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1

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING THE NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

national economies; Recognizing that significant interrelated, atmospheric, oceanic and terrestrial global, terrestrial and atmospheric ecosystem studies should focus on the structure and processes of the environment

2

Science DMZ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NOAA NOAA About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ CU Science DMZ Penn State & VTTI Science DMZ NOAA Science DMZ NERSC Science DMZ ALS Multi-facility Workflow LCLS ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Careers Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Science DMZ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Boulder houses the Earth System Research Lab, which supports a "reforecasting" project. The initiative involves running several decades of historical

3

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. We receive many benefits from the oceans from seafood, recreation and transportation industriesNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Oceans and Human Health Initiative (OHHI) is taking a new look at how the health of our ocean impacts our own health and well- being, and in turn how

4

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Name National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Address 1401 Constitution Avenue, NW Room 5128 Washington, DC 20230 Zip 20230 Phone number (301) 713-4000. Website http://www.noaa.gov/index.html Coordinates 38.892111°, -77.031981° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.892111,"lon":-77.031981,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

5

Technical Sessions B. E. Manner National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

B. E. Manner B. E. Manner National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Wave Propagation Laboratory 130ulder, CO 80303 The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) pirog ram goals are ambitious, and its schedule is demanding. Many of the instruments, proposed for operations at the first Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site as early alS 1992 represent emerging technology and exist only as :special research prototypes. Therefore, an important preparatory step for ARM was an intensive field project in Colorado in 1991 to assess the suitability of instruments an(j tech- niques for profiling the thermodynamic and kinematic structure of the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The field work was designed to provide ARM with a head start by gathering practical information for the desigln and

6

FOAM: Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FOAM: Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model FOAM: Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model FOAM: Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model FOAM is a fully coupled, mixed-resolution, general circulation model designed for high-throughput (simulated years per day) while still providing a good simulated mean climate and simulated variability. FOAM uses the combination of a low resolution (R15) atmosphere model, a highly efficient medium-resolution ocean model, and distributed memory parallel processing to achieve high throughput on relatively modest numbers of processors (16-64). The quality of the simulated climate compares well with higher resolution models. No flux corrections are used. FOAM's intended purpose is to study long-term natural variability in the climate system. FOAM is also well suited for paleoclimate applications. FOAM is highly

7

NOAA National Climatic Data Center National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based operational Climate Data Records, which provide objective climate information from weather satellite data Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service National Climatic Data Center Asheville, North Carolina 8 Releasing Five New Satellite-Based Operational Climate Data Records 9 Assuring Launch Readiness

8

Developing El Nio The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administratio...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(NOAA) recently announced the development of El Nio conditions in the tropical Pacific Ocean near the South American coastline. Scientists detected a 4F increase in...

9

Air Resources Laboratory The Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) is a research laboratory within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the atmospheric transport, transformation and fate of air pollutants. To support air quality decision makers, ARL the interaction of air pollutants in the atmosphere and between the atmosphere and the underlying land and water the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). ARL is headquartered at the NOAA Center for Weather

10

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research at the National Marine Fisheries Service Galveston, Texas Laboratory There are 5 different kinds FISHERIES SERVICE Southeast Fisheries Science Center - Galveston Laboratory 4700 Avenue U, Galveston, TX Galveston Laboratory Copies of this coloring book can be downloaded at: http://galveston

11

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Motor Vehicles DPS Distinct Population Segment DWH Deep Water Horizon EFH Essential Fish 181 1 #12;2 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS °C Degrees Celsius CWA Clean Water Act CHEU Charlotte Harbor Take Statement MHWL Mean High Water Line MLW Mean Low Water MLLW Mean Lower Low Water NGVD National

12

Science, Service, Stewardship U.S. Department of Commerce | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | National Marine Fisheries Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Atmospheric Administration | National Marine Fisheries Service Gulf of Mexico Seafood Safety The federal the safety of Gulf seafood.To ensure all seafood that goes to market is not tainted by oil or dispersant and is safe to eat, the process includes active monitoring of the areas where seafood is caught, frequent

13

NWSPD 60-1 JUNE 8, 2005 Department of Commerce $ National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration $ National Weather Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

$ National Weather Service NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE POLICY DIRECTIVE 60-1 June 8, 2005 Information Technology Wide Web presentation tools and technologies, where applicable, to ensure timely and cost effective with Technical standards 1194.22 (Web-based intranet and internet information and applications) of Section 508

14

Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean. Geophys. Res.Powers and Stoelinga (2000). They developed a comprehensive atmosphere-ocean-

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean. Geophys. Res.Powers and Stoelinga (2000). They developed a comprehensive atmosphere-ocean-

Seo, Hyodae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the discovery has implications for future shipping in the region. Census of Arctic Marine Life #12;Recent (2005 Antarctic Marine Living Resource Survey 6 Short-term Arctic Predictability 7 Advances in Satellite Products's Data, Information for IPY 11 NOAA's Change Detection Strategy 12 Decision support for increasing

Kuligowski, Bob

17

Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.coas.oregonstate.edu WECOMA WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents, to the south in summer and generally to the north in winter, create ocean currents. The strong summertime and the topography of the ocean floor influence the east-west cross-shelf currents. Understanding and being able

Pierce, Stephen

18

Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents introduced by man (e.g., pollutants). Knowledge of upper-ocean currents is important for navigation and for search and rescue. The ocean currents off Oregon vary seasonally and can also vary from year to year

Barth, Jack

19

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric administration national Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

national Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Madelyn Appelbaum Senior Communications Policy Advisor Summary: Communications Director Office of Oceanic & Atmospheric Research National...

20

NOAA FORM 88-166 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (12-82) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will file a FCF claim was caused by an item related to OCS oil and gas activities, you must submit at of social security numbers or taxpayer identification numbers is to sea by contacting the National Marine ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ NAME SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER DATE ______________________________________________________________

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ARM - Field Campaign - Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsTropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere govCampaignsTropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Exp Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Exp 1992.07.11 - 1993.02.28 Lead Scientist : Chuck Long Data Availability Final data available. For data sets, see below. Summary IOP completed. Description The Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA-COARE) was conducted to better understand the structure of the coupled system of the warm pool of the western Pacific Ocean. Hundreds of participants from dozens of countries took part in this experiment from November 1, 1992 through February 28, 1993. Campaign Data Sets

22

METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that there is no10 isotopic fractionation between the liquid phase and the generated moist "air". The water11., A microdrop generator for the calibration of.... 1. Introduction1 2 Water vapor is a key element in the globalAMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology EARLY ONLINE RELEASE

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

23

Doctoral Programs Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Professor; Recipient, Teaching Innovation Prize; Michigan Distinguished Professor of the Year Allison Mission to Comet 67P / Churyumov- Gerasimenko · Solar and Heliospheric Physics Group · STEREO Mission,OceanicandSpaceSciences Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences University of Michigan Space Research Building 2455 Hayward Street Ann

Eustice, Ryan

24

College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University 104 CEOAS Admin Bldg Announcement College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Posting 0012926 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, Earth Systems History The College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences (CEOAS) at Oregon State University

25

National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NARAC TOC NARAC TOC The National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center, NARAC, provides tools and services to the Federal Government, that map the probable spread of hazardous material accidentally or intentionally released into the atmosphere. NARAC provides atmospheric plume predictions in time for an emergency manager to decide if taking protective action is necessary to protect the health and safety of people in affected areas. Located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NARAC is a national support and resource center for planning, real-time assessment, emergency response, and detailed studies of incidents involving a wide variety of hazards, including nuclear, radiological, chemical, biological, and natural emissions. In an emergency situation (if lives are at risk), event-specific NARAC

26

A new mechanism for ocean-atmosphere coupling in midlatitudes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the tropopause are met frequently over all major western boundary currents and their extension in the oceanicA new mechanism for ocean-atmosphere coupling in midlatitudes A. Czaja, and N. Blunt Department The role of moist convection in "transferring" upward surface ocean condi- tions throughout the troposphere

27

Lecture(s) 9 Slides from atmosphere-ocean lectures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

albedo and ice can insulate the ocean from the atmosphere above. When the ocean surface freezes and ocean, meshed together and yet also forced by buoyant density differences. Ice and snow..the cryosphere it melts in summer this ice makes a layer of quite fresh water at the surface. ­ beside the density

28

EPS 22 The Fluid Earth: Oceans, Atmosphere, Climate & Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EPS 22 The Fluid Earth: Oceans, Atmosphere, Climate & Environment Spring 2012 Instructors: Steven Hall E Overview Description: EPS22 introduces students to the fluid earth, emphasizing Earth's weather is EPS22? A graphical representation of major topics. Current topics in atmospheric and ocean sciences

Huybers, Peter

29

Atmosphereocean dynamics in the Western Indian Ocean recorded in corals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Atmosphere-ocean-ecology dynamics in the Western Indian Ocean organized by Tom Spencer...18 O (dashed line) and 11-point moving average (solid line...Parker et al. 1995) and 11-point moving average (solid line...to the wind- driven southern Indian Ocean gyre (Allan et al. 1995...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Tropical atmosphere - Ocean interactions in a conceptual framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical analysis of observations (including atmospheric reanalysis and forced ocean model simulations) is used to address two questions: First, does an analogous mechanism to that of El NioSouthern Oscillation (ENSO) ...

Jansen, Malte Friedrich

31

12.003 Physics of Atmospheres and Oceans, Fall 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The laws of classical mechanics and thermodynamics are used to explore how the properties of fluids on a rotating Earth manifest themselves in, and help shape, the global patterns of atmospheric winds, ocean currents, and ...

Marshall, John C.

32

National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Release Advisory Center | National Nuclear Security Atmospheric Release Advisory Center | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Consequence Management > National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center

33

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric administration key Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) proposal (south Florida) and that such seafood... for Oceans and Atmosphere and Administrator ... Source: National Oceanic and...

34

Coastal Atmospheric Circulation around an Idealized Cape during Wind-Driven Upwelling Studied from a Coupled OceanAtmosphere Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study analyzes atmospheric circulation around an idealized coastal cape during summertime upwelling-favorable wind conditions simulated by a mesoscale coupled oceanatmosphere model. The domain resembles an eastern ocean boundary with a ...

Natalie Perlin; Eric D. Skyllingstad; Roger M. Samelson

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Representing El Nio in Coupled OceanAtmosphere GCMs: The Dominant Role of the Atmospheric Component  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A systematic modular approach to investigate the respective roles of the ocean and atmosphere in setting El Nio characteristics in coupled general circulation models is presented. Several state-of-the-art coupled models sharing either the same ...

E. Guilyardi; S. Gualdi; J. Slingo; A. Navarra; P. Delecluse; J. Cole; G. Madec; M. Roberts; M. Latif; L. Terray

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Evolving research directions in Surface OceanLower Atmosphere (SOLAS) science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolving research directions in Surface Ocean­Lower Atmosphere (SOLAS) science Cliff S. Law. Understanding the exchange of energy, gases and particles at the ocean­atmosphere interface is critical­Lower Atmosphere Study (SOLAS) coordinates multi-disciplinary ocean­ atmosphere research projects that quantify

37

Physics of Atmospheres and Oceans: Class Question Sheets COMPARATIVE PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the mass of Jupiter and R its radius. Assuming this is all converted to thermal energy, give a crudePhysics of Atmospheres and Oceans: Class Question Sheets COMPARATIVE PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES PLA.1 for discounting the less popular of these? Show that the energy liberated during the collapse of a sphere of mass

Read, Peter L.

38

Monitoring and interpreting the ocean uptake of atmospheric CO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...interpreting the ocean uptake of atmospheric CO2 Andrew J. Watson 1 * Nicolas Metzl 2 Ute...important sink for anthropogenically produced CO2, and on time scales longer than a century they will be the main repository for the CO2 that humans are emitting. Our knowledge...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

JOINT INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF THE ATMOSPHERE & OCEAN (JISAO)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dimensional datasets. SCIENCE HIgHLIgHTS MARINE ECOSYSTEMS / FISHERIES RECRUITMENT Collaborations JOINT INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF THE ATMOSPHERE & OCEAN (JISAO) ANNUAL REPORT JULy 1, 2005 ­ JUNE Management and Administration 20 ProjEct SummariES 23 Marine Ecosystems 24 Climate 44 Environmental Chemistry

Rigor, Ignatius G.

40

Doctoral Programs Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Michigan Space Research Building 2455 Hayward Street Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 aoss Katherine E. White, Ann Arbor ©The Regents of the University of Michigan Research areas Atmospheric Science/Thermosphere Physics Planetary Magnetospheres Solar & Heliospheric Physics Space Weather Aeronomy For Faculty involved

Eustice, Ryan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Ch.6 Atmospheric and Oceanic Circulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

difference in air pressure. #12;Measure Air Pressure-- Mercury Barometer ·Seal the glass tube at one end of latitude. Meridional flows Zonal flows #12;Learning Objective Two: Air Pressure #12;Air Pressure Atmospheric pressure is the force per unit area exerted against a surface by the weight of air above

Pan, Feifei

42

Radon and its Daughters in the Atmosphere Over the Equatorial Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Atmosphere Over the Equatorial Pacific Ocean T. Tanji M. Okino I. Sugioka...atmosphere over the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean during the period from 2 to 22...and over the central and western Pacific from 3 September to 14 December......

T. Tanji; M. Okino; I. Sugioka; S. Mochizuki

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Impacts of OceanAtmosphere Coupling on Tropical Cyclone Intensity Change and Ocean Prediction in the Australian Region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates the impact of atmosphereocean coupling on predicted tropical cyclone (TC) intensity change and the ocean response in the Australian region. The coupled model comprises the Australian Bureau of Meteorologys Tropical ...

P. A. Sandery; G. B. Brassington; A. Craig; T. Pugh

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

The effect of regional ocean-atmosphere coupling on the long-term variability in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model is applied to highlight the ... decadal and longer time scales) in the Pacific Ocean. We are interested in the effect of ... processes. The control run successfully simulate...

Lin Feng ? ?; Dexing Wu ???; Xiaopei Lin ???

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The impact of oceanic heat transport on the atmospheric circulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A general circulation model of intermediate complexity with an idealized earthlike aquaplanet setup is used to study the impact of changes in the oceanic heat transport on the global atmospheric circulation. Focus is put on the Lorenz energy cycle and the atmospheric mean meridional circulation. The latter is analysed by means of the Kuo-Eliassen equation. The atmospheric heat transport compensates the imposed oceanic heat transport changes to a large extent in conjunction with significant modification of the general circulation. Up to a maximum about 3PW, an increase of the oceanic heat transport leads to an increase of the global mean near surface temperature and a decrease of its equator-to-pole gradient. For larger transports, the gradient is reduced further but the global mean remains approximately constant. This is linked to a cooling and a reversal of the temperature gradient in the tropics. A larger oceanic heat transport leads to a reduction of all reservoirs and conversions of the Lorenz energy cycl...

Knietzsch, Marc-Andre; Lunkeit, Frank

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Modelling the Effect of Ocean Waves on the Atmospheric and Ocean Boundary Layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean waves, in addition to generating direct forces on fixed and floating offshore wind generator structures, also have significant indirect effects via their influence on the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers above and below the water surface. In the atmospheric boundary layer the waves act as roughness elements, influencing the turbulent flow and the vertical wind speed profile, and induce oscillatory motions in the airflow. Spray droplets from breaking wave crests enhance structure corrosion, and may lead to icing under low-temperature conditions. Below the water surface, the air-sea momentum flux and mechanical energy flux, mediated by the waves and wave-generated turbulence, affect the vertical profiles of ocean current, temperature, and salinity. Effects include modifying the structural forces and dynamics, and the movement and dispersion of marine organisms, pollutants, and air bubbles generated by breaking waves, with consequences for fouling, corrosion, and environmental impact. Measurement of relevant airflow and ocean dynamical variables is also challenging, as near the water surface it is often necessary to use instruments mounted on moving measurement platforms. Modelling such boundary-layer effects is a complex task, as a result of feedbacks between the airflow, wave field, current field, and turbulence in the atmosphere and the ocean. We present results from a coupled model study of the North Sea and Norwegian Sea area. We employ a mesoscale atmosphere model (WRF) and a spectral wave model (WAM), running simultaneously and coupled using the open-source coupler MCEL which can interpolate between different model grids and time steps. To investigate the ocean boundary layer, one-dimensional model experiments were performed for an idealized Ekman layer and for locations in the North Sea, Atlantic Ocean, and the northern Pacific, using a version of the GOTM turbulence model, modified to take wave dynamics into account. Results show how the wave field alters the ocean's aerodynamic roughness and the airsea momentum flux, depending on the relation between the surface wind speed and the propagation speed of the wave crests (the wave age). These effects will feed back into the airflow, wind speed and turbulence profile in the boundary layer. The ocean dynamics experiments showed results which compare favourably with field observations from the LOTUS3 and PROVESS experiments in the north Atlantic and North Sea, and Ocean Weather Station Papa in the Pacific Ocean.

Alastair D. Jenkins; Mostafa Bakhoday Paskyabi; Ilker Fer; Alok Gupta; Muralidhar Adakudlu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

VOCALS (VAMOS* Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) is an international CLIVAR program the major goal of which is to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding of the Southeast Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system on diurnal to inter-annual timescales. The principal program objectives are: 1) the improved understanding and regional/global model representation of aerosol indirect effects over the SEP; 2) the elimination of systematic errors in the region of coupled atmospheric-ocean general circulation models, and improved model simulations and predictions of the coupled climate in the SEP and global impacts of the system variability. VOCALS is organized into two tightly coordinated components: 1) a Regional Experiment (VOCALSREx), and 2) a Modeling Program (VOCALS-Mod). Extended observations (e.g. IMET buoy, satellites, EPIC/PACS cruises) will provide important additional contextual datasets that help to link the field and the modeling components. The coordination through VOCALS of observational and modeling efforts (Fig. 3) will accelerate the rate at which field data can be used to improve simulations and predictions of the tropical climate variability [Copied from the Vocals Program Summary of June 2007, available as a link from the VOCALS web at http://www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/vocals/]. The CLIVAR sponsored program to under which VOCALS falls is VAMOS, which stands for Variability of the American Monsoon Systems.

Wood, Robert (VOCALS-REx PI, University of Washington); Bretherton, Christopher (GEWEX/GCSS Representative, University of Washington); Huebert, Barry (SOLAS Representative, University of Hawaii); Mechoso, Roberto C. (VOCALS Science Working Group Chair, UCLA); Weller, Robert (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution)

48

Response of a Coupled OceanAtmosphere Model to Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide: Sensitivity to the Rate of Increase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of differing rates of increase of the atmospheric CO2 concentration on the climatic response is investigated using a coupled oceanatmosphere model. Five transient integrations are performed each using a different constant ...

Ronald J. Stouffer; Syukuro Manabe

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Interannual ENSO variability forced through coupled atmosphere-ocean feedback loops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2000; Power and Colman, 2006]. In this paper, we explore the extent to which baroclinic ocean Rossby1 Interannual ENSO variability forced through coupled atmosphere-ocean feedback loops Amy Solomon 1 feedback to, and significantly impact, the Tropics through ocean Rossby waves. We use an atmospheric

Solomon, Amy

50

Surface currents and equatorial thermocline in a coupled upper ocean-atmosphere GCM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Oregon State University coupled upper ocean-atmosphere GCM is evaluated in terms of the simulated winds, ocean currents and thermocline depth variations. Although the zonal ... a factor of about three and the...

Kenneth R Sperber; Sultan Hameed; W Gates Lawrence

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Climate Simulations for 19512050 with a Coupled AtmosphereOcean Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors simulate climate change for 19512050 using the GISS SI2000 atmospheric model coupled to HYCOM, a quasi-isopycnal ocean model (ocean E), and contrast the results with those obtained using the same atmosphere coupled to a passive Q-...

Shan Sun; James E. Hansen

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

OceanAtmosphere Interactions in the Emergence of Complexity in Simple Chemical Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

OceanAtmosphere Interactions in the Emergence of Complexity in Simple Chemical Systems ... In this Account, we examine how waterair interfaces, namely, the surfaces of lakes, oceans, and atmospheric aerosols on ancient Earth, facilitated the emergence of complex structures necessary for life. ... Aerosols are liquid or solid suspensions in air with a broad, power law size distribution. ...

Elizabeth C. Griffith; Adrian F. Tuck; Veronica Vaida

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

53

Analytical relationships between atmospheric carbon dioxide, carbon emissions, and ocean processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytical relationships between atmospheric carbon dioxide, carbon emissions, and ocean processes of the air-sea system. The perturbation, dIc, includes carbon emissions and changes in the terrestrial), Analytical relationships between atmospheric carbon dioxide, carbon emissions, and ocean processes, Global

Follows, Mick

54

Northerly surface wind events over the eastern North Pacific Ocean : spatial distribution, seasonality, atmospheric circulation, and forcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

atmosphere over the eastern Pacific Ocean in summer, volumeover the eastern North Pacific Ocean throughout the year,over the eastern North Pacific Ocean and the western US. A

Taylor, Stephen V.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The oceanic cycle and global atmospheric budget of carbonyl sulfide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant portion of stratospheric air chemistry is influenced by the existence of carbonyl sulfide (COS). This ubiquitous sulfur gas represents a major source of sulfur to the stratosphere where it is converted to sulfuric acid aerosol particles. Stratospheric aerosols are climatically important because they scatter incoming solar radiation back to space and are able to increase the catalytic destruction of ozone through gas phase reactions on particle surfaces. COS is primarily formed at the surface of the earth, in both marine and terrestrial environments, and is strongly linked to natural biological processes. However, many gaps in the understanding of the global COS cycle still exist, which has led to a global atmospheric budget that is out of balance by a factor of two or more, and a lack of understanding of how human activity has affected the cycling of this gas. The goal of this study was to focus on COS in the marine environment by investigating production/destruction mechanisms and recalculating the ocean-atmosphere flux.

Weiss, P.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in boundary current systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

response of the ocean eddies . The power spectrum of thethe ocean. As such, the larger energy in the power spectrumocean eddies. On the other hand, Smoothed ROMS has higher power

Putrasahan, Dian Ariyani

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Modeling the Interaction between the Atmospheric and Oceanic Boundary Layers, Including a Surface Wave Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interaction between the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers is simulated by solving a closed system of equations including equations of motion, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), turbulent exchange coefficient (TEC), expressions for air and ...

Le Ngoc Ly

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere ocean heat Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of ACC oceanic... heat flux Total heat flux at 900 m: 4.7 to 7.5 kWm2. Implies 0.3 PW heat loss to atmosphere south... 12;Mechanisms: ... Source: Gille, Sarah T. - Scripps...

59

The second Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM: model description, spinup and validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...?This study describes a new coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (OAGCM) developed for studies of climate change and results from a hindcast experiment. The model includes various physical and te...

T. C. Johns; R. E. Carnell; J. F. Crossley; J. M. Gregory

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Effects of oceanic and atmospheric phenomena on precipitation and flooding in the Manafwa River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An investigation was performed to determine the relationship between certain oceanic and atmospheric phenomena and the precipitation patterns in the Manafwa River Basin of eastern Uganda. Such phenomena are the El Nio ...

Finney, William W., III (William Warner)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Understanding El Nio in OceanAtmosphere General Circulation Models: Progress and Challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Determining how El Nio and its impacts may change over the next 10 to 100 years remains a difficult scientific challenge. Oceanatmosphere coupled general circulation models (CGCMs) are routinely used both to analyze El Nio mechanisms and ...

Eric Guilyardi; Andrew Wittenberg; Alexey Fedorov; Mat Collins; Chunzai Wang; Antonietta Capotondi; Geert Jan van Oldenborgh; Tim Stockdale

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The Total Meridional Heat Flux and Its Oceanic and Atmospheric Partition CARL WUNSCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model residual is done to permit calculation of a preliminary uncertainty estimate for the atmospheric the oceanic flux drops rapidly, but does not actually vanish until the oceanic surface area goes to zero The partitioning and fluctuations in the net poleward transport of heat (energy, actually enthalpy; see War- ren

Wunsch, Carl

63

Variability, interaction and change in the atmosphereoceanecology system of the Western Indian Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...all. In a symposium on the Indian Ocean over 30 years ago, David...sea level? Why do most modern Indian Ocean reefs only thinly veneer...survival over long time-scales) point to the importance of long-term...regeneration. In the Western Indian Ocean, studies are in place...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Predicting Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Modes with a Climate Modeling Hierarchy -- Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the project was to determine midlatitude climate predictability associated with tropical-extratropical interactions on interannual-to-interdecadal time scales. Our strategy was to develop and test a hierarchy of climate models, bringing together large GCM-based climate models with simple fluid-dynamical coupled ocean-ice-atmosphere models, through the use of advanced probabilistic network (PN) models. PN models were used to develop a new diagnostic methodology for analyzing coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions in large climate simulations made with the NCAR Parallel Climate Model (PCM), and to make these tools user-friendly and available to other researchers. We focused on interactions between the tropics and extratropics through atmospheric teleconnections (the Hadley cell, Rossby waves and nonlinear circulation regimes) over both the North Atlantic and North Pacific, and the oceans thermohaline circulation (THC) in the Atlantic. We tested the hypothesis that variations in the strength of the THC alter sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, and that the latter influence the atmosphere in high latitudes through an atmospheric teleconnection, feeding back onto the THC. The PN model framework was used to mediate between the understanding gained with simplified primitive equations models and multi-century simulations made with the PCM. The project team is interdisciplinary and built on an existing synergy between atmospheric and ocean scientists at UCLA, computer scientists at UCI, and climate researchers at the IRI.

Michael Ghil, UCLA; Andrew W. Robertson, IRI, Columbia Univ.; Sergey Kravtsov, U. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Padhraic Smyth, UC Irvine

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

65

Transient Responses of a Coupled OceanAtmosphere Model to Gradual Changes of Atmospheric CO2. Part I. Annual Mean Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates the response of a climate model to a gradual increase or decrease of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The model is a general circulation model of the coupled atmosphere-ocean-land surface system with global geography and ...

S. Manabe; R. J. Stouffer; M. J. Spelman; K. Bryan

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Pacific Oceans Acidification Laboratory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Pacific Oceans Acidification Laboratory ... Five years ago, at the quadrennial International Coral Reef Symposium in Okinawa, Japan, a poll of the scientists and resource managers present ranked ocean acidification 38th out of a list of 39 possible threats facing reefs, recalls Rusty Brainard, head of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrations (NOAAs) Coral Reef Ecosystem Division. ... As the oceans absorb CO2 from the atmosphere at the rate of one million tons per hour, the pH of the water is changing. ...

Christopher Pala

2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

67

Atmospheric and Climate Science | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric and Climate Science Atmospheric and Climate Science Argonne research in aerosols, micro-meteorology, remote sensing, and atmospheric chemistry combined with our scalable, portable, high-performance climate and weather applications offer a unique look at the complexities of a dynamic planet. Changes in climate can affect biodiversity, the cost of food, our health, and even whole economies. Argonne is developing computational models and tools designed to shed light on complex biological processes and their economic, social, and health effects. Research spans the molecular level to whole organisms and their interaction with climate, the ecosystem, and human activities. The goal is to improve our understanding of the world around us while increasing the accuracy of regional climate models to

68

Connectivity to National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC)  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish requirements for connectivity with the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for all DOE and NNSA sites and facilities with potential for hazardous materials releases at levels that require emergency response. The requirements of this Notice have been incorporated into DOE O 151.1C, Comprehensive Emergency Management System, dated 11-2-05. No cancellations.

2003-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

69

Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology EARLY ONLINE RELEASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Polar Research, Tachikawa, Japan Masaki Tsutsumi, National Institute of Polar Research, Tachikawa, Japan

Sato, Toru

70

The Impact of Oceanic Heat Transport on the Atmospheric Circulation: a Thermodynamic Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present study investigates how global thermodynamic properties of the climate system are affected by the changes in the intensity of the imposed oceanic heat transport in an atmospheric general circulation model in aqua-planet configuration. Increasing the poleward oceanic heat transport results in an overall increase in the surface temperature and a decrease in the equator-to-pole surface temperature difference as a result of the ice-albedo feedback. Following the classical ansatz by Stone, the atmospheric heat transport changes in such a way that the total poleward heat transport remains almost unchanged. We also find that the efficiency of the climate machine, the intensity of the Lorenz energy cycle and the material entropy production of the system decline with increased oceanic heat transport which suggests that the climate system becomes less efficient and turns into a state of reduced entropy production, as the enhanced oceanic transport performs a stronger large-scale mixing between geophysical fl...

Schrder, Alexander; Lunkeit, Frank

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology EARLY ONLINE RELEASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uncertainty associated with winter storm precipitation type, accumulation, and29 timing is a major forecasting hydrometeor classification algorithm for winter precipitation. J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol. doi:10.1175/JTECH classification algorithm for1 winter precipitation2 Elizabeth J. Thompson, Steven A. Rutledge, Brenda Dolan

Rutledge, Steven

72

Internal variability of the tropical Pacific ocean Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internal variability of the tropical Pacific ocean M. Jochum Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary model of the tropical Pacific ocean is analyzed to quantify the interannual variability caused by internal variability of ocean dynamics. It is found that along the Pacific cold tongue internal variability

Jochum, Markus

73

Regional Impacts of Climate Change and Atmospheric CO2 on Future Ocean Carbon Uptake: A Multimodel Linear Feedback Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The increase in atmospheric CO2 over this century depends on the evolution of the oceanic airsea CO2 uptake, which will be driven by the combined response to rising atmospheric CO2 itself and climate change. Here, the future oceanic CO2 uptake is ...

Tilla Roy; Laurent Bopp; Marion Gehlen; Birgit Schneider; Patricia Cadule; Thomas L. Frlicher; Joachim Segschneider; Jerry Tjiputra; Christoph Heinze; Fortunat Joos

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric administration noaa Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) proposal (Florida panhandle) and that such seafood should pose no food... Marine Fisheries Service National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

75

A Hybrid Atmosphere-Ocean Coupling Approach on the Simulation of Tropical Asian-Pacific Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Hybrid Atmosphere-Ocean Coupling Approach on the Simulation of Tropical Asian-Pacific Climate at Manoa, 1680 East West Road, POST Bldg. 4th Floor, Honolulu, HI 96822 #12;ABSTRACT A unique Hybrid spring (in late fall). The encouraging results from this hybrid coupled model indicate

Fu, Joshua Xiouhua

76

DEPARTMENT OF ATMOSPHERIC AND OCEANIC SCIENCE The Effect ENSO Has on Lightning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or no effect on flash rates. Historical records of lightning flash rates and lightning climatology are fairlyDEPARTMENT OF ATMOSPHERIC AND OCEANIC SCIENCE The Effect ENSO Has on Lightning Using NLDN and OTD/LIS Lightning Detection Networks Scholarly Paper in partial fulfillment of the requirements for an MS degree

Maryland at College Park, University of

77

The OceanLandAtmosphere Model: Optimization and Evaluation of Simulated Radiative Fluxes and Precipitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work continues the presentation and evaluation of the OceanLandAtmosphere Model (OLAM), focusing on the models ability to represent radiation and precipitation. OLAM is a new, state-of-the-art earth system model, capable of user-specified ...

David Medvigy; Robert L. Walko; Martin J. Otte; Roni Avissar

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

2015 Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 6 Atmospheric and Oceanic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Atmospheric Pressure Profile #12;© 2015 Pearson Education, Inc. Measure Air Pressure--Mercury Barometer · Seal Education, Inc. Learning Objectives · Define the concept of air pressure. · Describe instruments used to measure air pressure. · Define wind. · Locate the primary high- and low-pressure areas and principal winds

Pan, Feifei

79

Transient Response of the Hadley Centre Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Model to Increasing Carbon Dioxide. Part III: Analysis of Global-Mean Response Using Simple Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The roles of surface, atmospheric, and oceanic feedbacks in controlling the global-mean transient response of a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model to increasing carbon dioxide are investigated. The analysis employs a four-box ...

J. M. Murphy

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. AUTOMATED PRECIPITATION DATA (MINI-STORM) ANALYSIS . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 5.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 5.2 Grid Selection, Map Projection Selections

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Comparison of Atmospheric Reanalysis Products for the Arctic Ocean and Implications for Uncertainties in AirSea Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The uncertainties related to atmospheric fields in the Arctic Ocean from commonly used and recently available reanalysis products are investigated. Fields from the 1) ECMWF Interim Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim), 2) Common ...

Chaudhuri, Ayan H.

82

A Comparison of Atmospheric Reanalysis Surface Products over the Ocean and Implications for Uncertainties in AirSea Boundary Forcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper investigates the uncertainties related to atmospheric fields from reanalysis products used in forcing ocean models. Four reanalysis products, namely from 1) the interim ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim), 2) version ...

Chaudhuri, Ayan H.

83

GFD-2 Spring 2004 Syllabus Text: a nearly complete set of text handouts, plus A.E.Gill, Atmosphere-Ocean Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geography of potential vorticity -lateral circulation: wind-driven ocean gyres and boundary currents -circumpolar ocean currents and the atmospheric westerly winds: stationary Rossby waves with mountains; waveGFD-2 Spring 2004 Syllabus Text: a nearly complete set of text handouts, plus A.E.Gill, Atmosphere-Ocean

84

Data from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) Networks  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) is a nationwide network of sites collecting data on the chemistry of precipitation for monitoring of geographical and temporal long-term trends. The precipitation at each station is collected weekly according to strict clean-handling procedures. It is then sent to the Central Analytical Laboratory where it is analyzed for hydrogen (acidity as pH), sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride, and base cations (such as calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium). The network is a cooperative effort between many different groups, including the State Agricultural Experiment Stations, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and numerous other governmental and private entities. DOE is one of these cooperating agencies, though it plays a smaller funding role than some of the other federal sources. Since 1978, the NADP/NTN has grown from 22 stations to over 250 sites spanning the continental United States, Alaska, and Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The National Atmospheric Deposition Program has also expanded its sampling to two additional networks: 1) the Mercury Deposition Network (MDN), currently with over 90 sites, was formed in 1995 to collect weekly samples of precipitation which are analyzed by Frontier Geosciences for total mercury, and 2) the Atmospheric Integrated Research Monitoring Network (AIRMoN), formed for the purpose of studying precipitation chemistry trends with greater temporal resolution than the NTN. [taken from the NADP History and Overview page at http://nadp.sws.uiuc.edu/nadpoverview.asp] Data from these networks are freely available in via customized search interfaces linked to interactive maps of the stations in the three networks. Animated Isopleth maps in Flash and PowerPoint are also available to display concentrations and depositions various substances such as sulfate, nitrate, etc. (Specialized Interface)

85

Acoustic-gravity waves in ocean and atmosphere generated by an underwater source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air-water interface becomes anomalously transparent and the power flux in the wave transmitted into the air increases dramatically when a compact sound source in water approaches the interface within a fraction of wavelength [O.A. Godin Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 164301 (2006)]. The anomalous transparency of the ocean-atmosphere interface has important implications for detection of underwater explosions and monitoring of compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. At wave frequencies below 0.1 Hz it becomes necessary to take gravity into account. Then fluid buoyancy and compressibility simultaneously serve as restoring forces and mechanical perturbations in the water and in the air propagate as acoustic-gravity waves (AGW). It was previously shown [I. Fuks and O.A. Godin Proc. OCEANS'11 MTS/IEEE Kona HI Sept. 2011] that in the case of a shallow source in an ocean of an infinite depth a sharp peak in the power flux into air appears at frequencies close to a cutoff frequency of about 4mHz of a surfaceacoustic-gravity wave. In this paper we extend these results to the ocean of a finite depth where the AGWs interact with an elastic bottom.

Iosif Fuks; Oleg A. Godin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Indian Ocean Warming During 19502005 Determined by Flexible Global OceanAtmosphereLand System Model (FGOALS)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Indian Ocean has exhibited a basin-wide warming ... effectively reproduced by version 2 of the grid-point and spectral versions of the Flexible Global ...K), respectively. The trend of the Indian Ocean avera...

Lu Dong; Tianjun Zhou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Water-Soluble dicarboxylic acids, ketoacids and dicarbonyls in the atmospheric aerosols over the southern ocean and western pacific ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water-soluble dicarboxylic acids (DCAs), ketoacids, and ?-dicarbonyls in the marine aerosol samples collected over the Southern Ocean and western Pacific Ocean were determined. Oxalic acid was the most ... aeroso...

Haobo Wang; Kimitaka Kawamura; Koji Yamazaki

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The atmospheric ocean: eddies and jets in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the longest and the strongest current in the ocean carrying a volume transport...the most poorly understood currents in the ocean. The difficulty in obtaining...is dynamically distinct from ocean basin currents. As winds blow over the ocean...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Hydrogen in the atmosphere: Observations above a forest canopy in a polluted environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen in the atmosphere: Observations above a forest canopy in a polluted environment Diana H and Structure: Pollution--urban and regional (0305); 0365 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Troposphere. Novelli Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

90

Low-frequency variability and heat transport in a low-order nonlinear coupled ocean-atmosphere model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We formulate and study a low-order nonlinear coupled ocean-atmosphere model with an emphasis on the impact of radiative and heat fluxes and of the frictional coupling between the two components. This model version extends a previous 24-variable version by adding a dynamical equation for the passive advection of temperature in the ocean, together with an energy balance model. The bifurcation analysis and the numerical integration of the model reveal the presence of low-frequency variability (LFV) concentrated on and near a long-periodic, attracting orbit. This orbit combines atmospheric and oceanic modes, and it arises for large values of the meridional gradient of radiative input and of frictional coupling. Chaotic behavior develops around this orbit as it loses its stability; this behavior is still dominated by the LFV on decadal and multi-decadal time scales that is typical of oceanic processes. Atmospheric diagnostics also reveals the presence of predominant low- and high-pressure zones, as well as of a subtropical jet; these features recall realistic climatological properties of the oceanic atmosphere. Finally, a predictability analysis is performed. Once the decadal-scale periodic orbits develop, the coupled system's short-term instabilities --- as measured by its Lyapunov exponents --- are drastically reduced, indicating the ocean's stabilizing role on the atmospheric dynamics. On decadal time scales, the recurrence of the solution in a certain region of the invariant subspace associated with slow modes displays some extended predictability, as reflected by the oscillatory behavior of the error for the atmospheric variables at long lead times.

Stphane Vannitsem; Jonathan Demaeyer; Lesley De Cruz; Michael Ghil

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Air-sea interactions during the passage of a winter storm over the Gulf Stream: A three-dimensional coupled atmosphere-ocean model study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the surface currents in the Gulf Stream and generate southwestward flows on the shelf. The oceanic feedback% weaker. Differences in the surface ocean currents between these two experiments are significant-dimensional coupled atmosphere-ocean model study Yongping Li1 and Huijie Xue School of Marine Sciences, University

Maine, University of

92

Forecasting a large number of tropical cyclone intensities around Japan using a high-resolution atmosphere-ocean coupled model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work quantifies the benefits of using a high-resolution atmosphere-ocean coupled model in the tropical cyclone (TC) intensity forecasts in the vicinity of Japan. To do so, a large number of high-resolution calculations were performed by ...

Kosuke Ito; Tohru Kuroda; Kazuo Saito; Akiyoshi Wada

93

Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves J. N. MOUM College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences in the bottom bound- ary layer. In the nonlinear internal waves that were observed, the kinetic energy. The energy transported by these waves includes a nonlinear advection term uE that is negligible in linear

Kurapov, Alexander

94

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric dispersion coefficient Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

spill countermeasures to reduce the adverse effects of spilled oil on the environment. Dispersants Source: NOAA Marine Fisheries Review; National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

95

Overview of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center's urban research and development activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation describes the tools and services provided by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for modeling the impacts of airborne hazardous materials. NARAC provides atmospheric plume modeling tools and services for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear airborne hazards. NARAC can simulate downwind effects from a variety of scenarios, including fires, industrial and transportation accidents, radiation dispersal device explosions, hazardous material spills, sprayers, nuclear power plant accidents, and nuclear detonations. NARAC collaborates on radiological dispersion source terms and effects models with Sandia National Laboratories and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NARAC was designated the interim provider of capabilities for the Department of Homeland Security's Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center by the Homeland Security Council in April 2004. The NARAC suite of software tools include simple stand-alone, local-scale plume modeling tools for end-user's computers, and Web- and Internet-based software to access advanced modeling tools and expert analyses from the national center at LLNL. Initial automated, 3-D predictions of plume exposure limits and protective action guidelines for emergency responders and managers are available from the center in 5-10 minutes. These can be followed immediately by quality-assured, refined analyses by 24 x 7 on-duty or on-call NARAC staff. NARAC continues to refine calculations using updated on-scene information, including measurements, until all airborne releases have stopped and the hazardous threats are mapped and impacts assessed. Model predictions include the 3-D spatial and time-varying effects of weather, land use, and terrain, on scales from the local to regional to global. Real-time meteorological data and forecasts are provided by redundant communications links to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), U.S. Navy, and U.S. Air Force, as well as an in-house mesoscale numerical weather prediction model. NARAC provides an easy-to-use Geographical Information System (GIS) for display of plume predictions with affected population counts and detailed maps, and the ability to export plume predictions to other standard GIS capabilities. Data collection and product distribution is provided through a variety of communication methods, including dial-up, satellite, and wired and wireless networks. Ongoing research and development activities will be highlighted. The NARAC scientific support team is developing urban parameterizations for use in a regional dispersion model (see companion paper by Delle Monache). Modifications to the numerical weather prediction model WRF to account for characteristics of urban dynamics are also in progress, as is boundary-layer turbulence model development for simulations with resolutions greater than 1km. The NARAC building-resolving computational fluid dynamics capability, FEM3MP, enjoys ongoing development activities such as the expansion of its ability to model releases of dense gases. Other research activities include sensor-data fusion, such as the reconstruction of unknown source terms from sparse and disparate observations.

Lundquist, J K; Sugiyama, G A; Nasstrom, J

2007-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

96

ORISE: Climate and Atmospheric Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climate and Atmospheric Research Climate and Atmospheric Research Capabilities Overview U.S. Climate Reference Network U.S. Historical Climate Network Contact Us Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Climate and Atmospheric Research The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) partners with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) to conduct climate research focused on issues of national and global importance. Research is performed with personnel support from ORISE's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification (IEAV) programs, as well as in collaboration with scientists and engineers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and numerous other organizations, government agencies, universities and private research institutions.

97

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Manacapuru, Brazil for the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON) Field Campaign  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Amazon rain forest in Brazil is the largest broadleaf forest in the world, covering 7 million square kilometers of the Amazon Basin in South America. It represents over half of the planets remaining rain forests, and comprises the most biodiverse tract of tropical rain forest on the planet. Due to the sheer size of the Amazon rain forest, the area has a strong impact on the climate in the Southern Hemisphere. To understand the intricacies of the natural state of the Amazon rain forest, the Green Ocean Amazon, or GOAMAZON, field campaign is a two-year scientific collaboration among U.S. and Brazilian research organizations. They are conducting a variety of different experiments with dozens of measurement tools, using both ground and aerial instrumentation, including the ARM Aerial Facility's G-1 aircraft. For more information on the holistic view of the campaign, see the Department of Energys GOAMAZON website. As a critical component of GOAMAZON, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) will obtain measurements near Manacapuru, south of Manaus, Brazil, from January to December 2014. The city of Manaus, with a population of 3 million, uses high-sulfur oil as their primary source of electricity. The AMF site is situated to measure the atmospheric extremes of a pristine atmosphere and the nearby cities pollution plume, as it regularly intersects with the site. Along with other instrument systems located at the Manacapuru site, this deployment will enable scientists to study how aerosol and cloud life cycles are influenced by pollutant outflow from a tropical megacity.

98

Multiscale dynamics of atmospheric and oceanic variability in the climate system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Filtering) for Numerical Weather Prediction models wereNumerical Weather Prediction (NWP) in meteorology, caused ocean models

Subramanian, Aneesh C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks: results from an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biogeosciences, 6, 20992120, 2009 www.biogeosciences.net/6/2099/2009/ Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Biogeosciences Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks.... Inclusion of fundamental ecological interactions between carbon and nitrogen cycles in the land component of an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) leads to decreased carbon uptake associated with CO2 fertil- ization, and increased carbon...

Thornton, P. E.; Doney, S. C.; Lindsay, Keith; Moore, J. K.; Mahowald, N. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Fung, I.; Lamarque, J. F.; Feddema, Johannes J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Predictability of the Barents Sea ice in early winter: Remote effects of oceanic and atmospheric thermal conditions from the North Atlantic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Predictability of sea ice concentrations (SICs) in the Barents Sea in early winter (NovemberDecember) is studied using canonical correlation analysis with atmospheric and ocean anomalies from the NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (NCEP-CFSR)...

Takuya Nakanowatari; Kazutoshi Sato; Jun Inoue

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Transient Response of the Hadley Centre Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Model to Increasing Carbon Dioxide. Part 1: Control Climate and Flux Adjustment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the initialization of an experiment to study the time-dependent response of a high-resolution global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model to a gradual increase in carbon dioxide. The stability of the control ...

J. M. Murphy

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Oil Spill Clarifies Road Map for Sea Turtle Recovery By Jane Lubchenco, Ph.D., under secretary for oceans and atmosphere and NOAA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Spill Clarifies Road Map for Sea Turtle Recovery By Jane Lubchenco, Ph.D., under secretary for oceans and atmosphere and NOAA Administrator Sea turtles have roamed the oceans for millennia their populations to dangerously low levels. Some, such as Kemp's ridley sea turtles, were beginning to make

103

The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx): Goals, platforms, and field operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) was an international field program designed to make observations of poorly understood but critical components of the coupled climate system of the southeast Pacific. This region is characterized by strong coastal upwelling, the coolest SSTs in the tropical belt, and is home to the largest subtropical stratocumulus deck on Earth. The field intensive phase of VOCALS-REx took place during October and November 2008 and constitutes a critical part of a broader CLIVAR program (VOCALS) designed to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding, model simulations, and predictions of the southeastern Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system, on diurnal to interannual timescales. The other major components of VOCALS are a modeling program with a model hierarchy ranging from the local to global scales, and a suite of extended observations from regular research cruises, instrumented moorings, and satellites. The two central themes of VOCALS-REx focus upon (a) links between aerosols, clouds and precipitation and their impacts on marine stratocumulus radiative properties, and (b) physical and chemical couplings between the upper ocean and the lower atmosphere, including the role that mesoscale ocean eddies play. A set of hypotheses designed to be tested with the combined field, monitoring and modeling work in VOCALS is presented here. A further goal of VOCALS-REx is to provide datasets for the evaluation and improvement of large-scale numerical models. VOCALS-REx involved five research aircraft, two ships and two surface sites in northern Chile. We describe the instrument payloads and key mission strategies for these platforms and give a summary of the missions conducted.

Wood, R.; Springston, S.; Mechoso, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; A.Weller, R.; Huebert, B.; Straneo, F.; Albrecht, B. A.; Coe, H.; Allen, G.; Vaughan, G.; Daum, P.; Fairall, C.; Chand, D.; Klenner, L. G.; Garreaud, R.; Grados, C.; Covert, D. S.; Bates, T. S.; Krejci, R.; Russell, L. M.; Szoeke, S. d.; Brewer, A.; Yuter, S. E.; Chaigneau, A.; Toniazzo, T.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Abel, S. J.; Brown, W. O. J.; Williams, S.; Fochesatto, J.; Brioude, J.; Bower, K. N

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

104

Shelf edge reflection of atmospherically generated long ocean waves along the central U.S. East Coast  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes an investigation of unusual large-amplitude highfrequency sea level events (?4060cm) observed during the period 20062012 along the central U.S. East Coast. These events occurred 23h after offshore propagating atmospheric pressure disturbances crossed the coastline. The large amplitudes of the oscillations may be explained by Proudman resonance, as the average speed of the atmospheric pressure disturbances, estimated to be between 16 and 25m/s, was similar to the shallow-water wave speed over the shelf, ?1520m/s. The observed lag of 23h of the events can be explained by shoreward-propagating free waves generated as the atmospheric-forced waves crossed the shelf edge. The estimated pathways of the forced and reflected free ocean waves seem to have been coherent and in good agreement with the lag observed at tide gauge stations.

S. Pasquet; I. Vilibi?

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

DE-EE0000319 Final Technical Report [National Open-ocean Energy Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the authorization provided by Section 634 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (P.L. 110-140), in 2009 FAU was awarded U.S. Congressionally Directed Program (CDP) funding through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to investigate and develop technologies to harness the energy of the Florida Current as a source of clean, renewable, base-load power for Florida and the U.S. A second CDP award in 2010 provided additional funding in order to enhance and extend FAUs activities. These two CDPs in 2009 and 2010 were combined into a single DOE grant, DE-EE0000319, and are the subject of this report. Subsequently, in July 2010 funding was made available under a separate contract, DE-EE0004200. Under that funding, DOEs Wind and Water Power Program designated FAUs state of Florida marine renewable energy (MRE) center as the Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center (SNMREC). This report discusses SNMREC activities funded by the DE-EE0000319 grant, but will make reference, as appropriate, to activities that require further investigation under the follow-on grant. The concept of extracting energy from the motions of the oceans has a long history. However, implementation on large scales of the technologies to effect renewable energy recovery from waves, tides, and open-ocean currents is relatively recent. DOEs establishment of SNMREC recognizes a significant potential for ocean current energy recovery associated with the (relatively) high-speed Florida Current, the reach of the Gulf Stream System flowing through the Straits of Florida, between the Florida Peninsula and the Bahamas Archipelago. The proximity of the very large electrical load center of southeast Floridas metropolitan area to the resource itself makes this potential all the more attractive. As attractive as this potential energy source is, it is not without its challenges. Although the technology is conceptually simple, its design and implementation in a commercially-viable fashion presents a variety of challenges. Beyond the technology itself (and, especially, the effects on the technology of the harsh oceanic environment), it is important to consider the possible environmental impacts of commercial-scale implementation of oceanic energy extraction. Further, because such implementation represents a completely new undertaking, the human resources required do not exist, so education and training programs are critical to eventual success. This project, establishing a national open-ocean energy laboratory, was designed to address each of these three challenges in a flexible framework allowing for adaptive management as the project proceeded. In particular: ? the technology challenge, including resource assessment, evolved during the project to recognize and address the need for a national testing facility in the ocean for small-scale prototype MRE systems developed by industry; ? the environmental challenge became formalized and expanded during the permitting process for such a testing facility; and ? the human resources/societal challenges, both in terms of the need for education and training and in terms of public acceptance of MRE, stimulated a robust outreach program far beyond that originally envisioned at SNMREC. While all of these activities at SNMREC are ongoing, a number of significant milestones (in addition to the contributions listed in the appendices) were achieved under the auspices of this award. These include: ? Planning and site selection for the first-phase test facility, offshore of Dania Beach, FL, including some equipment for the facility, submission of an Interim Policy Lease Application to the U.S. Department of Interiors Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and completion of an Environmental Assessment by BOEM and a positive Consistency Determination by the State of Florida; ? Measurements using acoustic profilers of the current structure and variability in the vicinity of the site under a variety of weather conditions, seasons and time durations; ? Design and implementation of instrument

Skemp, Susan

2013-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

106

Transient Response of the Hadley Centre Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Model to Increasing Carbon Dioxide. Part II: Spatial and Temporal Structure of Response  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A high-resolution (2.75 lat 3.75 long) coupled ocean-atmosphere model has been used to simulate the transient response of climate to a gradual increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Although the radiative forcing increases ...

J. M. Murphy; J. F. B. Mitchell

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Roles of Indian and Pacific Ocean airsea coupling in tropical atmospheric variability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sea surface temperature (SST) variations include negative feedbacks from the atmosphere, whereas SST anomalies are specified in stand-alone atmospheric general circulation simulations. Is the SST forced response ...

Renguang Wu; Ben P. Kirtman

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The tropical cyclone-induced flux of carbon between the ocean and the atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tropical cyclones are known to cause phytoplankton blooms in regions of the ocean that would otherwise support very little life; it is also known that these storms entrain carbon-rich deep water, which can cause ...

Zimmerman, Neil L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Persistent Organic Pollutants in the Equatorial Atmosphere over the Open Indian Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to a 30% decline in the power of the air sampler, it was replaced by a 220-V AC H8400TE air sampler with a variable flow rate and a thermally protected motor for onward sample collection. ... Samples collected at Stations S1 and S2 originated from the northern and eastern coastal regions of Australia, but those collected at Station S3 and S5 are oceanic in origin, crossing the open ocean for 5 days prior to sampling. ... Concns. of organochlorines such as hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), DDTs, chlordanes, and PCBs were detd. in the air and surface water from various oceans in 1989-1990, to study their recent distribution and the function of the ocean in the long-range atm. ...

Oliver Wurl; John Robert Potter; Jeffrey Philip Obbard; Caroline Durville

2006-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

110

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sphere-sea-ice-ocean... .01.015 12;are included within the latest generation of Earth System Models in order to allow more direct... for Space Studies and Center for Climate...

111

Ocean Observing Ocean Observing Systems (OOS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, national, and global scales. · Ocean Observing Systems serve: Fishing industry National security Coastal properties, such as salinity, temperature, and waves Satellite maps of sea surface temperature NATIONAL Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) 11 REGIONAL Systems, including: MANY LOCAL Systems

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

112

Model Wind over the Central and Southern California Coastal Ocean HSIAO-MING HSU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model Wind over the Central and Southern California Coastal Ocean HSIAO-MING HSU National Center of high-resolution wind in coastal ocean modeling. This paper tests the Coupled Ocean­Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) at the 9-, 27-, and 81-km grid resolutions in simulating wind off the central

113

Intermediate Zonal Jets in the Tropical Pacific Ocean Observed by Argo Floats* SOPHIE CRAVATTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intermediate Zonal Jets in the Tropical Pacific Ocean Observed by Argo Floats* SOPHIE CRAVATTE´veloppement, LEGOS, Toulouse, France WILLIAM S. KESSLER National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Pacific Argo float data in the tropical Pacific Ocean during January 2003­August 2011 are analyzed to obtain

Boyer, Edmond

114

Exploring the Texture of Ocean-Atmosphere Redox Evolution on the Early Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

northeastern Baltic Shield. Earth Sci Rev 36:205- 241. B81.Earth.DC, Claire MW (2005) How Earths atmosphere evolved to an

Reinhard, Christopher Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Impact of anthropogenic atmospheric nitrogen and sulfur deposition on ocean acidification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning fluxes of NOx exceed the natural fluxes from land of combustion of fossil fuels and biomass burning (2). After chemical transformations in the atmosphere, much March 9, 2007) Fossil fuel combustion and agriculture result in atmospheric dep- osition of 0.8 Tmol

Mahowald, Natalie

116

Summary of Breakout Sessions D. A. Randall National Center for Atmospheric Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Breakout Sessions Breakout Sessions D. A. Randall National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder CO 80307-3000 J. T. Kiehl Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Ft. Collins, CO 80523 M. Bradley Lawrence Livermore National. Laboratory Livermore, CA 94550 Discussion of Intensive Operation Periods (lOPs) The group made several recommendations for lOPs in general. One of the main points was that members of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team should be given as much advance notification as possible of planned or potential lOPs. The group also recommended that a lead scientist be appointed for each lOP. This scientist should have expertise in the topic of primary focus of the lOP. The lead scientist's main responsibility would be to make sure that the operations carried out in the lOP

117

Carbohydrate-like composition of submicron atmospheric particles and their production from ocean bubble bursting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in one or two fossil fuel combustion factors, which were dominated...and the turbulent air-sea heat fluxes. J GeophysRes...for smoke from incomplete combustion. Appl Geochem 17(3...Measurements of non-methane hydrocarbons, DOC in surface ocean waters...

Lynn M. Russell; Lelia N. Hawkins; Amanda A. Frossard; Patricia K. Quinn; Tim S. Bates

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Frigatebird behaviour at the oceanatmosphere interface: integrating animal behaviour with multi-satellite data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...animal behaviour with multi-satellite data Silvia De Monte 1 2 3...nonlinear analysis of multi-satellite data. We find that frigatebirds...often referred to as the ocean weather and covers the mesoscale and...related to phytoplankton. Satellite, in situ and model data show...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Transient response of the Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere model to increasing carbon dioxide. Part I: Control climate and flux adjustment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the initialization of an experiment to study the time-dependent response of a high-resolution global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model to a gradual increase in carbon dioxide. The stability of the control integration with respect to climate drift is assessed, and aspects of the model climatology relevant to the simulation of climate change are discussed. The observed variation of oceanic temperature with latitude and depth is basically well simulated, although, in common with other ocean models, the main thermocline is too diffuse. Nevertheless, it is found that large heat and water flux adjustments must be added to the surface layer of the ocean in order to prevent the occurrence of unacceptable climate drift. The ocean model appears to achieve insufficient meridional heat transport, and this is supported by the pattern of the heat flux adjustment term, although errors in the simulated atmosphere-ocean heat flux also contribute to the latter. The application of the flux adjustments restricts climate drift during the 75-year control experiment. However, a gradual warming still occurs in the surface layers of the Southern Ocean because the flux adjustments are inserted as additive terms in this integration and cannot therefore be guaranteed to prevent climate drift completely. 68 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab.

Murphy, J.M. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Bracknell (United Kingdom)] [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Bracknell (United Kingdom)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

On a revised ocean-atmosphere physical coupling interface and about technical coupling software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

linking the main model components of present-day Earth System models (ESMs), i.e. the atmosphere constraints of Earth System Models (ESMs) as a whole and each component individually, including laws

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A Regional OceanAtmosphere Model for Eastern Pacific Climate: Toward Reducing Tropical Biases*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5°) of the ROAM enables it to capture mesoscale features, such as tropical instability waves, Central American gap these asymmetric features despite a solar radia- tion forcing at the top of the atmosphere that is zonally uniform

Wang, Yuqing

122

Analyzing Surface Solar Flux Data in Oregon for Changes Due to Aerosols Laura D. Riihimaki1, Frank E. Vignola1, Charles N. Long2, James A. Coakley Jr.3 1 University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Lab 2 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 3 Oregon State University, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

76 76 1980 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 2008 100 150 200 250 Direct Normal Irradiance (W/m 2 ) Eugene Hermiston Burns 3. All-sky direct normal irradiance increases 5% per decade Eppley NIP Conclusions Annual average all-sky total and direct normal irradiance measurements show an overall increase in Oregon between 1980 and 2007. Two measurement sites show statistically significant increases in clear- sky direct normal irradiance in background periods before and after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo [6] (1987- 2008), consistent with the hypothesis that a reduction in anthropogenic aerosols may contribute to the increase in surface irradiance. References 1. Long, C.N. and T. P. Ackerman, 2000: J. Geophys. Res., 105(D12), 15,609-15,626. 2. Long, C.N., and K.L. Gaustad, 2004: Atmospheric Radiation

123

Ice at the Interface: Atmosphere-Ice-Ocean Boundary Layer Processes and Their Role in Polar Change---Workshop Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atmosphere-ocean boundary layer in which sea ice resides includes many complex processes that require a more realistic treatment in GCMs, particularly as models move toward full earth system descriptions. The primary purpose of the workshop was to define and discuss such coupled processes from observational and modeling points of view, including insight from both the Arctic and Antarctic systems. The workshop met each of its overarching goals, including fostering collaboration among experimentalists, theorists and modelers, proposing modeling strategies, and ascertaining data availability and needs. Several scientific themes emerged from the workshop, such as the importance of episodic or extreme events, precipitation, stratification above and below the ice, and the marginal ice zone, whose seasonal Arctic migrations now traverse more territory than in the past.

Hunke, Elizabeth C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

124

National Marine Pollution Orogram: federal plan for ocean pollution research, development, and monitoring, fiscal years 1988-1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Marine Pollution Program is the composite of all programs funded by the Federal Government that conduct marine pollution research, development, or monitoring activities. In FY 1988, the Federal Government expended an estimated $107.2 million for marine pollution research and monitoring activities. These activities were funded by 11 Federal departments and independent agencies and included studies pertaining to pollution in coastal areas, estuaries, open oceans, and the Great Lakes. The Plan represents the fourth such document in the continuing interagency planning process called for in the National Ocean Pollution Planning Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-273), as amended. As required by the Act, a comprehensive 5-year Plan for the overall Federal effort is prepared and updated every 3 years. The Plan identifies national marine pollution needs and problems, describes the existing Federal capability for conducting marine pollution research and monitoring.

Not Available

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A New Method to Produce Sea Surface Temperature Using Satellite Data Assimilation into an AtmosphereOcean Mixed Layer Coupled Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A New Method to Produce Sea Surface Temperature Using Satellite Data Assimilation method of producing sea surface temperature (SST) data for numerical weather prediction is sug- gested, which is obtained from the assimilation of satellite-derived SST into an atmosphere­ocean mixed layer

Noh, Yign

126

K. SHAFER SMITH AND ROSS TULLOCH Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reply K. SHAFER SMITH AND ROSS TULLOCH Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute). Tulloch and Smith (2006, 2009) argued that sur- face quasigeostrophic effects are consistent with many, Tulloch and Smith (2006) considered a ``toy'' model consisting of SQG flow overlying a finite-depth region

Smith, K. Shafer

127

Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern U.S. climate analyzed  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

December » December » Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern climate Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern U.S. climate analyzed Researchers concluded that only part of the recent temperature rise in the Southwest could be attributed to greenhouse gases. December 19, 2013 Image from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Environmental Visualization Laboratory depicts sea surface temperatures around Greenland from October 2010. Image from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Environmental Visualization Laboratory depicts sea surface temperatures around Greenland from October 2010. Assuming that the past is a good indicator of the future, the scientists conclude that there should be wetter times ahead. Researchers have analyzed the relationship between a natural phenomenon in

128

Ocean Acidification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean Acidification ... The first assignment I give my students in Environmental Modeling class is to calculate the mass of the oceans versus the mass of the atmosphere and the living soil. ... As a young chemical engineer in the early 1970s, I remember discussing the horrors of sulfur and particulate pollution from steel mills, smelters, and power plants. ...

Jerald L. Schnoor

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

129

National Center for Atmospheric Research annual report, fiscal year 1991. Report for 1 October 1990-30 September 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) annual report for fiscal year 1991 is presented. NCAR's projects for the period included investigations of air pollution from the oil well fires in Kuwait, a solar eclipse, thunderstorms in central Florida, the El Nino current, greenhouse processes, and upper atmosphere phenomena.

Warner, L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Accelerating Ocean Energy to the Marketplace Environmental Research at the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) has mobilized its National Laboratories to address the broad range of environmental effects of ocean and river energy development. The National Laboratories are using a risk-based approach to set priorities among environmental effects, and to direct research activities. Case studies will be constructed to determine the most significant environmental effects of ocean energy harvest for tidal systems in temperate estuaries, for wave energy installations in temperate coastal areas, wave installations in sub-tropical waters, and riverine energy installations in large rivers. In addition, the National Laboratories are investigating the effects of energy removal from waves, tides and river currents using numerical modeling studies. Laboratory and field research is also underway to understand the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), acoustic noise, toxicity from anti-biofouling coatings, effects on benthic habitats, and physical interactions with tidal and wave devices on marine and freshwater organisms and ecosystems. Outreach and interactions with stakeholders allow the National Laboratories to understand and mitigate for use conflicts and to provide useful information for marine spatial planning at the national and regional level.

Copping, Andrea E.; Cada, G. F.; Roberts, Jesse; Bevelhimer, Mark

2010-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

131

Toward self-describing and workflow integrated Earth system models: A coupled atmosphere-ocean modeling system application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The complexity of Earth system models and their applications is increasing as a consequence of scientific advances, user demand, and the ongoing development of computing platforms, storage systems and distributed high-resolution observation networks. Multi-component Earth system models need to be redesigned to make interactions among model components and other applications external to the modeling system easier. To that end, the common component interfaces of Earth system models can be redesigned to increase interoperability between models and other applications such as various web services, data portals and science gateways. The models can be made self-describing so that the many configuration, build options and inputs of a simulation can be recorded. In this paper, we present a coupled modeling system that includes the proposed methodology to create self-describing models with common model component interfaces. The designed coupled atmosphere-ocean modeling system is also integrated into a scientific workflow system to simplify routine modeling tasks and relationships between these tasks and to demonstrate the enhanced interoperability between different technologies and components. Later on, the work environment is tested using a realistic Earth system modeling application. As can be seen through this example, a layered design for collecting provenance and metadata has the added benefit of documenting a run in far greater detail than before. In this way, it facilitates exploration and understanding of simulations and leads to possible reproducibility. In addition to designing self-describing Earth system models, the regular modeling tasks are also simplified and automated by using a scientific workflow which provides meaningful abstractions for the model, computing environment and provenance/metadata collection mechanisms. Our aim here is to solve a specific instance of a complex model integration problem by using a framework and scientific workflow approach together. The reader may also note that the methods presented in this paper might be also generalized to other types of Earth system models, leading to improved ease of use and flexibility. The initial results also show that the coupled atmosphere-ocean model, which is controlled by the designed workflow environment, is able to reproduce the Mediterranean Sea surface temperature when it is compared with the used CCSM3 initial and boundary conditions.

Ufuk Utku Turuncoglu; Nuzhet Dalfes; Sylvia Murphy; Cecelia DeLuca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

FY 2013 Appropriations for the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration NOAA's FY 2013 "Blue Book"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.0 Cooperative Observer Network 1.9 1.0 -47.4% 1.9 1.0 NOAA Profiler Network 4.2 1.8 -57.1% 4.2 1.8 Advanced as a conference--at least, not before the November elections. Further complicating this process is the fact

133

PAID TRAINING OPPORTUNITY FOR VETERANS National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/CCC/Veterans Fishery Corps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or violent crimes Participate in the CCC education program Work outdoors in all types of weather Service, or California Department of Fish and Wildlife. Assistance with job placement after successful completion of program. General health insurance while enrolled into program. Veterans Should Contact: Larry

134

[OMB # 0648-0327 EXP 07-31-2015] NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phone No. ( ) City State Zip Code Fax Phone No. ( ) Email Address Website Cell Phone No. ( ) SECTION 2 No. ( ) Email Address Birth Date (mm/dd/yy) Cell Phone No. ( ) SECTION 4 - ADDITIONAL FEDERAL - ADDITIONAL FACILITIES (add additional sheets if necessary) Business Name Daytime Phone No. Fax Phone No

135

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SpillResponse Oil Spill Dispersant Application and Monitoring Once oil has spilled, responders use a variety oil the oil slick and using photographic job aids or advanced remote sensing instruments, assesses dispersant slick. A sampling team on a boat uses a fluorometer to continuously monitor for dispersed oil one meter

136

,u.s. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

days. An intensive push-net fishery was conducted by women on the zero age group soon after that the fishery was supported by age group one, which was replaced at the end of the season by age group zero. Age group zero grew rapidly and reached a modal length of 75 to 80 mm. in 9 months in January; and adults

137

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'sOilSpillResponse Ensuring the Safety of Your Seafood Crude oil has the potential to taint seafood with flavors and odors of hydrocarbons as a possible adulterant in seafood. The public should not be concerned about the safety of seafood they are buying at this time. The federal and state governments have strong systems in place

138

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | NOAA Satellite and Information Service Two Orbits, One Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prepare for tsunami and other dangerous coastal flooding events. Weather Improved satellite data has awareness. SATELLITES PROVIDE 93% OF THE DATA used in global weather models along with global live data relies on NOAA satellite data for accurate weather models and mission planning. Major cities use data

139

Information & Activity Booklet National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | NOAA Satellite and Information Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Hurricanes andTyphoons Did you know that "hurricanes" and "typhoons" are location specific names, known as the "eye."The eye is the calmest part of the storm, with light winds and clear skies. Hurricanes can produce other hazardous weather events during its life span, such as: floods, tornadoes

140

An approach to designing a national climate service  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for the CIG Federal level Bonneville Power Administration NOAA Fisheries Service NOAA...Wildlife Federation Northwest Power and Conservation Council News...National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Regional Integrated...

E. L. Miles; A. K. Snover; L. C. Whitely Binder; E. S. Sarachik; P. W. Mote; N. Mantua

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Factors Affecting the Occurrence and Transport of Atmospheric Organochlorines in the China Sea and the Northern Indian and South East Atlantic Oceans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

BT analysis (Figure 1) for each sample shows that for samples collected in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean, air masses were predominantly oceanic (defined as air that has been away from the land for 3 days), whereas for the samples collected in the East and South China Seas, the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea air masses were partly continental (northeast China, Bangladesh, Northeast part of India and Philippines) and partly oceanic (Figure 1). ... t is the estimated travel time needed for atmospheric transport from one sampling point to the other using the measured relative wind speed and relative wind direction (see SI Figure SI.3 for an example of the graphical derivation of k). ... NA = not available because there were no sampling points that satisfied the criteria of having the same air mass travelling over these locations. ...

Rosalinda Gioia; Jun Li; Jasmin Schuster; Yanlin Zhang; Gan Zhang; Xiangdong Li; Baruch Spiro; Ravinder S. Bhatia; Jordi Dachs; Kevin C. Jones

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

142

Causes of ocean currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the foregoing analysis of the ocean and the atmosphere as two interacting subsystems, we have identified two major energy inputs into the ocean. These are the wind stress over the sea surface and heat fluxe...

David Tolmazin

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Iodide accumulation provides kelp with an inorganic antioxidant impacting atmospheric chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...stress and links to atmospheric new particle production . Environ...National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...antioxidant impacting atmospheric chemistry...Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't...TurboMatrix Automated Thermal Desorption...4) to remove plasma. Hereafter, blood...

Frithjof C. Kpper; Lucy J. Carpenter; Gordon B. McFiggans; Carl J. Palmer; Tim J. Waite; Eva-Maria Boneberg; Sonja Woitsch; Markus Weiller; Rafael Abela; Daniel Grolimund; Philippe Potin; Alison Butler; George W. Luther III; Peter M. H. Kroneck; Wolfram Meyer-Klaucke; Martin C. Feiters

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Memorandum of Understanding On Weather-Dependent and Oceanic Renewable Energy Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) On Weather-Dependent and Oceanic Renewable Energy Resources between the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and the U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

145

U.S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service 1315 East West Highway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-713-2355 Fax: 301-713-1081 Toll free: 800-422-2750 NMFS.Seafood.Services@noaa.gov www.seafood.nmfs.noaa.gov Impact of Crude Oil on Seafood Crude oil has the potential to taint seafood with flavors and odors of hydrocarbons as a possible adulterant in seafood. The public should not be concerned about the safety

146

Science, Service, Stewardship U.S. Department of Commerce | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | National Marine Fisheries Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to cargo vessels, failing to report catches or making false reports, keeping undersized fish or fish by reduced availability of target stocks due to poaching by IUU fishing operators and reduced revenues the problem of IUU fishing? Since the United States imports more than 80 percent of its seafood, we must

147

Northerly surface wind events over the eastern North Pacific Ocean : spatial distribution, seasonality, atmospheric circulation, and forcing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECMWF and NCEP numerical weather prediction models, Mon.atmospheric numerical weather prediction model. The

Taylor, Stephen V.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks: results from an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009 P. E. Thornton et al. : Carbon-nitrogen interactionsregulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks Monfray, P. ,T. H. : A global ocean carbon climatology: Results from

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Transient response of the Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere model to increasing carbon dioxide. Part II: Spatial and temporal structure of response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-resolution (2.75{degrees} lat x 3.75{degrees} long) coupled ocean-atmosphere model has been used to simulate the transient response of climate to a gradual increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Although the radiative forcing increases linearly, there is a delay of about 30 yr before the ocean warms appreciably. This {open_quotes}cold start{close_quotes} is, at least partly, an artifact of the experimental design. At the time of doubling (after 70 yr), the patterns of change are similar to those found in comparable studies of the equilibrium response, except in the high latitudes of the Southern Ocean and the North Atlantic, where the warming is considerably reduced. The mechanisms leading to this reduction are discussed. After two to three decades, the pattern of warming is well established. The warming over land is substantially larger than that over the sea, with a consequent lowering of surface pressure over the northern continents in summer. The patterns of changes in precipitation and soil moisture take longer to establish themselves, although locally there are consistent changes after the third decade. 55 refs., 30 figs., 6 tabs.

Murphy, J.M.; Mitchell, J.F.B. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom)] [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere and Ocean (11:670:451/16:712:552) Class website: Sakai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Oceanic Science. 2) Develop specific understanding of the radar and satellite remote sensors used to conduct a weather discussion of mesoscale and synoptic weather systems, and ocean state. 3) Develop and Scattering M. Miller Wind Profiler Radars M. Miller No Class J. Wilkin Weather Radar M. Miller Weather Radar

151

Friday, July 22, 2005 NATION/WORLD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of 3DenverPost.com - OPINION 7/22/2005http://www.denverpost.com/opinion/ci_2880467 #12;Enter search term Advanced Search Search National Center for Atmospheric Research, the National Oceanic PAGES HOME PODCASTS ETHICS POLICY SEARCH Site Search Link To Article Print Article Email Article

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

152

MET 600: Advanced Atmospheric Dynamics Air-sea interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven? #12;Upper-Ocean Currents How the atmosphere-ocean-land system/Salinity/Mass/Momentum Conservations #12; How the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven? It is the sun that sustains all living beings on earth #12;Energy Conservation: Global Radiation Balance How the atmosphere-ocean-land system is driven

Fu, Joshua Xiouhua

153

Introduction to Ocean Station Time Series CD-ROM The National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) and the World Data Center for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to Ocean Station Time Series CD-ROM The National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC, density, and nutrients, are now available on one CD-ROM (originally distributed in 1993). CD-ROM Contents a complete record layout of the SD2 format and the code tables used with it. This CD-ROM also holds

154

Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern U.S. climate analyzed  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern climate Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern climate Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern U.S. climate analyzed Researchers concluded that only part of the recent temperature rise in the Southwest could be attributed to greenhouse gases. December 19, 2013 Image from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Environmental Visualization Laboratory depicts sea surface temperatures around Greenland from October 2010. Image from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Environmental Visualization Laboratory depicts sea surface temperatures around Greenland from October 2010. Assuming that the past is a good indicator of the future, the scientists conclude that there should be wetter times ahead. Researchers have analyzed the relationship between a natural phenomenon in

155

Atmospheric three-dimensional inverse modeling of regional industrial emissions and global oceanic uptake of carbon tetrachloride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) has substantial stratospheric ozone depletion potential and its consumption is controlled under the Montreal Protocol and its amendments. We implement a Kalman filter using atmospheric CCl4 ...

Xiao, X.

156

The relative roles of the ocean and atmosphere as revealed by buoy air-sea observations in hurricanes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results from this multi-hurricane study suggest that the criticality of the oft-cited 26C hurricane threshold linked to hurricane maintenance may be more closely associated with atmospheric thermodynamic conditions within the inner core than ...

Joseph J. Cione

157

Forcing of the Indian Ocean Dipole on the Interannual Variations of the Tropical Pacific Ocean: Roles of the Indonesian Throughflow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Controlled numerical experiments using ocean-only and oceanatmosphere coupled general circulation models show that interannual sea level depression in the eastern Indian Ocean during the Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) events forces enhanced Indonesian ...

Dongliang Yuan; Jing Wang; Tengfei Xu; Peng Xu; Zhou Hui; Xia Zhao; Yihua Luan; Weipeng Zheng; Yongqiang Yu

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Infiltrating the Ocean Floor  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Infiltrating the Ocean Floor Infiltrating the Ocean Floor Grant S. Bromhal, Duane H. Smith, US DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880; M. Ferer, Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6315 Ocean sequestration of carbon dioxide is considered to be a potentially important method of reducing greenhouse gas emissions (US DOE, 1999). Oceans are currently the largest atmospheric carbon dioxide sink; and certainly, enough storage capacity exists in the oceans to hold all of the CO 2 that we can emit for many years. Additionally, technologies exist that allow us to pump liquid CO 2 into the oceans at depths between one and two kilometers for extended periods of time and five times that deep for shorter durations. The biggest unknown in the ocean sequestration process, however, is the fate and

159

NOAA's Climate Data Record Program at the National Climatic Data Center is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on regional, national, and global scales · Project future climate states · Inform economic decisions impactedNOAA's Climate Data Record Program at the National Climatic Data Center is leading NOAA's generation of operational climate records for the atmosphere, oceans, and land. NOAA's National Climatic Data

160

Is the basinwide warming in the North Atlantic Ocean related to atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming? Chunzai Wang1 and Shenfu Dong1,2 Received 31 January 2010 is controversial. Some studies argued that the warming is due to global warming in association with the secular sea surface temperature. Here we show that both global warming and AMO variability make a contribution

Wang, Chunzai

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Analog Missions and Field Tests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the habitat while wearing spacesuits. Testing in the antarctic simulated what it would be like for astronauts. The Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, home of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Marine Sanctuary, about 62 feet beneath the surface. A surface buoy provides connections for power, life

162

Graduate Opportunities in Atmospheric Modeling to Understand Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and energy infrastructure. The graduate projects, fully funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions. Samples of guiding questions as part of the projects include: � What can explain; (3) demonstrated computer skills (e.g., Linux, R, Matlab, Fortran, GIS); (4) excellent oral

Lin, John Chun-Han

163

Simple ocean carbon cycle models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

Caldeira, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffert, M.I. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Earth System Sciences; Siegenthaler, U. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Physik

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Indonesian archipelago links the tropical Indian and western Pacific Oceans, so transmission of oceanic and atmospheric energy across the archipelago has the potential to (more)

Drushka, Kyla

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Geospatial analysis of oil discharges observed by the National Aerial Surveillance Program in the Canadian Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Oil pollution resulting from day to day human maritime activities contributes a high portion of the overall input into marine environments, constituting a major threat to marine ecosystems worldwide. In Canada, the National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP) extensively monitors and collects information on oily discharges using remote sensing devices. Despite the availability of data from NASP and other surveillance programs internationally, there is a paucity of spatial analyses of oil pollution patterns, particularly in their association with human marine pursuits. The objective of this paper is to analyze the association between observed oily discharges and human maritime activities in the Canadian Pacific Ocean. This study used Poisson regression to spatially model detected oily discharges with marine traffic, coastal facilities and proximity to coast. Further, it developed localized (regional) models to address spatial heterogeneity. The models identify recreational activities, passenger traffic, commercial traffic, fisheries, and proximity to the coast as predictors of observed oily discharges. The regional models yield more accurate and reliable estimates of local associations, and identify more parsimonious sets of predictors for each region. By identifying and accounting for human activities most associated with oily discharge patterns, the models developed in this study could be used to estimate pollution rates in areas with less surveillance, and identify areas where NASP coverage may need to be increased. Spatially explicit rates estimated by these models can be used to monitor the effectiveness of programs and policy aimed at reducing discharge rates of oily pollution. This study can be used as a model approach for extending the analysis to the other coasts of Canada, using available NASP data.

Stefania Bertazzon; Patrick D. O'Hara; Olesya Barrett; Norma Serra-Sogas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric circulation related Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is influenced by the oceanic and atmospheric circulations... -surface temperature, ocean currents and atmospheric circulation patterns. In a paper by Delworth et al....

168

Thermal springs list for the United States; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Key to Geophysical Records Documentation No. 12  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compilation has 1702 thermal spring locations in 23 of the 50 States, arranged alphabetically by State (Postal Service abbreviation) and degrees of latitude and longitude within the State. It shows spring name, surface temperature in degrees Fahrenheit and degrees Celsius; USGS Professional Paper 492 number, USGS Circular 790 number, NOAA number, north to south on each degree of latitude and longitude of the listed. USGS 1:250,000-scale (AMS) map; and the USGS topographic map coverage, 1:63360- or 1:62500-scale (15-minute) or 1:24000-scale (7.5-minute) quadrangle also included is an alphabetized list showing only the spring name and the State in which it is located. Unnamed springs are omitted. The list includes natural surface hydrothermal features: springs, pools, mud pots, mud volcanoes, geysers, fumaroles, and steam vents at temperature of 20{sup 0}C (68[sup 0}F) or greater. It does not include wells or mines, except at sites where they supplement or replace natural vents presently or recently active, or, in some places, where orifices are not distinguishable as natural or artificial. The listed springs are located on the USGS 1:250,000 (AMS) topographic maps. (MHR)

Berry, G.W.; Grim, P.J.; Ikelman, J.A. (comps.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Decadal-Scale Climate and Ecosystem Interactions in the North Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Decadal-scale climate variations in the Pacific Ocean wield a strong influence on the oceanic ... unclear, but stochastic atmospheric forcing of the ocean combined with atmospheric teleconnections from the tropic...

Arthur J. Miller; Fei Chai; Sanae Chiba; John R. Moisan

170

CDIAC Atmospheric Pressure Data Sets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Atmospheric Pressure CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Pressure Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 1 (CDIAC NDP-041) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; through 1990 Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of sea-level pressure Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 2 (Note: the above link takes you to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center website.) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; some through most recent month

171

Comparison of the Carbon System Parameters at the Global CO2 Survey Crossover Locations in the North and South Pacific Ocean, 1990-1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a collaborative program to measure global ocean carbon inventories and provide estimates of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide (C02) uptake by the oceans. the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Department of Energy have sponsored the collection of ocean carbon measurements as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment and Ocean-Atmosphere Carbon Exchange Study cruises. The cruises discussed here occurred in the North and South Pacific from 1990 through 1996. The carbon parameters from these 30 crossover locations have been compared to ensure that a consistent global data set emerges from the survey cruises. !'he results indicate that for dissolved inorganic carbon. fugacity of C02 and pH. the a~:,rreements at most crossover locations are well within the design specifications for the global CO) survey: whereas. in the case of total alkaliniry. the agreement between crossover locations is not as close.

Feely, Richard A [NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL); Lamb, Marilyn F. [NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL); Greeley, Dana J. [NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL); Wanninkhof, Rik [NOAA, Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Ocean | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ocean Ocean Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean Welcome to our COMMUNITY This is the National Ocean Council's portal for data, information, and decision tools to support people engaged in regional marine planning for the future use of the ocean, our coasts, and the Great Lakes. Our goal is to enhance discovery of and access to data and information for planners, stakeholders, and the public. Please visit our Feedback page to tell us what would make the site most useful to you as we expand our content. Start Here! Previous Pause Next PacIOOS - Pacific Islands Voyager PacIOOS - Pacific Islands Voyager View More West Coast Governors Alliance - Regional Data Framework West Coast Governors Alliance - Regional Data Framework View More Mid-Atlantic Ocean Data Portal

174

Warming of the North Pacific Ocean: Local AirSea Coupling and Remote Climatic Impacts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, global climatic response to the North Pacific oceanic warming is investigated in a series of coupled oceanatmosphere modeling experiments. In the model, an idealized heating is imposed over the North Pacific Ocean, while the ocean ...

Lixin Wu; Chun Li

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Technical Sessions M. C. MacCracken Atmospheric amj Geophysical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

system, including treatment of the deep ocean and horizontal transport by ocean currents 4 Separate, uncoupled, and limited treatment of atmospheric composition,...

176

The Southern Ocean in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase5  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...atmosphere and ocean (although the ocean remains too coarse to permit mesoscale eddies), a larger proportion of full Earth system models (ESMs) resolving biogeochemical cycles, the inclusion of atmospheric ozone in all models and more complete atmospheric...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

[article MS-151 for the Encyclopedia of Atmospheric Sciences] Charles A. Doswell III, NOAA/National Severe Storms Laboratory, 1313 Halley Circle,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flooding [article MS-151 for the Encyclopedia of Atmospheric Sciences] Charles A. Doswell III, NOAA/National Severe Storms Laboratory, 1313 Halley Circle, Norman, Oklahoma 73069, U.S.A. Introduction Flooding anywhere. A flood is defined as water overflowing onto land that usually is dry. Flooding is often thought

Doswell III, Charles A.

178

National Climate Assessment: Background and Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Background and Process Print E-mail Background and Process Print E-mail Please view the links below to find out more about the background and process of the National Climate Assessment: National Climate Assessment Development & Advisory Committee Charter ( PDF) National Climate Assessment Proposed 2013 Report Outline [updated on 12/08/2011] (PDF) Strategy On May 20th, 2011 the National Climate Assessment released the following two strategy documents: National Climate Assessment Strategy Summary National Climate Assessment Engagement Strategy Federal Register Notices November 18, 2013 National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC) Notice of Open Meeting pdf | html A Notice by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on 10/29/2013 This notice sets forth the schedule of a forthcoming meeting of the DoC NOAA National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC).

179

Atmospheric Concentrations of CO2 from Mauna Loa, Hawaii  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Concentrations of CO2 from Mauna Loa, Hawaii Atmospheric Concentrations of CO2 from Mauna Loa, Hawaii The graphs on this page are generated from data taken from "Trends in Carbon Dioxide" page on the Department of Commerce/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) website. The NOAA website presents monthly and weekly atmospheric CO2 concentrations measured at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. It offers weekly and monthly data, additional graphs, analysis, descriptions of how the data are collected, and an animation of historical changes in atmospheric CO2. Mauna Loa constitutes the longest record of direct measurements of CO2 in the atmosphere. The measurents were started by C. David Keeling of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in March of 1958. Recent Monthly Average CO2

180

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C. UMMENHOFER*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C is restricted to the Indian or Pacific Ocean only, support the interpretation of forcing mechanisms for large Indian Ocean atmospheric forcing versus remote influences from Pacific wind forcing: low events develop

Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. CAU 105 comprises the following five corrective action sites (CASs): -02-23-04 Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney Closure In Place -02-23-05 Atmospheric Test Site T-2A Closure In Place -02-23-06 Atmospheric Test Site T-2B Clean Closure -02-23-08 Atmospheric Test Site T-2 Closure In Place -02-23-09 Atmospheric Test Site - Turk Closure In Place The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 105 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 22, 2012, through May 23, 2013, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices.

Matthews, Patrick

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Mesoscale Eddy Energy Locality in an Idealized Ocean Model IAN GROOMS, LOUIS-PHILIPPE NADEAU, AND K. SHAFER SMITH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. SHAFER SMITH Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York

Smith, K. Shafer

183

U.S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service The Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fisheries Service NOAA FISHERIES SERVICE The Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle Health and Stranding Response or otherwise in need of assistance. Impacts of Oil on Marine Mammals and Sea Turtles Key Points Oil). For turtles this will include differing impacts and vulnerabilities at the different life stages such as eggs

184

Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Cli- mate (ATOC assimilating ocean observations and changes expected from surface heat fluxes as measured by the daily National are a result of advection of heat by ocean currents. We calculate that the most likely cause of the discrepancy

Frandsen, Jannette B.

185

DOE/EA-1193: Environmental Assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Artic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site (February 1997)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

u. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY u. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT - The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean. The purpose of the ARM/CART program is to collect and analyze atmospheric data for the development and validation of global climate change models. The program involves construction of several small facilities and operation of sensing equipment. The EA analyzes the impacts on land use, tundra, air quality, cultura.l resources, socioeconomics, and wildlife. Separate studies (summarized in the EA) were also conducted to ensure that the operation of the facilities would not

186

E-Print Network 3.0 - atlantic ocean woce Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

S Upper ocean (250 m... OceanAtmosphere Interaction (1) The Hydrological Cycle ATMESSOCN 587 1142010 S. Riser 12... with temperature. An enhanced water cycle will...

187

ACR 891 (?) Ocean Policy: Current Issues seminar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACR 891 (?) Ocean Policy: Current Issues seminar Fall, 2013 (2 cr, + 1 cr optional) Professor of a common pool resource than the world's oceans it can only be the atmosphere. The latter is currently neglected. This seminar is intended to introduce students to some of the current issues in ocean policy

188

Physics-Based GOES Satellite Product for Use in NREL's National Solar Radiation Database: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), University of Wisconsin, and National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration are collaborating to investigate the integration of the Satellite Algorithm for Shortwave Radiation Budget (SASRAB) products into future versions of NREL's 4-km by 4-km gridded National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB). This paper describes a method to select an improved clear-sky model that could replace the current SASRAB global horizontal irradiance and direct normal irradiances reported during clear-sky conditions.

Sengupta, M.; Habte, A.; Gotseff, P.; Weekley, A.; Lopez, A.; Molling, C.; Heidinger, A.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Impacts of Atmospheric Anthropogenic Nitrogen on the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

anthropogenic carbon dioxide may result from this atmospheric nitrogen fertilization, leading to a decreaseImpacts of Atmospheric Anthropogenic Nitrogen on the Open Ocean R. A. Duce,1 * J. LaRoche,2 K quantities of atmospheric anthropogenic fixed nitrogen entering the open ocean could account for up to about

Ward, Bess

190

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CAU 104 comprises the 15 CASs listed below: (1) 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C; (2) 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1; (3) 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site; (4) 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a; (5) 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S); (6) 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S); (7) 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S); (8) 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (9) 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (10) 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus); (11) 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster); (12) 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth; (13) 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4; (14) 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b; (15) 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 28, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 104. The releases at CAU 104 consist of surface-deposited radionuclides from 30 atmospheric nuclear tests. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 104 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The presence of TED exceeding the FAL is considered a radiological contaminant of concern (COC). Anything identified as a COC will require corrective action. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters will be used to measure external radiological dose. Based on process knowledge of the releases associated with the nuclear tests and radiological survey information about the location and shape of the resulting contamination plume, it was determined that the releases from the nuclear tests are co-located and will be investigated concurrently. A field investigation will be performed to define areas where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether other COCs are present at the site. The investigation will also collect information to determine the presence and nature of contamination associated with migration and excavation, as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

Patrick Matthews

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

192

Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryMarch-April 2007 Volume11,Number2 AOML is a research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

miles, to ensure total coverage of the global ocean and to calibrate the satellites. AOML contributes, FloridaMiami, Florida Global Drifter 1250 Retrieved After Crossing North Atlantic Global drifter 1250 and the Global Telecommunications System. In fact, its sensors were still operational when retrieved

193

Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryNovember-December 2009 Volume 13, Number 6 AOML is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sponsored by the International Oceanographic Commission, while AOML investigators led a technology transfer of the Atlantic Ocean. Dr. Rik Wanninkhof of AOML's Global Carbon Cycle program was part of the international team commissioned by NOAA in 2002, and NOAA played a critical role in facilitating international collaboration

194

Special issue of Terrestrial, Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, 11(1), 157-186, March 2000. Assimilation of GPS Radio Occultation Data for Numerical Weather Prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assimilation of GPS Radio Occultation Data for Numerical Weather Prediction Y-H. Kuo1 , S. Sokolovskiy2, 3 , R, water vapor), and to effectively assimilate them into weather prediction models is a challenging task assimilation, GPS/MET, numerical weather prediction, COSMIC) 1. INTRODUCTION The lack of data over the oceans

195

An investigation of Bjerknes Compensation in the Southern Ocean in the CCSM4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project aims to understand the relationship between poleward oceanic and atmospheric heat transport in the Southern Ocean by analyzing output from the community Climate System Model Version 4 (CCSM4). In particular, time series of meridional heat transport in both the atmosphere and the ocean are used to study whether variability in ocean heat transport is balanced by opposing changes in atmospheric heat transport, called Bjerknes Compensation. It is shown that the heat storage term in the Southern Ocean has a significant impact on the oceanic heat budget; as a result, no robust coherences between oceanic and atmospheric heat transports could be found at these southern latitudes.

Weijer, Wilbert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kinstle, Caroline M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

196

11971197AUGUST 2007AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | The Global Ocean Data Assimilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and in situ observations, for NWP, ocean forecasting, ecosystem applications, and climate research. BY C forecasting, military and defence operations, validating or forcing ocean and atmospheric models, ecosystem11971197AUGUST 2007AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | The Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment

Merchant, Chris

197

Atlantic Ocean circulation at the last glacial maximum : inferences from data and models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis focuses on ocean circulation and atmospheric forcing in the Atlantic Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 18-21 thousand years before present). Relative to the pre-industrial climate, LGM atmospheric CO? ...

Dail, Holly Janine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Solar-Terrestrial Data Center, En-vironmental Data Service, National  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar-Terrestrial Data Center, En- vironmental Data Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric-Milwaukee, will become director of the Great Lakes and Marine Waters Center at the University of Michigan on I July 1976, the University of Michigan reports. Before joining the UW faculty, Beeton was chiefof the En- vironmental

199

AtmosphericAtmospheric Composition Introduction The division investigates the atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development on observation side was the installation of an ozone observation station in Surinam in close co-operation with the Surinam Meteorological Service. Processes in the tropical regions are important for the global climate and the global atmospheric composition. The participation in Indoex (Indian Ocean Experiment) and this Surinam

Haak, Hein

200

Shipboard Measurements and Estimations of AirSea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ship­board Measurements and Estimations of Air­Sea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean E dur­ ing the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Ocean and Atmospheric Response of the surface­layer turbulence properties are compared with those from previous land and ocean results. Momentum

California at Irvine, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The purpose of the CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed.

Matthews, Patrick

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Atmospheric dynamics triggered by an oceanic SST front in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Atmospheric dynamics triggered and motivation Over the last few years, the emphasis of air­sea interaction studies has shifted from the effect. 1981; Businger and Shaw 1984) noted that the asymmetry in the SST profile creates an unequal heating

Ghil, Michael

203

TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL VARIATION OF ATMOSPHERICALLY DEPOSITED ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS AT HIGH ELEVATION IN YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK, CALIFORNIA, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be transported tens of kilometers and deposited in adjacent mountains in many parts of the world. Atmospherically guidelines or critical thresholds in both parks. A general pattern of difference between Yosemite and Sequoia to organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides. Variability of chemical concentrations among sites, between sampling

Knapp, Roland

204

OceanEnergyMMS.p65  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Minerals Management Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Ocean Energy PAGE 1 Minerals Management Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Ocean Energy PAGE 1 Teacher Guide .......................................................... 2 Related National Science Standards .......................... 3 Introduction to Ocean Energy .................................. 4 Petroleum & Natural Gas ......................................... 5 Natural Oil and Gas Seeps ........................................ 7 Methane Hydrates .................................................... 8 Solar Energy .............................................................. 9 Wind Energy ........................................................... 10 Wave Energy ........................................................... 11 OTEC: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion .............

205

ORISE: Capabilities in Climate and Atmospheric Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities ORISE partners with NOAA to operate climate monitoring network U.S. Climate Reference Network (CRN) station in Hawaii The U.S. Climate Reference Network (CRN) consists of 121 stations throughout the continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii and Canada. The stations use highly accurate and reliable sensors and gauges to measure temperature, wind speed and precipitation. The network allows scientists to study the climate of an area over sustained periods, from 50 to 100 years. Pictured here is a CRN station at the Mauna Loa Slope Observatory in Hawaii. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) works closely with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) to perform lower

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric diffusion experiments Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

technical coupling software... linking the main model components of present-day Earth System models (ESMs), i.e. the atmosphere... be followed to couple ocean and atmosphere...

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere model version Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

coupling software Summary: linking the main model components of present-day Earth System models (ESMs), i.e. the atmosphere... be followed to couple ocean and atmosphere...

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric models final Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

coupling software Summary: linking the main model components of present-day Earth System models (ESMs), i.e. the atmosphere... be followed to couple ocean and atmosphere...

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric experiment recherche Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

technical coupling software... linking the main model components of present-day Earth System models (ESMs), i.e. the atmosphere... be followed to couple ocean and atmosphere...

210

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric interference Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

technical coupling software... linking the main model components of present-day Earth System models (ESMs), i.e. the atmosphere... be followed to couple ocean and atmosphere...

211

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 105 is a geographical grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with atmospheric nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 105, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 02-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney 02-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site T-2A 02-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-2B 02-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site T-2 02-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Turk These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 105. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with all CAU 105 CASs are from atmospheric nuclear testing activities. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 105 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; DOE, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted after the plan is approved.

Patrick Matthews

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

NATIONAL OCEAN SERVICE ($ in Thousands)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Restoration, HI 185 0 0 0 (185) UTMSI - Center for Biological Indicators of Change in Coastal Ecosystem Health and Restoration Response and Restoration Base 19,266 493 1,400 19,134 (132) Estuary Restoration Program 2,188 0 0 1,188 (1,000) Marine Debris 4,000 0 0 4,000 0 Marine Debris Removal - Alaska 0 0 0 0 Aquatic

213

Ocean Currents and Circulation and Climate Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Atlantic Ocean, in particular its Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC), is sensitive to the patterns of atmospheric forcing, in particular to that of the freshwater flux. Relatively small changes in at...

Henk A. Dijkstra

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CAU 570 comprises the following six corrective action sites (CASs): 02-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Tesla 09-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site T-9 09-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site S-9G 09-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Rushmore 09-23-15, Eagle Contamination Area 09-99-01, Atmospheric Test Site B-9A These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 570. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 570 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed near the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

Patrick Matthews

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Posters Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer: Status and Water Vapor Continuum Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 Posters Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer: Status and Water Vapor Continuum Results H. E. Revercomb, R. O. Knuteson, W. L. Smith, F. A. Best, and R. G. Dedecker University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin H. B. Howell National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Systems Design and Applications Branch Madison, Wisconsin Introduction Accurate and spectrally detailed observations of the thermal emission from radiatively important atmospheric gases, aerosols, and clouds are now being provided to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) data base by the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) prototype at the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site. Spectra over the range from 520 to 3000 cm -1 (3 to 19 microns) with a resolution of 0.5 cm

216

Robert Jacob | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jacob Jacob Computational Climate Scientist Robert Jacob is a computational climate scientist in the Mathematics and Computer Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory and a Fellow in the University of Chicago/Argonne Computation Institute. Jacob is the co-developer of the Model Coupling Toolkit which is used as the foundation coupling technology in the Community Climate System Model. He is also the lead developer of the Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model, a climate model used extensively in studies of paleoclimate and decadal variability. Jacob received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in Atmospheric Science in 1997. From 1998 to 2000 he held postdoctoral positions at the University of Wisconsin and at the Department of the Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago. He is a member of the

217

Prepare The Nation For Change  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Prepare The Nation For Change Print E-mail What Is Adaptation and Mitigation? Adaptation An adjustment in natural and/or human systems to a new or changing environment that exploits beneficial opportunities and moderates negative impacts. Mitigation An intervention to reduce the sources or enhance the sinks of greenhouse gases and other climate warming agents. This intervention could include approaches devised to: reduce emissions of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere to enhance their removal from the atmosphere through storage in geological formations, soils, biomass, or the ocean How do we prepare for global change? Global change is affecting many aspects of society, livelihoods, and the environment. Across the United States and around the world, people are making decisions to effectively minimize (mitigate) and prepare for (adapt) global change.

218

The short and long term role of the ocean in Greenhouse Gas mitigation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

JY01ax.doc 19 May 2001 JY01ax.doc 19 May 2001 The short and long term role of the ocean in Greenhouse Gas mitigation Ian S F Jones, Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, New York i.jones@ldeo.columbia.edu Helen E Young Earth Ocean and Space, Australian Technology Park, Sydney, HelenYoung@ozemail.com.au Introduction The carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere is rising rapidly, mostly as a result of fossil fuel burning. This is leading to more trapping of solar radiation in the atmosphere with the expectation that the world's climate will change. Rapid climate change has a downside risk of endangering the food security of the poor and raising the spectra of large scale transmigration. The UNFCCC was an agreement amongst most of the sovereign nations of the world

219

Ocean Color Web | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ocean Color Web Ocean Color Web Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean » Data Ocean Color Web Dataset Summary Description A comprehensive image analysis package for the processing, display, analysis, and quality control of ocean color data. Tags {Ocean,"water color",spectrometer,"sea viewing",MODIS,"marine biology",NASA,GSFC,"Goddard Space Flight Center"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet Dataset Additional Information Last Updated 15-Jan-2010 Publisher National Aeronautics and Space Administration Contact Name Contact Email Gene.C.Feldman@nasa.gov Unique Identifier NASA-1547

220

Ocean Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some of these technologies are taking off from very low power capacities, although with an intense activity....4, 5] including La Rance tidal power station calculate a capacity of ocean energy facilities worldwid...

Ricardo Guerrero-Lemus; Jos Manuel Martnez-Duart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Anthropogenic Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Ocean Acidification: The Potential Impacts on Ocean Biodiversity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most of the focus in recent years on the potential impacts of rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere linked to anthropogenic activities ... oceans as a consequence of the influx of carbon dioxide absor...

William C. G. Burns

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Ocean Aerosols: The Marine Fast-Rotating Shadow-Band Radiometer Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ocean Aerosols: The Marine Fast-Rotating Ocean Aerosols: The Marine Fast-Rotating Shadow-Band Radiometer Network M. A. Miller, R. M. Reynolds, and J. J. Bartholomew Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Introduction A network of ship-mounted marine fast-rotating shadow-band radiometers (FRSRs) and broadband radiometers have been deployed over the fast four years on several backbone ships, funded jointly by Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) and National Aeronautic and Space Administration's (NASA's) Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Studies (SIMBIOS). These radiometers operate continuously and automatically during daylight hours. There fundamental measurements made by the FRSRs in the network are the direct-normal irradiance

223

Quaternary Science Reviews 20 (2001) 15611576 Millennial scale climate variability of the northeast Pacific Ocean and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the northeast Pacific Ocean and northwest North America based on radiolaria and pollen N.G. Pisiasa, *, A in the Northeast Pacific and the northwestern United States. 2. Study region 2.1. Ocean climate and biota.C. Mixa , L. Heusserb a College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, 104 Ocean

Kurapov, Alexander

224

Atmospheric Chemistry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

competencies Atmospheric Chemistry Atmospheric Chemistry is the study of the composition of the atmosphere, the sources and fates of gases and particles in air, and changes induced...

225

CESM Century-Scale Climate Experiments with a High-Resolution Atmosphere |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A portion of the 1/4 degree grid global grid is shown over the southeast part of the United States. A portion of the 1/4 degree grid global grid is shown over the southeast part of the United States. The Community Earth System Model (CESM) is joint effort between the Department of Energy and National Science Foundation. It couples state-of-art atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, land/vegetation/ ecological/ and major glaciers into a unified system or components can be run independently. (see https://www2.ucar.edu/for-staff/update/community-earth-system-model) CESM Century-Scale Climate Experiments with a High-Resolution Atmosphere PI Name: Warren Washington PI Email: wmw@ucar.edu Institution: University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 102.8 Million Year: 2014 Research Domain: Earth Science Researchers at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)

226

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CAU 104 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These 15 CASs include releases from 30 atmospheric tests conducted in the approximately 1 square mile of CAU 104. Because releases associated with the CASs included in this CAU overlap and are not separate and distinguishable, these CASs are addressed jointly at the CAU level. The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives (CAAs), provide the rationale for the selection of recommended CAAs, and provide the plan for implementation of the recommended CAA for CAU 104. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 4, 2011, through May 3, 2012, as set forth in the CAU 104 Corrective Action Investigation Plan.

Patrick Matthews

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Mixed Layer Temperature Balance on Intraseasonal Timescales in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to document the zonal evolution of processes affecting sea surface temperature (SST) variability on intraseasonal timescales in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. Data primarily from the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) ...

Michael J. McPhaden

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Correlative Evolutions of ENSO and the Seasonal Cycle in the Tropical Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examines whether shifts between the correlative evolutions of ENSO and the seasonal cycle in the tropical Pacific Ocean can produce effects that are large enough to alter the evolution of the coupled atmosphereocean system. The ...

Heng Xiao; Carlos R. Mechoso

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Network), dial-up or wireless communication links using the internet, and using web tools implemented by NARAC. Emergency managers at NARAC supported sites, can request...

230

Changing controls on oceanic radiocarbon: New insights on shallow-to-deep ocean exchange and anthropogenic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of radiocarbon (14 C) into the atmosphere by nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 1960s has provided; Ito et al., 2004]. [3] Nuclear weapons testing added a large pulse of 14 C to the atmosphere dilution, is now weaker than before weapons testing in most regions. Oceanic 14 C, and particularly its

Keeling, Ralph

231

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 106: Area 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises four corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 05-20-02, Evaporation Pond; (2) 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able; (3) 05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area; (4) 05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 106 based on the implementation of corrective actions. The corrective action of clean closure was implemented at CASs 05-45-04 and 05-45-05, while no corrective action was necessary at CASs 05-20-02 and 05-23-05. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 20, 2010, through June 1, 2011, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides, and investigation of other releases (mechanical displacement and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 106 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is complete and acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Investigation results were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A radiological dose FAL of 25 millirem per year was established based on the Industrial Area exposure scenario (2,250 hours of annual exposure). The only radiological dose exceeding the FAL was at CAS 05-45-05 and was associated with potential source material (PSM). It is also assumed that additional PSM in the form of depleted uranium (DU) and DU-contaminated debris at CASs 05-45-04 and 05-45-05 exceed the FAL. Therefore, corrective actions were undertaken at these CASs that consisted of removing PSM and collecting verification samples. Results of verification samples show that remaining soil does not contain contamination exceeding the FALs. Therefore, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) provides the following recommendations: (1) No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 106. (2) A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 106. (3) Corrective Action Unit 106 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

Patrick Matthews and Dawn Peterson

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

233

Exploring the Deep... Ocean-Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the transfer of energy among these systems. Global energy balance The Sun is the primary source of energy on the others. To fully understand the dynamics of our climate, we must examine the global energy balance global energy balance. Incoming radiation 30 % reflected back to space 70 % radiated back to space 51

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

234

DEPARTMENT OF EARTH, OCEAN and ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prediction, meteorological data analysis, prognosis of weather systems, motion and development, satellite meteorology, west-coast meteorology, and interpretation of satellite images, radar images, and numerical-weather imagery, Doppler radar, numerical weather prediction, extended range forecasting, and applied laboratory

235

Atmospheric,OceanicandSpaceSciences Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Michigan Space Research Building 2455 Hayward Street Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 aoss_um@umich.edu http Arbor ©The Regents of the University of Michigan Mark Schlissel, ex officio Sequential Graduate / under/Thermosphere Physics Planetary Magnetospheres Solar & Heliospheric Physics Space Weather Aeronomy For Faculty involved

Eustice, Ryan

237

Oceans '88  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings discuss the following papers: Solid waste disposal crisis; Plastics in Ocean; Continental shelf environmental research; Seafood technology advancements; Gulf of Mexico chemosynthetic petroleum seep communities; Water reuse on onshore mariculture and processing facilities; Oil and gas industry conflicts on the outer continental shelf; Cumulative environmental effects of the oil and gas leasing program; Oil and gas exploration; and Oil and gas resource management; Aids to navigation systems and equipment; and Surveillance experiments.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

National Aeronautics and Space Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uncertainty ! Clouds and Climate Scenarios Projected warming Climate Change Prediction #12;National of air T and CO2 -> related to intensity of ocean turbulent mixing · Exchanges of energy, water and carbon with the ocean/ land/ice surface are mediated by turbulence #12;National Aeronautics and Space

Bordoni, Simona

239

Ocean - Regional Planning Efforts | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regional Planning Efforts Regional Planning Efforts Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Regional Planning Efforts Marine planning is a science-based process that provides transparent information about ocean use and guarantees the public and stakeholders a voice early on in decisions affecting the uses of the marine environment. It is an inclusive, bottom-up approach that gives the Federal Government, States, and Tribes, with input from local communities, stakeholders, and the public, the ability to make informed decisions on how best to optimize the use of and protect the ocean, coasts, and Great Lakes. Under the National Ocean Policy, the United States is subdivided into nine regional planning areas. Within each region, Federal, State, and Tribal

240

Workshop review: Management of data collected in GRAMP (Gulf Region Atmospheric Measurement Program). Held in Boulder, Colorado on July 22-24, 1991. Technical note  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The demolition and subsequent burning of the Kuwait oil fires was a senseless act of destruction that has threatened public health, damaged the environment, and may possibly cause short or longer term changes in regional and global climate. Many nations responded to this disaster by offering aid and by rushing teams into the affected area to make measurements that would assess the impact of the fires. The following report summarizes a workshop that was held July 24-26, 1991 at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) to discuss a plan to gather all the atmospheric measurements that are being made in the Gulf region and make them available for general dissemination. The workshop was initiated by the World Meteorological Organization and co-sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Organization.

Baumgardner, D.; Friesen, R.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Print E-mail Print E-mail National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC) pdf | html A Notice by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on 08/21/2013 This notice sets forth the schedule of a forthcoming meeting of the DoC NOAA National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC). Time and Date: The meeting will be held Monday, September 9, 2013 from 3:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Eastern time. Place: This meeting will be a conference call. Public access and materials will be available at the office of the U.S. Global Change Research Program, Conference Room A, Suite 250, 1717 Pennsylvania Avenue NW., Washington, DC 20006. The public will not be able to dial into the call. Please check the National Climate Assessment Web site for additional information at http://www.globalchange.gov/what-we-do/assessment.

242

Efficiency of Sequestrating CO2 in the Ocean  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Efficiency of Sequestrating CO Efficiency of Sequestrating CO 2 in the Ocean Richard Dewey (RDewey@uvic.ca ; 250-472-4009) University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria BC Canada V8N 3P6 Gilbert Stegen (Dr_Stegen@hotmail.com ; 425-869-7236) SAIC and GRS Associates 17257 NE 116 th St., Redmond WA USA 98052 Abstract Ocean disposal of CO 2 continues to be of great interest as a possible mitigation strategy for reducing atmospheric emissions of anthropogenic CO 2 . The ocean, and ultimately ocean sediments, naturally represents the single largest sink of CO 2 , and annually sequesters several gigatons of carbon from the atmosphere. The injection of additional CO 2 to artificially accelerate the use of the ocean as a sink for atmospheric CO 2 and avoid a short-term build-up of greenhouse gases has been investigated for

243

Liu et aL.September 2012 373 Simulation of ocean ReSponSeS to an idealized  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, inundation, significant wave heights and ocean currents in shallow coastal areas as a result of wave, significant wave height and ocean currents. Only in a TC-wave- ocean three-way coupled system, air, inundation, currents and significant wave height. Keywords: coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean modeling system

Liu, Paul

244

Subarctic Pacific evidence for a glacial deepening of the oceanic respired carbon pool S.L. Jaccard a,d,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subarctic Pacific evidence for a glacial deepening of the oceanic respired carbon pool S.L. Jaccard of the overturning circulation. Volumetrically the Pacific Ocean dominates the world ocean (it is three times larger of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, USA c Department of Geosciences, Princeton

Gilli, Adrian

245

Warm ocean processes and carbon cycling in the Eocene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the marine biological pump has also been emphasized...cloud formation, latent heat transfer to the atmosphere...affected the biological pump, that is, the biologically...Observational evidence for an ocean heat pump induced by tropical cyclones...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Ecological Carbon Sequestration in the Oceans and Climate Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The biological carbon pump helps regulate the partitioning of carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and the ocean and is expected to play a fundamental role in future climate change.

Richard Sanders; Stephanie Henson

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

How ocean color can steer Pacific tropical cyclones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Because ocean color alters the absorption of sunlight, it can produce changes in sea surface temperatures with further impacts on atmospheric circulation. These changes can project onto fields previously recognized to alter ...

Gnanadesikan, Anand

248

Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature Perturbations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The wind speed response to mesoscale SST variability is investigated over the Agulhas Return Current region of the Southern Ocean using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and the U.S. Navy Coupled OceanAtmosphere Mesoscale ...

Natalie Perlin; Simon P. de Szoeke; Dudley B. Chelton; Roger M. Samelson; Eric D. Skyllingstad; Larry W. ONeill

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Model Wind over the Central and Southern California Coastal Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent studies have shown the importance of high-resolution wind in coastal ocean modeling. This paper tests the Coupled OceanAtmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) at the 9-, 27-, and 81-km grid resolutions in simulating wind off the ...

Hsiao-ming Hsu; Lie-Yauw Oey; Walter Johnson; Clive Dorman; Richard Hodur

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Changing concentrations of CO, CH4, C5H8, CH3Br, CH3I, and dimethyl sulfide during the Southern Ocean Iron Enrichment Experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...important sink for atmospheric CH 3 Br, a result...half of the atmospheric organobromine burden...delay the recovery of stratospheric...from ocean waters is a major source of cloud condensation nuclei...above the atmospheric boundary layer...

Oliver W. Wingenter; Karl B. Haase; Peter Strutton; Gernot Friederich; Simone Meinardi; Donald R. Blake; F. Sherwood Rowland

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Ocean | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Related Links List of Ocean Thermal Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleOcean&oldid273467" Categories: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks Sectors...

252

Google Doc projects 1.2: Exploring NCEP atmospheric reanalysis data GFD-1 Winter 2011 1 Feb 2011 to be revised frequently (stay tuned). We will load some ocean data and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Google Doc projects 1.2: Exploring NCEP atmospheric reanalysis data GFD-1 Winter 2011 1 Feb 2011 ideas related to NCEP atmospheric data. The idea is to explore this data with Matlab (or other plotting increase right up to the stratosphere (look here at a map view over the North Pole..with Matlab

253

Ocean conditions and Columbia River salmon Testimony provided for the House Subcommittee on Power and Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean conditions and Columbia River salmon Testimony provided for the House Subcommittee on Power Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Oceans/School of Marine Affairs Climate Impacts Group Box controlling salmon marine survival in the Pacific Northwest, several ocean-climate events have been linked

Mantua, Nathan

254

Separating natural and bomb-produced radiocarbon in the ocean: The potential alkalinity method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the upper ocean, and as a proxy for anthropogenic CO2 concentration. Both the power and the difficultySeparating natural and bomb-produced radiocarbon in the ocean: The potential alkalinity method M. Key Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, USA

255

An Observational Estimate of Inferred Ocean Energy Divergence KEVIN E. TRENBERTH AND JOHN T. FASULLO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Observational Estimate of Inferred Ocean Energy Divergence KEVIN E. TRENBERTH AND JOHN T, in final form 25 September 2007) ABSTRACT Monthly net surface energy fluxes (FS) over the oceans are computed as residuals of the atmospheric energy budget using top-of-atmosphere (TOA) net radiation (RT

Fasullo, John

256

CARBON DIOXIDE AND OUR OCEAN LEGACY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to energy-consuming activities that burn fossil fuels. On a yearly basis, the average Ameri- can produces 22 of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, or nearly half of the fossil fuel carbon emissions over this period sea life that depend on the health and avail- ability of these shelled organisms. At present, ocean

257

A predictive ocean oil spill model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Initially, the project focused on creating an ocean oil spill model and working with the major oil companies to compare their data with the Los Alamos global ocean model. As a result of this initial effort, Los Alamos worked closely with the Eddy Joint Industry Project (EJIP), a consortium oil and gas producing companies in the US. The central theme of the project was to use output produced from LANL`s global ocean model to look in detail at ocean currents in selected geographic areas of the world of interest to consortium members. Once ocean currents are well understood this information could be used to create oil spill models, improve offshore exploration and drilling equipment, and aid in the design of semi-permanent offshore production platforms.

Sanderson, J.; Barnette, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Papodopoulos, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schaudt, K. [Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (United States); Szabo, D. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric circulation anomalies Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in atmospheric mass between the subtropical high located near... variations in the NAO. Ocean currents have the ability to propagate temperature ... Source: Khatiwala, Samar -...

259

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric methane extracted Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: atmospheric methane extracted Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Oceanic sediment methane, including methane clathrate hydrates (hydrates), is the Earth's largest...

260

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric sampling nouvelle Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) proposal (south Florida) and that such seafood... the area. Sensory evaluation of the 52 finfish samples for odors indicative of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere-surface exchange processes Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

atmospheric surface layer during CBLAST, in 16th Symposium on Boundary Layers... on heat, gas, and momentum transport, infrared remote sensing, upper-ocean processes,...

262

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric polycyclic aromatic Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

burning of coal, oil, gas... called aromatic hydrocarbons. These include harmful pollutants like dioxins, PCBs and a group called... by atmospheric currents and ocean currents...

263

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric mercury deposition Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Collection: Geosciences ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 32 Global 3-D land-ocean-atmosphere model for mercury: present-day vs. pre-industrial1 cycles and...

264

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheres annual status Sample Search...  

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sea and ice cover... , and planetary interiors human interactions with atmosphere, ocean, and land environments ... Source: Collection: Biology and Medicine 40 The Transport...

265

10-Ch09-N51893 [13:43 2008/9/13] Temam & Tribbia: Computational Methods for the Atmosphere and the Oceans Page: 377 377434 Data Assimilation for Geophysical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the Oceans Page: 377 377­434 Data Assimilation for Geophysical Fluids Jacques Blum Laboratoire Jean. A prerequisite before a prediction is to retrieve at best the state of the environment. Data assimilation-order analysis should be considered. One of the first methods used for assim- ilating data in oceanography

Navon, Michael

266

Atmospheric radiation measurement program facilities newsletter, June 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ARM Intensive Operational Period Scheduled to Validate New NASA Satellite--Beginning in July, all three ARM sites (Southern Great Plains [SGP], North Slope of Alaska, and Tropical Western Pacific; Figure 1) will participate in the AIRS Validation IOP. This three-month intensive operational period (IOP) will validate data collected by the satellite-based Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) recently launched into space. On May 4, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) launched Aqua, the second spacecraft in the Earth Observing System (EOS) series. The EOS satellites monitor Earth systems including land surfaces, oceans, the atmosphere, and ice cover. The first EOS satellite, named Terra, was launched in December 1999. The second EOS satellite is named Aqua because its primary focus is understanding Earth's water cycle through observation of atmospheric moisture, clouds, temperature, ocean surface, precipitation, and soil moisture. One of the instruments aboard Aqua is the AIRS, built by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a NASA agency. The AIRS Validation IOP complements the ARM mission to improve understanding of the interactions of clouds and atmospheric moisture with solar radiation and their influence on weather and climate. In support of satellite validation IOP, ARM will launch dedicated radiosondes at all three ARM sites while the Aqua satellite with the AIRS instrument is orbiting overhead. These radiosonde launches will occur 45 minutes and 5 minutes before selected satellite overpasses. In addition, visiting scientists from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory will launch special radiosondes to measure ozone and humidity over the SGP site. All launches will generate ground-truth data to validate satellite data collected simultaneously. Data gathered daily by ARM meteorological and solar radiation instruments will complete the validation data sets. Data from Aqua-based instruments, including AIRS, will aid in weather forecasting, climate modeling, and greenhouse gas studies. These instruments will provide more accurate, detailed global observations of weather and atmospheric parameters that will, in turn, improve the accuracy and quality of weather forecasts. A satellite-based instrument is cost-effective because it can provide continuous global measurements, eliminating isolated yet costly weather balloon releases. Aqua, launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California (Figure 2), carries six state-of-the-art instruments that measure various water vapor parameters: (1) AIRS, which measures atmospheric temperature and humidity, land and sea surface temperatures, cloud properties, and radiative energy flux; (2) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit, which measures atmospheric temperature and humidity during both cloudy and cloud-free periods; (3) Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer, which measures cloud properties, radiative energy flux, precipitation rates, land surface wetness, sea ice, snow cover, sea surface temperature, and wind fields; (4) Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System, which measures radiative energy flux; (5) Humidity Sounder for Brazil, which measures atmospheric humidity by using a passive scanning microwave radiometer; and (6) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, which measures cloud properties, radiative energy flux, aerosol properties, land cover and land use change, vegetation dynamics, land surface temperature, fire occurrence, volcanic effects, sea surface temperature, ocean color, snow cover, atmospheric temperature and humidity, and sea ice. The data-gathering capabilities of the Aqua instruments will provide an unprecedented view of atmosphere-land interactions (Figure 3). The availability of more frequent, more accurate global measurements of important atmospheric parameters will both improve our capabilities for short-term weather forecasting and lead to a better understanding of climate variability and climate change. Simultaneous measurements of many parameters will allow scientists to study complicated forcings and feedbacks of the atmosphere, which can be

Holdridge, D. J.

2002-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

267

Ecology and Physics of Bacterial Chemotaxis in the Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...source or sink of atmospheric CO2 (14). Marine...patches of DOC in the water column. Results...involved in cloud condensation. Several studies...released into the water column in ephemeral...assemblages to deep-sea water amendment. Environ...Production of atmospheric sulfur by oceanic...

Roman Stocker; Justin R. Seymour

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Detecting the Unexpected: A Research Framework for Ocean Acidification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1) In the oceans, increasing CO2 alters surface seawater chemistry by decreasing ocean pH and calcium carbonate saturation state. ... Along the California Current system, artificial warming of seawater by a power plant was predicted to have a positive effect on species with a southerly geographic range and a more negative effect on those with a northerly range. ... The effects of anthropogenic CO2 on ocean chemistry are relatively well understood due to research motivatedin partby the related climate change issue of oceanic and atmospheric warming. ...

Catherine A. Pfister; Andrew J. Esbaugh; Christina A. Frieder; Hannes Baumann; Emily E. Bockmon; Meredith M. White; Brendan R. Carter; Heather M. Benway; Carol A. Blanchette; Emily Carrington; James B. McClintock; Daniel C. McCorkle; Wade R. McGillis; T. Aran Mooney; Patrizia Ziveri

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Musical Atmospherics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE characteristics of audio musical atmospherics which are obtained when an ... musical atmospherics which are obtained when an audio amplifier is placed in a long line or aerial have been discussed from time to ...

T. L. ECKERSLEY

1935-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

270

Open Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration K. Coale coale@mlml.calstate.edu (831) 632-4400 Moss Landing Marine Laboratories 8272 Moss Landing Road Moss Landing, California 95039 USA Abstract The trace element iron has been recently shown to play a critical role in nutrient utilization, phytoplankton growth and therefore the uptake of carbon dioxide from the surface waters of the global ocean. Carbon fixation in the surface waters, via phytoplankton growth, shifts the ocean/atmosphere exchange equilibrium for carbon dioxide. As a result, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas) and iron flux to the oceans have been linked to climate change (glacial to interglacial transitions). These recent findings have led some to suggest that large scale

271

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

450 450 Varnish cache server Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource Dataset Summary Description This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. This approach is fully consistent with accepted global practice and includes the resource made available by the lateral transfer of wave energy along wave crests, which enables densities within a few kilometers of a linear array, even for fixed terminator devices.

272

Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:29am Addthis Photo of water flowing from several openings in a hydropower dam. Hydropower produces 10% of the nation's energy, including power from the Ice Harbor Dam in Burbank, Washington. This page provides a brief overview of hydropower and ocean energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply these technologies within the Federal sector. Overview Hydropower has been used for centuries to power machinery, but the application most commonly associated with hydropower is electricity production through dams. Ocean energy refers to various forms of renewable energy harnessed from the ocean. There are two primary types of ocean energy: mechanical and thermal.

273

Environmental siting suitability analysis for commercial scale ocean renewable energy| A southeast Florida case study.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis aims to facilitate the siting and implementation of Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center (FAU SNMREC) ocean current energy (more)

Mulcan, Amanda

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Search Workshop on Large-Scale AtmosphereCryosphere Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although certain regions of the Arctic have experienced periods of decadal warming during the last 100 years, recent decades show an ongoing suite of Arctic-wide, interrelated atmospheric, oceanic, terrestrial, and human dimension changes. A ...

James Overland; John Calder; Florence Fetterer; David McGuire; James Morison; Jackie Richter-Menge; Nancy Soreide; John Walsh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

E-Print Network 3.0 - administrative decisions national Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Schwaab Deputy Assistant Administrator for Operations John... Programs & Chief Science Advisor Vacant NMFS ORGANIZATION Assistant Administrator National Ocean Service......

276

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 69 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Atlas NESDIS 69 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009 Volume 2: Salinity Silver Spring, MD March 2010 U Atlas 2009 Volume 2: Salinity. S. Levitus Ed. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 69, U.S. Gov. Printing Office.html. National Oceanographic Data Center #12;NOAA Atlas NESDIS 69 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009 Volume 2: Salinity John

277

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 105 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 22, 2012, through May 23, 2013, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices.

Matthews, Patrick

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Atmospheric Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is a brief overview of the theory and experimental data of atmospheric neutrino production at the fiftieth anniversary of the experimental discovery of neutrinos.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

279

ocean | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ocean ocean Dataset Summary Description This shapefile represents the seasonal winter depth profile to reach water at a temperature of 20ºC. Source NREL Date Released October 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords depth profile hydrokinetic ocean ocean energy ocean thermal energy conversion OTEC seawater cooling thermal Data application/zip icon OTEC Seawater Cooling 20ºC Depth Profile - Winter Average (zip, 1.1 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period March 2009 - February 2011 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

280

High resolution properties of the marine atmospheric boundary layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) participated in the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) by fielding a water-vapor Raman lidar on board the Research Vessel Vickers. The lidar measured water vapor concentration from the surface to lower tropospheric altitudes in order to support the CEPEX goal of evaluating a hypothesis regarding feedback mechanisms for global circulation models. This report describes some of the features observed within the marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and the lower troposphere. Data was collected continuously 24 hours per day over the equatorial Pacific from March 8th to March 2 1st of 1993 while in route between Guadalcanal and Christmas Island (the transect was at approximately 2{degree} south latitude). The lidar collected vertical transects of water vapor concentration up to 10 km during night operations and 4 km in the day. The vertical lidar profiles of water vapor were produced by summing the data over a period up to 600 seconds. The water-vapor Raman lidar measured the properties of the marine ABL as well as the lower and mid-troposphere. From the lidar water vapor profiles, ``images`` of water vapor concentration versus altitude and date or sea surface temperature will be produced along with other products such as latent heat fluxes. The Raman water vapor lidar data will be used to better understand the role of transport and exchange at the ocean-atmosphere interface and throughout the marine atmosphere.

Cooper, D.; Cottingame, W.; Eichinger, W.; Forman, P.; Lebeda, C.; Poling, D.; Thorton, R.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Bringing the ocean into the laboratory to probe the chemical complexity of sea spray aerosol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...dDepartment of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins...anddDepartment of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins...the oceans, deserts, and wildfires, contribute 90% (mass/mass) to atmospheric...measurements were made using the Colorado State University continuous...

Kimberly A. Prather; Timothy H. Bertram; Vicki H. Grassian; Grant B. Deane; M. Dale Stokes; Paul J. DeMott; Lihini I. Aluwihare; Brian P. Palenik; Farooq Azam; John H. Seinfeld; Ryan C. Moffet; Mario J. Molina; Christopher D. Cappa; Franz M. Geiger; Gregory C. Roberts; Lynn M. Russell; Andrew P. Ault; Jonas Baltrusaitis; Douglas B. Collins; Craig E. Corrigan; Luis A. Cuadra-Rodriguez; Carlena J. Ebben; Sara D. Forestieri; Timothy L. Guasco; Scott P. Hersey; Michelle J. Kim; William F. Lambert; Robin L. Modini; Wilton Mui; Byron E. Pedler; Matthew J. Ruppel; Olivia S. Ryder; Nathan G. Schoepp; Ryan C. Sullivan; Defeng Zhao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

800,000-year Ice-Core Records of Atmospheric Methane (CH4)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Methane (CH4) » Ice Cores Methane (CH4) » Ice Cores 800,000-year Ice-Core Records of Atmospheric Methane (CH4) This page introduces ice-core records of methane (CH4) extending back 800,000 years at Dome C, Antarctica and over 400,000 years at the Vostok site. Links are also provided to shorter records from other Antarctic locations. The 2000-year record from Law Dome, Antarctica, has been merged with modern records to create a long-term record to the present. These records are maintained by the World Data Center for Paleoclimatology, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and have graciously been made freely available for access and distribution. The original investigators made the effort to obtain the data and assure their quality. To assure proper credit is given, please follow the citation instructions

283

Surface atmospheric pressure excitation of the translational mode of the inner core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using hourly atmospheric surface pressure field from ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) and from NCEP (National Centers for Environmental Prediction) Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) models, we show that atmospheric pressure fluctuations excite the translational oscillation of the inner core, the so-called Slichter mode, to the sub-nanogal level at the Earth surface. The computation is performed using a normal-mode formalism for a spherical, self-gravitating anelastic PREM-like Earth model. We determine the statistical response in the form of power spectral densities of the degree-one spherical harmonic components of the observed pressure field. Both hypotheses of inverted and non-inverted barometer for the ocean response to pressure forcing are considered. Based on previously computed noise levels, we show that the surface excitation amplitude is below the limit of detection of the superconducting gravimeters, making the Slichter mode detection a challenging instrumental task...

Rosat, Sverine; Rogister, Yves

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Noble gases as proxies of mean ocean temperature: sensitivity studies using a climate model of reduced complexity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-core measurements of krypton, xenon, and argon into a global mean ocean temperature change. Simulated noble gas-to-nitrogen gas Krypton Xenon Argon Mean ocean temperature Paleoclimatic proxy a b s t r a c t Past global mean ocean temperature may be reconstructed from measurements of atmospheric noble gas concentrations in ice

Stocker, Thomas

285

Impact of Anomalous Ocean Heat Transport on the North Atlantic Oscillation FABIO D'ANDREA, ARNAUD CZAJA, AND JOHN MARSHALL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the spectral power of the NAO. By greatly increasing the efficiency of ocean heat transport, the NAOImpact of Anomalous Ocean Heat Transport on the North Atlantic Oscillation FABIO D'ANDREA, ARNAUD 2005) ABSTRACT Coupled atmosphere­ocean dynamics in the North Atlantic is studied by means of a simple

Czaja, Arnaud

286

Sandia National Laboratories: ocean energy converters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Doppler Velocimeter EC Top Publications A Comparison of Platform Options for Deep-water Floating Offshore Vertical Axis Wind Turbines: An Initial Study Nonlinear Time-Domain...

287

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC 1, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. CAU 569 comprises the following nine corrective action sites (CASs): 03-23-09, T-3 Contamination Area 03-23-10, T-3A Contamination Area 03-23-11, T-3B Contamination Area 03-23-12, T-3S Contamination Area 03-23-13, T-3T Contamination Area 03-23-14, T-3V Contamination Area 03-23-15, S-3G Contamination Area 03-23-16, S-3H Contamination Area 03-23-21, Pike Contamination Area The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 569 based on the implementation of the corrective actions listed in Table ES-2.

Sloop, Christy

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Article Atmospheric Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

© The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp © The Author(s) 2012. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com csb.scichina.com www.springer.com/scp *Corresponding author (email: luchunsong110@gmail.com) Article Atmospheric Science February 2013 Vol.58 No.4-5: 545  551 doi: 10.1007/s11434-012-5556-6 A method for distinguishing and linking turbulent entrainment mixing and collision-coalescence in stratocumulus clouds LU ChunSong 1,2* , LIU YanGang 2 & NIU ShengJie 1 1 Key Laboratory for Atmospheric Physics and Environment of China Meteorological Administration, Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disaster of Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China; 2 Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York 11973, USA

289

Changes in Dimethyl Sulfide Oceanic Distribution due to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here they report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. They find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associted with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

Cameron-Smith, P; Elliott, S; Maltrud, M; Erickson, D; Wingenter, O

2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

290

EA-1336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, 336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania EA-1336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory's proposal to participate with a group of international organizations in an experiment to evaluate the dispersion and diffusion of liquid carbon dioxide droplets in ocean waters. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 4, 2001 EA-1336: Finding of No Significant Impact Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment May 4, 2001 EA-1336: Final Environmental Assessment Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment

291

CDIAC Atmospheric Moisture Data Sets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Moisture Atmospheric Moisture CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Moisture Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of dew point depression (combined with air temperature) Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Regional Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Six- and Three-Hourly Meteorological Observations from 223 Former U.S.S.R. Stations (CDIAC NDP-048) V. Razuvaev et al. Surface stations; 6- and 3-hourly observations of relative humidity, vapor pressure, humidity deficit, and dew point temperature Varies by station; through 2000

292

Atmospheric tritium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research progress for the year 1979 to 1980 are reported. Concentrations of tritiated water vapor, tritium gas and tritiated hydrocarbons in the atmosphere at selected sampling points are presented. (ACR)

Oestlund, H.G.; Mason, A.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Workshop on Carbon Sequestration Science - Ocean Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ocean Carbon Ocean Carbon Sequestration Howard Herzog MIT Energy Laboratory May 24, 2001 Ocean Carbon Sequestration Options * The direct injection of a relatively pure CO 2 stream that has been generated, for example, at a power plant or from an industrial process * The enhancement of the net oceanic uptake from the atmosphere, for example, through iron fertilization The DOE Center for Research on Ocean Carbon Sequestration (DOCS) * Established July 1999 * Centered at LBNL and LLNL * Participants S Eric Adams MIT S Jim Barry MBARI S Jim Bishop DOCS Scientific Co-director LBNL S Ken Caldeira DOCS Scientific Co-director LLNL S Sallie Chisholm MIT S Kenneth Coale Moss Landing Marine Laboratory S Russ Davis Scripps Institution of Oceanography S Paul Falkowski Rutgers S Howard Herzog MIT S Gerard Nihous Pacific International Center for High Technology Research

294

Author's personal copy Solar modulation in surface atmospheric electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Solar modulation in surface atmospheric electricity R. Giles Harrison a is the major source of air's electrical conductivity over the oceans and well above the continents atmospheric electrical circuit, including the local vertical current density and the related surface potential

Usoskin, Ilya G.

295

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draft Programmaticof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~on Ocean TherUial Energy Conversion, June 18, 1979. Ocean

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

COLLOQUIUM: The Alfvnic Motions of the Sun's Outer Atmosphere...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: The Alfvnic Motions of the Sun's Outer Atmosphere Scott McIntosh National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)...

297

The Role of Oceans and Sea Ice in Abrupt Transitions between Multiple Climate States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The coupled climate dynamics underlying large, rapid, and potentially irreversible changes in ice cover are studied. A global atmosphereoceansea ice general circulation model with idealized aquaplanet geometry is forced ...

Rose, Brian E. J.

298

Sensitivity of global warming to the pattern of tropical ocean warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The current generation of climate models that couple atmospheric and oceanic general circulation models predict substantially different patterns of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the Tropics when run in an...

Joseph J. Barsugli; Sang-Ik Shin; Prashant D. Sardeshmukh

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Oceanic control of the sea ice edge and multiple equilibria in the climate system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I study fundamental mechanisms of atmosphere-ocean-sea ice interaction. Hierarchies of idealized models are invoked to argue that multiple equilibria and abrupt change are robust features of the climate system. The main ...

Rose, Brian E. J. (Brian Edward James)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 569 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 569 comprises the nine numbered corrective action sites (CASs) and one newly identified site listed below: (1) 03-23-09, T-3 Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Annie, Franklin, George, and Moth); (2) 03-23-10, T-3A Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Harry and Hornet); (3) 03-23-11, T-3B Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Fizeau); (4) 03-23-12, T-3S Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Rio Arriba); (5) 03-23-13, T-3T Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Catron); (6) 03-23-14, T-3V Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Humboldt); (7) 03-23-15, S-3G Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Coulomb-B); (8) 03-23-16, S-3H Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Coulomb-A); (9) 03-23-21, Pike Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Pike); and (10) Waste Consolidation Site 3A. Because CAU 569 is a complicated site containing many types of releases, it was agreed during the data quality objectives (DQO) process that these sites will be grouped. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each study group. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the DQOs developed on September 26, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 569. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 569 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) at sample locations to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. A field investigation will be performed to define any areas where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether contaminants of concern are present at the site from other potential releases. The presence and nature of contamination from other types of releases (e.g., excavation, migration, and any potential releases discovered during the investigation) will be evaluated using soil samples collected from biased locations indicating the highest levels of contamination. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the objectives specific to each study group.

Patrick Matthews; Christy Sloop

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Acidbase chemical reaction model for nucleation rates in the polluted atmospheric boundary layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973; f Sustainable Energy Systems Group, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley agreement with measurements from Mexico City and Atlanta. amines | atmospheric aerosol | climate forcing

302

Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 5. Accidental Releases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the course of fifty-three years, LLNL had six acute releases of tritiated hydrogen gas (HT) and one acute release of tritiated water vapor (HTO) that were too large relative to the annual releases to be included as part of the annual releases from normal operations detailed in Parts 3 and 4 of the Tritium Dose Reconstruction (TDR). Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) had one such release of HT and one of HTO. Doses to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for these accidents have been modeled using an equation derived from the time-dependent tritium model, UFOTRI, and parameter values based on expert judgment. All of these acute releases are described in this report. Doses that could not have been exceeded from the large HT releases of 1965 and 1970 were calculated to be 43 {micro}Sv (4.3 mrem) and 120 {micro}Sv (12 mrem) to an adult, respectively. Two published sets of dose predictions for the accidental HT release in 1970 are compared with the dose predictions of this TDR. The highest predicted dose was for an acute release of HTO in 1954. For this release, the dose that could not have been exceeded was estimated to have been 2 mSv (200 mrem), although, because of the high uncertainty about the predictions, the likely dose may have been as low as 360 {micro}Sv (36 mrem) or less. The estimated maximum exposures from the accidental releases were such that no adverse health effects would be expected. Appendix A lists all accidents and large routine puff releases that have occurred at LLNL and SNL/CA between 1953 and 2005. Appendix B describes the processes unique to tritium that must be modeled after an acute release, some of the time-dependent tritium models being used today, and the results of tests of these models.

Peterson, S

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

TWIPS Sonar inspired by dolphins | News | National Oceanography Centre | from coast to deep ocean http://noc.ac.uk/news/twips-sonar-inspired-dolphins[10/11/2011 09:08:29  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contact us Home About Us Partners Research Education Technology Using Science Ships Data Ocean Watch News News List Latest News Research News Event News Blog News Promotional News Marine Life Talks News NOC is not responsible for external web content. NOC Events Marine Life Talk ­ 1 December 2011

Sóbester, András

304

Pathways and Mechanisms of OceanTracer Transport: Implications for Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This funding enabled the following published manuscripts in which we have developed models of direct relevance to ocean carbon sequestration and of the oceanic iron cycle, its connection to the global carbon cycle, and the sensitivity of atmospheric carbon dioxide to the external source of iron. As part of this process we have developed the adjoint of the MIT ocean biogeochemistry model which has enabled us to perform rigorous and efficient sensitivity studies.

Marshall, John; Follows, MIchael

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

305

The Oceanic Phosphorus Cycle Adina Paytan*, and Karen McLaughlin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.3. Atmospheric Deposition 566 3.4. Marine Sediments 566 3.5. Seawater-Ocean Crust Interactions 567 4. Phosphorus). In some organisms it can also be present as intracellular polyphosphate storage granules (Figure 1. The "biological pump", a process by which carbon is "pumped" from the euphotic zone to the deep ocean, exports

Paytan, Adina

306

Applications of the Generalized DDA Formalism and the Nature of Polarized Light in Deep Oceans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is applied to confi rmation of irregular invisibility cloaks made from metamaterials. In the second part, radiative transfer in a coupled atmosphere-ocean system is solved to study the asymptotic nature of the polarized light in deep oceans. The rate at which...

You, Yu

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

307

Decadal Modulations of the Indian Ocean Dipole in the SINTEX-F1 Coupled GCM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The decadal variation in the tropical Indian Ocean is investigated using outputs from a 200-yr integration of the Scale Interaction Experiment-Frontier Research Center for Global Change (SINTEX-F1) oceanatmosphere coupled model. The first EOF ...

Tomoki Tozuka; Jing-Jia Luo; Sebastien Masson; Toshio Yamagata

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

How ocean currents are studied  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

How infinite and boundless the ocean must have seemed to the first man to set foot upon its shore. Kind or stern, shallow or steep, the oceans shores have always held a peculiar fascination for man. The moist...

David Tolmazin

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Challenges in Ocean Energy Utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean is a reservoir of energy. It is ... . Development of suitable cost effective technologies for power generation from different forms of ocean energy (like wave energy, tidal energy, Ocean Thermal Energy Conv...

S. Neelamani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Ocean General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earths climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Chapter 16 - Ocean Engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Ocean thermal energy converters (OTECs) took advantage of the ocean acting as an immense collector and storer of solar radiation, thus delivering a steady flow of low-grade thermal energy. The ocean plays a similar role in relation to the wind energy, which is transformed into waves far steadier than the air currents that created them. Nevertheless, waves are neither steady nor concentrated enough to constitute a highly attractive energy source notwithstanding their large total power. There is little net horizontal motion of water in a surface ocean wave. A floating object drifts in the direction of the wave with about 1% of the wave velocity. A given elementary cell of water will move in a vertical circle, surging forward near the crest of the wave but receding by an almost equal amount at the trough. Any system in which the wave velocity depends on wavelength is called dispersive; hence the deep ocean is dispersive.

Aldo Vieira da Rosa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulated Arctic atmospheric feedbacks associated with late summer sea ice anomalies A. Rinke,1,2 K depend on regional and decadal variations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice system. Citation: Rinke to investigate feedbacks between September sea ice anomalies in the Arctic and atmospheric conditions in autumn

Moore, John

313

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch University, Princeton University, and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) suggests that it is not just a lack of iron, but a lack of iron in an easy-to-use form, that is affecting the ecosystems. The researchers sampled two north-south corridors across the Southern Ocean, traveling an easterly transect between the base of the South African National Antarctic Expeditions (SANAE IV) in Queen Maud Land and Cape Town, and a westerly transect between SANAE IV and South Georgia Island. Along the way they collected particles containing solid iron from a series of ocean systems with different characteristics.

314

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch University, Princeton University, and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) suggests that it is not just a lack of iron, but a lack of iron in an easy-to-use form, that is affecting the ecosystems. The researchers sampled two north-south corridors across the Southern Ocean, traveling an easterly transect between the base of the South African National Antarctic Expeditions (SANAE IV) in Queen Maud Land and Cape Town, and a westerly transect between SANAE IV and South Georgia Island. Along the way they collected particles containing solid iron from a series of ocean systems with different characteristics.

315

August 2014 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

- Sandia, Argonne, Brookhaven, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest - along with the National Center for Atmospheric Research,...

316

Extremes and Atmospheric Data Eric Gilleland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extremes and Atmospheric Data Eric Gilleland Research Applications Laboratory National Center for Atmospheric Research 2007-08 Program on Risk Analysis, Extreme Events and Decision Theory, opening workshop 16-19 September, North Carolina #12;Extremes · Interest in making inferences about large, rare, extreme phenomena

Gilleland, Eric

317

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al Qin Han,1 J. Keith Moore,1; accepted 7 December 2007; published 12 April 2008. [1] We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al (DEAD) model to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains all available

Zender, Charles

318

Separation of climatological imprints of the Kuroshio Extension and Oyashio fronts on the wintertime atmospheric boundary layer: Their sensitivity to SST resolution prescribed for atmospheric reanalysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mesoscale structures of the wintertime marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) as climatological imprints of oceanic fronts within the Kuroshio-Oyashio Extension (KOE) region east of Japan are investigated, by taking advantage of high horizontal ...

Ryusuke Masunaga; Hisashi Nakamura; Takafumi Miyasaka; Kazuaki Nishii; Youichi Tanimoto

319

NOAA Form 88-1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OMB APPROVED NO. 0648-0012 (1/22/99) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION Expires 1/31/2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) it is a citizen of the United States (if a corporation, at least 75% of the stock must be held by U.S. citizens. (If your application is not approved, one-half of the fee is refundable.) Do you want to keep

320

Generating electricity from the oceans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ocean energy has many forms, encompassing tides, surface waves, ocean circulation, salinity and thermal gradients. This paper will considers two of these, namely those found in the kinetic energy resource in tidal streams or marine currents, driven by gravitational effects, and the resources in wind-driven waves, derived ultimately from solar energy. There is growing interest around the world in the utilisation of wave energy and marine currents (tidal stream) for the generation of electrical power. Marine currents are predictable and could be utilised without the need for barrages and the impounding of water, whilst wave energy is inherently less predictable, being a consequence of wind energy. The conversion of these resources into sustainable electrical power offers immense opportunities to nations endowed with such resources and this work is partially aimed at addressing such prospects. The research presented conveys the current status of wave and marine current energy conversion technologies addressing issues related to their infancy (only a handful being at the commercial prototype stage) as compared to others such offshore wind. The work establishes a step-by-step approach that could be used in technology and project development, depicting results based on experimental and field observations on device fundamentals, modelling approaches, project development issues. It includes analysis of the various pathways and approaches needed for technology and device or converter deployment issues. As most technology developments are currently UK based, the paper also discusses the UK's financial mechanisms available to support this area of renewable energy, highlighting the needed economic approaches in technology development phases. Examination of future prospects for wave and marine current ocean energy technologies are also discussed.

AbuBakr S. Bahaj

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Radon in atmospheric studies: a review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The distribution of the isotopes of radon in space and time, their physical characteristics, and their behavior in the dynamics of the atmosphere have presented challenges for many decades. /sup 220/Rn, /sup 222/Rn and their daughters furnish a unique set of tracers for the study of transport and mixing processes in the atmosphere. Appropriate applications of turbulent diffusion theory yield general agreement with measured profiles. Diurnal and seasonal variations follow patterns set by consideration of atmospheric stability. /sup 222/Rn has been used successfully in recent studies of nocturnal drainage winds and cumulus convection. Good results have been obtained using /sup 222/Rn and its long-lived /sup 210/Pb daughter as tracers in the study of continent-to-ocean and ocean-to-continent air mass trajectories, /sup 220/Rn (thoron) because of its short half-life of only 55 seconds has been used to measure turbulent diffusion within the first few meters of the earth's surface and to study the influence of meteorological variables on the rate of exhalation from the ground. Radon daughters attach readily to atmospheric particulate matter which makes it possible to study these aerosols with respect to size spectra, attachment characteristics, removal by gravitation and precipitation, and residence times in the troposphere. The importance of ionization by radon and its daughters in the lower atmosphere and its effect on atmospheric electrical parameters is well known. Knowledge of the mobility and other characteristics of radon daughter ions has led to applications in the study of atmospheric electrical environments under fair weather and thunderstorm conditions and in the formation of condensation nuclei. The availability of increasingly sophisticated analytical tools and atmospheric measurement systems can be expected to add much to our understanding of radon and its daughters as trace components of the atmospheric environment in the years ahead.

Wilkening, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A pertinent question, however, is: what is the worldwide power resource that could be extracted with OTEC plants without affecting the thermohaline ocean circulation? The estimate is that the maximum steady-state...

Dr. Luis A. Vega Ph.D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A pertinent question, however, is: what is the worldwide power resource that could be extracted with OTEC plants without affecting the thermohaline ocean circulation? The estimate is that the maximum steady-state...

Dr. Luis A. Vega Ph.D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Use of Ocean Energies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For converting the current of water for the production of electricity, there is a wide range of technological approaches. The Italian ocean current power plant named Kobold (Fig.6.2) was the first commercial o...

Prof. Dr.-Ing Hermann-Josef Wagner

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Mining an Ocean of Data: Application of modern statistical methods for addressing biological oceanography questions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in our understanding of global ocean circulation, heat and energy transport associated with mesoscale methods of optimizing data analysis and interpretation for maximizing data use. As part of this proposal of their potential to store heat, sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide and influence major atmospheric weather events

Columbia University

326

Flexible ocean upwelling pipe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

California cooperative oceanic fisheries investigations. Reports volume 37, January 1--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientists from the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG), the Southwest Fisheries Science Center of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego (UCSD), have collaborated for 46 years in the longest-running large-scale study ever undertaken in the ocean. This study was begun in order to understand the causes of changes in population, over time, of commercially important fishes in California`s coastal waters. When the study began, the Pacific sardine was by far the most significant species of economic concern to the State of California. Because its population changes were thought to be caused by a diversity of atmospheric, oceanic, and biological variables, a wide array of measurements in the California Current region were begun and have been continued to this day. This long time series of data allows not only a better understanding of the flux of fish populations, but also lays the foundation for understanding interdecadal and secular change in the seas. This document contains papers from symposium of the 1995 CalCOFI Conference related to interdecadal changes in the ecology of the California current.

Olfe, J. [ed.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration #12;Acknowledgement The assembly .............................................................23 WESTERN WATER ASSESSMENT

Colorado at Boulder, University of

329

E-Print Network 3.0 - antarctic ozone hole Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Atmopsheric Chemistry and Global Change Program...

330

Multidecadal Warming and Shoaling of Antarctic Intermediate Water* SUNKE SCHMIDTKO AND GREGORY C. JOHNSON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. JOHNSON National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle

Johnson, Gregory C.

331

Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere by Anomalous/Lévy Diffusion: New Diagnostics Using FORTÉ Lightning Data A. B. Davis Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Remote Sensing Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico D. M. Suszcynsky Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Atmospheric Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Anomalous photon diffusion can be described as an ad hoc modification of the popular 2-stream approximation, specifically the δ-Eddington/diffusion version, for monochromatic radiative transfer in a scattering plane-parallel atmosphere. In the physical picture that describes the standard diffusion (hence

332

MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE, BIOSPHERE, AND POLICY SPHERE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MERCURY IN THE ATMOSPHERE, BIOSPHERE, AND POLICY SPHERE: Insights from a global 3D land.S. National Science Foundation Atmospheric Chemistry Program #12;FROM ATMOSPHERE TO FISH: MERCURY RISING Ice core from Wyoming [Schuster et al., ES&T 2002] Mercury deposition has increased by 300% since

Selin, Noelle Eckley

333

Ocean Energy Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy Ocean Resources Solar Wind Homes & Buildings Industry Vehicles & Fuels...

334

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

335

The circulation of the ocean is usually divided into two parts, a wind-driven circulation that  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Princeton, NJ 08540 #12;2 the solar energy reaching the lowest layers of the atmosphere during the winter southward through the Atlantic, around the tip of Africa, and into the ocean beyond. The Atlantic conveyor

336

Overview of environmental surveillance of waste management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), in southeastern Idaho, is a principal center for nuclear energy development for the Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Nuclear Navy. Fifty-two reactors have been built at the INEL, with 15 still operable. Extensive environmental surveillance is conducted at the INEL by DOE's Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL), the US Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), EG and G Idaho, Inc., and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO). Surveillance of waste management facilities is integrated with the overall INEL Site surveillance program. Air, water, soil, biota, and environmental radiation are monitored or sampled routinely at the INEL. Results to date indicate very small or no impacts from the INEL on the surrounding environment. Environmental surveillance activities are currently underway to address key environmental issues at the INEL. 7 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Smith, T.H.; Hedahl, T.G.; Wiersma, G.B.; Chew, E.W.; Mann, L.J.; Pointer, T.F.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Block-structured adaptive meshes and reduced grids for atmospheric general circulation models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...semi-Lagrangian shallow-water model on locally refined...Higgins1990Integration of the shallow water equations on the sphere...parallel adaptive mesh generator for atmospheric and oceanic simulationOcean...series to the shallow-water equations on sphereJ...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Ocean Carbon Cycle Data from the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The U.S. JGOFS program, a component of the U.S Global Change Research Program, grew out of the recommendations of a National Academy of Sciences workshop in 1984. An ambitious goal was set to understand the controls on the concentrations and fluxes of carbon and associated nutrients in the ocean. A new field of ocean biogeochemistry emerged with an emphasis on quality measurements of carbon system parameters and interdisciplinary field studies of the biological, chemical and physical process which control the ocean carbon cycle. U.S. JGOFS, ended in 2005 with the conclusion of the Synthesis and Modeling Project (SMP). Data are available throughout the U.S. JGOFS web site at http://usjgofs.whoi.edu/ and from the U.S. JGOFS Data System at http://usjgofs.whoi.edu/jg/dir/jgofs/. Major named segments of the project are: Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) Study, Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) Study, Equatorial Pacific Process Study, North Atlantic Bloom Experiment (1989), Arabian Sea Process Study, and the Southern Ocean Process Study.

339

Infrasonic ambient ocean noise: Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of ocean ambient noise were made at three widely separated deep?water bottom locations in the N. E. Pacific at eight frequencies in the range from 2.520.0 Hz for 40 consecutive days. Concurrent data on wind speed and wave height were collected. Analysis indicates that the spectrum level of infrasonicnoise is linearly related to the log of the wind speed above a threshold level. There is evidence that the noise can be directly associated with the wind rather than through the surface waves it produces. [Work supported by ONR.

Rudolph H. Nichols

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Incursion of the Pacific Ocean Water into the Indian Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using the data collected during the International Indian Ocean Expedition, maps showing the distribution of depth ... became clear that low-salinity water from the Pacific intrudes into the western Indian Ocean t...

G S Sharma; A D Gouveia

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

E-Print Network 3.0 - atlantic halibut larvae Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

larvae, Greenland halibut, newly... in the Atlantic Ocean (Bailey et al., 2005). In the Pacific Ocean, ... Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Pacific Marine...

342

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, November 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fall 2002 Intensive Operation Periods: Single Column Model and Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle--In an Intensive Operation Period (IOP) on November 3-23, 2002, researchers at the SGP CART site are collecting a detailed data set for use in improving the Single Column Model (SCM), a scaled-down climate model. The SCM represents one vertical column of air above Earth's surface and requires less computation time than a full-scale global climate model. Researchers first use the SCM to efficiently improve submodels of clouds, solar radiation transfer, and atmosphere-surface interactions, then implement the results in large-scale global models. With measured values for a starting point, the SCM predicts atmospheric variables during prescribed time periods. A computer calculates values for such quantities as the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface and predicts how clouds will evolve and interact with incoming light from the sun. Researchers compare the SCM's predictions with actual measurements made during the IOP, then adjust the submodels to make predictions more reliable. A second IOP conducted concurrently with the SCM IOP involves high-altitude, long-duration aircraft flights. The original plan was to use an unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV), but the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aircraft Proteus will be substituted because all UAVs have been deployed elsewhere. The UAV is a small, instrument-equipped, remote-control plane that is operated from the ground by a computer. The Proteus is a manned aircraft, originally designed to carry telecommunications relay equipment, that can be reconfigured for uses such as reconnaissance and surveillance, commercial imaging, launching of small space satellites, and atmospheric research. The plane is designed for two on-board pilots in a pressurized cabin, flying to altitudes up to 65,000 feet for as long as 18 hours. The Proteus has a variable wingspan of 77-92 feet and is 56 feet long. The plane can carry up to 7,260 pounds of equipment, making it a versatile research tool. The Proteus is making measurements at the very top of the cirrus cloud layer to characterize structures of these clouds. These new measurements will provide more accurate, more abundant data for use in improving the representation of clouds in the SCM. 2002-2003 Winter Weather Forecast--Top climate forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Climate Prediction Center say that an El Nino condition in the tropical Pacific Ocean will influence our winter weather this year. Although this El Nino is not as strong as the event of the 1997-1998 winter season, the United States will nevertheless experience some atypical weather. Strong impacts could be felt in several areas. Nationally, forecasters are predicting warmer-than-average temperatures over the northern tier of states and wetter-than-average conditions in the southern tier of states during the 2002-2003 winter season. Kansas residents should expect warmer and wetter conditions, while Oklahoma will be wetter than average.

Holdridge, D. J.

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

343

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Requirements and Challenges for Climate Mark Bourassa1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperatures, seasonal sea ice, and the remoteness of the regions all conspire to make observations difficult latitudes - the vertical exchanges of heat, momentum and material between the ocean, atmosphere and ice1 High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Requirements and Challenges for Climate Research

Gille, Sarah T.

344

United Nations Development Programme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

United Nations Development Programme Bureau for Development Policy Energy and Atmosphere Programme Development Programme with support from the Government of Norway #12;The views expressed in this volume. #12;5 Acknowledgements 6 Notes on Authors 7 Foreword 9 Executive Summary 27 Introduction: Energy

345

Cecilia Bitz Atmospheric Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in an eddy resolving ocean? And how does the heat affect Antarctic sea ice and ice shelves? Surface currents happens to the ocean and sea ice when westerly winds strengthen? Weddell Sea #12;0 10 20 30 40 50 60 0.1 degree Simulation 1 degree Simulation How does ocean heat transport change with increasing winds

346

Energy from the Ocean [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...development among the ocean energy options, and other relatively...paper focuses on ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). However, much of the paper's content has relevance to the use of the other ocean energy sources. Techniques of ocean...

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

atmospheric pressure | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pressure pressure Dataset Summary Description (Abstract):Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords atmospheric pressure climate NASA SWERA UNEP Data text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 46 MiB)

348

at Exchange Between Ocean and Atmosphere in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Trade Wind Zone Oceanography Pilot Study. Part IX: The sea-level wind field and wind stress values, July 1963 to June 1965. By Gunter R. Seckel, June 1970. iii + 66 pp.. 5 figs. 636. Oil pollution on Wake

349

Thomas H Zurbuchen, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Engineering, University of Michigan thomasz@umich.edu Exploring Plasmas Near Mercury: Solar Wind Driving and Surface Interac>ons #12;#12;Mercury Venus hemispherical instantaneous field of view (1.4 sr)! · Designed and built at University of Michigan! Mass: 1

350

College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operating across the continental US on a 70 kilometer grid; MOCHA onshore-offshore MT experiment imaging area where the broad Alaska continental margin transitions to stable North American craton. Two years. Other field campaigns are planned. The NGF is involved with offshore EM field measurements supporting

Kurapov, Alexander

351

Introduction to Atmosphere-Ocean J. H. LaCasce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blindern 0315 Oslo, Norway j.h.lacasce@geo.uio.no #12;2 #12;Contents 1 Equations 9 1.1 Derivatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 2.5.2 Mass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 2.5.3 Energy wind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 3.3 Hydrostatic balance

LaCasce, Joseph H.

352

Visualization and analysis of eddies in a global ocean simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eddies at a scale of approximately one hundred kilometers have been shown to be surprisingly important to understanding large-scale transport of heat and nutrients in the ocean. Due to difficulties in observing the ocean directly, the behavior of eddies below the surface is not very well understood. To fill this gap, we employ a high-resolution simulation of the ocean developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Using large-scale parallel visualization and analysis tools, we produce three-dimensional images of ocean eddies, and also generate a census of eddy distribution and shape averaged over multiple simulation time steps, resulting in a world map of eddy characteristics. As expected from observational studies, our census reveals a higher concentration of eddies at the mid-latitudes than the equator. Our analysis further shows that mid-latitude eddies are thicker, within a range of 1000-2000m, while equatorial eddies are less than 100m thick.

Williams, Sean J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hecht, Matthew W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Petersen, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Strelitz, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maltrud, Mathew E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hlawitschka, Mario [UC DAVIS; Hamann, Bernd [UC DAVIS

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Testing Components of New Community Isopycnal Ocean Circulation Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ocean and atmosphere are both governed by the same physical laws and models of the two media have many similarities. However, there are critical differences that call for special methods to provide the best simulation. One of the most important difference is that the ocean is nearly opaque to radiation in the visible and infra-red part of the spectrum. For this reason water mass properties in the ocean are conserved along trajectories for long distances and for long periods of time. For this reason isopycnal coordinate models would seem to have a distinct advantage in simulating ocean circulation. In such a model the coordinate surfaces are aligned with the natural paths of near adiabatic, density conserving flow in the main thermocline. The difficulty with this approach is at the upper and lower boundaries of the ocean, which in general do not coincide with density surfaces. For this reason hybrid coordinate models were proposed by Bleck and Boudra (1981) in which Cartesian coordinates were used near the ocean surface and isopycnal coordinates were used in the main thermocline. This feature is now part of the HICOM model (Bleck, 2002).

Bryan, Kirk

2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

354

ocean energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ocean energy ocean energy Dataset Summary Description This shapefile represents the seasonal winter depth profile to reach water at a temperature of 20ºC. Source NREL Date Released October 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords depth profile hydrokinetic ocean ocean energy ocean thermal energy conversion OTEC seawater cooling thermal Data application/zip icon OTEC Seawater Cooling 20ºC Depth Profile - Winter Average (zip, 1.1 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period March 2009 - February 2011 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

355

Ocean Circulation Lynne D Talley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the topography, with low pressure in the center. Ocean currents transport heat from the tropics to the poles have gone to sea. As knowledge about ocean currents and capabilities to observe it below the surfaceOcean Circulation Lynne D Talley Volume 1, The Earth system: physical and chemical dimensions

Talley, Lynne D.

356

SWASH ZONE CHARACTERISTICS AT OCEAN BEACH, SAN FRANCISCO, CA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Northern Ocean Beach Golden Gate Bridge #12;3 METHODS AND MEASUREMENT RESULTS Time-series of runup the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. The field effort in 2005 is part of an ongoing study that began, 400 Natural Bridges Drive, Santa Cruz, CA, 95060, USA #12;2 Figure 1. Definition sketch of a time

357

Ocean Current Drifter CD-ROMs File Naming Conventions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Current Drifter CD-ROMs File Naming Conventions Surface Current · Data are located on disc 1 of which are located in the directory FLOATS on disc 1. In summary, the files included in this CD-ROM set on which that file resides.) #12;Technical questions regarding the CD-ROMs should be addressed to: National

358

National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Notice Of Open Meeting Print E-mail Notice Of Open Meeting Print E-mail Please note this meeting has been cancelled. For more information please contact Cynthia Decker. National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC) Notice Of Open Meeting pdf | html A Notice by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on 09/16/2013 This notice sets forth the schedule of a forthcoming meeting of the DoC NOAA National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC). Time and Date: The meeting will be held October 1, 2013 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and October 2, 2013 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. These times are subject to change. Please refer to the Web page http://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/NCADAC/index.html for changes and for the most up-to-date meeting agenda. Place: The meeting will be held at the Four Points by Sheraton located at 1201 K Street NW., Washington, DC 20005. Please check the Web site http://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/NCADAC/index.html for confirmation of the venue and for directions.

359

Why Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean? Sequence Subarctic Pacific Ocean? The subarctic Pacific Ocean is one of the areas considered particularly vulnerable to acidification, which could affect the ocean's ability to act as a carbon sink. Global warming affects the food webs and biodiversity in marine ecosystems, especially in regions known as oxygen minimum zones where key components of the global carbon cycle take place. Oxygen minimum zones are found between 200 and 1,000 meters below sea level in the subarctic Pacific, the eastern South Pacific Ocean, the northern parts of the Indian Ocean and Arabian Sea, and off southwestern Africa. As global warming continues, researchers believe the oxygen levels in the oceans will decrease, a change that will extend the boundaries of the oxygen minimum

360

Model projections of atmospheric steering of Sandy-like superstorms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Polvani Adam H. Sobel aDepartment of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523;bDivision of Ocean...N Botzen WJW Emanuel K de Moel H ( 2013 ) Low-probability flood risk modeling for New York City . Risk Anal 33 ( 5 ): 772...

Elizabeth A. Barnes; Lorenzo M. Polvani; Adam H. Sobel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and the Global Carbon Cycle: The Key Uncertainties  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

The biogeochemical cycling of carbon between its sources and sinks determines the rate of increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The observed increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} content is less than the estimated release from fossil fuel consumption and deforestation. This discrepancy can be explained by interactions between the atmosphere and other global carbon reservoirs such as the oceans, and the terrestrial biosphere including soils. Undoubtedly, the oceans have been the most important sinks for CO{sub 2} produced by man. But, the physical, chemical, and biological processes of oceans are complex and, therefore, credible estimates of CO{sub 2} uptake can probably only come from mathematical models. Unfortunately, one- and two-dimensional ocean models do not allow for enough CO{sub 2} uptake to accurately account for known releases. Thus, they produce higher concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} than was historically the case. More complex three-dimensional models, while currently being developed, may make better use of existing tracer data than do one- and two-dimensional models and will also incorporate climate feedback effects to provide a more realistic view of ocean dynamics and CO{sub 2} fluxes. The instability of current models to estimate accurately oceanic uptake of CO{sub 2} creates one of the key uncertainties in predictions of atmospheric CO{sub 2} increases and climate responses over the next 100 to 200 years.

Peng, T. H.; Post, W. M.; DeAngelis, D. L.; Dale, V. H.; Farrell, M. P.

1987-12-00T23:59:59.000Z

362

Light extinction in the atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosol particles originating from natural sources, such as volcanos and sulfur-bearing gas emissions from the oceans, and from human sources, such as sulfur emissions from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, strongly affect visual air quality and are suspected to significantly affect radiative climate forcing of the planet. During the daytime, aerosols obscure scenic vistas, while at night they diminish our ability to observe stellar objects. Scattering of light is the main means by which aerosols attenuate and redistribute light in the atmosphere and by which aerosols can alter and reduce visibility and potentially modify the energy balance of the planet. Trends and seasonal variability of atmospheric aerosol loading, such as column-integrated light extinction or optical depth, and how they may affect potential climate change have been difficult to quantify because there have been few observations made of important aerosol optical parameters, such as optical depth, over the globe and over time and often these are of uneven quality. To address questions related to possible climate change, there is a pressing need to acquire more high-quality aerosol optical depth data. Extensive deployment of improved solar radiometers over the next few years will provide higher-quality extinction data over a wider variety of locations worldwide. An often overlooked source of turbidity data, however, is available from astronomical observations, particularly stellar photoelectric photometry observations. With the exception of the Project ASTRA articles published almost 20 years ago, few of these data ever appear in the published literature. This paper will review the current status of atmospheric extinction observations, as highlighted by the ASTRA work and augmented by more recent solar radiometry measurements.

Laulainen, N.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Large-Scale Distinctions between MJO and Non-MJO Convective Initiation over the Tropical Indian Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean JIAN LING Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, Florida of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, Florida PETER BECHTOLD European Centre discharge­recharge processes (Hendon 1988; Blade and Hartmann 1993; Kemball-Cook and Weare 2001

Zhang, Chidong

364

Climate change in the sea: the implications of increasing the carbon dioxide inputs to the surface ocean  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oceans are estimated to be absorbing one-third of the fossil fuel carbon released into the atmosphere, a process that is expected to change ocean carbon chemistry. I will present data from the Washington coast showing ocean pH declines and changes to the shell chemistry of bivalves. I will discuss implications of carbon cycle changes for marine species, including insights from a coastal area where I have worked for more than 24 years. I will summarize what we know to date about this process of ocean acidification.

Pfister, Cathy [University of Chicago

2012-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

365

Investigating the Role of OceanAtmosphere Coupling in the North Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Airsea interaction over the North Pacific is diagnosed using a simple, local coupled autoregressive model constructed from observed 7-day running-mean sea surface temperature (SST) and 2-m air temperature TA anomalies during the extended winter ...

Dimitry Smirnov; Matthew Newman; Michael A. Alexander

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Coupled OceanAtmosphere Dynamical Processes in the Tropical Indian and Pacific Oceans and the TBO  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The transitions (from relatively strong to relatively weak monsoon) in the tropospheric biennial oscillation (TBO) occur in northern spring for the south Asian or Indian monsoon and northern fall for the Australian monsoon involving coupled land...

Gerald A. Meehl; Julie M. Arblaster; Johannes Loschnigg

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .currents in the tropical Pacific Ocean. J. Phys. Oceanogr. ,in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean associated with the

Drushka, Kyla

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Laboratory Investigations in Support of Dioxide-Limestone Sequestration in the Ocean  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research under this Project has proven that liquid carbon dioxide can be emulsified in water by using very fine particles as emulsion stabilizers. Hydrophilic particles stabilize a CO{sub 2}-in-H{sub 2}O (C/W) emulsion; hydrophobic particles stabilize a H{sub 2}O-in-CO{sub 2} (W/C) emulsion. The C/W emulsion consists of tiny CO{sub 2} droplets coated with hydrophilic particles dispersed in water. The W/C emulsion consists of tiny H{sub 2}O droplets coated with hydrophobic particles dispersed in liquid carbon dioxide. The coated droplets are called globules. The emulsions could be used for deep ocean sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Liquid CO{sub 2} is sparsely soluble in water, and is less dense than seawater. If neat, liquid CO{sub 2} were injected in the deep ocean, it is likely that the dispersed CO{sub 2} droplets would buoy upward and flash into vapor before the droplets dissolve in seawater. The resulting vapor bubbles would re-emerge into the atmosphere. On the other hand, the emulsion is denser than seawater, hence the emulsion plume would sink toward greater depth from the injection point. For ocean sequestration a C/W emulsion appears to be most practical using limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) particles of a few to ten ?m diameter as stabilizing agents. A mix of one volume of liquid CO{sub 2} with two volumes of H{sub 2}O, plus 0.5 weight of pulverized limestone per weight of liquid CO{sub 2} forms a stable emulsion with density 1087 kg m{sup -3}. Ambient seawater at 500 m depth has a density of approximately 1026 kg m{sup -3}, so the emulsion plume would sink by gravity while entraining ambient seawater till density equilibrium is reached. Limestone is abundant world-wide, and is relatively cheap. Furthermore, upon disintegration of the emulsion the CaCO{sub 3} particles would partially buffer the carbonic acid that forms when CO{sub 2} dissolves in seawater, alleviating some of the concerns of discharging CO{sub 2} in the deep ocean. Laboratory experiments showed that the CaCO{sub 3} emulsion is slightly alkaline, not acidic. We tested the release of the CO{sub 2}-in-H{sub 2}O emulsion stabilized by pulverized limestone in the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory High Pressure Water Tunnel Facility (HPWTF). Digital photographs showed the sinking globules in the HPWTF, confirming the concept of releasing the emulsion in the deep ocean. We modeled the release of an emulsion from the CO{sub 2} output of a 1000 MW coal-fired power plant at 500 m depth. The emulsion would typically sink several hundred meters before density equilibration with ambient seawater. The CO{sub 2} globules would rain out from the equilibrated plume toward the ocean bottom where they would disintegrate due to wave action and bottom friction. Conceptual release systems are described both for an open ocean release and a sloping seabed release of the emulsion.

Dan Golomb; Eugene Barry; David Ryan; Stephen Pennell; Carl Lawton; Peter Swett; Devinder Arora; John Hannon; Michael Woods; Huishan Duan; Tom Lawlor

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Variations in eastern Indian Ocean upper-ocean thermal properties are assessed for the period 19702004, with a particular focus on asymmetric features related to opposite phases of Indian Ocean dipole events, using high-resolution ocean model ...

Caroline C. Ummenhofer; Franziska U. Schwarzkopf; Gary Meyers; Erik Behrens; Arne Biastoch; Claus W. Bning

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Halocarbon and Other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) Dataset Summary Description The general mission of the Halocarbons and other Atmospheric Trace Species group is to quantify the distributions and magnitudes of sources and sinks for atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) and halogen containing compounds. HATS utilizes numerous types of platforms, including ground-based stations, towers, ocean vessels, aircraft, and balloons, to accomplish its mission. For a detailed mission statement, consult our FAQ. Tags {"nitrous oxide","sulfur hexaflouride",CFC-11,CFC-12,CFC-113,CCl4,CH3CCl3,CH3Cl,halon-1211,HCFC-22,HCFC-142b,halocarbons,chromatograph,aircraft,balloons,vessels,ships,towers,"natural resources",environment,air,"GHG "}

372

ARM - Lesson Plans: Ocean Currents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ocean Currents Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global...

373

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric chemistry experiment Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(Sc) (Ns) 18 Cloud Physics and Atmospheric ... Source: Collection: Geosciences 2 Curriculum Vitae Hiroshi Tanimoto, Ph.D. Summary: : National Institute for Environmental Studies,...

374

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric nuclear tests Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atmospheric nuclear tests Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 January 3, 2007 National Nuclear Security...

375

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric aerosol aggregates Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are also directly associated with reduction in visibility and with long-range transport... for atmospheric aerosols is their association ... Source: Brookhaven National...

376

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere amap-nuuk west Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in the Atmosphere AMAP- Nuuk, Westgreenland 2002-2004 NERI Technical Report, No. 547 12;Tom side 12;National... Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment...

377

NREL Studies Wind Farm Aerodynamics to Improve Siting (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Studies Wind Farm Studies Wind Farm Aerodynamics to Improve Siting NREL researchers have used high-tech instruments and high- performance computing to understand atmospheric turbulence and turbine wake behavior in order to improve wind turbine design and siting within wind farms. The knowledge gained from this research could lead to improved turbine design standards, increased productivity in large wind farms, and a lower cost of energy from wind power. This is key, because as turbines grow in size-approximately doubling in height over the past five years-they present more complex challenges to wind turbine designers and operators. To gain new insights into turbine wind wakes, NREL and the Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute (RASEI) joined together with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the

378

New Report Summarizes Climate Change Impacts on U.S. Oceans, Marine  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Report Summarizes Climate Change Impacts on U.S. Oceans, Marine Resources Print E-mail New Report Summarizes Climate Change Impacts on U.S. Oceans, Marine Resources Print E-mail New Report Summarizes Climate Change Impacts on U.S. Oceans, Marine Resources Thursday, September 19, 2013 Featured by NOAA, a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program According to a new technical report prepared for the 2013 National Climate Assessment, the nation's valuable ocean ecosystems and marine resources are already being affected by a changing climate. These impacts are expected to increase in the coming years, putting marine resources - and the people and economies that depend on them - at high risk in a changing world. The report, Oceans and Marine Resources in a Changing Climate reviews how climate variability is affecting the physical, chemical, and biological conditions of ocean ecosystems, and how these changes are already having societal impacts by affecting fisheries and other valuable ocean products and services. It also synthesizes information on projected climate-driven changes in U.S. ocean ecosystems over the next 25 to 100 years.

379

Geoengineering Downwelling Ocean Currents: A Cost Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Downwelling ocean currents carry carbon into the deep ocean (the solubility pump), and play a ... weakening of the NADW is modification of downwelling ocean currents, by an increase in carbon concentration or ......

S. Zhou; P. C. Flynn

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ocean currents may prevent stagnation or accumulatioLegal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage Jason Heinrich Working Paper Laboratory for Energy #12;Introduction Ocean sequestration of CO2, a potentially significant technique to be used

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Ocean currents help explain population genetic structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...original work is properly cited. Ocean currents help explain population genetic...larval dispersal estimates based on ocean current observations, we demonstrate...Data-assimilated models of ocean currents for the study region were produced...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Configuration of a Southern Ocean Storm Track  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diagnostics of ocean variability that reflect and influence local transport properties of heat and chemical species vary by an order of magnitude along the Southern Oceans Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Topographic hotspots are important ...

Tobias Bischoff; Andrew F. Thompson

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Pelagic Polychaetes of the Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean CLAPARtDE,E. 1868. LesPolyc'haetes of the Pacific Ocean KINBERG, J. G. H. 1866.Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean TREADWELL, A. L. 1906.

Dales, K Phillips

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;2 Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere Contents 3 Heavy Snowfall regulations designed to elimi- nate human-caused haze in Big Bend and 155 other National Parks), and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), among others. In support of BRAVO, NPS and CIRA scientists

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

385

S. 2466: This Act may be cited as the National Atmospheric Nuclear Testing Compensation Act of 1990. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, April 19, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bill would amend Title XXI of the Public Health Service Act to provide for the establishment of an atmospheric nuclear testing compensation program to compensate civilians living down wind of the Nevada Test Site during above-ground testing of nuclear weapons and miners exposed in underground uranium mines supplying uranium for the primary use and benefit of the nuclear weapons program. The bill describes technical assistance and information, administrative procedures for filing a petition, determination of eligibility, and amount of compensation.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

SRNL EMERGENCY RESPONSE CAPABILITY FOR ATMOSPHERIC CONTAMINANT RELEASES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emergency response to an atmospheric release of chemical or radiological contamination is enhanced when plume predictions, field measurements, and real-time weather information are integrated into a geospatial framework. The Weather Information and Display (WIND) System at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilizes such an integrated framework. The rapid availability of predictions from a suite of atmospheric transport models within this geospatial framework has proven to be of great value to decision makers during an emergency involving an atmospheric contaminant release.

Koffman, L; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Buckley, R; Robert Addis, R

2006-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

387

Ocean Energy Technology: Overview, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

femp.energy.gov femp.energy.gov Ocean Energy Technology Overview Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Federal Energy Management Program July 2009 DOE/GO-102009-2823 Ocean Energy Technology Overview i Contacts Principal Investigators: Kari Burman Phone: 303-384-7558 E-mail: kari.burman@nrel.gov Andy Walker, PhD PE Phone: 303-384-7531 E-mail: andy.walker@nrel.gov Energy Management and Federal Markets Group National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) MS 301 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401 Sponsor: U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program Acknowledgements This work was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). Research regarding ocean energy resources, status of wave and tidal power technologies, and

388

Our Dusty Atmosphere | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dusty Atmosphere Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere September 6, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Researchers are developing a better understanding of the effects of

389

Our Dusty Atmosphere | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Our Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere Our Dusty Atmosphere September 6, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL A heavy layer of air pollution, a mix of aerosol particles and vapors, obscures the view over Mexico City. Two studies by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show the importance of including the small-scale effects of aerosols in climate modeling. | Image courtesy of PNNL Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? Researchers are developing a better understanding of the effects of

390

Interactive Visualization of Modeled Atmospheric Trace Constituents Carmen M. Benkovitz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effects of the emissions of Popocatepetl volcano, located near Mexico City. The effects of stronger of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Chemical Transport Model (CTM) of sulfate in the atmosphere. The visualization on climate. Anthropogenic activities affect the aerosol content of the atmosphere. Anthropogenic emissions

391

A Field Experiment to Validate Atmospheric Dispersion and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rise-R.495 A Field Experiment to Validate Atmospheric Dispersion and Dose Models S. P. Nielsen* S Roskilde, Denmark May 1986 #12;RIS?-R-495 DOUBLE TRACER EXPERIMENTS TO EVALUATE ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT Pollution Laboratory, Risø National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark Abstract. Two tracers

392

The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior Bonnie Monteleone, William Cooper, Jennifer O'Keefe, Pamela Seaton, and Maureen Conte #12;#12;#12;Plastic does not biodegrade it photo-degrades breaking down is the plastic cheese wrap? Unfortunately, marine creatures mistake plastics in the ocean for food #12

Boynton, Walter R.

393

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENERATING ELECTRICITY USING OCEAN WAVES A RENEWABLE SOURCE OF ENERGY REPORT FOR THE HONG KONG ELECTRIC COMPANY LIMITED Dr L F Yeung Mr Paul Hodgson Dr Robin Bradbeer July 2007 #12;Ocean Waves and construction of equipment that could measure and log wave conditions and tide levels at Hoi Ha Wan. Prototypes

Bradbeer, Robin Sarah

394

Atmospheric Transport of Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations is to provide estimates of concentration and surface deposition from routine and accidental releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. This paper discusses this topic.

Crawford, T.V.

2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

395

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) is a unique research facility for studying the planetary boundary layer and for testing and calibrating atmospheric sensors. The facility includes a 300 m tower instrumented with fast- and slow-response ...

J. C. Kaimal; J. E. Gaynor

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Ocean Navitas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Navitas Navitas Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Navitas Address Nursery House Place United Kingdom Zip DN21 5BQ Sector Ocean Product Ocean Navitas was incorporated in May 2006 by experienced engineers, businessmen and sailing enthusiasts David Hunt, James McCague and Simon Condry. Website http://www.oceannavitas.com Region United Kingdom References Ocean NavitasUNIQ75db538f85b32404-ref-000014E2-QINU LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Ocean Navitas NaREC This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Aegir Dynamo This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

397

Ocean - FAQ | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FAQ FAQ Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Frequently Asked Questions Following are some Frequently Asked Questions, we hope to add to this list as we hear from you. Questions What is Ocean.data.gov? How can I use this resource? What data can I expect to find here? Where do these data come from? Can data from State and academic sources be included in this portal? Who can suggest data and information to be included in Ocean.data.gov? Who decides what data are included? How do I get involved? How does this differ from other data efforts such as regional data portals? Where do I find information about data standards, metadata standards, and formats? Can we provide feedback about a particular dataset?

398

Aspects of modeling the North Pacific Ocean.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Three aspects of the problem of modeling North Pacific Ocean climate are investigated: the effect of viscosity on effective model resolution, the effect of ocean (more)

Dawe, Jordan Tyler

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

8, 10691088, 2008 Atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into the atmosphere (Molina et al., 1974; Farman et al., 1985) has led to an interna- tional effort to replace

Boyer, Edmond

400

Oceanic Communities in a Changing Planet - The Tara Oceans Project (GSC8 Meeting)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Jeroen Raes of the University of Brussels discusses the Tara-Oceans expedition at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009

Raes, Jeroen [University of Brussels

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The Upper Atmosphere Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with *the plasma frethe progress...explorcreated an even larger number of...the upper atmosphere and ionosphere...the upper atmosphere. For this...ionospheric plasma motion simul-taneously...field is large, the horizontal...resolved. The atmospheric gravity waves...simul-taneously at a large number of...two regions plasma drifts separated...

J. V. Evans

1972-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

402

The Upper Atmosphere Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DATA, JOURNAL OF ATMOSPHERIC AND TERRESTRIAL...IN NEAR-EARTH PLASMA, SPACE SCIENCE...INVESTIGATION OF WHISTLING ATMOSPHERICS, PHILOSOPHICAL...TRANSPOLAR EXOSPHERIC PLASMA .1. PLASMASPHERE...dynamics of the upper atmosphere. For this purpose...the ionospheric plasma motion simul-taneously...

J. V. Evans

1972-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

403

5, 60416076, 2005 Atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

opportunity to examine atmospheric oxidation in a megacity that has more pollution than typical USACPD 5, 6041­6076, 2005 Atmospheric oxidation in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area T. R. Shirley et.atmos-chem-phys.org/acpd/5/6041/ SRef-ID: 1680-7375/acpd/2005-5-6041 European Geosciences Union Atmospheric Chemistry

Boyer, Edmond

404

Science & Engineering Applications Software | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science & Engineering Applications Software Science & Engineering Applications Software Argonne's Mathematics and Computer Science Division applies its advanced algorithms and tools to create software that addresses the challenges critical to our society, such as life science, climate change, materials, and energy systems simulations. Software for applications includes: FOAM (Fast Ocean-Atmosphere Model) is a coupled ocean/atmosphere model that incorporates all the physics needed for multicentury simulations. It uses a combination of improved ocean model formulation and reduced-resolution atmosphere model to reduce computational requirements by a factor of ten relative to similar models. It uses parallel processing techniques to allow execution on parallel platforms that are more cost-effective than the vector multiprocessors traditionally used for

405

Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia National Laboratories: Missions:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accomplishments Accomplishments About Defense Systems & Assessments Program Areas Accomplishments Archives Cybersecurity Missions Accomplishments Protecting the nation Sandia lasers test and calibrate sensors on U.S. satellites Sandia's scientists and engineers have a significant impact on national security and continually deliver results, including these noteworthy successes from fiscal year 2012: AHW Launch Advanced Hypersonic Weapon test flight Sandia conducted a highly successful first test flight of the Advanced Hypersonic Weapon (AHW) concept for the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command. Designed to fly within the earth's atmosphere at hypersonic speed and long range, the first-of-its-kind glide vehicle launched from Sandia's Kauai Test Facility in Kauai, Hawaii, using a three-stage

406

Ocean Energy Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ocean Energy Technology Basics Ocean Energy Technology Basics Ocean Energy Technology Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis Text Version Photo of low waves in the ocean. A dock is visible in the background. Oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth's surface. As the world's largest solar collectors, oceans contain thermal energy from the sun and produce mechanical energy from tides and waves. Even though the sun affects all ocean activity, the gravitational pull of the moon primarily drives tides, and wind powers ocean waves. Learn more about: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy Ocean Resources Addthis Related Articles Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology

407

Upper Ocean Response to Tropical Cyclone Wind Asymmetries S. Daniel Jacob and Lynn K. Shay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) images of SST. As a storm intensifies, the increasing wind speed may. However, the significant SST reduction induced by the increasing wind speed leads to reduced air to the atmosphere ( 20%) and vertical mixing at the base of the oceanic mixed layer ( 80%) induced by wind stress

Shay, Lynn K. "Nick"

408

Influence of terrestrial weathering on ocean acidification and the next glacial inception  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H decline based on the default parameterizations. Thus on short timescales, weathering has little effect. Introduction [2] Humans have released over 300 Pg of carbon (1 Pg C = 1015 g C) mainly from fossil fuel unfortunately has its price: ocean acidification. Uptake of atmospheric CO2 lowers seawater pH and [CO3 2?

Zeebe, Richard E.

409

Processes of interannual mixed layer temperature variability in the thermocline ridge of the Indian Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dominates from July to November. Atmospheric fluxes generally damp SSTA generation in the TRIO region, there is no obvious peak in SSTA amplitude in boreal winter, as previously noted for heat content anomalies. Positive of the Indian Ocean (TRIO--Jayaku- mar et al. 2011). The TRIO is primarily maintained by wind stress curl

410

Multiple Hypothesis Object Tracking For Unsupervised Self-Learning: An Ocean Eddy Tracking Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and others 2003; Hoegh-Guldberg and Bruno 2010). In order to project a future response accurately eddies transport heat, salt, energy, and nutrients across oceans. As a result, accurately identi- fying and atmospheric CO2 levels remains a topic of intense scientific and societal inter- est (Caldeira, Wickett

Minnesota, University of

411

Ice-ocean boundary conditions for coupled models Gavin A. Schmidt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that must be simulated in any comprehensive earth system model incorporating ocean, atmosphere, sea ice different groups (a central fo- cus in the ongoing PRogramme for Integrated earth System Modelling (PRISM) and Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) projects). This paper addresses developments in coupling at sea

Bitz, Cecilia

412

Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 62 (2000) 15151525 www.elsevier.nl/locate/jastp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 62 (2000) 1515­1525 wwwDepartment of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA bDepartment ofAerospace Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA cDepartment of Electrical Engineering

Stout, Quentin F.

413

ARM Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates for AIRS Validation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates for AIRS Validation D. C. Tobin, H. E. Revercomb, W. F. Feltz, R. D. Knuteson, and D. D. Turner Space Science and Engineering Center University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison, Wisconsin B. M. Lesht Environmental Research Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois L. Strow University of Maryland College Park, Maryland C. Barnet Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology Baltimore, Maryland E. Fetzer National Aeronautics Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory Pasadena, California Introduction The atmospheric infrared sounder (AIRS) is a high spectral resolution infrared sounder on the earth observing plan (EOS) Aqua platform. Temperature and water vapor profile retrievals from AIRS are

414

Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with US Coast Guard vessels. The Corvallis seismic station is upgraded, relocated and tied. It grows to include studies on early life histories of fishes, vertical migration, ocean ecology

415

Ocean Barrier Layers Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

416

A REVIEW OF GLOBAL OCEAN TEMPERATURE OBSERVATIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR OCEAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by taking an inventory of changes in energy storage. The main storage is in the ocean, the latest values, Energy Sustainable Economic, Earth's energy imbalance, and thermosteric sea level rise. Up-to-date estimates are provided

417

composition of putative oceans on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Results: Oceanic water composition · Oceanic water is a NaCl-CaCl2 solution · Large Cl mass · Cl in a "soda ocean" Temperature, o C 100 200 300 400 500 Concentration,mole/kgH2O 0.01 0.1 1 Cl- CaCl2 CaCl+ Na calcite · Quartz · Na-K feldspars · Anhydrite · Pyrite · Hematite/magnetite · Evaporites: NaCl+CaCl2 350o

Treiman, Allan H.

418

ARM - Field Campaign - 2008 VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmos-Land Study (VOCALS)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmos-Land Study (VOCALS) 8 VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmos-Land Study (VOCALS) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : 2008 VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmos-Land Study (VOCALS) 2008.10.14 - 2008.11.13 Lead Scientist : Peter Daum For data sets, see below. Description The DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed to Arica, Chile as part of the NSF VAMOS Ocean-Cloud- Atmospheric-Land Study (VOCALS). The purpose of VOCALS is to develop an understanding of the physical and chemical processes central to the climate system of the Southeast Pacific. In this region, extensive areas of marine clouds exist (coverage about 70% in October). The ASP component of VOCALS focused on aerosols, and how their chemical and microphysical properties, and their ability to act as CCN differ between

419

Environmental impacts of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2}. Final report volume 2, September 1994--August 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One option to reduce atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels is to capture and sequester power plant CO{sub 2}. Commercial CO{sub 2} capture technology, though expensive, exists today. However, the ability to dispose of large quantities of CO{sub 2} is highly uncertain. The deep ocean is one of only a few possible CO{sub 2} disposal options (others are depleted oil and gas wells or deep, confined aquifers) and is a prime candidate because the deep ocean is vast and highly unsaturated in CO{sub 2}. Technically, the term `disposal` is really a misnomer because the atmosphere and ocean eventually equilibrate on a time scale of 1000 years regardless of where the CO{sub 2} is originally discharged. However, peak atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations expected to occur in the next few centuries could be significantly reduced by ocean disposal. The magnitude of this reduction will depend upon the quantity of CO{sub 2} injected in the ocean, as well as the depth and location of injection. Ocean disposal of CO{sub 2} will only make sense if the environmental impacts to the ocean are significantly less than the avoided impacts of atmospheric release. In this project, we examined these ocean impacts through a multi-disciplinary effort designed to summarize the current state of knowledge. In the process, we have developed a comprehensive method to assess the impacts of pH changes on passive marine organisms. This final report addresses the following six topics: CO{sub 2} loadings and scenarios, impacts of CO{sub 2} transport, near-field perturbations, far-field perturbations, environmental impacts of CO{sub 2} release, and policy and legal implications of CO{sub 2} release.

Herzog, H.J.; Adams, E.E. [eds.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Ocean Sci., 3, 417427, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/417/2007/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deacon Cell. When the ocean currents are averaged zon- ally to produce a meridional overturningOcean Sci., 3, 417­427, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/417/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science On the fast response of the Southern Ocean to changes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Silicic acid leakage from the Southern Ocean: Opposing effects of nutrient uptake and oceanic circulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the thermocline region of low latitudes. The power of Southern Ocean intermediate waters to affect phytoplanktonSilicic acid leakage from the Southern Ocean: Opposing effects of nutrient uptake and oceanic in formation rate of Southern Ocean intermediate waters. Comparison of d30 Si records from the Southern Ocean

Pahnke, Katharina

422

MANHAZ position paper on: Modelling of Pollutant Transport in the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANHAZ position paper on: Modelling of Pollutant Transport in the Atmosphere Torben Mikkelsen July, Denmark I Atmospheric dispersion: Basic The dispersion of pollutants is intimately related to the state 2003 Atmospheric Physics Division Wind Energy Department Risø National Laboratory Dk-4000 Roskilde

423

A white paper on Effects of Anthropogenic Pollution on the Atmospheric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A white paper on Effects of Anthropogenic Pollution on the Atmospheric Chemistry of the Tropical Brazilian Partner Organizations National Institute for Amazonian Research (INPA)1 The Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere by the atmospheric oxidation of trace gases to low volatility compounds (Chen et al. 2009). These products can

424

Toward Energetically Consistent Ocean Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Possibilities to construct a realistic quasi-global ocean model in Boussinesq approximation with a closed energy cycle are explored in this study. In such a model, the energy related to the mean variables would interact with all parameterized ...

Carsten Eden; Lars Czeschel; Dirk Olbers

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Ocean Currents at Rocas Alijos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The flow of oceanic water over and around an obstacle such as a seamount or island has the potential to profoundly affect the local biological community (Hamner and Hauri, 1986; Wolanski and Hamner, 1988). If ...

Shirley Vaughan; Ronald K. Skinner; Robert W. Schmieder; Brian McGuire

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Conference on oceans draws Clinton  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Against the tranquil backdrop of Monterey Bay, Calif., President Bill Clinton earlier this month signed a measure extending the U.S. ban on offshore oil drilling, and he proposed several sweeping initiatives to protect, restore, and explore the oceans....

ELIZABETH WILSON

1998-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

427

Pacific Ocean Islands Editorial Introduction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Islands in the Pacific Ocean are of three kinds (Nunn 2005). ... Most of the islands lie in the SW Pacific, but the Galapagos, Clipperton, and Easter ... Island are volcanic islands rising from the East Pacific R...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Comparison between Observed and Model Simulated Atmospheric Circulation Patterns Associated with Extreme Temperature Days over North America using CMIP5 Historical Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Circulation patterns associated with extreme temperature days over North America as simulated by a suite of climate models are compared with those obtained from observations. Seventeen coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models ...

Paul C. Loikith; Anthony J. Broccoli

429

The Dynamical Core, Physical Parameterizations, and Basic Simulation Characteristics of the Atmospheric Component AM3 of the GFDL Global Coupled Model CM3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) has developed a coupled general circulation model (CM3) for the atmosphere, oceans, land, and sea ice. The goal of CM3 is to address emerging issues in climate change, including aerosolcloud ...

Leo J. Donner; Bruce L. Wyman; Richard S. Hemler; Larry W. Horowitz; Yi Ming; Ming Zhao; Jean-Christophe Golaz; Paul Ginoux; S.-J. Lin; M. Daniel Schwarzkopf; John Austin; Ghassan Alaka; William F. Cooke; Thomas L. Delworth; Stuart M. Freidenreich; C. T. Gordon; Stephen M. Griffies; Isaac M. Held; William J. Hurlin; Stephen A. Klein; Thomas R. Knutson; Amy R. Langenhorst; Hyun-Chul Lee; Yanluan Lin; Brian I. Magi; Sergey L. Malyshev; P. C. D. Milly; Vaishali Naik; Mary J. Nath; Robert Pincus; Jeffrey J. Ploshay; V. Ramaswamy; Charles J. Seman; Elena Shevliakova; Joseph J. Sirutis; William F. Stern; Ronald J. Stouffer; R. John Wilson; Michael Winton; Andrew T. Wittenberg; Fanrong Zeng

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

431

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Atmospheric Pressure Deposition Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows TDM - Karma Sawyer Robert C. Tenent National Renewable Energy Laboratory robert.tenent@nrel.gov 303-384-6775 4/4/2013 Insulating Glass Unit (IGU) Glass Transparent Conductor (TC) Active Electrode Counter Electrode Ion Conductor 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose and Objectives * Expense - Current market price of $50-$100/ft 2 - Projections indicate under $20/ft 2 needed - A new production paradigm is required * Aesthetics - Architects hesitant to adopt "smurf glass"

432

DSM Will Acquire Ocean Nutrition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DSM Will Acquire Ocean Nutrition ... Dutch chemical maker DSM will spend about $530 million to acquire Ocean Nutrition Canada, which calls itself the worlds largest supplier of omega-3 fatty acids to the dietary supplement and food manufacturing markets. ... DSM says the acquisition is the fifth purchase it has made in the nutrition field since September 2010, when it announced a corporate strategy to expand in the health, nutrition, and industrial materials markets. ...

MICHAEL MCCOY

2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

433

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

434

Aircraft Observations of Convective Systems in the Indian Ocean [EVS Event]  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aircraft Observations of Convective Systems in the Indian Ocean Aircraft Observations of Convective Systems in the Indian Ocean August 23, 2013 Speaker: Bradley Nicholas Guy National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory Date: Friday, August 23, 2013 Time: 11:00 a.m. Location: Argonne National Laboratory TCS Building 240 Room 4301 In the DYNAMO (Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation) field experiment, a large number of measurement platforms were deployed to study environmental and convective cloud system characteristics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) initiation region in the Indian Ocean. A mobile platform, the NOAA P-3 instrumented aircraft, sampled intense convective cloud systems, along with the surrounding environment. This presentation will explore the characteristics of mesoscale convective

435

Comparison of Atmospheric Water Vapor in Observational and Model Data Sets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The global water vapor distribution for five observational based data sets and three GCM integrations are compared. The variables considered are the mean and standard deviation values of the precipitable water for the entire atmospheric column and the 500 to 300 hPa layer for January and July. The observationally based sets are the radiosonde data of Ross and Elliott, the ERA and NCEP reanalyses, and the NVAP blend of sonde and satellite data. The three GCM simulations all use the NCAR CCM3 as the atmospheric model. They include: a AMIP type simulation using observed SSTs for the period 1979 to 1993, the NCAR CSM 300 year coupled ocean--atmosphere integration, and a CSM integration with a 1% CO2 increase per year. The observational data exhibit some serious inconsistencies. There are geographical patterns of differences related to interannual variations and national instrument biases. It is clear that the proper characterization of water vapor is somewhat uncertain. Some conclusions about these data appear to be robust even given the discrepancies. The ERA data are too dry especially in the upper levels. The observational data evince much better agreement in the data rich Northern Hemisphere compared to the Southern. Distinct biases are quite pronounced over the Southern Ocean. The mean values and particularly the standard deviations of the three reanalyses are very dependent upon the GCM used as the assimilation vehicle for the analyses. This is made clear by the much enhanced tropical variability in the NCEP/DOE/ AMIP reanalyses compared the initial NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis. The NCAR CCM3 shows consistent evidence of a dry bias. The 1% CO2 experiment shows a very similar pattern of disagreement with the sonde data as the other integrations, once account is taken of the warming trend. No new modes of difference are evident in the 1% CO2 experiment. All the CCM3 runs indicated too much Tropical variability especially in the western Tropical Pacific and Southeast Asia. A EOF analysis of the interannual variations of the zonally averaged precipitable water and the 500 to 300 hPa layer reveals fundamental differences in the structure of the variations. The impact of ENSO and variations of the ITCZ have only a low level of correspondence between the observed data, much less the simulations. It is apparent that an adequate characterization of the climatology of the global water vapor distribution is not yet at hand.

Boyle, J.S.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

437

ARM - Atmospheric Heat Budget  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ListAtmospheric Heat Budget Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About...

438

Upper-Ocean Processes under the Stratus Cloud Deck in the Southeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The annual mean heat budget of the upper ocean beneath the stratocumulus/stratus cloud deck in the southeast Pacific is estimated using Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) and an eddy-resolving Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM). Both are ...

Yangxing Zheng; George N. Kiladis; Toshiaki Shinoda; E. Joseph Metzger; Harley E. Hurlburt; Jialin Lin; Benjamin S. Giese

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Open ocean DMS air/sea fluxes over the eastern South Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

over the North Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. - Atmos. ,air/sea fluxes over S. Pacific Ocean References Asher, W.in the equa- torial Pacific Ocean ( 1982 to 1996): Evidence

Marandino, C. A; De Bruyn, W. J; Miller, S. D; Saltzman, E. S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

National Oceanography Centre from coast to deep ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on a chip Microfluidic Sensors Targets: ­ Carbonate system (pH, Carbon dioxide.....) ­ Macro nutrients

Matthews, Adrian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Fallout of atmospheric nuclear tests in 1950s and 1960s exposed more people to Iodine-131 than Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A National Cancer Institute report on I-131 radiation exposure from atmospheric nuclear weapon tests in the USA is summarized. (AIP)

Goodwin, I. [Physics Today, American Center for Physics, One Physics Ellipse, College Park, Maryland 20740-3843 (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft ProgrammaticPlan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE Assistantl OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminary engineeringCompany. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission analysis

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byFifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, February1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plant

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference. June 19-

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Sound Waves in the Atmosphere at Infrasonic Frequencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various geophysical processes generate sound waves in the atmosphere. Some typical sources are auroral discharges in the upper atmosphere tornadoes and severe storms surface waves on the oceans volcanic explosions earthquakes and atmospheric oscillations arising from unstable wind flow at the tropopause. Man?made sources include powerful explosions and the shock waves from vehicles moving at supersonic speeds at altitudes below about 125 km. The components of sound?wave energy at infrasonic frequencies (oscillation periods >1.0 sec) are propagated for large distances (thousands of kilometers) over the earth's surface with very little loss of energy from absorption by viscosity and heat conduction. But the propagation depends strongly on (a) the horizontally stratified temperature structure of the atmosphere (b) the influence of gravity at oscillation periods greater than the atmospheric resonance period ?300 sec and (c) the nonuniform distribution of atmospheric winds. The microphones and electroacoustical apparatus at an infrasonics observation station e.g. the one at Washington D. C. measure (1) the amplitude and waveform of incident sound pressure (2) the direction of local propagation of the wave (3) the horizontal trace velocity and (4) the distribution of sound wave energy at various oscillation frequencies. Researches on propagation require observational data from a network of stations separated geographically by large distances coupled with theoretical analysis of sound propagation to arrive at useful results on the acoustics of the atmosphere.

Richard K. Cook

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Conference on Atmospheric Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE half-yearly Conference of representatives of local authorities and other organisations co-operating with the Department of Scientific ... of atmospheric pollution was held in the offices of the Department on May 25. The Conference received from Dr. G. M. B. Dobson, chairman of the Atmospheric Pollution ...

1936-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

Atmospheric Delta 14C Record from Wellington  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Isotopes » Carbon Isotopes » δ14C from Wellington Atmospheric δ14C Record from Wellington graphics Graphics data Data Investigators M.R. Manning, W.H. Melhuish National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Ltd., Climate Division, Gracefield Road, Gracefield, P.O. Box 31-311, Lower Hutt, New Zealand Period of Record 1954-93 Methods Trays containing ~2 L of 5 normal NaOH carbonate-free solution are typically exposed for intervals of 1-2 weeks, and the atmospheric CO2 absorbed during that time is recovered by acid evolution. Considerable fractionation occurs during absorption into the NaOH solution, and the standard fractionation correction (Stuiver and Polach 1977) is used to determine a δ 14C value corrected to δ 13C = -25 per mil. Some samples reported here were taken using BaOH solution or with extended

449

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Argonne scientists study climate change 1 of 22 Argonne scientists study climate change The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science provided $60 million in ARRA funding for climate research to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a DOE national user facility that has been operating climate observing sites around the world for nearly two decades. These sites help scientists study clouds and their influence on the sun's radiant energy, which heats our planet. Above is one of the purchases: the Vaisala Present Weather Detector. It optically measures visibility, present weather, precipitation intensity, and precipitation type. It provides a measure of current weather conditions by combining measurements from three

450

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

March/April 2008 March/April 2008 4 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Extending the Search for Extending the Search for A new imager will allow astrophysicists to study the atmospheres of distant planets. T HE discovery of other solar systems beyond ours has been the stuff of science fiction for decades. Great excitement greeted the positive identification of the first planet outside our solar system in 1995. Since then, scientists have identified approximately 250 extrasolar planets (exoplanets), but they have had no way to study the majority of these planets or their

451

North Pacific Mesoscale Coupled Air-Ocean Simulations Compared with Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive summary The main objective of the study was to investigate atmospheric and ocean interaction processes in the western Pacific and, in particular, effects of significant ocean heat loss in the Kuroshio and Kuroshio Extension regions on the lower and upper atmosphere. It is yet to be determined how significant are these processes are on climate scales. The understanding of these processes led us also to development of the methodology of coupling the Weather and Research Forecasting model with the Parallel Ocean Program model for western Pacific regional weather and climate simulations. We tested NCAR-developed research software Coupler 7 for coupling of the WRF and POP models and assessed its usability for regional-scale applications. We completed test simulations using the Coupler 7 framework, but implemented a standard WRF model code with options for both one- and two-way mode coupling. This type of coupling will allow us to seamlessly incorporate new WRF updates and versions in the future. We also performed a long-term WRF simulation (15 years) covering the entire North Pacific as well as high-resolution simulations of a case study which included extreme ocean heat losses in the Kuroshio and Kuroshio Extension regions. Since the extreme ocean heat loss occurs during winter cold air outbreaks (CAO), we simulated and analyzed a case study of a severe CAO event in January 2000 in detail. We found that the ocean heat loss induced by CAOs is amplified by additional advection from mesocyclones forming on the southern part of the Japan Sea. Large scale synoptic patterns with anomalously strong anticyclone over Siberia and Mongolia, deep Aleutian Low, and the Pacific subtropical ridge are a crucial setup for the CAO. It was found that the onset of the CAO is related to the breaking of atmospheric Rossby waves and vertical transport of vorticity that facilitates meridional advection. The study also indicates that intrinsic parameterization of the surface fluxes within the WRF model needs more evaluation and analysis.

Koracin, Darko; Cerovecki, Ivana; Vellore, Ramesh; Mejia, John; Hatchett, Benjamin; McCord, Travis; McLean, Julie; Dorman, Clive

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

452

A critical evaluation of the upper ocean heat budget in the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis data for the south central equatorial Pacific  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coupled ocean-atmospheric models suffer from the common bias of a spurious rain belt south of the central equatorial Pacific throughout the year. Observational constraints on key processes responsible for this bias are scarce. The recently available reanalysis from a coupled model system for the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) data is a potential benchmark for climate models in this region. Its suitability for model evaluation and validation, however, needs to be established. This paper examines the mixed layer heat budget and the ocean surface currents - key factors for the sea surface temperature control in the double Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone in the central Pacific - from 5{sup o}S to 10{sup o}S and 170{sup o}E to 150{sup o}W. Two independent approaches are used. The first approach is through comparison of CFSR data with collocated station observations from field experiments; the second is through the residual analysis of the heat budget of the mixed layer. We show that the CFSR overestimates the net surface flux in this region by 23 W m{sup -2}. The overestimated net surface flux is mainly due to an even larger overestimation of shortwave radiation by 44 W m{sup -2}, which is compensated by a surface latent heat flux overestimated by 14 W m{sup -2}. However, the quality of surface currents and the associated oceanic heat transport in CFSR are not compromised by the surface flux biases, and they agree with the best available estimates. The uncertainties of the observational data from field experiments are also briefly discussed in the present study.

Liu H.; Lin W.; Liu, X.; Zhang, M.

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

453

Atmospheric Pollution Research 1 (2010) 220228 Atmospheric Pollution Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmospheric Pollution Research 1 (2010) 220228 Atmospheric Pollution Research www in modeling of the associated multiphase processes. Iron redox species are important pollutants. The oxidative capacity of the atmospheric cloud water decreases when dissolution is included

Boyer, Edmond

454

Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia National Laboratories: Locations...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regional Park District Joshua Tree National Park Lassen Volcanic National Park Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks Yosemite National Park Cave exploring Diablo Grotto Moaning...

455

Atmosphere to Electrons Initiative Takes Shape  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Since DOE launched its Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) Initiative last July, the A2e executive committee has been developing a comprehensive approach for working with multiple stakeholders (industry, national laboratories, international experts, and universities) over the next 5- to 7 years. In February, they held an external merit review to lay the groundwork for an A2e multi-year strategic research plan.

456

Interviews in Washington, DC for Albert Einstein Fellowship Semi...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The DOE sponsors...

457

E-Print Network 3.0 - anchovy engraulis mordax Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

information on the northern anchovy Engraulis mordax Girard. Calif. Coop. Ocean. Fish. Invest., Rep. 11... :110-116. ... Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

458

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced satellite based Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

processed... , and distributed the data from these satellites to provide life-saving weather forecasts, measure ocean Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,...

459

E-Print Network 3.0 - av limnisk zooplankton Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the seasonal and annual Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Fishery Bulletin Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 29 J. Ocean Univ. China...

460

Ocean - Tools | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tools Tools Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean Decision-Support Tools (DSTs): Science and information are fundamental to effective marine planning. Marine planning involves inclusive discussion and analyses of the status and potential uses of 3-dimensional areas of coastal, marine and Great Lakes ecosystems (including the water column) and their potential changes over time. Relevant spatial data and derived interpretive and analytical products (i.e. decision-support tools) help inform all phases of the marine planning process. To date, several decision-support tools have been develop to support marine planning efforts. Marine planners should carefully evaluate which tools best apply to their region or specific issue or project. Below is a list of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Free Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Free-Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas Free-Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas G. A. Wurden, Z. Wang, C. Ticos Los Alamos National Laboratory L Al NM 87545 USA Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA C. J. v. Wurden Los Alamos High School L Al NM 87544 Los Alamos, NM 87544 Presented at the PPPL Colloquium Sept. 17, 2008 U N C L A S S I F I E D Operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA LA-UR-08-06284 Outline of this talk *A discussion of ball lightning reports in nature *How can ball plasmas be made in the laboratory? *Detailed experiments on long lived free floating *Detailed experiments on long-lived free-floating atmospheric pressure ball plasmas C i f l b b ll l i h "b ll *Comparison of laboratory ball plasmas with "ball lightning" *Summary U N C L A S S I F I E D Operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA

462

NOAA's National Marine Sanctuaries Media Library | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Marine Sanctuaries Media Library National Marine Sanctuaries Media Library Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data NOAA's National Marine Sanctuaries Media Library Dataset Summary Description NOAA (National Ocean Service) Office of National Marine Sanctuaries' Media Library is an online vault where a comprehensive collection of select video clips and high-resolution still images from America's underwater treasures are securely stored and available for searchable access and download. Tags {ONMS,"Office of National Marine Sanctuaries",MPA,"Marine Protected Area",habitat,fisheries,seafloor,lithology,oceans,"Environmental Monitoring",photos,video,recreation,travel,tourism,"whales,fish",sharks,culture,heritage,birds,science,research,plants,mammals,reptiles,media}

463

Mar Geophys Res DOI 10.1007/s11001-008-9060-y An uncertainty model for deep ocean single beam and multibeam echo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between ship surveys in the deep ocean basins. Their method has been adopted in the United States by a tri, Error, Uncertainty, Micronesia, Atlantic, Statistics Introduction The vast majority of the ocean lies beyond the boundaries of national territorial claims and mapping responsibilities, and is not subject

Kuligowski, Bob

464

National Park Service- San Miguel Island, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

San Miguel Island is one of five islands that make up Channel Islands National Park on the coast of southern California. The islands comprise 249,353 acres (100,910 hectares) of land and ocean that teems with terrestrial and marine life. The National Park Service (NPS) protects the pristine resources at Channel Islands National Park by conserving, recycling, using alternative fuel vehicles, applying renewable energy, and using resources wisely. It also seeks to replace conventional fuels with renewable energy wherever possible. This applies especially to diesel fuel and petroleum, which must be shipped in from the mainland to generate electricity.

465

Atmospheric Physics and Earth Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...has been used by atmospheric modelers as a vertical...Ackerman, in Atmospheric Physics from Spacelab...shut-tle allows recovery of the film, we...dry nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. To avoid water condensation on the optical...

M. HERS

1984-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

466

National Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

because NIF provides the only process for scientists to gain access to and examine thermonuclear burn. These experiments will also help the nation maintain the skills of nuclear...

467

On Rayleigh Waves Across the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Articles On Rayleigh Waves Across the Pacific Ocean K. E. Bullen University College, Auckland, N. Z. ON RAYLEIGH WAVES ACROSS THE PACIFIC OCEAN K. E. Bullen (Received 1939November 9) The Bering......

K. E. Bullen

1939-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Green Ocean Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Wave Air Piston This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGreenOceanWaveEnergy&oldid769161...

469

Ocean Data Impacts in Global HYCOM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impact of the assimilation of ocean observations on reducing global Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) 48-h forecast errors is presented. The assessment uses an adjoint-based data impact procedure that characterizes the forecast impact of ...

James A. Cummings; Ole Martin Smedstad

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Energy from the Ocean [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...October 1982 research-article Energy from the Ocean [and Discussion...Lennard J. H. Turner P. Wadhams Renewable ocean energy sources can eventually supply a large fraction of man's energy needs, starting in the 1990s...

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: ARM Site Atmospheric  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARM Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates for AIRS Forward Model and ARM Site Atmospheric State Best Estimates for AIRS Forward Model and Retrieval Validation Tobin, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Revercomb, Henry University Of Wisconsin-Madison Knuteson, Robert University Of Wisconsin Feltz, Wayne University of Wisconsin Moy, Leslie University of Wisconsin-Madison Lesht, Barry Argonne National Laboratory Cress, Ted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Strow, Larrabee Hannon, Scott Fetzer, Eric Jet Propulsion Laboratory The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua platform is the first of a new generation of advanced hyperspectral atmospheric sounders with the capability of retrieving temperature and trace gas profiles with high vertical resolution and absolute accuracy. In the past few years ARM has played a major role in the validation of AIRS, including the launch of

472

Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione Scientists and an international research team have announced discovery of molecular oxygen ions in the upper-most atmosphere of Dione. March 3, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

473

Federal Memorandum of Understanding for Hydropower/Federal Inland...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Energy Environmental Protection Agency Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Fish and Wildlife Service Forest Service National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

474

E-Print Network 3.0 - antwerp province quality Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CAN... (GLstates) other fuel (GLstates) manufother (GLstates) metals (GLstates) coal elec gen ... Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Pacific Marine...

475

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic aerosol burden Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and surface... generally exhibits low aerosol ... Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Atmopsheric Chemistry and...

476

E-Print Network 3.0 - ams radiocarbon analysis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

deposi- tion, evaporation, precipitation, transport, etc. Atmospheric ... Source: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Global Ocean...

477

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic haze Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

months but also ... Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Atmopsheric Chemistry and Global Change Program Collection:...

478

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne sunphotometer measurements Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NASA Ames Research Center; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Atmopsheric Chemistry and Global Change Program...

479

E-Print Network 3.0 - antarctic ozone recovery Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Antarctic ... Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Atmopsheric Chemistry and Global Change Program...

480

Bush Administration Plays Leading Role in Studying and Addressing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Secretary Samuel Bodman, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Stephen Johnson, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Administrator Vice...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national oceanic atmospheric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

E-Print Network 3.0 - adriatic sea italy Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from the Adriatic ... Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Fishery Bulletin Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 28 Biogeosciences, 4,...

482

E-Print Network 3.0 - active inorganic phosphate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for delayed analysis Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Fishery Bulletin Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 68 Can Eutrophication...

483

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond ... The column summarizes research articles from Nature that report on anthropogenic activities and natural phenomena that influence the chemical composition of Earth's atmosphere. ...

Sabine Heinhorst; Gordon Cannon

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Oceanic nutrient and oxygen transports and bounds on export production during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of intense climate interest. A large fraction of the carbon fixed in the oceanic surface waters is recycledOceanic nutrient and oxygen transports and bounds on export production during the World Ocean are estimated from selected hydrographic sections from the World Ocean Circulation Experiment spanning the world

Wunsch, Carl

485

Ocean Mixing and Climate ChangeOcean Mixing and Climate Change Factors inducing seawater mixing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the reverse current created when the fluid flows past an obstacle. Ocean Eddies range: cm-100 km. When two energy drives global winds ­ Latitudinal wind belts produce ocean currents · Determine circulation layer depth ~100 m · Heat transfer from equator to pole by ocean currents · Oceans redistribute about

Russell, Lynn

486

Ocean Sci., 4, 1529, 2008 www.ocean-sci.net/4/15/2008/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is everywhere perpendicular to the local direction of gravity. If there were no waves or currents in the oceanOcean Sci., 4, 15­29, 2008 www.ocean-sci.net/4/15/2008/ © Author(s) 2008. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science An Oceanographer's Guide to GOCE and the Geoid C. W

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

487

Ocean Sci., 3, 363377, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/363/2007/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

currents and water mass properties intriguing texture. In the upper ocean observational evidenceOcean Sci., 3, 363­377, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/363/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Variability of Antarctic intermediate Water properties

Boyer, Edmond

488

Indian Ocean Surface Circulations and Their Connection To Indian Ocean Dipole, Identified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Surface Currents Analysis Realtime (OSCAR) Data Advisor : Peter C Chu Second Reader : Charles Sun Aldisrupting Al--QaidaQaida''s networks network IraqIraq''s Instabilitys Instability #12;Ocean Surface Currents Analysis ­ Realtime (OSCAR) Data Base Ocean Surface currents data available for whole world' oceans at www

Chu, Peter C.

489

Ocean Science, 1, 97112, 2005 www.ocean-science.net/os/1/97/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oceanic currents by reducing the shears between them (Hansen and Paul, 1984; Weisberg, 1984Ocean Science, 1, 97­112, 2005 www.ocean-science.net/os/1/97/ SRef-ID: 1812-0792/os/2005-1-97 European Geosciences Union Ocean Science Multi-year satellite observations of instability waves

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

490

Ocean Sci., 3, 223228, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/223/2007/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and regional sea level changes associated with changing currents and mass distribution in the ocean. The studyOcean Sci., 3, 223­228, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/223/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Towards measuring the meridional overturning circulation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

491

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2 Qin Han, J. Keith Moore, Charles Zender, Chris Measures, David Hydes 3 Abstract 4 We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al and Deposition 6 (DEAD) model, to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains 7 all

Zender, Charles

492

Oceans and ClimateOceans and Climate PeterPeter RhinesRhines 11  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

say, the ocean is a great thermometer/thermometer/halometerhalometer Levitus, Antonov, Boyer+ Stephens

493

Coupling Mineral Carbonation and Ocean Liming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

systems suggests that, unless air capture significantly outperforms these systems, it is likely to require more than 400 kJ of work per mol of CO2, requiring it to be powered by CO2-neutral power sources in order to be CO2 neg. ... by the oceans at an increased rate if ocean alky. ... Oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) is altering the seawater chem. of the world's oceans with consequences for marine biota. ...

P. Renforth; T. Kruger

2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

494

The atmosphere of Venus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The investigations of Venus take a special position in planetary researches. It was just the atmosphere of Venus where first measurements in situ were carried out by means of the equipment delivered by a space pr...

V. I. Moroz

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Atmospheric Dynamics of Exoplanets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres has come of age in the last decade, as astronomical techniques now allow for albedos, chemical abundances, temperature profiles and maps, rotation periods and even wind speeds to be measured. Atmospheric dynamics sets the background state of density, temperature and velocity that determines or influences the spectral and temporal appearance of an exoplanetary atmosphere. Hot exoplanets are most amenable to these characterization techniques; in the present review, we focus on highly-irradiated, large exoplanets (the "hot Jupiters"), as astronomical data begin to confront theoretical questions. We summarize the basic atmospheric quantities inferred from the astronomical observations. We review the state of the art by addressing a series of current questions and look towards the future by considering a separate set of exploratory questions. Attaining the next level of understanding will require a concerted effort of constructing multi-faceted, multi-wavelength dat...

Heng, Kevin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Global impact of fossil fuel combustion on atmospheric NOx Larry W. Horowitz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potential than emissions in the United States to perturb the global oxidizing power of the atmosphere. #12% of NOx concentrations in the lower and middle troposphere throughout the extratropical northern of the ocean. Sources in the United States are found to contribute about half of the fossil fuel NOx over

Jacob, Daniel J.

497

What are greenhouse gases? Many chemical compounds in the atmosphere act as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

back into space. However, greenhouse gases will not let all the infrared light pass throughWhat are greenhouse gases? Many chemical compounds in the atmosphere act as greenhouse gases the land and oceans. The warmed Earth releases this heat in the form of infrared light (longwave radiation

498

The future of the carbon cycle: review, calcification response, ballast and feedback on atmospheric CO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...inorganic carbon ( C O2) in seawater is in the form HCO- 3 , the...inorganic carbon species in seawater is such that, for a given...effective buffering capacity of seawater is analogous to the Revelle...larger capacity for carbon storage in the oceans than in the atmosphere...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Response of the middle atmosphere to CO2 doubling: results from the Canadian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Ontario, Canada Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada #Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Manuscript received 2 an increase in solar heating and a decrease in infrared cooling, with the latter accounting for up to 15

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

500

Ocean viscosity and climate M. Jochum,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean viscosity and climate M. Jochum,1 G. Danabasoglu,1 M. Holland,1 Y.-O. Kwon,1 and W. G. Large1] The impacts of parameterized lateral ocean viscosity on climate are explored using three 120-year integrations of a fully coupled climate model. Reducing viscosity leads to a generally improved ocean circulation

Jochum, Markus