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1

Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Jump to: navigation, search Name Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power...

2

Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Jump to: navigation, search Name Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV Place India Sector Wind energy Product India-based wind power project developer. References Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV is a company located in India . References ↑ "Karnataka Power Corporation Limited and National Thermal Power Corporation JV" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Karnataka_Power_Corporation_Limited_and_National_Thermal_Power_Corporation_JV&oldid=3479

3

National Thermal Power Corporation NTPC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NTPC NTPC Jump to: navigation, search Name National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC) Place New Delhi, Delhi (NCT), India Zip 110003 Sector Biomass, Hydro, Solar, Wind energy Product Delhi-based, state owned largest thermal power generating company of India. The firm has also ventured into consultancy, power trading, ash utilisation and coal mining. The firm is also developing various wind, solar, small hydro and biomass project. References National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC) is a company located in New Delhi, Delhi (NCT), India . References ↑ "National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC)"

4

Modular Hybridization of Solar Thermal Power Plants for Developing Nations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The current energy scenario in the developing nations with abundant sun resource (e.g. southernMediterranean countries of Europe, Middle-East & North Africa) relies mainly on (more)

Darwish, Mazen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

ENHANCED THERMAL VACUUM TEST CAPABILITY FOR RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEMS AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY BETTER SIMULATES ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS OF SPACE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is preparing to fuel and test the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), the next generation space power generator. The INL identified the thermal vacuum test chamber used to test past generators as inadequate. A second vacuum chamber was upgraded with a thermal shroud to process the unique needs and to test the full power capability of the new generator. The thermal vacuum test chamber is the first of its kind capable of testing a fueled power system to temperature that accurately simulate space. This paper outlines the new test and set up capabilities at the INL.

J. C. Giglio; A. A. Jackson

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ECISEnergyRenewable EnergySolar EnergyConcentrating Solar Power ECISEnergyRenewable EnergySolar EnergyConcentrating Solar Power (CSP)National Solar Thermal Test Facility National Solar Thermal Test Facility NSTTF Interactive Tour National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) Operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) is the only test facility of this type in the United States. The NSTTF's primary goal is to provide experimental engineering data for the design, construction, and operation of unique components and systems in proposed solar thermal electrical plants planned for large-scale power generation. In addition, the site was built and instrumented to provide test facilities for a variety of solar and nonsolar applications. The facility can provide

7

Solar thermal power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal power is produced by three types of concentrating systems, which utilize parabolic troughs, dishes, and heliostats as the solar concentrators. These systems are at various levels of development and commercialization in the United States and in Europe. The U.S. Industry is currently developing these systems for export at the end of this century and at the beginning of the next one for remote power, village electrification, and grid-connected power. U.S. utilities are not forecasting to need power generation capacity until the middle of the first decade of the 21{sup st} century. At that time, solar thermal electric power systems should be cost competitive with conventional power generation in some unique U.S. markets. In this paper, the authors describe the current status of the development of trough electric, dish/engine, and power tower solar generation systems. 46 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

Mancini, T.R.; Kolb, G.J.; Prairie, M.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This is a brief report about a Sandia National Laboratory facility which can provide high-thermal flux for simulation of nuclear thermal flash, measurements of the effects of aerodynamic heating on radar transmission, etc

Cameron, C.P.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory Concentrating National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: National Laboratory Concentrating Solar Power Research on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage

10

Solar thermal power systems. Summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work accomplished by the Aerospace Corporation from April 1973 through November 1979 in the mission analysis of solar thermal power systems is summarized. Sponsorship of this effort was initiated by the National Science Foundation, continued by the Energy Research and Development Administration, and most recently directed by the United States Department of Energy, Division of Solar Thermal Systems. Major findings and conclusions are sumarized for large power systems, small power systems, solar total energy systems, and solar irrigation systems, as well as special studies in the areas of energy storage, industrial process heat, and solar fuels and chemicals. The various data bases and computer programs utilized in these studies are described, and tables are provided listing financial and solar cost assumptions for each study. An extensive bibliography is included to facilitate review of specific study results and methodology.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Solar thermal power systems. Program summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Each of DOE's solar Thermal Power Systems projects funded and/or in existence during FY 1978 is described and the status as of September 30, 1978 is reflected. These projects are divided as follows: small thermal power applications, large thermal power applications, and advanced thermal technology. Also included are: 1978 project summary tables, bibliography, and an alphabetical index of contractors. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL-TP-6A2-45833 February 2010 The Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage Ramteen Sioshansi The Ohio State University Columbus, Ohio Paul Denholm National...

13

An Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a California 33% Renewable Scenario (Report Summary) (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power An Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a California 33% Renewable Scenario (Report Summary) Paul Denholm, Yih-Huei Wan, Marissa Hummon, Mark Mehos March 2013 NREL/PR-6A20-58470 2 Motivation * Implement concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) in a commercial production cost model o Develop approaches that can be used by utilities and system planners to incorporate CSP in standard planning tools * Evaluate the optimal dispatch of CSP with TES o How would a plant actually be used to minimize system production cost? * Quantify the value of adding storage to CSP in a high renewable energy (RE) scenario in California

14

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa, Ontario: 1999.Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A Thesis submittedConcentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants by Corey Lee Hardin

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Power Electronics and Thermal Management Breakout Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POWER ELECTRONICS AND POWER ELECTRONICS AND THERMAL MANAGEMENT BREAKOUT SESSION July 24, 2012 EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Burak Ozpineci Oak Ridge National Laboratory Facilitator Vehicle Technologies Program - Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors eere.energy.gov Key DOE Technical Targets Power Electronics ($/kW) (kW/kg) (kW/l) 7.9 10.8 8.7 7 11.2 10 5 12 12 3.3 14.1 13.4 Electric Motors ($/kW) (kW/kg) (kW/l) 11.1 1.2 3.7 10 1.24 4 7 1.3 5 4.7 1.6 5.7 Traction Drive System Impacts  Reduce Cost Reduce Weight Reduce Volume Reduce Energy Storage Requirements Year Cost ($/kW) Specific Power (kW/kg) Power Density (kW/l) Efficiency 2010* 19 1.08 2.60 >90% 2012 17 1.12 2.86 >91% 2015 12 1.17 3.53 >93% 2020 8 1.44 4.00 >94%

16

Power and thermal challenges in mobile devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In spite of significant advances in the development of low-power designs and power management techniques, power remains and will remain a first-class design constraint for mobile devices. The functionality integrated into mobile devices will only continue ... Keywords: leakage power, mobile devices, power management, process variability, thermal management

Krishna Sekar

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Solar Thermal Group Australian National University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Concentrated Solar Power Parabolic Troughs (Concentration Ratio ~ 80) #12;Solar Thermal Group AustralianC 500o C Solar Concentrator (Dish or Trough) Rebecca Dunn & Dr Keith Lovegrove rebecca Concentrating Solar Power ­ The Basics 1. Parabolic mirror. 2. Receiver at focus. 3. Solar Radiation heats fluid

18

Power Marketing Administrations Leading the Nation's Transition...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administrations Leading the Nation's Transition to a 21st Century Electric Grid Power Marketing Administrations Leading the Nation's Transition to a 21st Century Electric...

19

Apparatus and method for thermal power generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved thermal power plant and method of power generation which minimizes thermal stress and chemical impurity buildup in the vaporizing component, particularly beneficial under loss of normal feed fluid and startup conditions. The invention is particularly applicable to a liquid metal fast breeder reactor plant.

Cohen, Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Redding, Arnold H. (Export, PA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Advanced Thermal Interface Materials for Power Electronics (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advancing thermal interface materials for power electronics is a critical factor in power electronics equipment. NREL aims to improve thermal interface materials for power electronics technologies.

Narumanchi, S.

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national thermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Residential Solar Thermal Power Plant  

Solar power is a renewable source of energy that involves no fossil fuel combustion, and releases no greenhouse gases. In the past, solar power has not been ...

22

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS, Eurosun 2010,COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A Thesis

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Solar thermal power today and tomorrow  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This article is a look at the status of solar thermal power plant design and application. The topics of the article include US DOE involvement, trough-electric systems as a current alternative to conventional electric power production, and central receiver systems and dish/Stirling systems as alternatives to fossil-fuel power plants within the next five years.

Mancini, T.R.; Chavez, J.M.; Kolb, G.J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Solar Thermal Technology Dept.)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Thermal Interface Materials for Power Electronics Applications: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The thermal resistance of the thermal interface material layer greatly affects the maximum temperature of the power electronics.

Narumanchi, S.; Mihalic, M.; Kelly, K.; Eesley, G.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F. Baldwin.a central solar thermal power plant. A variety of heliostatSTORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F. Baldwin.

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Gross Thermal Efficiency of a Solar Power Plant .and Maintenance* - Net Thermal Efficiency of the Solar PowerMWe Net Thermal Efficiency of the Solar Power Plant,MWe-hr/

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Parabolic Trough Solar Thermal Electric Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although many solar technologies have been demonstrated, parabolic trough solar thermal electric power plant technology represents one of the major renewable energy success stories of the last two decades.

Not Available

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Thermal spray applications for power plant components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plants usually are located near water and many are in salt water environments. Corrosion occurring in these environments is a problem often solved with thermal spray coatings. The use of thermal spray aluminum and zinc in three power plants for various components is reviewed. Special emphasis is on the cooling tower at the Seabrook, New Hampshire plant. A guide to selection of the coating and process also is given.

Sampson, E.R.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Waverly Light & Power - Residential Solar Thermal Rebates | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waverly Light & Power - Residential Solar Thermal Rebates Waverly Light & Power - Residential Solar Thermal Rebates Eligibility Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Solar...

30

Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal control is a critical factor in power electronics equipment. NREL aims to integrate and improve thermal system performance in power electronics.

Bennion, K.

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

31

Financing Solar Thermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The commercialization of concentrating solar power technology took a major step forward in the mid 1980s and early 1990s with the development of the SEGS plants in California. Over the years they have proven that parabolic trough power technologies are the most cost-effective approach for commercial scale solar power generation in the sunbelt countries of the world. However, the question must be asked why no additional solar power plants have been build following the bankruptcy of the developer of the SEGS projects, LUZ International Limited. Although many believe the SEGS projects were a success as a result of parabolic trough technology they employ, in truth, the SEGS projects were developed simply because they represented an attractive opportunity for investors. Simply stated, no additional projects have been developed because no one has been able to put together a similarly attractive financial package to potential investors. More than $1.2 billion in private capital was raised i n debt and equity financing for the nine SEGS plants. Investors and bankers who make these investments are the real clients for solar power technologies. They are not interested in annual solar to electric efficiencies, but in risk, return on investments, and coverage ratios. This paper will take a look at solar power projects from the financier's perspective. The challenge in moving forward is to attract private investors, commercial lenders, and international development agencies and to find innovative solutions to the difficult issues that investment in the global power market poses for solar power technologies.

Price, H. W.; Kistner, R.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Pv-Thermal Solar Power Assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flexible solar power assembly includes a flexible photovoltaic device attached to a flexible thermal solar collector. The solar power assembly can be rolled up for transport and then unrolled for installation on a surface, such as the roof or side wall of a building or other structure, by use of adhesive and/or other types of fasteners.

Ansley, Jeffrey H. (El Cerrito, CA); Botkin, Jonathan D. (El Cerrito, CA); Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Piedmont, CA)

2001-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

33

Aspects of thermal power plant automation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal electric power plant is a set of facilities/equipment interconnected, designed to produce electricity or heat and power, by converting chemical energy of a fuel. This paper analyze the energy production stations, both turbine and steam generator ... Keywords: modeling and simulation, the Ovation System

Marius-Constantin Popescu; Nikos Mastorakis

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Green Power Network: Past National Green Power Marketing Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fifth National Green Power Marketing Conference: Fifth National Green Power Marketing Conference: Powering the New Millennium Held August 7-8, 2000 in Denver, Colorado Fifth National Green Power Marketing Conference Summary (PDF 95.1 MB) Download Adobe Reader As the preeminent conference addressing green power marketing in the United States, the fifth annual conference provided an update of domestic green power marketing activities and address such topics as evolving perceptions of green power, why businesses and government agencies are buying green power, how to build demand for green power, what is working well in utility green pricing programs, and international green power markets. The conference was co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Electric Power Research Institute, and Edison Electric Institute

35

Thermocline Thermal Storage Test for Large-Scale Solar Thermal Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal-to-electric power plants have been tested and investigated at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) since the late 1970s, and thermal storage has always been an area of key study because it affords an economical method of delivering solar-electricity during non-daylight hours. This paper describes the design considerations of a new, single-tank, thermal storage system and details the benefits of employing this technology in large-scale (10MW to 100MW) solar thermal power plants. Since December 1999, solar engineers at Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) have designed and are constructing a thermal storage test called the thermocline system. This technology, which employs a single thermocline tank, has the potential to replace the traditional and more expensive two-tank storage systems. The thermocline tank approach uses a mixture of silica sand and quartzite rock to displace a significant portion of the volume in the tank. Then it is filled with the heat transfer fluid, a molten nitrate salt. A thermal gradient separates the hot and cold salt. Loading the tank with the combination of sand, rock, and molten salt instead of just molten salt dramatically reduces the system cost. The typical cost of the molten nitrate salt is $800 per ton versus the cost of the sand and rock portion at $70 per ton. Construction of the thermocline system will be completed in August 2000, and testing will run for two to three months. The testing results will be used to determine the economic viability of the single-tank (thermocline) storage technology for large-scale solar thermal power plants. Also discussed in this paper are the safety issues involving molten nitrate salts and other heat transfer fluids, such as synthetic heat transfer oils, and the impact of these issues on the system design.

ST.LAURENT,STEVEN J.

2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

36

Advanced Thermal Interface Materials (TIMs) for Power Electronics (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes our progress in the area of thermal interface materials for power electronics applications.

Narumanchi, S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Green Power Network: Past National Green Power Marketing Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Third National Green Power Conference: Selling Green Power in Competitive Markets Third National Green Power Conference: Selling Green Power in Competitive Markets Prepared by Blair Swezey Ashley Houston National Renewable Energy Laboratory Terry Peterson Electric Power Research Institute December 1998 Proceedings (PDF 84 KB) Download Adobe Reader Overview Green power is a market-driven product developed to meet expressed customer preference for electricity derived from renewable sources such as solar, wind, biomass, and geothermal. Over the last several years, more than 30 electric utility companies have designed green power service options for their customers as differentiated from the standard utility service. And now, as state electricity markets start to open to competition, a new industry is emerging to sell competitively priced green power products and services to discriminating consumers.

38

Method and apparatus for thermal power generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for power generation from a recirculating superheat-reheat circuit with multiple expansion stages which alleviates complex control systems and minimizes thermal cycling of system components, particularly the reheater. The invention includes preheating cold reheat fluid from the first expansion stage prior to its entering the reheater with fluid from the evaporator or drum component.

Mangus, James D. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Green Power Network: Past National Green Power Marketing Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fourth National Green Power Marketing Conference Fourth National Green Power Marketing Conference Key Ingredients for Successful Markets Held May 10-11, 1999 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania The Fourth National Green Power Marketing Conference was organized to examine the current state of green-power marketing and to explore opportunities to improve on the success of green-power sales in both regulated and deregulated markets. The conference was co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Electric Power Research Institute, Renewable Energy Alliance, and Edison Electric Institute. View all of the Conference Presentations in Microsoft PowerPoint 95 (PPT) or Adobe Acrobat PDF format. Format is noted with file sizes. REPORT SUMMARY Today, in regulated monopoly markets, more than 50 utilities offer "green pricing" to their customers, but competitive green power marketing is still in early evolution. After a year of competitive market activity, it has become clear that the rules and mechanisms established for electric industry restructuring are critical to the success of green power marketing. The Fourth National Green Power Conference examined the current state of green power marketing, identified key market and policy needs under electric industry restructuring, and explored opportunities to improve on the success of green power sales in both regulated and deregulated markets.

40

Design of Thermal Power Generation Device for Vehicle Recharging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With thermal power generation as the basis, vehicle heat sources (such as engine and exhaust pipe) as the carrier, and AT89C52 as the control center, this paper has designed a thermal power generation device for vehicle recharging. This device consists ... Keywords: thermal power generation, power supply for recharging, vehicle devices, design

Hong Fang

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national thermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Green Power Network: Past National Green Power Marketing Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sixth National Green Power Marketing Conference Sixth National Green Power Marketing Conference Opportunity in the Midst of Uncertainty Held July 30 - August 1, 2001 in Portland, OR Please visit EPRI to download your copy of Sixth National Green Power Marketing Conference Summary (PDF 8.8 MB) Conference speakers reviewed the past year's green power highlights, analyzed utility green pricing programs, presented insights into how to target green power demand, examined green certificate trading and tracking mechanisms, and described the best ways to market and sell green power. In addition, First Annual Green Power Leadership Awards were presented to recognize those who are significantly advancing the development of renewable electricity sources in the marketplace. We thank the following conference sponsors: the Center for Resource Solutions, Enron Power Marketing, Inc., E Source, Green Mountain Energy Company, and PacifiCorp Power Marketing, Inc. Event sponsors included PG&E National Energy Group, Portland General Electric, Batdorf & Bronson Coffee Roasters, Fetzer Vineyards, and New Belgium Brewing Company

42

Power Electronics and Thermal Management Breakout Sessions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POWER ELECTRONICS AND THERMAL POWER ELECTRONICS AND THERMAL MANAGEMENT EV Everywhere Workshop July 24, 2012 Breakout Session #1 - Discussion of Performance Targets and Barriers Comments on the Achievability of the Targets * Performance: Is achievable with these assumptions * Production Cost: $8/KW is achievable for PHEV40 and BEV300, $14/KW is okay for BEV100 * Production Efficiency: 95% system efficiency might be achievable * It is easier to achieve performance than cost targets * Integration of the different functionalities can help with achieving the targets * What is efficiency worth? What price do we place on it? Barriers Interfering with Reaching the Targets * Capacitors and magnetics (materials, performance, temperature, size, frequency, packaging) * Material cost, capacitors and magnetics are the priority

43

Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage for Integration Studies Marissa Hummon 3 rd International Solar Power Integration Workshop October 20-22, 2013...

44

Low thermal resistance power module assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power module assembly with low thermal resistance and enhanced heat dissipation to a cooling medium. The assembly includes a heat sink or spreader plate with passageways or openings for coolant that extend through the plate from a lower surface to an upper surface. A circuit substrate is provided and positioned on the spreader plate to cover the coolant passageways. The circuit substrate includes a bonding layer configured to extend about the periphery of each of the coolant passageways and is made up of a substantially nonporous material. The bonding layer may be solder material which bonds to the upper surface of the plate to provide a continuous seal around the upper edge of each opening in the plate. The assembly includes power modules mounted on the circuit substrate on a surface opposite the bonding layer. The power modules are positioned over or proximal to the coolant passageways.

Hassani, Vahab (Denver, CO); Vlahinos, Andreas (Castle Rock, CO); Bharathan, Desikan (Arvada, CO)

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

45

Development of Concentrating Solar Thermal Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Draft under Consideration by the World Bank) In May 2004, the World Bank submitted a status report on the GEF co-financed solar thermal portfolio to the GEF Council. In response to Council comments, the Bank subsequently commissioned an external assessment of the World Bank/GEFs strategy for the market development of concentrating solar thermal power. The consultant was selected through a competitive procurement process, following World Bank procedures. The selected consortium, the Global Research Alliance, is led by CSIR-South Africa, and includes the Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research, Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, and CSIRO-Australia. The reports findings and recommendations are now under consideration by the World Bank. Council Members are invited to comment on the report, by July 15, 2005.

Gef Council; Concentrating Solar; Thermal Power; Copied To Mr. Rohit Khanna; Senior Operations Officer; Steve Szewczuk; Csir South Africa; Thomas Engelmann; Michael Geyer; Juan Granados; Andreas Haeberle; Haeussermann Tewfik Hasni; David Kearney; Ludger Lorych; Thomas Mancini; Abdellah Mdarhri; Paul Nava; Joachim Nick-leptin; Hani El Nokrashy; Robert Pitz; Klaus-peter Pischke; Hank Price; Jrgen Ratzinger; Thomas Rueckert; David Saul; Franz Trieb; Christine Woerlen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Solar thermal electric power information user study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on solar thermal electric power are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. The report is 1 of 10 discussing study results. The overall study provides baseline data about information needs in the solar community. An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from five solar thermal electric power groups of respondents are analyzed: DOE-Funded Researchers, Non-DOE-Funded Researchers, Representatives of Utilities, Electric Power Engineers, and Educators. The data will be used as input to the determination of information products and services the Solar Energy Research Institute, the Solar Energy Information Data Bank Network, and the entire information outreach community should be preparing and disseminating.

Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Powerful Partnership | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powerful Partnership Powerful Partnership Powerful Partnership Posted: February 7, 2013 - 6:58pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 2 | 2013 Y-12 processes the feedstock to power the nation's submarines and aircraft carriers. These vessels can travel the world for years without refueling. When the U.S. Navy's Capt. Hyman Rickover and a small group of naval officers began to study nuclear power in 1946, Oak Ridge, Tenn., was the go-to place. This large, bustling but undisclosed city, born just four years earlier, was credited with developing the highly enriched uranium for the world's first atomic bomb. It held the secret knowledge that set Rickover on course to cultivate the thought of using nuclear reactors to power submarines. His curiosity more than 65 years ago initiated the Navy's

48

Powering the Nuclear Navy | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

The National Nuclear Security Administration Powering the Nuclear Navy Home > Our Mission > Powering the Nuclear Navy Powering the Nuclear Navy The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program...

49

Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Materials Storage Materials Laboratory may include: * CSP technology developers * Utilities * Certification laboratories * Government agencies * Universities * Other National laboratories Contact Us If you are interested in working with NREL's Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory, please contact: ESIF Manager Carolyn Elam Carolyn.Elam@nrel.gov 303-275-4311 Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory The Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) investigates materials that can be used as high-temperature heat transfer fluids or thermal energy storage media in concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Research objectives include the discovery and evaluation of

50

THERMAL STRESS CALCULATIONS FOR HEATPIPE-COOLED REACTOR POWER SYSTEMS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A heatpipe-cooled fast reactor concept has been under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the past several years, to be used as a power source for nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) or as a planetary surface power system. The reactor core consists of an array of modules that are held together by a core lateral restraint system. Each module comprises a single heatpipe surrounded by 3-6 clad fuel pins. As part of the design development and performance assessment activities for these reactors, specialized methods and models have been developed to perform thermal and stress analyses of the core modules. The methods have been automated so that trade studies can be readily performed, looking at design options such as module size, heatpipe and clad thickness, use of sleeves to contain the fuel, material type, etc. This paper describes the methods and models that have been developed, and presents thermal and stress analysis results for a Mars surface power system and a NEP power source.

Kapernick, R. J. (Richard J.); Guffee, R. M. (Ray M.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Low thermal resistance power module assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power module assembly (400) with low thermal resistance and enhanced heat dissipation to a cooling medium. The assembly includes a heat sink or spreader plate (410) with passageways or openings (414) for coolant that extend through the plate from a lower surface (411) to an upper surface (412). A circuit substrate (420) is provided and positioned on the spreader plate (410) to cover the coolant passageways. The circuit substrate (420) includes a bonding layer (422) configured to extend about the periphery of each of the coolant passageways and is made up of a substantially nonporous material. The bonding layer (422) may be solder material which bonds to the upper surface (412) of the plate to provide a continuous seal around the upper edge of each opening (414) in the plate. The assembly includes power modules (430) mounted on the circuit substrate (420) on a surface opposite the bonding layer (422). The power modules (430) are positioned over or proximal to the coolant passageways.

Hassani, Vahab (Denver, CO); Vlahinos, Andreas (Castle Rock, CO); Bharathan, Desikan (Arvada, CO)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

52

Optimisation of Concentrating Solar Thermal Power Plants with Neural Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimisation of Concentrating Solar Thermal Power Plants with Neural Networks Pascal Richter1 of solar power for energy supply is of in- creasing importance. While technical development mainly takes introduce our tool for the optimisation of parameterised solar thermal power plants, and report

Ábrahám, Erika

53

Sandia National Laboratories: Z Pulsed Power Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Z-Machine Z-Machine About Z Z Research Z News Contact Us Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Z-Machine Z Pulsed Power Facility Science serving the nation Created to validate nuclear weapons models, the Z machine is also in the race for viable fusion energy. Z-Machine From Earth's Core to Black Holes Contributing to discovery science by studying matter at conditions found nowhere else on Earth Center of Z About Z Sandia's Z machine is the world's most powerful and efficient laboratory radiation source. It uses high magnetic fields associated with high electrical currents to produce high temperatures, high pressures, and powerful X-rays for research in high energy density science. The Z machine creates conditions found nowhere else on Earth. Z is part of Sandia's Pulsed Power program, which began in the 1960s.

54

Pulsed Power Technology at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Z-Machine Time-exposure photograph of electrical flashover arcs produced over the surface of the water in the accelerator tank as a byproduct of Z operation. These flashovers are much like strokes of lightning Related links Electromagnetic Technology at Sandia National Laboratories Pulsed Power Technology Published Papers Inertial Fusion Energy C. L. Olson, "Inertial Fusion Energy with Pulsed Power," 2000 Codes: ALEGRA K. C. Cochrane, "Aluminum Equation of State Validation and Verification for the ALEGRA HEDP Simulation Code," 2006 T. Trucano, "ALEGRA-HEDP Validation Strategy," 2005 C. Garasi , "Multi-dimensional high energy density physics modeling and simulation of wire array z-pinch physics," 2003 Equation of State (EOS)

55

Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation gives an overview of the status and FY09 accomplishments for the NREL Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration Project.

Bennion, K.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Rapid Modeling of Power Electronics Thermal Management Technologies: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Describes a method of rapidly evaluating trade-offs associated with alternative packaging configurations and thermal management technologies for power electronics packaging.

Bennion, K.; Kelly, K.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Parabolic Trough Solar Thermal Electric Power Plants (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides an overview of the potential for parabolic trough solar thermal electric power plants, especially in the Southwestern U.S.

Not Available

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Design of a Solar Thermal Powered Cooling System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract The main objective of the thesis was to design a mechanical structure for a desiccant evaporative cooling, to apply solar thermal powered air conditioning (more)

Hurri, Olli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Low thermal resistance power module assembly - Energy Innovation ...  

A power module assembly (400) with low thermal resistance and enhanced heat dissipation to a cooling medium. The assembly includes a heat sink or spreader plate (410 ...

60

Sandia National Laboratories Distributive Power Initiative (DPI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benjamin L. Schenkman Benjamin L. Schenkman (505) 284-5883 BLSCHEN@SANDIA.GOV September 2008 ABMAS Battery Management System for USCG National Distress System Applications Annual DOE Peer Review National Distress System (NDS) Problem National Distress System (NDS) Problem  Supplying Fuel to the propane generators is expensive especially when the fuel has to be chartered by helicopter. NDS Background NDS Background  365/7/24 distress communication coverage  Remote Locations (Majority in Alaska)  VHF-FM system powered by Battery, PV and USCG owned propane generators  Fuel for the Generator is delivered by helicopter or car if possible Fuel/Battery Tradeoff Fuel/Battery Tradeoff Good charge acceptance Efficient generator operation Good charge acceptance Efficient generator

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national thermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Device for thermal transfer and power generation  

SciTech Connect

A system is provided. The system includes a device that includes top and bottom thermally conductive substrates positioned opposite to one another, wherein a top surface of the bottom thermally conductive substrate is substantially atomically flat and a thermal blocking layer disposed between the top and bottom thermally conductive substrates. The device also includes top and bottom electrodes separated from one another between the top and bottom thermally conductive substrates to define a tunneling path, wherein the top electrode is disposed on the thermal blocking layer and the bottom electrode is disposed on the bottom thermally conductive substrate.

Weaver, Stanton Earl (Northville, NY); Arik, Mehmet (Niskayuna, NY)

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

62

Optimal control for maximum power in thermal and chemical systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research treats power optimization for energy converters, such like thermal, solar and chemical engines. Thermodynamic analyses lead to converter's efficiency and limiting power. Steady and dynamic systems are investigated. Static optimization of ...

Stanislaw Sieniutycz

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Bettis and Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Bettis and Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

64

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar thermal power (CSP) systems. Background and motivation2 Figure 2: Schematic of Sensible Heat Based CSP Plant[3 Figure 3: Schematic of PCM Based CSP Plant[

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Sandia National Laboratories Distributive Power Initiative (DPI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peer Review This work was funded by the DOE Energy Storage Program November 2-3, 2006 Washington, DC Presented by: Tom Hund, Nancy Clark, David Johnson, and Wes Baca Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM (505) 844-8627 tdhund@sandia.gov *Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 2 Introduction (Previous Work)  Sandia's Power Sources Component Development Dept. provides unbiased energy storage testing support to the DOE Energy Storage Program.  Previous work has included supercap testing on ESMA, Maxwell, and Okamura Labs devices, and battery testing on EEI Bipolar NiMH, Cyclon VRLA,

66

Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Provider Energy Efficiency '''''This program reopened on October 3, 2011 for 2012 applications. Funding is limited and must be reserved through online application before the installation of qualifying solar water heating systems. See Gulf Power's [http://www.gulfpower.com/renewable/solarThermal.asp Solar Water Heating] web site for more information.''''' Gulf Power offers a Solar Thermal Water Heating rebate to customers who install water heaters. This program started after the original pilot

67

Increasing the energetic efficiency in producing of electric and thermal power in thermal power plants by using of variable speed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work is presenting a theoretical analysis and an experimental application of the energetic efficiency increase by using of variable-speed AC electric drive systems in a thermal power plant that produces electric and thermal power. Are presented ... Keywords: asynchronous motor, district heating system, energetic efficiency, harmonic distorsion generated by adjustable speed drives, pumping station, static frequency converter, testing

Sorin Ioan Deaconu; Gabriel Nicolae Popa; Iosif Popa

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Coupled power and thermal simulation with active cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Power is rapidly becoming the primary design constraint for systems ranging from server computers to handhelds. In this paper we study microarchitecture-level coupled power and thermal simulation considering dynamic and leakage power models with temperature and voltage scaling. We develop an accurate temperature-dependent leakage power model and efficient temperature calculation, and show that leakage energy can be different by up to 10X for temperatures between 35 o C and 110 o C. Given the growing significance of leakage power and its sensitive dependence on temperature, no power simulation without considering dynamic temperature calculation is accurate. Furthermore, we discuss the thermal runaway induced by the interdependence between leakage power and temperature, and show that in the near future thermal runaway could be a severe problem. We also study the microarchitecture level coupled power and thermal management by novel active cooling techniques that reduce packaging thermal resistance. We show that the active cooling technique that reduces thermal resistance from 0.8 o C/W to 0.05 o C/W can increase system maximum clock by up to 2.44X under the same thermal constraints. 1

Weiping Liao; Lei He

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Application of Combined Thermal Equivalen in Thermal Power Plant Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 3.8MPa medium-pressure steam of Yuntianhua Company get low pressure steam through reducing temperature and pressure, which is used as a heat tracing, a reserve supply of heat. For this situation, the article based on the analysis of energy and chemical ... Keywords: combined thermal equivalent, turbine, economize on energy

Zhang Zhuming; Li Hu; Wang Hua; Qing Shan; Li Liangqing; He Ping; Ma Linzhuan

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Market power and welfare effects in DC power flow electricity models with thermal line losses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nodal electric power network with Cournot-Nash interaction among power generators is formulated as a mixed complementarity problem. The model incorporates a direct current (DC) power flow approximation with thermal line losses to model real-time flows. ... Keywords: Electricity markets, Imperfect competition, Thermal line losses, Welfare measurement

Rastislav Ivanic; Paul V. Preckel; Zuwei Yu

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program Minnesota Power - Solar-Thermal Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Single-family unit: $2,000 Two- to three-family units: $4,000 Multi-family units (four or more): $10,000 Businesses: $25,000 Program Info Start Date 03/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 25% of costs Provider Minnesota Power Minnesota Power offers a 25% rebate for qualifying solar thermal water heating systems. The maximum award for single-family customers is $2,000 per customer; $4,000 for 2-3 family unit buildings; $10,000 for buildings

72

Thermal Storage Systems for Concentrating Solar Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

One challenge facing the widespread use of solar energy is reduced or curtailed energy production when the sun sets or is blocked by clouds. Thermal energy storage provides a workable solution to...

73

Concentrating Solar Power Thermal Storage System Basics | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Storage System Basics Thermal Storage System Basics Concentrating Solar Power Thermal Storage System Basics August 21, 2013 - 10:33am Addthis One challenge facing the widespread use of solar energy is reduced or curtailed energy production when the sun sets or is blocked by clouds. Thermal energy storage provides a workable solution to this challenge. In a concentrating solar power (CSP) system, the sun's rays are reflected onto a receiver, which creates heat that is used to generate electricity. If the receiver contains oil or molten salt as the heat-transfer medium, then the thermal energy can be stored for later use. This enables CSP systems to be cost-competitive options for providing clean, renewable energy. Several thermal energy storage technologies have been tested and

74

Green Power Network: Past National Green Power Marketing Conference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First DOE/EPRI Green Pricing Workshop First DOE/EPRI Green Pricing Workshop April 11-12, 1996 Golden, Colorado Prepared by Blair G. Swezey, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Terry M. Peterson, Electric Power Research Institute I. Overview Green pricing is an evolving utility service that responds to utility customers' preferences for electricity derived from renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, or biomass. Under green pricing, utilities offer customers a voluntary program or service to support electricity generated from renewable energy systems. Customers are asked to pay a rate premium, which is meant to cover the costs that the utility incurs above those paid today for electricity from conventional fuels. Utilities are considering green pricing as a way to build customer loyalty, deploy popular renewable technologies, expand business lines and expertise, and improve understanding of customer response to unbundled pricing and services.

75

Distributed Solar-Thermal Combined Heat and Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Solar-Thermal Combined Heat and Power Speaker(s): Zack Norwood Date: February 22, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 This seminar will examine the potential for the mild...

76

TAPO: Thermal-aware power optimization techniques for servers and data centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large portion of the power consumption of data centers can be attributed to cooling. In dynamic thermal management mechanisms for data centers and servers, thermal setpoints are typically chosen statically and conservatively, which leaves significant ... Keywords: power leakage power, TAPO, thermal aware power optimization techniques, data centers, server centers, power consumption, dynamic thermal management mechanisms, thermal setpoints, power budget, heating ventilation and air conditioning, HVAC, circuit leakage power

Wei Huang; M. Allen-Ware; J. B. Carter; E. Elnozahy; H. Hamann; T. Keller; C. Lefurgy; Jian Li; K. Rajamani; J. Rubio

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Rankline-Brayton engine powered solar thermal aircraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A Rankine-Brayton hybrid cycle heat engine is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller or other mechanism for enabling sustained free flight. The Rankine-Brayton engine has a thermal battery, preferably containing a lithium-hydride and lithium mixture, operably connected to it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery to a working fluid. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

78

Rankine-Brayton engine powered solar thermal aircraft  

SciTech Connect

A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A Rankine-Brayton hybrid cycle heat engine is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller or other mechanism for enabling sustained free flight. The Rankine-Brayton engine has a thermal battery, preferably containing a lithium-hydride and lithium mixture, operably connected to it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery to a working fluid. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

79

Thermal Energy Corporation Combined Heat and Power Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet the planned heating and cooling load growth at the Texas Medical Center (TMC), Thermal Energy Corporation (TECO) implemented Phase 1 of a Master Plan to install an additional 32,000 tons of chilled water capacity, a 75,000 ton-hour (8.8 million gallon) Thermal Energy Storage (TES) tank, and a 48 MW Combined Heat and Power (CHP) system. The Department of Energy selected TMC for a $10 million grant award as part of the Financial Assistance Funding Opportunity Announcement, U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology, Recovery Act: Deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems, District Energy Systems, Waste Energy Recovery Systems, and Efficiency Industrial Equipment Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FOA-0000044 to support the installation of a new 48 MW CHP system at the TMC located just outside downtown Houston. As the largest medical center in the world, TMC is home to many of the nation??s best hospitals, physicians, researchers, educational institutions, and health care providers. TMC provides care to approximately six million patients each year, and medical instruction to over 71,000 students. A medical center the size of TMC has enormous electricity and thermal energy demands to help it carry out its mission. Reliable, high-quality steam and chilled water are of utmost importance to the operations of its many facilities. For example, advanced medical equipment, laboratories, laundry facilities, space heating and cooling all rely on the generation of heat and power. As result of this project TECO provides this mission critical heating and cooling to TMC utilizing a system that is both energy-efficient and reliable since it provides the capability to run on power independent of the already strained regional electric grid. This allows the medical center to focus on its primary mission ?? providing top quality medical care and instruction ?? without worrying about excessive energy costs or the loss of heating and cooling due to the risk of power outages. TECO??s operation is the largest Chilled Water District Energy System in the United States. The company used DOE??s funding to help install a new high efficiency CHP system consisting of a Combustion Turbine and a Heat Recovery Steam Generator. This CHP installation was just part of a larger project undertaken by TECO to ensure that it can continue to meet TMC??s growing needs. The complete efficiency overhaul that TECO undertook supported more than 1,000 direct and indirect jobs in manufacturing, engineering, and construction, with approximately 400 of those being jobs directly associated with construction of the combined heat and power plant. This showcase industrial scale CHP project, serving a critical component of the nation??s healthcare infrastructure, directly and immediately supported the energy efficiency and job creation goals established by ARRA and DOE. It also provided an unsurpassed model of a district energy CHP application that can be replicated within other energy intensive applications in the industrial, institutional and commercial sectors.

E. Bruce Turner; Tim Brown; Ed Mardiat

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Thermal energy storage for power generation  

SciTech Connect

Studies strongly indicate that the United States will face widespread electrical power constraints in the 1990s, with most regions of the country experiencing capacity shortages by the year 2000. In many cases, the demand for increased power will occur during intermediate and peak demand periods. Much of this demand is expected to be met by oil- and natural gas-fired Brayton cycle turbines and combined-cycle plants. While natural gas is currently plentiful and reasonably priced, the availability of an economical long-term coal-fired option for peak and intermediate load power generation will give electric power utilities an option in case either the availability or cost of natural gas should deteriorate. 54 refs., 5 figs., 17 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Sathyanarayana, K.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national thermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Pulsed Power Technology at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are some specific sites on Pulsed Power MAGPIE Pulsed Power Facility, Imperial College NIF Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division Reviews of U.S. Fusion Policy UKAEA...

82

Zero Power Reactor simulation | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zero Power Reactor simulation Share Description Ever wanted to see a nuclear reactor core in action? Here's a detailed simulation of the Zero Power Reactor experiment, run by...

83

Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Process and Systems Process and Components Laboratory may include: * CSP technology developers * Utilities * Certification laboratories * Government agencies * Universities * Other National laboratories Contact Us If you are interested in working with NREL's Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory, please contact: ESIF Manager Carolyn Elam Carolyn.Elam@nrel.gov 303-275-4311 Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory The focus of the Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to research, develop, test, and evaluate new techniques for thermal energy storage systems that are relevant to utility-scale concentrating solar power plants. The laboratory holds

84

Modeling The Potential For Thermal Concentrating Solar Power Technologies  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we explore the tradeoffs between thermal storage capacity, cost, and other system parameters in order to examine possible evolutionary pathways for thermal Concen-trating Solar Power (CSP) technologies. A representation of CSP performance that is suit-able for incorporation into economic modeling tools is developed. We find that, as the fraction of electricity supplied by CSP technologies grows, the application of thermal CSP technologies might progress from current hybrid plants, to plants with a modest amount of thermal storage, and potentially even to plants with sufficient thermal storage to provide base load generation capacity. The representation of CSP cost and performance developed here was implemented in the ObjECTS MiniCAM long-term integrated assessment model. Datasets for global solar resource characteristics as applied to CSP technology were also developed. The regional and global potential of thermal CSP technologies is examined.

Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.; Kyle, G. Page; Stackhouse, Jr., Paul W.

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

85

Solar-Thermal Electric Power: 2003 Status Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. development efforts in solar-thermal technologies were particularly strong during the 1980s and resulted in a significant amount of experimental and commercial hardware. Those efforts subsided in the 1990s, primarily because energy prices stabilized at affordable levels. Also, primary interest in the solar power community underwent a shift from large-scale wholesale power to smaller-scale retail power. This shift derived, in part, from the electric-sector restructuring movement that was occurring. K...

2003-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

86

Thermal-Electric Conversion Efficiency of the Dish/AMTEC Solar Thermal Power System in Wind Condition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dish/AMTEC solar thermal power system is a newly proposed solar energy utilization system that enables the direct thermal-electric conversion. The performance of the solar dish/AMTEC system in wind condition has been theoretically evaluated in addition ... Keywords: dish/AMTEC solar thermal power system, efficiency, thermal-electric conversion, wind condition

Lan Xiao; Shuang-Ying Wu; You-Rong Li

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Thermal Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces for Power Electronics Packaging Applications (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses the thermal performance and reliability of bonded interfaces for power electronics packaging applications.

Devoto, D.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Power Plants: Scientists...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plants: Scientists Use X-ray Laser to Probe Engines of Photosynthesis By Glenn Roberts Jr. June 6, 2012 The molecular power plants that carry out photosynthesis are at the...

89

Waverly Light and Power - Residential Solar Thermal Rebates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Thermal Rebates Solar Thermal Rebates Waverly Light and Power - Residential Solar Thermal Rebates < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $3,500 Program Info Start Date 07/01/2009 State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 30/sq. foot of collector area Provider Waverly Light and Power Waverly Light and Power (WL&P) offers rebates for solar hot water heating systems to its residential customers. All purchases must be pre-approved through WL&P's solar water heater application process. In addition, residential customers must obtain a county-issued permit prior to installing a solar water heating system. There is a limit of one rebate per address. Funding is available until the rebate fund is exhausted.

90

Anyang Lingrui Thermal Power Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anyang Lingrui Thermal Power Co Ltd Anyang Lingrui Thermal Power Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Anyang Lingrui Thermal Power Co., Ltd Place Anyang, Henan Province, China Zip 455000 Sector Biomass Product China-based biomass project developer. Coordinates 37.396309°, 126.930939° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.396309,"lon":126.930939,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

91

Sandia National Laboratories Distributive Power Initiative (DPI...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benjamin L. Schenkman (505) 284-5883 BLSCHEN@SANDIA.GOV September 2008 ABMAS Battery Management System for USCG National Distress System Applications Annual DOE Peer Review...

92

Solar-thermal power technical and management support. Program summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Support activities described are: preparation of the significant development weekly reports; preparation of briefings for the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program; preparation of the Annual Thermal Power Systems Technical Progress Report; Integrated Solar Thermal/Industrial Process Heat Program Plan; review of the Storage Technology Development Program for Thermal Power Systems; and review of the Thermal Power Systems Multiyear Plan. A draft of the Goals and Requirements Section of the Integrated Solar Thermal/Industrial Process Heat Program Plan is included. (LEW)

Not Available

1979-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

93

Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a California 33% Renewable Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Concentrating Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a California 33% Renewable Scenario Paul Denholm, Yih-Huei Wan, Marissa Hummon, and Mark Mehos Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-58186 March 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 An Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a California 33% Renewable Scenario Paul Denholm, Yih-Huei Wan, Marissa Hummon, and Mark Mehos Prepared under Task No. CP08.8301

94

NETL: Gasification - National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Gasification National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility National Carbon Capture Center Participants The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. The PSDF now houses the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to address the nation's need for cost-effective, commercially viable CO2 capture options for flue gas from pulverized coal power plants and syngas from coal gasification power plants. The NCCC focuses national efforts on reducing greenhouse gas emissions through technological innovation, and serve as a neutral test center for emerging carbon capture technologies. PSDF-NCCC Background

95

Energy characterization of mobile devices and applications using power-thermal benchmarks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power consumption and heat dissipation are the major factors that limit the performance and mobility of battery-powered devices. As they become key elements in the design of mobile devices and their applications, different power and thermal management ... Keywords: Energy characterization, Power benchmark, Power management, Thermal benchmark, Thermal management

Marius Marcu; Dacian Tudor; Horatiu Moldovan; Sebastian Fuicu; Mircea Popa

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Distributed Wind Power Generation - National Renewable Energy ...  

Technology breakthrough in roof-top distributed wind power generation Multi-billion $ market opportunity in next 10 years recent venture capital investments

97

Sandia National Laboratories Distributive Power Initiative (DPI...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Large Format Carbon Enhanced VRLA Battery Test Results EESAT 2009 Funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy (DOEESS) through Sandia National...

98

Wind power for the Creek Nation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An Enertech 1800 horizontal-axis wind powered electric generator was purchased and interphased with the electric utility system provided to the Creek Nation by the Public Service Company of Oklahoma. Objectives of the work include: to determine the economic feasibility of wind power for the Creek Nation region; to educate the Creek Nation and other Indian tribes about the potential use of wind power; and to accumulate valuable climatic data through an on-site wind survey at a height of 60' over a long period of time. (LEW)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Energy Department Recognizes Nation's Top Green Power Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recognizes Nation's Top Green Power Programs Recognizes Nation's Top Green Power Programs Energy Department Recognizes Nation's Top Green Power Programs November 16, 2011 - 1:08pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today recognized four leading organizations for expanding the market for electricity produced from renewable energy sources during the 11th annual Green Power Leadership Awards in San Francisco, Calif. These organizations' innovative "green power" programs provide consumers with the opportunity to purchase clean energy from environmentally-preferred sources, such as wind and solar energy. Organizations that offer and promote green power programs support an industry that creates thousands of jobs each year, making clean, renewable energy accessible and affordable to the homeowners and businesses they

100

Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints Carlos Murillo{Sanchez Robert J algorithm for unit commitment that employs a Lagrange relaxation technique with a new augmentation. This framework allows the possibility of committing units that are required for the VArs that they can produce

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national thermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - World's Most Powerful...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

powers the sun. The experiments were carried out at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), whose rapid-fire laser pulses are a billion times brighter than those of any X-ray...

102

Sandia National Laboratories Distributive Power Initiative (DPI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Large Format Carbon Enhanced Large Format Carbon Enhanced VRLA Battery Test Results EESAT 2009 Funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy (DOE/ESS) through Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) October 4 - 7, 2009 Seattle, Washington Presented by: Tom Hund Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM (505) 844-8627 tdhund@sandia.gov *Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 2 Objective  Test Advanced Lead-Acid Battery Consortium (ALABC) technology for utility partial state of charge (PSOC) cycling applications. Utility applications may include: Wind farm energy smoothing Photovoltaic energy smoothing

103

Sandia National Laboratories Distributive Power Initiative (DPI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Devices Devices Testing and Evaluation of Energy Storage Devices DOE Energy Storage Systems Research Program Annual Peer Review Funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy (DOE/ESS) through Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) September 29 - 30, 2008 Washington, DC Presented by: Tom Hund, Nancy Clark and Wes Baca Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM (505) 844-8627 tdhund@sandia.gov Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 2 Objective (FY-08 Work) Objective (FY-08 Work)  Identify and test advanced battery technology including Valve Regulated Lead-Acid, (VRLA) and Li-ion (Li-

104

Argonne battery technology helps power Chevy Volt | Argonne National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne battery technology helps power Chevy Volt Intense, in-situ X-rays from the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne were used to help Argonne National Laboratory design the...

105

Thermal energy storage for coal-fired power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents an engineering and economic evaluation of using thermal energy storage (TES) with coal-fired conventional and combined cycle power plants. In the first case, conventional pulverized coal combustion equipment was assumed to continuously operate to heat molten nitrate salt which was then stored in a tank. During intermediate-load demand periods, hot salt was withdrawn from storage and used to generate steam for a Rankine steam power cycle. This allowed the coal-fired salt heater to be approximately one-third the size of a coal-fired boiler in a conventional cycling plant. The use of nitrate salt TES also reduced the levelized cost of power by between 5% and 24% depends on the operating schedule. The second case evaluate the use of thermal energy storage with an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant. In this concept, the nitrate salt was heated by a combination of the gas turbine exhaust and the hot fuel gas. The IGCC plant also contained a low-temperature storage unit that uses a mixture of oil and rock as the thermal storage medium. Thermal energy stored in the low-temperature TES was used to preheat the feedwater after it leaves the condenser and to produce process steam for other applications in the IGCC plant. This concept study also predicted a 5% to 20% reduction in levelized cost of power compared to other coal-fired alternatives. If significant escalation rates in the price of fuel were assumed, the concept could be competitive with natural-gas-fired intermediate-load power generation. A sensitivity analysis of using a direct-contact heat exchanger instead of the conventional finned-tube design showed a significant reduction in the installed capital cost. 3 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Somasundaram, S.; Brown, D.R.; Antoniak, Z.I.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Assessment of Thermal Control Technologies for Cooling Electric Vehicle Power Electronics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL is assessing thermal control technologies to improve the thermal performance of power electronics devices for electric vehicles, while reducing the cost, weight, and volume of the system.

Kelly, K.; Abraham, T.; Bennion, K.; Bharathan, D.; Narumanchi, S.; O'Keefe, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

2013 completions of large solar thermal power plants mark ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Several large, new solar thermal power plants are expected to begin commercial operation by the end of 2013, more than doubling the solar thermal ...

108

Novel power system demonstrated for space travel | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel power system demonstrated for space travel | National Nuclear Novel power system demonstrated for space travel | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Novel power system demonstrated for space travel Novel power system demonstrated for space travel Posted By Office of Public Affairs John Bounds, Los Alamos National Laboratory

109

Novel power system demonstrated for space travel | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Novel power system demonstrated for space travel | National Nuclear Novel power system demonstrated for space travel | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Novel power system demonstrated for space travel Novel power system demonstrated for space travel Posted By Office of Public Affairs John Bounds, Los Alamos National Laboratory

110

Chemical energy storage system for SEGS solar thermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In October 1988, a symposium was held in Helendale, California, to discuss thermal energy storage (TES) concepts applicable to medium-temperature (200 to 400{degrees}C) solar thermal electric power plants, in general, and the solar electric generating system (SEGS) plants developed by Luz International, in particular. Chemical reaction energy storage based on the reversible reaction between metal oxides and metal hydroxides was identified as a leading candidate for meeting Luz International's cost and performance requirements. The principal objectives of this study were to identify the design conditions, requirements, and potential feasibility for a chemical energy storage system applied to a SEGS solar thermal power plant. The remaining sections of this report begin by providing an overview of the chemical reaction energy storage concept and a SEGS solar thermal power plant. Subsequent sections describe the initial screening of alternative evaporation energy sources and the more detailed evaluation of design alternatives considered for the preferred evaporation energy source. The final sections summarize the results, conclusions, and recommendations. 7 refs., 8 figs., 13 tabs.

Brown, D.R.; LaMarche, J.L.; Spanner, G.E.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Sandia National Laboratories Distributive Power Initiative (DPI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Testing and Evaluation of Testing and Evaluation of Energy Storage Devices DOE Energy Storage Systems Research Program Annual Peer Review This work was funded by the DOE Energy Storage Program September 23 - 26, 2007 San Francisco, CA Presented by: Tom Hund, Nancy Clark, David Johnson, and Wes Baca Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM (505) 844-8627 tdhund@sandia.gov *Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 2 Introduction (FY-07 Work) Introduction (FY-07 Work) Sandia/MeadWestvaco/NorthStar Supercap and Carbon Enhanced Lead-Acid Battery Work Prepared second generation of MWV carbon for testing in NorthStar and Battery Energy batteries

112

Thermal Sciences The thermal sciences area involves the study of energy conversion and transmission, power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, power generation, the flow of liquids and gases, and the transfer of thermal energy (heat) by means, Thermodynamics, a sophomore spring course. This is followed by ME 608, Fluid Dynamics in the fall of the junior - Analytical Fluid Dynamics ME 709 - Computational Fluids Dynamics ME 712 - Waves in Fluids #12;

Chini, Gregory P.

113

Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor December 20, 1951 Arco, ID Electric Power Produced from Nuclear Reactor

114

Analyses of MTI Imagery of Power Plant Thermal Discharge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MTI images of thermal discharge from three power plants are analyzed in this paper with the aid of a 3-D hydrodynamic code. The power plants use different methods to dissipate waste heat in the environment: a cooling lake at Comanche Peak, ocean discharge at Pilgrim and cooling canals at Turkey Point. This paper shows that it is possible to reproduce the temperature distributions captured in MTI imagery with accurate code inputs, but the key parameters change from site to site. Wind direction and speed are the most important parameters at Pilgrim, whereas air temperatures and dewpoint temperatures are most important at Comanche Peak and Turkey Point. This paper also shows how the combination of high-resolution thermal imagery and hydrodynamic simulation lead to better understanding of the mechanisms by which waste heat is dissipated in the environment.

Garrett, A.J.

2001-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

115

Solar thermal power systems. Annual technical progress report, FY 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technical progress report on the DOE Solar Thermal Power Systems Program is given. Emphasis is on the technical progress of the projects rather than on activities and individual contractor efforts. Each project description indicates its place in the prior to FY 1978 is given; the significant achievements and real progress of each project during FY 1978 are described; and future project activities as well as anticipated significant achievements for each project are forecast. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Pulsed Power Technology at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News and Reviews News and Reviews Pulsed Power in the News Nuclear fusion simulation shows high-gain energy output (March 2012) Rapid-fire pulse brings Sandia Z method closer to goal of high-yield fusion reactor (April 2007) Ice created in nanoseconds by Sandia's Z machine (March 2007) Z-Machine Shockwaves Melt Diamond (November 2006) Phase diagram of water revised by Sandia researchers (October 2006) Z fires objects faster than Earth moves through space (June 6, 2005) Sandia imagists view imploding wire arrays on Z (November 10, 2004) Z's $61.7 million refurbishment to advance capabilities (October 21, 2004) Z produces fusion neutrons (April 7, 2003) Former shock physics manager (Asay) elected to NAE (February 20, 2003) Z-Beamlet image shows Z evenly compresses pellet (August 30, 2001)

117

Simultaneous power and thermal integrity driven via stapling in 3D ICs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existing work on via-stapling in 3D integrated circuits optimizes power and thermal integrity separately and uses steadystate thermal analysis. This paper presents the first in-depth study on simultaneous power and thermal integrity driven viastapling ... Keywords: structured and parameterized model order reduction, thermal modeling and management

Hao Yu; Joanna Ho; Lei He

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Analysis of photovoltaic/thermal electric power plant systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual definition and performance evaluation of a 100 megawatt (MW) hybrid photovoltaic/thermal electric power plant has been carried out. The concept utilizes the ability of gallium arsenide photovoltaic cells to achieve high conversion efficiency at high incident fluxes and elevated temperatures. Solar energy is focused by a field of steerable mirrors (heliostats) onto a tower mounted receiver whose outer surface is covered with gallium arsenide (AlGaAs/GaAs) solar cells and whose inner surface is a water boiler. The solar cells convert a fraction of the incident radiation into electrical energy, and the remaining energy is extracted at approximately 200/sup 0/C and used to power a Rankine cycle turbine generator (bottoming cycle). Water is used as the solar cell array coolant, as the thermodynamic working fluid, and as the thermal energy storage medium. Parametric studies were conducted to select conceptual design parameters and operational characteristics which imply the lowest levelized busbar electric energy costs. Parameters varied were collector area, condenser surface area, fan power, ambient temperature, and electric and thermal energy storage capacities. The report describes the concept, outlines the design analysis method, summarizes the parametric study results, and defines the selected plant configuration. The lowest levelized busbar electric energy generation cost, 70 mills/kilowatt-hr., was achieved with a relatively small collector area, 0.8 x 10/sup 6/ square meters, and no stored energy. A rough comparison of this combined power plant with a similar photovoltaic plant, operated at lower solar cell temperature and with no bottoming cycle, showed the busbar cost of electricity (BBEC) from the combined system to be approximately 9% lower.

Gluck, D.F.; Kelley, W.A.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

National-Scale Wind Resource Assessment for Power Generation (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes the current standards for conducting a national-scale wind resource assessment for power generation, along with the risk/benefit considerations to be considered when beginning a wind resource assessment. The presentation describes changes in turbine technology and viable wind deployment due to more modern turbine technology and taller towers and shows how the Philippines national wind resource assessment evolved over time to reflect changes that arise from updated technologies and taller towers.

Baring-Gould, E. I.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the value of concentrating solar power (CSP) and thermal energy storage (TES) in four regions in the southwestern United States. Our analysis shows that TES can increase the value of CSP by allowing more thermal energy from a CSP plant?s solar field to be used, by allowing a CSP plant to accommodate a larger solar field, and by allowing CSP generation to be shifted to hours with higher energy prices. We analyze the sensitivity of CSP value to a number of factors, including the optimization period, price and solar forecasting, ancillary service sales, capacity value and dry cooling of the CSP plant. We also discuss the value of CSP plants and TES net of capital costs.

Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national thermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Seawater pump study: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Program. Final report. [For ocean thermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The pumping power required to move cold seawater and warm seawater through an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plant is a significant portion of the plant power output; therefore, seawater pump performance, sizing, and cost information are very influential inputs into any power plant system design optimizations. The analysis and evaluation of large seawater pumping systems selected specifically for the OTEC application are provided with a view toward judging the impact of pump selection on overall OTEC power plant performance. A self-contained bulb, direct drive, axial flow pump was found to have a distinct advantage in performance and arrangement flexibility. A design of a pump operating at a net total head rise of 3.5 meters and a flow capacity of 100 m/sup 3//s is presented including pump blade geometry (profiles), pump diffuser geometry, and pump/diffuser configuration and performance. Results are presented in terms of the geometric and power requirements of several related pump designs over a range of seawater capacity from 25 m/sup 3//s to 100 m/sup 3//s. Summary analysis and evaluations include pump design weights and cost estimates.

Little, T.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Thermochemical seasonal energy storage for solar thermal power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the many years that thermochemical energy storage has been under investigation, the concept has been plagued with two persistent problems: high capital cost and poor efficiency. Literally hundreds of chemical reactions have also been carried out. For short-term storage, thermochemical systems suffer in comparison with highly efficient sensible storage media such as molten salts. Long-term storage, on the other hand, is not cost-competitive with systems employing fossil backup power. Thermochemical storage will play a significant role in solar thermal electric conversion only under highly select circumstances. The portion of electric demand served by solar plants must be sufficiently high that the balance of the grid cannot fully supplant seasonal storage. High fossil fuel costs must preclude the use of gas turbines for backup power. Significant breakthroughs in the development of one or more chemical reaction systems must occur. Ingeniously integrated systems must be employed to enhance the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of thermochemical storage. A promising integration scheme discussed herein consists of using sensible storage for diurnal cycling in parallel with thermochemical seasonal storage. Under the most favorable circumstances, thermochemical storage can be expected to play a small but perhaps vital role in supplying baseload energy from solar thermal electric conversion plants.

Barnhart, J.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Power conditioning development for the National Ignition Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high energy glass laser system and target chamber that will be used for research in inertial confinement fusion. The 192 beams of the NIF laser system are pumped by over 8600 Xenon flashlamps. The power conditioning system for NIF must deliver nearly 300 MJ of energy to the flashlamps in a cost effective and reliable manner. The present system design has over 200 capacitive energy storage modules that store approximately 1.7 MJ each and deliver that energy through a single switch assembly to 20 parallel sets of two series flashlamps. Although there are many possible system designs, few will meet the aggressive cost goals necessary to make the system affordable. Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are developing the system and component technologies that will be required to build the power conditioning system for the National Ignition Facility. This paper will describe the ongoing development activities for the NIF power conditioning system.

Newton, M.A.; Larson, D.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Wilson, J.M.; Harjes, H.C.; Savage, M.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, R.L. [American Controls, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHASE CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLARChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in ConcentratedChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHASE CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLARMaterials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated SolarMaterials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Numerical calculation of thermal field distribution in oil immersed power transformer: a comparison of methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarise a few computational methods and engineering models proposed for transformer thermal analysis and the accurate prediction of transformer thermal characteristics. The paper presents different approach for numerical calculation of thermal ... Keywords: hot-spot temperature, numerical calculation, power transformer, thermal field

Vlado Madzarevic; Izudin Kapetanovic; Majda Tesanovic; Mensur Kasumovic

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Thermal Energy Grid Concept M. Olszewski OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

38 longer term resource base, such as nuclear or coal, to supply this thermal energy. If nuclear fuels are used to supply a significant portion of the low to moderate temperature...

128

Thermally Conductive Graphite Foam - Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Thermoelectric devices Radiators EMI shielding Patent ... Materials Science UT-Battelle, LLC Oak Ridge National Laboratory Office Phone: 865.576.9682

129

A Scalable Modeling Technique to Estimate Dynamic Thermal Design Power of Datapath Intensive Designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a power modeling approach for the estimation of dynamic power under Thermal Design Power (TDP1) for datapath intensive designs is proposed. Early estimation of TDP is crucial for the design of thermal and cooling solutions of a chip and ...

Prashant Agrawal; Srinivasa R. STG; Ajit N. Oke; Saurabh Vijay

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Recent National Solar Thermal Test Facility activities, in partnership with industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA conducts testing of solar thermal components and systems, funded primarily by the US Department of Energy. Activities are conducted in support of Central Receiver Technology, Distributed Receiver Technology and Design Assistance projects. All activities are performed in support of various cost-shared government/industry joint ventures and, on a design assistance basis, in support of a number of other industry partners.

Ghanbari, C.; Cameron, C.P.; Ralph, M.E.; Pacheco, J.E.; Rawlinson, K.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evans, L.R. [Ewing Technical Design, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stores or releases thermal energy. This subsystem consistsGas - 436 MW Annual Thermal Energy Absorbed by the Heatof Storage Tanks, m Thermal Energy Stored per Cycle. MW -hr

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Central Receiver Solar Thermal Power System. Hailstone simulation test report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the work described is to verify heliostat survival and evaluate material damage resultant from the impact of 1 inch hailstones traveling at terminal velocity (75 feet/second). Data obtained from the tests were also used to predict the loss in specular transmittance of the plastic heliostat enclosures due to hail damage possible at potential solar thermal power plant sites in southwestern United States. The approach taken was to subject several different typical enclosure materials as well as an existing enclosure at Boardman, Oregon, to hailstone bombardment and measure and analyze the effects on enclosure performance. Hailstorm frequency and severity data, although sparse and highly generalized, was found in the literature and used along with the experimental data to predict total accumulative damage after 15 years of exposure. (WHK)

1978-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Summary Report for Concentrating Solar Power Thermal Storage Workshop: New Concepts and Materials for Thermal Energy Storage and Heat-Transfer Fluids, May 20, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes a workshop on thermal energy storage for concentrating solar power (CSP) that was held in Golden, Colorado, on May 20, 2011. The event was hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. The objective was to engage the university and laboratory research communities to identify and define research directions for developing new high-temperature materials and systems that advance thermal energy storage for CSP technologies. This workshop was motivated, in part, by the DOE SunShot Initiative, which sets a very aggressive cost goal for CSP technologies -- a levelized cost of energy of 6 cents per kilowatt-hour by 2020 with no incentives or credits.

Glatzmaier, G.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

NETL: Gasification - National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifier Optimization Main Area Gasifier Optimization Main Area National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility Southern Company Services, Inc. Project Number: FE0000749 Project Description The objective of this project is to develop technologies under realistic conditions that will reduce the cost of advanced coal-fueled power plants with CO2 capture. This technology development will include the design, procurement, construction, installation, and operation of a flexible facility for the testing of processes for pre-combustion CO2 capture, post-combustion CO2 capture and oxy-combustion. Components and systems that are appropriate for inclusion in the detailed test plan will be identified in collaboration with NETL. In addition to evaluating DOE sponsored projects; projects from industry, universities, and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) will be evaluated to assist in accomplishing the project objectives.

135

Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage with Embedded Heat Pipes for Concentrating Solar Power Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? An innovative, novel concept of combining heat pipes with latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) for concentrating solar power (CSP) applications is explored. The (more)

Robak, Christopher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Balance of Power: Dynamic Thermal Management for Internet Data Centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advent of Internet-based applications and their resulting multitier distributed architecture has changed the focus of design for large-scale Internet computing. Internet server applications execute in a horizontally scalable topology across hundreds ... Keywords: dynamic thermal management, thermal-load balancing, Internet data center, row-wise and regional thermal management, thermal policies

Ratnesh K. Sharma; Cullen E. Bash; Chandrakant D. Patel; Richard J. Friedrich; Jeffrey S. Chase

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A consideration of cycle selection for meso-scale distributed solar-thermal power .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Thermodynamic and thermoeconomic aspects of 12.5 kW residential solar-thermal power generating systems suitable for distributed, decentralized power generation paradigm are presented in this thesis. The (more)

Price, Suzanne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion Btu)

139

Use of GTE-65 gas turbine power units in the thermal configuration of steam-gas systems for the refitting of operating thermal electric power plants  

SciTech Connect

Thermal configurations for condensation, district heating, and discharge steam-gas systems (PGU) based on the GTE-65 gas turbine power unit are described. A comparative multivariant analysis of their thermodynamic efficiency is made. Based on some representative examples, it is shown that steam-gas systems with the GTE-65 and boiler-utilizer units can be effectively used and installed in existing main buildings during technical refitting of operating thermal electric power plants.

Lebedev, A. S.; Kovalevskii, V. P. ['Leningradskii Metallicheskii Zavod', branch of JSC 'Silovye mashiny' (Russian Federation); Getmanov, E. A.; Ermaikina, N. A. ['Institut Teploenergoproekt', branch of JSC 'Inzhenernyi tsentr EES' (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Air Cooling Technology for Power Electronics Thermal Control (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Assessing potential for air cooling in power electronics is a critical factor in power electronics equipment. NREL aims to assess effective air cooling techniques for power electronics technologies.

Bharathan, D.

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national thermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dry-Cooling Tower Power-Generation Subsystem Summary AnGas-Circulation Subsystem The Power-Generation Subsystem Theinsulating plant piping. power-generation heat exchangers.

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

EA-1857: Wind Turbine Power Generation Complex at Idaho National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA would evaluate the environmental impacts of the proposed wind turbine power generation complex at Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho.

143

Worker health and safety in solar thermal power systems. III. Thermal energy storage subsystems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of the use of thermal energy storage (TES) subsystems in solar thermal power systems (STPS) on operating failures and on worker health and safety are examined. Revelant near- and medium-term designs for TES subsystems are reviewed. Generic failure events are considered by an event tree methodology. Three generic categories of initiating events are identified which can lead to release of storage fluids and other hazards. Three TES subsystem designs are selected for, and subjected to, analysis. A fluid release event tree for a sensible heat TES subsystem using mixed media organic oil/crushed rock and sand, designed for the Barstow, CA, 10 MWe pilot plant, is developed. Toxicology and flammability hazards are considered. The effect of component failures, including ullage and fluid maintenance units, on subsystem safety is considered. A latent heat subsystem using NaNO/sub 3//NaOH as the working medium is studied, and relevant failure events delineated. Mechanical equipment failures including the scraped wall heat exchangers, are examined. Lastly, a thermochemical TES subsystem using SO/sub 2//SO/sub 3/ interconversion is considered. Principle hazards identified include mechanical failures and storage fluid release. The integrity of the system is found to depend on catalyst and heat exchanger reliability. Dynamic response to off-normal system events is considered.

Ullman, A.Z.; Sokolow, B.B.; Daniels, J.; Hurt, P.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Dynamic thermal modelling of a power integrated circuit with the application of structure functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents dynamic thermal analyses of a power integrated circuit with a cooling assembly. The investigations are based on the examination of the cumulative and differential structure functions obtained from the circuit cooling curves recorded ... Keywords: Contact thermal resistance, Heat transfer coefficient, Structure function, Thermal modelling and simulation

Marcin Janicki; Jedrzej Banaszczyk; Gilbert De Mey; Marek Kaminski; Bjorn Vermeersch; Andrzej Napieralski

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Photovoltaic power systems and the National Electrical Code: Suggested practices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This guide provides information on how the National Electrical Code (NEC) applies to photovoltaic systems. The guide is not intended to supplant or replace the NEC; it paraphrases the NEC where it pertains to photovoltaic systems and should be used with the full text of the NEC. Users of this guide should be thoroughly familiar with the NEC and know the engineering principles and hazards associated with electrical and photovoltaic power systems. The information in this guide is the best available at the time of publication and is believed to be technically accurate; it will be updated frequently. Application of this information and results obtained are the responsibility of the user.

Wiles, J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Southwest Technology Development Inst.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Effects of regional insolation differences upon advanced solar thermal electric power plant performance and energy costs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study determines the performance and cost of four 10 MWe advanced solar thermal electric power plants sited in various regions of the continental United States. The solar plants are conceptualized to begin commercial operation in the year 2000. It is assumed that major subsystem performance will have improved substantially as compared to that of pilot plants currently operating or under construction. The net average annual system efficiency is therefore roughly twice that of current solar thermal electric power plant designs. Similarly, capital costs reflecting goals based on high-volume mass production that are considered to be appropriate for the year 2000 have been used. These costs, which are approximately an order of magnitude below the costs of current experimental projects, are believed to be achievable as a result of the anticipated sizeable solar penetration into the energy market in the 1990 to 2000 timeframe. The paraboloidal dish, central receiver, cylindrical parabolic trough, and compound parabolic concentrators comprise the advanced collector concepts studied. All concepts exhibit their best performance when sited in regional areas such as the sunbelt where the annual insolation is high. The regional variation in solar plant performance has been assessed in relation to the expected rise in the future cost of residential and commercial electricity in the same regions. A discussion of the regional insolation data base, a description of the solar systems performance and costs, and a presentation of a range for the forecast cost of conventional electricity by region and nationally over the next several decades are given.

Latta, A.F.; Bowyer, J.M.; Fujita, T.; Richter, P.H.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Using SVM based method for equipment fault detection in a thermal power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the growing demand on electricity, how to improve the efficiency of equipment in a thermal power plant has become one of the critical issues. Reports indicate that efficiency and availability are heavily dependant upon high reliability and maintainability. ... Keywords: Classification, Data mining, Maintenance, Support vector machines, Thermal power

Kai-Ying Chen; Long-Sheng Chen; Mu-Chen Chen; Chia-Lung Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

A Local Model Networks Based Multivariable Long-Range Predictive Control Strategy for Thermal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Load-cycling operation of thermal power plants leads to changes in operating point right across the whole operating range. This results in non-linear variations in most of the plant variables. This paper investigates methods to account for non-linearities ... Keywords: Constrained multivariable control, local model networks, long range predictive control, thermal power plant boiler

G. PRASAD; E. SWIDENBANK; B. W. HOGG

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Development of HR module in ERP for IB thermal power station: a case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports the implementation of HR module in Enterprise Resources Planning (ERP) at IB Thermal Power Station (IBTPS). This paper covers the methodology adopted in implementing the module in ERP besides highlighting the structure ... Keywords: BMR, DFD, ERP, HRIS, HRM, India, business mapping report, data flow diagram, enterprise resources planning, human resource management, human resources information systems, thermal power plants

Sanjib K. Jena; Sarada Baboo; Srikanta Patnaik

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Maximizing Thermal Efficiency and Optimizing Energy Management (Fact Sheet), Thermal Test Facility (TTF), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maximizing Thermal Efficiency and Maximizing Thermal Efficiency and Optimizing Energy Management Scientists at this living laboratory develop optimal solutions for managing energy flows within buildings and transportation systems. The built environment is stressing the utility grid to a greater degree than ever before. Growing demand for electric vehicles, space conditioning, and plug loads presents a critical opportunity for more effective energy management and development of efficiency technologies. Researchers at the Thermal Test Facility (TTF) on the campus of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, are addressing this opportunity. Through analysis of efficient heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) strategies, automated home energy management (AHEM), and energy storage systems,

151

Ice Thermal Storage Systems for Nuclear Power Plant Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Availability of cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. One potential solution is to use ice thermal storage (ITS) systems that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plants thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses the ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS also provides a way to shift a large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ITS systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss during hot weather so that new plants could be considered in regions lack of cooling water. This paper will review light water reactor cooling issues and present the feasibility study results.

Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Economic analysis of PV hybrid power system: Pinnacles National Monument  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PV hybrid electric power systems can offer an economically competitive alternative to engine generator (genset) systems in many off-grid applications. Besides the obvious `green` advantages of producing less noise and emissions, the PV hybrid can, in some cases, offer a lower life-cycle cost (LCC) then the genset. This paper evaluates the LCC of the 9.6 kWp PV hybrid power system installed by the National Park Services (NPS) at Pinnacles National Monument, CA. NPS motivation for installation of this hybrid was not based on economics, but rather the need to replace two aging diesel gensets with an alternative that would be quieter, fuel efficient, and more in keeping with new NPS emphasis on sustainable design and operations. In fact, economic analysis shows a lower 20-year LCC for the installed PV hybrid than for simple replacement of the two gensets. The analysis projects are net savings by the PV hybrid system of $83,561 and over 162,000 gallons of propane when compared with the genset-only system. This net savings is independent of the costs associated with environmental emissions. The effects of including emissions costs, according to NPS guidelines, is also discussed. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Rosenthal, A.; Durand, S. [Southwest Technology Development Institute, Las Cruces, NM (United States); Thomas, M.; Post, H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

788-1), December 1976. Electric Power Research Institute,CONCEPT FOR SOLAR ELECTRIC POWER: Interim Report, Report No.generate t 100 MW , gross electric power. e Storage has been

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. , The Central Reciever Power Plant: An Environmental,of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of Storage

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on June, 1978 prices, AN OVERVIEW OF THE SOLAR POWER PLANTstorage for a solar power plant at a reasonable price usingsolar power plant energy storage for a reasonable price

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The ImpactGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageVessel Design on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I)

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageDesign on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I) II (I

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories conducts research and development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, photovoltaic (PV) energy generation techniques have received significant attention, since solar energy for practical applications, such as PV power stations, solar-powered vehicles, and solar power heating the string charger interface. Solar irradiations received by PV cells in the PV system, may be different

Fuerschbach, Phillip

159

A thermal analysis model for high power density beam stops  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is presently designing and building the 2.5 MeV injector for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The design includes various beam intercepting devices such as beam stops and slits. The target power densities can be as high as 500 kW/cm{sup 2} with a beam stopping range of 25 to 30 microns, producing stresses well above yield in most materials. In order to analyze the induced temperatures and stresses, a finite element model has been developed. The model has been written parametrically to allow the beam characteristics, target material, dimensions, angle of incidence and mesh densities to be easily adjusted. The heat load is applied to the model through the use of a 3-dimensional table containing the calculated volumetric heat rates. The load is based on a bi-gaussian beam shape which is absorbed by the target according to a Bragg peak distribution. The results of several analyses using the SNS Front End beam are presented.

Virostek, S.; Oshatz, D.; Staples, J.

2001-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

160

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the replacement of non-renewable energy production. Unlikereplacement of non-renewable energy sources. The thermal

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national thermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Large-Scale Testing and High-Fidelity Simulation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories to Support Space Power and Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, as a Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Agency, has major responsibility to ensure the safety and security needs of nuclear weapons. As such, with an experienced research staff, Sandia maintains a spectrum of modeling and simulation capabilities integrated with experimental and large-scale test capabilities. This expertise and these capabilities offer considerable resources for addressing issues of interest to the space power and propulsion communities. This paper presents Sandia's capability to perform thermal qualification (analysis, test, modeling and simulation) using a representative weapon system as an example demonstrating the potential to support NASA's Lunar Reactor System.

Dobranich, Dean [Thermal and Reactive Processes Department, Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Blanchat, Thomas K. [Fire Science and Technology Department, Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

162

Research and Development for Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems (TES) for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP)  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective was to develop innovative heat transfer devices and methodologies for novel thermal energy storage systems for concentrating solar power generation involving phase change materials (PCMs). Specific objectives included embedding thermosyphons and/or heat pipes (TS/HPs) within appropriate phase change materials to significantly reduce thermal resistances within the thermal energy storage system of a large-scale concentrating solar power plant and, in turn, improve performance of the plant. Experimental, system level and detailed comprehensive modeling approaches were taken to investigate the effect of adding TS/HPs on the performance of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems.

Faghri, Amir; Bergman, Theodore L; Pitchumani, Ranga

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

163

Sandia National Laboratories: Z Pulsed Power Facility: Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Z-Machine Z-Machine About Z Z Research Z News Contact Us Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Top Z News Publications Z-Machine Publications Archive Inertial Confinement Fusion Dynamic Hohlraums Thomas W. L. Sanford, "Overview of the Dynamic-Hohlraum X-ray Source at Sandia National Laboratories," April 2007 (1.5 MB PDF) T.W.L. Sanford, "Comparative properties of the Interior and Blowoff Plasmas in a dynamic Hohlraum," April 2007 (1.39 KB PDF) Tom Nash, "Current Scaling of Axially Radiated Power in dynamic Hohlraums and Dynamic Hohlraum Load Design for ZR," March 2007 (2.15 PDF) R. A. Vesey, "Target Design for High Fusion Yield with the Double Z-pinch driven Hohlraums," March 2007 (1.65 PDF) T.W.L. Sanford, "Wire Initiation Critical for Radiation symmetry

164

Study on the Mode of Power Plant Circulating Water Waste Heat Regenerative Thermal System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Plant Circulating Water (PPCW) waste heat recycling is an important way of increasing a power plants primary energy ratio. According to the PPCW waste heat regenerative thermal system, the authors propose two modes of heat pump heat regenerative ... Keywords: heat pump, power plant circulating water (PPCW), waste heat recycling, energy saving

Bi Qingsheng; Ma Yanliang; Yang Zhifu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Power and Thermal Characteristics of a Pentium M System Heather Hanson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was disabled. Both temperature and power are steady at 800 MHz, and after the p-state transition, both response to p-states for a series of mi- crobenchmarks and Section 4 shows the power and thermal response performance capability and may consume maximum power", and Pn as the state with performance "at its minimum

Keckler, Stephen W.

166

Thermal-Fluid Characterizations of ZnO and SiC Nanofluids for Advanced Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Special Issue on the 2008 International Congress on Advances in Nuclear Power Plants / Thermal Hydraulics

In Cheol Bang; Ji Hyun Kim

167

Bettis and Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Power Laboratories Bettis and Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories Bettis and Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories DE-NR0000031 Managed and Operated by Bechtel Marine Propulsion...

168

High-density thermoelectric power generation and nanoscale thermal metrology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermoelectric power generation has been around for over 50 years but has seen very little large scale implementation due to the inherently low efficiencies and powers available from known materials. Recent material advances ...

Mayer, Peter (Peter Matthew), 1978-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Integrating gray system theory and logistic regression into case-based reasoning for safety assessment of thermal power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety assessment of thermal power plants (TPPs) is one of the important means to guarantee the safety of production in thermal power production enterprises. Due to various technical limitations, existing assessment approaches, such as analytic hierarchy ... Keywords: Case-based reasoning, Gray system theory, Intelligent decision support system, Logistic regression, Management safety assessment, Thermal power plants

Changyong Liang; Dongxiao Gu; Isabelle Bichindaritz; Xingguo Li; Chunrong Zuo; Wenen Cheng

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Thermal Storage Systems for Concentrating Solar Power | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

that is used to generate electricity. If the receiver contains oil or molten salt as the heat-transfer medium, then the thermal energy can be stored for later use. This enables...

171

Fifth National Green Power Marketing Conference: Powering the New Millennium, August 7-8, 2000, Denver, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radical changes in the electricity industry have dramatically opened the marketplace to renewable energy development. In fact, by the end of 2000, more than one-third of all U.S. electricity consumers had option to purchase green power. The Fifth National Conference on Green Power Marketing -- attended by some 160 green power professionals -- examined various strategies for growing the green power market, successful utility approaches to green power pricing programs, and the cost of renewable energy syst...

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

172

Thermal And Mechanical Analysis of High-power Light-emitting Diodes with Ceramic Packages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present the thermal and mechanical analysis of high-power light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with ceramic packages. Transient thermal measurements and thermo-mechanical simulation were performed to study the thermal and mechanical characteristics of ceramic packages. Thermal resistance from the junction to the ambient was decreased from 76.1 oC/W to 45.3 oC/W by replacing plastic mould to ceramic mould for LED packages. Higher level of thermo-mechanical stresses in the chip were found for LEDs with ceramic packages despite of less mismatching coefficients of thermal expansion comparing with plastic packages. The results suggest that the thermal performance of LEDs can be improved by using ceramic packages, but the mounting process of the high power LEDs with ceramic packages is critically important and should be in charge of delaminating interface layers in the packages.

J. Hu; L. Yang; M. -W. Shin

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

173

NEUTRONIC AND THERMAL HYDRAULIC DESIGNS OF ANNULAR FUEL FOR HIGH POWER DENSITY BWRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a promising new fuel for high power density light water reactors, the feasibility of using annular fuel for BWR services is explored from both thermal hydraulic and neutronic points of view. Keeping the bundle size ...

Morra, P.

174

Thermal desalination : structural optimization and integration in clean power and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large number of resources are dedicated to seawater desalination and will only grow as world-wide water scarcity increases. In arid areas with high temperature and salinity seawater, thermal desalination and power plants ...

Zak, Gina Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion ...

176

Thermal energy storage for an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of molten nitrate salt thermal energy storage in an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant allowing the facility to economically provide peak- and intermediate-load electric power. The results of the study show that an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant with thermal energy storage can reduce the cost of coal-fired peak- or intermediate-load electric power by between 5% and 20% depending on the plants operating schedule. The use of direct-contact salt heating can further improve the economic attractiveness of the concept. 11 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Cost analysis of power plant cooling using aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most utilities in the US experience their peak demand for electric power during periods with high ambient temperature. Unfortunately, the performance of many power plants decreases with high ambient temperature. The use of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) for seasonal storage of chill can be an alternative method for heat rejection. Cold water produced during the previous winter is stored in the aquifer and can be used to provide augmented cooling during peak demand periods increasing the output of many Rankine cycle power plants. This report documents an investigation of the technical and economic feasibility of using aquifer thermal energy storage for peak cooling of power plants. 9 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

Zimmerman, P.W.; Drost, M.K.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Thermal energy storage for an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of molten nitrate salt thermal energy storage in an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant allowing the facility to economically provide peak- and intermediate-load electric power. The results of the study show that an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant with thermal energy storage can reduce the cost of coal-fired peak- or intermediate-load electric power by between 5% and 20% depending on the plants operating schedule. The use of direct-contact salt heating can further improve the economic attractiveness of the concept. 12 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Drost, K.; Antoniak, Z.; Brown, D.; Somasundaram, S.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Method of operating a thermal engine powered by a chemical reaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention involves a novel method of increasing the efficiency of a thermal engine. Heat is generated by a non-linear chemical reaction of reactants, said heat being transferred to a thermal engine such as Rankine cycle power plant. The novel method includes externally perturbing one or more of the thermodynamic variables of said non-linear chemical reaction.

Ross, John (Stanford, CA); Escher, Claus (Nieder-Ronstadt, DE)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Method of operating a thermal engine powered by a chemical reaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention involves a novel method of increasing the efficiency of a thermal engine. Heat is generated by a non-linear chemical reaction of reactants, said heat being transferred to a thermal engine such as Rankine cycle power plant. The novel method includes externally perturbing one or more of the thermodynamic variables of said non-linear chemical reaction. 7 figs.

Ross, J.; Escher, C.

1988-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national thermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Secondary concentrators for parabolic dish solar thermal power systems  

SciTech Connect

One approach to production of electricity or high-temperature process heat from solar energy is to use point-focusing, two-axis pointing concentrators in a distributed-receiver solar thermal system. This paper discusses some of the possibilities and problems in using compound concentrators in parabolic dish systems. 18 refs.

Jaffe, L.D.; Poon, P.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Power Electronics Symposium - Oak Ridge National Laboratory | ORNL  

For more information about the Power Electronics and Electrical Power Systems Research Center, visit http://peepsrc.ornl.gov/ or contact Mitch ...

183

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demonstrated how well a molten salt thermal storage systembased CSP plant. Cold molten salt is pumped from a largetemperature and send to a hot molten salt tank. Salt is then

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Feasibility of a hybrid cooling system in a thermal power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of introducing a hybrid cooling system in a thermal power plant is investigated with an aim to reduce water use with a minimum impact on plant performance. A number of cooling systems have been modelled including existing evaporative ... Keywords: cooling, hybrid cooling, power station, sustainable water consumption

C. R. Williams; M. G. Rasul

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Efficient power modeling and software thermal sensing for runtime temperature monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of microprocessors has been hindered by increasing power consumption and heat dissipation on die. An excessive amount of heat creates reliability problems, reduces the lifetime of a processor, and elevates the cost of cooling and packaging ... Keywords: Power, thermal

Wei Wu; Lingling Jin; Jun Yang; Pu Liu; Sheldon X.-D. Tan

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Topology, design, analysis and thermal management of power electronics for hybrid electric vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for fuel cells and advanced heavy-duty hybrid electric vehicles. He also has experience with alternativeTopology, design, analysis and thermal management of power electronics for hybrid electric vehicle an important role in the success of electric, hybrid and fuel cell vehicles. Typical power electronics circuits

Mi, Chunting "Chris"

187

Central receiver solar thermal power system, phase 1. Progress report for period ending December 31, 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program objective is the preliminary design of a 10 MWe pilot solar power plant supported by major subsystem experiments. Progress is reported on the following task elements: 10 MWe pilot plant; collector subsystem design and analysis; receiver subsystem requirements; receiver subsystem design; thermal storage subsystem; electrical power generation subsystem; and pilot plant architectural engineering and support. (WDM)

None

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Thermal Characteristic Analysis of Power Lithium-ion Battery System for Electric Vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the electric vehicles used lithium manganese lithium-ion power battery (LiMn2O4 power battery) as the research object, the paper researched on the parameter identification of battery cell, has built the finite element model of single cell and completed ... Keywords: Lithium-ion battery, Thermal characteristic analysis, Electric Vehicle

Wang Wenwei; Lin Cheng; Tang Peng; Zhou Chengjun

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Solar-thermal hybridization of Advanced Zero Emissions Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Dioxide emissions from power production are believed to have significant contributions to the greenhouse effect and global warming. Alternative energy resources, such as solar radiation, may help abate emissions but ...

El Khaja, Ragheb Mohamad Fawaz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Thermal-induced leakage power optimization by redundant resource allocation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, at early design stages, leakage power is associated with the number of transistors in a design. Hence, intuitively an implementation with minimum resource usage would be best for low leakage. Such an allocation would generally be followed ...

Min Ni; Seda Ogrenci Memik

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural-Draft Dry-Cooling Tower Power-Generation SubsystemSubsystem Costs Cost a, b, Dry-Cooling Tower Costs c, II.Steam Wet-Cooling Tower Costs Turbine~Generator STORAGE UNIT

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A thermally efficient micro-reactor for thermophotovoltaic power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon fuels exhibit very high energy densities, and micro-generators converting the stored chemical energy into electrical power are interesting alternatives to batteries in certain applications. The increasing demands ...

Nielsen, Ole Mattis, 1977-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Monitoring the Thermal Power of Nuclear Reactors with a Prototype Cubic Meter Antineutrino Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we estimate how quickly and how precisely a reactor's operational status and thermal power can be monitored over hour to month time scales, using the antineutrino rate as measured by a cubic meter scale detector. Our results are obtained from a detector we have deployed and operated at 25 meter standoff from a reactor core. This prototype can detect a prompt reactor shutdown within five hours, and monitor relative thermal power to three percent within seven days. Monitoring of short-term power changes in this way may be useful in the context of International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Reactor Safeguards Regime, or other cooperative monitoring regimes.

A. Bernstein; N. S. Bowden; A. Misner; T. Palmer

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

Monitoring the Thermal Power of Nuclear Reactors with a Prototype Cubic Meter Antineutrino Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we estimate how quickly and how precisely a reactor's operational status and thermal power can be monitored over hour to month time scales, using the antineutrino rate as measured by a cubic meter scale detector. Our results are obtained from a detector we have deployed and operated at 25 meter standoff from a reactor core. This prototype can detect a prompt reactor shutdown within five hours, and monitor relative thermal power to three percent within seven days. Monitoring of short-term power changes in this way may be useful in the context of International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Reactor Safeguards Regime, or other cooperative monitoring regimes.

Bernstein, A; Misner, A; Palmer, T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development-I. Phase I. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Power System Development-I (PSD-I), Phase I, study was to develop conceptual and preliminary designs of closed-cycle ammonia power system modules for the 100-MW(e) OTEC Demonstration Plant, the 400-MW(e) Commercial Size Plant, and Heat Exchanger Test Articles representative of the full-size power system module design. Results are presented.

Not Available

1978-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

196

GRC Workshop: The Power of the National Geothermal Data System | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GRC Workshop: The Power of the National Geothermal Data System GRC Workshop: The Power of the National Geothermal Data System GRC Workshop: The Power of the National Geothermal Data System October 2, 2013 (All day) Flyer for the National Geothermal Data System workshop at the Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting on October 2, 2013 in Las Vegas. Drilling Down: How Legacy and New Research Data Can Advance Geothermal Development-The Power of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) A workshop at the Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada Abstract: The National Geothermal Data System's (NGDS) launch in 2014 will provide open access to millions of datasets, sharing technical geothermal-relevant data across the geosciences to propel geothermal development and production forward. By aggregating findings from the Energy Department's RD&D projects

197

Assessment of the potential of solar thermal small power systems in small utilities. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study involved an assessment of the potential economic benefit of small solar thermal electric power systems to small municipal and rural electric utilities. Five different solar thermal small power system configurations were considered in the study representing three different solar thermal technologies. The configurations included: (1) 1-MW, 2-MW, and 10-MW parabolic dish concentrators with a 15-kW heat engine mounted at the focal point of each dish. These systems utilized advanced battery energy storage. (2) A 10-MW system with variable slat concentrators and central steam Rankine energy conversion. This system utilized sensible thermal energy storage. (3) A 50-MW central receiver system consisting of a field of heliostats concentrating energy on a tower-mounted receiver and a central steam Rankine conversion system. This system also utilized sensible thermal storage. The approach used in determining the potential for solar thermal small power systems in the small utility market involved a comparison of the economics of power supply expansion plans for seven hypothetical small utilities through the year 2000 both with and without the solar thermal small power systems. Insolation typical of the Southwestern US was assumed. A comparison of the break-even capital costs with the range of plant costs estimated in this study yields the following conclusions: (1) The parabolic dish concentrator systems could be economically competitive with conventional generation if the lowest capital costs can be achieved. (2) The variable slat concentrator and central receiver systems would have to achieve lower costs than the lowest in the cost ranges generally assumed in the study to become economically competitive. (3) All of the solar thermal plant types are potentially more competitive in utilities which are heavily dependent upon oil.

Steitz, P.; Mayo, L.G.; Perkins, S.P. Jr.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Rf power systems for the national synchrotron light source  

SciTech Connect

The booster synchrotron and the two storage rings at the NSLS are provided with rf power systems of 3 kW, 50 kW, and 500 kW nominal output power, all at 53 MHz. This power is supplied by grounded grid tetrode amplifiers designed for television broadcast service. These amplifiers and associated power supplies, control and interlock systems, rf controls, and computer interface are described.

Dickinson, T.; Rheaume, R.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Development and Demonstration of an Innovative Thermal Energy Storage System for Baseload Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to research and develop a thermal energy storage system (operating range 3000C ???¢???????? 450 0C ) based on encapsulated phase change materials (PCM) that can meet the utility-scale base-load concentrated solar power plant requirements at much lower system costs compared to the existing thermal energy storage (TES) concepts. The major focus of this program is to develop suitable encapsulation methods for existing low-cost phase change materials that would provide a cost effective and reliable solution for thermal energy storage to be integrated in solar thermal power plants. This project proposes a TES system concept that will allow for an increase of the capacity factor of the present CSP technologies to 75% or greater and reduce the cost to less than $20/kWht.

D. Y. Goswami

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

200

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development. Conceptual design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conceptual design of a power system for application to the OTEC 100-MWe Demonstration Plant is presented. System modeling, design, and performance are described in detail. Materials considerations, module assembly, and cost considerations are discussed. Appendices include: A) systems analysis, B) general arrangements, C) system equipment, D) ammonia system material considerations; E) ammonia cycle, F) auxiliary subsystems, G) DACS availability analysis, H) heat exchanger supporting data, I) rotating machinery, and J) platform influences. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national thermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fifth parabolic dish solar thermal power program annual review: proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Review was to present the results of activities within the Parabolic Dish Technology and Module/Systems Development element of the Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Energy Systems Program. The Review consisted of nine technical sessions covering overall Project and Program aspects, Stirling and Brayton module development, concentrator and engine/receiver development, and associated hardware and test results to date; distributed systems operating experience; international dish development activities; and non-DOE-sponsored domestic dish activities. A panel discussion concerning business views of solar electric generation was held. These Proceedings contain the texts of presentations made at the Review, as submitted by their authors at the beginning of the Review; therefore, they may vary slightly from the actual presentations in the technical sessions.

None

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Seventh National Green Power Marketing Conference: Sept. 30-Oct. 2, 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview for the Seventh National Green Power Conference Overview for the Seventh National Green Power Conference The Seventh National Green Power Marketing Conference was held in Washington D.C. on September 30 - October 2. Conference speakers reviewed the past year's green power highlights, analyzed utility green pricing programs, presented insights into how to target green power demand, examined green certificate trading and tracking mechanisms, and described the best ways to market and sell green power. In addition, Green Power Leadership Awards were presented to recognize those who are significantly advancing the development of renewable electricity sources in the marketplace. We thank the following conference sponsors: E Source, Green Mountain Energy Company, and Xenergy. Event sponsors included ComEd, Fetzer Vineyards, and Uinta Brewing Company.

203

Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Final Report March 31, 2012 Michael Schuller, Frank Little, Darren Malik, Matt Betts, Qian Shao, Jun Luo, Wan Zhong, Sandhya Shankar, Ashwin Padmanaban The Space Engineering Research Center Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University Abstract We demonstrated that adding nanoparticles to a molten salt would increase its utility as a thermal energy storage medium for a concentrating solar power system. Specifically, we demonstrated that we could increase the specific heat of nitrate and carbonate salts containing 1% or less of alumina nanoparticles. We fabricated the composite materials using both evaporative and air drying methods. We tested several thermophysical properties of the composite materials,

204

Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at nightwhen the sun is not outto drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNLs metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800C). A high-temperature tank in PNNLs storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNLs thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

None

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

205

Sandia National Laboratories: Z Pulsed Power Facility: About Z  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Z About Z Picture of Z Machine Sandia's Z machine is Earth's most powerful pulsed-power facility and X-ray generator. Z compresses energy in time and space to achieve extreme powers and intensities, found nowhere else on Earth. In approximately 200 shots Z fires every year, the machine uses currents of about 26 million amps to reach peak X-ray emissions of 350 terawatts and an X-ray output of 2.7 megajoules. The Z machine is located in Albuquerque, N.M., and is part of Sandia's Pulsed Power Program, which began in the 1960s. Pulsed power is a technology that concentrates electrical energy and turns it into short pulses of enormous power, which are then used to generate X-rays and gamma rays. Produced in the laboratory, this controlled radiation creates conditions similar to those caused by the detonation of nuclear weapons,

206

Economic analysis of nuclear power reactor dissemination to less developed nations with implications for nuclear proliferation  

SciTech Connect

An economic model is applied to the transfer of nuclear-power reactors from industrialized nations to the less developed nations. The model includes demand and supply factors and predicts the success of US nonproliferation positions and policies. It is concluded that economic forces dominate the transfer of power reactors to less developed nations. Our study shows that attempts to either restrict or promote the spread of nuclear-power technology by ignoring natural economic incentives would have only limited effect. If US policy is too restrictive, less developed nations will seek other suppliers and thereby lower US Influence substantially. Allowing less developed nations to develop nuclear-power technology as dictated by economic forces will result in a modest rate of transfer that should comply with nuclear-proliferation objectives.

Gustavson, R.L.; Howard, J.S. II

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Working fluid selection for an increased efficiency hybridized geothermal-solar thermal power plant in Newcastle, Utah.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Renewable sources of energy are of extreme importance to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from traditional power plants. Such renewable sources include geothermal and solar thermal (more)

Carnell, John Walter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Powering the Nuclear Navy | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powering the Nuclear Navy Powering the Nuclear Navy Home > About Us > Our Programs > Powering the Nuclear Navy Powering the Nuclear Navy The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program provides militarily effective nuclear propulsion plants and ensures their safe, reliable and long-lived operation. This mission requires the combination of fully trained U.S. Navy men and women with ships that excel in endurance, stealth, speed, and independence from supply chains. NNSA's Navy Reactors Program provides the design, development and operational support required to provide militarily effective nuclear propulsion plants and ensure their safe, reliable and long-lived operation. This budget requests more than $1 billion to power a modern nuclear Navy: Continuation of design and development work for the OHIO-class

209

Topology, Design, Analysis, and Thermal Management of Power Electronics for Hybrid Electric Vehicle Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power electronics circuits play an important role in the success of electric, hybrid and fuel cell vehicles. Typical power electronics circuits in hybrid vehicles include electric motor drive circuits and DC/DC converter circuits. Conventional circuit topologies, such as buck converters, voltage source inverters and bidirectional boost converters are challenged by system cost, efficiency, controllability, thermal management, voltage and current capability, and packaging issues. Novel topologies, such as isolated bidirectional DC/DC converters, multilevel converters, and Z-source inverters, offer potential improvement to hybrid vehicle system performance, extended controllability and power capabilities. This paper gives an overview of the topologies, design, and thermal management, and control of power electronics circuits in hybrid vehicle applications.

Mi, C.; Peng, F. Z.; Kelly, K. J.; O'Keefe, M.; Hassani, V.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Eighth National Green Power Marketing Conference: Increasing Access, Appeal, and Awareness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Eighth National Green Power Marketing Conference -- Increasing Access, Appeal, and Awareness -- reviewed the status of the green power marketing industry and explored innovative ways of designing and marketing green power products. The conference, held in Chicago, Illinois, November 35, 2003, was organized by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), EPRI, and Center for Resource Solutions. The conference was cosponsored by EPRI; the Office of Power Techn...

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

211

Solar Thermal Small Power Systems Study. Inventory of US industrial small electric power generating systems. [Less than 10 MW  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This inventory of small industrial electric generating systems was assembled by The Aerospace Corporation to provide a data base for analyses being conducted to estimate the potential for displacement of these fossil-fueled systems by solar thermal electric systems no larger than 10 MW in rated capacity. The approximately 2100 megawatts generating capacity of systems in this category constitutes a potential market for small solar thermal and other solar electric power systems. The sources of data for this inventory were the (former) Federal Power Commission (FPC) Form 4 Industrial Ledger and Form 12-C Ledger for 1976. Table 1 alphabetically lists generating systems located at industrial plants and at Federal government installations in each of the 50 states. These systems are differentiated by type of power plant: steam turbine, diesel generator, or gas turbine. Each listing is designated as a power system rather than a power unit because the FPC Ledgers do not provide a means of determining whether more than one unit is associated with each industrial installation. Hence, the user should consider each listing to be a system capacity rating wherein the system may consist of one or more generating units with less than 10 MW/sub e/ combined rating. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Power efficiency for very high temperature solar thermal cavity receivers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is an improved solar energy cavity receiver for exposing materials and components to high temperatures. The receiver includes a housing having an internal reflective surface defining a cavity and having an inlet for admitting solar radiation thereto. A photothermal absorber is positioned in the cavity to receive radiation from the inlet. A reflective baffle is positioned between the absorber and the inlet to severely restrict the re-radiation of energy through the inlet. The front surface of the baffle defines a narrow annulus with the internal reflective surface of the housing. The front surface of the baffle is contoured to reflect incoming radiation onto the internal surface of the housing, from which it is reflected through the annulus and onto the front surface of the absorber. The back surface of the baffle intercepts infrared radiation from the front of the absorber. With this arrangement, a high percentage of the solar power input is retained in the cavity; thus, high internal temperatures are attained.

McDougal, Allan R. (LaCanada-Flintridge, CA); Hale, Robert R. (Upland, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We demonstrated that adding nanoparticles to a molten salt would increase its utility as a thermal energy storage medium for a concentrating solar power system. Specifically, we demonstrated that we could increase the specific heat of nitrate and carbonate salts containing 1% or less of alumina nanoparticles. We fabricated the composite materials using both evaporative and air drying methods. We tested several thermophysical properties of the composite materials, including the specific heat, thermal conductivity, latent heat, and melting point. We also assessed the stability of the composite material with repeated thermal cycling and the effects of adding the nanoparticles on the corrosion of stainless steel by the composite salt. Our results indicate that stable, repeatable 25-50% improvements in specific heat are possible for these materials. We found that using these composite salts as the thermal energy storage material for a concentrating solar thermal power system can reduce the levelized cost of electricity by 10-20%. We conclude that these materials are worth further development and inclusion in future concentrating solar power systems.

Michael Schuller; Frank Little; Darren Malik; Matt Betts; Qian Shao; Jun Luo; Wan Zhong; Sandhya Shankar; Ashwin Padmanaban

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

214

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and DaimlerChrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research'), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Vehicle Systems subprogram within the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive and heavy truck technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles and heavy trucks will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. This work also supports the development of advanced automotive accessories and the reduction of parasitic losses (e.g., aerodynamic drag, thermal management, friction and wear, and rolling resistance). In supporting the development of hybrid propulsion systems, the Vehicle Systems subprogram has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve fuel economy, comply with projected emissions and safety regulations, and use fuels produced domestically. The Vehicle Systems subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership and the 21st Century Truck Partnership through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) Identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) Develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors, emission control devices, battery systems, power electronics, accessories, and devices to reduce parasitic losses; and (3) Determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under the Vehicle Systems subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the FreedomCAR Program. A key element in making hybrid electric vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include these: (1) Novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) Inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) Converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) More effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) Integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies. ORNL also executes speci

Olszewski, M.

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Analyzing throughput of power and thermal-constraint multicore processor under NBTI effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NBTI (Negative Bias Temperature Instability) which can degrade the switching speed of PMOS transistors has become a major reliability challenge. In this paper, we investigate the throughput impact of NBTI on power and thermal-constraint multicore processors ... Keywords: NBTI, multicore processor, negative bias temperature instability, process variation

Shi-Qun Zheng; Ing-Chao Lin; Yen-Han Lee

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Energy-Saving Analysis on Thermal System in 600MW Supercritical Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-efficiency, energy-saving and environmentally friendly supercritical thermal power units are gradually becoming main stream in China. In this paper, an advanced energy system analysis method, specific consumption analysis, is used to examine the ... Keywords: supercritical, energy-saving, specific consumption analysis, feed-water heating system, environmentally friendly

Yongping Yang; Yu Wu; Zhiping Yang; Ningling Wang; Gang Xu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Technical and economic analysis of the thermal performance of a solar boiling concentrator for power generation  

SciTech Connect

A system for power generation using solar energy collected by compound parabolic concentrators (CPC) incorporated into a Rankine cycle system is studied by developing a model to simulate the CPC performance. The power cycle is also modeled under quasi-steady and transient conditions. An economic analysis is performed through a model developed to study the economic viability of the power system. The CPC performance is sensitive to the ratio of diffuse to beam components of the solar incident irradiation. This ratio, along with the concentration ratio, govern the CPC optical efficiency which in turn determine the thermal efficiency. The performance of the CPC working under boiling and superheating conditions is governed by the axial fractional lengths of the non-boiling and the superheating regions. The overall thermal loss coefficient is formulated as a function of the local thermal loss coefficient in the different regions and the length of each region. The thermal efficiency of CPC's and flat plates, whether under non-boiling, boiling or superheating conditions, is evaluated. The CPC working under superheating conditions has a good potential for solar powered Rankine cycles. System efficiencies as high as 11.3% could be obtained at R-11 evaporation temperature of 120/sup 0/C and a condensation temperature of 20/sup 0/ C.

El-Assy, A.Y.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Soil Thermal Properties Manual for Underground Power Transmission: Soil Thermal Property Measurements, Soil Thermal Stability, and the Use of Corrective Thermal Backfills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal properties of soil used to bury underground transmission cables -- often only crudely estimated in the past -- can have a large impact on the capacity of a transmission system. This guide provides comprehensive information on soil thermal property measurement, surveying, interpretation, and improvement.

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

219

EA-1247: Electrical Power System Upgrades at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to upgrade the electrical power supply system for the U.S. Department of Energy Los Alamos National Laboratory to increase the...

220

Testing thermocline filler materials and molten-salt heat transfer fluids for thermal energy storage systems used in parabolic trough solar power plants.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Parabolic trough power systems that utilize concentrated solar energy to generate electricity are a proven technology. Industry and laboratory research efforts are now focusing on integration of thermal energy storage as a viable means to enhance dispatchability of concentrated solar energy. One option to significantly reduce costs is to use thermocline storage systems, low-cost filler materials as the primary thermal storage medium, and molten nitrate salts as the direct heat transfer fluid. Prior thermocline evaluations and thermal cycling tests at the Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility identified quartzite rock and silica sand as potential filler materials. An expanded series of isothermal and thermal cycling experiments were planned and implemented to extend those studies in order to demonstrate the durability of these filler materials in molten nitrate salts over a range of operating temperatures for extended timeframes. Upon test completion, careful analyses of filler material samples, as well as the molten salt, were conducted to assess long-term durability and degradation mechanisms in these test conditions. Analysis results demonstrate that the quartzite rock and silica sand appear able to withstand the molten salt environment quite well. No significant deterioration that would impact the performance or operability of a thermocline thermal energy storage system was evident. Therefore, additional studies of the thermocline concept can continue armed with confidence that appropriate filler materials have been identified for the intended application.

Kelly, Michael James; Hlava, Paul Frank; Brosseau, Douglas A.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national thermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Power Marketing Administrations Leading the Nation's Transition to a 21st  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Marketing Administrations Leading the Nation's Transition Power Marketing Administrations Leading the Nation's Transition to a 21st Century Electric Grid Power Marketing Administrations Leading the Nation's Transition to a 21st Century Electric Grid November 19, 2012 - 12:54pm Addthis The Joint Outreach Team, made up of experts from DOE and the Western Area Power Administration, is working to develop strategies to ensure the viability, sustainability, and resiliency of Western to continue to meet its core mission and respond to the energy challenges of the 21st century. The Joint Outreach Team, made up of experts from DOE and the Western Area Power Administration, is working to develop strategies to ensure the viability, sustainability, and resiliency of Western to continue to meet its core mission and respond to the energy challenges of the 21st century.

222

Management of National Nuclear Power Programs for assured safety  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed in this report include: nuclear utility organization; before the Florida Public Service Commission in re: St. Lucie Unit No. 2 cost recovery; nuclear reliability improvement and safety operations; nuclear utility management; training of nuclear facility personnel; US experience in key areas of nuclear safety; the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission - function and process; regulatory considerations of the risk of nuclear power plants; overview of the processes of reliability and risk management; management significance of risk analysis; international and domestic institutional issues for peaceful nuclear uses; the role of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO); and nuclear safety activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Connolly, T.J. (ed.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Thermal noise informatics: Totally secure communication via a wire; Zero-power communication; and Thermal noise driven computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Very recently, it has been shown that thermal noise and its artificial versions (Johnson-like noises) can be utilized as an information carrier with peculiar properties therefore it may be proper to call this topic Thermal Noise Informatics. Zero Power (Stealth) Communication, Thermal Noise Driven Computing, and Totally Secure Classical Communication are relevant examples. In this paper, while we will briefly describe the first and the second subjects, we shall focus on the third subject, the secure classical communication via wire. This way of secure telecommunication utilizes the properties of Johnson(-like) noise and those of a simple Kirchhoff's loop. The communicator is unconditionally secure at the conceptual (circuit theoretical) level and this property is (so far) unique in communication systems based on classical physics. The communicator is superior to quantum alternatives in all known aspects, except the need of using a wire. In the idealized system, the eavesdropper can extract zero bit of information without getting uncovered. The scheme is naturally protected against the man-in-the-middle attack. The communication can take place also via currently used power lines or phone (wire) lines and it is not only a point-to-point communication like quantum channels but network-ready. Tests have been carried out on a model-line with ranges beyond the ranges of any known direct quantum communication channel and they indicate unrivalled signal fidelity and security performance. This simple device has single-wire secure key generation/sharing rates of 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 bit/second for copper wires with diameters/ranges of 21 mm / 2000 km, 7 mm / 200 km, 2.3 mm / 20 km, and 0.7 mm / 2 km, respectively and it performs with 0.02% raw-bit error rate (99.98 % fidelity).

Laszlo B. Kish; Robert Mingesz; Zoltan gingl

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power system development. Phase I. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the conceptual and preliminary design of closed-cycle, ammonia, ocean thermal energy conversion power plants by Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Preliminary designs for evaporator and condenser test articles (0.13 MWe size) and a 10 MWe modular experiment power system are described. Conceptual designs for 50 MWe power systems, and 100 MWe power plants are also descirbed. Design and cost algorithms were developed, and an optimized power system design at the 50 MWe size was completed. This design was modeled very closely in the test articles and in the 10 MWe Modular Application. Major component and auxiliary system design, materials, biofouling, control response, availability, safety and cost aspects are developed with the greatest emphasis on the 10 MWe Modular Application Power System. It is concluded that all power plant subsystems are state-of-practice and require design verification only, rather than continued research. A complete test program, which verifies the mechanical reliability as well as thermal performance, is recommended and described.

Not Available

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

225

Improved VIKOR Algorithm Based on AHP and Shannon Entropy in the Selection of Thermal Power Enterprise's Coal Suppliers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to select the thermal power enterprises coal suppliers properly, certain attributes of the suppliers should be carefully analysis. Supplier selection is a multi criteria problem which multi attributions of the suppliers should be considered. ... Keywords: thermal power, VIKOR, Shannon Entropy, AHP

Ma Lihong; Zhang Yanping; Zhao Zhiwei

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Proceedings of National Avian-Wind Power Planning Meeting IV  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 The purpose of the fourth meeting was to (1) share research and update research conducted on avian wind interactions (2) identify questions and issues related to the research results, (3) develop conclusions about some avian/wind power issues, and (4) identify questions and issues for future avian research.

NWCC Avian Subcommittee

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Pulsed power -- Research and technology at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Over the past 15 years, steady and sometimes exciting progress has been made in the hybrid technology called Pulsed Power. Based on both electrical engineering and physics, pulsed power involves the generation, modification, and use of electrical pulses up to the multitrillion-watt and multimillion-volt ranges. The final product of these powerful pulses can take diverse forms--hypervelocity projectiles or imploding liners, energetic and intense particle beams, X-ray and gamma-ray pulses, laser light beams that cover the spectrum from ultraviolet to infrared, or powerful microwave bursts. At first, the needs of specific applications largely shaped research and technology in this field. New the authors are beginning to see the reverse--new applications arising from technical capabilities that until recently were though impossible. Compressing and heating microscopic quantities of matter until they reach ultra-high energy density represents one boundary of their scientific exploration. The other boundary might be a defensive weapon that can project vast amounts of highly directed energy over long distances. Other applications of the technology may range from the use of electron beams to sterilize sewage, to laboratory simulation of radiation effects on electronics, to electromagnetic launchings of projectiles into earth or into solar orbits. Eventually the authors hope to use pulsed power to produce an inexhaustible supply of energy by means of inertial confinement fusion (ICF)--a technique for heating and containing deuterium-tritium fuel through compression. Topics covered here are: (1) inertial confinement fusion; (2) simulation technology; (3) development of new technology; and (4) application to directed energy technologies.

1981-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Analysis of Off-Board Powered Thermal Preconditioning in Electric Drive Vehicles: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Following a hot or cold thermal soak, vehicle climate control systems (air conditioning or heat) are required to quickly attain a cabin temperature comfortable to the vehicle occupants. In a plug-in hybrid electric or electric vehicle (PEV) equipped with electric climate control systems, the traction battery is the sole on-board power source. Depleting the battery for immediate climate control results in reduced charge-depleting (CD) range and additional battery wear. PEV cabin and battery thermal preconditioning using off-board power supplied by the grid or a building can mitigate the impacts of climate control. This analysis shows that climate control loads can reduce CD range up to 35%. However, cabin thermal preconditioning can increase CD range up to 19% when compared to no thermal preconditioning. In addition, this analysis shows that while battery capacity loss over time is driven by ambient temperature rather than climate control loads, concurrent battery thermal preconditioning can reduce capacity loss up to 7% by reducing pack temperature in a high ambient temperature scenario.

Barnitt, R. A.; Brooker, A. D.; Ramroth, L.; Rugh , J.; Smith, K. A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

System for thermal energy storage, space heating and cooling and power conversion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated system for storing thermal energy, for space heating and cong and for power conversion is described which utilizes the reversible thermal decomposition characteristics of two hydrides having different decomposition pressures at the same temperature for energy storage and space conditioning and the expansion of high-pressure hydrogen for power conversion. The system consists of a plurality of reaction vessels, at least one containing each of the different hydrides, three loops of circulating heat transfer fluid which can be selectively coupled to the vessels for supplying the heat of decomposition from any appropriate source of thermal energy from the outside ambient environment or from the spaces to be cooled and for removing the heat of reaction to the outside ambient environment or to the spaces to be heated, and a hydrogen loop for directing the flow of hydrogen gas between the vessels. When used for power conversion, at least two vessels contain the same hydride and the hydrogen loop contains an expansion engine. The system is particularly suitable for the utilization of thermal energy supplied by solar collectors and concentrators, but may be used with any source of heat, including a source of low-grade heat.

Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Fields, Paul R. (Chicago, IL)

1981-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

230

composites for high performance electronic packaging and thermal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The applications include; leading edges and engine components for the National Aerospace Plane, radiators for space power, flexible high conductance thermal...

231

Sandia National Laboratories: Z Pulsed Power Facility: Z Research: Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Energy Picture of Z Machine Z machine contributes to clean-energy technologies The importance of Z in solving the world's energy challenges is directly connected to its fusion potential. Inertial confinement fusion for peaceful production of electricity has always been of interest to Sandia's pulsed power sciences. But today, in light of growing concern about the health of our planet and considering our escalating energy needs, the development of fusion technology is especially promising for several reasons First, the fuel needed for fusion is virtually limitless - deuterium, an isotope of hydrogen, is abundant in seawater; tritium is bred in the fusion power plant process. Half a bathtub full of seawater in a fusion reaction could produce as much energy as 40 train cars of coal.

232

Sandia National Laboratories: Z Pulsed Power Facility: Z Research: Fusion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion Fusion Sun Plasma The ultimate energy source Fusion occurs when two atomic nuclei are joined together. To fuse the atoms, the force that repels them as they come together must be overcome. Accelerators accomplish this by forcing molecules to collide with one another at very high temperatures (high temperatures are simply molecules moving at high speeds). When light nuclei are involved, fusion can produce more energy than was required to start the reaction. This process is the force that powers the Sun, whose source of energy is an ongoing fusion chain reaction. As an unconfined event, fusion was first developed for use in nuclear weapons. Fusion's great potential as a new energy source depends on scientists' ability to harness its power in laboratory events. The Z

233

Seventh National Green Power Marketing Conference: Expanding Markets Through Innovation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 300 electric utility companies offer green pricing, a practice that allows customers to purchase electricity generated from renewable energy sources, generally at a premium to the standard electricity rate. In a number of states that have deregulated the energy marketplace, consumers can choose green power products from alternative suppliers. Consumers nationwide also can purchase renewable energy certificates (RECs), which represent proof that a unit of electricityfor example, one megaw...

2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

234

Advanced thermal-energy-storage concept definition study for solar Brayton power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and operating criteria to be used in the Advanced Thermal Energy Storage Study are described. The storage system operating requirements and design standards are outlined and the corresponding power plant interface requirements are given. Each of the three alternative high temperature thermal energy storage systems (phase change, thermochemical, and sensible heat) is described. The approach and criteria to be used in developing energy cost numbers are described, and the systems requirements data and the requirements perturbations to be used in the trade studies are summarized. All of the requirements data to be used are compiled. (LEW)

Not Available

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Central Receiver Solar Thermal Power System, Phase 1. CDRL Item 10. First quarterly technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current definition of a 10-MWe pilot plant preliminary design base line is presented, as well as a summary of a 100-MWe commercial plant base line. The subsystems described for the plants include the collector, receiver, thermal storage, and electrical power generation. A master control concept employing a centralized computer is also described. The subsystem research experiment activities for the collector, receiver, and thermal storage subsystems are presented, including a summary of SRE test requirements, overall test scheduling, and status through the conceptual design review phase of the SRE effort.

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

NATIONAL GEODATABASE OF TIDAL STREAM POWER RESOURCE IN USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A geodatabase of tidal constituents is developed to present the regional assessment of tidal stream power resource in the USA. Tidal currents are numerically modeled with the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) and calibrated with the available measurements of tidal current speeds and water level surfaces. The performance of the numerical model in predicting the tidal currents and water levels is assessed by an independent validation. The geodatabase is published on a public domain via a spatial database engine with interactive tools to select, query and download the data. Regions with the maximum average kinetic power density exceeding 500 W/m2 (corresponding to a current speed of ~1 m/s), total surface area larger than 0.5 km2 and depth greater than 5 m are defined as hotspots and documented. The regional assessment indicates that the state of Alaska (AK) has the largest number of locations with considerably high kinetic power density, followed by, Maine (ME), Washington (WA), Oregon (OR), California (CA), New Hampshire (NH), Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ), North and South Carolina (NC, SC), Georgia (GA), and Florida (FL).

Smith, Brennan T [ORNL; Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Stewart, Kevin M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Review of Brookhaven National Laboratory superconducting power transmission program  

SciTech Connect

ABS>Research is being conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory to develop a superconducting ac cable system leading to the construction of a 1/2 mile model cable of 200 MVA capacity at Brookhaven and a cable of larger (>2000 MVA) capacity for test at a utility testing site. It is a coaxial cable of flexible design using Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor, and a tape wound dielectric, helium impregnated, of a material yet to be determined. The research development is reported on the dielectric materials, cryogenic enclosure, refrigeration, and superconducting materials. (MCW)

Jensen, J.E.

1973-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

238

Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

Bowman, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

Bowman, C.D.

1992-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

240

Stochastic Lagrangian relaxation applied to power scheduling in a hydro-thermal system under uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A dynamic (multi-stage) stochastic programming model for the weekly cost-optimal generation of electric power in a hydro-thermal generation system under uncertain load is developed. The model involves a large number of mixed-integer (stochastic) decision variables and constraints linking time periods and operating power units. Astochastic Lagrangian relaxation scheme is designed by assigning (stochastic) multipliers to all constraints coupling power units. It is assumed that the stochastic load process is given (or approximated) by a nite number of realizations (scenarios) in scenario tree form. Solving the dual by a bundle subgradient method leads to a successive decomposition into stochastic single (thermal or hydro) unit subproblems. The stochastic thermal and hydro subproblems are solved by astochastic dynamic programming technique and by a speci c descent algorithm, respectively. A Lagrangian heuristics that provides approximate solutions for the rst stage (primal) decisions starting from the optimal (stochastic) multipliers is developed. Numerical results are presented for realistic data from a German power utility andfornumbers of scenarios ranging from 5 to 100 and a time horizon from 7 to 9 days. The sizes of the corresponding optimization problems go up to 200.000 binary and 350.000 continuous variables, and more than 500.000 constraints.

M. P. Nowak; W. Rmisch

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national thermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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241

Power Surge: Uranium alloy fuel for TerraPower | Y-12 National Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Surge: Uranium alloy ... Power Surge: Uranium alloy ... Power Surge: Uranium alloy fuel for TerraPower Posted: July 18, 2012 - 9:45am | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 1 | 2012 Since 2010, Y-12 has provided TerraPower with technical support in the fabrication methods for uranium alloy fuel to be used in a new traveling wave nuclear reactor that can run for more than 30 years without refueling. Image of reactor power concept, used with permission of TerraPower, LLC. Y-12's nuclear expertise, expanding since the site's integral role in the Manhattan Project, is positioning the Y-12 Complex at the forefront of what Sen. Lamar Alexander repeatedly asserts is needed - "a new Manhattan Project for clean energy independence." TerraPower, a private company backed by Microsoft founder Bill Gates, is

242

National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants January 25, 2013 - 11:10am Addthis AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy What Does AVESTAR Provide? Advanced dynamic simulation, control and virtual plant technologies

243

An Evolutionary Path for Concentrating Thermal Solar Power Technologies: A New Approach for Modeling CSP Power Costs and Potential  

SciTech Connect

Concentrating thermal solar power (CSP) technology is a potentially competitive power generation option, particularly in arid regions where direct sunlight is abundant. We examine the potential role of CSP power plants and their contribution to carbon emissions reduction. The answers to these questions depend on the cost of electricity generated by CSP plants. Although a few studies have projected future CSP costs based on assumptions for technology advancement and the effect of economies of scale and learning curves, few studies have considered the combined effects of intermittency, solar irradiance changes by season, and diurnal and seasonal system load changes. Because the generation of a solar plant varies over a day and by season, the interactions between CSP generators and other generators in the electric system can play an important role in determining costs. In effect, CSP electricity generation cost will depend on the CSP market penetration. This paper examines this relationship and explores possible evolutionary paths for CSP technologies with and without thermal storage.

Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.

2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

244

Initial Activation and Operation of the Power Conditioning System for the National Ignition Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NIF Power Conditioning System (PCS) resides in four Capacitor Bays, supplying energy to the Master and Power Amplifiers which reside in the two adjacent laser bays. Each capacitor bay will initially house 48 individual power conditioning modules, shown in Figure 2, with space reserved for expansion to 54 modules. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Power Conditioning System (PCS) is a modular capacitive energy storage system that will be capable of storing nearly 400 MJ of electrical energy and delivering that energy to the nearly 8000 flashlamps in the NIF laser. The first sixteen modules of the power conditioning system have been built, tested and installed. Activation of the first nine power conditioning modules has been completed and commissioning of the first ''bundle'' of laser beamlines has begun. This paper will provide an overview of the power conditioning system design and describe the status and results of initial testing and activation of the first ''bundle'' of power conditioning modules.

Newton, M A; Kamm, R E; Fulkerson, E S; Hulsey, S D; Lao, N; Parrish, G L; Pendleton, D L; Petersen, D E; Polk, M; Tuck, J M; Ullery, G T; Moore, W B

2003-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

245

Sandia National Laboratories: Z Pulsed Power Facility: Z News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Z News Z News Dry-run experiments verify key aspect of Sandia nuclear fusion concept View All News Releases News Releases Fusion instabilities lessened by unexpected effect Jan. 9, 2014 Japanese city councilor journeys to end furor over Sandia Z tests May 23, 2013 Sandia physicist wins two national awards Nov. 29, 2012 Dry-run experiments verify key aspect of Sandia nuclear fusion concept Sept. 17, 2012 Nuclear fusion simulation shows high-gain energy output March 20, 2012 Z researcher Dan Sinars awarded $2.5 million DOE Early Career grant May 25, 2011 Second Z plutonium "shot" safely tests materials for NNSA May 11, 2011 Sandia effort images the sea monster of nuclear fusion: the Rayleigh-Taylor instability Nov. 11, 2010 Image Gallery Video Z In the News Triple-threat method sparks hope for fusion

246

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research'), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of hybrid propulsion systems, the APEEM effort has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve advanced vehicle efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors, and power electronics; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under this subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in HEVs, and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the Vehicle Technologies Program. A key element in making HEVs practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include these: (1) novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) more effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program, APEEM subprogram. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies.

Olszewski, M.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

FY2009 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research'), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the APEEM effort has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors and power electronics; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under this subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in HEVs (PHEVs), all electric vehicles, and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the Vehicle Technologies Program. A key element in making these advanced vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include these: (1) novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency, with the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments while achieving high reliability; (3) converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) new onboard battery charging concepts that result in decreased cost and size; (5) more effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (6) integrated motor/inverter concepts. ORNL's Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program, APEEM subprogram. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies. ORNL also executes specific projects for DOE. The following report discusses those projects carried out in FY 2009 and conveys highlights of their accomplishments. Numerous project reviews, technical reports, and papers have been published for these efforts, if the reader is in

Olszewski, Mitchell [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research'), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of hybrid propulsion systems, the APEEM effort has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve advanced vehicle efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors, and power electronics; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under this subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in HEVs, and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the Vehicle Technologies Program. A key element in making HEVs practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include these: (1) novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) more effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program, APEEM subprogram. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies.

Olszewski, M.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

FY2009 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research'), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the APEEM effort has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors and power electronics; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under this subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in HEVs (PHEVs), all electric vehicles, and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the Vehicle Technologies Program. A key element in making these advanced vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include these: (1) novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency, with the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments while achieving high reliability; (3) converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) new onboard battery charging concepts that result in decreased cost and size; (5) more effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (6) integrated motor/inverter concepts. ORNL's Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program, APEEM subprogram. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies. ORNL also executes specific projects for DOE. The following report discusses those projects carried out in FY 2009 and conveys highlights of their accomplishments. Numerous project reviews, technical reports, and papers have been published for these efforts, if the reader is interested in pursuing details of the work.

Olszewski, Mitchell [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Smart grid powers up on NNSA land in Los Alamos | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Smart grid powers up on NNSA land in Los Alamos | National Nuclear Security Smart grid powers up on NNSA land in Los Alamos | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Smart grid powers up on NNSA land ... Smart grid powers up on NNSA land in Los Alamos Posted By Office of Public Affairs A $53 million state-of-the-art, international smart grid project has been

251

Smart grid powers up on NNSA land in Los Alamos | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Smart grid powers up on NNSA land in Los Alamos | National Nuclear Security Smart grid powers up on NNSA land in Los Alamos | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Smart grid powers up on NNSA land ... Smart grid powers up on NNSA land in Los Alamos Posted By Office of Public Affairs A $53 million state-of-the-art, international smart grid project has been

252

Boryeong Thermal Power Complex, Boryeong-Si, Chungcheongnam-do Province, South Korea  

SciTech Connect

From tall skyscrapers and flashing neon signs to Buddhist temples and pagodas, South Korea is a mixture of the new and old Asia. Doing its part to help modernise this country, the Boryeong thermal power complex operates six coal-fired 500-MW units that provide electricity to power South Korea's economic growth. One of the important reasons for this facility's overall success is its operational reliability. An example of this is Boryeong Unit 3's outstanding achievement of 3,000 days of trouble-free operation. The Complex also has a dozen 150 MW combined cycle units burning imported liquefied natural gas for electrical system peaking. 4 photos.

Neville, J.D.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power system development. Phase I: preliminary design. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse has completed the Preliminary Design Phase for the Power System Development of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Demonstration Plant project. This study included the development of a preliminary design for a Modular Application scaled power system (10MWe) and Heat Exchanger Test Articles, both based on the concept developed in the Conceptual Design Phase. The results of this study were used to improve the baseline design of the 50MWe module for the Commercial Size Power System, which was recommended for the demonstration plant by the conceptual design study. The 50MWe module was selected since it has the lowest cost, and since its size convincingly demonstrates that future economically viable commercial plants, having reliable operation with credible anticipated costs, are possible. Additional optimization studies on the size of the power system plus hull continue to identify 50MWe as the preferred minimum cost configuration. This study was limited to a closed cycle ammonia power system module, using a seawater temperature difference of 40/sup 0/F, and a surface platform/ship reference hull. This volume describes system operation, a complete test program to verify mechanical reliability and thermal performance, fabrication and installation operations, and a cost analysis. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

254

Development of encapsulated lithium hydride thermal energy storage for space power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inclusion of thermal energy storage in a pulsed space power supply will reduce the mass of the heat rejection system. In this mode, waste heat generated during the brief high-power burst operation is placed in the thermal store; later, the heat in the store is dissipated to space via the radiator over the much longer nonoperational period of the orbit. Thus, the radiator required is of significantly smaller capacity. Scoping analysis indicates that use of lithium hydride as the thermal storage medium results in system mass reduction benefits for burst periods as long as 800 s. A candidate design for the thermal energy storage component utilizes lithium hydride encapsulated in either 304L stainless steel or molybdenum in a packed-bed configuration with a lithium or sodium-potassium (NaK) heat transport fluid. Key issues associated with the system design include phase-change induced stresses in the shell, lithium hydride and shell compatibility, lithium hydride dissociation and hydrogen loss from the system, void presence and movement associated with the melt-freeze process, and heat transfer limitations on obtaining the desired energy storage density. 58 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

Morris, D.G.; Foote, J.P.; Olszewski, M.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Testing Active Power Control from Wind Power at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to keep the electricity grid stable and the lights on, the power system relies on certain responses from its generating fleet. This presentation evaluates the potential for wind turbines and wind power plants to provide these services and assist the grid during critical times.

Ela, E.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Solar thermal small power systems study, program summary report. Phase II: study results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Phase II Study of small solar power systems (SSPS) has been structured to determine conditions under which SSPS can be cost-effective sources of electric power in the US in the period 1985 to 2015. An extensive data base, which provides a discrete identification of all utility and industrial electric generating units up to and including 10 MW/sub e/ in rated capacity, has been prepared. This data base defines the market for which comparative evaluations are made of SSPS and alternative fossil-fueled power plants. The market penetration of SSPS is determined and the effect of economic incentives on accelerating the penetration is evaluated. The solar electric power system is evaluated as either a complete replacement for existing conventional electric power systems or as a repowering installation for boilers supplying steam to turbine-driven generators. The cost data used in the market penetration analysis are for a central receiver-type of small solar theral power system. While the market penetration discussed herein is for this type of SSPS, the sensitivity data in the report can be used to determine the market penetration of other types of solar thermal power systems (e.g., point focus distributed receiver) with different system costs.

Lapedes, D.E.; Munjal, P.K.; Sitney, L.R.

1979-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

257

The National Ignition Facility National Ignition Campaign Short Pulse Lasers High-Average-Power Laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Average-Power Laser NIF-1005-11471 07BEW/dj P9765 Agenda #12;P9516NIF-0805-11197 01EIM/dj Stockpile Stewardship #12;P9504NIF-0404-08345r2 27EIM/ld Basic Science and Cosmology #12;NIF-0702-05346rIFSA Fusion Energy Campaign and point design NIF-0305-10564 23MLS/cld P8719 The NIF Laser User Optics Physics Operations

258

Solar thermal electric power systems with line-focus collectors. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electric power generation by conventional Rankine cycle heat engines with heat supplied by line-focus solar collectors was investigated. The objectives of the study were: (1) determine which of four types of line-focus solar collectors coupled with turbine-generators of conventional design has the potential to produce low-cost electric power with thermal energy in 100 to 300/sup 0/C range; (2) develop performance and cost relationships for organic Rankine cycle engines for power generation capacities from 3 MW/sub e/ to 300 MW/sub e/; (3) develop conceptual storage units for organic fluid systems. Evaluation procedures and study results and conclusion are presented and discussed in detail. (WHK)

Duff, W.S.; Karaki, S.; Shaner, W.W.; Wilbur, P.J.; Somers, E.V.; Grimble, R.E.; Wilson, H.S.; Watt, A.D.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Thermal energy storage for integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants  

SciTech Connect

There are increasingly strong indications that the United States will face widespread electrical power generating capacity constraints in the 1990s; most regions of the country could experience capacity shortages by the year 2000. The demand for new generating capacity occurs at a time when there is increasing emphasis on environmental concerns. The integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant is an example of an advanced coal-fired technology that will soon be commercially available. The IGCC concept has proved to be efficient and cost-effective while meeting all current environmental regulations on emissions; however, the operating characteristics of the IGCC system have limited it to base load applications. The integration of thermal energy storage (TES) into an IGCC plant would allow it to meet cyclic loads while avoiding undesirable operating characteristics such as poor turn-down capability, impaired part-load performance, and long startup times. In an IGCC plant with TES, a continuously operated gasifier supplies medium-Btu fuel gas to a continuously operated gas turbine. The thermal energy from the fuel gas coolers and the gas turbine exhaust is stored as sensible heat in molten nitrate salt; heat is extracted during peak demand periods to produce electric power in a Rankine steam power cycle. The study documented in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and consists of a review of the technical and economic feasibility of using TES in an IGCC power plant to produce intermediate and peak load power. The study was done for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. 11 refs., 5 figs., 18 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Somasundaram, S.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Thermal energy storage for integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are increasingly strong indications that the United States will face widespread electrical power generating capacity constraints in the 1990s; most regions of the country could experience capacity shortages by the year 2000. The demand for new generating capacity occurs at a time when there is increasing emphasis on environmental concerns. The integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant is an example of an advanced coal-fired technology that will soon be commercially available. The IGCC concept has proved to be efficient and cost-effective while meeting all current environmental regulations on emissions; however, the operating characteristics of the IGCC system have limited it to base load applications. The integration of thermal energy storage (TES) into an IGCC plant would allow it to meet cyclic loads while avoiding undesirable operating characteristics such as poor turn-down capability, impaired part-load performance, and long startup times. In an IGCC plant with TES, a continuously operated gasifier supplies medium-Btu fuel gas to a continuously operated gas turbine. The thermal energy from the fuel gas coolers and the gas turbine exhaust is stored as sensible heat in molten nitrate salt; heat is extracted during peak demand periods to produce electric power in a Rankine steam power cycle. The study documented in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and consists of a review of the technical and economic feasibility of using TES in an IGCC power plant to produce intermediate and peak load power. The study was done for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. 11 refs., 5 figs., 18 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Somasundaram, S.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Power system development: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC). Preliminary design report: appendices, Part 2 (Final)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is the development of a preliminary design for a full-sized, closed cycle, ammonia power system module for the 100 MWe OTEC demonstration plant. In turn, this demonstration plant is to demonstrate, by 1984, the operation and performance of an Ocean Thermal Power Plant having sufficiently advanced heat exchanger design to project economic viability for commercial utilization in the late 1980's and beyond. Included in this power system development are the preliminary designs for a proof-of-concept pilot plant and test article heat exchangers which are scaled in such a manner as to support a logically sequential, relatively low-cost development of the full-scale power system module. The conceptual designs are presented for the demonstration plant power module, the proof-of-concept pilot plant, and for a pair of test article heat exchangers. Costs associated with the design, development, fabrication, checkout, delivery, installation, and operation are included. The accompanying design and producibilty studies on the full-scale power system module project the performance/economics for the commercial plant. This section of the report contains appendices on the electrical system, instrumentation and control, ammonia pump evaluation study, ammonia and nitrogen support subsystems, piping and support design calculations, and plant availability. (WHK)

None

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

262

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development. Preliminary design report, Appendices, Part 1 (Final)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is the development of a preliminary design for a full-sized, closed cycle, ammonia power system module for the 100 MWe OTEC demonstration plant. In turn, this demonstration plant is to demonstrate, by 1984, the operation and performance of an Ocean Thermal Power Plant having sufficiently advanced heat exchanger design to project economic viability for commercial utilization in the late 1980's and beyond. Included in this power system development are the preliminary designs for a proof-of-concept pilot plant and test article heat exchangers which are scaled in such a manner as to support a logically sequential, relatively low-cost development of the full-scale power system module. The conceptual designs are presented for the demonstration plant power module, the proof-of-concept pilot plant, and for a pair of test article heat exchangers. Costs associated with the design, development, fabrication, checkout, delivery, installation, and operation are included. The accompanying design and producibilty studies on the full-scale power system module project the performance/economics for the commercial plant. This section of the report contains appendices on the developed computer models, water system dynamic studies, miscellaneous performance analysis, materials and processes, detailed equipment lists, turbine design studies, tube cleaner design, ammonia leak detection, and heat exchanger design supporting data. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

263

Encapsulated sink-side thermal energy storage for pulsed space power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In sprint mode space applications, which require high power for relatively short durations, energy storage devices may be employed to reduce the size and mass of the thermal management system. This is accomplished by placing the reject heat in the thermal store during the sprint mode. During the remaining nonoperational portion of the orbit the stored heat is dissipated to space. The heat rejection rate is thus reduced, and this results in a smaller radiator being required. Lithium hydride (LiH) has been identfied as the best candidate for use in power system sink-side thermal energy storage applications due to its superior heat storage properties and suitable melt temperature (T/sub m/ = 962K). To maximize storage density, both sensible and latent modes of heat storage are used. This paper focuses on the use of encapsulated lithium hydride shapes in a packed bed storage unit with lithium or NaK as the heat transport fluid. Analytical and experimental development work associated with the concept is described. Since the program is in its early stages, emphasis thus far has been on feasibility issues associated with encapsulating lithium hydride spheres. These issues include shell stress induced by phase-change during heating, hydrogen diffusion through the encapsulating shell, heat transfer limitations due to poor conductivity of the salt, void behavior, and material constraints. The impact of these issues on the design of encapsulated lithium hydride spheres has been evaluated, and design alternatives have been identified for circumventing key problem areas.

Foote, J.P.; Morris, D.G.; Olszewski, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Horizontal Steam Generator Thermal-Hydraulics at Various Steady-State Power Levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional computer simulation and analyses of the horizontal steam generator thermal-hydraulics of the WWER 1000 nuclear power plant have been performed for 50% and 75% partial loads, 100% nominal load and 110% over-load. Presented results show water and steam mass flow rate vectors, steam void fraction spatial distribution, recirculation zones, swell level position, water mass inventory on the shell side, and other important thermal-hydraulic parameters. The simulations have been performed with the computer code 3D ANA, based on the 'two-fluid' model approach. Steam-water interface transport processes, as well as tube bundle flow resistance, energy transfer, and steam generation within tube bundles are modelled with {sup c}losure laws{sup .} Applied approach implies non-equilibrium thermal and flow conditions. The model is solved by the control volume procedure, which has been extended in order to take into account the 3D flow of liquid and gas phase. The methodology is validated by comparing numerical and experimental results of real steam generator operational conditions at various power levels of the WWER Novovoronezh, Unit 5. One-dimensional model of the horizontal steam generator has been built with the RELAP 5 standard code on the basis of the multidimensional two-phase flow structure obtained with the 3D ANA code. RELAP 5 and 3D ANA code results are compared, showing acceptable agreement. (authors)

Stevanovic, Vladimir D. [University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije 16, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia); Stosic, Zoran V.; Kiera, Michael; Stoll, Uwe [Framatome ANP GmbH, P.O. Box 3220, 91050 Erlangen (Germany)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

The Effect of Power-Law Body Forces on a Thermally Driven Flow between Concentric Rotating Spheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical study is conducted to determine the effect of power-law body forces on a thermally driven axisymmetric flow field confined between concentric co-rotating spheres. This study is motivated by Spacelab geophysical fluid-flow experiments, ...

Michele G. Macaraeg

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Ice Thermal Storage Systems for LWR Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting  

SciTech Connect

Availability of enough cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. The issues become more severe due to the new round of nuclear power expansion and global warming. During hot summer days, cooling water leaving a power plant may become too hot to threaten aquatic life so that environmental regulations may force the plant to reduce power output or even temporarily to be shutdown. For new nuclear power plants to be built at areas without enough cooling water, dry cooling can be used to remove waste heat directly into the atmosphere. However, dry cooling will result in much lower thermal efficiency when the weather is hot. One potential solution for the above mentioned issues is to use ice thermal storage systems (ITS) that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plants thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses those ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS is suitable for supplemental cooling storage due to its very high energy storage density. ITS also provides a way to shift large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. Some gas turbine plants already use ITS to increase thermal efficiency during peak hours in summer. ITSs have also been widely used for building cooling to save energy cost. Among three cooling methods for LWR applications: once-through, wet cooling tower, and dry cooling tower, once-through cooling plants near a large water body like an ocean or a large lake and wet cooling plants can maintain the designed turbine backpressure (or condensation temperature) during 99% of the time; therefore, adding ITS to those plants will not generate large benefits. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body like a river or a small lake, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ice thermal storage systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss and water consumption during hot weather so that new LWRs could be considered in regions without enough cooling water. \\ This paper presents the feasibility study of using ice thermal storage systems for LWR supplemental cooling and peak power shifting. LWR cooling issues and ITS application status will be reviewed. Two ITS application case studies will be presented and compared with alternative options: one for once-through cooling without enough cooling for short time, and the other with dry cooling. Because capital cost, especially the ice storage structure/building cost, is the major cost for ITS, two different cost estimation models are developed: one based on scaling method, and the other based on a preliminary design using Building Information Modeling (BIM), an emerging technology in Architecture/Engineering/Construction, which enables design options, performance analysis and cost estimating in the early design stage.

Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Ocean thermal energy conversion gas desorption studies. Volume 1. Design of experiments. [Open-cycle power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seawater deaeration is a process affecting almost all proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) open-cycle power systems. If the noncondensable dissolved air is not removed from a power system, it will accumulate in thecondenser, reduce the effectiveness of condensation, and result in deterioration of system performance. A gas desorption study is being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the goal of mitigating these effects; this study is designed to investigate the vacuum deaeration process for low-temperature OTEC conditions where conventional steam stripping deaeration may not be applicable. The first in a series describing the ORNL studies, this report (1) considers the design of experiments and discusses theories of gas desorption, (2) reviews previous relevant studies, (3) describes the design of a gas desorption test loop, and (4) presents the test plan for achieving program objectives. Results of the first series of verification tests and the uncertainties encountered are also discussed. A packed column was employed in these verification tests and test data generally behaved as in previous similar studies. Results expressed as the height of transfer unit (HTU) can be correlated with the liquid flow rate by HTU = 4.93L/sup 0/ /sup 25/. End effects were appreciable for the vacuum deaeration system, and a correlation of them to applied vacuum pressure was derived.

Golshani, A.; Chen, F.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Conceptual design of an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion net power-producing experiment (OC-OTEC NPPE)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the conceptual design of an experiment to investigate heat and mass transfer and to assess the viability of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). The experiment will be developed in two stages, the Heat- and Mass-Transfer Experimental Apparatus (HMTEA) and the Net Power-Producing Experiment (NPPE). The goal for the HMTEA is to test heat exchangers. The goal for the NPPE is to experimentally verify OC-OTEC's feasibility by installing a turbine and testing the power-generating system. The design effort met the goals of both the HMTEA and the NPPE, and duplication of hardware was minimal. The choices made for the design resource water flow rates are consistent with the availability of cold and warm seawater as a result of the seawater systems upgrade carried out by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the state of Hawaii, and the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research. The choices regarding configuration of the system were made based on projected performance, degree of technical risk, schedule, and cost. The cost for the future phase of the design and the development of the HMTEA/NPPE is consistent with the projected future program funding levels. The HMTEA and NPPE were designed cooperatively by PICHTR, Argonne National Laboratory, and Solar Energy Research Institute under the guidance of DOE. The experiment will be located at the DOE's Seacoast Test Facility at the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii, Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. 71 refs., 41 figs., 34 tabs.

Bharathan, D.; Green, H.J.; Link, H.F.; Parsons, B.K.; Parsons, J.M.; Zangrando, F.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Central Receiver Solar Thermal Power System, Phase 1. CDRL Item 10. Final technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of analysis and design efforts by McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC), Rocketdyne, Stearns-Roger, Inc., Sheldahl, Inc., and the University of Houston between 1 July 1975 and 30 June 1977 are summarized. This is the Final Technical Progress Report published on the Phase 1 Central Receiver Solar Thermal Power System contract. Historical summaries and final selection of 10-MWe pilot plant and 100-MWe commercial systems are presented, with emphasis on the collector field characteristics, overall system performance, selection of steam/feedwater operating conditions, and rationale for system and subsystem selection. The commercial and pilot plant designs, as well as the subsystem research experiment activities for the collector, receiver, and thermal storage subsystems are presented, including a historical summary, design summary, and a description of the overall SRE test program and major test results for each of the subsystems.

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Method for evaluating the technical state of boilers and piping in thermal power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An approach for evaluating the current technical state of thermal equipment in thermal power plants is discussed. A system of parameters and corresponding criteria are developed for the technical state of groups of essential components of boilers and piping. Ascale for evaluation of safety factors is proposed in terms of the relationship between state parameters and the corresponding criteria. Analytic expressions are given for an approximate evaluation of the maximum lifetime limit for operation of an object in terms of an integral safety factor and an evaluation of this type is illustrated for the case of the live steam pipeline in a 300-MW unit. An algorithm is set up for actions to be taken by equipment owners in organizing monitoring of the technical state of the equipment.

Grin', E. A. [JSC 'All-Russian Thermal Engineering Institute' (JSC 'VTI') (Russian Federation); Stepanov, V. V.; Sarkisyan, V. A.; Babkina, R. I. [JSC 'All-Russian Thermal Engineering Institute' (JSC 'VTI') (Russian Federation)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Neural-net based real-time economic dispatch for thermal power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes the application of artificial neural networks to real-time optimal generation dispatch of thermal units. The approach can take into account the operational requirements and network losses. The proposed economic dispatch uses an artificial neural network (ANN) for generation of penalty factors, depending on the input generator powers and identified system load change. Then, a few additional iterations are performed within an iterative computation procedure for the solution of coordination equations, by using reference-bus penalty-factors derived from the Newton-Raphson load flow. A coordination technique for environmental and economic dispatch of pure thermal systems, based on the neural-net theory for simplified solution algorithms and improved man-machine interface is introduced. Numerical results on two test examples show that the proposed algorithm can efficiently and accurately develop optimal and feasible generator output trajectories, by applying neural-net forecasts of system load patterns.

Djukanovic, M.; Milosevic, B. [Inst. Nikola Tesla, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Dept. of Power Systems; Calovic, M. [Univ. of Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Sobajic, D.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Formation processes and main properties of hollow aluminosilicate microspheres in fly ash from thermal power stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main parameters of aluminosilicate microspheres formed at thermal power stations in Russia were studied. These parameters are responsible for the prospective industrial application of these microspheres. A comparative analysis of the properties of mineral coal components, the conditions of coal combustion, and the effects of chemical and phase-mineralogical compositions of mineral impurities in coals from almost all of the main coal deposits on the formation of microspheres was performed. The effects of thermal treatment conditions on gas evolution processes in mineral particles and on the fraction of aluminosilicate microspheres in fly ash were considered. It was found that the yield of microspheres was higher in pulverized coal combustion in furnaces with liquid slag removal, all other factors being equal. The regularities of microsphere formation were analyzed, and the mechanism of microsphere formation in fly ash during the combustion of solid fuels was considered.

V.S. Drozhzhin; M.Ya. Shpirt; L.D. Danilin; M.D. Kuvaev; I.V. Pikulin; G.A. Potemkin; S.A. Redyushev [Russian Federal Nuclear Center VNIIEF, Nizhegorodskaya oblast (Russia)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Power management in a hydro-thermal system under uncertainty by Lagrangian relaxation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a dynamic multistage stochastic programming model for the cost-optimal generation of electric power in a hydro-thermal system under uncertainty in load, inflow to reservoirs and prices for fuel and delivery contracts. The stochastic load process is approximated by a scenario tree obtained by adapting a SARIMA model to historical data, using empirical means and variances of simulated scenarios to construct an initial tree, and reducing it by a scenario deletion procedure based on a suitable probability distance. Our model involves many mixed-integer variables and individual power unit constraints, but relatively few coupling constraints. Hence we employstochastic Lagrangian relaxation that assigns stochastic multipliers to the coupling constraints. Solving the Lagrangian dual by a proximal bundle method leads to successive decomposition into single thermal and hydro unit subproblems that are solved by dynamic programming and a specialized descent algorithm, respectively. The optimal stochastic multipliers are used in Lagrangian heuristics to construct approximately optimal first stage decisions. Numerical results are presented for realistic data from a German power utility, with a time horizon of one week and scenario numbers ranging from 5 to 100. The corresponding optimization problems have up to 200,000 binary and 350,000 continuous variables, and more than 500,000 constraints.

Nicole Grwe-Kuska; Krzysztof C. Kiwiel; Matthias P. Nowak; Werner Rmisch; Isabel Wegner

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Test results of a steam injected gas turbine to increase power and thermal efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The desire to increase both power and thermal efficiency of the gas turbine (Brayton cycle) engine has been pursued for a number of years and has involved many approaches. The use of steam in the cycle to improve performance has been proposed by various investigators. This was most recently proposed by International Power Technology, Inc. (IPT) and has been tested by Detroit Diesel Allison (DDA), Division of General Motors. This approach, identified as the Cheng dual-fluid cycle (Cheng/DFC), includes the generation of steam using heat from the exhaust, and injecting this steam into the engine combustion chamber. Test results on an Allison 501-KB engine have demonstrated that use of this concept will increase the thermal efficiency of the engine by 30% and the output power by 60% with no increase in turbine inlet temperature. These results will be discussed, as will the impact of steam rate, location of steam injection, turbine temperature, and engine operational characteristics on the performance of the Cheng/DFC.

Messerlie, R.L.; Tischler, A.O.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Worker health and safety in solar thermal power systems. IV. Routine failure hazards  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Routine failure events in selected solar thermal power system designs are examined, and their rates of occurrence estimated. The results are used to compare and rank the systems considered. Modules of 1 to 100 MWe are developed based on reference or other near-term designs. Technologies used include parabolic trough, parabolic dish, and central tower focusing; central and distributed power generation; and proximate and independent siting of power modules. Component counts and failure rates estimated include heat transfer system leaks, sensor failures, and mechanical and electrical component failures, such as pumps, motors, and wire and cable. Depending on the technology chosen, leak rates can approach 1000 per year per 100 MWe system capacity, while component failure rates can be several times that level. Within categories of failures, the various technologies can have rates differing by a factor of 1000 or more. A uniform weighting for the consequences of the various failure types is proposed. Under this weighting, central tower systems are most favored, followed by parabolic trough, parabolic dishes with dispersed power generation, and parabolic dishes with central power generation. This weighting does not account for possible variations in the technologies. A sensitivity analysis is used to bound the relative hazards of the various failure events required to invert one or more of the system rankings.

Ullman, A.Z.; Sokolow, B.B.; Hill, J.; Meunier, G.; Busick, H. III

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power system development. Phase I: preliminary design. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse has completed the Preliminary Desigh Phase for the Power System Development of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Demonstration Plant project. This study included the development of a preliminary design for a Modular Application scaled power system (10MWe) and Heat Exchanger Test Articles, both based on the concept developed in the Conceptual Design Phase. The results of this study were used to improve the baseline design of the 50MWe module for the Commercial Size Power System, which was recommended for the demonstration plant by the conceptual design study. The 50MWe module was selected since it has the lowest cost, and since its size convincingly demonstrates that future economically viable commercial plants, having reliable operation with credible anticipated costs, are possible. Additional optimization studies on the size of the power system plus hull continue to identify 50MWe as the preferred minimum cost configuration. This study was limited to a closed cycle ammonia power system module, using a seawater temperature difference of 40/sup 0/F, and a surface platform/ship reference hull. This volume presents the preliminary design configuration and system optimization. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

277

Molten Salt Nanomaterials for Thermal Energy Storage and Concentrated Solar Power Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thermal efficiency of concentrated solar power (CSP) system depends on the maximum operating temperature of the system which is determined by the operating temperature of the TES device. Organic materials (such as synthetic oil, fatty acid, or paraffin wax) are typically used for TES. This limits the operating temperature of CSP units to below 400 degrees C. Increasing the operating temperature to 560 degrees C (i.e., the creeping temperature of stainless steel), can enhance the theoretical thermal efficiency from 54 percent to 63 percent. However, very few thermal storage materials are compatible for these high temperatures. Molten salts are thermally stable up to 600 degrees C and beyond. Using the molten salts as the TES materials confers several benefits, which include: (1) Higher operating temperature can significantly increase the overall cycle efficiency and resulting costs of power production. (2) Low cost of the molten salt materials can drastically reduce the cost. (3) The molten salts, which are environmentally safe, can also reduce the potential environmental impact. However, these materials suffer from poor thermo-physical properties. Impregnating these materials with nanoparticles can enhance these properties. Solvents doped with nanoparticles are termed as nanofluids. Nanofluids have been reported in the literature for the anomalous enhancement of their thermo-physical properties. In this study, the poor thermal properties of the molten salts were enhanced dramatically on mixing with nanoparticles. For example the specific heat capacity of these molten salt eutectics was found to be enhanced by as much as ~ 26 percent on mixing with nanoparticles at a mass fraction of ~ 1 percent. The resultant properties of these nanomaterials were found to be highly sensitive to small variations in the synthesis protocols. Computational models were also developed in this study to explore the fundamental transport mechanisms on the molecular scale for elucidating the anomalous enhancements in the thermo-physical properties that were measured in these experiments. This study is applicable for thermal energy storage systems utilized for other energy conversion technologies such as geothermal energy, nuclear energy and a combination of energy generation technologies.

Shin, Donghyun

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

An Equal Opportunity Employer / Operated by Los Alamos National Security LLC for DOE/NNSA Solar Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Executive Overview: The rising total cost of energy is fueling new markets for solar power. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is now offering its extensive port- folio of solar power technology for licensing and collaboration. The LANL solar power portfolio includes breakthrough technologies

279

Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model  

SciTech Connect

Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Kinematic Stirling engine as an energy conversion subsystem for paraboloidal dish solar thermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential of a suitably designed and economically manufactured Stirling engine as the energy conversion subsystem of a paraboloidal dish-Stirling solar thermal power module has been estimated. Results obtained by elementary cycle analyses have been shown to match quite well the performance characteristics of an advanced kinematic Stirling engine, the United Stirling P-40, as established by current prototypes of the engine and by a more sophisticated analytic model of its advanced derivative. In addition to performance, brief consideration has been given to other Stirling engine criteria such as durability, reliability, and serviceability. Production costs have not been considered here.

Bowyer, J.M.

1984-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national thermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Thermal analysis of heat storage canisters for a solar dynamic, space power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thermal analysis was performed of a thermal energy storage canister of a type suggested for use in a solar receiver for an orbiting Brayton cycle power system. Energy storage for the eclipse portion of the cycle is provided by the latent heat of a eutectic mixture of LiF and CaF/sub 2/ contained in the canister. The chief motivation for the study is the prediction of vapor void effects on temperature profiles and the identification of possible differences between ground test data and projected behavior in microgravity. The first phase of this study is based on a two-dimensional, cylindrical coordinates model using an interim procedure for describing void behavior in 1/minus/g and microgravity. The thermal anaylsis includes the effects of solidification front behavior, conduction in liquid/solid salt and canister materials, void growth and shrinkage, radiant heat transfer across the void, and convection in the melt due to Marangoni-induced flow and, in 1/minus/g, flow due to density gradients. A number of significant differences between 1/minus/g and 0/minus/g behavior were found. These resulted from differences in void location relative to the maximum heat flux and a significantly smaller effective conductance in 0/minus/g due to the absence of gravity-induced convection.

Wichner, R.P.; Solomon, A.D.; Drake, J.B.; Williams, P.T.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

SOLERAS - Solar-Powered Water Desalination Project at Yanbu: Thermal energy storage tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solar-powered water desalination pilot plant at Yanbu in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is a unique project in terms of its size, purpose, objectives, and scope. The plant uses a combination of solar thermal energy and fossil-fuel energy to provide the shaft horsepower necessary to operate the indirect heat-transfer freeze desalination process developed and patented by Chicago Bridge and Iron Inc. (CBandI) to produce potable water. The thermal storage acts as a buffer between the energy collection subsystem and the energy delivery subsystem. This report describes the thermal storage subsystem. One of the objectives of the desalination research project is to publish a series of reports on the performance of its various subsystems. The authors of this report do not claim that it is exhaustive and complete in all respects, for more than one reason. Any research activity is like an open-ended problem and during the tenure of its investigation it raises more problems than can be solved. However, the authors believe that the storage system behavior has posed no serious problem and that the report adequately covers all the facets of the investigation. 3 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Optimization and analysis of LiH thermal energy storage device configurations for space power applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal energy storage (TES) can be used to reduce the area and mass of the heat rejection system for space-based sprint power systems. During the sprint mode power cycle, reject heat is placed into storage. The heat is then rejected to the ultimate sink over the much longer non-operational portion of the orbits, through a correspondingly smaller radiator. Preliminary analysis has shown significant weight advantage for the heat storage plus radiator concept over the radiator only concept. Thermal performance analysis and optimization of five heat sink TES configurations using LiH was completed. The configurations are: (a) LiH encapsulated spheres in the packed bed, (b) standard tube and shell arrangement with LiH on the tube side, (c) tube and shell with LiH on the shell side, (d) alternating concentric rings of LiH and heat transport fluid, and (e) parallel slabs of LiH. System performance was calculated for a wide range of parameters and included effects of prespecified internal voids, enhanced conductivity and internal fins.

Siman-Tov, M.; Williams, P.; Olszewski, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Improved Electrical Load Match In California By Combining Solar Thermal Power Plants with Wind Farms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

California with its hydro, geothermal, wind, and solar energy is the second largest producer of renewable electricity in the United States (Washington state is the largest producer of renewable energy electricity due to high level of hydro power). Replacing fossil fuel electrical generation with renewable energy electrical generation will decrease the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere which will slow down the rapid increase in global warming (a goal of the California state government). However, in order for a much larger percentage of the total electrical generation in California to be from renewable energies like wind and solar, a better match between renewable energy generation and utility electrical load is required. Using wind farm production data and predicted production from a solar thermal power plant (with and without six hours of storage), a comparison was made between the renewable energy generation and the current utility load in California. On a monthly basis, wind farm generated electricity at the three major wind farm areas in California (Altamont Pass, east of San Francisco Bay area; Tehachapi Pass in the high desert between Tehachapi and Mojave; and San Gorgonio Pass in the low desert near Palm Springs) matches the utility load well during the highest electrical load months (May through September). Prediction of solar thermal power plant output also indicates a good match with utility load during these same high load months. Unfortunately, the hourly wind farm output during the day is not a very good match to the utility electrical load (i.e. in spring and summer the lowest wind speed generally occurs during mid-day when utility load is highest). If parabolic trough solar thermal power plants are installed in the Mojave Desert (similar to the 354 MW of plants that have been operating in Mojave Desert since 1990) then the solar electrical generation will help balance out the wind farm generation since highest solar generated electricity will be during mid-day. Adding six hours of solar thermal storage improved the utility load match significantly in the evening and reliability was also improved. Storage improves reliability because electrical production can remain at a high level even when there are lulls in the wind or clouds decrease the solar energy striking the parabolic trough mirrors. The solar energy from Mojave Desert and wind energy in the major wind farm areas are not a good match to utility load during the winter in California, but if the number of wind farms were increased east of San Diego, then the utility renewable energy match would be improved (this is because the wind energy is highest during the winter in this area). Currently in California, wind electrical generation only contributes 1.8% of total electricity and solar electrical generation only contributes 0.2%. Combining wind farms and solar thermal power plants with storage would allow a large percentage of the electrical load in California to be met by wind and solar energy due to a better match with utility load than by either renewable resource separately.

Vick, B. D.; Clark, R. N.; Mehos, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants January 25, 2013 - 11:10am Addthis AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. Gayland Barksdale Technical Writer, Office of Fossil Energy What Does AVESTAR Provide? Advanced dynamic simulation, control and virtual plant technologies

286

National Bio Energy Co Ltd formerly Guoneng Biomass Power Ltd | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bio Energy Co Ltd formerly Guoneng Biomass Power Ltd Bio Energy Co Ltd formerly Guoneng Biomass Power Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name National Bio Energy Co Ltd (formerly Guoneng Biomass Power Ltd.) Place Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip 100005 Sector Biomass Product Invest in, build and run biomass power plants. Coordinates 39.90601°, 116.387909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.90601,"lon":116.387909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

287

Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade September 10, 2010 - 2:54pm Addthis This “power tower” is part of the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, which is getting upgrades through Recovery Act funding. | Photo Courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories This "power tower" is part of the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, which is getting upgrades through Recovery Act funding. | Photo Courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories is unique - and in demand. The Facility has been instrumental in NASA tests, national defense programs and concentrated solar technology development.

288

Survey of strong motion earthquake effects on thermal power plants in California with emphasis on piping systems. Volume 2, Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 2 of the ``Survey of Strong Motion Earthquake Effects on Thermal Power Plants in California with Emphasis on Piping Systems`` contains Appendices which detail the detail design and seismic response of several power plants subjected to strong motion earthquakes. The particular plants considered include the Ormond Beach, Long Beach and Seal Beach, Burbank, El Centro, Glendale, Humboldt Bay, Kem Valley, Pasadena and Valley power plants. Included is a typical power plant piping specification and photographs of typical power plant piping specification and photographs of typical piping and support installations for the plants surveyed. Detailed piping support spacing data are also included.

Stevenson, J.D. [Stevenson and Associates, Cleveland, OH (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

100-kWp photovoltaic power system at Natural Bridges National Monument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Natural Bridges National Monument in southeastern Utah is the location of the world's largest solar photovoltaic power system. This system, which operates in a stand-alone mode without utility backup, supplies from 300 to 400 kWh/day of 60-Hz AC electrical energy to the diversified loads in the monument headquarters area. A diesel-powered generator serves as backup for the system. The solutions to a number of problems encountered in the design, fabrication, testing and early operation of the system are discussed.

Solman, F.J.; Helfrich, J.H.; Lyon, E.F.; Benoit, A.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Sixth National Green Power Marketing Conference: Opportunity in the Midst of Uncertainty, July 30 - August 1, 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last several years, a green power marketing industry has evolved, with companies offering green power service choices to retail customers. The reverberations of the recent California energy shortage have dampened the steady growth trend of green power markets. The Sixth National Conference on Green Power Marketing, held in Portland, Oregon, July 30 - August 1, 2001, examined the state of green power marketing in this critical period while exploring opportunities to improve on the success of gree...

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

291

Combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system for solar-thermal steam-electric power plants. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal performance and economics of the combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system concept for solar-thermal steam-electric plants have been evaluated. Based on the computer simulation of the operation of southwest-sited solar-thermal plants, it has been determined that the combined pond-tower concept has significant cost and performance advantages over conventional dry cooling systems. Use of a thermal storage pond as a component of the dry cooling system allows a significant reduction in the required dry cooling heat exchange capacity and the associated parasitic power consumption. Importantly, it has been concluded that the combined pond-tower dry cooling system concept can be employed to economically maintain steam condensing temperatures at levels normally achieved with conventional evaporative cooling systems. An evaluation of alternative thermal storage pond design concepts has revealed that a stratified vertical-flow cut-and-fill reservoir with conventional membrane lining and covering would yield the best overall system performance at the least cost.

Guyer, E.C.; Bourne, J.G.; Brownell, D.L.; Rose, R.M.

1979-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

292

Conformal Thermal Models for Optimal Loading and Elapsed Life Estimation of Power Transformers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Power and Generator Transformers are important and expensive elements of a power system. Inadvertent failure of Power Transformers would cause long interruption in power supply (more)

Pradhan, Manoj Kumar

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Development of encapsulated lithium hydride sink-side thermal energy storage for pulsed space power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Value analysis indicates that inclusion of thermal energy storage (TES) as an element in a pulsed space power supply will reduce the mass of the heat rejection system. A candidate design for the TES component utilizes lithium hydride (LiH) encapsulated in 304L stainless steel or molybdenum in a packed-bed configuration with a lithium or sodium-potassium (NaK) heat transport fluid. Critical concerns with this concept are the need to (1) accommodate shell stresses induced by volumetric expansion of the melting salt or surface gripping by the freezing salt and (2) minimize hydrogen loss through the shell due to LiH dissociation at high temperatures. Experimental observation of significant cracking of the LiH during cooling mitigates the first of these issues by providing a leakage path into the interior void as melting occurs at the salt-containment interface, thus allowing use of thin shells.

Morris, D.G.; Foote, J.P.; Olszewski, M.; Whittaker, J.W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Convection heat loss from cavity receiver in parabolic dish solar thermal power system: A review  

SciTech Connect

The convection heat loss from cavity receiver in parabolic dish solar thermal power system can significantly reduce the efficiency and consequently the cost effectiveness of the system. It is important to assess this heat loss and subsequently improve the thermal performance of the receiver. This paper aims to present a comprehensive review and systematic summarization of the state of the art in the research and progress in this area. The efforts include the convection heat loss mechanism, experimental and numerical investigations on the cavity receivers with varied shapes that have been considered up to date, and the Nusselt number correlations developed for convection heat loss prediction as well as the wind effect. One of the most important features of this paper is that it has covered numerous cavity literatures encountered in various other engineering systems, such as those in electronic cooling devices and buildings. The studies related to those applications may provide valuable information for the solar receiver design, which may otherwise be ignored by a solar system designer. Finally, future development directions and the issues that need to be further investigated are also suggested. It is believed that this comprehensive review will be beneficial to the design, simulation, performance assessment and applications of the solar parabolic dish cavity receivers. (author)

Wu, Shuang-Ying; Xiao, Lan; Li, You-Rong [College of Power Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Cao, Yiding [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Two-tank indirect thermal storage designs for solar parabolic trough power plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The performance of a solar thermal parabolic trough plant with thermal storage is dependent upon the arrangement of the heat exchangers that ultimately transfer energy (more)

Kopp, Joseph E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage for Integration Studies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) can provide multiple benefits to the grid, including low marginal cost energy and the ability to levelize load, provide operating reserves, and provide firm capacity. It is challenging to properly value the integration of CSP because of the complicated nature of this technology. Unlike completely dispatchable fossil sources, CSP is a limited energy resource, depending on the hourly and daily supply of solar energy. To optimize the use of this limited energy, CSP-TES must be implemented in a production cost model with multiple decision variables for the operation of the CSP-TES plant. We develop and implement a CSP-TES plant in a production cost model that accurately characterizes the three main components of the plant: solar field, storage tank, and power block. We show the effect of various modelling simplifications on the value of CSP, including: scheduled versus optimized dispatch from the storage tank and energy-only operation versus co-optimization with ancillary services.

Hummon, M.; Jorgenson, J.; Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage for Integration Studies: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) can provide multiple benefits to the grid, including low marginal cost energy and the ability to levelize load, provide operating reserves, and provide firm capacity. It is challenging to properly value the integration of CSP because of the complicated nature of this technology. Unlike completely dispatchable fossil sources, CSP is a limited energy resource, depending on the hourly and daily supply of solar energy. To optimize the use of this limited energy, CSP-TES must be implemented in a production cost model with multiple decision variables for the operation of the CSP-TES plant. We develop and implement a CSP-TES plant in a production cost model that accurately characterizes the three main components of the plant: solar field, storage tank, and power block. We show the effect of various modelling simplifications on the value of CSP, including: scheduled versus optimized dispatch from the storage tank and energy-only operation versus co-optimization with ancillary services.

Hummon, M.; Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Mehos, M.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

REID, ROBERT S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PEARSON, J. BOSIE [Los Alamos National Laboratory; STEWART, ERIC T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

299

Experimental Evaluation of the Thermal Performance of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 deg. C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 deg. C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

Pearson, J. Boise; Stewart, Eric T. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Reid, Robert S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

Overview and Status of the Power Conditioning System for the National Ignition Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Power Conditioning System (PCS) is a modular capacitive energy storage system that provides over 34 kilojoules of energy to each of the nearly 8000 flashlamps in the NIF laser. Up to 400 megajoules of energy can be stored in the NIF PCS system, discharged through spark gaps and delivered to the flashlamps through a coaxial transmission line system requiring nearly 100 miles of high-voltage cable. The NIF PCS has been under development for nearly 4 years. During this time, the system was developed and designed by Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM (SNLA) in conjunction with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Extensive reliability testing was performed at SNLA on the First Article NIF Test Module (FANTM) test facility and design improvements were implemented based on FANTM test results, leading to the final design presently undergoing system reliability testing at LLNL. Low-cost energy-storage capacitors, charging power supplies, and reliable, fault-tolerant components were developed through partnerships with numerous contractors. Extensive reliability and fault testing of components has also been performed. This paper will provide an overview of the many efforts that have culminated in the final design of the NIF PCS. The PCS system design will be described and the cost tradeoffs discussed. Plans for fabrication and installation of the NIF PCS system over the next 6 years will be presented.

Newton, M A; Fulkerson, E S; Hulsey, S D; Kamm, R E; Pendleton, D L; Petersen, D E; Smith, C R; Ullery, G T; McKay, P F; Moore, W B; Muirhead, D A

2001-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national thermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

National Assembly of the Republic of Slovenia Subiceva ulica 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) for Unit 6 at Sostanj Thermal Power Plant Dear President and members of the National Assembly Thermal Power Plant, yet still ensuring a secure available energy supply, as well as competitiveness of extermination. We cannot assign blame for extermination of a specific species on a specific power plant

Hansen, James E.

302

Thermal Efficiency Optimization for Industrial Power Plants Under Load Fluctuations Using Fuzzy Logic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The automation of the control to a power plant is indeed a challenge mainly because of the occurrences of random and unpredictable variations in output demands as well as because of highly non-linear behavior of the system itself. It is sometimes argued that the 'best' control for a power plant is the operators themselves. Experienced operators are capable of making decisions on the basis of incomplete and imprecise information. The extent to which these decisions are correct is a matter of speculation. Erroneous conclusions, established post facto, are chalked up to the learning process and in fact, contribute to the forming of a good, experienced control team. The need to automate the control process for a plant is even more acutely felt when considering the complexity of the plants themselves and the volume of data that would have to be processed before a control decision can be taken. Factored into this decision would also be several governing parameters such as costs, reliability, other constraints and their interdependency, as well as planned and unscheduled outages for maintenance and so on. In this paper, however, only one facet of a power plant operation is considered. It is intended to demonstrate that thermal efficiency may be improved by better techniques for automated control of throttle valves in the steam turbine of the plant. One of these options, fuzzy logic, is selected, and defended, as being the more effective than current approaches. A comparative analysis is conducted of control methods for plant operations followed by a brief overview of fuzzy control and its application to control of non-linear systems. A method of applying this 'new' computer-based technique to control of non-linear, somewhat erratic plants is presented and discussed.

Steffenhagan, W.; de Sam Lazaro, A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

FY 2005 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and DaimlerChrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from ''Freedom'' and ''Cooperative Automotive Research''), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Vehicle Systems subprogram within the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive and heavy truck technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles and heavy trucks will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. This work also supports the development of advanced automotive accessories and the reduction of parasitic losses (e.g., aerodynamic drag, thermal management, friction and wear, and rolling resistance). In supporting the development of hybrid propulsion systems, the Vehicle Systems subprogram has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve fuel economy, comply with projected emissions and safety regulations, and use fuels produced domestically. The Vehicle Systems subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel and the 21st Century Truck Partnerships through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) Identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements, then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) Develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors, emission control devices, battery systems, power electronics, accessories, and devices to reduce parasitic losses; and (3) Determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under the Vehicle Systems subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the FreedomCAR Program. A key element in making hybrid electric vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include: (1) Novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) Inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) Converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) More effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) Integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies. ORNL also executes specific projects for DOE. The following

Olszewski, M

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

304

FY 2005 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and DaimlerChrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from ''Freedom'' and ''Cooperative Automotive Research''), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Vehicle Systems subprogram within the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive and heavy truck technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles and heavy trucks will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. This work also supports the development of advanced automotive accessories and the reduction of parasitic losses (e.g., aerodynamic drag, thermal management, friction and wear, and rolling resistance). In supporting the development of hybrid propulsion systems, the Vehicle Systems subprogram has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve fuel economy, comply with projected emissions and safety regulations, and use fuels produced domestically. The Vehicle Systems subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel and the 21st Century Truck Partnerships through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) Identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements, then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) Develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors, emission control devices, battery systems, power electronics, accessories, and devices to reduce parasitic losses; and (3) Determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under the Vehicle Systems subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the FreedomCAR Program. A key element in making hybrid electric vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include: (1) Novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) Inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) Converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) More effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) Integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technolo

Olszewski, M

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

305

Thermal Modeling of NUHOMS HSM-15 and HSM-1 Storage Modules at Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station ISFSI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the Department of Energy (DOE), visual inspections and temperature measurements were performed on two storage modules in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Stations Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). Detailed thermal models models were developed to obtain realistic temperature predictions for actual storage systems, in contrast to conservative and bounding design basis calculations.

Suffield, Sarah R.; Fort, James A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Cuta, Judith M.; Collins, Brian A.; Siciliano, Edward R.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Survey of Thermal Storage for Parabolic Trough Power Plants; Period of Performance: September 13, 1999 - June 12, 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to identify and selectively review previous work done on the evaluation and use of thermal energy storage systems applied to parabolic trough power plants. Appropriate storage concepts and technical options are first discussed, followed by a review of previous work.

Pilkington Solar International GmbH

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

307

CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION TO INSTALL EMSL SUPER-COMPUTER POWER INFRASTRUCTURE, PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TO INSTALL EMSL SUPER-COMPUTER TO INSTALL EMSL SUPER-COMPUTER POWER INFRASTRUCTURE, PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON Proposed Action: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) proposes to provide enhanced electrical service to the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) to provide an increased power capacity for future facility computational developments. Location of Action: The electrical service would be installed underground via excavation in the lawn and gravel area between EMSL, room 1145, west toward the northeast comer of the Biological Sciences Facility (BSF), in Richland, Washington. The excavation would also extend north-south for about 450 feet along the property line between EMSL and BSF. Please refer to Figure 1.

308

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Wireless Power Transfer Development for Sustainable Campus Initiative  

SciTech Connect

Wireless power transfer (WPT) is a convenient, safe, and autonomous means for electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging that has seen rapid growth in recent years for stationary applications. WPT does not require bulky contacts, plugs, and wires, is not affected by dirt or weather conditions, and is as efficient as conventional charging systems. This study summarizes some of the recent Sustainable Campus Initiative activities of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in WPT charging of an on-campus vehicle (a Toyota Prius plug-in hybrid electric vehicle). Laboratory development of the WPT coils, high-frequency power inverter, and overall systems integration are discussed. Results cover the coil performance testing at different operating frequencies, airgaps, and misalignments. Some of the experimental results of insertion loss due to roadway surfacing materials in the air-gap are presented. Experimental lessons learned are also covered in this study.

Onar, Omer C [ORNL; Miller, John M [ORNL; Campbell, Steven L [ORNL; Coomer, Chester [ORNL; White, Cliff P [ORNL; Seiber, Larry Eugene [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Design and cost of near-term OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) plants for the production of desalinated water and electric power. [Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There currently is an increasing need for both potable water and power for many islands in the Pacific and Caribbean. The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology fills these needs and is a viable option because of the unlimited supply of ocean thermal energy for the production of both desalinated water and electricity. The OTEC plant design must be flexible to meet the product-mix demands that can be very different from site to site. This paper describes different OTEC plants that can supply various mixes of desalinated water and vapor -- the extremes being either all water and no power or no water and all power. The economics for these plants are also presented. The same flow rates and pipe sizes for both the warm and cold seawater streams are used for different plant designs. The OTEC plant designs are characterized as near-term because no major technical issues need to be resolved or demonstrated. The plant concepts are based on DOE-sponsored experiments dealing with power systems, advanced heat exchanger designs, corrosion and fouling of heat exchange surfaces, and flash evaporation and moisture removal from the vapor using multiple spouts. In addition, the mature multistage flash evaporator technology is incorporated into the plant designs were appropriate. For the supply and discharge warm and cold uncertainties do exist because the required pipe sizes are larger than the maximum currently deployed -- 40-inch high-density polyethylene pipe at Keahole Point in Hawaii. 30 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

Rabas, T.; Panchal, C.; Genens, L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Non-Thermal X-ray Properties of Rotation Powered Pulsars and Their Wind Nebulae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a statistical study of the non-thermal X-ray emission of 27 young rotation powered pulsars (RPPs) and 24 pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) by using the Chandra and the XMM-Newton observations, which with the high spatial resolutions enable us to spatially resolve pulsars from their surrounding PWNe. We obtain the X-ray luminosities and spectra separately for RPPs and PWNe, and then investigate their distribution and relation to each other as well as the relation with the pulsar rotational parameters. In the pair-correlation analysis we find that: (1) the X-ray (2-10 keV) luminosities of both pulsar and PWN (L_{psr} and L_{pwn}) display a strong correlation with pulsar spin down power Edot and characteristic age, and the scalings resulting from a simple linear fit to the data are L_{psr} \\propto Edot^{0.92 \\pm 0.04} and L_{pwn} \\propto Edot^{1.45 \\pm 0.08} (68% confidence level), respectively, however, both the fits are not statistically acceptable; (2) L_{psr} also shows a possible weak correlation with pulsar period P and period derivative Pdot, whereas L_{pwn} manifests a similar weak correlation with Pdot only; (3) The PWN photon index Gamma_{pwn} is positively correlated with L_{pwn} and L_{pwn}/Edot. We also found that the PWN X-ray luminosity is typically 1 to 10 times larger than that from the underlying pulsar, and the PWN photon indices span a range of ~1.5 to ~2. The statistic study of PWN spectral properties supports the particle wind model in which the X-ray emitting electrons are accelerated by the termination shock of the wind.

Xiang-Hua Li; Fang-Jun Lu; Zhuo Li

2007-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

311

Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Phase 1 Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this project is to develop and validate an innovative, scalable phase change salt thermal energy storage (TES) system that can interface with Infinias family of free-piston Stirling engines (FPSE). This TES technology is also appropriate for Rankine and Brayton power converters. Solar TES systems based on latent heat of fusion rather than molten salt temperature differences, have many advantages that include up to an order of magnitude higher energy storage density, much higher temperature operation, and elimination of pumped loops for most of Infinias design options. DOE has funded four different concepts for solar phase change TES, including one other Infinia awarded project using heat pipes to transfer heat to and from the salt. The unique innovation in this project is an integrated TES/pool boiler heat transfer system that is the simplest approach identified to date and arguably has the best potential for minimizing the levelized cost of energy (LCOE). The Phase 1 objectives are to design, build and test a 1-hour TES proof-of-concept lab demonstrator integrated with an Infinia 3 kW Stirling engine, and to conduct a preliminary design of a 12-hour TES on-sun prototype.

Qiu, Songgang

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Review of sodium effects on candidate materials for central receiver solar-thermal power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Available information on the corrosion behavior and mechanical properties of structural materials in a high-temperature sodium environment has been reviewed to compile a data base for selection of materials for advanced central-receiver solar-power systems, for which sodium is being considered as a heat-transfer fluid and thermal-storage medium. Candidate materials for this application (e.g., Types 304, 316, and 321 stainless steel, Alloy 800, and Fe-2 1/4 Cr-1Mo and Fe-9Cr-1Mo ferritic steels) have been used in the construction of various components for liquid-metal fast-breeder reactors in this country and abroad with considerable success. Requirements for additional information on material properties in a sodium environment are identified. The additional data coupled with more quantitative deformation models, failure criteria, and component design rules will further reduce uncertainties in the assessment of performance limits and component reliability in large sodium heat-transport systems. 120 references.

Chopra, O.K.; Wang, J.Y.N.; Natesan, K.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Enabling Greater Penetration of Solar Power via the Use of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At high penetration of solar generation there are a number of challenges to economically integrating this variable and uncertain resource. These include the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal demand patterns and limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate variable generation resources. Of the large number of technologies that can be used to enable greater penetration of variable generators, concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) presents a number of advantages. The use of storage enables this technology to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. In addition, CSP can provide substantial grid flexibility by rapidly changing output in response to the highly variable net load created by high penetration of solar (and wind) generation. In this work we examine the degree to which CSP may be complementary to PV by performing a set of simulations in the U.S. Southwest to demonstrate the general potential of CSP with TES to enable greater use of solar generation, including additional PV.

Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Proceedings of the 2012 International Congress on Advances in National Power Plants - ICAPP '12  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ICAPP '12 provides a forum for leaders of the nuclear industry to exchange information, present results from their work, review the state of the industry, and discuss future directions and needs for the deployment of new nuclear power plant systems around the world. These proceedings gather 326 papers covering the following topics: 1. Water-Cooled Reactor Programs; 2. High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors; 3. LMFR and Innovative Reactor Programs; 4. Operation, Performance and Reliability Management; 5. Plant Safety Assessment and Regulatory Issues; 6. Reactor Physics and Analysis; 7. Thermal Hydraulics Analysis and Testing; 8. Fuel Cycle and Waste Management; 9. Materials and Structural Issues; 10. Nuclear Energy and Global Environment; 11. Deployment and Cross-Cutting Issues; 12. Plant Licensing and International Regulatory Issues.

NONE

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Rhodium self-powered neutron detector as a suitable on-line thermal neutron flux monitor in BNCT treatments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: A rhodium self-powered neutron detector (Rh SPND) has been specifically developed by the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) of Argentina to measure locally and in real time thermal neutron fluxes in patients treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this work, the thermal and epithermal neutron response of the Rh SPND was evaluated by studying the detector response to two different reactor spectra. In addition, during clinical trials of the BNCT Project of the CNEA, on-line neutron flux measurements using the specially designed detector were assessed. Methods: The first calibration of the detector was done with the well-thermalized neutron spectrum of the CNEA RA-3 reactor thermal column. For this purpose, the reactor spectrum was approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the thermal energy range. The second calibration was done at different positions along the central axis of a water-filled cylindrical phantom, placed in the mixed thermal-epithermal neutron beam of CNEA RA-6 reactor. In this latter case, the RA-6 neutron spectrum had been well characterized by both calculation and measurement, and it presented some marked differences with the ideal spectrum considered for SPND calibrations at RA-3. In addition, the RA-6 neutron spectrum varied with depth in the water phantom and thus the percentage of the epithermal contribution to the total neutron flux changed at each measurement location. Local (one point-position) and global (several points-positions) and thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities were determined from these measurements. Thermal neutron flux was also measured during BNCT clinical trials within the irradiation fields incident on the patients. In order to achieve this, the detector was placed on patient's skin at dosimetric reference points for each one of the fields. System stability was adequate for this kind of measurement. Results: Local mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities and global thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities derived from measurements performed at the RA-6 were compared and no significant differences were found. Global RA-6-based thermal neutron sensitivity showed agreement with pure thermal neutron sensitivity measurements performed in the RA-3 spectrum. Additionally, the detector response proved nearly unchanged by differences in neutron spectra from real (RA-6 BNCT beam) and ideal (considered for calibration calculations at RA-3) neutron source descriptions. The results confirm that the special design of the Rh SPND can be considered as having a pure thermal response for neutron spectra with epithermal-to-thermal flux ratios up to 12%. In addition, the linear response of the detector to thermal flux allows the use of a mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivity of 1.95 {+-} 0.05 x 10{sup -21} A n{sup -1}{center_dot}cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s. This sensitivity can be used in spectra with up to 21% epithermal-to-thermal flux ratio without significant error due to epithermal neutron and gamma induced effects. The values of the measured fluxes in clinical applications had discrepancies with calculated results that were in the range of -25% to +30%, which shows the importance of a local on-line independent measurement as part of a treatment planning quality control system. Conclusions: The usefulness of the CNEA Rh SPND for the on-line local measurement of thermal neutron flux on BNCT patients has been demonstrated based on an appropriate neutron spectra calibration and clinical applications.

Miller, Marcelo E.; Sztejnberg, Manuel L.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Longhino, Juan M.; Estryk, Guillermo [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina); Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429, Argentina and CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1033 (Argentina); Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Thermal power systems: Small Power Systems Applications Project. Volume II. Detailed report. Annual technical report, fiscal year 1978  

SciTech Connect

Small Power Systems Applications activities for FY 1978 are reported. Studies were conducted to address current small power system technology as applied to power plants up to 10 MWe in size. Markets for small power systems were characterized and cost goals were established for the project. Candidate power plant system design concepts were selected for evaluation and preliminary performance and cost assessments were made. Economic studies were conducted at JPL and under contract to Burns and McDonnell. Breakeven capital costs were determined for leading contenders among the candidate systems. An applications study was made of the potential use of small power systems in providing part of the demand for pumping power by the extensive aqueduct system of California, estimated to be 1000 MWe by 1985. Criteria and methodologies were developed for application to the ranking of candidate power plant system design concepts. Experimental power plants concepts of 1 MWe rating were studied by three contractors as a Phase I effort leading toward the definition of a power plant configuration for subsequent detail design, construction, testing and evaluation as Engineering Experiment No. 1 (EE No. 1). Site selection criteria and ground rules for the solicitation of EE No. 1 site participation proposals by DOE were developed.

1979-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Phase 1: conceptual design. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development. Volume 2 of 3. Technical details. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse has completed the conceptual design of the Power System for the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Demonstration Plant project. This study included the development of a conceptual design for the following three items: first, a full-size power system module for the 100 MWe Demonstration Plant; second, a scaled proof of concept power system; and third, a heat exchanger test article. The study was limited to a closed cycle ammonia power system module, using a water temperature difference of 40/sup 0/F., and a surface platform/ship reference hull. Two power module of 50 MWe each are recommended for the demonstration plant. The 50 MWe module was selected since it has the lowest cost, and since it is of a size which convincingly demonstrates that future economically viable commercial plants, having reliable operation with credible anticipated costs, are possible. A modular, tube bundle approach to heat exchanger design makes large heat exchangers practical and economical. Other power module elements are considered to be within state-of-practice. Technological assessments of all subsystems indicate requirements for verification only, rather than continued research. A complete test program, which will verify the mechanical reliability as well as thermal performance, is recommended.

Not Available

1978-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

318

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with CombinedHeat and Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The addition of solar thermal and heat storage systems can improve the economic, as well as environmental attraction of micro-generation systems, e.g. fuel cells with or without combined heat and power (CHP) and contribute to enhanced CO2 reduction. However, the interactions between solar thermal collection and storage systems and CHP systems can be complex, depending on the tariff structure, load profile, etc. In order to examine the impact of solar thermal and heat storage on CO2 emissions and annual energy costs, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program. The objective is minimization of annual energy costs. This paper focuses on analysis of the optimal interaction of solar thermal systems, which can be used for domestic hot water, space heating and/or cooling, and micro-CHP systems in the California service territory of San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E). Contrary to typical expectations, our results indicate that despite the high solar radiation in southern California, fossil based CHP units are dominant, even with forecast 2020 technology and costs. A CO2 pricing scheme would be needed to incent installation of combined solar thermal absorption chiller systems, and no heat storage systems are adopted. This research also shows that photovoltaic (PV) arrays are favored by CO2 pricing more than solar thermal adoption.

Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Lai, Judy; Siddiqui, Afzal

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Utility Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems National Solar Energy Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF THE PROPOSED REGULATION REPEAL: UCF-8.002 Solar Thermal Collector and PV Module Testing Standards. (1) The Testing and Standards Program shall apply to solar thermal collectors and PV modules submitted for testing thermal collectors or PV modules in Florida. (3) The criteria for testing the performance of solar thermal

320

FY2007 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as 'FreedomCAR' (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research'), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieving the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of hybrid propulsion systems, the APEEM effort has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve advanced vehicle efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors and power electronics; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under this subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. A key element in making hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include these: (1) novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) more effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, APEEM subprogram. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies. ORNL also executes specific projects for DOE. The following report discusses those projects carried out in FY 2007 and conveys highlights of their accomplishments. Numerous project reviews, technical reports, and papers have been published for these efforts, if the reader is interested in pursuing details of the work.

Olszewski, Mitchell [ORNL

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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321

FY2007 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as 'FreedomCAR' (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research'), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public/private partnerships to fund high-risk, high-payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieving the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on understanding and improving the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of hybrid propulsion systems, the APEEM effort has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve advanced vehicle efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three-phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle-related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors and power electronics; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under this subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. A key element in making hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the power electronics and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include these: (1) novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency and the ability to accommodate higher-temperature environments; (3) converter concepts that employ means of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) more effective thermal control and packaging technologies; and (5) integrated motor/inverter concepts. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the DOE Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, APEEM subprogram. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies. ORNL also executes specific projects for DOE. The following report discusses those projects carried out in FY 2007 and conveys highlights of their accomplishments. Numerous project reviews, technical reports, and papers have been published for these efforts, if the reader is interested in pursuing details of the work.

Olszewski, Mitchell [ORNL

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Systems analysis of solar thermal power systems. Report on Task 1: determination and characterization of solar thermal conversion options  

SciTech Connect

Seven general solar thermal conversion concepts were selected initially. The literature review confirmed that these are the only concepts that are developed to a level suitable for inclusion in the comparative analysis to be performed. A summary of information pertaining to these concepts is given and the concepts are briefly described. The information presented is abstracted from applicable references presented in the bibliography. The bibliography and a list of the major contacts established are included in appendices. The seven concepts are: point-focusing distributed receiver system; point focusing, central receiver systems; fixed mirror/distributed focus system; line-focus central receiver system; line-focus distributed receiver system; fixed mirror line-focus distributed receiver system, and low concentrator non-tracking systems. (WHR)

Apley, W.J.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED THERMAL-ACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to explore microwave-excited thermal-acoustic (META) phenomena for quantitative analysis of granular and powdered materials, with the culmination of the research to be an on-line carbon-in-ash monitor for coal-fired power plants. This technique of analyzing unburned carbon in fly ash could be a less tedious and time consuming method as compared to the traditional LOI manual procedure. Phase 1 of the research focused on off-line single-frequency thermal-acoustic measurements where an off-line fly ash monitor was constructed that could operate as analytical tool to explore instrument and methodology parameters for quantifying the microwave-excited thermal-acoustic effect of carbon in fly ash, and it was determined that the off-line thermal-acoustic technique could predict the carbon content of a random collection of fly ashes with a linear correlation constant of R{sup 2} = 0.778. Much higher correlations are expected for fly ashes generated from a single boiler. Phase 2 of the research developing a methodology to generate microwave spectra of various powders, including fly ash, coal, and inorganic minerals, and to determine if these microwave spectra could be used for chemical analyses. Although different minerals produced different responses, higher resolution microwave spectra would be required to be able to distinguish among minerals. Phase 3 of the research focused on the development of an on-line fly ash monitor that could be adapted to measure either a thermal-acoustic or thermal-elastic response to due microwave excitation of fly ash. The thermal-acoustic response was successfully employed for this purpose but the thermal-elastic response was too weak to yield a useful on-line device.

Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Jeffrey J. Swetelitsch

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Thermal-hydraulics Analysis of a Radioisotope-powered Mars Hopper Propulsion System  

SciTech Connect

Thermal-hydraulics analyses results produced using a combined suite of computational design and analysis codes are presented for the preliminary design of a concept Radioisotope Thermal Rocket (RTR) propulsion system. Modeling of the transient heating and steady state temperatures of the system is presented. Simulation results for propellant blow down during impulsive operation are also presented. The results from this study validate the feasibility of a practical thermally capacitive RTR propulsion system.

Robert C. O'Brien; Andrew C. Klein; William T. Taitano; Justice Gibson; Brian Myers; Steven D. Howe

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation gives an overview of NREL's Thermal Stress and Reliability Project work from October 2007 to March 2009 with an emphasis on activity during 2008/2009.

O'Keefe, M. P.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Advanced thermal-energy-storage concept-definition study for solar Brayton power plants. Final technical report, Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The detailed results are presented of a technical and economic assessment of phase change and thermochemical energy storage systems in a solar power plant employing a high temperature Brayton cycle thermal engine with helium as the heat transport fluid. The assessment included an examination of the storage system operation, efficiency, power plant interaction, design, materials, safety, maintenance, environmental impact, system life, and economics. These considerations are implemented in the conceptual design of three baseline storage systems and their components for use in a solar power plant module of 50 megawatt electrical power output. Rationale is provided to support the configuration, operation and material choices. A preliminary assessment of the technology development and experimental test program requirements are also included. The report is contained in four separate volumes. This volume is the technical report.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

A two-stage planning model for power scheduling in a hydro-thermal system under uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. A two-stage stochastic programming model for the short- or mid-term cost-optimal electric power production planning is developed. We consider the power generation in a hydro-thermal generation system under uncertainty in demand (or load) and prices for fuel and delivery contracts. The model involves a large number of mixed-integer (stochastic) decision variables and constraints linking time periods and operating power units. A stochastic Lagrangian relaxation scheme is designed by assigning (stochastic) multipliers to all constraints that couple power units. It is assumed that the stochastic load and price processes are given (or approximated) by a finite number of realizations (scenarios). Solving the dual by a bundle subgradient method leads to a successive decomposition into stochastic single unit subproblems. The stochastic thermal and hydro subproblems are solved by a stochastic dynamic programming technique and by a specific descent algorithm, respectively. A Lagrangian heuristics that provides approximate solutions for the primal problem is developed. Numerical results are presented for realistic data from a German power utility and for numbers of scenarios ranging from 5 to 100 and a time horizon of 168 hours. The sizes of the corresponding optimization problems go up to 400.000 binary and 650.000 continuous variables, and more than 1.300.000 constraints. Keywords: stochastic programming, Lagrangian relaxation, unit commitment

Robert Nrnberg; Werner Rmisch

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

FY2010 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from ''Freedom'' and ''Cooperative Automotive Research''), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public-private partnerships to fund high risk, high payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE) and electric motor technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the APEEM subprogram has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors and PE; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under this subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in HEVs (PHEVs), battery electric vehicles, and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the VTP. A key element in making these advanced vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the PE and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include: (1) novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency, with the ability to accommodate higher temperature environments while achieving high reliability; (3) converter concepts that use methods of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) new onboard battery charging concepts that result in decreased cost and size; (5) more effective thermal control through innovative packaging technologies; and (6) integrated motor/inverter concepts. ORNL's Power Electronics and Electric Machines Research Program conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the VTP APEEM subprogram. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies. ORNL also executes specific projects for DOE. The following report discusses those projects carried out in FY 2010 and conveys highlights of their accomplishment

Olszewski, Mitchell [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

FY2010 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler) announced in January 2002 a new cooperative research effort. Known as FreedomCAR (derived from ''Freedom'' and ''Cooperative Automotive Research''), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public-private partnerships to fund high risk, high payoff research into advanced automotive technologies. Efficient fuel cell technology, which uses hydrogen to power automobiles without air pollution, is a very promising pathway to achieve the ultimate vision. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines (APEEM) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE) and electric motor technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the APEEM subprogram has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The APEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership through a three phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component research and development activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including electric motors and PE; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under this subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in HEVs (PHEVs), battery electric vehicles, and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the VTP. A key element in making these advanced vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, and cost targets for the PE and electrical machines subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include: (1) novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency, with the ability to accommodate higher temperature environments while achieving high reliability; (3) converter concepts that use methods of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) new onboard battery charging concepts that result in decreased cost and size; (5) more effective thermal control through innovative packaging technologies; and (6) integrated motor/inverter concepts. ORNL's Power Electronics and Electric Machines Research Program conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the VTP APEEM subprogram. In this role, ORNL serves on the FreedomCAR Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies. ORNL also executes specific projects for DOE. The following report discusses those projects

Olszewski, Mitchell [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Topology optimization for fluid---thermal interaction problems under constant input power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with density-based topology optimization considering fluid and thermal interactions, in which the Navier---Stokes and heat transport equations are coupled. We particularly focus on designing heat exchangers. In the engineering context, ... Keywords: Fluid---thermal interaction, Heat transfer, Topology optimization

Tadayoshi Matsumori; Tsuguo Kondoh; Atsushi Kawamoto; Tsuyoshi Nomura

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Thermal performance of space-cooling solar-energy systems in the National Solar Data Network  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results derived from analysis of data obtained from monitoring the operation of four solar energy cooling installations in the National Solar Data Network are presented. It is shown that chiller coefficients of performance (COP) on the order of 0.65 can be easily obtained with existing technology, provided the designer adequately matches the solar energy system to the absorption chiller. It is also shown that flat-plate, concentrating, and evacuated tube collectors may each be used successfully to operate absorption chillers in space cooling systems. The results show that appreciation for the systems engineering aspects of solar energy is extremely important to the development of a viable industry.

Bartlett, J.C.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Corrosion and biofouling on the non-heat-exchanger surfaces of an ocean thermal energy conversion power plant: a survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Of the many foreseeable problems confronting economical ocean thermal energy conversion operation, two major items are the deterioration of the structural and functional components, which prevents efficient operation, and the biofouling of the surfaces, which adds excess weight to the floating ocean platform. The techniques required for effective long-term control of deterioration and corrosion have been investigated actively for many years, and successful solutions for most situations have been developed. For the most part, these solutions can be directly transferred to the ocean thermal energy conversion plant. The majority of problems in these areas are expected to be associated with scale-up and will require some advanced development due to the immensity of the ocean thermal energy conversion platform. Current antifouling control systems are not effective for long-term fouling prevention. Commercially available antifouling coatings are limited to a 3-year service life in temperate waters, and even shorter in tropical waters. However, underwater cleaning techniques and some fouling-control systems presently being used by conventional power plants may find utility on an ocean thermal energy conversion plant. In addition, some recent major advances in long-term antifouling coatings sponsored by the Navy may be applicable to ocean thermal energy conversion. 132 references.

Castelli, V.J. (ed.)

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Combining a thermal-imaging diagnostic with an existing imaging VISAR diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical diagnostics are currently being designed to analyze high-energy density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Two independent line-imaging Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) interferometers have been fielded to measure shock velocities, breakout times, and emission of targets having sizes of 1-5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter, fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter NIF vacuum chamber. VISAR recordings use a 659.5-nm probe laser. By adding a specially coated beam splitter to the interferometer table, light at wavelengths from 540 to 645 nm is spilt into a thermal-imaging diagnostic. Because fused silica lenses are used in the first triplet relay, the intermediate image planes for different wavelengths separate by considerable distances. A corrector lens on the interferometer table reunites these separated wavelength planes to provide a good image. Thermal imaging collects light at f/5 from a 2-mm object placed at Target Chamber Center (TCC). Streak cameras perform VISAR and thermal-imaging recording. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that pointing accuracy of the optical axis may be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) are used to align both diagnostics. The red alignment laser is selected to be at the 50 percent reflection point of the beam splitter. This alignment laser is introduced at the recording streak cameras for both diagnostics and passes through this special beam splitter on its way into the NIF vacuum chamber.

Malone, R; Celeste, J; Celliers, P; Frogget, B; Guyton, R L; Kaufman, M; Lee, T; MacGowan, B; Ng, E W; Reinbachs, I P; Robinson, R B; Seppala, L; Tunnell, T W; Watts, P

2005-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

334

Combining a thermal-imaging diagnostic with an existing imaging VISAR diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical diagnostics are currently being designed to analyze high-energy density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Two independent line-imaging Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) interferometers have been fielded to measure shock velocities, breakout times, and emission of targets having sizes of 15 mm. An 8-inch-diameter, fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter NIF vacuum chamber. VISAR recordings use a 659.5-nm probe laser. By adding a specially coated beam splitter to the interferometer table, light at wavelengths from 540 to 645 nm is spilt into a thermal-imaging diagnostic. Because fused silica lenses are used in the first triplet relay, the intermediate image planes for different wavelengths separate by considerable distances. A corrector lens on the interferometer table reunites these separated wavelength planes to provide a good image. Thermal imaging collects light at f/5 from a 2-mm object placed at Target Chamber Center (TCC). Streak cameras perform VISAR and thermal-imaging recording. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that pointing accuracy of the optical axis may be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) are used to align both diagnostics. The red alignment laser is selected to be at the 50 percent reflection point of the beam splitter. This alignment laser is introduced at the recording streak cameras for both diagnostics and passes through this special beam splitter on its way into the NIF vacuum chamber.

Robert M. Malone; John R. Celesteb; Peter M. Celliers; Brent C. Froggeta; Robert L. Guyton; Morris I. Kaufman; Tony L. Lee; Brian J. MacGowan; Edmund W. Ng; Imants P. Reinbachs; Ronald B. Robinson; Lynn G. Seppala; Tom W. Tunnell; Phillip W. Watts

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Techno-economic projections for advanced small solar thermal electric power plants to years 1990--2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced technologies applicable to solar thermal electric power systems in the 1990--2000 time-frame are delineated for power applications that fulfill a wide spectrum of small power needs with primary emphasis on power ratings <10 MWe. Techno-economic projections of power system characteristics (energy and capital costs as a function of capacity factor) are made based on development of identified promising technologies. The key characteristic of advanced technology systems is an efficient low-cost solar energy collection while achieving high temperatures for efficient energy conversion. Two-axis tracking systems such as the central receiver or power tower concept and distributed parabolic dish receivers possess this characteristic. For these two basic concepts, advanced technologies including, e.g., conversion systems such as Stirling engines, Brayton/Rankine combined cycles and storage/transport concepts encompassing liquid metals, and reversible-reaction chemical systems are considered. In addition to techno-economic aspects, technologies are also judged in terms of factors such as developmental risk, relative reliability, and probability of success. Improvements accruing to projected advanced technology systems are measured with respect to current (or pre-1985) steam-Rankine systems, as represented by the central receiver pilot plant being constructed near Barstow, California. These improvements, for both central receivers and parabolic dish systems, indicate that pursuit of advanced technology across a broad front can result in post-1985 solar thermal systems having the potential of approaching the goal of competitiveness with conventional power systems; i.e., capital costs of $600 kWe and energy costs of 50 mills/kWe-hr (1977 dollars).

Fujita, T.; Manvi, R.; Roschke, E.J.; El Gabalawi, N.; Herrera, G.; Kuo, T.J.; Chen, K.H.

1978-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

FY2011 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced in May 2011 a new cooperative research effort comprising DOE, the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford Motor Company, General Motors Company, and Chrysler Group), Tesla Motors, and representatives of the electric utility and petroleum industries. Known as U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public-private partnerships to fund high risk-high reward research into advanced automotive technologies. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the partnership known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research') that ran from 2002 through 2010 and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machines (PEEM) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor (EM), and traction drive system technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the PEEM subprogram has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The PEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the U.S. DRIVE partnership through a three phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component R&D activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including EMs and PE; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under this subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in HEVs (PHEVs), battery electric vehicles, and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the VTP. A key element in making these advanced vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, efficiency, and cost targets for the PE and EM subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include: (1) novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency with the ability to accommodate higher temperature environments while achieving high reliability; (3) converter concepts that use methods of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) new onboard battery charging concepts that result in decreased cost and size; (5) more effective thermal control through innovative packaging technologies; and (6) integrated motor-inverter traction drive system concepts. ORNL's PEEM research program conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the VTP Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) program. In this role, ORNL serves on the U.S. DRIVE Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies. ORNL also executes specific projects for

Olszewski, Mitchell [ORNL

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

FY2011 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Progress Report for the Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced in May 2011 a new cooperative research effort comprising DOE, the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (composed of automakers Ford Motor Company, General Motors Company, and Chrysler Group), Tesla Motors, and representatives of the electric utility and petroleum industries. Known as U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability), it represents DOE's commitment to developing public-private partnerships to fund high risk-high reward research into advanced automotive technologies. The new partnership replaces and builds upon the partnership known as FreedomCAR (derived from 'Freedom' and 'Cooperative Automotive Research') that ran from 2002 through 2010 and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles initiative that ran from 1993 through 2001. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Power Electronics and Electric Machines (PEEM) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies now under development. Research is focused on developing revolutionary new power electronics (PE), electric motor (EM), and traction drive system technologies that will leapfrog current on-the-road technologies. The research and development (R&D) is also aimed at achieving a greater understanding of and improvements in the way the various new components of tomorrow's automobiles will function as a unified system to improve fuel efficiency. In supporting the development of advanced vehicle propulsion systems, the PEEM subprogram has enabled the development of technologies that will significantly improve efficiency, costs, and fuel economy. The PEEM subprogram supports the efforts of the U.S. DRIVE partnership through a three phase approach intended to: (1) identify overall propulsion and vehicle related needs by analyzing programmatic goals and reviewing industry's recommendations and requirements and then develop the appropriate technical targets for systems, subsystems, and component R&D activities; (2) develop and validate individual subsystems and components, including EMs and PE; and (3) determine how well the components and subsystems work together in a vehicle environment or as a complete propulsion system and whether the efficiency and performance targets at the vehicle level have been achieved. The research performed under this subprogram will help remove technical and cost barriers to enable the development of technology for use in such advanced vehicles as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in HEVs (PHEVs), battery electric vehicles, and fuel-cell-powered automobiles that meet the goals of the VTP. A key element in making these advanced vehicles practical is providing an affordable electric traction drive system. This will require attaining weight, volume, efficiency, and cost targets for the PE and EM subsystems of the traction drive system. Areas of development include: (1) novel traction motor designs that result in increased power density and lower cost; (2) inverter technologies involving new topologies to achieve higher efficiency with the ability to accommodate higher temperature environments while achieving high reliability; (3) converter concepts that use methods of reducing the component count and integrating functionality to decrease size, weight, and cost; (4) new onboard battery charging concepts that result in decreased cost and size; (5) more effective thermal control through innovative packaging technologies; and (6) integrated motor-inverter traction drive system concepts. ORNL's PEEM research program conducts fundamental research, evaluates hardware, and assists in the technical direction of the VTP Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) program. In this role, ORNL serves on the U.S. DRIVE Electrical and Electronics Technical Team, evaluates proposals for DOE, and lends its technological expertise to the direction of projects and evaluation of developing technologies. ORNL also executes specific projects for

Olszewski, Mitchell [ORNL

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal-Hydraulics Thermal-Hydraulics Dr. Tanju Sofu, Argonne National Laboratory In a power reactor, the energy produced in fission reaction manifests itself as heat to be removed by a coolant and utilized in a thermodynamic energy conversion cycle to produce electricity. A simplified schematic of a typical nuclear power plant is shown in the diagram below. Primary coolant loop Steam Reactor Heat exchanger Primary pump Secondary pump Condenser Turbine Water Although this process is essentially the same as in any other steam plant configuration, the power density in a nuclear reactor core is typically four orders of magnitude higher than a fossil fueled plant and therefore it poses significant heat transfer challenges. Maximum power that can be obtained from a nuclear reactor is often limited by the

339

Thermal-hydraulic analysis of cross-shaped spiral fuel in high power density BWRs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preliminary analysis of the cross-shaped spiral (CSS) fuel assembly suggests great thermal-hydraulic upside. According to computational models, the increase in rod surface area, combined with an increase in coolant turbulence ...

Conboy, Thomas M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Thermal Power Systems, Point-Focusing Distributed Receiver Technology Project. Annual technical report, Fiscal Year 1978. Volume II. Detailed report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal or electrical power from the sun's radiated energy through Point-Focusing Distributed Receiver technology is the goal of this Project. The energy thus produced must be economically competitive with other sources. This Project supports the industrial development of technology and hardware for extracting energy from solar power to achieve the stated goal. Present studies are working to concentrate the solar energy through mirrors or lenses, to a working fluid or gas, and through a power converter change it to an energy source useful to man. Rankine-cycle and Brayton-cycle engines are currently being developed as the most promising energy converters for our near future needs. Accomplishments on point-focusing technology in FY 1978 are detailed.

Not Available

1979-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national thermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Thermal fluid analysis of combined power and desalination concepts for a high temperature reactor / Ryno Nel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??South Africa is on a path of dramatically increasing its energy supplying capabilties. Eskom (the main utility supplying electricity to the national grid) recently announced (more)

Nel, Ryno

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

The DOE Solar Thermal Electric Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s Solar Thermal Electric Program is managed by the Solar thermal and biomass Power division which is part of the Office of utility Technologies. The focus of the Program is to commercialize solar electric technologies. In this regard, three major projects are currently being pursued in trough, central receiver, and dish/Stirling electric power generation. This paper describes these three projects and the activities at the National laboratories that support them.

Mancini, T.R.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Thermal Integration of CO{sub 2} Compression Processes with Coal-Fired Power Plants Equipped with Carbon Capture  

SciTech Connect

Coal-fired power plants, equipped either with oxycombustion or post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture, will require a CO{sub 2} compression system to increase the pressure of the CO{sub 2} to the level needed for sequestration. Most analyses show that CO{sub 2} compression will have a significant effect on parasitic load, will be a major capital cost, and will contribute significantly to reduced unit efficiency. This project used first principle engineering analyses and computer simulations to determine the effects of utilizing compressor waste heat to improve power plant efficiency and increase net power output of coal-fired power plants with carbon capture. This was done for units with post combustion solvent-based CO{sub 2} capture systems and for oxyfired power plants, firing bituminous, PRB and lignite coals. The thermal integration opportunities analyzed for oxycombustion capture are use of compressor waste heat to reheat recirculated flue gas, preheat boiler feedwater and predry high-moisture coals prior to pulverizing the coal. Among the thermal integration opportunities analyzed for post combustion capture systems are use of compressor waste heat and heat recovered from the stripper condenser to regenerate post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture solvent, preheat boiler feedwater and predry high-moisture coals. The overall conclusion from the oxyfuel simulations is that thermal integration of compressor heat has the potential to improve net unit heat rate by up to 8.4 percent, but the actual magnitude of the improvement will depend on the type of heat sink used and to a lesser extent, compressor design and coal rank. The simulations of a unit with a MEA post combustion capture system showed that thermal integration of either compressor heat or stripper condenser heat to preheat boiler feedwater would result in heat rate improvements from 1.20 percent to 4.19 percent. The MEA capture simulations further showed that partial drying of low rank coals, done in combination with feedwater heating, would result in heat rate reductions of 7.43 percent for PRB coal and 10.45 percent for lignite.

Edward Levy

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

344

A Review of Hazardous Chemical Species Associated with CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants and Their Potential Fate in CO2 Geologic Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluation of an oxyfuel power plant using mixed conductingA Vision for Thermal Power-Plant Technology Development inon an Existing US Coal-Fired Power Plant . First National

Apps, J.A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

NREL Uses Computing Power to Investigate Tidal Power (Fact Sheet), Innovation: The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uses Computing Power to Uses Computing Power to Investigate Tidal Power Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have applied their knowledge of wind flow and turbulence to simulations of underwater tidal turbines. Inspired by similar simulations of wind turbine arrays, NREL researchers used their wind expertise, a supercomputer, and large-eddy simulation to study how the placement of turbines affects the power production of an underwater tidal turbine array. As tides ebb and flow, they create water currents that carry a significant amount of kinetic energy. To capture this energy, several companies are developing and deploying devices known as horizontal-axis tidal turbines, which resemble small wind turbines. These devices can be arranged in an array of multiple turbines to maximize the energy extracted in tidal

346

Proceedings: fourth parabolic-dish solar-thermal power program review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of the review was to present the results of activities within the Parabolic Dish Technology and Applications Development element of the Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Energy Systems Program. The Review consisted of 6 technical sessions, covering Stirling, Organic Rankine and Brayton module technologies, associated hardware and test results to date; concentrator development and progress; economic analyses; and current international dish development activities. Two panel discussions, concerning industry issues affecting solar thermal dish development and dish technology from a utility/user perspective, were also held. These Proceedings contain the texts of presentations made at the review, which are abstracted separately for EDB.

Not Available

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Influence of Cooling Circulating Water Flow on Back Pressure Variation of Thermal Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under certain conditions, condenser pressure can be considered as back pressure of the steam turbine, which has great influence on the unit power. Based on the back pressure calculation model, influence on back pressure variation by adjusting circulating ... Keywords: Cold-end system, back pressure, cooling water flow, unit power

Nian Zhonghua, Liu Jizhen, Liu Guangjian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Summary of: Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

A review of test results on solar thermal power modules with dish-mounted Stirling and Brayton cycle engines  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents results of development tests of various solar thermal parabolic dish modules and assemblies that used dish-mounted Brayton or Stirling cycle engines for production of electric power. These tests indicate that early modules achieve net efficiencies up to 29 percent in converting sunlight to electricity, as delivered to the grid. Various equipment deficiencies were observed and a number of malfunctions occurred. The performance measurements, as well as the malfunctions and other test experience, provided information that should be of value in developing systems with improved performance and reduced maintenance.

Jaffe, L.D.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Thermal energy storage systems using phase change materials were evaluated for trough systems that use oil, steam, and high temperature salts as heat transfer fluids. A variety of eutectic salts and metal alloys were considered as phase change materials in a cascaded arrangement. Literature values of specific heat, latent heat, density, and other thermophysical properties were used in initial analyses. Testing laboratories were contracted to measure properties for candidate materials for comparison to the literature and for updating the models. A TRNSYS model from Phase 1 was further developed for optimizing the system, including a novel control algorithm. A concept for increasing the bulk thermal conductivity of the phase change system was developed using expanded metal sheets. Outside companies were contracted to design and cost systems using platecoil heat exchangers immersed in the phase change material. Laboratory evaluations of the one-dimensional and three-dimensional behavior of expanded metal sheets in a low conductivity medium were used to optimize the amount of thermal conductivity enhancement. The thermal energy storage systems were compared to baseline conventional systems. The best phase change system found in this project, which was for the high temperature plant, had a projected cost of $25.2 per kWhth, The best system also had a cost that was similar to the base case, a direct two-tank molten salt system.

Gawlik, Keith

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

351

CONC/11: a computer program for calculating the performance of dish-type solar thermal collectors and power systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CONC/11 is a computer program designed for calculating the performance of dish-type solar thermal collectors and power systems. It is intended to aid the system or collector designer in evaluating the performance to be expected with possible design alternatives. From design or test data on the characteristics of the various subsystems, CONC/11 calculates the efficiencies of the collector and the overall power system as functions of the receiver temperature for a specified insolation. If desired, CONC/11 will also determine the receiver aperture and the receiver temperature that will provide the highest efficiencies at a given insolation. The program handles both simple and compound concentrators. CONC/11 is written in Athena Extended Fortran (similar to Fortran 77) to operate primarily in an interactive mode on a Sperry 1100/81 computer. It could also be used on many small computers.

Jaffe, L.D.

1984-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). Power system development. Preliminary design report, final  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary design of the 10 MWe OTEC power module and the 200 kWe test articles is given in detail. System operation and performance; power system cost estimates; 10 MWe heat exchangers; 200 kWe heat exchanger articles; biofouling control;ammonia leak detection, and leak repair; rotating machinery; support subsystem; instrumentation and control; electrical subsystem; installation approach; net energy and resource analysis; and operability, maintainability, and safety are discussed. The conceptual design of the 40 MWe electrical power system includes four or five 10 MWe modules as designed for the 10 MWe pilot plant. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

353

Manager, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

354

Cold side thermal energy storage system for improved operation of air cooled power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air cooled power plants experience significant performance fluctuations as plant cooling capacity reduces due to higher daytime temperature than nighttime temperature. The purpose of this thesis is to simulate the detailed ...

Williams, Daniel David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Acoustic and thermal packaging of small gas turbines for portable power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To meet the increasing demand for advanced portable power units, for example for use in personal electronics and robotics, a number of studies have focused on portable small gas turbines. This research is concerned with ...

Tanaka, Shinji, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development-I. Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a conceptual and preliminary design study of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) closed loop ammonia power system modules performed by Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc. (LMSC) are presented. This design study is the second of 3 tasks in Phase I of the Power System Development-I Project. The Task 2 objectives were to develop: 1) conceptual designs for a 40 to 50-MW(e) closed cycle ammonia commercial plant size power module whose heat exchangers are immersed in seawater and whose ancillary equipments are in a shirt sleeve environment; preliminary designs for a modular application power system sized at 10-MW(e) whose design, construction and material selection is analogous to the 50 MW(e) module, except that titanium tubes are to be used in the heat exchangers; and 3) preliminary designs for heat exchanger test articles (evaporator and condenser) representative of the 50-MW(e) heat exchangers using aluminum alloy, suitable for seawater service, for testing on OTEC-1. The reference ocean platform was specified by DOE as a surface vessel with the heat exchanger immersed in seawater to a design depth of 0 to 20 ft measured from the top of the heat exchanger. For the 50-MW(e) module, the OTEC 400-MW(e) Plant Ship, defined in the Platform Configuration and Integration study, was used as the reference platform. System design, performance, and cost are presented. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

357

Final report on the power production phase of the 10 MW/sub e/ Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the evaluations of the power production testing of Solar One, the 10 MW/sub e/ Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant near Barstow, California. The Pilot Plant, a cooperative project of the US Department of Energy and utility firms led by the Southern California Edison Company, began a three year period of power production operation in August 1984. During this period, plant performance indicators, such as capacity factor, system efficiency, and availability, were studied to assess the operational capability of the Pilot Plant to reliably supply electrical power. Also studied was the long-term performance of such key plant components as the heliostats and the receiver. During the three years of power production, the Pilot Plant showed an improvement in performance. Considerable increases in capacity factor, system efficiency, and availability were achieved. Heliostat operation was reliable, and only small amounts of mirror corrosion were observed. Receiver tube leaks did occur, however, and were the main cause of the plant's unscheduled outages. The Pilot Plant provided valuable lessons which will aid in the design of future solar central receiver plants. 53 refs., 46 figs., 4 tabs.

Radosevich, L.G.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Reactor thermal-hydraulic FY 1986 status report for the multimegawatt Space Nuclear Power Program  

SciTech Connect

PNL's 1986 activities can be divided into three basic areas: code assessment, correlation assessment and experimental activities. The ultimate goal of all these activities is developing computer codes and verifying their use to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis and design of the reactor core and plenum of the various proposed concepts. To perform this task as assessment is made of existing computer codes, models, correlations, and microgravity experimental data.

Krotiuk, W.J.; Antoniak, Z.I.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

JV Task 46 - Development and Testing of a Thermally Integrated SOFC-Gasification System for Biomass Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center has designed a biomass power system using a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) thermally integrated with a downdraft gasifier. In this system, the high-temperature effluent from the SOFC enables the operation of a substoichiometric air downdraft gasifier at an elevated temperature (1000 C). At this temperature, moisture in the biomass acts as an essential carbon-gasifying medium, reducing the equivalence ratio at which the gasifier can operate with complete carbon conversion. Calculations show gross conversion efficiencies up to 45% (higher heating value) for biomass moisture levels up to 40% (wt basis). Experimental work on a bench-scale gasifier demonstrated increased tar cracking within the gasifier and increased energy density of the resultant syngas. A series of experiments on wood chips demonstrated tar output in the range of 9.9 and 234 mg/m{sup 3}. Both button cells and a 100-watt stack was tested on syngas from the gasifier. Both achieved steady-state operation with a 22% and 15% drop in performance, respectively, relative to pure hydrogen. In addition, tar tolerance testing on button cells demonstrated an upper limit of tar tolerance of approximately 1%, well above the tar output of the gasifier. The predicted system efficiency was revised down to 33% gross and 27% net system efficiency because of the results of the gasifier and fuel cell experiments. These results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of thermally integrating a gasifier and a high-temperature fuel cell in small distributed power systems.

Phillip Hutton; Nikhil Patel; Kyle Martin; Devinder Singh

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Design of cold water pipe for sea thermal power plants. Progress report, 1 May 1975--30 May 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the preliminary analysis of design conditions for a 40-ft. diameter, 4000 ft. long, cold water supply pipe for a 100 MW sea thermal power plant. The pipe is assumed to be freely suspended from a floating platform. The design is based on a circular row of tubes with spacers between to form the pipe wall. Internal pressure conditions are calculated for maximum assumed flow rates in the pipe. External pressure distribution is calculated for maximum assumed ocean current velocity. Drag and moment distributions are calculated for the pipe loaded with an assumed current velocity profile and buoyancy distribution. Collapse stability calculations are made for the pipe and for the individual tubes. Tube and spacer interaction stresses are calculated for the combined pressure, bending moment, and tensile loads imposed on the pipe. Preliminary analysis is performed on a flexible pipe support system capable of isolating the pipe from the platform during any sea state likely to be encountered by a sea thermal power plant. It is concluded that the basic design is feasible and justifies more precise analysis.

Anderson, J.H.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national thermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Central receiver solar thermal power system, phase 1. Quarterly progress report (final) for period ending June 30, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During this report period, the major program activities were aimed toward the fabrication of the three major research experiments and continued evaluation of the Pilot Plant performance and operating modes. The detail designs were completed early in this period. Effort was continued in the evaluation of Pilot Plant start transients. Both warm and hot starts from thermal storage were evaluated as was a cold start from the Receiver. In the Collector Subsystem Experiment the heliostat structures and drive mechanisms were completed and delivered. The detail design of the 5 MW Receiver Experiment was completed at Foster Wheeler. In the Thermal Storage Subsystem the detail design of the experiment was completed early in the period. A final selection of the heat transport media was made with Hitec selected as the molten salt and Caloria HT-43 selected as the hydrocarbon oil. During this period Bechtel continued its efforts in the optimization of the Electrical Power Generation Subsystem. Work was also continued on the completion of data that will be used in the Electrical Power Generation Subsystem analytical model being prepared by Martin as a part of the overall Pilot Plant Simulation Model. (WDM)

None

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

On the Influence of Supernova Remnant Thermal Energy in Powering Galactic Winds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental tenet of the classical supernovae-driven wind model of elliptical galaxies is that the residual thermal energy of all supernovae remnants (SNRs) provide sufficient energy to overcome the binding energy of the remaining interstellar gas, thereby driving a global galactic wind. We re-examine model predictions of this epoch of wind ejection t_GW, highlighting a heretofore underappreciated sensitivity to the adopted remnant thermal energy formalism, and illustrating cases in which previous work may have substantially overestimated t_GW. Arguments based upon chemical evolution alone, put forth to reject the hypothesis of dark matter distributions similar to the luminous component in spheroids, are shown to be tenuous. Finally, the predicted enrichment of intracluster gas during the wind phase of cluster ellipticals, and its relation to the selected SNR interior thermal energy evolutionary scheme, is addressed. Despite the success of previous wind models, our results still call into question the correctness of the simple analytical approach used thus far, and imply that a more appropriate technique should be adopted in the future.

Brad K. Gibson

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

363

Thermal spray coatings: New materials, processes and applications; Proceedings of the Second National Conference on Thermal Spray, Long Beach, CA, October 31-November 2, 1984  

SciTech Connect

Thermal-spray-coating techniques and their applications are discussed in reviews and reports of laboratory experiments and industrial experience. Topics explored include the future of thermal spraying, plasma-sprayed bonding coats for plastic substrates, plasma-spray deposition of hollow-particle ceramic powders, volumetric-feed-back powder-feed controllers, metal sprayed coating systems onboard U.S. Navy ships, high-performance plasma-sprayed coatings, and arc-coating technology and equipment. Consideration is given to cavitation-erosion of plasma-sprayed alloys, statistical methods of plasma-spray parameter testing, NDE of surface coatings by photothermal imaging, NDE of thermal-spray-coating bonds, and diamond-wheel grinding of thermal-spray materials.

Longo, F.N.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

DOE/EA-1247; Environmental Assessment for Electrical Power System Upgrades at Los Alamos National Laboratory (03/09/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

47 47 Environmental Assessment for Electrical Power System Upgrades at Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico Final Document Date Prepared: March 9, 2000 Prepared by: U.S. Department of Energy, Los Alamos Area Office Final EA Electrical Power System Upgrades EA March 9, 2000 DOE/LAAO iii CONTENTS ACRONYMS AND TERMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1.1 Role of Cooperating Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Background . . . . . . .

365

Highlighting High Performance: National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Thermal Test Facility, Golden, Colorado. Office of Building Technology State and Community Programs (BTS) Brochure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Thermal Test Facility in Golden, Colorado, was designed using a whole-building approach--looking at the way the building's systems worked together most efficiently. Researchers monitor the performance of the 11,000-square-foot building, which boasts an energy cost savings of 63% for heating, cooling, and lighting. The basic plan of the building can be adapted to many needs, including retail and warehouse space. The Thermal Test Facility contains office and laboratory space; research focuses on the development of energy-efficiency and renewable energy technologies that are cost-effective and environmentally friendly.

Burgert, S.

2002-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

366

Application of Extruded Dielectric Cable Model in the Dynamic Thermal Circuit Rating (DTCR) System for San Diego Gas & Electric's Ot ay Mesa Power Loop Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to limited incentives for new construction, utilities around the world are undergoing a major transformation that is redefining the use of existing power equipment in the electric transmission network. Under these circumstances, utilities are forced to find new ways to increase power flow through the existing transmission corridors with minimal investments. This report addresses the application of the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Dynamic Thermal Circuit Rating (DTCR) program to San Di...

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

367

Department of Veterans Affairs, FONSI - Rooftop solar PV power at Calverton National Cemetery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

An Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared under the direction of an interdisciplinary team analyzing theproposed construction of a Photovoltaic System at the Calvertion National Cemetery ...

368

Ocean Thermal Energy Conservation (OTEC) power system development (PDS) II. Preliminary design report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the results and conclusions of the PDS II, Phase I, preliminary design of a 10 MWe OTEC power system, using enhanced plate type heat exchangers, and of representative 0.2 MWe test articles. It further provides the documentation (specifications, drawings, trade studies, etc.) resulting from the design activities. The data and discussions of the technical concepts are organized to respond to the PDS II, Phase II proposal evaluation criteria. This volume, which specifically addresses the three evaluation categories (heat exchangers, rotating machinery, and power system configuration and performance) is an integral part of the Phase II plans (proposal) which describe the technical approach to delivering test articles to OTEC-1. In addition, there is a section which addresses power system cost and net energy analysis and another which discusses the results of stainless steel feasibility studies. Supporting documentation is contained in two appendix volumes.

Not Available

1979-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

369

Use of plasma fuel systems at thermal power plants in Russia, Kazakhstan, China, and Turkey  

SciTech Connect

The technology of plasma ignition of solid fuels is described, as well as its creation and development steps, the technoeconomic characteristics of plasma igniter systems, schemes of their installation in pulverized-coal boilers, and results of their application at pulverized coal-fired power plants.

Karpenko, E.I.; Karpenko, Y.E.; Messerle, V.E.; Ustimenko, A.B. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ulan Ude (Russian Federation). Institute of Thermal Physics

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Conceptual design of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power plants in the Philippines  

SciTech Connect

Extensive temperature readings were obtained to determine suitable OTEC power plant sites in the Philippines. An analysis of temperature profiles reveals that surface seawater is in the range of 25 to 29{degree}C throughout the year while seawater at 500 to 700 m depth remains at a low temperature of 8 to 4{degree}C, respectively. In this article, 14 suitable sites within the Philippine seas are suggested. Conceptual designs for a 5-MW onland-type and a 25-MW floating-type OTEC power plant are proposed. Optimum conditions are determined and plant specifications are computed. Cost estimates show that a floating-type 25-MW OTEC power plant can generate electricity at a busbar power cost of 5.33 to 7.57 cents/kW {times} h while an onshore type 5-MW plant can generate electricity at a busbar cost of 14.71 to 18.09 cents/kW {times} h.

Haruo Uehara; Dilao, C.O.; Tsutomu Nakaoka (Saga Univ. (Japan))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Stirling Engines for Low-Temperature Solar-Thermal-Electric Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AUG 1979 SYSTEM PERFORMANCE OF A STIRLING ENGINE POWERED HEAT ACTIVATED HEAT PUMP W. D. Richards W of the subsystem compo- nents, especially between the free piston Stirling engine and the free piston linear),* and a decision was made to proceed with the Prototype Development. Superiority of a Stirling engine over other

Sanders, Seth

372

China power - thermal coal and clean coal technology export. Topical report  

SciTech Connect

China is the world`s fourth largest electric power producer, and is expected to surpass Japan within the next two years to become the third largest power producer. During the past 15 years, China`s total electricity generation more than tripled, increasing from about 300 TWh to about 1,000 TWh. Total installed generating capacity grew at an average of 8.2 percent per year, increasing from 66 to 214 GW. The share of China`s installed capacity in Asia increased from 21 to 31 percent. The Chinese government plans to continue China`s rapid growth rate in the power sector. Total installed capacity is planned to reach 300 GW by 2000, which will generate 1,400 TWh of electricity per year. China`s long-term power sector development is subject to great uncertainty. Under the middle scenario, total capacity is expected to reach 700 GW by 2015, with annual generation of 3,330 TWh. Under the low and high scenarios, total capacity will reach 527-1,005 GW by 2015. The high scenario representing possible demand. To achieve this ambitious scenario, dramatic policy changes in favor of power development are required; however, there is no evidence that such policy changes will occur at this stage. Even under the high scenario, China`s per capita annual electricity consumption would be only 3,000 kWh by 2015, less than half of the present per capita consumption for OECD countries. Under the low scenario, electricity shortages will seriously curb economic growth.

Binsheng Li

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage for Dish-Engine Solar Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes the final results of the Phase II Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage for Dish-Engine Solar Power Generation project being performed by Infinia Corporation for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-FC36-08GO18157 during the project period of September 1, 2009 - August 30, 2012. The primary objective of this project is to demonstrate the practicality of integrating thermal energy storage (TES) modules, using a suitable thermal salt phase-change material (PCM) as its medium, with a dish/Stirling engine; enabling the system to operate during cloud transients and to provide dispatchable power for 4 to 6 hours after sunset. A laboratory prototype designed to provide 3 kW-h of net electrical output was constructed and tested at Infinia's Ogden Headquarters. In the course of the testing, it was determined that the system's heat pipe network - used to transfer incoming heat from the solar receiver to both the Stirling generator heater head and to the phase change salt - did not perform to expectations. The heat pipes had limited capacity to deliver sufficient heat energy to the generator and salt mass while in a charging mode, which was highly dependent on the orientation of the device (vertical versus horizontal). In addition, the TES system was only able to extract about 30 to 40% of the expected amount of energy from the phase change salt once it was fully molten. However, the use of heat pipes to transfer heat energy to and from a thermal energy storage medium is a key technical innovation, and the project team feels that the limitations of the current device could be greatly improved with further development. A detailed study of manufacturing costs using the prototype TES module as a basis indicates that meeting DOE LCOE goals with this hardware requires significant efforts. Improvement can be made by implementing aggressive cost-down initiatives in design and materials, improving system performance by boosting efficiencies, and by refining cost estimates with vendor quotes in lieu of mass-based approaches. Although the prototype did not fully demonstrate performance and realize projected cost targets, the project team believes that these challenges can be overcome. The test data showed that the performance can be significantly improved by refining the heat pipe designs. However, the project objective for phase 3 is to design and test on sun the field ready systems, the project team feels that is necessary to further refine the prototype heat pipe design in the current prototype TES system before move on to field test units, Phase 3 continuation will not be pursued.

Qui, Songgang [Temple University] [Temple University; Galbraith, Ross [Infinia] [Infinia

2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

374

Environmental Assessment for Electrical Power System Upgrades at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico - Final Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ''National Environmental Policy Act of 1969'' (NEPA) requires Federal agency officials to consider the environmental consequences of their proposed actions before decisions are made. In complying with NEPA, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) follows the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021). The purpose of an Environmental Assessment (EA) is to provide Federal decision makers with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact. In this case, the DOE decision to be made is whether to construct and operate a 19.5-mile (mi) (31-kilometer [km]) electric transmission line (power line) reaching from the Norton Substation, west across the Rio Grande, to locations within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Areas (TAs) 3 and 5 at Los Alamos, New Mexico. The construction of one electric substation at LANL would be included in the project as would the construction of two line segments less than 1,200 feet (ft) (366 meters [m]) long that would allow for the uncrossing of a portion of two existing power lines. Additionally, a fiber optics communications line would be included and installed concurrently as part of the required overhead ground conductor for the power line. The new power line would improve the reliability of electric service in the LANL and Los Aktrnos County areas as would the uncrossing of the crossed segments of the existing lines. Additionally, installation of the new power line would enable the LANL and the Los Alamos County electric grid, which is a shared resource, to be adapted to accommodate the future import of increased power when additional power service becomes available in the northern New Mexico area. Similarly, the fiber optics line would allow DOE to take advantage of future opportunities in enhanced communications services. The objectives of this EA are to (1) describe the baseline environmental conditions at the proposed power line location, (2) analyze the potential effects to the existing environment from construction, operation, and maintenance of a new power line, and (3) compare the effects of the Proposed Action and the four action alternatives to the No Action Alternative. In addition, the EA provides DOE with environmental information that could be used in developing mitigative actions to minimize or avoid adverse effects to the integrity of the human environment and natural ecosystems should DOE decide to proceed with construction and operation of the new power line. Ultimately, the goal of NEPA and this EA is to aid DOE officials in making decisions based on understanding the environmental consequences of their decision.

N /A

2000-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

375

National Ignition Facility & Photon Science - Bringing Star Power to Earth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NIF Go NIF Go LLNL Logo Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LLNL Home NIF Home LIFE Home Jobs Site Map Contact News Press Releases In the News Status Update Media Assistance About Us National Ignition Facility About NIF How NIF Works The Seven Wonders of NIF Building NIF An Engineering Marvel NIFFY Early Light Collaborators Status Visiting NIF Missions National Security Energy for the Future Understanding the Universe People The People of NIF Awards NIF Professor Sabbatical Opportunities NIF Online Store Programs National Ignition Campaign How to Make a Star (ICF) Target Physics Target Fabrication Cryogenic Target System Diagnostics Participants Photon Science & Applications Advanced Optics Advanced Radiography Directed Energy Fusion Energy Inertial Fusion Energy How IFE Works Science at the Extremes

376

Transport of a Power Plant Tracer Plume over Grand Canyon National Park  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological and air-quality data, as well as surface tracer concentration values, were collected during 1990 to assess the impacts of Navajo Generating Station (NGS) emissions on Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP) air quality. These data have ...

Jun Chen; Robert Bornstein; Charles G. Lindsey

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development (PSD) II. Preliminary design report. Appendix II: supporting data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The trade studies, calculations, and reports which provide the rationale for design conclusions for the 10 MWe OTEC power system are presented in this volume. These appendices include: (1) system design and optimization model; (2) system off-design performance computer model; (3) seawater system dynamics; (4) system mechanical design studies; (5) electrical design studies; (6) structural design studies; (7) tube cleaner design report and proposed brush test program; (8) heat exchangers: mechanical design; (9) heat exchangers: thermal hydraulic computer model; (10) heat exchangers: manufacturing flow plan; (11) heat exchangers: installation and removal procedures; (12) heat exchangers: stainless steel conceptual design; (13) heat exchangers: cost studies; (14)heat exchangers: materials selection and corrosion; and (15) heat exchangers: quality assurance. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

378

Active Power Control Testing at the U.S. National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to keep the electricity grid stable and the lights on, the power system relies on certain responses from its generating fleet. This presentation evaluates the potential for wind turbines and wind power plants to provide these services and assist the grid during critical times.

Ela, E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Central Receiver Solar Thermal Power System, Phase 1: CDRL Item 2, Pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume 1. Executive overview  

SciTech Connect

This summary introduces the McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC) Central Receiver System Preliminary Design and reports the results of the Subsystem Research Experiments (SRE) recently completed. The baseline central receiver concept defined by the MDAC team consists of the following features: (A) An external receiver mounted on a tower, and located in a 360-deg array of sun-tracking heliostats which comprise the collector subsystem. (B) Feedwater from the electrical power generation subsystem is pumped through a riser to the receiver, where the feedwater is converted to superheated steam in a single pass through the tubes of the receiver panels. (C) The steam from the receiver is routed through a downcomer to the ground and introduced to a turbine directly for expansion and generation of electricity, and/or to a thermal storage subsystem, where the steam is condensed in charging heat exchangers to heat a dual-medium oil and rock thermal storage unit (TSU). (D) Extended operation after daylight hours is facilitated by discharging the TSU to generate steam for feeding the admission port of the turbine. (E) Overall control of the system is provided by a master control unit, which handles the interactions between subsystems that take place during startup, shutdown, and transitions between operating modes.

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. Quarterly progress report (final) for period ending March 31, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During this period (January 1976 through March 1976), the primary program effort was expended toward the completion of the detail design of the three major research experiments. Also, the Preliminary Pilot Plant Economic Cost Study was completed. In the Collector Subsystem, the designs for both the twenty-five mirror and the nine-mirror heliostats were completed and released. In the Receiver Subsystem, Foster Wheeler continued with the detail design of the 5 MW research experiment receiver. A preliminary draft of the detailed test plan for the receiver subsystem research experiment was prepared and is now undergoing a final review. The detailed design of the Thermal Storage Subsystem continued at Georgia Institute of Technology. Several incremental detail design reviews were held as the design progressed. During this period, Bechtel completed the preliminary environmental analysis for the Pilot Plant. The optimization studies of the electrical power generation subsystem were initiated. A major effort was the preparation of the preliminary cost analysis for the 10 MWe Central Receiver Solar Thermal Pilot Plant. This task required the development of a cost accounting structure and a definition of all of the costs associated with the design, construction, checkout, and two-year test of the Pilot Plant. (WDM)

None

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national thermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar power plants, thermal power plants(fuel, nuclear),reject heat from thermal power plants can only be re-protection is the thermal electric power plant. Electric

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar thermal systems, which can be used for domestic hot water, space heatingsolar thermal systems, which can be used for domestic hot water, space heating

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Partnership Produces Record-Setting Power,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 23, 2011 Problem 1: (the Stirling cycle) Show that for an idealized Stirling cycle, the thermal efficiency is: H L th T T 1 Problem 2: (Otto cycle) An open, ideal Otto-cycle engine has a compression ratio of the turbine. i) draw a T-s diagram process for the compound engine ii) determine the work output

384

Fluidized bed combustor 50 MW thermal power plant, Krabi, Thailand. Feasibility study. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The report presents the results of a study prepared by Burns and Roe for the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand to examine the technical feasibility and economic attractiveness for building a 50 MW Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion lignite fired power plant at Krabi, southern Thailand. The study is divided into seven main sections, plus an executive summary and appendices: (1) Introduction; (2) Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion Technology Overview; (3) Fuel and Limestone Tests; (4) Site Evaluation; (5) Station Design and Arrangements; (6) Environmental Considerations; (7) Economic Analysis.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Development and Performance Evaluation of High Temperature Concrete for Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

Thermal energy can be stored by the mechanism of sensible or latent heat or heat from chemical reactions. Sensible heat is the means of storing energy by increasing the temperature of the solid or liquid. Since the concrete as media cost per kWhthermal is $1, this seems to be a very economical material to be used as a TES. This research is focused on extending the concrete TES system for higher temperatures (500 ?ºC to 600 ?ºC) and increasing the heat transfer performance using novel construction techniques. To store heat at high temperature special concretes are developed and tested for its performance. The storage capacity costs of the developed concrete is in the range of $0.91-$3.02/kWhthermal Two different storage methods are investigated. In the first one heat is transported using molten slat through a stainless steel tube and heat is transported into concrete block through diffusion. The cost of the system is higher than the targeted DOE goal of $15/kWhthermal The increase in cost of the system is due to stainless steel tube to transfer the heat from molten salt to the concrete blocks.The other method is a one-tank thermocline system in which both the hot and cold fluid occupy the same tank resulting in reduced storage tank volume. In this model, heated molten salt enters the top of the tank which contains a packed bed of quartzite rock and silica sand as the thermal energy storage (TES) medium. The single-tank storage system uses about half the salt that is required by the two-tank system for a required storage capacity. This amounts to a significant reduction in the cost of the storage system. The single tank alternative has also been proven to be cheaper than the option which uses large concrete modules with embedded heat exchangers. Using computer models optimum dimensions are determined to have an round trip efficiency of 84%. Additionally, the cost of the structured concrete thermocline configuration provides the TES capacity cost of $33.80$/kWhthermal compared with $30.04/kWhthermal for a packed-bed thermocline (PBTC) configuration and $46.11/kWhthermal for a two-tank liquid configuration.

R. Panneer Selvam, Micah Hale and Matt strasser

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Impact of incremental changes in meteorology on thermal compliance and power system operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of the TVA reservoir and power supply systems to extreme meteorology was evaluated using a series of mathematical models to simulate the relationship between incremental changes in meteorology, associated changes in water temperature, and power plant generation. Single variable analysis techniques were applied at selected TVA facilities for representative average and extreme weather conditions. In the analysis, base case simulations were first conducted for each representative year using observed meteorology (i.e., the no change condition). The impacts of changes in meteorology were subsequently analyzed by uniformly constant at their respective base case values. Project results are generally presented in terms of deviations from base case conditions for each representative year. Based on an analysis of natural flow and air temperature patterns at Chickamauga Dam, 1974 was selected to represent extreme cold-wet conditions; 1965 as reflecting average conditions; and 1986 as an example of an extremely hot-dry year. The extreme years (i.e., 1974 and 1986) were used to illustrate sensitivities beyond historical conditions; while the average year provided a basis for comparison. Observed reservoir conditions, such as inflows, dam releases, and reservoir elevations for each representative year, were used in the analysis and were assumed to remain constant in all simulations. Therefore, the Lake Improvement Plan (which was implemented in 1991) and its consequent effects on reservoir operations were not incorporated in the assessment. In the model simulations, computed water temperatures were based on vertically well-mixed conditions in the reservoirs.

Miller, B.A.; Alavian, V.; Bender, M.D. [and others

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Central receiver solar thermal power system: collector subsystem extended life test. Final report  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate long term durability and stability of heliostat reflector and enclosure materials an extended life test program was performed on Research Experiment Heliostats by Boeing Engineering and Construction. The reflectors and enclosures were periodically evaluated and analyzed for the effects of dirt, sunlight, wind and thermal cycling on the mechanical and optical properties of Tedlar and changes in the Mylar reflector tension and reflectivity. During testing the heliostats were maintained and semi-annualy evaluated for optical and mechanical stability. The heliostats tested were located at the Boeing Boardman, Oregon test facility. The purpose of the program was to obtain data through measurements and observation to aid in heliostat design improvement. Certain weather and time related information, most reliably acquired by real time exposure testing, was sought through performance of mechanical and optical testing of the Boardman heliostats. The key areas of technical concern were: (1) enclosure and reflector optical property retention; (2) enclosure and reflector mechanical property retention; and (3) reflector creep (or loss in membrane tension) using bonded joints. In-place optical measurements as well as laboratory optical measurements on coupons cut from a heliostat, mechanical measurements from heliostat coupons, reflector sag measurements, and observations of the air supply system pressure stability and filter condition were made during the initial and two semi-annual test samplings. Results are summarized and discussed. (WHK)

1979-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

388

Solar multiple optimization for a solar-only thermal power plant, using oil as heat transfer fluid in the parabolic trough collectors  

SciTech Connect

Usual size of parabolic trough solar thermal plants being built at present is approximately 50 MW{sub e}. Most of these plants do not have a thermal storage system for maintaining the power block performance at nominal conditions during long non-insolation periods. Because of that, a proper solar field size, with respect to the electric nominal power, is a fundamental choice. A too large field will be partially useless under high solar irradiance values whereas a small field will mainly make the power block to work at part-load conditions. This paper presents an economic optimization of the solar multiple for a solar-only parabolic trough plant, using neither hybridization nor thermal storage. Five parabolic trough plants have been considered, with the same parameters in the power block but different solar field sizes. Thermal performance for each solar power plant has been featured, both at nominal and part-load conditions. This characterization has been applied to perform a simulation in order to calculate the annual electricity produced by each of these plants. Once annual electric energy generation is known, levelized cost of energy (LCOE) for each plant is calculated, yielding a minimum LCOE value for a certain solar multiple value within the range considered. (author)

Montes, M.J. [E.T.S.I.Industriales - U.N.E.D., C/Juan del Rosal, 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Abanades, A.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Valdes, M. [E.T.S.I.Industriales - U.P.M., C/Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Characterization of the Li(Si)/CoS(2) couple for a high-voltage, high-power thermal battery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to determined the capabilities of a thermal battery with high-voltage and high-power requirements, a detailed characterization of the candidate LiSi/LiCl-LiBr-LiF/CoS{sub 2} electrochemical couple was conducted. The rate capability of this system was investigated using 0.75 inch-dia. and 1.25 inch-dia. single and multiple cells under isothermal conditions, where the cells were regularly pulsed at increasingly higher currents. Limitations of the electronic loads and power supplies necessitated using batteries to obtain the desired maximum current densities possible for this system. Both 1.25 inch-dia. and 3 inch-dia. stacks were used with the number of cells ranging from 5 to 20. Initial tests involved 1.25 inch-dia. cells, where current densities in excess of 15 A/cm{sup 2} (>200 W/cm{sup 2}) were attained with 20-cell batteries during 1-s pulses. In subsequent follow-up tests with 3 inch-dia., 10-cell batteries, ten 400-A 1-s pulses were delivered over an operating period often minutes. These tests formed the foundation for subsequent full-sized battery tests with 125 cells with this chemistry.

GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Collaborative National Program for the Development and Performance Testing of Distributed Power Technologies with Emphasis on Combined Heat and Power Applications  

SciTech Connect

A current barrier to public acceptance of distributed generation (DG) and combined heat and power (CHP) technologies is the lack of credible and uniform information regarding system performance. Under a cooperative agreement, the Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) and the U.S. Department of Energy have developed four performance testing protocols to provide a uniform basis for comparison of systems. The protocols are for laboratory testing, field testing, long-term monitoring and case studies. They have been reviewed by a Stakeholder Advisory Committee made up of industry, public interest, end-user, and research community representatives. The types of systems covered include small turbines, reciprocating engines (including Stirling Cycle), and microturbines. The protocols are available for public use and the resulting data is publicly available in an online national database and two linked databases with further data from New York State. The protocols are interim pending comments and other feedback from users. Final protocols will be available in 2007. The interim protocols and the national database of operating systems can be accessed at www.dgdata.org. The project has entered Phase 2 in which protocols for fuel cell applications will be developed and the national and New York databases will continue to be maintained and populated.

Soinski, Arthur; Hanson, Mark

2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

391

Thermal Design of an Ultrahigh Temperature Vapor Core Reactor Combined Cycle Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

Current work modeling high temperature compact heat exchangers may demonstrate the design feasibility of a Vapor Core Reactor (VCR) driven combined cycle power plant. For solid nuclear fuel designs, the cycle efficiency is typically limited by a metallurgical temperature limit which is dictated by fuel and structural melting points. In a vapor core, the gas/vapor phase nuclear fuel is uniformly mixed with the topping cycle working fluid. Heat is generated homogeneously throughout the working fluid thus extending the metallurgical temperature limit. Because of the high temperature, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation is employed for topping cycle power extraction. MHD rejected heat is transported via compact heat exchanger to a conventional Brayton gas turbine bottoming cycle. High bottoming cycle mass flow rates are required to remove the waste heat because of low heat capacities for the bottoming cycle gas. High mass flow is also necessary to balance the high Uranium Tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}) mass flow rate in the topping cycle. Heat exchanger design is critical due to the high temperatures and corrosive influence of fluoride compounds and fission products existing in VCR/MHD exhaust. Working fluid compositions for the topping cycle include variations of Uranium Tetrafluoride, Helium and various electrical conductivity seeds for the MHD. Bottoming cycle working fluid compositions include variations of Helium and Xenon. Some thought has been given to include liquid metal vapor in the bottoming cycle for a Cheng or evaporative cooled design enhancement. The NASA Glenn Lewis Research Center code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA) is utilized for evaluating chemical species existing in the gas stream. Work being conducted demonstrates the compact heat exchanger design, utilization of the CEA code, and assessment of different topping and bottoming working fluid compositions. (authors)

Bays, Samuel E.; Anghaie, Samim; Smith, Blair; Knight, Travis [Innovative Space Power and Propulsion Institute, University of Florida, 202 Nuclear Science Building, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Development and Performance Evaluation of High Temperature Concrete for Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two different storage methods are investigated. In the first one heat is transported using molten slat through a stainless steel tube and heat is transported into concrete block through diffusion. The cost of the system is higher than the targeted DOE goal of $15/kWhthermal The increase in cost of the system is due to stainless steel tube to transfer the heat from molten salt to the concrete blocks.The other method is a one-tank thermocline system in which both the hot and cold fluid occupy the same tank resulting in reduced storage tank volume. In this model, heated molten salt enters the top of the tank which contains a packed bed of quartzite rock and silica sand as the thermal energy storage (TES) medium. The single-tank storage system uses about half the salt that is required by the two-tank system for a required storage capacity. This amounts to a significant reduction in the cost of the storage system. The single tank alternative has also been proven to be cheaper than the option which uses large concrete modules with embedded heat exchangers. Using computer models optimum dimensions are determined to have an round trip efficiency of 84%. Additionally, the cost of the structured concrete thermocline configuration provides the TES capacity cost of $33.80$/kWhthermal compared with $30.04/kWhthermal for a packed-bed thermocline (PBTC) configuration and $46.11/kWhthermal for a two-tank liquid configuration.

R. Panneer Selvam, Micah Hale and Matt strasser

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

Nuclear safety surveillance and control of National Nuclear Safety Administration of PRC during commissioning and operation of nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the method of nuclear safety surveillance and control of National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) of PRC during commissioning and operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs) and the practice for Qinshan NPP and for Guangdong Daya Bay NPP (GNPS). The results of the practice show that the surveillance models set up for Qinshan NPP and for GNPS commissioning were effective and the surveillance has played an important role for ensuring the quality and safety of the commissioning testing and consequently the nuclear safety of these two plants.

Feng, W.; Zhang, C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Verification Survey of the Building 315 Zero Power Reactor-6 Facility, Argonne National Laboratory-East, Argonne, Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) conducted independent verification radiological survey activities at Argonne National Laboratorys Building 315, Zero Power Reactor-6 facility in Argonne, Illinois. Independent verification survey activities included document and data reviews, alpha plus beta and gamma surface scans, alpha and beta surface activity measurements, and instrumentation comparisons. An interim letter report and a draft report, documenting the verification survey findings, were submitted to the DOE on November 8, 2006 and February 22, 2007, respectively (ORISE 2006b and 2007).

W. C. Adams

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

395

Improved power efficiency for very-high-temperature solar-thermal-cavity receivers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is an improved solar energy cavity receiver for exposing materials and components to high temperatures. The receiver includes a housing having an internal reflective surface defining a cavity and having an inlet for admitting solar radiation thereto. A photothermal absorber is positiond in the cavity to receive radiation from the inlet. A reflective baffle is positioned between the absorber and the inlet to severely restrict the re-radiation of energy through the inlet. The front surface of the baffle defines a narrow annulus with the internal reflective surface of the housing. The front surface of the baffle is contoured to reflect incoming radiation onto the internal surface of the housing, from which it is reflected through the annulus and onto the front surface of the absorber. The back surface of the baffle intercepts radiation from the front of the absorber. With this arrangement, a high percentage of the solar power input is retained in the cavity; thus, high internal temperatues are attained.

McDougal, A.R.; Hale, R.R.

1982-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

396

Secondary and compound concentrators for parabolic-dish solar-thermal power systems  

SciTech Connect

A secondary optical element may be added to a parabolic dish solar concentrator to increase the geometric concentration ratio attainable at a given intercept factor. This secondary may be a Fresnel lens or a mirror, such as a compound elliptic concentrator or a hyperbolic trumpet. At a fixed intercept factor, higher overall geometric concentration may be obtainable with a long focal length primary and a suitable secondary matched to it. Use of a secondary to increase the geometric concentration ratio is more likely to be worthwhile if the receiver temperature is high and if errors in the primary are large. Folding the optical path with a secondary may reduce cost by locating the receiver and power conversion equipment closer to the ground and by eliminating the heavy structure needed to support this equipment at the primary focus. Promising folded-path configurations include the Ritchey-Chretien and perhaps some three-element geometries. Folding the optical path may be most useful in systems that provide process heat.

Jaffe, L.D.; Poon, P.T.

1981-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications: analysis of electric power generating costs for systems larger than 10 MWe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces); and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and one was analyzed with a Stirling-cycle engine. With these engine options, and the consideration of both thermal and electrical storage for the Brayton-cycle central receiver, 11 systems were formulated for analysis. Conceptual designs developed for the 11 systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. No attempt was made to perform a detailed optimization of each conceptual design. Rather, designs best suited for a comparative evaluation of the concepts were formulated. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts. The computer code SOLSTEP was used to analyze the thermodynamic performance characteristics and energy costs of the 11 concepts. Year-long simulations were performed using meteorological and insolation data for Barstow, California. Results for each concept include levelized energy costs and capacity factors for various combinations of storage capacity and collector field size.

Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Patton, W.P.; Williams, T.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Particle Swarm Optimization and Gradient Descent Methods for Optimization of PI Controller for AGC of Multi-area Thermal-Wind-Hydro Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The automatic generation control (AGC) of three unequal interconnected Thermal, Wind and Hydro power plant has been designed with PI controller. Further computational intelligent technique Particle Swarm Optimization and conventional Gradient Descent ... Keywords: Automatic generation control, Particle swarm optimization, Gradient Descent method, Generation rate constraint, Area control error, Wind energy conversion system

Naresh Kumari, A N. Jha

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Areal power density: A preliminary examination of underground heat transfer in a potential Yucca Mountain repository and recommendations for thermal design approaches; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

The design of the potential Yucca Mountain repository is subject to many thermal goals related to the compliance of the site with federal regulations. This report summarizes a series of sensitivity studies that determined the expected temperatures near the potential repository. These sensitivity studies were used to establish an efficient loading scheme for the spent fuel canisters and a maximum areal power density based strictly on thermal goals. Given the current knowledge of the site, a design-basis areal power density of 80 kW/acre can be justified based on thermal goals only. Further analyses to investigate the impacts of this design-basis APD on mechanical and operational aspects of the potential repository must be undertaken before a final decision is made.

Hertel, E.S. Jr.; Ryder, E.E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

SunShot Initiative: Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Low-Cost Solar Thermal Collector on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative CSP Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Deployment National Laboratory Research & Development

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national thermal power" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Isotopic power supplies for space and terrestrial systems: quality assurance by Sandia National Laboratories  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sandia National Laboratories participation in Quality Assurance (QA) programs for Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators which have been used in space and terrestrial systems over the past 15 years is summarized. Basic elements of the program are briefly described and recognition of assistance from other Sandia organizations is included. Descriptions of the various systems for which Sandia has had the QA responsibility are also presented. In addition, the outlook for Sandia participation in RTG programs for the next several years is noted.

Hannigan, R.L.; Harnar, R.R.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Pathway from the National Ignition Facility to an operational LIFE power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

next step, after NIF, is construction of a full-scale power plant NIF-1111-23807.ppt 4 #12 delivery #12;7NIF-1111-23807.ppt #12;Principle of LIFE plant operation Heat transfer DT fuel cycle for high plant availability NIF-based fusion performance, with low tritium inventory in the plant

403

NREL Provides Guidance to Improve Air Mixing and Thermal Comfort in Homes (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research determines optimal HVAC system design for research determines optimal HVAC system design for proper air mixing and thermal comfort in homes. As U.S. homes become more energy efficient, heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) systems will be downsized, and the air flow volumes required to meet heating and cooling loads may be too small to maintain uniform room air mixing-which can affect thermal comfort. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) evalu- ated the performance of high sidewall air supply inlets and confirmed that these systems can achieve good air mixing and provide suitable comfort levels for occupants. Using computational fluid dynamics modeling, NREL scientists tested the performance of high sidewall supply air jets over a wide range of parameters including supply air tempera-

404

Wireless Power May Cut the Cord for Plug-In Devices, Including Cars1 by Will Ferguson for National Geographic News, abbreviated2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wireless Power May Cut the Cord for Plug-In Devices, Including Cars1 by Will Ferguson for National no power cord, a car fueled by a cordless panel in the floor:4 In a nondescript building just outside Boston, these and other applications of wireless electricity signal a future with fewer snaking5 cables.6

South Bohemia, University of

405

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of combined solar thermal absorption chiller systems, and noon solar thermal and absorption chiller adoption in 2020,used to supply an absorption chiller. In the CO 2 price run,

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N. et al. , (2007), Microgrids, An Overview of OngoingSolar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat andSolar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Power Systems Integration Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced functionality testing Advanced functionality testing (i.e., IEEE 1547.8, IEEE 2030 capability tests) * Electrical performance testing (efficiency, maximum power) * Safety testing * Model validation testing * Long duration reliability testing Partner with Us Work with NREL experts and take advantage of the state-of-the-art capabilities at the ESIF to make progress on your projects, which may range from fundamental research to applications engineering.

408

Natural Gas and Power in the Marcellus Super-Region: Regional and National Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dramatic increases in shale gas production across the United States have fundamentally changed the outlook for gas markets in the near term, and perhaps for decades. The Marcellus shale has emerged in just a few years as the second largest gas field in the nation. The Marcellus region, which has historically been a large natural gas importer, is now poised to be a significant exporter, and a large producer of natural gas liquids. This report explores the resource base and cost ranges of production, ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

National Energy Code Lighting Power Limits: The Need for an Updated Calculation Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lighting energy codes throughout the US have become progressively more stringent due to increased interest in energy efficiency, and associated federal legislation. At the same time, the codes must, and are expected to allow for design flexibility. Historical code development for lighting has been mostly empirical with often limited observation to always make the best fit for the reality of design. With each iteration, the processes used to determine the codes and standards tries to become more closely representative of practical design and application. A natural challenge in this process is the number of variables associated with lighting design that challenges code writers to think critically about the visual needs of people, generally accepted lighting practices, and changes in the market that promote energy efficiency. Despite the issues, the code must keep designs from being wasteful and allow designers the artistic flexibility to achieve the lighting needs of the space. This paper provides a detailed look at these issues and how they affect the code development process through the development of one of the national lighting energy codes/standards. As new 2010 and beyond versions of the codes are in preparation, more detailed methods are being developed to walk that fine line between efficiency and design flexibility. The paper also explains some of the progression of the process of development of national lighting energy codes (ASHRAE/IES 90.1) and its effect on other codes.

Richman, Eric E.; Meyer, Timothy

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

410

Preliminary Physics Motivation and Engineering Design Assessment of the National High Power Torus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In April 2006, Dr. Ray Orbach, Director of the DOE Office of Science, challenged the fusion community to "propose a new facility... which will put the U.S. at the lead in world fusion science." Analysis of the gaps between expected ITER performance and the requirements of a demonstration power plant (Demo) pointed to the critical and urgent need to develop fusion-relvant plasma-material interface (PMI) solutions consistent with sustained high plasma performance. A survey of world fusion program indicated that present and planned experimental devices do not advance the PMI issue beyond ITER, and a major dedicated experimental facility is warranted. Such a facility should provide the flexibility and access needed to solve plasma boundary challenges related to divertor heat flux and particle exhaust while also developing methods to minimize hydrogenic isotope retention and remaining compatible with high plasma performance.

Robert D. Woolley

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

411

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MW) solar thermal for absorption cooling (MW) adopoted heatdisplaced due to absorption building cooling (GWh/a) annualthat cooling is necessary all day long and the absorption

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Comparative ranking of 0. 1 to 10 MW(e) solar thermal electric power systems. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1 to 10 MW(e), operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW(e), a range that is attractive to industrial and other non-utility applications. This volume summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 10 MW(e). Volume II presents data on performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kowalik, J.S.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Central Receiver Solar Thermal Power System, Phase 1. CDRL Item 2. Pilot Plant preliminary design report. Volume III, Book 1. Collector subsystem  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The central receiver system consists of a field of heliostats, a central receiver, a thermal storage unit, an electrical power generation system, and balance of plant. This volume discusses the collector field geometry, requirements and configuration. The development of the collector system and subsystems are discussed and the selection rationale outlined. System safety and availability are covered. Finally, the plans for collector portion of the central receiver system are reviewed.

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009, Solar Thermal Power Plants, The European PhysicalThermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Power Plants,fuel based power plants, and most nuclear and solar thermal

Coso, Dusan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Thermal Barrier Coatings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Barrier Coatings Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States...

416

Electric Power Metrology Programs/Projects in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric Power Metrology Programs/Projects in Semiconductors. Power Device and Thermal Metrology. Contact. General ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

417

NNSA interns visit Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

interns visit Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

418

Evaluation of the Heating & Cooling Energy Demand of a Case Residential Building by Comparing The National Calculation Methodology of Turkey and EnergyPlus through Thermal Capacity Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In all around the world, because of the rapid population growth and exhausting energy sources over time, energy efficiency and energy conservation gradually come into prominence. Hence, in 2002, a directive (EPBD) which obligates reducing energy usage and energy performance in buildings was published by European Union. In this scope, Turkey has developed a National Building Energy Performance Calculation Methodology, BepTr, which is based on simple hourly method in ISO EN 13790 Umbrella Document to determine the energy performance of buildings. The aim of the paper is to display the energy demand differences resultant from only the envelopes thermal capacity between simplified method which is projected in ISO EN 13790 Umbrella Document and EnergyPlus which is based on full dynamic simulation method.

Atamaca, Merve; Kalaycioglu, Ece; Yilmaz, Zerrin

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Near and far field models of external fluid mechanics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world is facing the challenge of finding new renewable sources of energy - first, in response to fossil fuel reserve depletion, and second, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) can ...

Rodrguez Buo, Mariana

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Secretary Chu visits Sandia National Labs | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and Albuquerque Mayor Richard Berry on a tour of Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility, which is working to advance industry collaboration on clean...

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421

Secretary Chu visits Sandia National Labs | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mayor Richard Berry on a tour of Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility, which is working to advance industry collaboration on clean energy...

422

Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications. Volume II. Analysis of thermal energy production costs for systems from 50 to 600 MWt  

SciTech Connect

A comparative analysis of solar thermal concepts that are potentially suitable for development as large process heat systems (50 to 600 MWt) was performed. The concepts considered can be classified into three categories based on the type of solar tracking used by the collector: (1) two-axis tracking, in which concentrators track the sun's motion in both azimuth and altitude; (2) one-axis tracking, in which concentrators track changes in either azimuth or altitude; and (3) non-tracking, in which the concentrators are fixed. Seven generic types of collectors were considered. Conceptual designs developed for the seven systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts.

Bird, S.P.; Apley, W.J.; Barnhart, J.S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Williams, T.A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications. Volume II. Analysis of thermal energy production costs for systems from 50 to 600 MWt  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparative analysis of solar thermal concepts that are potentially suitable for development as large process heat systems (50 to 600 MWt) was performed. The concepts considered can be classified into three categories based on the type of solar tracking used by the collector: (1) two-axis tracking, in which concentrators track the sun's motion in both azimuth and altitude; (2) one-axis tracking, in which concentrators track changes in either azimuth or altitude; and (3) non-tracking, in which the concentrators are fixed. Seven generic types of collectors were considered. Conceptual designs developed for the seven systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts.

Bird, S.P.; Apley, W.J.; Barnhart, J.S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Williams, T.A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Thermal springs list for the United States; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Key to Geophysical Records Documentation No. 12  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The compilation has 1702 thermal spring locations in 23 of the 50 States, arranged alphabetically by State (Postal Service abbreviation) and degrees of latitude and longitude within the State. It shows spring name, surface temperature in degrees Fahrenheit and degrees Celsius; USGS Professional Paper 492 number, USGS Circular 790 number, NOAA number, north to south on each degree of latitude and longitude of the listed. USGS 1:250,000-scale (AMS) map; and the USGS topographic map coverage, 1:63360- or 1:62500-scale (15-minute) or 1:24000-scale (7.5-minute) quadrangle also included is an alphabetized list showing only the spring name and the State in which it is located. Unnamed springs are omitted. The list includes natural surface hydrothermal features: springs, pools, mud pots, mud volcanoes, geysers, fumaroles, and steam vents at temperature of 20{sup 0}C (68[sup 0}F) or greater. It does not include wells or mines, except at sites where they supplement or replace natural vents presently or recently active, or, in some places, where orifices are not distinguishable as natural or artificial. The listed springs are located on the USGS 1:250,000 (AMS) topographic maps. (MHR)

Berry, G.W.; Grim, P.J.; Ikelman, J.A. (comps.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Solar Thermal Reactor Materials Characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current research into hydrogen production through high temperature metal oxide water splitting cycles has created a need for robust high temperature materials. Such cycles are further enhanced by the use of concentrated solar energy as a power source. However, samples subjected to concentrated solar radiation exhibited lifetimes much shorter than expected. Characterization of the power and flux distributions representative of the High Flux Solar Furnace(HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory(NREL) were compared to ray trace modeling of the facility. In addition, samples of candidate reactor materials were thermally cycled at the HFSF and tensile failure testing was performed to quantify material degradation. Thermal cycling tests have been completed on super alloy Haynes 214 samples and results indicate that maximum temperature plays a significant role in reduction of strength. The number of cycles was too small to establish long term failure trends for this material due to the high ductility of the material.

Lichty, P. R.; Scott, A. M.; Perkins, C. M.; Bingham, C.; Weimer, A. W.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

First National Technology Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 10 First National Technology First National Technology Center Center The Nature of the Grid - Industrial Age Power - Normal Course Voltage Interruptions: 2-3 seconds Lights and...

427

Proceedings of nuclear power systems classified session, third intersociety energy conversion engineering conference (IECEC), National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado, August 13--16, 1968  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed include: programmatic evaluation of SNAP-19 intact re- entry heat source development program; SNAP 19 aerospace nuclear safety evaluation; aerothermal analysis and testing of the SNAP-l9 intact re-entry heat source; SNAP-27 radioisotopic thermoelectric generators; compact thermoelectric converter program; experimental evaluation of an automatic temperature controlled heat pipe; conceptual design of a radioisotope heat pipe thermionic space power system; fast reactor systems for secondary space power; and a l5 kW(e) modular thermionic thermal reactor (MATTRAC). (TFD)

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Evaluation of the thermal-hydraulic response and fuel rod thermal and mechanical deformation behavior during the power burst facility test LOC-3. [PWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation of the results from the LOC-3 nuclear blowdown test conducted in the Power Burst Facility is presented. The test objective was to examine fuel and cladding behavior during a postulated cold leg break accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Separate effects of rod internal pressure and the degree of irradiation were investigated in the four-rod test. Extensive cladding deformation (ballooning) and failure occurred during blowdown. The deformation of the low and high pressure rods was similar; however, the previously irradiated test rod deformed to a greater extent than a similar fresh rod exposed to identical system conditions.

Yackle, T.R.; MacDonald, P.E.; Broughton, J.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

NUCLEAR-CONVENTIONAL POWER PLANT COST STUDY CONVENTIONAL COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS, 25,000 KW TO 325,000 KW, FOR ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY, LEMONT, ILLINOIS  

SciTech Connect

In order to establish a basis for comparing the estimated cost of nuclear power plant designs, a set of general and detailed design considerations for conventional coal-fired power plants was established. Five preliminary designs of conventional coal-fired power plants ranging in size from 25to 325 mw were selected, and cost estimates were prepared. ( A.C.)

Chittenden, W.A.

1959-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

The conversion of biomass to ethanol using geothermal energy derived from hot dry rock to supply both the thermal and electrical power requirements  

SciTech Connect

The potential synergism between a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy source and the power requirements for the conversion of biomass to fuel ethanol is considerable. In addition, combining these two renewable energy resources to produce transportation fuel has very positive environmental implications. One of the distinct advantages of wedding an HDR geothermal power source to a biomass conversion process is flexibility, both in plant location and in operating process is flexibility, both in plant location and in operating conditions. The latter obtains since an HDR system is an injection conditions of flow rate, pressure, temperature, and water chemistry are under the control of the operator. The former obtains since, unlike a naturally occurring geothermal resource, the HDR resource is very widespread, particularly in the western US, and can be developed near transportation and plentiful supplies of biomass. Conceptually, the pressurized geofluid from the HDR reservoir would be produced at a temperature in the range of 200{degrees} to 220{degrees}c. The higher enthalpy portion of the geofluid thermal energy would be used to produce a lower-temperature steam supply in a countercurrent feedwater-heater/boiler. The steam, following a superheating stage fueled by the noncellulosic waste fraction of the biomass, would be expanded through a turbine to produce electrical power. Depending on the lignin fraction of the biomass, there would probably be excess electrical power generated over and above plant requirements (for slurry pumping, stirring, solids separation, etc.) which would be available for sale to the local power grid. In fact, if the hybrid HDR/biomass system were creatively configured, the power plant could be designed to produce daytime peaking power as well as a lower level of baseload power during off-peak hours.

Brown, D.W.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development utilizing advanced, high-performance heat transfer techniques. Volume 1. Conceptual design report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is the development of a preliminary design for a full-sized, closed cycle, ammonia power system module for the 100 MWe OTEC Demonstration Plant. In turn, this Demonstration Plant is to demonstrate, by 1984, the operation and performance of an ocean thermal power plant having sufficiently advanced heat exchanger design to project economic viability for commercial utilization in the late 1980's and beyond. Included in this power system development are the preliminary designs for a proof-of-concept pilot plant and test article heat exchangers which are scaled in such a manner as to support a logically sequential, relatively low-cost development of the full-scale power system module. The conceptual designs are presented for the Demonstration Plant power module, the proof-of-concept pilot plant, and for a pair of test article heat exchangers. Costs associated with the design, development, fabrication, checkout, delivery, installation, and operation are included. The accompanying design and producibility studies on the full-scale power system module project the performance/economics for the commercial plant. This section of the report describes the full-size power system module, and summarizes the design parameters and associated costs for the Demonstration Plant module (prototype) and projects costs for commercial plants in production. The material presented is directed primarily toward the surface platform/ship basic reference hull designated for use during conceptual design; however, other containment vessels were considered during the design effort so that the optimum power system would not be unduly influenced or restricted. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

432

Solar Total Energy System: Large Scale Experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia. Final technical progress report. Volume I. Section 1. Conclusions and recommendations. Section 2. Systems requirements. [1. 72-MW thermal and 383. 6-kW electric power for 42,000 ft/sup 2/ knitwear plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Stearns-Roger Engineering Company conceptual design of ERDA's Large Scale Experiment No. 2 (LSE No. 2) is described. The various LSE's are part of ERDA's Solar Total Energy Program (STES) and a separate activity of the National Solar Thermal Power Systems Program. The object of this LSE is to design, construct, test, evaluate and operate a STES for the purpose of obtaining experience with large scale hardware systems and to establish engineering capability for subsequent demonstration projects. This particular LSE is to be located at Shenandoah, Georgia and will provide power to the Bleyle knitwear factory. The Solar Total Energy system is sized to supply 1.720 MW thermal power (both space heating and process heat) and 383.6 KW electrical power. The STES is sized for the extended knitwear plant of 3902 M/sup 2/ (42,000 sq-ft) which will eventually employ 300 people. The section on conclusions and recommendations described the baseline design recommendation, facility requirements, the solar system, power conversion system, schedules and cost, and additional candidate systems. The systems requirements analysis includes detailed descriptions and analyses of the following subtasks: load analysis, energy displacement, local laws and ordinances, life cycle cost, health and safety, environmental assessment, reliability assessment, and utility interface. (WHK)

None,

1977-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

433

In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs January 7, 2014 - 5:30pm Addthis These solar power collection dishes at Sandia National Labs' National Solar Thermal Test Facility are capable of some of the highest solar to electricity conversion. In January 2008, this technology set a new solar-to-grid system conversion efficiency record of 31.25 percent net efficiency rate; the technology is still available to benefit the U.S. by delivering power at all hours of the day by implementing thermal energy storage. CSP with storage provides important benefits to integrate more renewable energy to our electric power supply by mitigating resource variability and satisfying peak demand after sunset. | Photo courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories.

434

Preliminary Thermal Modeling of HI-Storm 100S-218 Version B Storage Modules at Hope Creek Cuclear Power Station ISFSI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development, a consortium of national laboratories and industry is performing visual inspections and temperature measurements of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States. This report documents thermal analyses in in support of the inspections at the Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station ISFSI. This site utilizes the HI-STORM100 vertical storage system developed by Holtec International. This is a vertical storage module design, and the thermal models are being developed using COBRA-SFS (Michener, et al., 1987), a code developed by PNNL for thermal-hydraulic analyses of multi assembly spent fuel storage and transportation systems. This report describes the COBRA-SFS model in detail, and presents pre-inspection predictions of component temperatures and temperature distributions. The final report will include evaluation of inspection results, and if required, additional post-test calculations, with appropriate discussion of results.

Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

435

Components Makeover Gives Concentrating Solar Power a Boost (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Components Makeover Gives Components Makeover Gives Concentrating Solar Power a Boost Parabolic trough technology is the most mature of the various concentrating solar power (CSP) options. But scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) continue to make advances on troug