National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for national level revisions

  1. High Level Waste System Plan Revision 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, N.R.; Wells, M.N.; Choi, A.S.; Paul, P.; Wise, F.E.

    1998-04-01

    Revision 9 of the High Level Waste System Plan documents the current operating strategy of the HLW System at SRS to receive, store, treat, and dispose of high-level waste.

  2. Level: National Data;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, ... (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, ...

  3. " Level: National Data;" " ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Reasons that Made Residual Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: ... barrels." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Residual Fuel Oil Unswitchable" " "," ",,,..." " ...

  4. Revised Propane Stock Levels for 6/7/13

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Revised Propane Stock Levels for 6713 Release Date: June 19, 2013 Following the release of the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) for the week ended June 7, 2013, EIA...

  5. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E.

    1992-12-01

    This fifth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Information is presented on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels, prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. Models are described that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for the NEPA documents at the Hanford Site, are provided.

  6. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E. ed.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A. and others

    1995-09-01

    This seventh revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, environmental monitoring, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors. Chapter 5.0 was not updated from the sixth revision (1994). It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE Orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be used directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

  7. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E.; Baker, D.A.; Chamness, M.A.

    1994-08-01

    This sixth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes up-to-date information on climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors; Chapter 5.0 has been significantly updated from the fifth revision. It describes models, including their principal underlying assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclide transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions; The updated Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site, following the structure of Chapter 4.0. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be utilized directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

  8. Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations This...

  9. Hanford Site National Evnironmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushing, C.E.

    1991-12-01

    This fourth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Site-related NEPA documentation. In Chapter 4.0 are presented summations of up-to-date information about climate and meteorology, geology and hydrology, ecology, history and archaeology, socioeconomics, land use, and noise levels. Chapter 5.0 describes models, including their principal assumptions, that are to be used in simulating realized or potential impacts from nuclear materials at the Hanford Site. Included are models of radionuclides transport in groundwater and atmospheric pathways, and of radiation dose to populations via all known pathways from known initial conditions. Chapter 6.0 provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE orders and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable for environmental impact statements for the Hanford Site, following the structure Chapter 4.0. NO conclusions or recommendations are given in this report.

  10. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, D.A.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Fosmire, C.J.

    1997-08-01

    This ninth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Chapters 4 and 6 in Hanford Site-related NEPA documents. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological and historical resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. Not all of the sections have been updated for this revision. The following lists the updated sections: climate and meteorology; ecology (threatened and endangered species section only); culture, archaeological, and historical resources; socioeconomics; all of Chapter 6.

  11. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Levels of Price...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Substitute, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Levels of Price ... Substitute, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Levels of Price ...

  12. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization, Revision 15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Burk, Kenneth W.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.; Woody, Dave M.

    2003-09-01

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the thirteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the fourteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

  13. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, D.A.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Fosmire, C.J.; Fowler, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    This eighth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the Hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Chapters 4 and 6 in Hanford Site-related NEPA documents. Chapter 4 (Affected Environment) includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, historical, archaeological and cultural resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. The following sections were updated in this revision: climate and meteorology; ecology (threatened and endangered species section only); historical; archaeological and cultural resources; and all of chapter 6. No conclusions or recommendations are given in this report. Rather, it is a compilation of information on the Hanford Site environment that can be used directly by Site contractors. This information can also be used by any interested individual seeking baseline data on the hanford Site and its past activities by which to evaluate projected activities and their impacts.

  14. IAEA Information Circular 225 Revision 5: Fact Sheet | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Finally, INFCIRC225Revision 5 provides clearer physical protection guidance for states that may be developing peaceful nuclear energy for the first time. US Efforts to Implement ...

  15. Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This letter, from the Director of the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Federal Activities, outlines EPA's position as to how the revised National Air Quality Standard should be reflected in NEPA evaluations of proposed actions.

  16. Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations (EPA, 2007) Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations (EPA, 2007) This letter, from the Director ...

  17. Revisions

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. proved reserves of crude oil and lease condensate, crude oil, and lease condensate, 2004-14 million barrels Revisions a Net of Sales b New Reservoir Proved d Change Net and and New Field Discoveries Total c Estimated Reserves from Adjustments Revisions Adjustments Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields Discoveries Production 12/31 Prior Year Year (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) 2004 80 444 524 37 731 36 159 926 2,001 22,592 -514 2005 237 558 795 327 946 209 57 1,212

  18. Revisions

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    proved reserves of natural gas, wet after lease separation, 2001-14 billion cubic feet Revisions a Net of Sales b New Reservoir Proved d Change Net and and New Field Discoveries Total c Estimated Reserves from Adjustments Revisions Adjustments Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields Discoveries Production 12/31 Prior Year Year (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) Total natural gas (billion cubic feet) 2001 1,849 -2,438 -589 2,715 17,183 3,668 2,898 23,749 20,642 191,743 5,233

  19. Nevada National Security Site Integrated Groundwater Sampling Plan, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marutzky, Sam; Farnham, Irene

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Integrated Sampling Plan (referred to herein as the Plan) is to provide a comprehensive, integrated approach for collecting and analyzing groundwater samples to meet the needs and objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity. Implementation of this Plan will provide high-quality data required by the UGTA Activity for ensuring public protection in an efficient and cost-effective manner. The Plan is designed to ensure compliance with the UGTA Quality Assurance Plan (QAP). The Plan’s scope comprises sample collection and analysis requirements relevant to assessing the extent of groundwater contamination from underground nuclear testing. This Plan identifies locations to be sampled by corrective action unit (CAU) and location type, sampling frequencies, sample collection methodologies, and the constituents to be analyzed. In addition, the Plan defines data collection criteria such as well-purging requirements, detection levels, and accuracy requirements; identifies reporting and data management requirements; and provides a process to ensure coordination between NNSS groundwater sampling programs for sampling of interest to UGTA. This Plan does not address compliance with requirements for wells that supply the NNSS public water system or wells involved in a permitted activity.

  20. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory installation roadmap document. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-30

    The roadmapping process was initiated by the US Department of Energy`s office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) to improve its Five-Year Plan and budget allocation process. Roadmap documents will provide the technical baseline for this planning process and help EM develop more effective strategies and program plans for achieving its long-term goals. This document is a composite of roadmap assumptions and issues developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by US Department of Energy Idaho Field Office and subcontractor personnel. The installation roadmap discusses activities, issues, and installation commitments that affect waste management and environmental restoration activities at the INEL. The High-Level Waste, Land Disposal Restriction, and Environmental Restoration Roadmaps are also included.

  1. National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clobes, A.R.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility M Project. It was prepared for the NIP Prood Office by the NIF Procurement Manager.

  2. IAEA Information Circular 225 Revision 5: Fact Sheet | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOENNSA) led the five-year effort by the U.S. Government and other International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) ...

  3. Future scientists advance to national level

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future scientists advance to national level Future scientists advance to DOE national competition A team from Los Alamos bested 39 other teams from around New Mexico in the 10-hour New Mexico Regional Science Bowl. April 3, 2012 Members of the Los Alamos High School Science Bowl Team Members of the Los Alamos High School Science Bowl Team were in Washington DC after their regional win, representing New Mexico in the 22nd Annual Department of Energy (DOE) National Science Bowl. Contact Kathy

  4. National Ignition Facility Quality Assurance Program Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, C.R.; Yatabe, J.

    1996-09-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a key constituent of the Department of Energy`s Stockpile Stewardship Program. The NIF will use inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to produce ignition and energy gain in ICF targets, and will perform weapons physics and high-energy- density experiments in support of national security and civilian objectives. The NIF Project is a national facility involving the collaboration of several DOE laboratories and subcontractors, including Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). The primary mission of the NIF Project is the construction and start-up operation of laser-based facilities that will demonstrate fusion ignition in the laboratory to provide nuclear-weapons-related physics data, and secondarily, to propagate fusion burn aimed at developing a potential source of civilian energy. To support the accomplishment of this very important mission, the LLNL Laser Directorate created the NIF Project Office to organize and bring about the Project. The NIF Project Office has established this Quality Assurance Program to ensure its success. This issue of the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) adds the requirements for the conduct of Title 11 design, construction, procurement, and Title III engineering. This QAPP defines and describes the program-the management system-for specifying, achieving, and assuring the quality of all NIF Project work consistent with the policies of the Laboratory and the Laser Directorate.

  5. Operating Experience Level 3, OSHA's Revised Hazard Communication...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Publications Hazard Communication Training - Upcoming Implementation Date for New Hazard Communication Standard Operating Experience Level 3, Safe Management of Mercury...

  6. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forgy, Jr., J. R.

    1991-12-01

    The goal of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Management Program is the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. A vital aspect of this goal is to comply with all applicable state, federal, and DOE requirements. Waste management requirements for DOE radioactive wastes are detailed in DOE Order 5820.2A, and the ORNL Waste Management Program encompasses all elements of this order. The requirements of this DOE order and other appropriate DOE orders, along with applicable Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules and regulations, provide the principal source of regulatory guidance for waste management operations at ORNL. The objective of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, what activities are planned for the forthcoming fiscal year (FY), and how all of the activities are documented.

  7. Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations (EPA, 2007)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This letter, from the Director of the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Federal Activities, outlines EPA's position as to how the revised National Air Quality Standard should be reflected in NEPA evaluations of proposed actions.

  8. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Combustible Energy, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; ... Combustible Energy, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; ...

  9. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and ... 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and ...

  10. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Technologies, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within ... Technologies, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within ...

  11. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources ... (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources ...

  12. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Buildings, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and ... Buildings, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and ...

  13. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; ... Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; ...

  14. Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irene Farnham

    2011-05-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) program requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) Sub-Project (hereafter the Sub-Project) activities. The requirements in this QAPP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2005); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). The QAPP Revision 0 supersedes DOE--341, Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 4.

  15. 2010 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 19)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2011-06-01

    This 2010 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 19) provides water use information (monthly annual average and total annual volume) for production and potable water wells at the Idaho National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2010. It also provides detailed information for new, modified, and abandoned (decommissioned) wells and holes. Five new wells were drilled and completed in the latter part of Calendar Years 2009 and 2010. Two wells were modified in Calendar Year 2010 and 66 wells and boreholes reported as abandoned (decommissioned). Detailed construction information for the new and modified wells, along with abandonment information for older wells, is provided. Location maps are provided if survey information was available. This report is being submitted in accordance with the Water Rights Agreement between the State of Idaho and the United States, for the United States Department of Energy (dated 1990) and the subsequent Partial Decree for Water Right 34-10901 issued June 20, 2003.

  16. 2011 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 20)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renee Bowser

    2012-06-01

    This 2011 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 20) provides water use information (monthly annual average and total annual volume) for production and potable water wells at the Idaho National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2011. It also provides detailed information for new, modified, and abandoned (decommissioned) wells and holes. One new well was drilled and completed and one well was modified in Calendar Year 2011. A total of 14 wells and boreholes were reported as decommissioned. Detailed construction information for the new and modified wells is provided. Details are provided for the wells and boreholes that have been decommissioned, and if available, construction diagrams. Location maps are included, provided survey information was available. This report is being submitted in accordance with the Water Rights Agreement between the State of Idaho and the United States, for the United States Department of Energy (dated 1990) and the subsequent Partial Decree for Water Right 34-10901 issued June 20, 2003.

  17. 2013 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 22)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-06-01

    This 2013 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 22) provides water use information for production and potable water wells at the Idaho National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2013. It also provides detailed information for new, modified, and decommissioned wells and holes. Two new wells were drilled and completed in Calendar Year 2013. No modifications were performed on any wells. Seven wells were decommissioned in Calendar Year 2013. Detailed construction information for the new and decommissioned wells is provided. Location maps are included, provided survey information was available. This report is being submitted in accordance with the Water Rights Agreement between the State of Idaho and the United States, for the United States Department of Energy (dated 1990) and the subsequent Partial Decree for Water Right 34-10901 issued June 20, 2003.

  18. 2014 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 23)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Mike

    2015-06-01

    This 2014 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 23) provides water use information for production and potable water wells at the Idaho National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2014. It also provides detailed information for new, modified, and decommissioned wells and holes. One new well was drilled and completed in Calendar Year 2014. No modifications were performed on any wells. No wells were decommissioned in Calendar Year 2014. Detailed construction information and a location map for the new well is provided. This report is being submitted in accordance with the Water Rights Agreement between the State of Idaho and the United States, for the United States Department of Energy (dated 1990), the subsequent Partial Decree for Water Right 34-10901 issued June 20, 2003, and the Final Unified Decree issued August 26, 2014.

  19. Underground Test Area Activity Quality Assurance Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krenzien, Susan; Farnham, Irene

    2015-06-01

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) activities. The requirements in this QAP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1D, Change 1, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2013a); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). If a participant’s requirement document differs from this QAP, the stricter requirement will take precedence. NNSA/NFO, or designee, must review this QAP every two years. Changes that do not affect the overall scope or requirements will not require an immediate QAP revision but will be incorporated into the next revision cycle after identification. Section 1.0 describes UGTA objectives, participant responsibilities, and administrative and management quality requirements (i.e., training, records, procurement). Section 1.0 also details data management and computer software requirements. Section 2.0 establishes the requirements to ensure newly collected data are valid, existing data uses are appropriate, and environmental-modeling methods are reliable. Section 3.0 provides feedback loops through assessments and reports to management. Section 4.0 provides the framework for corrective actions. Section 5.0 provides references for this document.

  20. Underground Test Area Activity Quality Assurance Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnham, Irene; Krenzien, Susan

    2012-10-01

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) activities. The requirements in this QAP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2005); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). NNSA/NSO, or designee, must review this QAP every two years. Changes that do not affect the overall scope or requirements will not require an immediate QAP revision but will be incorporated into the next revision cycle after identification. Section 1.0 describes UGTA objectives, participant responsibilities, and administrative and management quality requirements (i.e., training, records, procurement). Section 1.0 also details data management and computer software requirements. Section 2.0 establishes the requirements to ensure newly collected data are valid, existing data uses are appropriate, and environmental-modeling methods are reliable. Section 3.0 provides feedback loops through assessments and reports to management. Section 4.0 provides the framework for corrective actions. Section 5.0 provides references for this document.

  1. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Revised Manuscript 01 October 2012 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 4 D.R. Tilley 1,2 and H.R. Weller 1,3 1 Traingle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27706, USA 2 Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA 3 Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27706, USA G.M. Hale Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA Abstract: A compilation of information on A = 4 was published in Nuclear Physics A541 (1992), p. 1. Information

  2. IEEE 1547 Revision--Will You Be Ready?; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preus, Robert

    2015-06-15

    Summary of some of the main new developments being developed for the revised IEEE 1547 distributed generation grid interconnection standard.

  3. Future scientists advance to national level

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for modeling lung cancer. In other news December, 1 2015 - Novel therapy for stomach cancer; grand opening of Manhattan Project National Historical Park; 2015 Northern New...

  4. Lessons Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-level

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Work Planning & Control | Department of Energy Lessons Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-level Work Planning & Control Lessons Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-level Work Planning & Control May 16, 2013 Presenter: Donna J. Governor, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Topics Covered: Work Control Review Board (WCRB) Functional Area Manager identified at the Institution level reporting directly to the Deputy Laboratory Director

  5. Lesson Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-level

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Work Planning and Control | Department of Energy Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-level Work Planning and Control Lesson Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-level Work Planning and Control May 16, 2013 Presenter: Donna J. Governor Deputy Dept Mgr for Planning & Integration Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Topics Covered: LLNL WP&C was implemented lab-wide for all Activity Level Work Within 16 months Depth and breadth of LLNL work varies

  6. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. ...

  7. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil ...

  8. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel ...

  9. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate ...

  10. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. ...

  11. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. ...

  12. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... for any table cell, multiply the cel corresponding RSE column and RSE row factors. ... Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2006 Level: National and ...

  13. How to Integrate Climate Change Adaptation into National-Level...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Integrate Climate Change Adaptation into National-Level Policy and Planning in the Water Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: How to Integrate Climate...

  14. Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per ...

  15. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption ...

  16. Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per ...

  17. Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per ...

  18. Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per ...

  19. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption ...

  20. Distribution-Transformer Level Flynn, Eric B. [Los Alamos National

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Taming the Grid: Dynamic Load Composition Quantification at the Distribution-Transformer Level Flynn, Eric B. Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holby, Edward F. Los Alamos...

  1. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Technologies, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Usage within ... Estimate less than 0.5. WWithheld to avoid disclosing data for individual establishments. ...

  2. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization Report, Revision 17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2005-09-30

    This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many environmental documents being prepared by DOE contractors concerning the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). No statements about significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year’s report is the seventeenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the eighteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology; air quality; geology; hydrology; ecology; cultural, archaeological, and historical resources; socioeconomics; noise; and occupational health and safety. Sources for extensive tabular data related to these topics are provided in the chapter. Most subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information, where available, of the 100, 200, 300, and other areas. This division allows the reader to go directly to those sections of particular interest. When specific information on each of these separate areas is not complete or available, the general Hanford Site description should be used. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities

  3. NFPA, 1996 revisions to National Electrical Code, NFPA 110, and NFPA 99 that affect on-site power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, G.S.; Bell, J.; Whittall, H.

    1995-12-31

    The three most important NFPA standards for the on-site power industry are: NFPA 70-The National Electrical Code, NFPA 110 Emergency and Standby Power Systems and NFPA 99-Health Care Facilities. This paper will cover the important revisions affecting on-site power generation systems for the 1996 editions. Each of the three authors is a member of one or more of the technical committees that have responsibility for writing these standards.

  4. The Usefulness of Bi-Level Switching; Original Technical Note: November 1998. Revised August, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Building Technologies Department

    1998-11-01

    California's Title 24 Energy Efficiency Building Standard requires multiple lighting level control in all individual offices. Usually, this requirement is fulfilled using bi-level switching. With bi-level switching, each office occupant is provided with two wall switches near the doorway to control their lights. In a typical installation, one switch would control 1/3 of the fluorescent lamps in the ceiling lighting system, while the other switch would control the remaining 2/3 of the lamps. This allows four possible light levels: OFF, 1/3, 2/3 and FULL lighting. Because it has been required by building code since 1983, bi-level switching is common in California office buildings. However, there is no published evidence showing that occupants sometimes use just one switch rather than just switching on both switches when entering the room. Consequently, some have questioned whether bi-level switching is a necessary or desirable requirement for typical office buildings. In fact, the draft national standard, ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1989K apparently does not require bi-level switching at all.

  5. Underground Test Area Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Quality Assurance Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnham, Irene; Marutzky, Sam

    2013-01-01

    This report is mandated by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and identifies the UGTA quality assurance (QA) activities for fiscal year (FY) 2012. All UGTA organizations—U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); Desert Research Institute (DRI); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I); National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec); and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)—conducted QA activities in FY 2012. The activities included conducting assessments, identifying findings and completing corrective actions, evaluating laboratory performance, revising the QAPP, and publishing documents. In addition, processes and procedures were developed to address deficiencies identified in the FY 2011 QAPP gap analysis.

  6. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: ...

  7. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: ...

  8. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 6.1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. ...

  9. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 6.1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios Unit: Varies. ...

  10. Groundwater Level Status Report for 2005 Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.P. Allen; R.J. Koch

    2006-05-15

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2005 is provided in this report. The Groundwater Level Monitoring Project was instituted in 2005 to provide a framework for the collection and processing of quality controlled groundwater level data. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 137 monitoring wells, including 41 regional aquifer wells, 22 intermediate wells, and 74 alluvial wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 118 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well.

  11. How to Apply the National Register Criteria for Evaluation (NPS, 1990, revised 1997)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of properties recognized to have national, state, or local significance in American history, architecture, archaeology, engineering, and culture. To guide the selection of properties included in the National Register, the National Park Service (NPS) has developed the National Register Criteria for Evaluation. This bulletin explains how the NPS applies these criteria in evaluating the wide range of properties that may be significant in local, state, and national history. It should be used by anyone who must decide if a particular property qualifies for the National Register.

  12. Radionuclide concentrations in elk that winter on Los Alamos National Laboratory lands. Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.A.; Salazar, J.G.

    1994-07-01

    Elk spend the winter in areas at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) that may contain radioactivity above natural and/or worldwide fallout levels. This study was initiated to determine the levels of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and total uranium in various tissues (brain, hair, heart, jawbone, kidneys, leg bone, liver, and muscle) of adult cow elk that use LANL lands during the fall/winter months. No significant differences in radionuclide contents were detected in any of the tissue samples collected from elk on LANL lands as compared with elk collected from off-site locations. The total effective (radiation) dose equivalent a person would receive from consuming 3.2 lb of heart, 5.6 lb of liver, and 226 lb of muscle from elk that winter on LANL lands, after natural background has been subtracted, was 0.00008, 0.0001, and 0.008 mrem/yr, respectively. The highest dose was less than 0.01% of the International Commission on Radiological Protection permissible dose limit for protecting the public.

  13. LANL Biosafety Level 3 Facility Environmental Impact Statement | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) LANL Biosafety Level 3 Facility Environmental Impact Statement Los Alamos National Laboratory Biosafety Level 3 Facility Environmental Impact Statement (LANL BSL-3 EIS) DOE/EIS-0388 In 2002, NNSA prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the construction and operation of the Facility. On February 23, 2002, NNSA issued a Final EA (DOE 2001a) and a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the construction and operation of a BSL-3 Facility (DOE

  14. Revision of species inventory checklists for Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, N.T. )

    1990-10-01

    This report revises and updates the 1974 report by W. C. Martin and W. L. Wagner, Biological Survey of Kirtland Air Force Base (East). The biological communities of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) are described with respect to the Biome classification system of Brown (1982), and a standardized system of habitat types is proposed based on biome and soil type. The potential occurrence of state or federally endangered species is discussed. No species listed as endangered or threatened is known to occur on KAFB, although five are identified as potentially occurring. Updated lists of amphibians, reptiles, breeding birds, mammals, and plants are presented. 18 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Disposal of Low-Level Waste at the Nevada National Security Site...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Low-Level Waste at the Nevada National Security Site Disposal of Low-Level Waste at the Nevada National Security Site Disposal of Low-Level Waste at the Nevada National Security ...

  16. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Levels of Price Difference;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Percent of Establishments by Levels of Price Difference that Would Cause Fuel Switching from Coal to a Less Expensive Substitute, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Levels of Price Difference; Unit: Establishment Counts. Would Switch Would Not Estimate to More NAICS Establishments Switch Due 1 to 10 11 to 25 26 to 50 Over 50 Cannot Expensive Code(a) Subsector and Industry Able to Switch(b) to Price Percent Percent Percent Percent Be Provided Substitute Total United States

  17. Working with the National Center of Photovoltaics (NCPV) (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Working with the National Center for Photovoltaics. One-sided sheet that includes projects in various areas: Technology Pathway Partnerships, CRADAs, Incubator Program, Pre-Incubator Program, Universities, Next-Generation Program, and NREL T&E.

  18. " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Short Tons." ,,"Coal",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","

  19. " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Billion Cubic Feet." ,,"Natural Gas",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","

  20. " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"Residual Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","

  1. " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Million Kilowatthours." ,,"Electricity Receipts",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","

  2. " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","

  3. " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Short Tons." ,,"Coal",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" "NAICS"," ","Total","

  4. " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Billion Cubic Feet." ,,"Natural Gas",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total","

  5. " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"Residual Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total","

  6. " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Thousand Barrels." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total","

  7. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Residual Fuel Oil(b) Alternative Energy Sources(c) Coal Coke NAICS Total Establishments Not Electricity Natural Distillate and Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry Consuming Residual Fuel Oil(d Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food

  8. Notice of Intent to Revise Department of Energy Order 461.1B, Packaging and Transportation for Offsite Shipment of Materials of National Security Interest

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-01-15

    The purpose of this memorandum is to provide justification for the proposed revision of DOE O 461.1B, Packaging and Transportation for Offsite Shipment of Materials of National Security Interest, dated 12-16-2010, as part of the the quadrennial review and recertification as required by DOE O 251.1C, Departmental Directives Program.

  9. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Restoration Program (ERP), Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF). Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-20

    This document was prepared to take the place of a Safety Evaluation Report since the Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF)and associated Baseline Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) File do not meet the requirements of a complete safety analysis documentation. Its purpose is to present in summary form the background of how the BSAF and Baseline TSR originated and a description of the process by which it was produced and approved for use in the Environmental Restoration Program.The BSAF is a facility safety reference document for INEL environmental restoration activities including environmental remediation of inactive waste sites and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of surplus facilities. The BSAF contains safety bases common to environmental restoration activities and guidelines for performing and documenting safety analysis. The common safety bases can be incorporated by reference into the safety analysis documentation prepared for individual environmental restoration activities with justification and any necessary revisions. The safety analysis guidelines in BSAF provide an accepted method for hazard analysis; analysis of normal, abnormal, and accident conditions; human factors analysis; and derivation of TSRS. The BSAF safety bases and guidelines are graded for environmental restoration activities.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Environmental Baseline update--Revision 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    This report provides a baseline update to provide the background information necessary for personnel to prepare clear and consise NEPA documentation. The environment of the Sandia National Laboratories is described in this document, including the ecology, meteorology, climatology, seismology, emissions, cultural resources and land use, visual resources, noise pollution, transportation, and socioeconomics.

  11. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke NAICS Total Establishments Not Electricity Natural Distillate Residual and Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry Consuming LPG(d) Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 4,039 600 2,860 356 221 Q W 0 0 16 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling

  12. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Natural Gas(b) Alternative Energy Sources(c) Coal Coke NAICS Total Establishments Not Electricity Distillate Residual and Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry Consuming Natural Gas(d Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 10,373 1,667

  13. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke NAICS Total Establishments Not Natural Distillate Residual and Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry with Electricity Receipts(d Switchable Switchable Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(e) Total United States 311 Food 13,265 765 11,829 482 292 Q Q 51 Q Q 3112 Grain and Oilseed

  14. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. Coal Coke NAICS Total Establishments Not Electricity Natural Residual and Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry Consuming Distillate Fuel Oil(d Switchable Switchable Receipts(e) Gas Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 2,416 221 2,115 82 160 Q 0 Q 0 30 3112 Grain and

  15. Electric Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart (Revised) (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Dispensing Infrastructure NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. CONTROLLING AUTHORITIES: State and Federal Energy Regulatory Commissions CONTROLLING AUTHORITIES: Local Building and Fire Departments CONTROLLING AUTHORITIES: DOT/NHTS Many standards development organizations (SDOs) are working to develop codes and standards needed for the utilization of alternative fuel

  16. Waste Management Facilities cost information for mixed low-level waste. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biadgi, C.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing mixed low-level waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

  17. Background Information for the Nevada National Security Site Integrated Sampling Plan, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnham, Irene; Marutzky, Sam

    2014-12-01

    This document describes the process followed to develop the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Integrated Sampling Plan (referred to herein as the Plan). It provides the Plan’s purpose and objectives, and briefly describes the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity, including the conceptual model and regulatory requirements as they pertain to groundwater sampling. Background information on other NNSS groundwater monitoring programs—the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan (RREMP) and Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP)—and their integration with the Plan are presented. Descriptions of the evaluations, comments, and responses of two Sampling Plan topical committees are also included.

  18. Overview of groundwater and surface water standards pertinent to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundahl, A.L.; Williams, S.; Grizzle, B.J.

    1995-09-01

    This document presents an overview of groundwater- and surface water-related laws, regulations, agreements, guidance documents, Executive Orders, and DOE orders pertinent to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This document is a summary and is intended to help readers understand which regulatory requirements may apply to their particular circumstances. However, the document is not intended to be used in lieu of applicable regulations. Unless otherwise noted, the information in this report reflects a summary and evaluation completed July 1, 1995. This document is considered a Living Document, and updates on changing laws and regulations will be provided.

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory transuranic waste quality assurance project plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-14

    This Transuranic (TRU) Waste Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) serves as the quality management plan for the characterization of transuranic waste in preparation for certification and transportation. The Transuranic Waste Characterization/Certification Program (TWCP) consists of personnel who sample and analyze waste, validate and report data; and provide project management, quality assurance, audit and assessment, and records management support, all in accordance with established requirements for disposal of TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility. This QAPjP addresses how the TWCP meets the quality requirements of the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) and the technical requirements of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). The TWCP characterizes and certifies retrievably stored and newly generated TRU waste using the waste selection, testing, sampling, and analytical techniques and data quality objectives (DQOs) described in the QAPP, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Certification Plan (Certification Plan), and the CST Waste Management Facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria and Certification [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC)]. At the present, the TWCP does not address remote-handled (RH) waste.

  20. Chemical reactivity testing for the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koester, L.W.

    2000-02-08

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPjP) summarizes requirements used by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Incorporated (LMES) Development Division at Y-12 for conducting chemical reactivity testing of Department of Energy (DOE) owned spent nuclear fuel, sponsored by the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP). The requirements are based on the NSNFP Statement of work PRO-007 (Statement of Work for Laboratory Determination of Uranium Hydride Oxidation Reaction Kinetics.) This QAPjP will utilize the quality assurance program at Y-12, Y60-101PD, Quality Program Description, and existing implementing procedures for the most part in meeting the NSNFP Statement of Work PRO-007 requirements, exceptions will be noted. The project consists of conducting three separate series of related experiments, ''Passivation of Uranium Hydride Powder With Oxygen and Water'', '''Passivation of Uranium Hydride Powder with Surface Characterization'', and ''Electrochemical Measure of Uranium Hydride Corrosion Rate''.

  1. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. ... National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Establishment Counts. ...

  2. Lesson Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-level Work Planning and Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Slide Presentation by Donna J. Governor, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Lessons Learned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Activity-Level Work Planning & Control.

  3. Likely social impacts of proposed national-level policy initiatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piernot, C.A.; Rothweiler, M.A.; Levine, A.; Crews, R.

    1981-03-01

    The results are described of an investigation of likely social effects of enacting nine proposed national-level policy initiatives to accelerate development and use of solar energy. This study is part of the Technology Assessment of Solar Energy Systems (TASE) project supported by the US Department of Energy. The report presents general social impact information about the variety of ways in which the American people could be affected by enactment of these initiatives. It identifies the effects of each initiative on individuals, groups, organizations, communities, and society as a whole. In addition, it provides a framework for organizing a myriad of impact information into a set of conceptually exclusive impact categories. It illustrates that social impacts means effects on people as individuals, groups, organizations, and communities as well as on the infrastructure of society. Finally, it demonstrates the importance of specifying an audience of impact with a case example from the residential rental market.

  4. Site safety plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory CERCLA investigations at site 300. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilmer, J.

    1997-08-01

    Various Department of Energy Orders incorporate by reference, health and safety regulations promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). One of the OSHA regulations, 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response, requires that site safety plans are written for activities such as those covered by work plans for Site 300 environmental investigations. Based upon available data, this Site Safety Plan (Plan) for environmental restoration has been prepared specifically for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300, located approximately 15 miles east of Livermore, California. As additional facts, monitoring data, or analytical data on hazards are provided, this Plan may need to be modified. It is the responsibility of the Environmental Restoration Program and Division (ERD) Site Safety Officer (SSO), with the assistance of Hazards Control, to evaluate data which may impact health and safety during these activities and to modify the Plan as appropriate. This Plan is not `cast-in-concrete.` The SSO shall have the authority, with the concurrence of Hazards Control, to institute any change to maintain health and safety protection for workers at Site 300.

  5. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 465: Hydronuclear Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Burmeister and Patrick Matthews

    2012-11-01

    The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 465 are located within Areas 6 and 27 of the NNSS. CAU 465 comprises the following CASs: • 00-23-01, Hydronuclear Experiment, located in Area 27 of the NNSS and known as the Charlie site. • 00-23-02, Hydronuclear Experiment, located in Area 27 of the NNSS and known as the Dog site. • 00-23-03, Hydronuclear Experiment, located in Area 27 of the NNSS and known as the Charlie Prime and Anja sites. • 06-99-01, Hydronuclear, located in Area 6 of the NNSS and known as the Trailer 13 site. The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 465 were met. From September 2011 through July 2012, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 465: Hydronuclear, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada.

  6. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan, fiscal year 1994. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A was promulgated in final form on September 26, 1988. The order requires heads of field organizations to prepare and to submit updates on the waste management plans for all operations under their purview according to the format in Chap. 6, {open_quotes}Waste Management Plan Outline.{close_quotes} These plans are to be submitted by the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) in December of each year and distributed to the DP-12, ES&H-1, and other appropriate DOE Headquarters (DOE-HQ) organizations for review and comment. This document was prepared in response to this requirement for fiscal year (FY) 1994. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) waste management mission is reduction, collection, storage, treatment, and disposal of DOE wastes, generated primarily in pursuit of ORNL missions, in order to protect human health and safety and the environment. In carrying out this mission, waste management staff in the Waste Management and Remedial Action Division (WMRAD) will (1) guide ORNL in optimizing waste reduction and waste management capabilities and (2) conduct waste management operations in a compliant, publicly acceptable, technically sound, and cost-efficient manner. Waste management requirements for DOE radioactive wastes are detailed in DOE Order 5820.2A, and the ORNL Waste Management Program encompasses all elements of this order. The requirements of this DOE order and other appropriate DOE orders, along with applicable Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules and regulations, provide the principal source of regulatory guidance for waste management operations at ORNL. The objective of this document is compilation and consolidation of information on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what activities are planned for FY 1994, and how all of the activities are documented.

  7. Update of the management strategy for Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Low-Level Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, S.M.; Abraham, T.J.; DePaoli, S.M.; Walker, A.B.

    1995-04-01

    The strategy for management of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL) radioactively contaminated liquid waste was reviewed in 1991. The latest information available through the end of 1990 on waste characterization, regulations, US Department of Energy (DOE) budget guidance, and research and development programs was evaluated to determine how the strategy should be revised. Few changes are needed to update the strategy to reflect new waste characterization, research, and regulatory information. However, recent budget guidance from DOE indicates that minimum funding will not be sufficient to accomplish original objectives to upgrade the liquid low-level waste (LLLW) system to comply with the Federal Facilities Agreement, provide long-term LLLW treatment capability, and minimize environmental, safety, and health risks. Options are presented that might allow the ORNL LLLW system to continue operations temporarily, but they would significantly reduce its capabilities to handle emergency situations, provide treatment for new waste streams, and accommodate waste from the Environmental Restoration Program and from decontamination and decommissioning of surplus facilities. These options are also likely to increase worker radiation exposure, risk of environmental insult, and generation of solid waste for on-site and off-site disposal/storage beyond existing facility capacities. The strategy will be fully developed after receipt of additional guidance. The proposed budget limitations are too severe to allow ORNL to meet regulatory requirements or continue operations long term.

  8. Entry-Level Positions | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Blog NNSA & Nuclear Security Enterprise support nation's preparedness NNSA Blog NNSA's work aids in fight against cancer NNSA Blog NSC leader recognized as community role model...

  9. EA-1947: Draft Revised Finding of No Significant Impact | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1947: Draft Revised Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1947: Draft Revised Finding of No Significant Impact Transfer of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri The National ...

  10. Evaluation of Conservation Voltage Reduction (CVR) on a National Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Kevin P.; Fuller, Jason C.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Singh, Ruchi

    2010-09-29

    Conservation Voltage Reduction (CVR) is a reduction of energy consumption resulting from a reduction of feeder voltage. While there have been numerous CVR systems deployed in North America there has been little substantive analytic analysis of the effect; the majority of the published results are based on empirical field measurements. Since these results are based on empirical measurements it is difficult to extrapolate how this technology will behave on the various types of distribution feeders found throughout the nation. This report has utilized the Taxonomy of Prototypical feeder developed under the Modern Grid Initiative (MGI), now the Modern Grid Strategy (MGS), in order to estimate the benefits of CVR on multiple distribution feeder types. This information will then be used to determine an estimate of the national benefits of a wide scale deployment of CVR.

  11. Outcomes of Patients With Revised Stage I Clear Cell Sarcoma of Kidney Treated in National Wilms Tumor Studies 1-5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalapurakal, John A., E-mail: j-kalapurakal@northwestern.edu [Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Perlman, Elizabeth J. [Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Seibel, Nita L. [Cancer Therapy and Evaluation Program, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)] [Cancer Therapy and Evaluation Program, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ritchey, Michael [Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona (United States)] [Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Dome, Jeffrey S. [Children's National Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States)] [Children's National Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Grundy, Paul E. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada)] [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcomes of children with revised stage I clear cell sarcoma of the kidney (CCSK) using the National Wilms Tumor Study Group (NWTS)-5 staging criteria after multimodality treatment on NWTS 1-5 protocols. Methods and Materials: All CCSK patients enrolled in the National Wilms Tumor Study Group protocols had their pathology slides reviewed, and only those determined to have revised stage I tumors according to the NWTS-5 staging criteria were included in the present analysis. All patients were treated with multimodality therapy according to the NWTS 1-5 protocols. Results: A total of 53 children were identified as having stage I CCSK. All patients underwent primary surgery with radical nephrectomy. The chemotherapy regimens used were as follows: regimen A, C, F, or EE in 4 children (8%); regimen DD or DD4A in 33 children (62%); regimen J in 4 children (8%); and regimen I in 12 children (22%). Forty-six patients (87%) received flank radiation therapy (RT). Seven children (13%) did not receive flank RT. The median delay between surgery and the initiation of RT was 9 days (range, 3-61). The median RT dose was 10.8 Gy (range, 10-36). The flank RT doses were as follows: 10.5 or 10.8 Gy in 25 patients (47%), 11-19.9 Gy in 2 patients (4%), 20-29.9 Gy in 9 patients (17%), and 30-40 Gy in 10 patients (19%). The median follow-up for the entire group was 17 years (range, 2-36). The relapse-free and cancer-specific survival rate was 100% at the last follow-up examination. Conclusions: The present results have demonstrated that children with revised stage I CCSK using the NWTS-5 staging criteria have excellent survival rates despite the use of varying RT doses and chemotherapy regimens in the NWTS 1-5 protocols.

  12. Implementation plan for liquid low-level radioactive waste systems under the FFA for fiscal years 1996 and 1997 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    This document is the fourth annual revision of the plans and schedules for implementing the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) compliance program, originally submitted in 1992 as ES/ER-17&D1, Federal Facility Agreement Plans and Schedules for Liquid Low-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This document summarizes the progress that has been made to date implementing the plans and schedules for meeting the FFA commitments for the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In addition, this document lists FFA activities planned for FY 1997. Information presented in this document provides a comprehensive summary to facilitate understanding of the FFA compliance program for LLLW tank systems and to present plans and schedules associated with remediation, through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) process, of LLLW tank systems that have been removed from service.

  13. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2011-06-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 566 comprises Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-99-20, EMAD Compound, located within Area 25 of the Nevada National Security Site. The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CAU 566 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 566 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. From October 2010 through May 2011, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were as follows: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) to determine COCs for CAU 566. Assessment of the data from collected soil samples, and from radiological and visual surveys of the site, indicates the FALs were exceeded for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and radioactivity. Corrective actions were implemented to remove the following: • Radiologically contaminated soil assumed greater than FAL at two locations • Radiologically contaminated soil assumed greater than FAL with

  14. LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE & MIXED WASTE SHIPMENTS TO THE NEVADA NATIONAL SECURITY SITE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NV NY NY NV OH TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TX y ct 2 Plant Perma-Fix LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE & MIXED WASTE SHIPMENTS TO THE NEVADA NATIONAL SECURITY SITE FIRST QUARTER REPORT, FY 2011 (OCTOBER, NOVEMBER, DECEMBER 2010) Livermore National Laboratory ergy Alliance onal Laboratory Mixed Waste Treatment Project gonne National Laboratory ational Laboratory Gaseous Diffusion Plant Proving Ground terra, LLC en National Laboratory y Environmental Services ecurity Technologies, Inc. h Gaseous Diffusion

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 550: Smoky Contamination Area Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2012-05-01

    on January 31, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 550. The potential contamination sources associated with the study groups are from nuclear testing activities conducted at CAU 550. The DQO process resulted in an assumption that the total effective dose (TED) within the default contamination boundary of CAU 550 exceeds the final action level and requires corrective action. The presence and nature of contamination outside the default contamination boundary at CAU 550 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the TED at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each group of CASs.

  16. EA-0843: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Low-Level and Mixed Waste Processing, Idaho Falls, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to (1) reduce the volume of the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL) generated low-level waste (LLW)...

  17. Underground Test Area Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Quality Assurance Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krenzien, Susan; Marutzky, Sam

    2014-01-01

    This report is required by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) and identifies the UGTA quality assurance (QA) activities for fiscal year (FY) 2013. All UGTA organizations—U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO); Desert Research Institute (DRI); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I); National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec); and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)—conducted QA activities in FY 2013. The activities included conducting assessments, identifying findings and completing corrective actions, evaluating laboratory performance, and publishing documents. In addition, integrated UGTA required reading and corrective action tracking was instituted.

  18. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Revised Guidance for Recruitment, Retention and Relocation Incentives Revised Guidance for Recruitment, Retention and Relocation Incentives 3Rs Revised Guidance.pdf (66.78 KB) CHCO Memo_3Rs Guidance_Attachment_05-12-2016_FINAL.pdf (181.71 KB) Responsible Contacts Tiffany Wheeler Human Resources Specialist E-mail tiffany.wheeler@hq.doe.gov Phone (202) 586-8481 More Documents & Publications Manager's Desk Reference on Human Capital Management Flexibilities DOE Handbook

  19. Groundwater Level Status Report for Fiscal Year 2007 - Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon P. Allen, Richard J. Koch

    2008-03-17

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in Fiscal Year 2007 is provided in this report. The Groundwater Level Monitoring Project was instituted in 2005 to provide a framework for the collection and processing of quality controlled groundwater level data. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 166 monitoring wells, including 45 regional aquifer wells, 25 intermediate wells, and 96 alluvial wells, and 11 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 133 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well.

  20. National low-level waste management program radionuclide report series, Volume 15: Uranium-238

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, J.P.

    1995-09-01

    This report, Volume 15 of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, discusses the radiological and chemical characteristics of uranium-238 ({sup 238}U). The purpose of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series is to provide information to state representatives and developers of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities about the radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the waste disposal facility environment. This report also includes discussions about waste types and forms in which {sup 238}U can be found, and {sup 238}U behavior in the environment and in the human body.

  1. One size fits all? An assessment tool for solid waste management at local and national levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broitman, Dani; Ayalon, Ofira; Kan, Iddo

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Waste management schemes are generally implemented at national or regional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local conditions characteristics and constraints are often neglected. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed an economic model able to compare multi-level waste management options. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A detailed test case with real economic data and a best-fit scenario is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most efficient schemes combine clear National directives with local level flexibility. - Abstract: As environmental awareness rises, integrated solid waste management (WM) schemes are increasingly being implemented all over the world. The different WM schemes usually address issues such as landfilling restrictions (mainly due to methane emissions and competing land use), packaging directives and compulsory recycling goals. These schemes are, in general, designed at a national or regional level, whereas local conditions and constraints are sometimes neglected. When national WM top-down policies, in addition to setting goals, also dictate the methods by which they are to be achieved, local authorities lose their freedom to optimize their operational WM schemes according to their specific characteristics. There are a myriad of implementation options at the local level, and by carrying out a bottom-up approach the overall national WM system will be optimal on economic and environmental scales. This paper presents a model for optimizing waste strategies at a local level and evaluates this effect at a national level. This is achieved by using a waste assessment model which enables us to compare both the economic viability of several WM options at the local (single municipal authority) level, and aggregated results for regional or national levels. A test case based on various WM approaches in Israel (several implementations of mixed and separated waste) shows that local characteristics significantly

  2. Underground Test Area Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Quality Assurance Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krenzien, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This report is required by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) and identifies the UGTA quality assurance (QA) activities from October 1, 2013, through September 30, 2014 (fiscal year [FY] 2014). All UGTA organizations—U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO); Desert Research Institute (DRI); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec); Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I); and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)—conducted QA activities in FY 2014. The activities included conducting oversight assessments for QAP compliance, identifying findings and completing corrective actions, evaluating laboratory performance, and publishing documents. UGTA Activity participants conducted 25 assessments on topics including safe operations, QAP compliance, activity planning, and sampling. These assessments are summarized in Section 2.0. Corrective actions tracked in FY 2014 are presented in Appendix A. Laboratory performance was evaluated based on three approaches: (1) established performance evaluation programs (PEPs), (2) interlaboratory comparisons, or (3) data review. The results of the laboratory performance evaluations, and interlaboratory comparison results are summarized in Section 4.0. The UGTA Activity published three public documents and a variety of other publications in FY 2014. The titles, dates, and main authors are identified in Section 5.0. The Contract Managers, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Leads, Preemptive Review (PER) Committee members, and Topical Committee members are listed by name and organization in Section 6.0. Other activities that affected UGTA quality are discussed in Section 7.0. Section 8.0 provides the FY 2014 UGTA QA program conclusions, and Section 9.0 lists the references not identified in Section 5.0.

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 573: Alpha Contaminated Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 573 is located in Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 573 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with non-nuclear experiments and nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 573, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 05-23-02, GMX Alpha Contaminated Area • 05-45-01, Atmospheric Test Site - Hamilton These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives.

  4. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment. Volume 1, Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 22, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root causes of the findings identified during the assessment. The action plan has benefited from a complete review by various offices at DOE Headquarters as well as review by the Tiger Team that conducted the assessment to ensure that the described actions are responsive to the observed problems.

  5. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 544: Cellars, Mud Pits, and Oil Spills, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss and Catherine Birney

    2011-05-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 544: Cellars, Mud Pits, and Oil Spills, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 544 are located within Areas 2, 7, 9, 10, 12, 19, and 20 of the Nevada National Security Site. Corrective Action Unit 544 comprises the following CASs: • 02-37-08, Cellar & Mud Pit • 02-37-09, Cellar & Mud Pit • 07-09-01, Mud Pit • 09-09-46, U-9itsx20 PS #1A Mud Pit • 10-09-01, Mud Pit • 12-09-03, Mud Pit • 19-09-01, Mud Pits (2) • 19-09-03, Mud Pit • 19-09-04, Mud Pit • 19-25-01, Oil Spill • 19-99-06, Waste Spill • 20-09-01, Mud Pits (2) • 20-09-02, Mud Pit • 20-09-03, Mud Pit • 20-09-04, Mud Pits (2) • 20-09-06, Mud Pit • 20-09-07, Mud Pit • 20-09-10, Mud Pit • 20-25-04, Oil Spills • 20-25-05, Oil Spills The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 544 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 544 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection.

  6. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 June 2013 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 10 D.R. Tilley a,b , J.H. Kelley a,b , J.L. Godwin a,c , D.J. Millener d J. Purcell a,e , C.G. Sheu a,c and H.R. Weller a,c a Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 b Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 c Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0305 d Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 e Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University,

  7. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    30 August 2012 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 20 D.R. Tilley a,b , C.M. Cheves a,c , J.H. Kelley a,c , S. Raman d and H.R. Weller a,c a Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 b Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 c Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0305 d Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 20 was published in Nuclear Physics A636 (1998), p. 247. This

  8. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment. Volume 2, Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 2, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root cause of the findings identified during the assessment. This report is concerned with reactors safety and health findings, responses, and planned actions. Specific areas include: organization and administration; quality verification; operations; maintenance; training and certification; auxiliary systems; emergency preparedness; technical support; nuclear criticality safety; security/safety interface; experimental activities; site/facility safety review; radiological protection; personnel protection; fire protection; management findings, responses, and planned actions; self-assessment findings, responses, and planned actions; and summary of planned actions, schedules, and costs.

  9. Mixed Waste Management Options: 1995 Update. National Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirner, N.; Kelly, J.; Faison, G.; Johnson, D.

    1995-05-01

    In the original mixed Waste Management Options (DOE/LLW-134) issued in December 1991, the question was posed, ``Can mixed waste be managed out of existence?`` That study found that most, but not all, of the Nation`s mixed waste can theoretically be managed out of existence. Four years later, the Nation is still faced with a lack of disposal options for commercially generated mixed waste. However, since publication of the original Mixed Waste Management Options report in 1991, limited disposal capacity and new technologies to treat mixed waste have become available. A more detailed estimate of the Nation`s mixed waste also became available when the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published their comprehensive assessment, titled National Profile on Commercially Generated Low-Level Radioactive Mixed Waste (National Profile). These advancements in our knowledge about mixed waste inventories and generation, coupled with greater treatment and disposal options, lead to a more applied question posed for this updated report: ``Which mixed waste has no treatment option?`` Beyond estimating the volume of mixed waste requiring jointly regulated disposal, this report also provides a general background on the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). It also presents a methodical approach for generators to use when deciding how to manage their mixed waste. The volume of mixed waste that may require land disposal in a jointly regulated facility each year was estimated through the application of this methodology.

  10. An update of a national database of low-level radioactive waste in Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De, P.L.; Barker, R.C.

    1993-03-01

    This paper gives an overview and update of a national database of low-level radioactive waste in Canada. To provide a relevant perspective, Canadian data are compared with US data on annual waste arisings and with disposal initiatives of the US compacts and states. Presented also is an assessment of the data and its implications for disposal solutions in Canada.

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 365: Baneberry Contamination Area, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-12-01

    Corrective Action Unit 365 comprises one corrective action site (CAS), CAS 08-23-02, U-8d Contamination Area. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for the CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 6, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for the Baneberry site. The primary release associated with Corrective Action Unit 365 was radiological contamination from the Baneberry nuclear test. Baneberry was an underground weapons-related test that vented significant quantities of radioactive gases from a fissure located in close proximity to ground zero. A crater formed shortly after detonation, which stemmed part of the flow from the fissure. The scope of this investigation includes surface and shallow subsurface (less than 15 feet below ground surface) soils. Radionuclides from the Baneberry test with the potential to impact groundwater are included within the Underground Test Area Subproject. Investigations and corrective actions associated with the Underground Test Area Subproject include the radiological inventory resulting from the Baneberry test.

  12. Environmental Assessment Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, low-level and mixed waste processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0843, for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) low-level and mixed waste processing. The original proposed action, as reviewed in this EA, was (1) to incinerate INEL`s mixed low-level waste (MLLW) at the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF); (2) reduce the volume of INEL generated low-level waste (LLW) through sizing, compaction, and stabilization at the WERF; and (3) to ship INEL LLW to a commercial incinerator for supplemental LLW volume reduction.

  13. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) planning for the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of the waste. This report estimates volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms of GTCC LLW to the year 2035. It groups the waste into four categories, representative of the type of generator or holder of the waste: Nuclear Utilities, Sealed Sources, DOE-Held, and Other Generator. GTCC LLW includes activated metals (activation hardware from reactor operation and decommissioning), process wastes (i.e., resins, filters, etc.), sealed sources, and other wastes routinely generated by users of radioactive material. Estimates reflect the possible effect that packaging and concentration averaging may have on the total volume of GTCC LLW. Possible GTCC mixed LLW is also addressed. Nuclear utilities will probably generate the largest future volume of GTCC LLW with 65--83% of the total volume. The other generators will generate 17--23% of the waste volume, while GTCC sealed sources are expected to contribute 1--12%. A legal review of DOE`s obligations indicates that the current DOE-Held wastes described in this report will not require management as GTCC LLW because of the contractual circumstances under which they were accepted for storage. This report concludes that the volume of GTCC LLW should not pose a significant management problem from a scientific or technical standpoint. The projected volume is small enough to indicate that a dedicated GTCC LLW disposal facility may not be justified. Instead, co-disposal with other waste types is being considered as an option.

  14. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 October 2014 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 5 D.R. Tilley a,b , C.M. Cheves a,c , J.L. Godwin a,c , G.M. Hale d , H.M. Hofmann e , J.H. Kelley a,b , C.G. Sheu a,c and H.R. Weller a,c a Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 b Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 c Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0305 d Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 e Universit¨ at Erlangen-N¨ urnberg,

  15. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 June 2012 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 6 D.R. Tilley a,b , C.M. Cheves a,c , J.L. Godwin a,c , G.M. Hale d , H.M. Hofmann e , J.H. Kelley a,b , C.G. Sheu a,c and H.R. Weller a,c a Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 b Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 c Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0305 d Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 e Universit¨ at Erlangen-N¨ urnberg, Erlangen,

  16. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 June 2012 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 7 D.R. Tilley a,b , C.M. Cheves a,c , J.L. Godwin a,c , G.M. Hale d , H.M. Hofmann e , J.H. Kelley a,b , C.G. Sheu a,c and H.R. Weller a,c a Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 b Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 c Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0305 d Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 e Universit¨ at Erlangen-N¨ urnberg, Erlangen,

  17. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 7.1 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources

  18. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;" " Unit: Million short tons." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Coal Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable

  19. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Reasons that Made LPG Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;" " Unit: Million barrels." ,,,,"Reasons that Made LPG Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable

  20. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;" " Unit: Million barrels." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Distillate Fuel Oil Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable

  1. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Coal(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","

  2. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"LPG(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","

  3. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Natural Gas(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","

  4. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","

  5. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002; " " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Electricity Receipts(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","

  6. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","

  7. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    11 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Coal(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" "NAICS"," ","Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual"

  8. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"LPG(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total","

  9. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Natural Gas(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total","

  10. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total","

  11. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; " " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Electricity Receipts(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total","

  12. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total","

  13. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch LPG to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"LPG(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total Establishments","

  14. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Natural Gas to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Natural Gas(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total Establishments","

  15. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0.5 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Residual Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total Establishments","

  16. " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Number of Establishments with Capability to Switch Distillate Fuel Oil to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010;" " Level: National Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,"Distillate Fuel Oil(b)",,,"Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total Establishments","

  17. Level: National Data; Row: General Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 8.1 Number of Establishments by Participation in General Energy-Management Activities, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: General Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes; Column: Participation and Source of Assistance; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Code(a) Energy-Management Activity No Participation Participation(b) In-house Utility/Energy Suppler Product/Service Provider Federal Program State/Local Program Don't Know Total United States 311 -

  18. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Reasons that Made Natural Gas Unswitchable, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Reasons that Made Quantity Unswitchable; Unit: Billion cubic feet. Total Amount of Total Amount of Equipment is Not Switching Unavailable Long-Term Unavailable Combinations of NAICS Natural Gas Unswitchable Capable of Using Adversely Affects Alternative Environmenta Contract Storage for Another Columns F, G, Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed as a FueNatural Gas Fuel Use Another Fuel the

  19. National profile on commercially generated low-level radioactive mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, J.A.; Mrochek, J.E.; Jolley, R.L.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Francis, A.A.; Wright, T.

    1992-12-01

    This report details the findings and conclusions drawn from a survey undertaken as part of a joint US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and US Environmental Protection Agency-sponsored project entitled ``National Profile on Commercially Generated Low-Level Radioactive Mixed Waste.`` The overall objective of the work was to compile a national profile on the volumes, characteristics, and treatability of commercially generated low-level mixed waste for 1990 by five major facility categories-academic, industrial, medical, and NRC-/Agreement State-licensed goverment facilities and nuclear utilities. Included in this report are descriptions of the methodology used to collect and collate the data, the procedures used to estimate the mixed waste generation rate for commercial facilities in the United States in 1990, and the identification of available treatment technologies to meet applicable EPA treatment standards (40 CFR Part 268) and, if possible, to render the hazardous component of specific mixed waste streams nonhazardous. The report also contains information on existing and potential commercial waste treatment facilities that may provide treatment for specific waste streams identified in the national survey. The report does not include any aspect of the Department of Energy`s (DOES) management of mixed waste and generally does not address wastes from remedial action activities.

  20. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Capability to Switch Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Coal Coke NAICS Total Not Natural Distillate Residual and Code(a) Selected Subsectors and Industry Receipts(c) Switchable Switchable Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Coal LPG Breeze Other(d) Total United States 311 Food 75,673 2,403 70,987 666 1,658 Q 406 Q Q 141 3112 Grain and Oilseed

  1. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2.3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes Column: Energy Sources Unit: Trillion Btu Economic Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and Characteristic(a) Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coal Breeze Other(e) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 47 0 3 5 Q 20 1 17 20-49 112 7 Q 20 1 12 1 64 50-99 247 29 Q 26 88 33 * 68 100-249 313 28 1 97 12 48 43 85

  2. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Electricity: Sales to Utility and Nonutility Purchasers, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Utility and Nonutility Purchasers; Unit: Million Kilowatthours. Total of Economic Sales and Utility Nonutility Characteristic(a) Transfers Offsite Purchaser(b) Purchaser(c) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 28 28 0 20-49 307 227 80 50-99 2,218 1,673 545 100-249 2,647 1,437 1,210 250-499 3,736 2,271

  3. Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Capability to Switch Coal to Alternative Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National Data and Regional Totals; Row: NAICS Codes, Value of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Thousand Short Tons. NAICS Total Not Electricity Natural Distillate Residual Code(a) Subsector and Industry Consumed(c) Switchable Switchable Receipts(d) Gas Fuel Oil Fuel Oil LPG Other(e) Total United States 311 Food 6,603 1,013 5,373 27 981 303 93 271 86 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 5,099 658 4,323

  4. Level: National Data; Row: Specific Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 8.4 Number of Establishments by Participation in Specific Energy-Management Activities, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Specific Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes; Column: Participation; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Code(a) Energy-Management Activity No Participation Participation(b) Don't Know Not Applicable Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Full-Time Energy Manager (c) 159,258 9,922 25,553 -- Set Goals for

  5. Level: National Data; Row: Specific Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 8.4 Number of Establishments by Participation in Specific Energy-Management Activities, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: Specific Energy-Management Activities within NAICS Codes; Column: Participation; Unit: Establishment Counts. NAICS Code(a) Energy-Management Activity No Participation Participation(b) Don't Know No Steam Used Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES Full-Time Energy Manager (c) 142,267 12,536 15,365 -- Set Goals for

  6. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory low-level waste systems performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    This Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) Systems Performance Assessment (PA) presents a systematic analysis of the potential risks posed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) waste management system. Potential risks to the public and environment are compared to established performance objectives as required by DOE Order 5820.2A. The report determines the associated maximum individual committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) to a member of the public from LLW and mixed waste. A maximum annual CEDE of 0.01 mrem could result from routine radioactive liquid effluents. A maximum annual CEDE of 0.003 mrem could result from routine radioactive gaseous effluents. No other pathways for radiation exposure of the public indicated detectable levels of exposure. The dose rate, monitoring, and waste acceptance performance objectives were found to be adequately addressed by the LLNL Program. 88 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs.

  7. Microsoft Word - Transmittal Revised B6 Checlist and Additional...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Idaho National LaboratoryCentral Characterization Project Remote-Handled Waste Visual Examination Process, Audit A-10-03 Dear Mr. Zappe: This letter transmits the revised...

  8. Revised DOE Acquisition Guide Chapter 71.1 Headquarters Business...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    71.1 Headquarters Business Clearance Process Revised DOE Acquisition Guide Chapter 71.1 Headquarters Business Clearance Process There was mention in the National Academy of Public ...

  9. DOE Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions DOE Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions September 30, 2011 - 2:30pm Addthis On September 27, 2011, the Department of Energy (DOE) approved revisions to its National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations, and on September 28th, submitted the revisions to the Federal Register. The final regulations, which become effective 30 days after publication in the Federal Register, are

  10. Heating Oil and Propane Update - Revision report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Revision reports Revision report 2015-2016 Revision report 2014-2015

  11. Performance Assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Arthur S. Rood

    2012-05-01

    This performance assessment for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of low-level radioactive waste at the facility. This assessment evaluates compliance with the applicable radiological criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involve modeling transport of radionuclides from buried waste to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses are calculated for both offsite receptors and individuals who inadvertently intrude into the waste after site closure. The results of the calculations are used to evaluate the future performance of the low-level radioactive waste disposal facility and to provide input for establishment of waste acceptance criteria. In addition, one-factor-at-a-time, Monte Carlo, and rank correlation analyses are included for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The comparison of the performance assessment results to the applicable performance objectives provides reasonable expectation that the performance objectives will be met

  12. Commercial disposal options for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, C.L.; Widmayer, D.A.

    1995-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned, contractor-operated site. Significant quantities of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) have been generated and disposed of onsite at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The INEL expects to continue generating LLW while performing its mission and as aging facilities are decommissioned. An on-going Performance Assessment process for the RWMC underscores the potential for reduced or limited LLW disposal capacity at the existing onsite facility. In order to properly manage the anticipated amount of LLW, the INEL is investigating various disposal options. These options include building a new facility, disposing the LLW at other DOE sites, using commercial disposal facilities, or seeking a combination of options. This evaluation reports on the feasibility of using commercial disposal facilities.

  13. Level 3 Baseline Risk Assessment for Building 3515 at Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollert, D.A.; Cretella, F.M.; Golden, K.M.

    1995-08-01

    The baseline risk assessment for the Fission Product Pilot Plant (Building 3515) at the Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) provides the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program at ORNL and Building 3515 project managers with information concerning the results of the Level 3 baseline risk assessment performed for this building. The document was prepared under Work Breakdown Structure 1.4.12.6.2.01 (Activity Data Sheet 3701, Facilities D&D) and includes information on the potential long-term impacts to human health and the environment if no action is taken to remediate Building 3515. Information provided in this document forms the basis for the development of remedial alternatives and the no-action risk portion of the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis report.

  14. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Facilities Division- Optimizing Activity-level Work Planning and Control Lessons Learned

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Ken Fletcher, Deputy Division Director for Facilities, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

  15. Landfill impacts on aquatic plant communities and tissue metal levels at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, P.M. [National Biological Service, Porter, IN (United States). Lake Michigan Ecological Station; Scribailo, R.W. [Purdue Univ.North Central, Westville, IN (United States). Section of Biology and Chemistry

    1995-12-31

    One important environmental issue facing Northwest Indiana and park management at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (INOU) is the contamination of water, sediment and biota by persistent toxic substances. Aquatic plant communities were used to evaluate the water/organismal quality of the Grand Calumet Lagoons and two dunal ponds (pannes) at Gary, Indiana, which are partially located in the Miller Woods Unit of INDU. The lagoon is divided into several areas, the USX Lagoon is located between sections of a large industrial landfill (steel slag and other material). The Marquette Lagoon is located further away from the landfill and tends to be upgradient from the landfill. The West Panne (WP) is located next to the landfill, while the East Panne (EP) is separated from the landfill and the WP by a high dune ridge. Plant populations shift toward fewer submergent aquatics, with a higher abundance of tolerant taxa in the western section of the USX Lagoon. These differences are supported by cluster analysis. Heavy metals in root tissue of Scirpus americanus and other plant species from the pannes were significantly higher than those found in shoots. Shoot tissue metal levels in plants collected from the lagoons were higher than root tissue metal levels. The WP site has the most elevated tissue metal levels for most metals assayed, while the EP site shows similar contaminant levels. The plant distributions observed and tissue metal concentrations measured suggest that INDU`s aquatic plant community has been affected by the industrial landfill and that there exists a hydrological connection between the ponds.

  16. Revised Manuscript May

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Revised Manuscript May 20, 2014 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 3 J.E. Purcell a,b , J.H. Kelley a,c , E. Kwan a,d , C.G. Sheu a,d and H.R. Weller a,d a Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708-0308 b Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 c Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 d Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0305 Abstract: A compilation of experimental and

  17. Application of spectral summing to indeterminate suspect low-level drums at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruetzmacher, Kathleen M; Veilleux, John M; Lucero, Randy P; Seamans, Jr., James V; Clapham, Martin J

    2010-11-09

    An analytical technique developed by Pajarito Scientific Corporation (PSC), utilizing spectral summing of spectra from groups of drums of similar waste type, is being employed by the Waste Disposition Project - Low Level Waste Disposal (WDP-LLWD) Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This technique has been used to disposition low-level radioactive waste that has dropped out of the transuranic (TRU) category and has no place to go unless it can be proven to be LLW and not TRU. The TRU program at LANL run by Mobile Characterization Services (MCS) employs two High Efficiency Neutron Counters (HENC) with built-in gamma assay systems to assay radioactive waste for shipment and disposal as TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) at Carlsbad, New Mexico. As well as being certified for WIPP assays, the HENC systems can also be used for low-level waste assays for disposal at LANL or off-site disposal facilities, such as the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Some of the waste processed through the HENC systems cannot be confinned TRU due to the absence of detected TRU alpha emitters above the TRU cutoff of 100 nCi/g. This waste becomes suspect low-level waste (SLLW). In many cases, the waste also can't be classified as LLW because the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of TRU radio nuclides is above the 100 nCi/g level. These wastes that do not have enough detectable TRU activity to be classified as TRU waste and have too high a MDA to be classified as LLW enter a radioactive waste characterization indetenninate status that prevents their dispositioning as either TRU waste or LLW. Spectral summing allows an experienced ganuna spectroscopy analyst to add the HENC gamma spectra of a number of similar waste items together to form a consolidated (summed) spectrum. This summed spectrum contains the assay results of the group of items rather than the individual item, and gamma peaks that were not discernable in the individual spectra can become quantifiable in the

  18. Ecosystem level assessment of the Grand Calumet Lagoons, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, P.M. [National Biological Service, Porter, IN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The Grand Calumet Lagoons make up the eastern section of the Grand Calumet River (GCR), Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal and nearshore Lake Michigan Area of Concern (AOC). The GCR AOC is the only one of the 42 Great Lakes Areas of Concern identified by the International Joint Commission with all 14 designated uses classified as impaired. Included within the boundaries of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (INDU), is the central section of the Grand Calumet Lagoons. A number of biotic and abiotic factors were tested to determine the effects of an industrial landfill that borders the lagoons to assess the potential impact on park resources. Analysis included water quality testing, assessments of macroinvertebrate, fish, algae and aquatic plant communities and contaminant concentrations in water, sediment and plant and fish tissue. Surface water testing found very few contaminants, but significantly higher nutrient levels were found in the water column closest to the landfill. Macroinvertebrate, aquatic plant and fish communities all showed significant impairment in relationship to their proximity to the landfill. Aquatic plant growth habit became limited next to the landfill with certain growth habits disappearing entirely. Aquatic plants collected close to the landfill had high concentrations of several heavy metals in their stems and shoots. Using the index of biotic integrity (IBI), fish community assessment indicated impairment in the areas adjacent to the landfill. Sediments tested at one site had over 12% polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and carp (Cyprinus carpio) collected from this site had whole fish tissue concentrations over 1 mg/kg PAH.

  19. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Technical Assessment Team Report Revision 0 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Technical Assessment Team Report Revision 0 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Technical Assessment Team Report Revision 0 This report provides the results of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) technical assessment led by the Savannah River National Laboratory and conducted by a team of experts in pertinent disciplines from SRNL and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Sandia

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews; Christy Sloop

    2012-02-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 569 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 569 comprises the nine numbered corrective action sites (CASs) and one newly identified site listed below: (1) 03-23-09, T-3 Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Annie, Franklin, George, and Moth); (2) 03-23-10, T-3A Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Harry and Hornet); (3) 03-23-11, T-3B Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Fizeau); (4) 03-23-12, T-3S Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Rio Arriba); (5) 03-23-13, T-3T Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Catron); (6) 03-23-14, T-3V Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Humboldt); (7) 03-23-15, S-3G Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Coulomb-B); (8) 03-23-16, S-3H Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Coulomb-A); (9) 03-23-21, Pike Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Pike); and (10) Waste Consolidation Site 3A. Because CAU 569 is a complicated site containing many types of releases, it was agreed during the data quality objectives (DQO) process that these sites will be grouped. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each study group. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the DQOs developed on September 26, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO

  1. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 372: Area 20 Cabriolet/Palanquin Unit Craters, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick and Sloop, Christy

    2011-04-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 372, Area 20 Cabriolet/Palanquin Unit Craters, located within Areas 18 and 20 at the Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 372 comprises four corrective action sites (CASs): • 18-45-02, Little Feller I Surface Crater • 18-45-03, Little Feller II Surface Crater • 20-23-01, U-20k Contamination Area • 20-45-01, U-20L Crater (Cabriolet) The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 372 based on the implementation of the corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls at all CASs. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from November 9, 2009, through December 10, 2010, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 372: Area 20 Cabriolet/Palanquin Unit Craters. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides and investigation of other releases (migration in washes and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 372 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Investigation results were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A radiological dose FAL was established of 25 millirem per year based on the Remote Work Area exposure scenario (336 hours of annual exposure). Radiological doses exceeding the FAL were found to be present at all four CASs. It is assumed that radionuclide levels present within the Little Feller I and Cabriolet high

  2. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 365: Baneberry Contamination Area, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit 365 comprises one corrective action site (CAS), CAS 08-23-02, U-8d Contamination Area. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 365 based on the implementation of the corrective action of closure in place with a use restriction (UR). Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from January 18, 2011, through August 2, 2011, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 365: Baneberry Contamination Area. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 365 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is complete and acceptable for use in supporting the DQO decisions. Investigation results were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A radiological dose FAL of 25 millirem per year was established based on the Remote Work Area exposure scenario (336 hours of annual exposure). Radiological doses exceeding the FAL were found to be present to the southwest of the Baneberry crater. It was also assumed that radionuclide levels present within the crater and fissure exceed the FAL. Corrective actions were undertaken that consisted of establishing a UR and posting warning signs for the crater, fissure, and the area located to the southwest of the crater where soil concentrations exceeded the FAL. These URs were recorded in the FFACO database; the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Facility Information Management System; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: (1) No further corrective actions beyond what are described in this document are necessary for CAU 365. (2) A Notice of Completion to

  3. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A 9 D.R. Tilley a,b , J.H. Kelley a,b , J.L. Godwin a,c , D.J. Millener d J. Purcell a,e , C.G. Sheu a,c and H.R. Weller a,c a Triangle Universities ...

  4. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Kauss

    2011-06-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 539 are located within Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada National Security Site. Corrective Action Unit 539 comprises the following CASs: • 25-99-21, Area 25 Railroad Tracks • 26-99-05, Area 26 Railroad Tracks The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 539 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Reviewed documentation on historical and current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Conducted radiological walkover surveys of railroad tracks in both Areas 25 and 26. • Collected ballast and soil samples and calculated internal dose estimates for radiological releases. • Collected in situ thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements and calculated external dose estimates for radiological releases. • Removed lead bricks as potential source material (PSM) and collected verification samples. • Implemented corrective actions as necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly disposed of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Implemented an FFACO use restriction (UR) for radiological contamination at CAS 25-99-21. The approved UR form and map are provided in Appendix F and will be filed in the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Facility Information Management System; the FFACO database; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. From November 29

  5. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 November 2010 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 6 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A490 (1988), p. 1. This version of A = 6 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. The introduction and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the

  6. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 February 2011 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 9 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A490 (1988), p. 1. This version of A = 9 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. The introduction and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the

  7. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    31 October 2013 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 10 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A413 (1984), p. 1. This version of A = 10 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and Introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Also, Reference key numbers have been changed to the

  8. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    30 October 2012 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 13 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 13-15 was published in Nuclear Physics A523 (1991), p. 1. This version of A = 13 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. The introduction and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the

  9. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2012 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 15 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 13-15 was published in Nuclear Physics A523 (1991), p. 1. This version of A = 15 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. The introduction and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the

  10. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 November 2013 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 18 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 18-20 was published in Nuclear Physics A392 (1983), p. 1. This version of A = 18 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Also, Reference key numbers have been changed to the

  11. Determination of low-level radioactivity in environmental samples by gamma spectroscopy at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streets, W.E.; Heinrich, R.R.; Lamoureux, L.L.

    1988-01-01

    We currently have six Ge/Ge(Li) detectors that are being used for gamma counting of environmental samples (three with horizontal geometry, three with vertical geometry). The detectors were calibrated for close-geometry efficiency by counting standards in a set configuration (a height of 6.4 cm in a 4-oz. wide-mouthed Naglene bottle) immediately adjacent to the cryostat face. This configuration was chosen so that the standards would be symmetrical to the centers of both the horizontal and vertical detectors. Two solid standards were prepared by adding a known amount of Standard Reference Material NBL No. 6-A (Pitchblende) and NBL No. 7-A (Monazite Sand) to a blanked soil and mixing. Homogeneity of the standards was checked by counting each standard at each quadrant (on a horizontal detector). The final mixtures showed less than 1% deviation between the high and low quadrant counts. Two liquid secondary standards were prepared from stock solutions of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 131/I, and /sup 110m/Ag, which has been characterized as point sources using several detector efficiency curves. These efficiencies were determined using point source standards from the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). All standards had activity levels that allowed less than 1% counting statistics to be obtained on the major peaks (i.e., those with stronger branching ratio) within two hours. Analysis of the resulting data yield smooth efficiency curves for each of the six detectors. Although the standard compositions varied, solid and liquid, the densities were all approx. =1.0 g/cm/sup 3/. 3 refs.

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 567: Miscellaneous Soil Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, with ROTC 1 Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick K.

    2013-07-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 567 is located in Areas 1, 3, 5, 20, and 25 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 567 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 567, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 01-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-1 • 03-23-25, Seaweed E Contamination Area • 05-23-07, A5b RMA • 20-23-08, Colby Mud Spill • 25-23-23, J-11 Soil RMA These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on May 6, 2013, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 567. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with CAU 567 releases are nuclear test operations and other NNSS operations. The DQO process resulted in an assumption that total effective dose (TED) within a default contamination boundary

  13. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 105 is a geographical grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with atmospheric nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 105, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney • 02-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site T-2A • 02-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-2B • 02-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site T-2 • 02-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Turk These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 105. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with all CAU 105 CASs are from atmospheric nuclear testing activities. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU

  14. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 2008 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 5 T. Lauritsen a and F. Ajzenberg-Selove b a California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California b University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics 78 (1966), p. 1. This version of A = 5 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discov- ered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from

  15. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 January 2016 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 5 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A227 (1974), p. 1. This version of A = 5 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL format.

  16. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 September 2014 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 5 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A320 (1979), p. 1. This version of A = 5 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the TUNL/NNDC

  17. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 2010 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 5 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A490 (1988), p. 1. This version of A = 5 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. The introduction and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL

  18. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 September 2008 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 6 F. Ajzenberg-Selove a and T. Lauritsen b a University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 b California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-24 was published in Nuclear Physics 11 (1959), p. 1. This version of A = 6 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discov- ered after the article went to press. Figures and Introductory tables have been omitted

  19. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 August 2008 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 6 T. Lauritsen a and F. Ajzenberg-Selove b a California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California b University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics 78 (1966), p. 1. This version of A = 6 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discov- ered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from

  20. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 January 2016 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 6 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A227 (1974), p. 1. This version of A = 6 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the TUNL/NNDC format.

  1. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 September 2014 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 6 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A320 (1979), p. 1. This version of A = 6 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the TUNL/NNDC

  2. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 August 2013 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 6 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A413 (1984), p. 1. This version of A = 6 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Also, Reference key numbers have been changed to the TUNL/NNDC

  3. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 September 2008 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 7 F. Ajzenberg-Selove a and T. Lauritsen b a University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 b California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-24 was published in Nuclear Physics 11 (1959), p. 1. This version of A = 7 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discov- ered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted

  4. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 August 2008 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 7 T. Lauritsen a and F. Ajzenberg-Selove b a California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California b University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics 78 (1966), p. 1. This version of A = 7 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discov- ered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from

  5. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 February 2016 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 7 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A227 (1974), p. 1. This version of A = 7 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the TUNL/NNDC

  6. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 September 2014 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 7 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A320 (1979), p. 1. This version of A = 7 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the TUNL/NNDC

  7. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 September 2013 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 7 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A413 (1984), p. 1. This version of A = 7 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and Introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Also, Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL

  8. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 April 2013 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 7 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A490 (1988), p. 1. This version of A = 7 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. The introduction and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL

  9. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 August 2008 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 8 T. Lauritsen a and F. Ajzenberg-Selove b a California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California b University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics 78 (1966), p. 1. This version of A = 8 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors dis- covered after the article went to press. Figures and ntroductory tables have been omitted from

  10. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 February 2016 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 8 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A227 (1974), p. 1. This version of A = 8 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the TUNL/NNDC

  11. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 September 2014 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 8 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A320 (1979), p. 1. This version of A = 8 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the TUNL/NNDC

  12. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 September 2013 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 8 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A413 (1984), p. 1. This version of A = 8 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and Introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Also, Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL

  13. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 2011 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 8 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A490 (1988), p. 1. This version of A = 8 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. The introduction and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL

  14. Revised Manuscript

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    3 October 2008 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 9 F. Ajzenberg-Selove a and T. Lauritsen b a University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 b California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-24 was published in Nuclear Physics 11 (1959), p. 1. This version of A = 9 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discov- ered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from

  15. Revised Manuscript

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    2 September 2008 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 9 T. Lauritsen a and F. Ajzenberg-Selove b a California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California b University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics 78 (1966), p. 1. This version of A = 9 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discov- ered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted

  16. Revised Manuscript

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    22 February 2016 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 9 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A227 (1974), p. 1. This version of A = 9 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the TUNL/NNDC

  17. Revised Manuscript

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    30 September 2014 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 9 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A320 (1979), p. 1. This version of A = 9 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the TUNL/NNDC

  18. Revised Manuscript

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    5 October 2013 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 9 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A413 (1984), p. 1. This version of A = 9 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and Introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Also, Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL

  19. Revised Manuscript

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    3 October 2008 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 10 F. Ajzenberg-Selove a and T. Lauritsen b a University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 b California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-24 was published in Nuclear Physics 11 (1959), p. 1. This version of A = 10 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors dis- covered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted

  20. Revised Manuscript

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    15 September 2008 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 10 T. Lauritsen a and F. Ajzenberg-Selove b a California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California b University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics 78 (1966), p. 1. This version of A = 10 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors dis- covered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted

  1. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 March 2016 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 10 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A227 (1974), p. 1. This version of A = 10 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the TUNL/NNDC format.

  2. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 October 2014 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 10 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A320 (1979), p. 1. This version of A = 10 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL

  3. Revised Manuscript

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    9 May 2012 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 10 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-10 was published in Nuclear Physics A490 (1988), p. 1. This version of A = 10 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. The introduction and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL

  4. Revised Manuscript

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    0 February 2009 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 11 F. Ajzenberg-Selove a and T. Lauritsen b a University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 b California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-24 was published in Nuclear Physics 11 (1959), p. 1. This version of A = 11 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors dis- covered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted

  5. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    05 February 2009 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 11 F. Ajzenberg-Selove a and T. Lauritsen b a University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 b California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California Abstract: An evaluation of A = 11-12 was published in Nuclear Physics A114 (1968), p. 1. This version of A = 11 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted

  6. Revised Manuscript

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    6 October 2015 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 11 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 11-12 was published in Nuclear Physics A248 (1975), p. 1. This version of A = 11 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL

  7. Revised Manuscript

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    31 July 2014 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 11 F. Ajzenberg-Selove and C.L. Busch University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 11-12 was published in Nuclear Physics A336 (1980), p. 1. This version of A = 11 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the

  8. Revised Manuscript

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    5 May 2013 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 11 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 11-12 was published in Nuclear Physics A433 (1985), p. 1. This version of A = 11 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL format.

  9. Revised Manuscript

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    5 June 2012 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 11 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 11-12 was published in Nuclear Physics A506 (1990), p. 1. This version of A = 11 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers are in the NNDC/TUNL format. (References

  10. Revised Manuscript

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    9 August, 2015 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 12 F. Ajzenberg-Selove a and T. Lauritsen b a University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 b California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-24 was published in Nuclear Physics 11 (1959), p. 1. This version of A = 12 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors dis- covered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted

  11. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 July 2015 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 12 F. Ajzenberg-Selove a and T. Lauritsen b a University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 b California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California Abstract: An evaluation of A = 11-12 was published in Nuclear Physics A114 (1968), p. 1. This version of A = 12 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from

  12. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 February 2016 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 12 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 11-12 was published in Nuclear Physics A248 (1975), p. 1. This version of A = 12 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL

  13. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 January 2016 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 12 F. Ajzenberg-Selove and C.L. Busch University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 11-12 was published in Nuclear Physics A336 (1980), p. 1. This version of A = 12 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the

  14. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 May 2016 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 12 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 11-12 was published in Nuclear Physics A433 (1985), p. 1. This version of A = 12 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL format.

  15. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    02 June 2016 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 12 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 11-12 was published in Nuclear Physics A506 (1990), p. 1. This version of A = 12 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers are in the NNDC/TUNL format. (References

  16. Revised Manuscript

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    3 February 2009 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 13 F. Ajzenberg-Selove a and T. Lauritsen b a University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 b California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-24 was published in Nuclear Physics 11 (1959), p. 1. This version of A = 13 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors dis- covered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted

  17. Revised Manuscript

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    08 August 2016 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 13 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 13-15 was published in Nuclear Physics A152 (1970), p. 1. This version of A = 13 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL

  18. Revised Manuscript

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    2 July 2015 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 13 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 13-15 was published in Nuclear Physics A268 (1976), p. 1. This version of A = 13 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL format.

  19. Revised Manuscript

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    15 July 2015 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 13 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 13-15 was published in Nuclear Physics A360 (1981), p. 1. This version of A = 13 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Also, Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL

  20. Revised Manuscript

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    1 March 2013 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 13 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 13-15 was published in Nuclear Physics A449 (1986), p. 1. This version of A = 13 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL

  1. Revised Manuscript

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    9 August 2016 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 14 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 13-15 was published in Nuclear Physics A152 (1970), p. 1. This version of A = 14 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL

  2. Revised Manuscript

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    5 August 2015 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 14 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 13-15 was published in Nuclear Physics A268 (1976), p. 1. This version of A = 14 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL

  3. Revised Manuscript

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    8 April 2014 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 14 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 13-15 was published in Nuclear Physics A360 (1981), p. 1. This version of A = 14 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Also, Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL

  4. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 April 2013 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 14 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 13-15 was published in Nuclear Physics A449 (1986), p. 1. This version of A = 14 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL

  5. Revised Manuscript

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    6 June 2008 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 15 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 13-15 was published in Nuclear Physics A152 (1970), p. 1. This version of A = 15 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL format.

  6. Revised Manuscript

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    October 2015 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 15 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 13-15 was published in Nuclear Physics A268 (1976), p. 1. This version of A = 15 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL

  7. Revised Manuscript

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    9 May 2014 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 15 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 13-15 was published in Nuclear Physics A360 (1981), p. 1. This version of A = 15 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Also, Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL

  8. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 April 2013 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 15 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 13-15 was published in Nuclear Physics A449 (1986), p. 1. This version of A = 15 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL

  9. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 November 2008 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 16 F. Ajzenberg-Selove a and T. Lauritsen b a University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 b California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California Abstract: An evaluation of A = 5-24 was published in Nuclear Physics 11 (1959), p. 1. This version of A = 16 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors dis- covered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted

  10. Revised Manuscript

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    8 May 2016 Energy Levels of Light Nuclei A = 16 F. Ajzenberg-Selove University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6396 Abstract: An evaluation of A = 16-17 was published in Nuclear Physics A166 (1971), p. 1. This version of A = 16 differs from the published version in that we have corrected some errors discovered after the article went to press. Figures and introductory tables have been omitted from this manuscript. Reference key numbers have been changed to the NNDC/TUNL format.