...

105

Native Meadow Restoration Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mono-culture switchgrass Additional areas added for switchgrass with acceptance into Biofuel Initiative Program Roundup application to remove existing non-native grasses and...

106

Native Grass Restoration Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reader pdf format) on the Oak Ridge Reservation. Native Grass Restoration Projects Power Line Right-of-Way Roadside Re-Vegetation Riparian Restoration SNS Entrance Habitat...

107

The short-term impacts of burning and mowing on prairie ant communities of the Oak Openings Region.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Controlled burning and mowing are among the most common forms of disturbance in prairie grasslands. Extensive studies on vegetative responses to fire, grazing, and mowing… (more)

Friedrich, Russell L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Native Grass Community Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

Land managers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in East Tennessee are restoring native warm-season grasses and wildflowers to various sites across the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Some of the numerous benefits to planting native grasses and forbs include improved habitat quality for wildlife, improved aesthetic values, lower long-term maintenance costs, and compliance with Executive Order 13112 (Clinton 1999). Challenges to restoring native plants on the ORR include the need to gain experience in establishing and maintaining these communities and the potentially greater up-front costs of getting native grasses established. The goals of the native grass program are generally outlined on a fiscal-year basis. An overview of some of the issues associated with the successful and cost-effective establishment and maintenance of native grass and wildflower stands on the ORR is presented in this report.

Ryon, Michael G [ORNL; Parr, Patricia Dreyer [ORNL; Cohen, Kari [ORNL

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Feral Africanized honey bee ecology in a coastal prairie landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Honey bees, Apis mellifera, play an important role in many ecosystems, pollinating a wide variety of native, agricultural, and exotic plants. The recent decline in the number of feral and managed honey bee colonies in North America, as well as the arrival of Africanized honey bees, have caused concern about adequate pollination for agricultural crops and natural plant communities. However, little is known about feral colonies, and the feral population is the source for Africanized honey bees as they spread and infiltrate managed populations. The goal of my dissertation was to examine the ecology of feral honey bee colonies, adding the spatial context necessary to understand the population ecology and patterns of resource use by feral honey bees on the Welder Wildlife Refuge. I defined the functional heterogeneity of feral honey bee habitat by identifying the suitability of different habitats for feral colonies based on the distribution and abundance of important resources (cavities, nectar, and pollen). I evaluated the distribution and abundance of feral colonies by examining nest site characteristics, population trends, and spatial and temporal patterns in cavity use. Lastly, I examined resource use by evaluating patterns in pollen collection and identifying where and when honey bees searched for resources. Overall, the Welder Wildlife Refuge provided excellent habitat for feral honey bees, supporting a high density of feral colonies. The dense live oak habitat was the best overall source for cavities, nectar, and pollen. Nectar and pollen were abundant throughout the year, with the exception of December and January, when a large number of honey bees searched for resources. Cavities did not appear to vary in their suitability for feral colonies based on measured structural and environmental attributes, since no cavity attributes were correlated with indices of cavity quality. However, the cavity quality indices varied between cavities, suggesting some cavities were more suitable for feral honey bees than others. Colonies were aggregated within the study area, probably due to the distribution of resources. The invasion of Africanized honey bees appeared to fragment the existing European population, with Africanized colonies aggregated in distribution and European colonies random in distribution.

Baum, Kristen Anne

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Extensive investigation of reticuloendotheliosis virus in the endangered Attwater's prairie chicken  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) is a retrovirus that causes a neoplastic disease in a wide range of avian hosts including chickens, turkeys, and ducks. In 1993, REV was detected in the endangered Attwater's prairie chicken (Tympanachus cupido attwateri), a subspecies of Tympanachus cupido. Subsequent infections of this prairie chicken have been identified at captive breeding facilities throughout Texas. The implications of these infections have severely hindered repopulation efforts by these facilities. This study focused on investigating REV infection of captive Attwater'Ã?Â?Ã?Â?s prairie chicken in order to better understand the disease affecting these endangered birds. The overall objective was to develop a means of eliminating this threat to the repopulation of the Attwater's prairie chicken. Several aspects of virus infection were investigated. Reagents capable of recognizing prairie chicken IgY and viral gag polypeptides were developed for use in assays for detection of antibody responses and titration of viral concentrations. Sequencing data of genomes collected from isolates of Texas prairie chickens and domestic chickens, as well as three REV prototype viruses, were compared to determine relationships among strains and identify the potential origin of the REV infecting Attwater'Ã?Â?Ã?Â?s prairie chicken. Additionally, a flow cytometry technique of segregating the lymphocyte population from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) using a pan leukocyte monoclonal antibody was developed to more accurately measure changes within lymphocyte populations. This technique combined with intracellular labeling was used to deduce the target cells of REV infection. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test was developed for greater sensitivity in detecting infection in birds than the previous method of single amplification PCR. This greater sensitivity results in earlier identification of the virus in infected birds, which allows for earlier removal of infected birds to minimize transmission of the virus throughout the flock. The sensitivity of the nested PCR diagnostic test was determined in a dose response pathogenesis study, which was conducted on hybrid greater/Attwater's prairie chicken to observe the experimental development of disease in these birds. Finally, a vaccine was developed using plasmid DNA with REV encoded genes and tested on naturally infected prairie chickens to determine its efficacy in reducing viral load. Although no reduction in viral load was detected, the vaccine may be effective in providing prophylactic protection in future studies.

Bohls, Ryan Lanier

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Native American Cats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

realized that the native cats have a vital, useful place in nature. These members of the cat family have much in common with your pet pussycat. They purr when contented. They growl...

112

Natively probabilistic computation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I introduce a new set of natively probabilistic computing abstractions, including probabilistic generalizations of Boolean circuits, backtracking search and pure Lisp. I show how these tools let one compactly specify ...

Mansinghka, Vikash Kumar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Insects at Work in Our World  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Insects at Work in Insects at Work in Our World Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Insects at Work in Our World June 20, 2013 3:30PM EDT to June 21, 2013 5:30PM EDT Fermilab What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a professional development workshop for teachers. Tens of thousands of square miles of glorious color, waves of grass, and diverse animal populations inhabited what we now call home. How-and why-has this amazing ecosystem changed? Using observation, experience, inquiry, and critical thinking, convey the story of the prairie and westward expansion to your students. This program incorporates science, language arts, mathematics, social science, and more!

114

Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Beauty and Charm at Fermilab  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Beauty and Charm at Beauty and Charm at Fermilab Fermilab Workshop for Prairie - Our Heartland: Beauty and Charm at Fermilab July 15, 2013 3:30PM EDT to July 19, 2013 5:30PM EDT Fermilab What was the Midwest like 200 years ago? The Prairie - Our Heartland is both an interdisciplinary ecology program including free field trips to Fermilab for upper elementary students and a professional development workshop for teachers. Tens of thousands of square miles of glorious color, waves of grass, and diverse animal populations inhabited what we now call home. How-and why-has this amazing ecosystem changed? Using observation, experience, inquiry, and critical thinking, convey the story of the prairie and westward expansion to your students. This program incorporates science, language arts, mathematics, social science, and more!

115

watchlist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Watch List for Native Prairie Plants Watch List for Native Prairie Plants Common Name Scientific Name Date Found Grasses BIG BLUESTEM Andropogon gerardii * INDIAN GRASS Sorghastrum nutans * LITTLE BLUESTEM Andropogon scoparius * SWITCH GRASS Panicum virgatum * CORD GRASS Spartina pectinata * NEEDLEGRASS Stipa spartea **u PRAIRIE DROPSEED Sporobolus pectinata **u SIDE-OATS GRAMA Bouteloua curtipendula **u Forbs ROSINWEED Silphium integrifolium SAW-TOOTHED SUNFLOWER Helianthus grossesserratus * WILD BERGAMOT Monarda fistulosa * YELLOW CONEFLOWER Ratibida pinnata * BLACK-EYED SUSAN Rudbeckia hirta ** COMPASS PLANT Silphium lactiniatum ** CUP-PLANT Silphium perfoliatum **u NEW ENGLAND ASTER Aster novae-angilae ** PRAIRIE DOCK Silphium terebinthinaceum ** RATTLESNAKE MASTER Eryngium yuccifolium ** STIFF GOLDENROD Solidaga rigida **

116

EIS-0485: Interconnection of the Grande Prairie Wind Farm, Holt County, Nebraska  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of interconnecting the proposed Grande Prairie Wind Farm, in Holt County, near the city of O’Neill, Nebraska, to Western’s power transmission system. The proposed wind energy generation project would include up to 266 wind turbines.

117

Press Pass - Press Release - September 16, 2013: Two chances for green  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 September 16, 2013 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Two chances for green thumbs at FermilabÂ’s Prairie Harvest on Oct. 5 and Nov. 2 Calling all nature lovers. How would you like the chance to help diversify one of the oldest prairie restorations in Illinois? The U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is looking for volunteers to help with its annual prairie seed harvest. Two harvest events are planned, on Saturday, Oct. 5 and Saturday, Nov. 2, beginning at 10 a.m. Fermilab's site hosts 1,000 acres of restored native prairie land, and each year community members pitch in to help collect seeds from those native plants. Less than one-tenth of one percent of native prairies in Illinois remains intact. Fermilab's restored grassland is one of the largest prairies in the state. The deep-rooted natural grasses of the prairie help prevent erosion and preserve the area's aquifers.

118

An Intercomparison of Two Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometers Used for Eddy Correlation Measurements of Methane Flux in a Prairie Wetland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intercomparison was made between two tunable diode laser spectrometers used to measure methane fluxes by the eddy correlation technique at a prairie wetland site. The spectrometers were built by Unisearch Associates Inc. of Concord, Ontario, ...

D. P. Billesbach; Joon Kim; R. J. Clement; S. B. Verma; F. G. Ullman

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Native American and Alaskan Native  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Native American and Alaskan Native American and Alaskan Native Area Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Native American and Alaskan Native Area Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in Native American and/or Alaskan Native areas. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 9, 2011 CX-006774: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alaska-Tribe-Chilkat Indian Village (Klukwan) CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 09/09/2011 Location(s): Chilkat, Alaska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy September 6, 2011 CX-006561: Categorical Exclusion Determination Arizona-Tribe-Cocopah Indian Tribe CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 09/06/2011 Location(s): Arizona Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy September 6, 2011 CX-006560: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alaska-Tribe-Tanana Chief's Conference

120

Medicinal Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medicinal Plants Medicinal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 187 April 11, 1981 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation MEDICINAL PLANTS In springtime, many years ago, grandma made her family drink gallons of tea made by boiling roots of the sassafras. That was supposed to thin and purify the blood. Children were sent out to gather dandelion, curly dock, wild mustard, pokeberry and other greens as soon as they appeared -- not only because they added welcome variety to the diet of bread, meat, potatoes and gravy, but because some of them were also laxatives. For a bad "cold on the lungs," she slapped a mustard plaster on the patient's back, and on his chest she put a square of red flannel soaked in goose grease. For whooping cough she used a syrup of red clover blossoms. She made cough medicine from the bloodroot plant, and a tea from the compass plant of the prairies was also used for fevers and coughs. She made a pleasant tea from the blossoms of the linden or basswood tree. For stomach aches she used tea from any of several aromatic herbs such as catnip, fennel, yarrow, peppermint, spearmint, sweetflag, wild ginger, bergamot and splice bush.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DOE/EA-1689: Environmental Assessment PrairieWinds - ND 1 Basin Electric Power Cooperative (June 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PrairieWinds - ND 1 Basin Electric Power Cooperative Prepared for: Rural Utilities Service Prepared by: Tetra Tech 4900 Pearl East Circle, Suite 300W Boulder, CO 80301 June 2009 Environmental Assessment PrairieWinds - ND 1 Tetra Tech June 2009 i Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ....................................................................................................................1 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR PROPOSED ACTION ..............................................................1 1.1 Purpose and Need ...........................................................................................................1

122

Plant and Soil An International Journal on Plant-Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 23 Plant and Soil An International Journal on Plant-Soil Relationships ISSN 0032-079X Plant Soil DOI 10.1007/s11104-012-1353-x Seedling growth and soil nutrient availability in exotic and native tree growth and soil nutrient availability in exotic and native tree species: implications for afforestation

Neher, Deborah A.

123

THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY Office of Industrial Productivity and Energy Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of spraying broadleaf herbicides on a native prairie. The immediate effect is to kill broadleaf plants, which flowers, glowing sunsets, towering clouds and fierce storms of the prairie landscape. But it's not just, herbicides should never be broadcast-sprayed. The herbicides will harm non-target broadleaf plants, including

124

Akiachak Native Community Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Akiachak Native Community Electric Co Akiachak Native Community Electric Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Akiachak Native Community Electric Co Place Alaska Utility Id 192 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location AK ISO Other Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Electricty Rate Average Rates Residential: $0.6250/kWh Commercial: $0.3380/kWh Industrial: $0.7360/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Akiachak_Native_Community_Electric_Co&oldid=408947"

125

Genetic conservation of native trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genetic conservation of native trees Scott McG. Wilson1 and C. J. A. Samuel Over recent years, the genetic conservation of British native tree populations has become an increasingly important part policy-makers in the genetic basis of forest biodiversity conservation, both at the UK and, more

126

Chilled Ammonia Process Development Unit at We Energies Pleasant Prairie Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alstom Power, Inc. (Alstom) has developed a patented process technology referred to as the chilled ammonia process (CAP) for the capture and concentration of carbon dioxide from combustion flue gas. The technology involves the use of a chilled, concentrated ammonia solution to chemically bind the carbon dioxide, followed by a thermal decomposition step to liberate the carbon dioxide for collection and further use. This report documents results from the process development unit (PDU) testing of the CAP at...

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

127

Use of Transmission Line Easements for the Benefit of Native Bees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objectives of this study were twofold. The first of these was to evaluate the impact of habitat vegetation management in transmission line easements on native bee communities, which are among the most important pollinators of both native and agricultural plants in the United States. More specifically, the aim was to quantitatively test whether management strategies (for example, integrated vegetation management, seeding, and planting) that differ from the standard mechanical removal of ...

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Pioneer Prairie I (3Q08) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Q08) Wind Farm Q08) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Pioneer Prairie I (3Q08) Wind Farm Facility Pioneer Prairie I (3Q08) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer Horizon Wind Energy Location Northeastern IA IA Coordinates 43.450321°, -92.551074° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.450321,"lon":-92.551074,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

129

Pioneer Prairie I (4Q08) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4Q08) Wind Farm 4Q08) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Pioneer Prairie I (4Q08) Wind Farm Facility Pioneer Prairie I (4Q08) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Developer Horizon Energy Purchaser N/a Location Northeastern IA IA Coordinates 43.450321°, -92.551074° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.450321,"lon":-92.551074,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

130

Comparison between the Droughts of the 1930s and the 1980s in the Southern Prairies of Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The drought decades of the 1930s and 1980s in the southern prairies of Canada were compared using Palmer’s drought severity index (PDSI). Nine of the 11 yr from 1929 to 1939 inclusive were drought years compared to 6 of 11 from 1979 to 1989. The ...

Lawrence Nkemdirim; Lena Weber

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

A Heart Health Alaska Natives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Honoring the Gift of Heart Health A Heart Health Educator's Manual for Alaska Natives U . S . D E Health Service Office of Prevention, Education, and Control #12;Honoring the Gift of Heart Health A Heart National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and Indian Health Service NIH Publication No. 06-5218 Revised

Bandettini, Peter A.

132

Restoration of resaca wetlands and associated wet prairie habitats at Palo Alto Battlefield National Historic Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cultivation and drainage projects associated with livestock production have substantially disturbed resaca wetlands and wet prairie habitats in southern Texas. As a consequence of the anthropogenic disturbances, the area of these wetlands has been reduced and the ecological integrity of the remaining wetlands has been compromised. The goal of this study was to explore effective strategies for ecological restoration of coastal prairie and resaca ecosystems in south Texas and provide restoration recommendations to the National Park Service at Palo Alto Battlefield National Historic Site (NHS). Field experiments were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of different approaches for restoring Spartina spartinae on disturbed saline flats. A resaca hydrologic study was initiated to evaluate the groundwater hydrology in disturbed versus undisturbed resaca wetlands and explore potential restoration strategies. Transplanting S. spartinae in the fall season was more successful (80% survivability) than seeding (0% initial establishment), spring transplanting (0% survival), spring and fall mechanical transplanting (0% and 6% survivability, respectively). Soil disturbance significantly affected (p < 0.05) survival of transplanted tillers and basal diameter of both the bare root and container-grown transplants in the fall manual treatments. The initial hydrologic study of the resaca wetlands found that vegetation rooting zone hydrology was likely dependent on surface water rather than groundwater. These findings suggest that strategies that restore surface hydrologic regimes will likely restore the ecosystem structure and function of disturbed resacas. Manually transplanting bare-root stock of S. spartinae in the late fall season without soil disturbance will increase the likelihood of successful saline flat restoration.

Margo, Michael Ray

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Native American and Alaskan Native  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 22, 2009 December 22, 2009 CX-000145: Categorical Exclusion Determination Yavapai-Apache Nation of the Camp Verde Indian Reservation Street Lighting Retrofits CX(s) Applied: B1.32, B5.1 Date: 12/22/2009 Location(s): Arizona Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy December 22, 2009 CX-000144: Categorical Exclusion Determination Native Village of Karluk Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 12/22/2009 Location(s): Karluk, Alaska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy December 22, 2009 CX-000143: Categorical Exclusion Determination King Island Native Community Energy Audits CX(s) Applied: B5.1, A9 Date: 12/22/2009 Location(s): King Island, Alaska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy December 18, 2009 CX-000141: Categorical Exclusion Determination

134

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Native American and Alaskan Native  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 1, 2011 March 1, 2011 CX-005302: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alaska-Tribe-Native Village of Mekoryuk CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 03/01/2011 Location(s): Mekoryuk, Alaska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy March 1, 2011 CX-005696: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alaska-Tribe-Native Village of Mekoryuk CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 03/01/2011 Location(s): Mekoryuk, Alaska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy February 28, 2011 CX-005301: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alaska-Tribal Energy Program-The Tatitlek Corporation CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 02/28/2011 Location(s): Tatitlek, Alaska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy February 22, 2011 CX-005300: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alaska-Tribe-Chinik Eskimo Community

135

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Native American and Alaskan Native  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 24, 2009 September 24, 2009 CX-004583: Categorical Exclusion Determination Native Village of Tetlin of Alaska Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategies CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 09/24/2009 Location(s): Tetlin, Alaska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy September 23, 2009 CX-004620: Categorical Exclusion Determination Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin - Energy Efficiency Retrofits for the Tribal Headquarters CX(s) Applied: A1, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 09/23/2009 Location(s): Keshena, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy September 23, 2009 CX-004577: Categorical Exclusion Determination Native Village of Napaimute of Alaska Energy Distribution CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 09/23/2009 Location(s): Napamiute, Alaska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

136

Alaska Federation of Natives Annual Convention  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. Delegates are elected on a population formula of one...

137

2013 Alaska Federation of Natives Convention  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. Delegates are elected on a population formula of one...

138

care and maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Care and Maintenance of the Prairie Parcel Care and Maintenance of the Prairie Parcel Now that your prairie parcel is up and growing, there are just a few concerns that you should consider about its care. Weeding The question of weeding is really just a matter of aesthetics. You do not have to weed your parcel. If your parcel is a large one, weeding may not even be practical. Although the "weed" species will dominate your parcel for the first few years, they will give way to the native plant species. You can liken the native plants to long distance runners; they appear to start off slowly, but end up winning the ecological race. After all, they are the plants that are genetically-suited and adapted to growing in this environment. The native prairie plants will be developing extensive root structure the

139

Native Village of Perryville, Alaska (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Perryville, Alaska (Utility Company) Perryville, Alaska (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Native Village of Perryville Place Alaska Utility Id 14832 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location AK Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rate Commercial Community Facilities Rate Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.7620/kWh Commercial: $0.7660/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Native_Village_of_Perryville,_Alaska_(Utility_Company)&oldid=412328"

140

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Native American and Alaskan Native  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 20, 2010 December 20, 2010 CX-004785: Categorical Exclusion Determination Minnesota-Tribe-Minnesota Chippewa Tribe (Leech Lake Tribe) CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 Date: 12/20/2010 Location(s): Minnesota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy December 20, 2010 CX-004781: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alaska-Tribe-Village of Wainwright CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 12/20/2010 Location(s): Wainwright, Alaska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy December 20, 2010 CX-004780: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alaska-Tribe-Ivanof Bay Tribal Council CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 12/20/2010 Location(s): Ivanof Bay, Alaska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy December 20, 2010 CX-004779: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alaska-Tribe-Bristol Bay Native Association

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Download a draft agenda for the Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop scheduled for October 21-23, 2013, in Fairbanks, Alaska.

142

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Native American and Alaskan...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Pedro Bay Native Village Technical Consulting Services for Mini Hydropower Feasibility Study CX(s) Applied: A9, A11 Date: 12042009 Location(s): Alaska...

143

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Native American Resources  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Resources Resources This page lists resources and tools specifically for Native Americans. Read personal interviews with Native Americans who have experience installing wind power on Native American lands, find wind resource maps that have Indian Reservation boundaries, and watch a video about installing wind power on Native American lands. Search the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative's Database Choose a Type of Information All News Publications Web Resource Videos Choose # of Records per Page Default (10 per page) 5 25 50 To search the titles, enter a word or phrase. Start Search Clear Contents Total of 42 records found. Page 1 of 9, Sorted by descending date Filtered by: Native Americans 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Next Page >> Date sort by ascending date sort by descending date State sort by ascending state sort by descending state Type of Information Program Area Title sort by ascending title sort by descending title

144

Prairie Canal Well No. 1, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. Volume 1. Completion and testing. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Prairie Canal Company, Inc. Well No. 1, approximately 8 miles south of the city of Lake Charles, Louisiana, was tested through the annulus between 5-1/2 inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. The interval tested was from 14,782 to 14,820 feet. The geological section was the Hackberry Sand, a member of the Oligocene Frio formation. Produced water was injected into a disposal well which was perforated in several Miocene Sands from 3070 to 4600 feet. Original plans were to test a section of the Hackberry sand from 14,976 to 15,024 feet. This primary zone, however, produced a large amount of sand, shale, gravel, and rocks during early flow periods and was abandoned in favor of the secondary zone. Four pressure drawdown flow tests and three pressure buildup tests were conducted during a 12-day period. A total of 36,505 barrels of water was produced. The highest sustained flow rate was approximately 7100 BWPD. The gas-to-water ratio, measured during testing, ranged from 41 to 50 SCF/BBL. There is disagreement as to the saturation value of the reservoir brine, which may be between 43.3 and 49.7 SCF/BBL. The methane content of the flare line gas averaged 88.4 mole percent. The CO/sub 2/ content averaged 8.4 mole percent. Measured values of H/sub 2/S in the gas were between 12 and 24 ppM.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Plant maintenance and advanced reactors, 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of the September-October issue is on plant maintenance and advanced reactors. Major articles/reports in this issue include: A new day for energy in America; Committed to success more than ever, by Andy White, GE--Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Competitive technology for decades, by Steve Tritch, Westinghouse Electric Company; Pioneers of positive community relationship, by Exelon Nuclear; A robust design for 60-years, by Ray Ganthner, Areva; Aiming at no evacuation plants, by Kumiaki Moriya, Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd.; and, Desalination and hydrogen economy, by Dr. I. Khamis, International Atomic Energy Agency. Industry innovation articles in this issue are: Reactor vessel closure head project, by Jeff LeClair, Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant; and Submersible remote-operated vehicle, by Michael S. Rose, Entergy's Fitzpatrick Nuclear Station.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

ReproducedfromSoilScienceSocietyofAmericaJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Hydraulic Properties in a Silt Loam Soil under Natural Prairie,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ReproducedfromSoilScienceSocietyofAmericaJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Hydraulic Properties in a Silt Loam Soil under Natural Prairie, Conventional Till, and No-Till Juan P. Fuentes, Markus Flury,* and David F. Bezdicek ABSTRACT undergo this dramatic cyclic change in soil

Flury, Markus

147

DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business...

148

Department of Energy Awards Grant to Sole Native American Community...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awards Grant to Sole Native American Community Reuse Organization Department of Energy Awards Grant to Sole Native American Community Reuse Organization Department of Energy Awards...

149

Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals to the Department of Energy Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals to the...

150

Native Village of Teller Addresses Heating Fuel Shortage, Improves...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Native Village of Teller Addresses Heating Fuel Shortage, Improves Energy Security Native Village of Teller Addresses Heating Fuel Shortage, Improves Energy Security June 22, 2012...

151

President Obama Proclaims November National Native American Heritage...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

President Obama Proclaims November National Native American Heritage Month President Obama Proclaims November National Native American Heritage Month October 31, 2013 - 12:23pm...

152

Hanford Site Celebrates National Native American Heritage Month...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Celebrates National Native American Heritage Month with Educational Workshops Hanford Site Celebrates National Native American Heritage Month with Educational...

153

Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agency Careers November 17, 2011 - 3:15pm Addthis Native American student interns at LLNL meet with Navajo Tribal President Ben Shelly this summer. Native American student...

154

Field trials identify more native plants suited to urban landscaping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gardens in seven climate zones throughout the state, whereThese irrigation and climate zone trials are part of anseven USDA zones and 24 climate zones as described in Sunset

Reid, S. Karrie; Oki, Lorence R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE INVASIVE NON-NATIVE PLANT CONTROL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Torpedo Grass CogonGrass Chinese Tallow Japanese Climbing Fern #12;Wide Range of Habitats /Dispersal Mechanisms Barrier Island Sand Dune Flatwood Swamp CHINESE TALLOW CHINESE TALLOW #12;Application Equipment treatments Urban Interface Plantation Cut Stump #12;More Treatments COGON GRASS TALLOW TREES CLIMBING FERN

Watson, Craig A.

156

Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop October 21-23, 2013 Presented by: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program Co-sponsored by: University of Alaska-Fairbanks and Alaska Center for Energy and Power This workshop is designed to help Alaska Native villages and corporations understand the range of energy efficiency and renewable energy opportunities that exist in their remote communities. Part of an overall effort to further support and encourage accelerated clean energy resource development in Alaska Native villages, the workshop will cover topics such as: * Strategic energy planning * Clean energy project development and financing

157

AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF NAPAKIAK  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF NAPAKIAK AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF NAPAKIAK Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF NAPAKIAK AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Native Village of Napakiak proposes to renovate/retrofit two buildings (Health Clinic and Community Center [former Transportation Building]) to become more energy efficient. Energy efficiency retrofits would include improvements to lighting systems, supplemental loads, air distribution systems, and/or heating and cooling systems, insulation, and windows/doors. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

158

Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presented by the DOE Office of Indian Energy and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program, this workshop is designed to help Alaska Native villages and corporations...

159

Advancing Efforts to Energize Native Alaska (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This brochure describes key programs and initiatives of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs to advance energy efficiency, renewable energy, and energy infrastructure projects in Alaska Native villages.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

American Journal of Botany 90(2): 243249. 2003. EFFECTS OF SIMULATED HERBIVORY AND RESOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON CHINESE TALLOW TREE (SAPIUM SEBIFERUM, EUPHORBIACEAE) INVASION OF NATIVE COASTAL PRAIRIE1 WILLIAM E to novel resistance that repels native herbivores. Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum, Euphorbiaceae potential. Key words: acute defoliation; Chinese tallow tree; chronic defoliation; compensatory plant growth

Siemann, Evan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Non-native speech perception in adverse conditions: A review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If listening in adverse conditions is hard, then listening in a foreign language is doubly so: non-native listeners have to cope with both imperfect signals and imperfect knowledge. Comparison of native and non-native listener performance in speech-in-noise ... Keywords: Noise, Non-native, Review, Speech perception

Maria Luisa Garcia Lecumberri; Martin Cooke; Anne Cutler

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Probing Membrane Protein Dimerization in the Native Bilayer ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Native Bilayer Environment. Kalina Hristova, Department of Materials Science and Engineering Johns Hopkins University. ...

163

NativeEnergy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NativeEnergy Inc NativeEnergy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name NativeEnergy, Inc Place Charlotte, Vermont Zip 5445 Sector Renewable Energy Product Vermont-based company that develop renewable energy projects and thereafter sell the VERs generated by them to third parties. Coordinates 35.2225°, -80.837539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2225,"lon":-80.837539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

164

Celebrating National Native American Heritage Month at the Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Native American Heritage Month at the National Native American Heritage Month at the Department of Energy Celebrating National Native American Heritage Month at the Department of Energy November 16, 2011 - 2:39pm Addthis A display for Native American Heritage Month in the Forrestal headquarters lobby. A display for Native American Heritage Month in the Forrestal headquarters lobby. We celebrate Native American Heritage Month to honor Native Americans, their rich heritage, and their present accomplishments. Native Americans are innovators, entrepreneurs, leaders, and scholars, and our debt to them is immense. Yesterday we kicked off a three-part film series for Native American Heritage Month, co-presented by the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian. Employees and contractors from the Department of Energy

165

Native Village of Teller Addresses Heating Fuel Shortage, Improves Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Native Village of Teller Addresses Heating Fuel Shortage, Improves Native Village of Teller Addresses Heating Fuel Shortage, Improves Energy Security Native Village of Teller Addresses Heating Fuel Shortage, Improves Energy Security June 22, 2012 - 4:54pm Addthis The combination of the Native Village of Teller’s limited fuel storage capacity and a harsh winter led to a supply shortage. Photo by Alexander Dane, NREL The combination of the Native Village of Teller's limited fuel storage capacity and a harsh winter led to a supply shortage. Photo by Alexander Dane, NREL Native Village of Teller Addresses Heating Fuel Shortage, Improves Energy Security Native Village of Teller fuel storage. Photo by Alexander Dane, NREL Native Village of Teller fuel storage. Photo by Alexander Dane, NREL The combination of the Native Village of Teller's limited fuel storage capacity and a harsh winter led to a supply shortage. Photo by Alexander Dane, NREL

166

Native Village of Teller Addresses Heating Fuel Shortage, Improves Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Native Village of Teller Addresses Heating Fuel Shortage, Improves Native Village of Teller Addresses Heating Fuel Shortage, Improves Energy Security Native Village of Teller Addresses Heating Fuel Shortage, Improves Energy Security June 22, 2012 - 4:54pm Addthis The combination of the Native Village of Teller’s limited fuel storage capacity and a harsh winter led to a supply shortage. Photo by Alexander Dane, NREL The combination of the Native Village of Teller's limited fuel storage capacity and a harsh winter led to a supply shortage. Photo by Alexander Dane, NREL Native Village of Teller Addresses Heating Fuel Shortage, Improves Energy Security Native Village of Teller fuel storage. Photo by Alexander Dane, NREL Native Village of Teller fuel storage. Photo by Alexander Dane, NREL The combination of the Native Village of Teller's limited fuel storage capacity and a harsh winter led to a supply shortage. Photo by Alexander Dane, NREL

167

Plant Communities, Soil Carbon, and Soil Nitrogen Properties in a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brye KR, Kucharik CJ (2003) Carbon and nitrogen sequestration in two prairie topochronosequences on contrasting soils in Southern. Wisconsin. American ...

168

Expression of multiple proteins in transgenic plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for the production of multiple proteins in transgenic plants. A DNA construct for introduction into plants includes a provision to express a fusion protein of two proteins of interest joined by a linking domain including plant ubiquitin. When the fusion protein is produced in the cells of a transgenic plant transformed with the DNA construction, native enzymes present in plant cells cleave the fusion protein to release both proteins of interest into the cells of the transgenic plant. Since the proteins are produced from the same fusion protein, the initial quantities of the proteins in the cells of the plant are approximately equal.

Vierstra, Richard D. (Madison, WI); Walker, Joseph M. (Madison, WI)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

DOE Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Workshop Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Download the agenda for the DOE Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Workshop entitled "Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency for Alaska Native Community Development" being held October 16-17,...

170

EM's New Project of the Month Focuses on Tribes' Work with Native  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Project of the Month Focuses on Tribes' Work with New Project of the Month Focuses on Tribes' Work with Native Plants for Hanford Site EM's New Project of the Month Focuses on Tribes' Work with Native Plants for Hanford Site January 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM is highlighting important work by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in a new Project of the Month on EM's public Web site, www.em.doe.gov. With the help of EM funding, the Umatilla Tribes have been building a tribal field station and two greenhouses for researching and reproducing native plants to revegetate the Hanford site. Habitat at the site has been disturbed by EM's Cold War cleanup and subsequent restoration, as well as natural forces such as wildfires. Addthis Related Articles The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation's field station, located in Mission, Ore., will be home to one-of-a-kind research and development for revegetation efforts.

171

Microsoft Word - NativeCRO20030513.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bryan Wilkes/NNSA: 202-586-7371 Bryan Wilkes/NNSA: 202-586-7371 Jacqueline Johnson/DOE: 202-586-5806 Tuesday, May 13, 2003 Department of Energy Awards Grant to Sole Native American Community Reuse Organization Brooks presents $200,000 to the Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council SANTA FE, NM - The only Native American Community Reuse Organization (CRO) received a $200,000 grant from the Department of Energy (DOE) today to assist in the completion of its community transition plan, a requirement in order for a CRO to obtain project funding. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Acting Administrator Linton Brooks announced the award to the Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Council (ENIPC) in northern New Mexico in a ceremony at the Pueblos-owned Santa Fe Hotel. Brooks is also the DOE undersecretary for

172

Documentarary Series from the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership and Prairie Public Broadcasting  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

•\tManaging Carbon Emissions: The Geologic Solution: Natural CO2 tapped from underground geologic formations has been used for more than 30 years to help recover more oil from reservoirs in West Texas. Anthropogenic or human-derived CO2 from a coal gasification plant has been doing the same in southern Saskatchewan. Using this same technique called CO2 enhanced oil recovery, scientists and engineers are developing safe, practical ways of permanently storing CO2 from fossil fuel-fired power plants in natural sealed containers deep underground. This practice is called geologic sequestration. It is the storage component of carbon capture and storage (CCS). The concepts of CCS and geologic sequestration will be explained to show how these strategies can help manage carbon in our world.

173

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Native American Wind Interest Group  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Interest Group Newsletter Wind Interest Group Newsletter Wind Powering America initiated a quarterly Native American Wind Interest Group (NAWIG) Newsletter that was published from 2003 to 2009 as part of its Native American outreach plan. It presented Native American wind information, including projects, interviews with pioneers, issues, Wind Powering America activities, and related events. It was Wind Powering America's hope that this newsletter would both inform and elicit comments and input on wind development in Indian Country. Due to funding cutbacks, the newsletter is no longer in production. Native American Wind Interest Group Newsletter, Fall 2009. Native American Wind Interest Group Newsletter Fall 2009 Native American Wind Interest Group Newsletter, Spring 2009. Native American Wind Interest Group Newsletter

174

Introduction to NABI and Asset Building in Native Communities Webinar |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Introduction to NABI and Asset Building in Native Communities Introduction to NABI and Asset Building in Native Communities Webinar Introduction to NABI and Asset Building in Native Communities Webinar May 23, 2013 2:00PM EDT Webinar The Administration for Children and Families Office of Community Services and Administration for Native Americans invite you to participate in two pre-application webinars introducing the 2013 Native Asset Building Initiative (NABI) funding opportunity. During these webinars, you will learn: Details of the 2013 NABI funding opportunity, including application requirements and how to leverage additional funding Proven strategies to strengthen financial literacy and wealth creation among low-income Native populations How to design and manage a successful asset building project in a Native community.

175

President Obama Proclaims November National Native American Heritage Month  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

President Obama Proclaims November National Native American President Obama Proclaims November National Native American Heritage Month President Obama Proclaims November National Native American Heritage Month October 31, 2013 - 12:23pm Addthis From Alaskan mountain peaks to the Argentinian pampas to the rocky shores of Newfoundland, Native Americans were the first to carve out cities, domesticate crops, and establish great civilizations. When the Framers gathered to write the United States Constitution, they drew inspiration from the Iroquois Confederacy, and in the centuries since, American Indians and Alaska Natives from hundreds of tribes have shaped our national life. During Native American Heritage Month, we honor their vibrant cultures and strengthen the government-to-government relationship between the United

176

Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development Workshop Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development Workshop November 9, 2012 - 12:29pm Addthis Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development Workshop As Alaska Native villages prepared for winter and the intensified energy challenges the season will bring, DOE's Office of Indian Energy (DOE-IE) and DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program co-hosted a workshop focused on solutions to those challenges. Held in Anchorage, Alaska, on October 16 and 17, the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency for Alaska Native Community Development workshop was designed to help Alaska tribal leaders and staffs understand the range of

177

Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development Workshop Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development Workshop November 9, 2012 - 12:29pm Addthis Alaska Natives Benefit from First-Ever Community Energy Development Workshop As Alaska Native villages prepared for winter and the intensified energy challenges the season will bring, DOE's Office of Indian Energy (DOE-IE) and DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program co-hosted a workshop focused on solutions to those challenges. Held in Anchorage, Alaska, on October 16 and 17, the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency for Alaska Native Community Development workshop was designed to help Alaska tribal leaders and staffs understand the range of

178

Integrating Two Worlds: A Supportive Pathway for Native American Students |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrating Two Worlds: A Supportive Pathway for Native American Integrating Two Worlds: A Supportive Pathway for Native American Students Integrating Two Worlds: A Supportive Pathway for Native American Students November 18, 2011 - 3:41pm Addthis Native American student interns at LLNL meet with Navajo Tribal President Ben Shelly this summer. Native American student interns at LLNL meet with Navajo Tribal President Ben Shelly this summer. Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director When the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) looked for an institution to get a strong engineering base to recruit from, they turned to Northern Arizona University (NAU), the top recruiter of Native American engineering students in their area. Since 2010, NNSA has funded a 12-week summer internship program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

179

President Obama's Native American Heritage Month Proclamation | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

President Obama's Native American Heritage Month Proclamation President Obama's Native American Heritage Month Proclamation President Obama's Native American Heritage Month Proclamation November 5, 2013 - 2:25pm Addthis BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA A PROCLAMATION From Alaskan mountain peaks to the Argentinian pampas to the rocky shores of Newfoundland, Native Americans were the first to carve out cities, domesticate crops, and establish great civilizations. When the Framers gathered to write the United States Constitution, they drew inspiration from the Iroquois Confederacy, and in the centuries since, American Indians and Alaska Natives from hundreds of tribes have shaped our national life. During Native American Heritage Month, we honor their vibrant cultures and strengthen the government-to-government relationship between the United

180

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Power for Native Americans  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Power for Native Americans Wind Power for Native Americans Wind Power for Native Americans poster with five happy Native American children and a wind turbine. Click on the image to view a larger version. Wind Power for Native Americans poster There are more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaskan villages and corporations located on 96 million acres in the United States. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. Changing national utility policy, a keen interest in economic development, environmental concerns, and availability of low-cost financing have kindled a strong interest in tribal wind development opportunities. However, several key issues need to be addressed, including lack of wind resource

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Students  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Students from High School to College to National Nuclear Security Agency Careers Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Students from High School to College to National Nuclear Security Agency Careers November 17, 2011 - 3:15pm Addthis Native American student interns at LLNL meet with Navajo Tribal President Ben Shelly this summer. Native American student interns at LLNL meet with Navajo Tribal President Ben Shelly this summer. Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director When the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) looked for an institution to get a strong engineering base to recruit from, they turned straight to Northern Arizona University (NAU), the top recruiter of Native

182

President Obama's Native American Heritage Month Proclamation | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

President Obama's Native American Heritage Month Proclamation President Obama's Native American Heritage Month Proclamation President Obama's Native American Heritage Month Proclamation November 5, 2013 - 2:25pm Addthis BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA A PROCLAMATION From Alaskan mountain peaks to the Argentinian pampas to the rocky shores of Newfoundland, Native Americans were the first to carve out cities, domesticate crops, and establish great civilizations. When the Framers gathered to write the United States Constitution, they drew inspiration from the Iroquois Confederacy, and in the centuries since, American Indians and Alaska Natives from hundreds of tribes have shaped our national life. During Native American Heritage Month, we honor their vibrant cultures and strengthen the government-to-government relationship between the United

183

DOE Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Workshop DOE Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Workshop DOE Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Workshop October 16, 2012 8:30AM AKDT to October 17, 2012 6:00PM AKDT Anchorage, Alaska The Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program are offering a 2-day workshop for Alaska Native village and corporation leaders and staff members to learn about the range of energy efficiency and renewable energy opportunities that exist in Alaska Native villages. The training will also cover project development and financing for clean energy projects. Don't miss the opportunity to learn from other Alaska Native Villages about their efforts to deploy clean energy technologies. View the agenda.

184

President Obama Proclaims November National Native American Heritage Month  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

President Obama Proclaims November National Native American President Obama Proclaims November National Native American Heritage Month President Obama Proclaims November National Native American Heritage Month October 31, 2013 - 12:23pm Addthis From Alaskan mountain peaks to the Argentinian pampas to the rocky shores of Newfoundland, Native Americans were the first to carve out cities, domesticate crops, and establish great civilizations. When the Framers gathered to write the United States Constitution, they drew inspiration from the Iroquois Confederacy, and in the centuries since, American Indians and Alaska Natives from hundreds of tribes have shaped our national life. During Native American Heritage Month, we honor their vibrant cultures and strengthen the government-to-government relationship between the United

185

Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Students  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Students from High School to College to National Nuclear Security Agency Careers Integrating Two Worlds: a Supportive Pathway for Native American Students from High School to College to National Nuclear Security Agency Careers November 17, 2011 - 3:15pm Addthis Native American student interns at LLNL meet with Navajo Tribal President Ben Shelly this summer. Native American student interns at LLNL meet with Navajo Tribal President Ben Shelly this summer. Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director When the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) looked for an institution to get a strong engineering base to recruit from, they turned straight to Northern Arizona University (NAU), the top recruiter of Native

186

Helping Alaska Native Communities Reduce Their Energy Costs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Helping Alaska Native Communities Reduce Their Energy Costs Helping Alaska Native Communities Reduce Their Energy Costs Helping Alaska Native Communities Reduce Their Energy Costs May 3, 2013 - 12:50pm Addthis The Energy Department is helping Alaska Native communities reduce their energy costs by investing in renewable energy and energy efficiency upgrades. | Photo courtesy of Western Community Energy. The Energy Department is helping Alaska Native communities reduce their energy costs by investing in renewable energy and energy efficiency upgrades. | Photo courtesy of Western Community Energy. Tracey A. LeBeau Director, Office of Indian Energy Policy & Programs What are the key facts? It's not uncommon for families in Alaska Native communities to spend nearly half of their monthly income on energy costs. To help these communities make smart energy choices, the Energy

187

Wind Power on Native American Lands: Process and Progress (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. The Wind Powering America program engages Native Americans in wind energy development. This poster describes the process and progress of Wind Powering America's involvement with Native American wind energy projects.

Jimenez, A.; Flowers, L.; Gough, R.; Taylor, R.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Post-award Training for 2013 Administration for Native Americans...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Native Americans (ANA) grantees understand the federal requirements related to tracking and reporting their new ANA project. The training will be held in Sacramento,...

189

Executive Order 13592: Improving American Indian and Alaska Native  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

592: Improving American Indian and Alaska Native 592: Improving American Indian and Alaska Native Educational Opportunities and Strengthening Tribal Colleges and Universities (2011) Executive Order 13592: Improving American Indian and Alaska Native Educational Opportunities and Strengthening Tribal Colleges and Universities (2011) Superseded EO 13021 to ensure that all American Indian students, regardless of which institution they attend, receive support from the federal government at elementary through college levels. This EO also creates an Interagency Working Group on AI/AN Education to establish educational goals across the government. Executive Order 13592: Improving American Indian and Alaska Native Educational Opportunities and Strengthening Tribal Colleges and Universities (2011) More Documents & Publications

190

Alaska Native Communities Receive Technical Assistance for Local...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Articles Alaska Native Tribes Receive Technical Assistance for Local Clean Energy Projects DOE Office of Indian Energy Partners with ACEP to Study Wind-Diesel Systems in Alaska...

191

Alaska Native Communities Receive Technical Assistance for Local...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

clean energy and energy efficiency projects that advance energy self-sufficiency and job creation in rural Alaska. "Through the START program, we are helping Native American...

192

Oak Ridge Reservation Native Grass Meeting - 1/26/10  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy Presentationname Oak Ridge Reservation Native Grass Meeting, January 26, 2010 Introduction - Mike Ryon Overview of...

193

Native Americans and state and local governments  

SciTech Connect

Native Americans` concerns arising from the possibility of establishment of a nuclear repository for high level wastes at Yucca Mountain fall principally into two main categories. First, the strongest objection to the repository comes from traditional Western Shoshones. Their objections are based on a claim that the Western Shoshones still own Yucca Mountain and also on the assertion that putting high level nuclear wastes into the ground is a violation of their religious views regarding nature. Second, there are several reservations around the Yucca Mountain site that might be affected in various ways by building of the repository. There is a question about how many such reservations there are, which can only be decided when more information is available. This report discusses two questions: the bearing of the continued vigorous assertion by traditionalist Western Shoshones of their land claim; and the extent to which Nevada state and local governments are able to understand and represent Indian viewpoints about Yucca Mountain.

Rusco, E.R. [Cultural Resources Consultants, Ltd. Reno, Nevada (United States)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Native American Training Program in Petroleum Technology  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines a comprehensive training program for members of Native American tribes whose lands have oil and gas resources. The program has two components: short courses and internships. Programs are proposed for: (1) adult tribes representatives who are responsible for managing tribal mineral holdings, setting policy, or who work in the oil and gas industry; (2) graduate and undergraduate college students who are tribal members and are studying in the appropriate fields; and (3) high school and middle school teachers, science teachers. Materials and program models already have been developed for some components of the projects. The plan is a coordinated, comprehensive effort to use existing resources to accomplish its goals. Partnerships will be established with the tribes, the BIA, tribal organizations, other government agencies, and the private sector to implement the program.

Ho, Winifred M.; Kokesh, Judith H.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

195

Sandia secure processor : a native Java processor.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandia Secure Processor (SSP) is a new native Java processor that has been specifically designed for embedded applications. The SSP's design is a system composed of a core Java processor that directly executes Java bytecodes, on-chip intelligent IO modules, and a suite of software tools for simulation and compiling executable binary files. The SSP is unique in that it provides a way to control real-time IO modules for embedded applications. The system software for the SSP is a 'class loader' that takes Java .class files (created with your favorite Java compiler), links them together, and compiles a binary. The complete SSP system provides very powerful functionality with very light hardware requirements with the potential to be used in a wide variety of small-system embedded applications. This paper gives a detail description of the Sandia Secure Processor and its unique features.

Wickstrom, Gregory Lloyd; Gale, Jason Carl; Ma, Kwok Kee

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Ken Kimes & Sandra Ward: New Natives Farm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rots the fixtures. Because chlorine floats in the air and ithand-soaked plants, the chlorine soaks and everything. Theythousand-parts-per-million chlorine soak on your seeds.

Farmer, Ellen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Robusta: taming the native beast of the JVM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Java applications often need to incorporate native-code components for efficiency and for reusing legacy code. However, it is well known that the use of native code defeats Java's security model. We describe the design and implementation of Robusta, ... Keywords: JNI, JVM, SFI, sandboxing

Joseph Siefers; Gang Tan; Greg Morrisett

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

2012 Alaska Federation of Natives Convention | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Federation of Natives Convention Alaska Federation of Natives Convention 2012 Alaska Federation of Natives Convention October 18, 2012 - 12:49pm Addthis Anchorage, Alaska October 18 - 20, 2012 During the Alaska Federation of Natives Convention held October 18-20 in Anchorage, the DOE Office of Indian Energy and the EERE Tribal Energy Program presented a preconference workshop entitled "Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency for Alaska Native Community Development." The workshop was designed to help tribal leaders and staff understand the range of energy efficiency and renewable energy opportunities that exist in their remote communities, and also covered project development and financing for clean energy projects. Download the Alaska workshop presentations. Addthis Related Articles

199

Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop POSTPONED | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop POSTPONED Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop POSTPONED Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop POSTPONED October 21, 2013 8:00AM AKDT to October 23, 2013 5:00PM AKDT Fairbanks, Alaska NOTICE: WORKSHOP POSTPONED ******************************************************************* The DOE Office of Indian Energy and the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program regret to inform you that, due to the partial shutdown of the federal government, we had to postpone the Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop scheduled for October 21-23. We apologize for any inconvenience this postponement has created. The Department is committed to working with Alaska Native villages, corporations, and organizations to promote the development of clean energy

200

Wind Projects on Native American Lands | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Projects on Native American Lands Projects on Native American Lands Jump to: navigation, search The United States is home to more than 700 nations, tribes, bands, villages, regional corporations, and communities of indigenous peoples, from Alaska to Hawaii and the Pacific and Caribbean Islands. Native American tribes on reservation lands in the lower 48 states comprise the largest and most diverse of these indigenous peoples. Consideration of wind energy opportunities and issues for Native Americans must recognize this diversity, including cultures, histories, beliefs, relationships to surrounding communities, control of and access to resources, governmental and social organization, land tenure and jurisdiction, and energy infrastructure. Contents 1 Native American Wind Opportunities 1.1 Tremendous Wind Resources

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals to the Department of Energy Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals to the Department of Energy December 7, 2011 - 12:35pm Addthis Dr. Stan Atcitty, a Sandia engineer, works on power electronics and energy storage integration to the grid. A program run by Sandia Labs for Native Americans in STEM paid for his Master's and Ph.D. degrees while he worked at Sandia. Dr. Stan Atcitty, a Sandia engineer, works on power electronics and energy storage integration to the grid. A program run by Sandia Labs for Native Americans in STEM paid for his Master's and Ph.D. degrees while he worked at Sandia. Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director From their labs under the hot New Mexican sun, the staff at Sandia National

202

DOE American Indian and Alaska Natives Tribal Government Policy |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Indian and Alaska Natives Tribal Government Policy American Indian and Alaska Natives Tribal Government Policy DOE American Indian and Alaska Natives Tribal Government Policy This Policy sets forth the principles to be followed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure an effective implementation of a government to government relationship with American Indian and Alaska Native tribal governements. This Policy is based on the United States Constitution, treaties, Supreme Court decisions, Executive Orders, statutes, existing federal policies, tribla laws, and the dynamic political relationship between Indian nations and the Federal government. DOE American Indian and Alaska Natives Tribal Government Policy More Documents & Publications U.S. Department of Energy Amerian Indian Policy DOE Order 144.1: Department of Energy American Indian Tribal Government

203

Native American Venture Acceleration Fund provides boost to six regional  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Native American Venture Acceleration Fund Native American Venture Acceleration Fund Native American Venture Acceleration Fund provides boost to six regional businesses The grants are designed to help the recipients create jobs, increase their revenue base and help diversify the area economy. February 26, 2013 Ribbon cutting and grand opening of Than Povi Fine Art Gallery in Cuyamungue. Ribbon cutting and grand opening of Than Povi Fine Art Gallery in Cuyamungue. Contact Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email LANS and Los Alamos National Laboratory are excited to announce the first of these Native American Venture Acceleration Grant Fund recipients and we look forward to working with these and other Native American businesses to promote economic development in Northern New Mexico.

204

Hanford Site Celebrates National Native American Heritage Month with  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Celebrates National Native American Heritage Month Site Celebrates National Native American Heritage Month with Educational Workshops Hanford Site Celebrates National Native American Heritage Month with Educational Workshops November 28, 2012 - 12:23pm Addthis *Editor's Note: This article was originally posted in the Office of Environmental Management's EM Update, Volume 4, Issue 11, November 2012. RICHLAND, Wash. - Each November, in honor of Native American Heritage Month, the Richland Operations Office at the Hanford site offers educational programs on local Native American topics for federal and contractor employees. The Energy Department interacts and consults with three federally recognized tribes affected by Hanford operations, including the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, the Confederated Tribes

205

Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals to the Department of Energy Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals to the Department of Energy December 7, 2011 - 12:35pm Addthis Dr. Stan Atcitty, a Sandia engineer, works on power electronics and energy storage integration to the grid. A program run by Sandia Labs for Native Americans in STEM paid for his Master's and Ph.D. degrees while he worked at Sandia. Dr. Stan Atcitty, a Sandia engineer, works on power electronics and energy storage integration to the grid. A program run by Sandia Labs for Native Americans in STEM paid for his Master's and Ph.D. degrees while he worked at Sandia. Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director From their labs under the hot New Mexican sun, the staff at Sandia National

206

Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Creek  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Control and Reclamation ActSurface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977of 1977 Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000)Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000) BackgroundBackground Fish populations in Coal Creek

Gray, Matthew

207

Environmental quandary shuts Mohave plants  

SciTech Connect

The 1,580 MW coal-fired Mohave Generating Station in Laughlin, NV was closed on 31 December 2005 and is expected to be closed for four years whilst the owners Southern California Edison sort out battles over the plant's pollutant emissions and negotiate with two native tribes over rights to the water needed to deliver fuel to Mohave as a slurry. The plant was forced to close because it was unable to comply with a 1999 court order to reduce emissions of sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and particulates. 1 photo.

NONE

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 7. Geochemistry and geologic setting of the thermal waters of the Camas Prairie area, Blaine and Camas Counties, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal waters of the east-west trending intermontane basin making up the Camas Prairie area were sampled during the fall of 1973. Average ground water temperature is 15/sup 0/C (10/sup 0/C above mean annual temperature). The thermal waters, chemically similar to thermal waters discharging from granitic rocks elsewhere in Idaho, have high pH, high Na/K and Na/Ca ratios, and high fluoride content. They are low in total dissolved solids (less than 365 mg/l), low in chloride, and exhibit relatively constant chloride/fluoride ratios and silica concentrations. Geochemical thermometers are interpreted to indicate that maximum aquifer temperatures in the Camas Prairie Basin are only about 100/sup 0/C, although higher temperatures were predicted by the quartz equilibrium geochemical thermometer and mixing models. The Magic Hot Springs well, located near the north shore of the Magic Reservoir at Hot Springs Landing, is an exception to these general conclusions. These waters may be circulating to depths approaching 1,800 to 2,500 m along faults or fissures; or may be due to leakage from an aquifer or reservoir heated by a shallow heat source, related perhaps to the Holocene basalt flows south of Magic Reservoir. These waters are nearly neutral in pH, are much higher in dissolved solids, exhibit higher chloride/fluoride, chloride/carbonate plus bicarbonate, and chloride/sulfate ratios, and are, in general, chemically dissimilar to thermal waters elsewhere in the area. Temperatures predicted by geochemical thermometers are thought to indicate that Magic Hot Springs well waters are ascending from an aquifer or reservoir with temperatures from 140/sup 0/ to 200/sup 0/C. Temperatures in this range would be sufficient for application in many industrial processes, including power generation, should sufficient water be available.

Mitchell, J.C.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Presidential Memorandum: Government-to-Government Relations with Native  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presidential Memorandum: Government-to-Government Relations with Presidential Memorandum: Government-to-Government Relations with Native American Tribal Governments (1994) Presidential Memorandum: Government-to-Government Relations with Native American Tribal Governments (1994) The following memorandum was sent to all heads of executive departments and agencies and appeared in the May 4, 1994 issue of the Federal Register. It was signed and released in conjunction with the historic meeting between the President and representatives of Tribal governments held at the White House on April 29, 1995. The White House Washington, DC April 29, 1994 MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES SUBJECT: Government-to-Government Relations with Native American Tribal Governments The United States government has a unique legal relationship with Native

210

Administration for Native Americans Project Planning and Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration for Native Americans Project Planning and Administration for Native Americans Project Planning and Development Training Administration for Native Americans Project Planning and Development Training November 4, 2013 8:00AM PST to November 6, 2013 5:00PM PST Las Vegas, Nevada Have you ever wondered what the secret is to preparing for an Administration for Native Americans (ANA) grant application? The ANA Western Region Training and Technical Assistance Center is hosting a project planning and development training to provide information about the critical, time-consuming work that comes before writing an ANA grant application. Learn how to use the development process to prepare projects for a variety of public or private funders, including the ANA. The goal of the training is to provide you with tools to better define problems faced by your

211

Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Native Youth  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Native Youth in STEM Education Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Native Youth in STEM Education November 13, 2013 - 4:50pm Addthis Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Native Youth in STEM Education Andre H. Sayles, Ph.D. Andre H. Sayles, Ph.D. Principal Deputy Director of the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity and Acting Deputy Director of the Office of Minority Business and Economic Development Recently, I had the honor of announcing the launch of the SUN Project, a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy and the American Indian Science and Engineering Society to engage urban Native American youth in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.

212

Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Native Youth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Native Youth in STEM Education Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Native Youth in STEM Education November 13, 2013 - 4:50pm Addthis Energy Department Announces the SUN Project, Empowering Urban Native Youth in STEM Education Andre H. Sayles, Ph.D. Andre H. Sayles, Ph.D. Principal Deputy Director of the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity and Acting Deputy Director of the Office of Minority Business and Economic Development Recently, I had the honor of announcing the launch of the SUN Project, a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy and the American Indian Science and Engineering Society to engage urban Native American youth in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.

213

Native Learning Center's Training for Building Sustainable Communities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8:00AM EDT to April 3, 2014 5:00PM EDT Green Bay, Wisconsin Save the date for the Seminole Tribe of Florida's Native Learning Center's (NLC's) upcoming training, Building...

214

DOE American Indian and Alaska Native Tribal Government Policy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Energy Washington, DC 20585 January 20,2006 MEMORANDUM FOR FROM: SUBJECT: HEADS OF DEPARTMENTAL ELEMENTS n SAMUEL W. BODMAN s 4 W d d b L DOE American Indian and Alaska Natives...

215

Wind Power Across Native America: Opportunities, Challenges, and Status (Poster)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind projects on tribal lands are differennt, and this poster outlines the ways in which these projects differ, a summary of existing and pending Native American Wind Projects (50 kW and larger), and tribal wind opportunities and issues.

Jimenez, A.; Gough, R.; Flowers, L.; Taylor, R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Prairie Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rubric assesses learner outcomes above. Optional Rubrics assess various student skills. (Teachers may choose any of these rubrics that help assess student work. The...

217

Prairie Project Rubric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

learned. Other project rubrics assess other research skills. Student Name Exceeds Expectations Meets Expectations Does Not Meet Expectations...

218

Prairie Forbes Key  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

smell very mint-like, 1 to 3 feet tall...Mountain mint, Pycnanthemum virginranum 4(2') Leaves that are long, thick, yucca-like,...

219

Prairie Teaching Example  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are gathering information about how to control oil spills and the positive effects an oil refinery will have on Smallville. All of this information will be helpful when the...

220

Prairie Teaching Example  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oil spills, the group has decided to do a demonstration of their ability to clean up an oil spill should one occur near their refinery as part of their presentation. Josh and the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Harvesting the Prairie  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

As summer winds down and the telltale signs of autumn emerge in the Fox Valley, the Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory - in keeping with a fall tradition...

222

TRC Bibliographies: Prairie Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1994. ISBN: 0-02-728466-2. Ham, John and David Mohrhardt, Kitchen Table Bird Book, Two Peninsula Press, 1995. ISBN: 1882376153. Jenkins, Priscilla Belz, A Nest Full of...

223

Kalispel Non-Native Fish Suppression Project 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Non-native salmonids are impacting native salmonid populations throughout the Pend Oreille Subbasin. Competition, hybridization, and predation by non-native fish have been identified as primary factors in the decline of some native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) populations. In 2007, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Kalispel Nonnative Fish Suppression Project. The goal of this project is to implement actions to suppress or eradicate non-native fish in areas where native populations are declining or have been extirpated. These projects have previously been identified as critical to recovering native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout (WCT). Lower Graham Creek was invaded by non-native rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) after a small dam failed in 1991. By 2003, no genetically pure WCT remained in the lower 700 m of Graham Creek. Further invasion upstream is currently precluded by a relatively short section of steep, cascade-pool stepped channel section that will likely be breached in the near future. In 2008, a fish management structure (barrier) was constructed at the mouth of Graham Creek to preclude further invasion of non-native fish into Graham Creek. The construction of the barrier was preceded by intensive electrofishing in the lower 700 m to remove and relocate all captured fish. Westslope cutthroat trout have recently been extirpated in Cee Cee Ah Creek due to displacement by brook trout. We propose treating Cee Cee Ah Creek with a piscicide to eradicate brook trout. Once eradication is complete, cutthroat trout will be translocated from nearby watersheds. In 2004, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) proposed an antimycin treatment within the subbasin; the project encountered significant public opposition and was eventually abandoned. However, over the course of planning this 2004 project, little public involvement or education was conducted prior to the planned implementation. Therefore, in 2007 we implemented an extensive process to provide public education, address public concerns and provide opportunity for public involvement in implementing piscicides and other native fish recovery actions in the subbasin.

Wingert, Michele; Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

224

Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center Indian Housing Training Conference  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

To register for the conference and see a preliminary agenda, visit the Native Learning Center website.

225

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Native American Anemometer Loan  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Anemometer Loan Program Anemometer Loan Program Photo of an anemometer, before it is raised, in Bay Mills, Michigan. Photo of an anemometer, before it is raised, in Bay Mills, Michigan Here you will find anemometer loan applications for tribes. Wind Powering America's Native American anemometer loan program is part of an effort to promote the installation of wind turbines on Native American lands. Wind Powering America's program allows Native American tribes to borrow anemometers and the equipment needed for installation so that they may measure the wind resource on tribal lands. By significantly reducing the cost of quantifying the wind resource on tribal lands, Wind Powering America expects that more tribes will be encouraged to install wind turbines. The anemometer loan program is administered jointly by the

226

Plants of the Bible  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bible Bible Nature Bulletin No. 188-A April 16, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation PLANTS OF THE BIBLE When Jesus suffered on the cross, we are told in the Gospel according to St. Matthew (27:48) that at the ninth hour he thirsted and a sponge, filled with vinegar and put upon a reed, was raised to His lips. It is so related in St. Mark (15:36) but according to St. John (19:29), "they filled a sponge with vinegar, and put it upon hyssop, and put it into his mouth. " What was hyssop. The plant is mentioned frequently in the Bible. The hyssop of our herb gardens is not native to Palestine, Syria or Egypt, but there is evidence that when Solomon "spoke of trees, from the cedar tree that is in Lebanon even unto the hyssop that springeth out of the wall" (I Kings 4:23), he spoke of the herb we call marjoram. The hyssop dipped in the blood of a sacrificial lamb and used by the Israelites in Egypt to mark their doorways (Exodus 12:22), and the hyssop referred to by St. John but called a reed by St. Matthew and St. Mark, was probably sorghum, a tall cereal plant grown by the Jews for food and also used for brushes and brooms.

227

Plant Operational Status - Pantex Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status Plant Operational Status Page Content Operational Status Shift 1 - Day The Pantex Plant is open for normal operations. All personnel are to report for duty according to...

228

Water Conservation with Urban Landscape Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water shortages are a common problem in much of the southwest. Increasing urbanization and increasing population places greater demands on dwindling water supplies. Over half of the water used in urban areas of the southwest is used in the irrigation of landscapes. To help cope with increased urban water demands and low water supplies, research was conducted from March 1981 to July 1983 at The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station at Dallas to gain information relative to consumptive water use by native and non-native landscape plants. Twenty weighing lysimeters were constructed and installed and plants established in the lysimeters and adjacent areas. The lysimeters were made from 0.6 X 0.9 m undisturbed cores of Austin silty clay soil. Plants used in the lysimeter study were buffalograss, St. Augustine grass, cenizo, boxwood and Texas barberry. All plants are native to Texas except boxwood and St. Augustine grass. Four lysimeters were planted to each plant type. This allowed two moisture levels and two replications of each plant type. There was no difference in water use by St. Augustine grass and buffalo grass during the year of establishment. Daily water use ranged from 0.49 to 0.08 cm per day but was generally 50% class A pan evaporation. St. Augustine grass used 0.03 cm/day more water than buffalo grass during 1982. -Irrigation treatments used in 1982 did not influence water use by either grass type but buffalo grass retained higher quality under dry treatment (irrigated at 0.40 bar moisture tension) than St. Augustine grass. Water use from May to July 1983 was highest (of all treatments) by St. Augustine grass when irrigated at 0.25 bar soil moisture tension at 76 cm depth and lowest (of all treatments) by buffalograss when irrigated at 0.75 bar soil moisture tension at 76 cm depth. Application of 50% class A pan evaporation each week appears to be an acceptable guideline for irrigation of either turfgrass but research should be conducted over a longer time period to obtain more specific guidelines for each grass species. Water use by shrubs in lysimeters was variable and not influenced by plant type during the period of establishment (Fall 1981). During 1982 water use was influenced more by plant size than by specie or water level. Cenizo had much faster growth rate than the other shrubs in the study. Water use by container grown plants indicated that cenizo had higher water use efficiency than boxwood or Indian Hawthorn. Water use was determined for several native shrubs and of the ones compared, Texas barberry appeared to have the most promise for use in water conserving landscapes.

Hip, B. W.; Giordano, C.; Simpson, B.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Alaska Native Community Energy Planning and Projects (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet provides information on the Alaska Native villages selected to receive assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy 2013 Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) Program, which provides technical expertise to support the development of next-generation energy projects on tribal lands.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Economic Impact of 8(a) and Native American Contractors | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Impact of 8(a) and Native American Contractors Economic Impact of 8(a) and Native American Contractors Economic Impact of 8(a) and Native American Contractors August 14, 2012 - 2:25pm Addthis Jennine Elias Jennine Elias Director of External Affairs for the Native American Contractors Association Editor's Note: This blog post was guest written by Jennine Elias, Director of External Affairs for the Native American Contractors Association (www.nativecontractors.org) What is Native 8(a) and how do Tribes, Alaska Native Corporation, and Native Hawaiian Organizations fit into the Small Business Administration's (SBA) 8(a) Business Development Program? According to the SBA, this program, which was named for Section 8(a) of the Small Business Act, was created to help small and disadvantaged businesses compete in the marketplace. It also helps these companies gain access to

231

var labelType, useGradients, nativeTextSupport, animate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and that as of today iPhone/iPad current text support is lame. labelType = (!nativeCanvasSupport || (textSupport && !iStuff))? 'Native' : 'HTML'; ...

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

232

Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center Webinar: Grant Writing Essentials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Native Learning Center (NLC) offers tuition FREE courses and trainings to Native Americans and indigenous people with an emphasis on the educational needs of tribal members and their...

233

Native homing endonucleases can target conserved genes in humans and in animal models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be more predictable for native HEases. Based on our experimental observations, we present the HomeBase

Pupko, Tal

234

Reconstructing the Past: Historical Interpretations and Native Experiences at Contemporary California Missions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

widely. Meat, hide, and tallow that Native people cultivateddaily lives. 79 Hides and tallow products, such a soap and

Lorimer, Michelle

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

ORIGINAL PAPER Comparisons of arthropod assemblages on an invasive and native  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tallow tree (Triadica sebifera) and three native tree species: silver maple (Acer saccharinum), sycamore and abundance of arthropods on tallow tree were similar to the natives. But, ordination (NMS) showed community composition differed on tallow tree compared to all three native trees. It supported an arthropod community

Siemann, Evan

236

Alaska Native Communities Receive Technical Assistance for Local Clean  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Communities Receive Technical Assistance for Local Communities Receive Technical Assistance for Local Clean Energy Development Alaska Native Communities Receive Technical Assistance for Local Clean Energy Development April 29, 2013 - 3:08pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's efforts to help Tribal communities across the country enhance their energy security and build a sustainable energy future, the Energy Department and the Denali Commission today announced that five Alaska Native communities will receive technical expertise through the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) program. Building on five technical assistance awards made last year, the projects selected today will further accelerate local clean energy and energy efficiency projects that advance energy self-sufficiency

237

Native Learning Center's Training for Building Sustainable Communities in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Center's Training for Building Sustainable Center's Training for Building Sustainable Communities in Indian Country Native Learning Center's Training for Building Sustainable Communities in Indian Country April 1, 2014 8:00AM EDT to April 3, 2014 5:00PM EDT Green Bay, Wisconsin Save the date for the Seminole Tribe of Florida's Native Learning Center's (NLC's) upcoming training, Building Sustainable Communities in Indian Country. Please note there has been a change in the date and location of the training to April 1-3, 2014, in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Topics will include, but are not limited to: Sustainable Housing Practices Building Economic Opportunities in Tribal Communities Sustainable Community Infrastructure Alternative Energy Sources Building Strategic Partnerships Fundraising and Grant Opportunities

238

Native Learning Center Training for Building Sustainable Communities in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Center Training for Building Sustainable Center Training for Building Sustainable Communities in Indian Country Native Learning Center Training for Building Sustainable Communities in Indian Country April 1, 2014 8:00AM CDT to April 3, 2014 5:00PM CDT Green Bay, Wisconsin The Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center (NLC) will host this training on Building Sustainable Communities in Indian Country. Topics will include, but are not limited to: sustainable housing practices, building economic opportunities in tribal communities, sustainable community infrastructure, alternative energy sources, building strategic partnerships, fundraising and grant opportunities, and youth and elder opportunities. NLC, a program of the Housing Department of the Seminole Tribe of Florida, receives funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and

239

Use of Transmission Line Easements for Benefit of Native Bees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The management of vegetation on electric utility rights-of-way (ROWs) is an essential part of managing electrical transmission and distribution systems. This study examines the impact of habitat vegetation management in transmission line easements on native bee communities. The study emphasizes quantitative testing of whether management strategies such as integrated vegetation management, seeding, and plantingall of which differ from the standard mechanical removal of tall vegetation through episodic mow...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

240

Assessment of Non-Native Invasive Plant Species on the United...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lobata (Willd.) Maesen and S.M. Almeida is a notorious invader of roadsides and power transmission line rights-of-way in the southeastern United States, but it is seldom found...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Landscape and Urban Planning 78 (2006) 229240 The economics of native plants in residential landscape designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

landscape designs Gloria E. Helfand, Joon Sik Park, Joan I. Nassauer, Sandra Kosek School of Natural in the School of Natural Resources and Environment at the University of Michigan. Sandra Kosek received her Ph

Nassauer, Joan Iverson

242

Celebrating our work with Native American Students in STEM During National  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

our work with Native American Students in STEM During our work with Native American Students in STEM During National Native American Heritage Month Celebrating our work with Native American Students in STEM During National Native American Heritage Month November 15, 2012 - 9:28am Addthis Students and faculty participating in AIREI gather at the one-week Energy Summer Institute, held at NREL last summer. Students and faculty participating in AIREI gather at the one-week Energy Summer Institute, held at NREL last summer. Dot Harris Dot Harris The Honorable Dot Harris, Director, Office of Economic Impact and Diversity Throughout November, we celebrate Native American Heritage Month as a country, honoring the first people who lived in the United States and the ways that American Indians and Alaska Natives enrich our Nation.

243

Frozen plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frozen plants Frozen plants Name: janicehu Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Why do some plants freeze and others do not? Replies: The main reason some plants freeze and others do not is that some plants do not have much water in them. Pine tree leaves have little water and are therefore difficult to freeze. Another reason is that some plants make chemicals to put into their fluids that reduce the freezing temperature. Salts and oils are some. The polyunsaturated fats found in many plants freeze at a lower temperature than the saturated fats found in many animals. Therefore plant fats are liquid (oils) at room temperature, and animal fats are solid. Plants could not use so many saturated fats as warm blooded animals do or they would freeze up solid at higher temperatures. I know little of plants but many animals can make ethylene glycol to keep themselves from freezing. Ethylene glycol is the active ingredient in car anti-freeze

244

Ghimire et al 2010.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of of fungal endophyte communities inhabiting switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) growing in the native tallgrass prairie of northern Oklahoma Sita R. Ghimire & Nikki D. Charlton & Jeremey D. Bell & Yelugere L. Krishnamurthy & Kelly D. Craven Received: 24 November 2010 / Accepted: 12 December 2010 # Kevin D. Hyde 2010 Abstract This study was conducted to explore fungal endophyte communities inhabiting native switchgrass plants from the tallgrass prairie of northern Oklahoma. The primary focus was to isolate these endophytes in pure culture from surface-sterilized plant tissues and provide taxonomic identifications based on comparative analysis of ITS rDNA gene sequences. From these data, we evaluated the biodiversity of these potentially beneficial endosym- bionts from this rapidly disappearing habitat of the Great Plains. While important from a strictly

245

NICCR - National Institute for Climate Change Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Williams Abstract Williams Abstract Direct and indirect effects of warming, elevated CO2 and non-native plant invasion on carbon and water cycling in semiarid grassland Principle Investigator: David G. Williams, University of Wyoming Co-Investigators: Elise Pendall, University of Wyoming Abstract:: Our proposed work builds on the Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment (PHACE) experiment underway in semiarid grassland of Wyoming. We will evaluate relative sensitivities of carbon and water cycles to elevated CO2 and temperature, and non-native plant invasion, separately and in combination, and distinguish direct from indirect effects of these factors on ecosystem physiology. Location: The PHACE experiment is being conducted at the USDA-ARS High Plains Grasslands Research Station, located near Cheyenne, WY. The ecosystem is a northern mixed-grass prairie consisting of C3 and C4 grasses, C3 forbs and C3 sub-shrubs. Laboratory analyses will be conducted at the University of Wyoming in Laramie.

246

Carnivorous Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carnivorous Plants Carnivorous Plants Nature Bulletin No. 597-A March 27, 1976 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CARNIVOROUS PLANTS Plants, generally, are eaten by insects or furnish other food for them. But there are a few families of strange plants that, instead, "eat" insects and other small animals. About 500 species are distributed over the world, from the arctic to the tropics. Most of them have peculiar leaves that not only attract insects but are equipped to trap and kill their victims. Even more remarkable is the fact that some have glands which secrete a digestive juice that softens and decomposes the animal until it is absorbed by the plant in much the same way as your stomach digests food.

247

Irreversible transformations of native celluloses, upon exposure to elevated temperatures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbohydrate Polymers 100 (2014) 2- 8 Carbohydrate Polymers 100 (2014) 2- 8 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Carbohydrate Polymers j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / c a r b p o l Irreversible transformations of native celluloses, upon exposure to elevated temperatures R.S. Atalla a , M.F. Crowley b , M.E. Himmel b , R.H. Atalla a,c,∗ a Cellulose Sciences International, Madison, WI, United States b National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO, United States c University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 29 August 2012 Received in revised form 4 June 2013 Accepted 7 June 2013 Available online 15 June 2013 Keywords: Transformation Irreversible Celluloses Elevated Temperatures Native Accessibility Aggregation a b s t r a c t Current research, basic and applied, assumes that observed recalcitrance of celluloses is an inherent

248

KSU EA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

native prairie grassland used as pasture and was disturbed recently for installation of transmission lines and towers. Wind Turbine Similar to Zond Model Proposed Action and...

249

NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group; Summer 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. The Wind Powering America program engages Native Americans in wind energy development, and as part of that effort, the NAWIG newsletter informs readers of events in the Native American/wind energy community.

Not Available

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group, Spring 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of its Native American outreach, DOE's Wind Powering America program has initiated a NAWIG newsletter to present Native American wind information, including projects, interviews with pioneers, issues, WPA activities, and related events. It is our hope that this newsletter will both inform and elicit comments and input on wind development in Indian Country. This issue profiles the Banner Wind Project in Nome, Alaska, and a new Native project in Kansas.

Not Available

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group, Fall 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. The Wind Powering America program engages Native Americans in wind energy development, and as part of that effort, the NAWIG newsletter informs readers of events in the Native American/wind energy community.

Not Available

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group; Summer 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. The Wind Powering America program engages Native Americans in wind energy development, and as part of that effort, the NAWIG newsletter informs readers of events in the Native American/wind energy community.

Not Available

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group, Spring 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. The Wind Powering America program engages Native Americans in wind energy development, and as part of that effort, the NAWIG newsletter informs readers of events in the Native American/wind energy community.

Not Available

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group; Summer 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. The Wind Powering America program engages Native Americans in wind energy development, and as part of that effort, the NAWIG newsletter informs readers of events in the Native American/wind energy community.

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

NAWIG News: The Native American Wind Interest Group Newsletter, Spring 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE's Wind Powering America program has initiated a quarterly NAWIG newsletter to present Native American wind information, including projects, interviews with pioneers, issues, WPA activities, and related events.

Not Available

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Conservation Refugees: The Hundred-Year Conflict Between Global Conservation and Native Peoples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

readers and funders of conservation organizations who seekReview: Conservation Refugees: The Hundred-Conflict Between Global Conservation and Native Peoples By

Jenkins, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Native Students and the Gains from Exporting Higher Education: Evidence from Australia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper proposes a general equilibrium model with non-pro…t publicly subsidized universities to show that native applicants do not have to lose from exporting higher education, as suggested by standard trade models. The gains from exporting higher education that initially accrue to universities will be redistributed to natives through increased investment in research and teaching. With Australian university-level data from 2001 to 2007, the empirical investigation identi…es the impact of exporting higher education on native enrollment using the instrumental variable approach: the enrollment of one more foreign student leads to the enrollment of about 0.75 more Australian native students.

Li Zhou; Julie Cullen; Gordon Hanson; Gordon Dahl; Roger Gordon

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Reconstructing the Past: Historical Interpretations and Native Experiences at Contemporary California Missions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Shaping of Southern California. Minneapolis: UniversityPast. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005. Dixon,Native Languages of California. ” American Anthropologist

Lorimer, Michelle

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group, Summer 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE's Wind Powering America program has initiated a quarterly NAWIG newsletter to present Native American wind information, including projects, interviews with pioneers, issues, WPA activities, and related events.

Not Available

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Knowing which way the wind blows| Weather observation, belief and practice in Native Oklahoma.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? I conducted field interviews and observed and participated in farming and cultural activities to understand how Native American farmers and traditionalists in southwestern Oklahoma… (more)

Peppler, Randy A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Native American prehistory of the middle Savannah River Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archaeological investigations on the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina span 17 years and continue today through a cooperative agreement between DOE and the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology (SCIAA), University of South Carolina. The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) of SCIAA has been and continues to be the sole archaeological consultant for DOE-SRS. This report documents technical aspects of all prehistoric archaeological research conducted by the SRARP between 1973 and 1987. Further, this report provides interpretative contexts for archaeological resources as a basis for an archaeological resource plan reported elsewhere (SRARP 1989), and as a comprehensive statement of our current understanding of Native American prehistory. 400 refs., 130 figs., 39 tabs.

Sassaman, K.E.; Brooks, M.J.; Hanson, G.T.; Anderson, D.G.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative  

SciTech Connect

To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

263

Recovery of Recombinant and Native Proteins from Rice and Corn Seed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plants are potential sources of valuable recombinant and native proteins that can be purified for pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and food applications. Transgenic rice and corn germ were evaluated for the production of novel protein products. This dissertation addresses: 1) the extraction and purification of the recombinant protein, human lysozyme (HuLZ), from transgenic rice and 2) the processing of dry-milled corn germ for the production of high protein germ and corn protein concentrate (CPC). The factors affecting the extraction and purification of HuLZ from rice were evaluated. Ionic strength and pH was used to optimize HuLZ extraction and cation exchange purification. The selected conditions, pH 4.5 with 50 mM NaCl, were a compromise between HuLZ extractability and binding capacity, resulting in 90% purity. Process simulation was used to assess the HuLZ purification efficiency and showed that the processing costs were comparable to native lysozyme purification from egg-white, the current predominant lysozyme source. Higher purity HuLZ (95%) could be achieved using pH 4.5 extraction followed by pH 6 adsorption, but the binding capacity was unexpectedly reduced by 80%. The rice impurity, phytic acid, was identified as the potential cause of the unacceptably low capacity. Enzymatic (phytase) treatment prior to adsorption improved purification, implicating phytic acid as the primary culprit. Two processing methods were proposed to reduce this interference: 1) pH 10 extraction followed by pH 4.5 precipitation and pH 6 adsorption and 2) pH 4.5 extraction and pH 6 adsorption in the presence of TRIS counter-ions. Both methods improved the binding capacity from 8.6 mg/mL to >25 mg/mL and maintained HuLZ purity. Processing of dry-milled corn germ to increase protein and oil content was evaluated using germ wet milling. In this novel method, dry-milled germ is soaked and wet processed to produce higher value protein products. Lab-scale and pilot-scale experiments identified soaking conditions that reduced germ starch content, enhanced protein and oil content, and maintained germ PDI (protein dispersibility index). Soaking at neutral pH and 25 degrees C maintained germ PDI and improved CPC yield from defatted germ flour. CPC with greater than 75% protein purity was produced using protein precipitation or membrane filtration.

Wilken, Lisa Rachelle

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Bog Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bog Plants Bog Plants Nature Bulletin No. 385-A June 6, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation BOG PLANTS Fifty years ago there were probably more different kinds of plants within a 50 mile radius from the Loop than anywhere else in the Temperate Zone. Industrial, commercial and residential developments, plus drainage and fires have erased the habitats where many of the more uncommon kinds flourished, including almost all of the tamarack swamps and quaking bogs. These bogs were a heritage from the last glacier. Its front had advanced in a great curve, from 10 to 20 miles beyond what is now the shoreline of Lake Michigan, before the climate changed and it began to melt back. Apparently the retreat was so rapid that huge blocks of ice were left behind, surrounded by the outwash of boulders, gravel and ground-up rock called "drift". These undrained depressions; became lakes. Sphagnum moss invaded many of them and eventually the thick floating mats of it supported a variety of bog-loving plants including certain shrubs, tamarack, and a small species of birch. Such lakes became bogs.

265

prairie project summary.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Based Learning SubjectContent Area: Biology, environmental science, social sciences, math and English. Learner Outcomes: Through the group activities, students will be able...

266

Energy Department Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes to Develop Renewable Energy Resources Energy Department Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes to Develop Renewable Energy Resources June 14, 2005 - 4:54pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that it is making nearly $2.5 million available to 18 Native American tribes to advance the use of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies on tribal lands. "DOE is committed to helping Native American tribes develop their energy resources," said Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman. "Renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies can play a significant role in encouraging tribal self-sufficiency, creating jobs and improving

267

Energy Department Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes to Develop Renewable Energy Resources Energy Department Makes $2.5 Million Available for Native American Tribes to Develop Renewable Energy Resources June 14, 2005 - 4:54pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that it is making nearly $2.5 million available to 18 Native American tribes to advance the use of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies on tribal lands. "DOE is committed to helping Native American tribes develop their energy resources," said Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman. "Renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies can play a significant role in encouraging tribal self-sufficiency, creating jobs and improving

268

Smooth Brome-The Silent Invader of Native Areas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smooth Brome-The Silent Invader of Native Areas Smooth Brome-The Silent Invader of Native Areas Smooth Brome-The Silent Invader of Native Areas December 31, 2007 - 8:57am Addthis Jody K. Nelson*, USDOE - Rocky Flats Site, Westminster, CO Smooth Brome (Bromus inermis) - The Silent Invader of Native Areas Smooth brome (Bromus inermis) is an exotic graminoid species that has been used for over a century across much of North America for range improvement and revegetation. While most "noxious" weeds invade quickly and are quite noticeable, a smooth brome invasion can imperceptibly transform the native grassland diversity to a near monoculture over many years or decades. At the Rocky Flats Site, a U.S. Department of Energy facility near Denver, Colorado, smooth brome is increasingly problematic, as it is along

269

NETL: News Release - Workshop Will Assist Native Americans in Applying for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 18, 2002 January 18, 2002 Workshop Will Assist Native Americans in Applying for Federal Grants to Apply Petroleum Technologies Largest Amount of Marine Hydrate Core Ever Recovered TULSA, OK - The National Energy Technology Laboratory is conducting a one day, no cost workshop to demonstrate how to respond to the most recent Native American Solicitation, Applications of Petroleum Technologies on Native American and Alaskan Native Corporation Properties for the Benefit of the Entire Tribe/Native Corporation. MORE INFO Details of this solicitation can be found at: NETL Business Page or at e-center.doe.gov The workshop will be a hands-on demonstration of the new electronic application process - the Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS). Attendees will have the opportunity to learn about the solicitation goals

270

Native American Students in STEM Fields: A Critical Need for our Country |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Native American Students in STEM Fields: A Critical Need for our Native American Students in STEM Fields: A Critical Need for our Country Native American Students in STEM Fields: A Critical Need for our Country August 1, 2012 - 10:20am Addthis Dot Harris, Director of the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, speaks about her engineering career to Native American students at the Intertribal Youth Summit on July 30. | Photo Credit: AnneMarie Ashburn, Department Of Energy. Dot Harris, Director of the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, speaks about her engineering career to Native American students at the Intertribal Youth Summit on July 30. | Photo Credit: AnneMarie Ashburn, Department Of Energy. Dot Harris Dot Harris The Honorable Dot Harris, Director, Office of Economic Impact and Diversity "Engineering has greatly enhanced my critical thinking and analytical

271

Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria for Phytostabilization of Mine Tailings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eolian dispersion of mine tailings in arid and semiarid environments is an emerging global issue for which economical remediation alternatives are needed. Phytostabilization, the revegetation of these sites with native plants, is one such alternative. Revegetation often requires the addition of bulky amendments such as compost which greatly increases cost. We report the use of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) to enhance the revegetation of mine tailings and minimize the need for compost amendment. Twenty promising PGPB isolates were used as seed inoculants in a series of greenhouse studies to examine revegetation of an extremely acidic, high metal content tailings sample previously shown to require 15% compost amendment for normal plant growth. Several isolates significantly enhanced growth of two native species, quailbush and buffalo grass, in tailings. In this study, PGPB/compost outcomes were plant specific; for quailbush, PGPB were most effective in combination with 10% compost addition while for buffalo grass, PGPB enhanced growth in the complete absence of compost. Results indicate that selected PGPB can improve plant establishment and reduce the need for compost amendment. Further, PGPB activities necessary for aiding plant growth in mine tailings likely include tolerance to acidic pH and metals.

Grandlic, C.J.; Mendez, M.O.; Chorover, J.; Machado, B.; Maier, R.M.

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

272

Poisonous Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plants Plants Nature Bulletin No. 276 October 1, 1983 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation POISONOUS PLANTS In the autumn of 1818, Nancy Hanks Lincoln died of milk sickness and left her son, Abe, motherless before he was ten years old. Since colonial times, in most of the eastern half of the United States, that dreaded disease has been a hazard in summer and fall, wherever cattle graze in woodlands or along wooded stream banks. In the 1920s it was finally traced to white snakeroot -- an erect branched plant, usually about 3 feet tall, with a slender round stem, sharply-toothed nettle-like leaves and, in late summer, several small heads of tiny white flowers. Cows eating small amounts over a long period develop a disease called "trembles", and their milk may bring death to nursing calves or milk sickness to humans. When larger amounts are eaten the cow, herself, may die.

273

Bagdad Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bagdad Plant Bagdad Plant 585 Silicon Drive Leechburg, P A 15656 * ATI Allegheny "'I Ludlum e-mail: Raymond.Polinski@ATImetals.com Mr. James Raba U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Building Technologies Program 1000 Independence Avenue SW Washington, DC 205585-0121 Raymond J. Polinski General Manager Grain-Oriented Electrical Steel RE: Distribution Transformers Rulemaking Docket Number EE-2010-STD-0048 RIN 1904-AC04 Submitted 4-10-12 via email Mr. Raba, I was planning to make the following closing comments at the DOE Public Meeting on February 23, 2012, but since the extended building evacuation caused the meeting to run well past the scheduled completion time I decided to submit my comments directly to you for the record.

274

FIA-12-0063 - In the Matter of Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation. |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

63 - In the Matter of Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation. 63 - In the Matter of Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation. FIA-12-0063 - In the Matter of Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation. On October 31, 2012, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision denying an appeal (Appeal) from a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) determination issued by the Department of Energy's Golden Field Office (GFO). Specifically, the Appellant, the Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation, contested the adequacy of the GFO's search, contending that based on the documents that the GFO provided to the Appellant, additional responsive documents should have been produced. The OHA reviewed the GFO's description of its search and determined that the GFO conducted an adequate search for responsive documents. Furthermore, the GFO explained

275

FIA-12-0063 - In the Matter of Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation. |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 - In the Matter of Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation. 3 - In the Matter of Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation. FIA-12-0063 - In the Matter of Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation. On October 31, 2012, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision denying an appeal (Appeal) from a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) determination issued by the Department of Energy's Golden Field Office (GFO). Specifically, the Appellant, the Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation, contested the adequacy of the GFO's search, contending that based on the documents that the GFO provided to the Appellant, additional responsive documents should have been produced. The OHA reviewed the GFO's description of its search and determined that the GFO conducted an adequate search for responsive documents. Furthermore, the GFO explained

276

DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office September 21, 2012 - 5:16pm Addthis John Hale III John Hale III Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization Editor's Note: This announcement was originally posted on the Office of Environmental Management's website. Today the Energyy Department awarded a $20 million contact (estimated value) to a Native American Tribally-Owned Section 8(a) company for administrative support services and information technology support at our Savannah River Operations Office. The company, NOVA Corp. of Window Rock, Arizona, is owned by the Navajo Nation. NOVA

277

DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office September 21, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor, DOE bill.taylor@srs.gov 803-952-8564 Aiken, SC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a set- aside contract to the NOVA Corp. of Window Rock, Arizona. NOVA will provide administrative support services and information technology support to the Savannah River Operations Office. The firm fixed-price Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity contract with an estimated value of $20 million with a two-year performance period. NOVA Corp. is a Native American Tribally-Owned (Navajo) Section 8(a)

278

DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office September 21, 2012 - 5:16pm Addthis John Hale III John Hale III Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization Editor's Note: This announcement was originally posted on the Office of Environmental Management's website. Today the Energyy Department awarded a $20 million contact (estimated value) to a Native American Tribally-Owned Section 8(a) company for administrative support services and information technology support at our Savannah River Operations Office. The company, NOVA Corp. of Window Rock, Arizona, is owned by the Navajo Nation. NOVA

279

EA-1932: Bass Lake Native Fish Restoration, Eureka, Lincoln County, Montana  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA was initiated to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a BPA proposal to fund Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks to help restore native fish populations to the Tobacco River and Lake Koocanusa. The project has been cancelled.

280

Regional Modeling of Ammonia Emissions from Native Soil Sources in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a new emissions inventory of ammonia volatilization from native soil sources (excluding direct emissions from fertilizer application sources) for the state of California is discussed. Because a comprehensive measurement dataset ...

Christopher Potter; Steven Klooster; Charles Krauter

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Post-award Training for 2013 Administration for Native Americans Grantees  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The goal of this training is to help Administration for Native Americans (ANA) grantees understand the federal requirements related to tracking and reporting their new ANA project. The training...

282

NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group, Fall 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of its Native American outreach, DOE's Wind Powering America program has initiated a NAWIG newsletter to present Native American wind information, including projects, interviews with pioneers, issues, WPA activities, and related events. It is our hope that this newsletter will both inform and elicit comments and input on wind development in Indian Country. This issue profiles the Campo Band Wind Project in California and a feature on the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe's plans for a 100- to 125-MW project.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Wind Power on Native American Lands: Opportunities, Challenges, and Status (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. This conference poster for Windpower 2007 describes the opportunities, challenges, and status of wind energy projects on Native American lands in the United States.

Jimenez, A.; Johnson, P. B.; Gough, R.; Robichaud, R.; Flowers, L.; Taylor, R.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Plant Rosettes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rosettes Rosettes Nature Bulletin No. 662 January 13, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County John J. Duffy, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist PLANT ROSETTES In winter our landscape is mostly leafless trees silhouetted against the sky, and the dead stalks of wildflowers, weeds and tall grasses -- with or without a blanket of snow. Some snows lie on the ground for only a few days. Others follow one after another and cover the ground with white for weeks at a time. Soon the eye begins to hunger for a glimpse of something green and growing. Then, in sunny spots where the snow has melted or where youngsters have cleared it away, there appear clusters of fresh green leaves pressed tight to the soil. Whether it is a dandelion in the lawn, a pansy in a flower border, or a thistle in a vacant lot, such a typical leaf cluster -- called a winter rosette -- is a ring of leaves around a short central stem. The leaves are narrow at the base, wider toward the tip, and spread flat on the ground with little or no overlap. This arrangement gives full exposure to sunlight and close contact with the warmer soil beneath. Such plants continue to grow, sometimes faster, sometimes slower, even under snow, throughout winter.

285

Biotic Interactivity between Grazers and Plants: Relationships Contributing to Atmospheric Boundary Layer Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 1987 and 1988 First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment (FIFE) studies conducted in the tallgrass prairie of central Kansas, variations in ungulate grazing intensity produced a patchy spatial ...

M. I. Dyer; C. L. Turner; T. R. Seastedt

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Immigrants and Native Workers New Analysis Using Longitudinal Employer-Employee Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a database that includes the universe of individuals and establishments in Denmark over the period 1991-2008 we analyze the effect of a large inflow of non-European (EU) immigrants on Danish workers. We first identify a sharp and sustained supply-driven increase in the inflow of non-EU immigrants in Denmark, beginning in 1995 and driven by a sequence of international events such as the Bosnian, Somalian and Iraqi crises. We then look at the response of occupational complexity, job upgrading and downgrading, wage and employment of natives in the short and long run. We find that the increased supply of non-EU low skilled immigrants pushed native workers to pursue more complex occupations. This reallocation happened mainly through movement across firms. Immigration increased mobility of natives across firms and across municipalities but it did not increase their probability of unemployment. We also observe a significant shift in the native labor force towards complex service industries in locations receiving more immigrants. The complementarity of immigrants and the career progression towards more complex occupations generated a significant wage and earnings increase for more and less educated native workers, especially in the complex service sector. Those mechanisms protected individual wages from immigrants competition and enhanced their wage outcomes. While the highly educated experienced wage gains already in the short-run, the gains of the less educated built up over time as they moved towards jobs that were complementary to those held by the non-EU immigrants.

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Long-day plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-day plants Name: Ryan S Martin Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What are long-day plants? Replies: Long-day plants are those that require a...

288

File:03AKHAlaskaNativeClaimsSettlementLandsLeasing.pdf | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AKHAlaskaNativeClaimsSettlementLandsLeasing.pdf AKHAlaskaNativeClaimsSettlementLandsLeasing.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:03AKHAlaskaNativeClaimsSettlementLandsLeasing.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 16 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 10:17, 18 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 10:17, 18 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (16 KB) Jnorris (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information) File usage The following 2 pages link to this file: GRR/Flowcharts

289

Native American fishery issues: Hanford involvement in evaluation of the Zone 6 fishery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Native American fishers are concerned about the deteriorating quality of salmon and other fish caught from the Columbia River. They fear salmon are not healthy and that eating the fish could Jeopardize the health of Native Americans. In 1991, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). with the assistance of the Yakima Indian Nation (YIN). monitored the salmon and steelhead fishery in the lower Columbia River (Zone 6 fishery). PNL biologists set up a hot-line'' for Native American fishers to call if they caught fish they suspected were diseased or contaminated. Fish reported to the hot-line were examined by a fish disease pathologist. Additionally. PNL and YIN staff reviewed water-quality data of the lower Columbia River. Water-quality data collected from 1949 through 1990. Results are described.

Abernethy, C.S.; Neitzel, D.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Strom, G. (Yakima Indian Nation, Toppenish, WA (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Native American fishery issues: Hanford involvement in evaluation of the Zone 6 fishery  

SciTech Connect

Native American fishers are concerned about the deteriorating quality of salmon and other fish caught from the Columbia River. They fear salmon are not healthy and that eating the fish could Jeopardize the health of Native Americans. In 1991, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). with the assistance of the Yakima Indian Nation (YIN). monitored the salmon and steelhead fishery in the lower Columbia River (Zone 6 fishery). PNL biologists set up a hot-line'' for Native American fishers to call if they caught fish they suspected were diseased or contaminated. Fish reported to the hot-line were examined by a fish disease pathologist. Additionally. PNL and YIN staff reviewed water-quality data of the lower Columbia River. Water-quality data collected from 1949 through 1990. Results are described.

Abernethy, C.S.; Neitzel, D.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Strom, G. (Yakima Indian Nation, Toppenish, WA (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group, Spring 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. The Wind Powering America program engages Native Americans in wind energy development, and as part of that effort, the NAWIG newsletter informs readers of events in the Native American/wind energy community. This issue features an interview with Steven J. Morello, director of DOE's newly formed Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, and a feature on the newly installed Vestas V-47 turbine at Turtle Mountain Community College.

Baranowski, R.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

TABLE 2. U.S. Nuclear Reactor Ownership Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station Point Beach Nuclear Plant Prairie Island Quad Cities Generating Station R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant River Bend PSEG Salem Generating ...

293

Gasification Plant Databases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Gasification Plant Databases Welcome to the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory's Gasification Plant Databases Within these...

294

NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group, Spring 2009  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Farm Brings Jobs, Lower Energy Costs Wind Farm Brings Jobs, Lower Energy Costs to Nome, Alaska Jointly owned by Sitnasuak Native Corporation and Bering Straits Native Corporation, the 18-turbine, 1,170-kW Banner Wind Project in Nome, Alaska, is the state's newest and largest wind farm. The project was completed in December, and then the turbines were taken offline for repairs and adjustments. In August, the project will once again produce 10% of the energy needed in Nome, a city

295

Native American Technical Assistance and Training for Renewable Energy Resource Development and Electrical Generation Facilities Management  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) will facilitate technical expertise and training of Native Americans in renewable energy resource development for electrical generation facilities, and distributed generation options contributing to feasibility studies, strategic planning and visioning. CERT will also provide information to Tribes on energy efficiency and energy management techniques.This project will provide facilitation and coordination of expertise from government agencies and private industries to interact with Native Americans in ways that will result in renewable energy resource development, energy efficiency program development, and electrical generation facilities management by Tribal entities. The intent of this cooperative agreement is to help build capacity within the Tribes to manage these important resources.

A. David Lester

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

296

New baseload power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a listing of 221 baseload power plant units currently in the planning stage. The list shows the plant owner, capacity, fuel, engineering firm, constructor, major equipment suppliers (steam generator, turbogenerator, and flue gas desulfurization system), partner, and date the plant is to be online. This data is a result of a survey by the journal of power plant owners.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Discrimination of Near-Native Protein Structures From Misfolded Models by Empirical Free Energy Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discrimination of Near-Native Protein Structures From Misfolded Models by Empirical Free Energy University, Boston, Massachusetts ABSTRACT Free energy potentials, combining molecular mechanics of discrimination that in- clude the correlation coefficient between RMSD and free energy, and a new measure labeled

Vajda, Sandor

298

Protocol for Appraisal of Petroleum Producing Properties on Native American Tribal Lands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum is currently produced on Native American Tribal Lands and has been produced on some of these lands for approximately 100 years. As these properties are abandoned at a production level that is considered the economic limit by the operator, Native American Tribes are considering this an opportunity to assume operator status to keep the properties producing. In addition to operating properties as they are abandoned, Native American Tribes also are assuming liabilities of the former operator(s) and ownership of equipment left upon abandonment. Often, operators are assumed by Native American Tribes without consideration of the liabilities left by the former operators. The purpose of this report is to provide protocols for the appraisal of petroleum producing properties and analysis of the petroleum resource to be produced after assuming operations. The appraisal protocols provide a spreadsheet for analysis of the producing property and a checklist of items to bring along before entering the property for onsite appraisal of the property. The report will provide examples of some environmental flags that may indicate potential liabilities remaining on the property left unaddressed by previous operators. It provides a starting point for appraisal and analysis of a property with a basis to make the decision to assume operations or to pursue remediation and/or closure of the liabilities of previous operators.

NONE

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

299

Structural and functional diversity of soil bacterial and fungal communities following woody plant encroachment in the southern Great Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the southern Great Plains (USA), encroachment of grassland ecosystems by Prosopis glandulosa (honey mesquite) is widespread. Mesquite encroachment alters net primary productivity, enhances stores of C and N in plants and soil, and leads to increased levels of soil microbial biomass and activity. While mesquite's impact on the biogeochemistry of the region is well established, it effects on soil microbial diversity and function are unknown. In this study, soils associated with four plant types (C{sub 3} perennial grasses, C{sub 4} midgrasses, C{sub 4} shortgrasses, and mesquite) from a mesquite-encroached mixed grass prairie were surveyed to in an attempt to characterize the structure, diversity, and functional capacity of their soil microbial communities. rRNA gene cloning and sequencing were used in conjunction with the GeoChip functional gene array to evaluate these potential differences. Mesquite soil supported increased bacterial and fungal diversity and harbored a distinct fungal community relative to other plant types. Despite differences in composition and diversity, few significant differences were detected with respect to the potential functional capacity of the soil microbial communities. These results may suggest that a high level of functional redundancy exists within the bacterial portion of the soil communities; however, given the bias of the GeoChip toward bacterial functional genes, potential functional differences among soil fungi could not be addressed. The results of this study illustrate the linkages shared between above- and belowground communities and demonstrate that soil microbial communities, and in particular soil fungi, may be altered by the process of woody plant encroachment.

Hollister, Emily B [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Ansley, R J [Texas A& M University; Boutton, Thomas W [Texas A& M University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in the Mojave Desert Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in the Mojave Desert August 21, 2013 - 4:03pm Addthis Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are using predictive tools to understand ecological changes driven by frequent fires due to invasive plant species in California’s Mojave Desert. In collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey, scientists are integrating recent advances in fire science and remote sensing tools to characterize the relationship between non-native invasive plant species and wildfire in the desert under current and changing climate conditions. The satellite image shown here is of the Mojave Desert transformed to principal components highlighting geologic formations, land use and vegetation cover. | Image courtesy of PNNL scientist Jerry Tagestad and the U.S. Global Land Cover Facility in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Property:EIA/861/OperatesGeneratingPlant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OperatesGeneratingPlant OperatesGeneratingPlant Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Boolean. Description: Operates Generating Plant Entity operates power generating plants (Y or N) [1] References ↑ EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2008 - F861 File Layout-2008.doc Pages using the property "EIA/861/OperatesGeneratingPlant" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) + true + AEP Generating Company + true + AES Eastern Energy LP + true + AGC Division of APG Inc + true + Akiachak Native Community Electric Co + true + Alabama Municipal Elec Authority + true + Alabama Power Co + true + Alaska Electric & Energy Coop + true + Alaska Electric Light&Power Co + true + Alaska Energy Authority + true +

302

Plant immune systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant immune systems Plant immune systems Name: stephanie Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Do plants have an immune system? How does it work? Are plants able to "fight off" infections such as Dutch Elm disease? Replies: In the broadest sense, an immune system is any method an organism has protect itself from succeeding to another organism's efforts to undermine its health and integrity. In this sense, yes, plants have immune systems. Plants do NOT have "active" immune systems, like humans, including macrophages, lymls, antibodies, complements, interferon, etc., which help us ward off infection. Rather, plants have "passive" mechanisms of protection. For instance, the waxy secretion of some plants (cuticle) functions to help hold in moisture and keep out microorganisms. Plants can also secrete irritating juices that prevent insects and animals from eating it. The thick bark of woody plants is another example of a defensive adaptation, that protects the more delicate tissues inside. The chemical secretions of some plants are downright poisonous to many organisms, which greatly enhance the chances of survival for the plant. Fruits of plants contain large amounts of vitamin C and bioflavonoids, compounds which have been shown in the lab to be anti-bacterial and antiviral. So in these ways, plants can improve their chances of survival. Hundreds of viruses and bacteria attack plants each year, and the cost to agriculture is enormous. I would venture to guess that once an organism establishes an infection in a plant, the plant will not be able to "fight" it. However, exposure to the sun's UV light may help control an infection, possibly even defeat it, but the plant does not have any inherent "active" way to fight the infection

303

Vegetation component of geothermal EIS studies: Introduced plants, ecosystem stability, and geothermal development  

SciTech Connect

This paper contributes new information about the impacts from introduced plant invasions on the native Hawaiian vegetation as consequences of land disturbance and geothermal development activities. In this regard, most geothermal development is expected to act as another recurring source of physical disturbance which favors the spread and maintenance of introduced organisms throughout the region. Where geothermal exploration and development activities extend beyond existing agricultural and residential development, they will become the initial or sole source of disturbance to the naturalized vegetation of the area. Kilauea has a unique ecosystem adapted to the dynamics of a volcanically active landscape. The characteristics of this ecosystem need to be realized in order to understand the major threats to the ecosystem and to evaluate the effects of and mitigation for geothermal development in Puna. The native Puna vegetation is well adapted to disturbances associated with volcanic eruption, but it is ill-adapted to compete with alien plant species in secondary disturbances produced by human activities. Introduced plant and animal species have become a major threat to the continued presence of the native biota in the Puna region of reference.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Plant Phenotype Characterization System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

305

Monitoring, assessing and evaluating the pollinator species (Hymenoptera: apoidea) found on a native brush site, a revegetated site and an urban garden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research presents the findings of a pollinator diversity study that took place at three study sites. Although variation in pollinator diversity occurred between the three sites, fewer pollinators than expected were recorded from the La Joya Tract (revegetated site). Numerous genera and species were recorded from the Havana Tract (native site) as well as the Valley Nature Center (urban garden). In contrast, the La Joya Tract had a comparatively depauperate pollinator fauna. The numbers of pollinator genera and species recorded from the three study sites were decreased in comparison to the total number of genera and species recorded from Hidalgo County. Hidalgo County has 35 known genera and 75 species of bees documented to date. About 40% of the genera and 23% of the species recorded from Hidalgo County were recorded from the Havana Tract in this study, while a mere 8.5% of the genera and 4% of the species were reported from the La Joya Tract and 34% of the genera and 16% of the species were reported from the Valley Nature Center. Although the vascular plant species identified from these study sites were diverse, the floral rewards they provided yielded an insight as to what was going on in terms of pollinator diversity. Plants may yield nectar or pollen floral rewards or both in some cases to pollinators. The current study provides evidence that revegetation of land with plants that primarily provide nectar rewards will result in fewer observed bee taxa than from land revegetated with plants that provide a mix of nectar and pollen floral rewards.

Cate, Carrie Ann

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Plants & Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plants & Animals Plants & Animals Plants & Animals Plant and animal monitoring is performed to determine whether Laboratory operations are impacting human health via the food chain. April 12, 2012 A rabbit on LANL land. A rabbit on LANL land. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We sample many plants and animals, including wild and domestic crops, game animals, fish, and food products from animals, as well as other plants and animals not considered food sources. What plants and animals do we monitor? LANL monitors both edible and non-edible plants and animals to determine whether Laboratory operations are impacting human health via the food chain, or to find contaminants that indicate they are being moved in the

307

Chlorine and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chlorine and Plants Name: Paul Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Is too Much chlorine going to kill or harm plants? I couldn't find information anywhere but I found...

308

Chlorine and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chlorine and Plants Name: james Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I am doing project on the effects of chlorine on plant growth and i cant find any info. If you could...

309

PLANT BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLANT BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT HANDBOOK 2012-2013 University of Georgia Athens, GA 30602 Updated: 9/5/12 #12;Plant Biology Handbook Table of Contents General Information and Operating Procedures 1

Arnold, Jonathan

310

Plants producing DHA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CSIRO researchers published results in November 2012 showing that the long-chain n-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) can be produced in land plants in commercially valuable quantities. Plants producing DHA inform Magazine algae algal AOCS bi

311

Oil and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil and Plants Name: Matt Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: If you could please tell me exactly what motor oil (unused) does to plants, and the effects. Does it...

312

Paste Plant Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... It now provides data extraction features that aggregate system ... DUBAL Carbon Plant management team defined and implemented a 3-year strategic ... how to best approach Paste Plant operating and maintenance activities.

313

Plants and Dirt Compaction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dirt Compaction Name: Conor Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: When growing corn and soybean plants does the compaction of dirt effect the growth of the plant? Replies:...

314

Light Wavelength and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Wavelength and Plants Name: John Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I just was wandering whether plants grow better in artificial light or in sunlight. I am...

315

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, James (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

316

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, James (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

317

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach, Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Del Mar, CA); Jin, RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO); Keith, Kevin (Three Forks, MT); Copenhaver, Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

318

Plant centromere compositions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach; Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL), Zieler; Helge (Del Mar, CA), Jin; RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO), Keith; Kevin (Three Forks, MT), Copenhaver; Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC), Preuss; Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

319

Palacios and Kitten : high performance operating systems for scalable virtualized and native supercomputing.  

SciTech Connect

Palacios and Kitten are new open source tools that enable applications, whether ported or not, to achieve scalable high performance on large machines. They provide a thin layer over the hardware to support both full-featured virtualized environments and native code bases. Kitten is an OS under development at Sandia that implements a lightweight kernel architecture to provide predictable behavior and increased flexibility on large machines, while also providing Linux binary compatibility. Palacios is a VMM that is under development at Northwestern University and the University of New Mexico. Palacios, which can be embedded into Kitten and other OSes, supports existing, unmodified applications and operating systems by using virtualization that leverages hardware technologies. We describe the design and implementation of both Kitten and Palacios. Our benchmarks show that they provide near native, scalable performance. Palacios and Kitten provide an incremental path to using supercomputer resources that is not performance-compromised.

Widener, Patrick (University of New Mexico); Jaconette, Steven (Northwestern University); Bridges, Patrick G. (University of New Mexico); Xia, Lei (Northwestern University); Dinda, Peter (Northwestern University); Cui, Zheng.; Lange, John (Northwestern University); Hudson, Trammell B.; Levenhagen, Michael J.; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Alaska Native Weatherization Training and Jobs Program First Steps Toward Tribal Weatherization – Human Capacity Development  

SciTech Connect

The Alaska Native Weatherization Training and Jobs Project expanded weatherization services for tribal members’ homes in southeast Alaska while providing weatherization training and on the job training (OJT) for tribal citizens that lead to jobs and most probably careers in weatherization-related occupations. The program resulted in; (a) 80 Alaska Native citizens provided with skills training in five weatherization training units that were delivered in cooperation with University of Alaska Southeast, in accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy Core Competencies for Weatherization Training that prepared participants for employment in three weatherizationrelated occupations: Installer, Crew Chief, and Auditor; (b) 25 paid OJT training opportunities for trainees who successfully completed the training course; and (c) employed trained personnel that have begun to rehab on over 1,000 housing units for weatherization.

Wiita, Joanne

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

New baseload power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a tabulation of the results of this magazines survey of current plans for new baseload power plants. The table lists the unit name, capacity, fuel, engineering firm, constructor, suppliers for steam generator, turbine generator and flue gas desulfurization equipment, date due on-line, and any non-utility participants. The table includes fossil-fuel plants, nuclear plants, geothermal, biomass and hydroelectric plants.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Cooling Plant Optimization Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Central cooling plants or district cooling systems account for 22 percent of energy costs for cooling commercial buildings. Improving the efficiency of central cooling plants will significantly impact peak demand and energy usage for both building owners and utilities. This guide identifies opportunities for optimizing a central cooling plant and provides a simplified optimization procedure. The guide focuses on plant optimization from the standpoint of minimizing energy costs and maximizing efficiencies...

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

323

Plant design: Integrating Plant and Equipment Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Like power plant engineers, process plant engineers must design generating units to operate efficiently, cleanly, and profitably despite fluctuating costs for raw materials and fuels. To do so, they increasingly create virtual plants to enable evaluation of design concepts without the expense of building pilot-scale or demonstration facilities. Existing computational models describe an entire plant either as a network of simplified equipment models or as a single, very detailed equipment model. The Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) project (Figure 5) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) seeks to bridge the gap between models by integrating plant modeling and equipment modeling software. The goal of the effort is to provide greater insight into the performance of proposed plant designs. The software integration was done using the process-industry standard CAPE-OPEN (Computer Aided Process Engineering–Open), or CO interface. Several demonstration cases based on operating power plants confirm the viability of this co-simulation approach.

Sloan, David (Alstrom Power); Fiveland, Woody (Alstrom Power); Zitney, S.E.; Osawe, Maxwell (Ansys, Inc.)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Better Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Plants on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Better Plants on Google Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Better Plants on Delicious Rank Advanced...

325

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed--has been benchmarked against measurements.30 At the Ringhals nuclear power plant, this measurement is car a measurement performed at the PWR Unit 4 of the Ring hals Nuclear Power Plant was available to us

Demazière, Christophe

326

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed reactivity effects--has been benchmarked against measurements.30 At the Ringhals nuclear power plant a measurement performed at the PWR Unit 4 of the Ring- hals Nuclear Power Plant was available to us

Demazière, Christophe

327

Decisions decisions plant vessels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes concepts for a family of plant vessels that help users make decisions or reach goals. The concepts use plants to mark time or answer questions for the user, creating a connection between the user and the individual plant. These concepts ...

Jenny Liang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Compact Beta Particle/Positron Imager for Plant Biology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 11CO2 tracer is used to facilitate plant biology research towards optimization of plant productivity, biofuel development and carbon sequestration in biomass. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to study carbon transport in live plants using 11CO2. Plants typically have very thin leaves resulting in little medium for the emitted positrons to undergo an annihilation event. For the emitted positron from 11C decay approximately 1mm of water equivalent material is needed for positron annihilation. Thus most of the positrons do not annihilate inside the leaf, resulting in limited sensitivity for PET imaging. To address this problem we have developed a compact beta-positive beta-minus particle (BPBM) imager for 11CO2 leaf imaging. The detector is based on a Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tube optically coupled via optical grease and a 3mm thick glass plate to a 0.5mm thick Eljin EJ-212 plastic scintillator. The detector is equipped with a flexible arm to allow its placement and orientation on the leaf of the plant of interest while maintaining the leaf's original orientation. We are planning to utilize the imaging device at the Duke University Phytotron to investigate dynamic carbon transport differences between invasive and native species.

Weisenberger, Andrew; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Xi, Wenze; Zorn, Carl; Stolin, Alexander; Majewski, Stan; Majewski, Stanislaw; Howell, Calvin; Crowell, Alec

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group, Fall 2008, Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

As part of its Native American outreach, DOE?s Wind Powering America program produces a newsletter to present Native American wind information, including projects, interviews with pioneers, issues, WPA activities, and related events. This issue features an interview with Dave Danz, a tribal planner for the Grand Portage Band of Chippewa in northeastern Minnesota, and a feature on the new turbine that powers the KILI radio station on the Pine Ridge Reservation.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation in Plants: Mechanisms and Enhancement of Phytoremediation of Groundwater Contamination  

SciTech Connect

Several varieties of transgenic poplar containing cytochrome P-450 2E1 have been constructed and are undergoing tests. Strategies for improving public acceptance and safety of transgenic poplar for chlorinated hydrocarbon phytoremediation are being developed. We have discovered a unique rhizobium species that lives within the stems of poplar and we are investigating whether this bacterium contributes nitrogen fixed from the air to the plant and whether this endophyte could be used to introduce genes into poplar. Studies of the production of chloride ion from TCE have shown that our present P-450 constructs did not produce chloride more rapidly than wild type plants. Follow-up studies will determine if there are other rate limiting downstream steps in TCE metabolism in plants. Studies of the metabolism of carbon tetrachloride in poplar cells have provided evidence that the native plant metabolism is due to the activity of oxidative enzymes similar to the mammalian cytochrome P-450 2E1.

Strand, Stuart E.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Crystals and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crystals and Plants Crystals and Plants Name: Diab Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What will the likely effects of crystallized filaments in plant cells be? I had noticed that moth balls (para dichlorbenzene) tends within a very short temperature range to transform from a solid to gas and back to solid in the form of crystal filaments. I been wondering about the likely effects of an experiment in which a plant is placed in a chamber saturated with the fumes of a substance that had the same transformation properties of its state but none of the toxic effects be on the plants and will such filaments form inside the cell and rearrange its DNA strands or kill it outright? Replies: The following might be helpful: http://biowww.clemson.edu/biolab/mitosis.html http://koning.ecsu.ctstateu.edu/Plant_Physiology/osmosis.html

333

Conditional sterility in plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure provides methods, recombinant DNA molecules, recombinant host cells containing the DNA molecules, and transgenic plant cells, plant tissue and plants which contain and express at least one antisense or interference RNA specific for a thiamine biosynthetic coding sequence or a thiamine binding protein or a thiamine-degrading protein, wherein the RNA or thiamine binding protein is expressed under the regulatory control of a transcription regulatory sequence which directs expression in male and/or female reproductive tissue. These transgenic plants are conditionally sterile; i.e., they are fertile only in the presence of exogenous thiamine. Such plants are especially appropriate for use in the seed industry or in the environment, for example, for use in revegetation of contaminated soils or phytoremediation, especially when those transgenic plants also contain and express one or more chimeric genes which confer resistance to contaminants.

Meagher, Richard B. (Athens, GA); McKinney, Elizabeth (Athens, GA); Kim, Tehryung (Taejeon, KR)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

334

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station Massachusetts Total MD Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Maryland Total MI Fermi Donald C Cook Michigan Total MN Prairie Island ...

335

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fermilab Today classifieds SubscribeUnsubscribe to Fermilab Today Photographer Lindy Smith Visits Fermilab Lindy Smith Lindy Smith at Fermilab arranging prairie plants on paper...

336

Minnesota - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Pine Bend Refinery, located in the Twin Cities suburbs, ... Prairie Island nuclear power plant's units 1 and 2 had their licenses renewed in June ...

337

Electrical generating plant availability  

SciTech Connect

A discussion is given of actions that can improve availability, including the following: the meaning of power plant availability; The organization of the electric power industry; some general considerations of availability; the improvement of power plant availability--design factors, control of shipping and construction, maintenance, operating practices; sources of statistics on generating plant availability; effects of reducing forced outage rates; and comments by electric utilities on generating unit availability.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Plant Growth and Photosynthesis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Growth and Photosynthesis Plant Growth and Photosynthesis Name: Jack Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Do plants have any other way of growing besides photosythesis? Plants do not use photosynthesis to grow!!! They use cellular respiration just like every other organism to process energy into work. Plants use oxygen just like we do. Photosynthesis is principally only a process to change sunlight into a chemical form for storage. Replies: Check out our archives for more information. www.newton.dep.anl.gov/archive.htm Steve Sample Jack, Several kinds of flowering plants survive without the use of chlorophyll which is what makes plants green and able to produce sugar through photosynthesis. Dodder is a parasitic nongreen (without chlorophyll) plant that is commonly found growing on jewelweed and other plants in damp areas. Dodder twines around its host, (A host is an organism that has fallen victim to a parasite.), like a morning glory and attaches itself at certain points along the stem where it absorbs sugar and nutrients from the hosts sap.

339

Sunrise II Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sunrise Power Company, LLC (Sunrise), has planned the modification of an existing power plant project to increase its generation capacity by 265 megawatts by 2003. The initial...

340

Plant and Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

publicationshouseplantligh t.html Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach "Artificial" light comes from many kinds of bulbs that emit different wavelengths of light; Many plants...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Repurposing a Hydroelectric Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis project explores repurposing a hydroelectric plant along Richmond Virginia's Canal Walk. The building has been redesigned to create a community-oriented space programmed as… (more)

Pritcher, Melissa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

& Immobilization Plant Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the current mixing, erosion, corrosion, instrumentation and monitoring challenges at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) in Hanford. The "black cell" design concept and the use of...

343

Rangeland plant response to elevated CO{sub 2}. Annual report, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Effects of carbon dioxide enrichment on a tallgrass ecosystem were monitored during the 1990 growing season. The chambers, CO{sub 2} delivery system, and data acquisition and control system were in place and operational by 4 April 1990. CO{sub 2} fumigation and data acquisition began on that date. Nitrogen fertilizer as ammonium nitrate was applied at a rate of 45 kg ha {sup -1} on 1 April to the N-fertilized plots. The chambers were 4.5 m in diameter and 4 m in height to allow for destructive sampling for biomass accumulation, leaf area determination, and for grazing esophageally-fistulated sheep. The experimental site was located in pristine Tallgrass Prairie north of/and adjacent to the Kansas State University campus. Vegetation on the site was a mixture of C3 and C4 species and was dominated by big bluestem (Andropogon geradii vitman) and indiangrass (Sorghastrum nutans (L.) Nash). Subdominants included Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.), sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula (Michx.) Torr.), and tall dropseed (Sporobolus asper var. asper (Michx.) Kunth). Members of the sedge family made up 5-10% of the composition. Principal forbs included western ragweed (Ambrosia psilostachya DC.), Louisiana sagewort (Artemesia ludoviciana Nutt.), and mayflower scurfpea (Psoralea tenuiflora var. floribunda (Nutt.) Rydb.). Average peak biomass occurs in early August at 425 g m{sup -2} of which 35 g m{sup -2} is from forbs. The area was ideal for meeting the experimental objectives, in that the mixture of C3 and C4 plants would allow for assessment of competitive relationships among numerous species of both carbon fixation pathways.

Owensby, C.E.; Coyne, P.I.; Ham, J.M.; Parton, W.; Rice, C.; Auen, L.M.; Adam, N.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

JEPSON PRAIRIE Self Guided Nature Trail  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Addington long mound, and NUMBER 72 November 2012 THE NEWSLETTER OF THE PREHISTORIC SOCIETY Registered mound (2009; 2010-11). 5. Small-scale excavations of the flanking ditches of the Kit's Coty House long mound (2011). 6. Large-scale magnetometry survey of the Burham causewayed enclosure (2009, 2010). 7

Hammock, Bruce D.

345

Blooming Prairie Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

150 - 400 Dishwashers: 300 - 1,000 Ventilation Hood Controllers: 165HP Low-Flow Spray Valve: 50% of installed cost Equipment Requirements Appliances must be Energy Star...

346

Blooming Prairie Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

150 - 400 Dishwashers: 300 - 1,000 Ventilation Hood Controllers: 165HP Low-Flow Spray Valve: 50% of installed cost Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (SMMPA) is a...

347

Blooming Prairie Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

unit Central AC: 100 - 200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Air Source Heat Pump:100 - 200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above...

348

The Albedo Decay of Prairie Snows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily albedos of snow were measured between November and April, 1969–87, and were analyzed to determine the decay rate between snowfalls. The data essentially represent the snow accumulation season because the analysis was limited to days when ...

D. G. Baker; D. L. Ruschy; D. B. Wall

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Modulating lignin in plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

350

NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear power plant for use in an airless environment or other environment in which cooling is difficult is described. The power plant includes a boiling mercury reactor, a mercury--vapor turbine in direct cycle therewith, and a radiator for condensing mercury vapor. (AEC)

Carter, J.C.; Armstrong, R.H.; Janicke, M.J.

1963-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

351

Plants “remember” drought, adapt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research carried out at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL; USA) shows that plants subjected to a previous period of drought learn to deal with the stress owing to their “memories” of the experience. Plants “remember” drought, adapt Inform Magazine

352

BNL | Plant Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Sciences Plant Sciences The Plant Sciences group's goal is to understand the principles underlying carbon capture, conversion, and storage in living systems; and develop the capability to model, predict and optimize these processes in plants and microorganisms. Staff Members John Shanklin Jason Candreva Jilian Fan Hui Liu Qin Liu Edward Whittle Xiaohong Yu Dax Fu Jin Chai Chang-Jun Liu Yuanheng Cai Mingyue Gou Guoyin Kai Zhaoyang Wei Huijun Yang Kewei Zhang Xuebin Zhang Jörg Schwender Jordan Hay Inga Hebbelmann Hai Shi Zhijie Sun Changcheng Xu Chengshi Yan Zhiyang Zhai Plant Sciences Contact John Shanklin, (631)344-3414 In the News No stories available Funding Agencies DOE Basic Energy Sciences Bayer CropScience The Biosciences Department is part of the Environment and Life Sciences Directorate at Brookhaven National Laboratory

353

Granby Pumping Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Granby Pumping Plant Granby Pumping Plant Skip Navigation Links Transmission Functions Infrastructure projects Interconnection OASIS OATT Granby Pumping Plant-Windy Gap Transmission Line Rebuild Project Western owns and operates a 12-mile, 69-kV electric transmission line in Grand County, Colo., that originates at Windy Gap Substation and terminates at Granby Pumping Plant Switchyard. The proposed project would rebuild the single circuit line as a double circuit transmission line and add a second power transformer. One circuit would replace the existing 69-kV line; the other circuit would be a new 138-kV line. Granby Pumping Plant Switchyard would be expanded to accommodate the second line and power transformer. Windy Gap Substation would be modified to accommodate the second line.

354

AVESTAR® - Smart Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Plant In the area of smart plant operations, AVESTAR's dynamic simulators enable researchers to analyze plant-wide performance over a wide range of operating scenarios, including plant startup (cold, warm, hot), shutdown, fuel switchovers, on-load cycling, high-load operations of 90-120% of rated capacity, and high frequency megawatt changes for automatic generation control. The dynamic simulators also let researchers analyze the plant's response to disturbances and malfunctions. The AVESTAR team is also using dynamic simulators to develop effective strategies for the operation and control of pre-combustion capture technology capable of removing at least 90% of the CO2 emissions. Achieving operational excellence can have significant impact on the extent and the rate at which commercial-scale capture processes will be scaled-up, deployed, and used in the years to come. If deployment of new CO2 capture technologies is to be accelerated, power generators must be confident in ensuring efficient, flexible, reliable, environmentally-friendly, and profitable plant operations.

355

Co-Designing Sustainable Communities: The Identification and Incorporation of Social Performance Metrics in Native American Sustainable Housing and Renewable Energy System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

renewable energy power generation from wind power to provideExercise and Human Power Generation Native Shrubs in theFloors (No Wood) Human Power Generation Building Materials

Shelby, Ryan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Assessment of Native Salmonids Above Hells Canyon Dam, Idaho, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the western United States, exotic brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis frequently have a deleterious effect on native salmonids, and biologists often attempt to remove brook trout in streams using electrofishing. Although the success of electrofishing removal projects typically is low, few studies have assessed the underlying mechanisms of failure, especially in terms of compensatory responses. We evaluated the effectiveness of a three-year removal project in reducing brook trout and enhancing native salmonids in 7.8 km of an Idaho stream and looked for brook trout compensatory responses such as decreased natural mortality, increased growth, increased fecundity at length, or earlier maturation. Due to underestimates of the distribution of brook trout in the first year and personnel shortages in the third year, the multiagency watershed advisory group that performed the project fully treated the stream (i.e. multipass removals over the entire stream) in only one year. In 1998, 1999, and 2000, a total of 1,401, 1,241, and 890 brook trout were removed, respectively. For 1999 and 2000, an estimated 88 and 79% of the total number of brook trout in the stream were removed. For the section of stream that was treated in all years, the abundance of age-1 and older brook trout decreased by 85% from 1998 to 2003. In the same area, the abundance of age-0 brook trout decreased 86% from 1998 to 1999 but by 2003 had rebounded to near the original abundance. Abundance of native redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss decreased for age-1 and older fish but did not change significantly for age-0 fish. Despite high rates of removal, total annual survival rate for brook trout increased from 0.08 {+-} 0.02 in 1998 to 0.20 {+-} 0.04 in 1999 and 0.21 {+-} 0.04 in 2000. Growth of age-0 brook trout was significantly higher in 2000 (the year after their abundance was lowest) compared to other years, and growth of age-1 and age-2 brook trout was significantly lower following the initial removal years but recovered by 2003. Few other brook trout demographic parameters changed appreciably over the course of the project. Electrofishing removals required 210 person-days of effort. Despite experiencing slight changes in abundance, growth, and survival, brook trout in Pikes Fork appeared little affected by three years of intensive removal efforts, most likely because mortality within the population was high prior to initiation of the project such that the removal efforts merely replaced natural mortality with exploitation.

Meyer, Kevin A.; Lamansky, Jr., James A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

358

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

359

Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

360

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

362

Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

363

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

364

Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

365

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

366

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

367

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

368

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

369

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

370

California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

371

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

372

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

373

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

374

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

375

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

376

NETL: Power Plant Improvement Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PPII Major Demonstrations Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) The Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) was established in October 2000 to further the commercial-scale...

377

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

378

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

379

Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

380

Artificial light and plant growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Artificial light and plant growth Name: Lim Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What color of artificial light works the best in plant growth? Replies:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chicago Area Prairie Plants Chicago Area Prairie Plants Statement by Bob Shaw: Photographer, Site Developer and Fermilab Docent This is my attempt to provide a simple way to identify prairie plants found in the Chicago area. It is based on my 30+ years of teaching middle school science. Having been involved in leaf collections and rock and mineral identifications I have tried to make this as simple as possible so that both novice teachers and students could use this to identify flowers. It has been used by some teachers and docents at the Lederman Science Center at Fermilab. The pictures were taken by me at The Morton Arboretum, Wolf Road Prairie, Belmont Prairie, the Great Western Prairie and Fermi National Laboratory. I will update this as corrections or additions need to be made.

382

The First Coal Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Plants Coal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 329-A January 25, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE FIRST COAL PLANTS Coal has been called "the mainspring" of our civilization. You are probably familiar, in a general way, with the story of how it originated ages ago from beds of peat which were very slowly changed to coal; and how it became lignite or brown coal, sub-bituminous, bituminous, or anthracite coal, depending on bacterial and chemical changes in the peat, how much it was compressed under terrific pressure, and the amount of heat involved in the process. You also know that peat is formed by decaying vegetation in shallow clear fresh-water swamps or bogs, but it is difficult to find a simple description of the kinds of plants that, living and dying during different periods of the earth's history, created beds of peat which eventually became coal.

383

Pollution adn Plant Growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollution adn Plant Growth Pollution adn Plant Growth Name: Virdina Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What are the effcts off water polltuion on plant growth? Are there any good websites where I can find current or on going research being done by other scientist? Replies: Dear Virdina, Possibly helpful: http://www.ec.gc.ca/water/en/manage/poll/e_poll.htm http://www.epa.vic.gov.au/wq/info/wq987.htm Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach This is a very complicated question, there are so many different types of water pollution and different species of plants react very differently. Good places to start are the U.S. environmental protection agency, the office of water is at: http://www.epa.gov/ow/ and there is a link to a kid's page from there: http://www.epa.gov/OST/KidsStuff/ You might also try state EPA's, Illinois is at:

384

Water Treatment Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to see the operation than have us explain it. Basically, most treatment plants remove the solid material and use living organisms and chlorine to clean up the water. Steve Sample...

385

Fuel rod reprocessing plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A plant for the reprocessing of fuel rods for a nuclear reactor comprises a plurality of rectangular compartments desirably arranged on a rectangular grid. Signal lines, power lines, pipes, conduits for instrumentation, and other communication lines leave a compartment just below its top edges. A vehicle access zone permits overhead and/or mobile cranes to remove covers from compartments. The number of compartments is at least 25% greater than the number of compartments used in the initial design and operation of the plant. Vacant compartments are available in which replacement apparatus can be constructed. At the time of the replacement of a unit, the piping and conduits are altered to utilize the substitute equipment in the formerly vacant compartment, and it is put on stream prior to dismantling old equipment from the previous compartment. Thus the downtime for the reprocessing plant for such a changeover is less than in a traditional reprocessing plant.

Szulinski, M.J.

1981-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

386

Power Plant Closure Guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organizations that are planning to decommission an aged power plant face a host of issues that must be addressed and many tasks that must be properly executed in order to ensure a successful closure of the facility.

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

387

B Plant facility description  

SciTech Connect

Buildings 225B, 272B, 282B, 282BA, and 294B were removed from the B Plant facility description. Minor corrections were made for tank sizes and hazardous and toxic inventories.

Chalk, S.E.

1996-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

388

Plant Pathogen Resistance  

Crop plants are infected by numerous fungal and bacterial pathogens that reduce crop quality and yield. Common methods for addessing this problem include time consuming processes such as genetic engeneering, and possibly enviromentally risky ...

389

U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Summit with American Indian and Alaska Native Leaders  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tribal Summit with Tribal Summit with American Indian and Alaska Native Leaders Winning Our Energy Future Crystal Gateway Marriott * 1700 Jefferson Davis Highway* Arlington, Virginia May 4-5, 2011 May 4, 2011 Pre-Summit Programmatic Roundtables with Tribal Elected Leadership (Closed to Press) 8:30 - 9:30 Registration and Continental Breakfast (Outside the Grand Ballroom) 9:30 - 10:00 Invocation, Welcome, and Remarks from DOE Salons V & VI * Arun Majumdar, ARPA-E Director and Senior Advisor to the Secretary Neile Miller, Principal Deputy Administrator, National Nuclear Security Administration Tracey LeBeau, Director, Office of Indian Energy 10:00 - 12:00 Concurrent Roundtable Discussions with Tribal Elected Leadership and DOE

390

Diversity in Free Energy Landscape of Proteins with the Same Native Topology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to elucidate the role of the native state topology and the stability of subdomains in protein folding, we investigate free energy landscape of human lysozyme, which is composed of two subdomains, by Monte Carlo simulations. A realistic lattice model with Go-like interaction is used. We take the relative interaction strength (stability, in other word) of two subdomains as a variable parameter and study the folding process. A variety of folding process is observed and we obtained a phase diagram of folding in terms of temperature and the relative stability. Experimentally-observed diversity in folding process of c-type lysozimes is thus understood as a consequence of the difference in the relative stability of subdomains.

Hiroo Kenzaki; Macoto Kikuchi

2005-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

391

Conceptual geologic model and native state model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual geologic model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system was developed by a review of the available literature. The hydrothermal system consists of a meteoric recharge area in the Mineral Mountains, fluid circulation paths to depth, a heat source, and an outflow plume. A conceptual model based on the available data can be simulated in the native state using parameters that fall within observed ranges. The model temperatures, recharge rates, and fluid travel times are sensitive to the permeability in the Mineral Mountains. The simulation results suggests the presence of a magma chamber at depth as the likely heat source. A two-dimensional study of the hydrothermal system can be used to establish boundary conditions for further study of the geothermal reservoir.

Faulder, D.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Conceptual geologic model and native state model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual geologic model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system was developed by a review of the available literature. The hydrothermal system consists of a meteoric recharge area in the Mineral Mountains, fluid circulation paths to depth, a heat source, and an outflow plume. A conceptual model based on the available data can be simulated in the native state using parameters that fall within observed ranges. The model temperatures, recharge rates, and fluid travel times are sensitive to the permeability in the Mineral Mountains. The simulation results suggests the presence of a magma chamber at depth as the likely heat source. A two-dimensional study of the hydrothermal system can be used to establish boundary conditions for further study of the geothermal reservoir. 33 refs., 9 figs.

Faulder, D.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Renewable Energy Feasibility Study Leading to Development of the Native Spirit Solar Energy Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE-funded renewable energy feasibility study conducted by Red Mountain Tribal Energy on behalf of the Southwest Tribal Energy Consortium (SWTEC). During the course of the study, SWTEC members considered multiple options for the organization structure, selected a proposed organization structure, and drafted a Memorandum of Understanding for the SWTEC organization. High-level resource assessments for SWTEC members were completed; surveys were developed and completed to determine each member’s interest in multiple participation options, including on-reservation projects. With the survey inputs in mind, multiple energy project options were identified and evaluated on a high-level basis. That process led to a narrowing of the field of technology options to solar generation, specifically, utility-scale Concentrating Solar-Powered Generation projects, with a specific, tentative project location identified at the Fort Mojave Indian Reservation -- the Native Spirit Solar Energy Facility.

Carolyn Stewart; Tracey LeBeau

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Final Project Report, Bristol Bay Native Corporation Wind and Hydroelectric Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC) grant project focused on conducting nine wind resource studies in eight communities in the Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska and was administered as a collaborative effort between BBNC, the Alaska Energy Authority, Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Nushagak Electric Cooperative (NEC), Naknek Electric Association (NEA), and several individual village utilities in the region. BBNC’s technical contact and the project manager for this study was Douglas Vaught, P.E., of V3 Energy, LLC, in Eagle River, Alaska. The Bristol Bay region of Alaska is comprised of 29 communities ranging in size from the hub community of Dillingham with a population of approximately 3,000 people, to a few Native Alaska villages that have a few tens of residents. Communities chosen for inclusion in this project were Dillingham, Naknek, Togiak, New Stuyahok, Kokhanok, Perryville, Clark’s Point, and Koliganek. Selection criteria for conduction of wind resource assessments in these communities included population and commercial activity, utility interest, predicted Class 3 or better wind resource, absence of other sources of renewable energy, and geographical coverage of the region. Beginning with the first meteorological tower installation in October 2003, wind resource studies were completed at all sites with at least one year, and as much as two and a half years, of data. In general, the study results are very promising for wind power development in the region with Class 6 winds measured in Kokhanok; Class 4 winds in New Stuyahok, Clark’s Point, and Koliganek; Class 3 winds in Dillingham, Naknek, and Togiak; and Class 2 winds in Perryville. Measured annual average wind speeds and wind power densities at the 30 meter level varied from a high of 7.87 meters per second and 702 watts per square meter in Kokhanok (Class 6 winds), to a low of 4.60 meters per second and 185 watts per square meter in Perryville (Class 2 winds).

Vaught, Douglas J.

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

How do plants grow?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How do plants grow? How do plants grow? Name: Sally McCombs Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: A 4th grade class at our school is doing plant research and would like to know if plants grow from the top up or from the bottom up? Thanks for your help! Replies: Plants grow from the top up (or from the bottom down, in the case of root growth). Right at the tip, more cells form by division, and just behind that is an area where cells get bigger). More amazing than all of this is where your question comes from. I went to 4th grade there!!! Amazing, Just after the school was built, I think, maybe around 1959 to about early 1960's. Then I moved on to St. Pete High School, then my parents got jobs in Alabama, where I did the last year of High School. Then onto college in New England, graduate school in California, a research job in England, and now finally as a professor at the University of Washington in Seattle. Brings back memories...

396

Plant critical concept  

SciTech Connect

The achievement of operation and maintenance (O&M) cost reductions is a prime concern for plant operators. Initiatives by the nuclear industry to address this concern are under way and/or in development. These efforts include plant reliability studies, reliability-centered maintenance, risk ranking and testing philosophies, performance-based testing philosophies, graded quality assurance, and so forth. This paper presents the results of an effort to develop a methodology that integrates and applies the common data and analysis requirements for a number of risk-based and performance-based initiatives. This initial phase of the effort applied the methodology and its results to two initiatives. These were the procurement function and the preventive maintenance function. This effort integrated multiple programs and functions to identify those components that are truly critical from an integrated plant performance perspective. The paper describes the scope of the effort, the development of a methodology to identify plant critical components, and the application of these results to the maintenance rule compliance, preventive maintenance, and procurement functions at the candidate plant.

O`Regan, P.J. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Maintaining plant safety margins  

SciTech Connect

The Final Safety Analysis Report Forms the basis of demonstrating that the plant can operate safely and meet all applicable acceptance criteria. In order to assure that this continues through each operating cycle, the safety analysis is reexamined for each reload core. Operating limits are set for each reload core to assure that safety limits and applicable acceptance criteria are not exceeded for postulated events within the design basis. These operating limits form the basis for plant operation, providing barriers on various measurable parameters. The barriers are refereed to as limiting conditions for operation (LCO). The operating limits, being influenced by many factors, can change significantly from cycle to cycle. In order to be successful in demonstrating safe operation for each reload core (with adequate operating margin), it is necessary to continue to focus on ways to maintain/improve existing safety margins. Existing safety margins are a function of the plant type (boiling water reactor/pressurized water reactor (BWR/PWR)), nuclear system supply (NSSS) vendor, operating license date, core design features, plant design features, licensing history, and analytical methods used in the safety analysis. This paper summarizes the experience at Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) in its efforts to provide adequate operating margin for the plants that it supports.

Bergeron, P.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

NISTIR 6005 Plant Spatial Configuration Application Protocol ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Part 12, Description method: The EXPRESS-I language reference manual; ... Decommission Plant ... Plant operating procedures; ...

1998-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

399

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Cycling Costs Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-55433 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Subcontract No. NFT-1-11325-01

400

Plant Tumor Growth Rates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Tumor Growth Rates Plant Tumor Growth Rates Name: Gina and Maria Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We are doing a science fair project on if B. Carotene, Green tea, and Grape Seed Extract helps plants against the crown gall disease. We injected sunflowers with agrobacterium tum. one week ago (Sun. Feb. 27, 2000). Our questions is how long will it take for the tumors to grow? We scratched the surface of the stems and injected the agrobacterium in the wound. Also which do you think, in your opinion, will do the best, if any? Our science fair is April 13, do you think we'll have growth before then, atleast enough time to do our conclusion and results? Thank you, any information you forward will be very helpful. Replies: Sunflowers form galls relatively quickly. I usually get them in two weeks at least. Good luck.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Plant and Animal Immigrants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Animal Immigrants and Animal Immigrants Nature Bulletin No. 43 December 1, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation PLANT AND ANIMAL IMMIGRANTS When foreign plants and animals are brought to a new country they either become naturalized and thrive, or they cling to their old ways and die out. after they, too, find new freedoms because they leave their enemies, competitors, parasites, and some of their diseases behind them -- much as immigrant people do. The United States now supports about 300 times as many people as it did when Columbus discovered America. This is possible because the domesticated plants and animals that the early settlers brought with them give much higher yields of food and clothing than the Indians got from wild ones.

402

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, was the largest of three defense production sites in the U.S. Over the span of 40 years, it was used to produce 64 metric tons of plutonium, helping end World War II and playing a major role in military defense efforts during the Cold War. As a result, 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical wastes are now stored in 177 underground tanks on the Hanford Site. To address this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the "Vit Plant," will use vitrification to immobilize most of Hanford's dangerous tank waste.

403

Plants making oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plants making oxygen Plants making oxygen Name: Doug Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: How many plants are needed to make enough oxygen for one person for one hour? We are experimenting with Anacharis plants. Replies: The problem can be solved when broken down into smaller questions: 1. How much oxygen does a person need in an hour? 2. How much oxygen does a plant produce in an hour? 3. Based on the above, how many plants will provide the oxygen needs of the person for the hour? Here is the solution to the first question: A resting, healthy adult on an average, cool day breathes in about 53 liters of oxygen per hour. An average, resting, health adult breathes in about 500 mL of air per breath. This is called the normal tidal volume. Now, 150 mL of this air will go to non- functioning areas of the lung, called the "dead space." The average breath rate for this average person is 12 breaths per minute. So, the amount of air breathed in by the person which is available for use is 12 x (500 mL -150 mL) = 4,200 mL/minute. Multiply by 60 to get 252,000 mL/hour. That is, every hour, the person will breathe in 252 L of air. Now, on an average, cool, clear day, only 21% of that air is oxygen. So, 21% of 252 L is 53 L. So, in an hour, the person breathes in about 53 L of oxygen.

404

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant AFFIDAVIT FOR SURVIVING RELATIVE STATE _______________ ) ) ss: __________________ COUNTY OF _____________ ) That I, ________________________, am the _________________________ (Indicate relationship) of ___________________________, who is deceased and make the attached request pursuant to 10 CFR, Section 1008. That the information contained on the attached request is true and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief, and I am signing this authorization subject to the penalties provided in 18 U.S.C. 1001. ____________________________ SIGNATURE NOTARIZATION: SUBSCRIBED and SWORN to before me this ______day of __________, 20_____

405

Long-term biobarriers to plant and animal intrusions of uranium tailings. [24% trifluralin, 18% carbon black, and 58% polymer  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of physical and chemical barriers designed to prevent plant and animal breachment of uranium mill tailings containment systems for an extended period of time. A polymeric carrier/biocide delivery system was developed and tested in the laboratory, greenhouse and field. A continuous flow technique was established to determine the release rates of the biocides from the PCD systems; polymeric carrier specifications were established. Studies were conducted to determine effective biocide concentrations required to produce a phytotoxic response and the relative rates of phytotoxin degradation resulting from chemical and biological breakdown in soils. The final PCD system developed was a pelletized system containing 24% trifluralin, 18% carbon black and 58% polymer. Pellets were placed in the soil at the Grand Junction U-tailings site at one in. and two in. intervals. Data obtained in the field determined that the pellets released enough herbicide to the soil layer to stop root elongation past the barrier. Physical barriers to subsurface movement of burrowing animals were investigated. Small crushed stone (1 to 1 1/2 in. diameter) placed over asphalt emulsion and multilayer soil seals proved effective as barriers to a small mammal (ground squirrels) but were not of sufficient size to stop a larger animal (the prairie dog). No penetrations were made through the asphalt emulsion or the clay layer of the multilayer soil seals by either of the two mammals tested. A literature survey was prepared and published on the burrowing habits of the animals that may be found at U-tailings sites.

Cline, J.F.; Burton, F.G.; Cataldo, D.A.; Skiens, W.E.; Gano, K.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Snakes and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Snakes and Plants Snakes and Plants Name: kathy Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We live in the southern most tip of Illinois,on horseshoe lake. I would like to know what time of the year do snakes come out and when do they go back in? Also is there any plants to plant to keep them away? Replies: What kind of snakes, in what kind of habitat? All snakes in Illinois hibernate in winter, but their habits differ by species. I'm not sure of the range of dates for southern Illinois, but they start to come out of hibernation in northern Illinois around the end of March or in April, depending on the weather. Advance of spring is usually about 3 weeks earlier in southern Illinois than northern, so i guess snake emergence would be about that much advanced as well. They will come out when there are warm sunny days to get them warmed up, and nights are not so cold that they will be harmed. Fall entry into hibernation is roughly parallel, snakes will often bask in the sun on sunny fall days before going into hibernation, again in no. Ill usually in October but widely varying.

407

Pinellas Plant facts  

SciTech Connect

The Pinellas Plant, near St. Petersburg, Florida, is wholly owned by the United States Government. It is operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by GE Aerospace, Neutron Devices (GEND). This plant was built in 1956 to manufacture neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. The neutron generators built at Neutron Devices consist of a miniaturized linear ion accelerator assembled with the pulsed electrical power supplies required for its operation. Production of these devices has necessitated the development of several uniquely specialized areas of competence and supporting facilities. The ion accelerator, or neutron tube, requires ultra clean, high vacuum technology; hermetic seals between glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic, and metal materials; plus high voltage generation and measurement technology. The existence of these capabilities at Neutron Devices has led directly to the assignment of other weapon application products: the lightning arrester connector, specialty capacitor, vacuum switch, and crystal resonator. Other product assignments such as active and reserve batteries and the radioisotopically-powered thermoelectric generator evolved from the plant`s materials measurement and controls technologies which are required to ensure neutron generator life.

NONE

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Troubleshooting power plant controls  

SciTech Connect

Using an example from an 80 MW cogeneration plant working at near capacity on a hot day, the paper illustrates the steps involved in troubleshooting a maintenance problem. It discusses identification of the problem, the planning involved in the identification of the problem, development of proof of an hypothesis, human factors, implementing effective solutions, and determination of the root cause.

Alley, S.D. [ANNA, Inc., Annapolis, MD (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

A brief general description is given of a geothermal resource. Geothermal exploration in the Takinoue area is reviewed. Geothermal drilling procedures are described. The history of the development at the Takinoue area (the Kakkonda Geothermal Power Plant), and the geothermal fluid characteristics are discussed. The technical specifications of the Kakkonda facility are shown. Photographs and drawings of the facility are included. (MHR)

DiPippo, R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics: Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate SE- 10658 Stockholm, Sweden. NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 131 AUG. 2000 239 by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, contract 14.5-980942-98242. REFERENCES 1. A. M. WEINBERG and H. C

Pázsit, Imre

411

Mechanisms in Plant Development  

SciTech Connect

This meeting has been held every other year for the past twenty-two years and is the only regularly held meeting focused specifically on plant development. Topics covered included: patterning in developing tissues; short and long distance signaling; differentiation of cell types; the role of epigenetics in development; evolution; growth.

Hake, Sarah [USDA ARS Plant Gene Expression Center

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

412

Plantings that save energy  

SciTech Connect

In this 12th of a series on urban forestry, homeowners and community planners are offered practical guidance in selection of landscape plantings which will significantly reduce wind velocity and heat loss from homes in winter and reduce energy costs for air conditioning in summer.

Heisler, G.M.; DeWalle, D.R.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Evaluating the Potential of Native Ureolytic Microbes To Remediate a 90Sr Contaminated Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was a preliminary evaluation of ureolytically driven calcite precipitation and strontium coprecipitation for remediating 90Sr contamination at the Hanford 100-N Area in Washington; in particular the approach is suitable for treating sorbed 90Sr that could otherwise be a long-term source for groundwater contamination. Geochemical conditions at the site are compatible with long-term calcite stability, and therefore groundwater and sediment samples were examined to assess the ureolytic capabilities of the native microbiota. Quantitative assays detected up to 2 × 104 putative ureC gene copies mL-1 in water and up to 9 × 105 copies g-1 in sediment. The ureC assays and laboratory-based estimates of ureolytic activity indicated that the distribution of in situ ureolytic potential was very heterogeneous with depth and also that the ureolytic activity was predominantly associated with attached organisms. A mixed kinetic-equilibrium model was developed for the 100-N site to simulate urea treatment and predict strontium removal. Together, the microbial characterization data and modeling suggest that the site has the requisite biogeochemical characteristics for application of the calcite precipitation remediation approach for 90Sr.

Yoshiko Fujita; Joanna L. Taylor; Lynn M. Wendt; David W. Reed; Robert W. Smith

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Structural Fluctuation of Protein in Water around Its Native State: A New Statistical Mechanics Formulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new statistical mechanics formulation of characterizing the structural fluctuation of protein correlated with that of water is presented based on the generalized Langevin equation and the 3D-RISM/RISM theory of molecular liquids. The displacement vector of atom positions and their conjugated momentum, are chosen for the dynamic variables for protein, while the density fields of atoms and their momentum fields are chosen for water. Projection of other degrees of freedom onto those dynamic variables using the standard projection operator method produces essentially two equations which describe the time evolution of fluctuation concerning the density field of solvent and the conformation of protein around an equilibrium state, which are coupled with each other. The equation concerning the protein dynamics is formally akin to that of the coupled Langevin oscillators, and is a generalization of the latter, to atomic level. The most intriguing feature of the new equation is that it contains the variance-covariance matrix as the "Hessian" term describing the "force" restoring an equilibrium conformation, which is the second moment of the fluctuation of atom positions. The "Hessian" matrix is naturally identified as the second derivative of the free energy surface around the equilibrium. A method to evaluate the Hessian matrix based on the 3D-RISM/RISM theory is proposed. Proposed also is an application of the present formulation to the molecular recognition, in which the conformational fluctuation of protein around its native state becomes an important factor as exemplified by so called "induced fitting".

Bongsoo Kim; Fumio Hirata

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

415

Final Report of Native Village of Venetie Tribal Government Solar Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The villages of Venetie and Arctic, located above the Arctic Circle in northeast Alaska along the Chandalar River and just southeast of the Brooks Range, will study the feasibility of powering the villages using renewable solar energy during the season of the midnight sun. The solar electric (photovoltaic) system will replace diesel generator power for most of the summertime, yielding great economic, environmental, and social benefits. The Native Village of Venetie Tribal Government conducted a feasibility study for powering of an entire village during the season of the midnight sun, using renewable solar energy. The goal was for the renewable system to allow the diesel generators to be turned completely off for most of the summertime, yielding great economic, environmental, and social benefits. The system would operate year round. While there would be no solar energy input during the long night of December and January, during the months that the sun does not shine, the system's energy storage component would continue to provide benefits by saving fuel, due to more steady generator operation and by providing back-up power during generator outages.

Lance Whitwell

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The Dissolution of Native Oxide Films on Titanium for Pyrotechnic Applications  

SciTech Connect

The dissolution of native oxides on Ti were studied over the temperature range 25 degrees - 730 degrees C to determine their role in the pyrotechnic reaction of Ti with KCl0{sub}4. From AES data it was found that the solubility of the oxide in Ti increased sharply at 350 degrees C. High resolution AES scans of the Ti LMM transitions as well as XPS scans of the Ti 2 p level showed that free Ti is present at the surface above 350 degrees C. The O 1s XPS data shows that the surface contains hydroxyl as well as oxide groups. The hydroxide to oxide ratio begins to decrease below 250 degrees C, and at 450 degrees C the remaining oxygen is bound predominatly as oxide. Additionally, the XPS data shows that the dissoluton process proceeds through the formation of titanium suboxides. These AES and XPS results complement physical property measurements which have also been made on the Ti/KCl0{sub}4 mixture. These physical property measurements show that 1) below 300 degrees C no reaction occurs and 2) just above 300 degrees C an exothermic reaction occurs corresponding to the reaction of free Ti with atmospheric oxygen.

Wittberg, T. N.; Moddeman, W. E.; Collins, L. W.; Wang, P. S.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Fertilization with nitrogen and phosphorus increases abundance of non-native species in Hawaiian montane forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the understory plant commu- nity of two montane wet forests in Hawaii. One site occupies a young substrate, where montane forests Rebecca Ostertag1,3,* and Julia H. Verville2,4 1 Department of Botany, University address: Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA; *Author

Ostertag, Rebecca

418

The Iowa Stored Energy Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Robert Haug Executive Director Iowa Association of Municipal Utilities for Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency THE IOWA STORED ENERGY PLANT What is ISEP? ISEP is a DOE-supported effort...

419

Pantex Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pantex Plant Pantex Plant Pantex Plant Pantex Plant | September 2010 Aerial View Pantex Plant | September 2010 Aerial View The primary mission of the Pantex Plant is the assembly, disassembly, testing, and evaluation of nuclear weapons in support of the NNSA stockpile stewardship program. Pantex also performs research and development in conventional high explosives and serves as an interim storage site for plutonium pits removed from dismantled weapons. Enforcement January 7, 2013 Enforcement Letter, NEL-2013-01 Issued to B&W Pantex, LLC related to the Conduct of Nuclear Explosive Operations at the Pantex Plant November 21, 2006 Preliminary Notice of Violation, BWXT Pantex, LLC - EA-2006-04 Issued to BWXT Pantex, LLC, related to Quality Assurance and Safety Basis Requirements Violations at the Pantex Plant

420

Production of virus resistant plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection.

Dougherty, William G. (Philomath, OR); Lindbo, John A. (Kent, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1, Unit 2","1,705","13,994",100.0,"Calvert Cliffs Nuclear PP Inc" "1 Plant 2...

422

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

423

Production of virus resistant plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection. 9 figs.

Dougherty, W.G.; Lindbo, J.A.

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

424

Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Oceanographic Operations 1 2 8 5 3 4 7 6 AMC Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby

Thomas, Andrew

425

Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Chadbourne Merrill Aubert Hannibal Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby Machine Tool Lab Children's Center Rogers N

Thomas, Andrew

426

Executive Order 13592: Improving American Indian and Alaska Native Educational Opportunities and Strengthening Tribal Colleges and Universities (2011)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

76603 Federal Register 76603 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 236 / Thursday, December 8, 2011 / Presidential Documents Executive Order 13592 of December 2, 2011 Improving American Indian and Alaska Native Educational Opportunities and Strengthening Tribal Colleges and Univer- sities By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, I hereby order as follows: Section 1. Policy. The United States has a unique political and legal relation- ship with the federally recognized American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/ AN) tribes across the country, as set forth in the Constitution of the United States, treaties, Executive Orders, and court decisions. For centuries, the Federal Government's relationship with these tribes has been guided by

427

NETL: Power Plant Improvement Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Performance Summaries Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) Project Performance Summaries Project Performance Summaries are written after project completion. These...

428

US prep plant census 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year Coal Age conducts a fairly comprehensive survey of the industry to produce the US coal preparation plant survey. This year's survey shows how many mergers and acquisitions have given coal operators more coal washing capacity. The plants are tabulated by state, giving basic details including company owner, plant name, raw feed, product ash %, quality, type of plant builder and year built. 1 tab., 1 photo.

Fiscor, S.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Importance of Processing Plant Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... new survey instrument to collect information from natural gas processing plants during non-emergency and supply-emergency conditions. ...

430

T Plant Cell Investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Management Project within Fluor Hanford performed an initial investigation of the current and historical contents of 221-T (T Plant Canyon) process cells. This Phase I report is intended to be followed by a final, more detailed, Phase II report. This information has been gathered in order to help reduce uncertainties and future surprises regarding cell contents during future work in and around T Plant process cells. The information was obtained from available documentation and was compiled into a database that is included in the report. Resolution of any apparently conflicting information was not a part of the Phase I effort. No information has been found to date that would indicate there could be a significant unexpected hazard in any of the process cells.

HLADEK, K.L.

2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

431

Jennings Demonstration PLant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

Russ Heissner

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

Pantex Plant | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Locations > Pantex Plant Pantex Plant http:www.pantex.com Field Office: The NNSA Production Office is responsible for contract management and oversight of the Pantex Plant in...

433

The Kansas City Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Kansas City Plant The Kansas City Plant The Kansas City Plant More Documents & Publications OPSAID Initial Design and TestingReport SECURITY CORE FUNCTION AND DEFINITION REPORT...

434

IMPROVEMENTS IN POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A power plant for nuclear reactors is designed for improved cycle efficiency. In addition to the usual heat exchanger for heat transfer from gaseous reactor coolant to water for vaporization, a second heat exchanger is provided between the first heat exchanger and a point betwveen the intermediate- pressure and low-pressure turbine stages. In this way, interstage reheating of the steam is obtained without passage of the steam back to the first heat exchanger. (D.L.C.) Research Reactors

Peters, M.C.

1961-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

435

Nuclear Plant Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 1990s several nuclear utilities proceeded with full decommissioning of their nuclear power plants based on perceived economics. This major shift to immediate decommissioning presented a significant challenge to the industry in terms of the development of a decommissioning process and a comprehensive updated regulatory framework. EPRI responded by undertaking the formation of the Decommissioning Support Program. The initial work involved conducting a series of topical workshops directed to specific...

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

436

NEUTRONIC REACTOR POWER PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a nuclear reactor power plant incorporating an air-cooled, beryllium oxide-moderated, pebble bed reactor. According to the invention means are provided for circulating a flow of air through tubes in the reactor to a turbine and for directing a sidestream of the circu1ating air through the pebble bed to remove fission products therefrom as well as assist in cooling the reactor. (AEC)

Metcalf, H.E.

1962-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

437

Delayed Planting Considerations for Corn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quite a bit of Indiana’s corn crop remains to be planted, especially in southern Indiana, due to the current rainy spell that put the brakes on what had been a very rapid planting pace. As of 11 May, 42 % of Indiana’s intended corn acreage was yet to be planted (USDA-NASS,

John Obermeyer; Entomology Dept; Tony Vyn; Agronomy Dept

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Mercury Emission Measurement at a CFB Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In response to pending regulation to control mercury emissions in the United States and Canada, several projects have been conducted to perform accurate mass balances at pulverized coal (pc)-fired utilities. Part of the mercury mass balance always includes total gaseous mercury as well as a determination of the speciation of the mercury emissions and a concentration bound to the particulate matter. This information then becomes useful in applying mercury control strategies, since the elemental mercury has traditionally been difficult to control by most technologies. In this instance, oxidation technologies have proven most beneficial for increased capture. Despite many years of mercury measurement and control projects at pc-fired units, far less work has been done on circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) units, which are able to combust a variety of feedstocks, including cofiring coal with biomass. Indeed, these units have proven to be more problematic because it is very difficult to obtain a reliable mercury mass balance. These units tend to have very different temperature profiles than pc-fired utility boilers. The flexibility of CFB units also tends to be an issue when a mercury balance is determined, since the mercury inputs to the system come from the bed material and a variety of fuels, which can have quite variable chemistry, especially for mercury. In addition, as an integral part of the CFB operation, the system employs a feedback loop to circulate the bed material through the combustor and the solids collection system (the primary cyclone), thereby subjecting particulate-bound metals to higher temperatures again. Despite these issues, CFB boilers generally emit very little mercury and show good native capture. The Energy & Environmental Research Center is carrying out this project for Metso Power in order to characterize the fate of mercury across the unit at Rosebud Plant, an industrial user of CFB technology from Metso. Appropriate solids were collected, and flue gas samples were obtained using the Ontario Hydro method, mercury continuous emission monitors, and sorbent trap methods. In addition, chlorine and fluorine were determined for solids and in the flue gas stream. Results of this project have indicated a very good mercury mass balance for Rosebud Plant, indicating 105 {+-} 19%, which is well within acceptable limits. The mercury flow through the system was shown to be primarily in with the coal and out with the flue gas, which falls outside of the norm for CFB boilers.

John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Lucinda Hamre

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

439

Poinsettia -- The Christmas Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poinsettia -- The Christmas Plant Poinsettia -- The Christmas Plant Nature Bulletin No. 699 December 22, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor POINSETTIA -- THE CHRISTMAS PLANT Christmas is a day of family gatherings. In each home they have their own traditional customs. Some of us cherish those that are peculiar to the region where we were children, or the land from whence our forefathers came. Most of us have also adopted customs -- such as decorating with holly and mistletoe -- that stem from ancient pagan ceremonies or festivals but have lost their original significance. There are many myths and legends about the origin of our Yuletide customs. (See Bulletins No. 135, 173, 211, 326 and 475). In this country most families have a Christmas tree, a custom that was introduced from Germany by Hessian troops in the British army during the Revolutionary War. It prevails in Britain and most of northern Europe but is unusual in Italy, Spain and Latin America. There, the symbol of Christmas and heart of the celebration in a home is not an Evergreen tree but a miniature reproduction of the stable and manger where Christ was born.

440

Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Saguargo Solar Power Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status In Service Developer Solargenix Location Red Rock, Arizona Coordinates 32.54795°, -111.292887° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.54795,"lon":-111.292887,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Deming Solar Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer New Solar Ventures/ Solar Torx 50/50 Location New Mexico Coordinates 34.9727305°, -105.0323635° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9727305,"lon":-105.0323635,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

442

Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Prescott Airport Solar Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer APS Location Prescott, Arizona Coordinates 34.5400242°, -112.4685025° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.5400242,"lon":-112.4685025,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

443

Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Solar Power Plant Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Solana Generating Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status Under Construction Developer Abengoa Solar Location Gila Bend, Arizona Coordinates 32.916163°, -112.968727° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.916163,"lon":-112.968727,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

444

Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in the Mojave Desert Photo of the Week: Mapping the Link between Invasive Plants and Wildfire in the Mojave Desert August 21, 2013 - 4:03pm Addthis Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are using predictive tools to understand ecological changes driven by frequent fires due to invasive plant species in California’s Mojave Desert. In collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey, scientists are integrating recent advances in fire science and remote sensing tools to characterize the relationship between non-native invasive plant species and wildfire in the desert under current and changing climate conditions. The satellite image shown here is of the Mojave Desert transformed to principal components highlighting geologic formations, land use and vegetation cover. | Image courtesy of PNNL scientist Jerry Tagestad and the U.S. Global Land Cover Facility in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

445

Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation in Plants: Mechanisms and Enhancement of Phytoremediation of Groundwater Contamination  

SciTech Connect

The research objectives for this report are: (1) Transform poplar and other tree species to extend and optimize chlorinated hydrocarbon (CHC) oxidative activities. (2) Determine the mechanisms of CHC oxidation in plants. (3) Isolate the genes responsible for CHC oxidation in plants. We have made significant progress toward an understanding of the biochemical mechanism of CHC transformation native to wild-type poplar. We have identified chloral, trichloroethanol, trichloroacetic acid, and dichloroacetic acid as products of TCE metabolism in poplar plants and in tissue cultures of poplar cells.(Newman et al. 1997; Newman et al. 1999) Use of radioactively labeled TCE showed that once taken up and transformed, most of the TCE was incorporated into plant tissue as a non-volatile, unextractable residue.(Shang et al. 2001; Shang and Gordon 2002) An assay for this transformation was developed and validated using TCE transformation by poplar suspension cells. Using this assay, it was shown that two different activities contribute to the fixation of TCE by poplar cells: one associated with cell walls and insoluble residues, the other associated with a high molecular weight, heat labile fraction of the cell extract, a fixation that was apparently catalyzed by plant enzymes.

Stuart Strand

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

446

Carpathian Journal of Earth and Environmental Sciences, September 2011, Vol. 6, No. 2, p. 85 -100 ACCUMULATION OF HEAVY METALS IN NATIVE PLANTS GROWING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) phosphogypsum stored in the form of "Tabia". These releases are trace elements-rich such as 85 emse-00611766 phosphogypsum releases are stored near the site. Mud samples were taken from Kef Eddour, Métlaoui, Sehib and M. In addition phosphogypsum was taken from TCG Tabia. Four reference samples providing from non polluted area

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

447

B plant mission analysis report  

SciTech Connect

This report further develops the mission for B Plant originally defined in WHC-EP-0722, ``System Engineering Functions and Requirements for the Hanford Cleanup Mission: First Issue.`` The B Plant mission analysis will be the basis for a functional analysis that breaks down the B Plant mission statement into the necessary activities to accomplish the mission. These activities are the product of the functional analysis and will then be used in subsequent steps of the systems engineering process, such as identifying requirements and allocating those requirements to B Plant functions. The information in this mission analysis and the functional and requirements analysis are a part of the B Plant technical baseline.

Lund, D.P.

1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

448

Investigation of the kinetics of protein folding and the ensemble of conformations in non-native states of proteins by liquid NMR spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a complete description of protein folding dynamics and the structure of the folded state, of unfolded and of non-native states of proteins and the kinetics of protein folding from the unfolded state to the folded state ...

Wirmer, Julia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Genetic and Phenotypic Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the Interior Columbia River Basin; Populations of the Upper Yakima Basin, 1997-1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique.

Trotter, Patrick C. (Fishery Science Consultant, Seattle, WA); McMillan, Bill; Gayeski, Nick (Washington Trout, Duvall, WA)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Reduction of native oxides on InAs by atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

Thin high-{kappa} oxide films on InAs, formed by atomic layer deposition, are the key to achieve high-speed metal-oxide-semiconductor devices. We have studied the native oxide and the interface between InAs and 2 nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or HfO{sub 2} layers using synchrotron x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Both films lead to a strong oxide reduction, obtaining less than 10% of the native As-oxides and between 10% and 50% of the native In-oxides, depending on the deposition temperature. The ratio of native In- to As-oxides is determined to be 2:1. The exact composition and the influence of different oxidation states and suboxides is discussed in detail.

Timm, R.; Fian, A.; Hjort, M.; Thelander, C.; Lind, E.; Andersen, J. N.; Wernersson, L.-E.; Mikkelsen, A. [Department of Physics, Nanometer Structure Consortium, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, 22 100 Lund (Sweden)

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

451

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 2 Nutrition and Cardiovascular Disease in American Indians and Alaska Natives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 2 Nutrition and Cardiovascular Disease in American Indians and Alaska Natives Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

452

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Review Report 2013 Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Work Planning and Control Activities, April 2013 Review Report 2012 Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, November 2012 Activity Reports 2011 Orientation Visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, September 2011 Review Reports 2007 Independent Oversight Inspection of Emergency Management at the Carlsbad Field Office and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 2007 Review Reports 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Summary Report, August 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Volume I, August 2002

453

Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pinellas Plant has been part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) nuclear weapons complex since the plant opened in 1957. In March 1995, the DOE sold the Pinellas Plant to the Pinellas County Industry Council (PCIC). DOE has leased back a large portion of the plant site to facilitate transition to alternate use and safe shutdown. The current mission is to achieve a safe transition of the facility from defense production and prepare the site for alternative uses as a community resource for economic development. Toward that effort, the Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report (EBR) discusses the current and past environmental conditions of the plant site. Information for the EBR is obtained from plant records. Historical process and chemical usage information for each area is reviewed during area characterizations.

Not Available

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Plant Pathogen Resistance - Energy Innovation Portal  

Plant Pathogen Resistance Agent for Plant Protection from Common Virulent Pathogens Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Contact ORNL About This Technology

455

Gas turbine plant emissions  

SciTech Connect

Many cogeneration facilities use gas turbines combined with heat recovery boilers, and the number is increasing. At the start of 1986, over 75% of filings for new cogeneration plants included plans to burn natural gas. Depending on the geographic region, gas turbines are still one of the most popular prime movers. Emissions of pollutants from these turbines pose potential risks to the environment, particularly in geographical areas that already have high concentrations of cogeneration facilities. Although environmental regulations have concentrated on nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) in the past, it is now necessary to evaluate emission controls for other pollutants as well.

Davidson, L.N.; Gullett, D.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

A LUNAR POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A concept of a nuclear power plant to be assembled on earth and operated on the moon is presented. The two principal design objectives are reliability and high specific power. Wherever there is an incompatibility between these two objectives, the decision favors reliability. The design is based on the premise that the power plant must be designed on the basis of current technology and with a minimum amount of research and development. The principal components consist of a fast reactor in a direct cycle with a mercury-vapor turbine. The high- frequency generator, hydrogen compressor for the generator cooling system, mercury-recirculating pump, and condensate pump are on an extension of the turbine shaft. Ths mercury vapor is condensed and the hydrogen cooled in wing radiators. The reactor is of a construction quite similar to EBR-I Mark IlI for which there is a large amount of operating experience. The radiator is a vertical tube-and-fin type built in concentric cylindrical sections of increseing diameter. The curved headers are connected by swivel joints so that, upon arrival, the radiator can be quickly unfolded from the compact cylindrical package it formed during transportation. (auth)

Armstrong, R.H.; Carter, J.C.; Hummel, H.H.; Janicke, M.J.; Marchaterre, J.F.

1960-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Nuclear Plant/Hydrogen Plant Safety: Issues and Approaches  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, through its agents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, is working on developing the technologies to enable the large scale production of hydrogen using nuclear power. A very important consideration in the design of a co-located and connected nuclear plant/hydrogen plant facility is safety. This study provides an overview of the safety issues associated with a combined plant and discusses approaches for categorizing, quantifying, and addressing the safety risks.

Steven R. Sherman

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Balance of Plant Corrosion Issues in Aging Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... number of times, can be used to forecast the most probable number of leaks. ... Conditions for Long Term Operation of Nuclear Power Plants in Sweden.

459

The SONATRACH jumbo LPG plant  

SciTech Connect

The authors aim is to give to the 17 TH world gas conference a general idea on SONATRACH LPG PLANT which is located in the ARZEW area. They develop this communication as follows: general presentation of LPG plant: During the communication, the author's will give the assistance all the information concerning the contractions the erection's date and the LPG PLANT process, start-up of the plant: In this chapter, the authors's will describe the start-up condition, the performance test result, the flexibility test result and the total mechanical achievement of the plant; operation by SONATRACH: After the success that obtained during the mechanical achievement and performance test, the contractor handed over the plant to SONATRACH.

Ahmed Khodja, A.; Bennaceur, A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Viral vectors for gene modification of plants as chem/bio sensors.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical or biological sensors that are specific, sensitive, and robust allowing intelligence gathering for verification of nuclear non-proliferation treaty compliance and detouring production of weapons of mass destruction are sorely needed. Although much progress has been made in the area of biosensors, improvements in sensor lifetime, robustness, and device packaging are required before these devices become widely used. Current chemical and biological detection and identification techniques require less-than-covert sample collection followed by transport to a laboratory for analysis. In addition to being expensive and time consuming, results can often be inconclusive due to compromised sample integrity during collection and transport. We report here a demonstration of a plant based sensor technology which utilizes mature and seedling plants as chemical sensors. One can envision genetically modifying native plants at a site of interest that can report the presence of specific toxins or chemicals. In this one year project we used a developed inducible expression system to show the feasibility of plant sensors. The vector was designed as a safe, non-infectious vector which could be used to invade, replicate, and introduce foreign genes into mature host plants that then allow the plant to sense chem/bio agents. The genes introduced through the vector included a reporter gene that encodes for green fluorescent protein (GFP) and a gene that encodes for a mammalian receptor that recognizes a chemical agent. Specifically, GFP was induced by the presence of 17-{beta}-Estradiol (estrogen). Detection of fluorescence indicated the presence of the target chemical agent. Since the sensor is a plant, costly device packaging development or manufacturing of the sensor were not required. Additionally, the biological recognition and reporting elements are maintained in a living, natural environment and therefore do not suffer from lifetime disadvantages typical of most biosensing platforms. Detection of the chem/bio agent reporter (GFP) can be detected only at a specific wavelength.

Manginell, Monica; Harper, Jason C.; Arango, Dulce C.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Dolan, Patricia L.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

How plants grow toward light  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How plants grow toward light How plants grow toward light Name: schwobtj Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: When a seed is planted below the surface of the ground, how does it "know" to grow toward the light? Replies: Plants don't know where the light is, they do respond to gravity. Since light is usually up, a plant seed grows up and finds light enough to keep things going. Psych One way that plants below ground can tell which way is up is with the use of STATOLITHS. Statoliths are dense pieces of material that settle to the bottom of a STATOCYST. In plants, pieces of starch or another material denser than water will settle to the bottom of the cell. Somehow the plant cell determines on what side the statolith has fallen, and then somehow relays a message (probably a chemical) that tells the bottom cells to grow faster than the top cells, therefore causing upward growth. There is still quite a lot of mystery in there to be discovered. I got this explanation from BIOLOGY by Neil Campbell. This is similar to the way in which plants use chemical signals to help them grow towards light.

462

Owners of nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Development of Virtual Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Virtual Power Plants We are working in the emerging intersection between information, computation, and complexity Applications * Design * Environmental modeling * Controls with...

464

Research Addressing Power Plant Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Power Plant Water Management to Minimize Water Use while Providing Reliable Electricity Generation Water and Energy 2 Water and Energy are inextricably linked. Because...

465

MEASUREMENT OF POWER PLANT EXHAUST ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... by tracking propagation of acoustic plane waves in a ... of the robustness of plane wave propagation to ... for GHG monitoring in power plant stacks and ...

466

The northeast Georgia hydroelectric plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Northeast Georgia hydroelectric plants are important cultural resources to the state of Georgia and the communities immediately adjacent. If the early technology of these… (more)

Kelly, Nancy Elizabeth

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

,"California Natural Gas Plant Processing"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Plant Processing",3,"Annual",2011,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1031...

468

Plant energy auditing | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

track, and benchmark Improve energy performance ENERGY STAR industrial partnership Energy guides Energy efficiency and air regulation Plant energy auditing Industrial...

469

ALARA at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Implementation of the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle at nuclear power plants presents a continuing challenge for health physicists at utility corporate and plant levels, for plant designers, and for regulatory agencies. The relatively large collective doses at some plants are being addressed though a variety of dose reduction techniques. It is planned that this report will include material on historical aspects, management, valuation of dose reduction, quantitative and qualitative aspects of optimization, design, operational considerations, and training. The status of this work is summarized in this report. 30 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Baum, J.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Fossil Energy Power Plant Desk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy Power Plant Desk Reference Revision 1: Bituminous Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity October 18, 2011 DOENETL-20111516 Preliminary - Do Not Cite or Quote Fossil...

471

Asbury power plant, Asbury, Missouri  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Asbury power plant in rural southwest Missouri is off the beaten path in more ways than one. Three years ago, Empire District Electric Co., the plant's owner/operator, began mixing pieces of discarded tires into its coal fuel supply. Each ensuing year, without compromising local air quality, the plant has rid the area of millions of tires that otherwise would have ended up in a landfill. For demonstrating that a blight can be made right, Asbury is one of Power's 2005 top plants. 2 figs., 1 tab.

Wicker, K.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Plant construction and community stress  

SciTech Connect

Reports on a study commissioned by EPRI's Energy Analysis and Environment Division to acquire a better understanding of the power plant construction process and the socioeconomic impacts it can bring about. Points out that because of a parallel study the NRC conducted involving nuclear plants, the EPRI study's emphasis was on coal-fired power plants, which represented 9 of the 12 case studies. Finds that the impacts on communities near the case study plants were considerably less than had been forecast. Emphasizes that improper socioeconomic assessment procedures and poor mitigation planning can contribute to costly construction delays and lower construction worker productivity.

Lihach, N.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

,"Texas Natural Gas Plant Processing"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Plant Processing",3,"Annual",2011,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1031...

474

MHD plant turn down considerations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The topic of part load operation of the MHD power plant is assessed. Current and future planned MHD research is reviewed in terms of addressing topping and bottoming cycle integration needs. The response of the MHD generator to turn up and down scenarios is reviewed. The concept of turning the MHD power to met changes in plant load is discussed. The need for new ideas and focused research to study MHD plant integration and problems of plant turn down and up is cited. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Lineberry, J.T.; Chapman, J.N.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Better Plants  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Better Buildings, Better Plants Program Partners are demonstrating their commitment to energy savings by signing a voluntary pledge to reduce energy intensity by 25% over ten...

476

"NATURAL GAS PROCESSING PLANT SURVEY"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 3 "Operator Company:" "PART 3. CONTACTS" "Section A: Contact information during an emergency (such as a hurricane):" "Processing Plant Operations Contact:",,,...

477

Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assurance November 2000 Independent Oversight Evaluation of the Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise OVERSIGHT Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION ......

478

Importance of Processing Plant Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

During an Emergency. 12. Department of Energy Situation Reports During an Energy Emergency. 13. Why Survey Natural Gas Processing Plants? 14.

479

Steam turbine plant  

SciTech Connect

A system for regulating the rate of closing of the turbine intake valve of a steam turbine plant is disclosed. A steam turbine is supplied from a steam generator through a turbine intake valve. A branch line conducts the steam to a bypass valve which is normally closed. In the event of conditions making it necessary to close the turbine intake valve rapidly, a regulator is provided to control the rate of closing of the turbine intake valve and the opening of the bypass valve so that the pressure conditions in the steam generator do not exceed the limits established by the manufacturer. Pressure measuring instruments are placed in the system to sense the pressure immediately upstream from the turbine intake valve and the bypass valve as well as the initial steam supply pressure. These pressure signals are transmitted to a computer which produces a control signal in accordance with predetermined conditions.

Skala, K.

1981-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

480

THE SCIOTO ORDNANCE PLANT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' 1 . \." _ j. .I > * .A; .i ,' / / ,/ ' , ( , ( 1: 1 i I l-1 5 ' / ,,' :A' ' , THE SCIOTO ORDNANCE PLANT . and THE MARION ENGINEER DEPOT of Marion, Ohio A Profile AFTER FORTY YEARS BY Charles D. Mosher and Delpha Ruth Mosher . . . 111 THE AUTHORS Charles D. Mosher was born on a farm located in Morrow County on Mosher Road near Mt. Gilead. He received his TH.B. from Malone College, B.A. from Baldwin-Wallace College and his B.Div. and M.Div. at the Nazarene Theological Seminary in Kansas City, MO. He did additional graduate work at Western Reserve University, Kent State University and Florida State University. He has taught in Cleveland and in Morrow County and has been an Occupational Work Adjustment teacher at Harding High School in Marion

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "native prairie plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed to immobilize pretreated Hanford high-level waste and transuranic waste in borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters. Testing is being conducted in the HWVP Technology Development Project to ensure that adapted technologies are applicable to the candidate Hanford wastes and to generate information for waste form qualification. Empirical modeling is being conducted to define a glass composition range consistent with process and waste form qualification requirements. Laboratory studies are conducted to determine process stream properties, characterize the redox chemistry of the melter feed as a basis for controlling melt foaming and evaluate zeolite sorption materials for process waste treatment. Pilot-scale tests have been performed with simulated melter feed to access filtration for solids removal from process wastes, evaluate vitrification process performance and assess offgas equipment performance. Process equipment construction materials are being selected based on literature review, corrosion testing, and performance in pilot-scale testing. 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Larson, D.E.; Allen, C.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Kruger, O.L.; Weber, E.T. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

ATOMIC POWER PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to neutronic reactor power plants and discloses a design of a reactor utilizing a mixture of discrete units of a fissionable material, such as uranium carbide, a neutron moderator material, such as graphite, to carry out the chain reaction. A liquid metal, such as bismuth, is used as the coolant and is placed in the reactor chamber with the fissionable and moderator material so that it is boiled by the heat of the reaction, the boiling liquid and vapors passing up through the interstices between the discrete units. The vapor and flue gases coming off the top of the chamber are passed through heat exchangers, to produce steam, for example, and thence through condensers, the condensed coolant being returned to the chamber by gravity and the non- condensible gases being carried off through a stack at the top of the structure.

Daniels, F.

1957-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a giv

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Demonstration of the economic feasibility of plant tissue culture for jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) and Euphorbia spp  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic feasibility of plant tissue culture was demonstrated as applied to two plants: jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) and Euphorbia spp. The gopher weed (Euphorbia lathyris) was selected as the species of Euphorbia to research due to the interest in this plant as a potential source of hydrocarbon-like compounds. High yield female selections of jojoba were chosen from native stands and were researched to determine the economic feasibility of mass producing these plants via a tissue culture micropropagation program. The female jojoba selection was successfully mass produced through tissue culture. Modifications in initiation techniques, as well as in multiplication media and rooting parameters, were necessary to apply the tissue culture system, which had been developed for juvenile seedling tissue, to mature jojobas. Since prior attempts at transfer of tissue cultured plantlets were unsuccessful, transfer research was a major part of the project and has resulted in a system for transfer of rooted jojoba plantlets to soil. Euphorbia lathyris was successfully cultured using shoot tip cultures. Media and procedures were established for culture initiation, multiplication of shoots, callus induction and growth, and root initiation. Well-developed root systems were not attained and root initiation percentages should be increased if the system is to become commercially feasible.

Sluis, C.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Power plants with topping gas turbines and coal gasification planning of new plants and upgrading of existing plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on existing and new power plants improved environmentally and economically by integrating gas turbines in the plant process. The rate of additional firing has an influence on the overall plant efficiency. The influence of the additional firing of natural gas-fired power plants is compared to that of power plants with integrated coal gasification. The differences are explained. The result of the examination lead to recommendations for the design of new plants and for upgrading of existing plants. The advantages of topping gas turbines are shown by examples of new power plants and upgraded plants.

Schoedel, J.; Mertens, K. (ABB Kraftwerke AG, Mannheim (DE))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Uniform power plant identification system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the seventies in the Federal Republic of Germany a uniform power plant identification system (Kraftwerks-Kennzeichen-System, KKS) was developed and introduced. It allows to keep the identification by all engineering disciplines from planning to waste management for any type of power plant. The paper explains the historical development, the structure and the application of this system.

Christiansen, W. (RWE Energie AG, Hauptverwaltung, Essen (DE)); Pannenbacker, K. (GABO mbH, Erlangen (DE)); Popp, H. (Siemens AG, Bereich Anlagentechnik, Erlangen (DE)); Seltmann, A. (ABB Kraftwerke AG, Mannheim (DE))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes several approaches to reduce the costs and enhance the performance of geothermal power generation plants. Electricity supply planners, research program managers, and engineers evaluating geothermal power plant additions or modifications can use this report to compare today's geothermal power systems to several near- and long-term future options.

1996-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

489

Refinery, petrochemical plant injuries decline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Petroleum Refiners Association (NPRA) reports a 7% reduction in workplace injury and illness incidence rates for refineries in 1993, and a 21% decrease for petrochemical plants. The report summarizes data from 135 of the 162 US member refineries, and 117 of the 172 US member petrochemical plants. This paper summarizes the report findings.

Not Available

1994-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

490

Hydrocarbons from plants and trees  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The way energy was used in the US in 1980 was examined. A diagram shows the development of energy from its source to its end use. The following are described: the carbon dioxide problem - the greenhouse effect, sugar cane as an energy source, hydrocarbon-producing plants and trees, and isoprenoids from plants and trees. (MHR)

Calvin, M.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM TECHNICAL REPORT A-S3-1 AERIAL SURVEY TECHNIQUES TO MAP NUMBER rGOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. Technical Report A-83-l 4. TI T L E (""d Subtitle) 5. AERIAL SURVEY···..,." -.d Identity by block numb,,,) Aerial surveys Computer applications Aquatic plant control Mapping

US Army Corps of Engineers

492

Nuclear power plant design analysis  

SciTech Connect

Information concerning the engineering aspects of the design of commercial nuclear power plants is presented. Topics discussed include: electric utility economics; nuclear plant cconomics; thermal-transport systems and core design; nuclear analysis methods; safcty requirements; fuel-system analysis; dcsign considerations; and optimization approaches. (DCC)

Sesonske, A.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Importance of Processing Plant Information  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This presentation provides information about the importance of information about natural gas processing plants, particularly during periods of natural gas supply disruption, such as hurricanes. It also provides information about a relatively new survey instrument to collect information from natural gas processing plants during non-emergency and supply-emergency conditions.

Information Center

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

494

Plants and Night Oxygen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plants and Night Oxygen Production Plants and Night Oxygen Production Name: Ashar Status: other Grade: other Location: Outside U.S. Country: India Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: I would like to know if there are any plants which produces oxygen at night (without photosynthesis). I was told by a friend that Holy Basil (Ocimum tenuiflorum) produces oxygen even at night and I'm not convinced. I would like to get confirmation from experts. Replies: Some plants (particularly those of dry regions, e.g., deserts) only open their stomates at night to avoid drying out to intake CO2 (and output O2) (CAM photosynthesis) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crassulacean_acid_metabolism Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach, PhD Missouri Botanical Garden Bringing oxygen producing plants into your home is a way to mimic the healthy lifestyle factors of longevity in humans from the longest lived cultures.

495

NETL Water and Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water and Power Plants Review Water and Power Plants Review A review meeting was held on June 20, 2006 of the NETL Water and Power Plants research program at the Pittsburgh NETL site. Thomas Feeley, Technology Manager for the Innovations for Existing Plants Program, gave background information and an overview of the Innovations for Existing Plants Water Program. Ongoing/Ending Projects Alternative Water Sources Michael DiFilippo, a consultant for EPRI, presented results from the project "Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities". John Rodgers, from Clemson University, presented results from the project "An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation".

496

Amine plant troubleshooting and optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic method for troubleshooting and optimization of amine plants, if properly used, will result in fewer plant upsets, quick and correct responses to changing conditions and long-term profitable operations of any amine unit. It is important for amine plants to maintain safe, continuous and optimized operations for short- and long-term success. Effective and fast resolution of maine unit upsets plays a large part in this success. These considerations are as important in plants using generic amines such as monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and specialty amines based on MDEA. The key to troubleshooting and optimization is a systematic approach. Developing and using control charts can also be used to monitor amine plant operations. By using these techniques collectively, a formal method for troubleshooting and optimization can be established. This will ultimately result in a more trouble-free, continuous operation.

Abry, R.G.F. [Dow Chemical Co., Ft. Saskatchewan, Alberta (Canada); DuPart, M.S. [Dow Chemical Co., Freeport, TX (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Assessment of the Species Composition, Densities, and Distribution of Native Freshwater Mussels along the Benton County Shoreline of the Hanford Reach, Columbia River, 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Reach of the Columbia River is the last unimpounded section of the river and contains substrate characteristics (cobble, gravel, sand/silt) suitable for many of the native freshwater mussels known to exist