Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Guidance Related to Analysis of Impacts to Workers in National Policy Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance Related to Analysis of Impacts to Workers in National Guidance Related to Analysis of Impacts to Workers in National Policy Act (NEPA) Documentation Guidance Related to Analysis of Impacts to Workers in National Policy Act (NEPA) Documentation The purpose of this memorandum is to provide general guidance regarding the analysis of impacts to workers in DOE environmental impact statements (EISs) and environmental assessments (EAs) in order to assist DOE program and field offices in meeting the requirements of NEPA and to establish a general consistency in the Department's NEPA documentation. This guidance was prompted by several questions raised in this regard and was developed by the Office of NEPA Project Assistance, after consultation with the Office of General Counsel. Guidance Related to Analysis of Impacts to Workers in National Policy Act

2

Guidance Related to Analysis of Impacts to Workers in National Environmental Policy Act Documentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

D D A T E : June 10, 1988 REPLY TO ATTN OF: E H - 2 5 SUBJECT: Guidance Related to Analysis of Impacts to Workers in National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Documentation TO : D I S T R I BUT I ON The purpose of this memorandum is to provide general guidance regarding the analysis of impacts to workers in DOE environmental impact statements (EISs) and environmental assessments (EAs) in order to assist DOE program and field offices in meeting the requirements of NEPA and to establish a general consistency in the Department's NEPA documentation. This guidance was prompted by several questions raised in this regard and was developed by the Office of NEPA Project Assistance, after consultation with the Office of General Counsel. Background Neither the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations for

3

Final Supplement Analysis for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Sandia National Laboratories, Sandia, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81-SA-04 81-SA-04 Final Supplement Analysis for the Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico August 2006 U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Sandia Site Office This page intentionally left blank COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY/NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION TITLE: Final Supplement Analysis for the Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (DOE/EIS-0281-SA-04) CONTACT: For further information concerning this Supplement Analysis, contact Ms. Susan Lacy Environmental Team Leader Sandia Site Office National Nuclear Security Administration P. O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-5400 Phone: (505) 845-5542

4

Our Impact | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our Impact Our Impact Argonne is the largest federally funded R&D center in Illinois and the entire Midwest. For 65 years, our scientific and engineering research has helped drive the region's economic growth and bring high-tech workers into the state. Today, as the United States faces major challenges in energy, environment and national security, research at Argonne fuels the economic competitiveness of Illinois, the Midwest and beyond. Our goal is to ignite an innovation ecology that strengthens research partnerships among the state's universities, laboratories and industry. Argonne's impact on Illinois FY 2010 by the numbers 4,950 jobs created throughout Illinois $695 million total economic impact on Illinois $600 million in federal research funding attracted to Illinois

5

Brookhaven National Lab Economic Impact Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New York State economy Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Future of New York State's Economy Brookhaven National Laboratory's impact on New York State's (and Long Island's)...

6

DOE/EIS-0236/SA-6 Final Supplement Analysis for Pit Manufacturing Facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DATE: REPLY TO ATTN OF: DP-45 (G. Palmer, 6-1785) SUBJECT: DETERMINATION OF THE NEED FOR ADDITIONAL NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) REVIEW TO: Dave Beck, DP-20 As requested in your action memorandum, same subject, I have reviewed the attached Final Supplement Analysis for Pit Manufacturing Facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, dated August 1999. This analysis was prepared in accordance with 10 CFR 1021.314, contains the comments on the draft Supplement Analysis, dated June 1999, and responds to the comments in Appendix D. Based on my review of the six issues analyzed in the Supplement Analysis, I have determined that none of the information and analysis represent substantial changes to the actions

7

Navajo Generating Station and Air Visibility Regulations: Alternatives and Impacts (Revised), Energy Analysis, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Navajo Generating Station Navajo Generating Station Navajo Generating Station and Air Visibility Regulations: Alternatives and Impacts David J. Hurlbut, Scott Haase, Gregory Brinkman, Kip Funk, Rachel Gelman, Eric Lantz, Christina Larney, David Peterson, Christopher Worley National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ed Liebsch HDR Engineering, Inc. Prepared under Task No. WFJ5.1000 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-53024 * Revised March 2012 Contract No. DE-AC36-08G028308 Produced under direction of the U.S. Department of the Interior by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Interagency Agreement R11PG30024 and Task No. WFJ5.1000. ERRATA SHEET NREL REPORT/PROJECT NUMBER: NREL/TP-6A20-53024 DOE NUMBER: N/A TITLE: Navajo Generating Station and Air Visibility Regulations: Alternatives and

8

Sandia National Laboratories: News: Economic Impact  

Sandia National Laboratories has a robust and widespread economic impact. Spending by the Labs exceeds $2 billion a year. Nearly $1 billion goes to the procurement of ...

9

DOE/EIS-0350-SA-01: Supplement Analysis for Environmental Impact Statement for the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement (CMRR) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (01/05)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SA-01 SA-01 Supplement Analysis Environmental Impact Statement for the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement (CMRR) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico Changes to the Location of the CMRR Facility Components January 2005 Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Site Office Supplement Analysis Introduction This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Environmental Impact Statement for the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (CMRR EIS) (DOE/EIS-0350) adequately addresses the environmental effects of proposed changes in the location of certain components of the Preferred Alternative that the National Nuclear Security

10

Draft Nevada National Security Site Environmental Impact Statement Released  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada National Security Site Environmental Impact Statement Nevada National Security Site Environmental Impact Statement Released Draft Nevada National Security Site Environmental Impact Statement Released July 25, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Darwin J. Morgan morgan@nv.doe.gov 702-295-3521 Kelly K. Snyder snyderk@nv.doe.gov 702-295-3521 The Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) for the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and Off-Site Locations in Nevada is available for public review and comment through October 27, 2011. Within the draft SWEIS, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Security Administration Nevada Site Office presents a formal analysis of how current and potential missions at the NNSS (formerly the Nevada Test Site) and related off-site locations may affect the environment over the next ten

11

Impact Velocity (2011) | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Impact Velocity (2011) | National Nuclear Security Administration Impact Velocity (2011) | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Video Gallery > Impact Velocity (2011) Impact Velocity (2011) Impact Velocity (2011) From: NNSANews Views: 388 2 ratings Time: 02:26 More in Science & Technology See video Facebook Twitter

12

Analysis Activities at Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Laboratory Operated by The University of Chicago Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Marianne M. Mintz Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program Systems Analysis Workshop July 28-29, 2004 Washington, D.C. 2 ANL's Charter ANL's Charter ANL's Charter Systems analysis in Energy Systems (CTR), Decision and Information Sciences History of working in partnership with industry Analytical work has spanned the range of: Energy Supply - globally and by region Demand for transportation fuels - globally and region Assessment of vehicle technologies and fuels Economic analysis and interaction between energy prices and macro activity Life-cycle analyses of energy use and environmental impacts associated with

13

Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the 1603 Treasury Grant Program Daniel Steinberg and Gian Porro National Renewable Energy...

14

DOE/EIS-0281-SA-02: Supplement Analysis for Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Isentropic Compression and Flyer Plate Experiments Involving Plutonium at the Z and Saturn Accelorators (September 2002)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81-SA-02 81-SA-02 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Isentropic Compression and Flyer Plate Experiments Involving Plutonium at the Z and Saturn Accelerators September 2002 INTRODUCTION - PURPOSE OF SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SWEIS), DOE/EIS-0281, adequately addresses the environmental effects of a proposal to conduct isentropic compression and flyer plate experiments involving plutonium at the Z and Saturn Accelerators, or if additional documentation under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is needed. The need for a SA to an existing

15

No Significant Impact Effluent Reduction Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of Finding of No Significant Impact Effluent Reduction Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico U. S. Department of Energy Los Alamos Area Office 528 35th Street Los Alamos, NM 87544 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT EFFLUENT REDUCTION LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY EFFLUENT REDUCTION FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT: The Environmental Assessment (EA) for Effluent Reduction (DOE/EA-1156) (attached) briefly provides sufficient evidence and analysis t o determine that a finding of no significant impact is appropriate for this action. The EA documents the evidence and analysis in the following chapters: 1. Purpose and Need for Agency Action; 2. Description of Alternatives; 3. Affected Environment and Environmental Consequences; 4. Abnormal Events; 5. Agencies

16

National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human Health Print E-mail National Institutes of Health Research Portfolio Monday, April 22, 2013 Featured by...

17

Impact of the national energy plan on solar economics. [Economic analysis of solar space heating and solar water heating by state  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Plan (NEP) sets as a goal the use of solar energy in two and a half million homes in 1985. A key provision of the NEP (as well as congressional alternatives) provides for the subsidization of solar equipment. The extent to which these subsidies (income tax credits) might offset the impact of continued energy price control is examined. Regional prices and availability of conventional energy sources (oil, gas, and electricity) were compiled to obtain a current and consistent set of energy prices by state and energy type. These prices are converted into equivalent terms ($/10/sup 6/ Btu) which account for combustion and heat generation efficiencies. Projections of conventional fuel price increases (or decreases) are made under both the NEP scenario and a projected scenario where all wellhead price controls are removed on natural gas and crude oil production. The economic feasibility (life-cycle cost basis) of solar energy for residential space heating and domestic hot water is examined on a state-by-state basis. Solar system costs are developed for each state by fraction of Btu heating load provided. The total number of homes, projected energy savings, and sensitivity to heating loads, alternative energy costs and prices are included in the analysis.

Ben-David, S.; Noll, S.; Roach, F.; Schulze, W.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

LANL:CPO: Los Alamos National Laboratory Impacts and Investments...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL:CPO: Los Alamos National Laboratory Impacts and Investments in Los Alamos County LA-UR 11-02574 (42513) Los Alamos National Laboratory Impacts and Investments in Los Alamos...

19

LANL:CPO: Los Alamos National Laboratory Impacts and Investments...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL:CPO: Los Alamos National Laboratory Impacts and Investments in Taos County LA-UR 11-02376 (21313) Los Alamos National Laboratory Impacts and Investments in Taos County Taos...

20

Long-Term National Impacts of State-Level Policies  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents analysis conducted with the Wind Deployment System Model (WinDS)--a model of capacity expansion in the U.S. electric sector. With 358 regions covering the United States, detailed transmission system representation, and an explicit treatment of wind intermittency and ancillary services, WinDS is uniquely positioned to evaluate the market impacts of specific state-level policies. This paper provides analysis results regarding the impact of existing state-level policies designed to promote wind-capacity expansion, including state portfolio standards, mandates, and tax credits. Our results show the amount of wind deployment due to current state-level incentives as well as examine their lasting impact on the national wind industry. For example, state-level mandates increase industry size and lower costs, which result in wind capacity increases in states without mandates and greater market growth even after the policies expire. Although these policies are enacted by individual states, the cumulative effect must be examined at a national level. Finally, this paper examines the impact on wind-capacity growth by increasing the penalty associated with the state-level renewable portfolio standards (RPS). Our results show national and regional wind energy deployment and generation through 2050.

Blair, N.; Short, W.; Denholm, P.; Heimiller, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of...

22

Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric power lines and climate change model Electric power lines and climate change model Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts application/pdf icon eaei-org-chart-11-2013.pdf The Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department analyzes U.S. and global energy consumption and the associated social, economic, and environmental impacts, including human health, greenhouse gas emissions, and global climate change. Researchers conduct R&D and provide technical assistance to governments on: Lifecycle analysis of products and industries; How energy use affects health in the indoor environment; Energy markets and utility policy; Renewable energy policy and economics; Energy efficiency standards and codes; International energy and environmental impacts in the developed and

23

Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Nevada | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

> About Us > Our Operations > NNSA Office of General Counsel > National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) > NEPA Reading Room > Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement...

24

Sandia National Laboratories Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

25

Brookhaven National Lab Economic Impact Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

national labs funded by DOE's Office of Science. Established in 1947, Brookhaven Lab is the only national lab located in the Northeast. It is also one of New York State's...

26

Environmental Impact Statements Related Documents | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2008 SWEIS (PDF, 52KB) 2008 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Mitigation Action Plan 2011 Annual Report (PDF, 10MB) 2008 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Mitigation...

27

National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program Office  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... National Science Foundation (NSF). The program is currently lead by the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). ...

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

28

Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations into Environmental Impact Analysis under NEPA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations Into Environmental Impact Analysis Under the National Environmental Policy Act Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations Into Environmental Impact Analysis Under the National Environmental Policy Act CouncilonEnvironmental Quality Executive Officeof thePresident 722Jackson Place, NW Washington, DC 20503 January 1993 This report presents the results of consultations by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) concerning the consideration of biological diversity in analyses prepared under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This report is intended to provide background on the emerging, complex subject of biodi- versity, outline some general concepts that underlie biological diversity analysis and man-

29

Brookhaven National Lab Economic Impact Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inc., located in Schenectady. Collaborative Efforts Addressing Major National Needs Brookhaven Lab is also working with public agencies and industry partners in a variety of...

30

The National Meteorological Center Regional Analysis System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Meteorological Center (NMC) Regional Optimum-Interpolation (ROI) analysis is described. The ROI is the analysis component of the Regional Analysis and Forecast System (RAFS) and is specially designed to provide initial conditions for ...

Geoffrey J. DiMego

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The REDTI and MSI: Two New National Climate Impact Indices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two climate indices that are useful for monitoring the impact of weather and climate on energy usage and crop yields in the United States have been developed at the National Climatic Data Center. The residential energy-demand temperature index (...

Richard R. Heim Jr.; Jay H. Lawrimore; David B. Wuertz; Anne M. Waple; Trevor W. R. Wallis

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Second National Climate Assessment: Climate Change Impacts By...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change Impacts By Region Print E-mail alt An affiliated website was created specifically for the 2009 National Climate Assessment so that the report would be more...

33

Second National Climate Assessment: Climate Change Impacts By...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment: Climate Change Impacts By Sector Print E-mail alt An affiliated website was created specifically for the 2009 National Climate Assessment so that the report would be...

34

Environmental Impacts of Tourism in Khao Yai National Park, Thailand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of visitor impacts is critical for sustainable tourism management in national parks. The focus of past tourism impact research on national parks is either on bio-physical impacts (conducted as recreation ecology research) or on social impacts (human dimensions, including environmental perception and crowding). Research integrating these two dimensions has been rarely conducted. This research aims to fill this gap through the integrative approach that attempts to understand current biophysical impacts of visitor activities in a national park, and it examines how visitors perceive these impacts. The primary objectives of this dissertation are 1) to provide a synthesis of existing of bio-physical impacts of visitor activities in the Khao Yai National Park (KYNP) and 2) to examine visitors’ perception of those impacts. Also, the factors affecting visitors’ perception are analyzed. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used in this study. Previous impact studies conducted in KYNP were reviewed. A visitor survey was conducted between December 2008 and February 2009. The questionnaires were distributed to 628 domestic and 40 international visitors. The 38 KYNP official interviews were completed. Based on previous impact research in KYNP, the most common bio-physical impacts include soil compaction, removal of humus layer, erosion, plant damage, soil and root exposure, water quality deterioration, disturbance and feeding wildlife. Other environmental impacts include noise pollution and garbage accumulation. The results indicate that more than 30 percent of visitors do not recognize the negative results of their activities. With the exception of vegetation and water impacts, overall, visitors perceive the impacts as less severe than the actual impacts. Environmental impacts are rated differently by the KYNP officials, domestic, and international visitors. Also, significant differences were found among birders, hikers, and campers. The key factors influencing impact perceptions include income level, education level, residential location, park visitation experience, length of stay in KYNP, recreation activity, frequency of activity, group type, and group size. It is suggested that both the quality and the quantity of visitor impact research are needed to construct the body of knowledge of impacts in KYNP. A long-term impact monitoring is required to sustain the ecological integrity in KYNP.

Phumsathan, Sangsan

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Economic impact analysis for the petroleum refineries NESHAP. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An economic analysis of the industries affected by the Petroleum Refineries National Emmissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) was completed in support of this standard. The industry for which economic impacts was computed was the petroleum refinery industry. Affected refineries must reduce HAP emissions by the level of control required in the standard. Several types of economic impacts, among them price product changes, output changes, job impacts, and effects on foriegn trade, were computed for the selected regulatory alternative.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Oil's Impact on Our National Security | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil's Impact on Our National Security Oil's Impact on Our National Security Oil's Impact on Our National Security April 25, 2011 - 6:12pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Our dependence on foreign oil not only impacts hard working Americans at the pump, but it also compromises the security of our troops, as transporting large quantities of oil to our armed forces is often a dangerous and costly endeavor. The Department of Energy is committed to reducing our dependence on oil and supporting our armed forces, and that's why we've been collaborating with the Department of Defense throughout this administration to develop clean energy technologies and get them into the field. Tomorrow, Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman will join Deputy Secretary of

37

Finding of No Significant Impact Improvements at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Newsport News, Virginia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IMPROVEMENTS AT THE THOMAS JEFFERSON NATIONAL ACCELERATOR FACILITY IMPROVEMENTS AT THE THOMAS JEFFERSON NATIONAL ACCELERATOR FACILITY NEWPORT NEWS, VIRGINIA AGENCY: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ACTION: FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1384) for proposed Improvements at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). Newport News, Virginia. Based on the results of the impacts analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not necessary, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No

38

LEDSGP/analysis/impacts/DIAWebinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LEDSGP/analysis/impacts/DIAWebinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low LEDSGP/analysis/impacts/DIAWebinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development < LEDSGP‎ | analysis/impacts Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Joint Implementation Network, German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, People and Policy Phase: Bring the Right People Together Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Training materials, Webinar Cost: Free Language: English Webinar Summary Constructing a LEDS requires a tool that enables governments to evaluate

39

EA-1758: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1758: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis EA-1758: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis EA-1758: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis Drilling, Testing, and Monitoring of up to 12 Temperature Gradient/Passive Seismic Geothermal Exploratory Wells Deschutes County, Oregon This document presents information supplemental to the Environmental Assessment (EA), Drilling, Testing, and Monitoring of up to 12 Temperature Gradient/Passive Seismic Geothermal Exploratory Wells Deschutes County, Oregon (DOE/EA-1758) prepared by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). This document addresses potential impacts associated with other proposed future geothermal projects in the area of the Newberry National Volcanic Monument that may be cumulative with those described in the EA. Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis of Drilling, Testing, and

40

EA-1758: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis : Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis EA-1758: Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis Drilling, Testing, and Monitoring of up to 12 Temperature Gradient/Passive Seismic Geothermal Exploratory Wells Deschutes County, Oregon This document presents information supplemental to the Environmental Assessment (EA), Drilling, Testing, and Monitoring of up to 12 Temperature Gradient/Passive Seismic Geothermal Exploratory Wells Deschutes County, Oregon (DOE/EA-1758) prepared by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). This document addresses potential impacts associated with other proposed future geothermal projects in the area of the Newberry National Volcanic Monument that may be cumulative with those described in the EA. Supplement to the Cumulative Impact Analysis of Drilling, Testing, and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Analysis Activities at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Hydrogen Analysis Capabilities Marylynn Placet Manager, Energy Policy and Planning Group m.placet@pnl.gov (202) 646-5249 DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program Systems Analysis Workshop July 28-29, 2004 Washington, D.C. U.S. Department of Energy Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 2 Charter PNNL Energy Science and Technology Directorate's Energy Mission: Secure, clean, and affordable energy systems in a carbon constrained world. PNNL Analysis Objectives/Principles: * Development of state-of-the-art analysis tools for critical policy issues (e.g., climate change, electricity grid issues) * Use of tools appropriate to the need * Objectivity; analysis based on best available,

42

Likely social impacts of proposed national-level policy initiatives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are described of an investigation of likely social effects of enacting nine proposed national-level policy initiatives to accelerate development and use of solar energy. This study is part of the Technology Assessment of Solar Energy Systems (TASE) project supported by the US Department of Energy. The report presents general social impact information about the variety of ways in which the American people could be affected by enactment of these initiatives. It identifies the effects of each initiative on individuals, groups, organizations, communities, and society as a whole. In addition, it provides a framework for organizing a myriad of impact information into a set of conceptually exclusive impact categories. It illustrates that social impacts means effects on people as individuals, groups, organizations, and communities as well as on the infrastructure of society. Finally, it demonstrates the importance of specifying an audience of impact with a case example from the residential rental market.

Piernot, C.A.; Rothweiler, M.A.; Levine, A.; Crews, R.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Analysis of Environmental Impacts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis of Environmental Impacts Analysis of Environmental Impacts Analysis of Environmental Impacts Selected documents on the Analysis of Environmental Impacts under NEPA. October 3, 1984 Policy and Procedures for the Review of Federal Actions Impacting the Environment This manual establishes policies and procedures for carrying out the Environmental Protection Agency's responsibilities to review and comment on Federal actions affecting the quality of the environment. January 5, 1981 Implementation of Executive Order 12114 Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions: Final Guideline The Department of Energy hereby adopts final Departmental guidelines implementing Executive Order 12114-Environmental Effecrs Abroad of Major Federal Actions, whic was issued on January 4, 1979. November 17, 1980

44

Poverty Social Impact Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Poverty Social Impact Analysis Poverty Social Impact Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Poverty Social Impact Analysis Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Climate Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTPSIA/0,,contentMDK:2041525 Related Tools Poverty Social Impact Analysis Intertemporal Computable Equilibrium System (ICES) Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS An ex-ante or ex-post analysis that predicts the distributional social impacts of public policies, with particular emphasis on the poor and vulnerable. This approach generates evidence to inform policy dialogue, debate and decision-making. In climate change mitigation projects, PSIA can

45

Analysis Activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory David L. Greene Engineering Science and Technology Division Paul N. Leiby Environmental Sciences Division Juan Ferrada Nuclear Science and Technology Division DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program Systems Analysis Workshop July 28-29, 2004 Washington, D.C. 2 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Charter * The Engineering Science and Technology Division, National Transportation Research Center conducts engineering and analytical R&D for DOE, other federal sponsors and the private sector. * The Environmental Sciences Division conducts interdisciplinary research, develops technology, and performs analyses to understand and assess responses to global and regional change, environmental stress, and resource use.

46

NREL: Education Programs - Wind for Schools Program Impacting Nation's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Schools Program Impacting Nation's Renewable Energy Future for Schools Program Impacting Nation's Renewable Energy Future February 28, 2013 Audio with Dan McGuire, Nebraska Wind for Schools Program Consultant (MP3 4.7 MB). Download Windows Media Player. Time: 00:05:03. The U.S. Department of Energy, Wind Powering America, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory launched the Wind for Schools Program in 2006. These groups identified six priority states for the program-and Nebraska was one of those states. Nebraska Wind for Schools Program Consultant Dan McGuire says the program has three primary goals. First, to engage rural school teachers and students in wind energy education. Second, to equip college students with wind energy education and in wind energy applications to provide interested, equipped engineers for the growing U.S. wind industry. And

47

National Green Building Standard Analysis  

SciTech Connect

DOE's Building America Program is a research and development program to improve the energy performance of new and existing homes. The ultimate goal of the Building America Program is to achieve examples of cost-effective, energy efficient solutions for all U.S. climate zones. Periodic maintenance of an ANSI standard by review of the entire document and action to revise or reaffirm it on a schedule not to exceed five years is required by ANSI. In compliance, a consensus group has once again been formed and the National Green Building Standard is currently being reviewed to comply with the periodic maintenance requirement of an ANSI standard.

NAHB Research Center, Upper Marlboro, Maryland

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Impacts of the national energy programme on solar economics  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Plan (NEP) sets as a goal the use of solar energy in two and a half million homes in 1985. A key provision of the NEP (as well as congressional alternatives) provides for the subsidization of solar equipment. The extent to which these subsidies (income tax credits) might offset the impact of continued energy-price control is examined. Regional prices and availability of conventional energy sources (oil, gas, and electricity) were compiled to obtain a current and consistent set of energy prices by state and energy type. These prices are converted into equivalent terms ($/10/sup 6/ Btu) that account for combustion and heat-generation efficiencies. Projections of conventional-fuel price increases (or decreases) are made under both the NEP scenario and a projected scenario where all wellhead price controls are removed on natural gas and crude oil production. The economic feasibility (life-cycle cost basis) of solar energy for residential space heating and domestic hot water is examined on a state-by-state basis. Solar-system costs are developed for each state by fraction of Btu heating load provided. The total number of homes, projected energy savings, and sensitivity to heating loads, alternative energy costs, and prices are included in the analysis.

Ben-David, S.; Noll, S.; Roach, F.; Schulze, W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human Health Print E-mail National Institutes of Health Explore Impact of Climate Change on Human Health Print E-mail National Institutes of Health Research Portfolio Monday, April 22, 2013 Featured by NIEHS a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program What are the potential effects of global climate change on human health? This is a question that a growing number of federally funded studies seek to answer. A new analysis recently published in the journal, Environmental Health Perspectives, looks at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) research portfolio on climate change and human health. Climate change is affecting human health through environmental consequences, such as sea-level rise, changes in precipitation, heat waves, changes in intensity of hurricanes and storms, and degraded air quality, according to the World Health Organization and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

50

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unique Solutions] Unique Solutions] [Working With Us] [Contacting Us] [News Center] [Search] [Home] [navigation panel] Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis Our Mission Our Contacts Write to Us Package Development Risk Assessment RADTRAN GIS Mapping Structural Analysis Thermal Analysis Structural Testing Thermal Testing MIDAS Data Aquisition System Concepts Materials Characterization Regulatory Development Certification Support RMIR Data Base Scientific Visualization Mobile Instrumentation Data Acquisition System (MIDAS) Doug Ammerman, (505) 845-8158 The Mobile Instrumentation Data Acquisition System (MIDAS), developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy, provides on-site data acquisition of containers that transport radioactive materials during impact, puncture, fire, and immersion tests.

51

2005 Supplement Analysis of the INL Site Portion of the April 1995 Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fule Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

03-F-SA-02 03-F-SA-02 2005 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS of the INL Site Portion of the April 1995 Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact Statement June 2005 United States Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office 1.0. 2.0. 3.0. 3.1. 3.2. 3.3. 3.4. 3.5. 3.6. 4.0. 5.0. 5.1. 5.2. 5.3. 5.3.1. 5.3.2. 5.3.3. 5.3.4. 5.3.5. 5.4. 6.0. 6.1. 6.2. 6.3. 6.3.1. 6.3.2. 6.3.3. 6.3.4. 6.3.5. 6.3.6. 6.3.7. 6.3.8. 6.3.9. 6.3.10. 6.3.11. 6.3.12. 6.3.13. 6.3.14. 6.3.15. 6.3.16. 6.3.17. 6.3.18. DOE/EIS-0203-F-SA-02 Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY..................................................................................1 INTRODUCTION..............................................................................................

52

Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Y-12 National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Y-12 National Security Complex | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

53

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY-TRAIN PIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IDAHO IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY-TRAIN PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetext/neword/206/02061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-wrltten submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element &Site June 11, 2009 Idaho National Laboratory Name of Infonnatlon SY8tem or IT Project Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) Exhibit Project UID 70 NewPIA [!J Update D N T Otl I Contact Information ame, I e Ph E " I one, mal SY8tem Owner Carla J. Drake, Manager (208) 526-0841 Systems Approach

54

Analysis Activities at National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Laboratory DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program Systems Analysis Workshop July 28-29, 2004 Washington, D.C. Margaret K. Mann Hydrogen Analysis Task Leader Charter * NREL's mission: NREL develops renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies and practices, advances related science and engineering, and transfers knowledge and innovations to address the nation's energy and environmental goals. * The NREL Hydrogen Analysis Group provides leadership in hydrogen production, delivery, transition, and market analysis, to increase the efficiency of hydrogen research and implementation. * The NREL Hydrogen Analysis Group has received the majority of its funding from the DOE Hydrogen Program (now HFCIT), with some funding coming from PBA and OFCVT

55

Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary-1992.html[6/24/2011 3:44:58 PM] Summary-1992.html[6/24/2011 3:44:58 PM] EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Regents of the University of California (UC) propose the continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 10 years) proposed projects, of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In addition, DOE proposes the continued operation, including near-term proposed projects, of Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). Continued operation plus proposed projects at the two Laboratories is needed so that the research and development missions established by Congress and the President can continue to be supported. As provided and encouraged by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), DOE and UC have prepared this document as a joint Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and

56

Long-Term National Impacts of State-Level Policies: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents analysis conducted with the Wind Deployment System Model (WinDS) -- a model of capacity expansion in the U.S. electric sector. With 358 regions covering the United States, detailed transmission system representation, and an explicit treatment of wind intermittency and ancillary services, WinDS is uniquely positioned to evaluate the market impacts of specific state-level policies. This paper provides analysis results regarding the impact of existing state-level policies designed to promote wind-capacity expansion, including state portfolio standards, mandates, and tax credits. The results show the amount of wind deployment due to current state-level incentives as well as examine their lasting impact on the national wind industry. For example, state-level mandates increase industry size and lower costs, which result in wind capacity increases in states without mandates and greater market growth even after the policies expire. Although these policies are enacted by individual states, the cumulative effect must be examined at a national level. Finally, this paper examines the impact on wind-capacity growth by increasing the penalty associated with the state-level renewable portfolio standards (RPS). The results show national and regional wind energy deployment and generation through 2050.

Blair, N.; Short, W.; Denholm, P.; Heimiller, D.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Analysis Activities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory / Energy Security and Technology Program Jeffrey Stewart Group Leader: Applied Statistics and Economics DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program Systems Analysis Workshop July 28-29, 2004 Washington, D.C. 2 Charter * LLNL's mission is to provide research in the areas of national and homeland security and other important areas to DOE such as Energy,Climate and Water * To conduct systems and economic modeling and analysis to determine the technical and economic characteristics of individual technologies within systems to achieve policy objectives * DOE NETL, NE,Policy,HEU; Japanese Govt, CEC, Internal 3 History * LLNL has had a systems analysis group for over 25 years supporting national security, defense, energy and environment programs

58

Cross-impacts analysis development and energy policy analysis applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose of this report is to describe the cross-impact analysis process and microcomputer software developed for the Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis (PPA) of DOE. First introduced in 1968, cross-impact analysis is a technique that produces scenarios of future conditions and possibilities. Cross-impact analysis has several unique attributes that make it a tool worth examining, especially in the current climate when the outlook for the economy and several of the key energy markets is uncertain. Cross-impact analysis complements the econometric, engineering, systems dynamics, or trend approaches already in use at DOE. Cross-impact analysis produces self-consistent scenarios in the broadest sense and can include interaction between the economy, technology, society and the environment. Energy policy analyses that couple broad scenarios of the future with detailed forecasting can produce more powerful results than scenario analysis or forecasts can produce alone.

Roop, J.M.; Scheer, R.M.; Stacey, G.S.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Engineering Analysis Multimedia - Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Analysis > Multimedia Engineering Analysis > Multimedia Multimedia Nuclear Systems Analysis Engineering Analysis Nonproliferation and National Security Detection & Diagnostic Systems Engineering Development & Applications Argonne's Nuclear Science & Technology Legacy Other Multimedia Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Bookmark and Share Engineering Analysis: Multimedia Related Resources Engineering Analysis Click on the "Date" header to sort the videos/podcasts in chronological order (ascending or descending). You may also search for a specific keyword; click on the reset button refresh to remove the keyword filter and show again all the Videos/Podcasts. Keywords are linked to "in-depth" information about that particular topic.

60

Analysis and Selection of Analytical Tools to Assess National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Selection of Analytical Tools to Assess National-Interest Transmission Bottlenecks Final Report Analysis and Selection of Analytical Tools to Assess National-Interest...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC) mission is to: (1) Improve the understanding, preparation, and mitigation of the consequences of infrastructure disruption; (2) Provide a common, comprehensive view of U.S. infrastructure and its response to disruptions - Scale & resolution appropriate to the issues and All threats; and (3) Built an operations-tested DHS capability to respond quickly to urgent infrastructure protection issues.

Berscheid, Alan P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

62

Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-1992/01eis0157_rg.html[6/24/2011 4:00:49 PM] 1-1992/01eis0157_rg.html[6/24/2011 4:00:49 PM] READER'S GUIDE The Final EIS/EIR is organized to assist the reader's understanding of the complex operations at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Organization of Documents The EIS/EIR is divided into five volumes and two companion reports: Volume I. This volume contains the Final EIS/EIR, which in part relies on the detailed information in the appendices, and comprehensively discusses the proposed action, the alternatives, and the existing conditions and impacts of the proposed action and the alternatives. Volume II. This volume contains the Final EIS/EIR technical appendices which provide technical support for the analyses in Volume I and also provide additional information and references. Appendix E was originally identified in

63

Renewable Fuels Legislation Impact Analysis  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

An analysis based on an extension of the ethanol supply curve in our model to allow for enough ethanol production to meet the requirements of S. 650. This analysis provides an update of the May 23, 2005 analysis, with revised ethanol production and cost assumptions.

Information Center

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Sandia National Laboratories analysis code data base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, mission is to solve important problems in the areas of national defense, energy security, environmental integrity, and industrial technology. The Laboratories` strategy for accomplishing this mission is to conduct research to provide an understanding of the important physical phenomena underlying any problem, and then to construct validated computational models of the phenomena which can be used as tools to solve the problem. In the course of implementing this strategy, Sandia`s technical staff has produced a wide variety of numerical problem-solving tools which they use regularly in the design, analysis, performance prediction, and optimization of Sandia components, systems and manufacturing processes. This report provides the relevant technical and accessibility data on the numerical codes used at Sandia, including information on the technical competency or capability area that each code addresses, code ``ownership`` and release status, and references describing the physical models and numerical implementation.

Peterson, C.W.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Modeling National Impacts for the Building America Program  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we present a model to estimate the nationalenergy and economic impacts of the Department of Energy Building Americaprogram. The program goal is to improve energy performance in newresidential construction, by working with builders to design andconstruct energy-efficient homes at minimal cost. The model is anadaptation of the method used to calculate the national energy savingsfor appliance energy efficiency standards. The main difference is thatthe key decision here is not the consumer decision to buy anefficienthouse, but rather the builder decision to offer such a house inthe market. The builder decision is treated by developing a number ofscenarios in which the relative importance of first costs vs. energysavings is varied.

Coughlin, Katie M.; McNeil, Michael A.

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

National Household Travel Survey (NHTS): Travel Trends, Analysis and Data Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the nation's transportation system to meet current demands and accommodate future demands; to assess of alternative transportation investment programs; and to assess the energy-use and air-quality impacts Analysis Data, Statistical Analysis Geo-Spatial Information Tools Defense Transportation Energy Policy

67

Chapter 16: Environmental Impact Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOR FOR 10 CFR 431 ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT: PACKAGED TERMINAL AIR CONDITIONER AND PACKAGED TERMINAL HEAT PUMP ENERGY CONSERVATION STANDARDS; FINAL RULE October 2008 DOE/EA-1637 NOTE: The following Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1637) was integrated into the Technical Support Document (TSD) that was prepared for the Final Rule, 10 CFR Part 431, regarding the Department of Energy's energy conservation standards rulemaking on packaged terminal air conditioners and packaged terminal heat pumps. The environmental analysis was contained in Chapter 16 of the TSD, which is provided here. The complete TSD is located on the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Website at the following URL:

68

Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia/California Economic Impact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SandiaCalifornia Economic Impact Summary Making an impact Sandia generates nearly 1 billion in economic output in California with nearly half coming from the San Francisco Bay...

69

Program Impact Analysis | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Impact Analysis Program Impact Analysis BECP periodically assesses the impacts of its activities by estimating historical and projected energy savings, consumer savings, and avoided emissions. Since the inception of the Program 20 years ago, cumulative full-fuel-cycle (FFC) energy savings from 1992- 2012 are estimated to be approximately 4.8 quads and cost savings to consumers have been more than $44 billion. These savings have resulted primarily from the Program's activities which upgrade the model energy codes, accelerate their adoption by states and localities, and improve code compliance by means of various software tools and other types of training and technical support. The federal budgetary cost of the Program over this same period (1992-2012) was estimated to be around $110 million, resulting in a ratio of more than $400

70

Perform multi-criteria impact analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Perform multi-criteria impact analysis Perform multi-criteria impact analysis Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

71

National Water Program Impact Report, 2006-2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wheeler, Blackfeet, the program manager for All Nations LSAMP, explains, "Salish Kootenai College used

72

Supplement analysis for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Volume 2: Comment response document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE), prepared a draft Supplement Analysis (SA) for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL-L), in accordance with DOE`s requirements for implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (10 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 1021.314). It considers whether the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (1992 EIS/EIR) should be supplement3ed, whether a new environmental impact statement (EIS) should be prepared, or no further NEPA documentation is required. The SA examines the current project and program plans and proposals for LLNL and SNL-L, operations to identify new or modified projects or operations or new information for the period from 1998 to 2002 that was not considered in the 1992 EIS/EIR. When such changes, modifications, and information are identified, they are examined to determine whether they could be considered substantial or significant in reference to the 1992 proposed action and the 1993 Record of Decision (ROD). DOE released the draft SA to the public to obtain stakeholder comments and to consider those comments in the preparation of the final SA. DOE distributed copies of the draft SA to those who were known to have an interest in LLNL or SNL-L activities in addition to those who requested a copy. In response to comments received, DOE prepared this Comment Response Document.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies; (2) model biomass productivity and associated environmental impacts of annual cellulosic feedstocks; (3) simulate production of perennial biomass feedstocks grown on marginal lands; and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. We used the EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) model to simulate biomass productivity and environmental impacts of annual and perennial cellulosic feedstocks across much of the USA on both croplands and marginal lands. We used data from LTER and eddy-covariance experiments within the study region to test the performance of EPIC and, when necessary, improve its parameterization. We investigated three scenarios. In the first, we simulated a historical (current) baseline scenario composed mainly of corn-, soybean-, and wheat-based rotations as grown existing croplands east of the Rocky Mountains in 30 states. In the second scenario, we simulated a modified baseline in which we harvested corn and wheat residues to supply feedstocks to potential cellulosic ethanol biorefineries distributed within the study area. In the third scenario, we simulated the productivity of perennial cropping systems such as switchgrass or perennial mixtures grown on either marginal or Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) lands. In all cases we evaluated the environmental impacts (e.g., soil carbon changes, soil erosion, nitrate leaching, etc.) associated with the practices. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided initial simulation results on the potential of annual and perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Modeling the Impact of Summer Temperatures on National Electricity Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National population-weighted weekly degree day totals, which have been used to model and assess temperature-related natural gas consumption, are compared with summertime electricity consumption. A very close relationship between national cooling ...

Douglas M. Le Comte; Henry E. Warren

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Nevada | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

| National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

76

Cross-Sector Impact Analysis of Industrial Efficiency Measures  

SciTech Connect

The industrial or manufacturing sector is a foundational component to all economic activity. In addition to being a large direct consumer of energy, the manufacturing sector also produces materials, products, and technologies that influence the energy use of other economic sectors. For example, the manufacturing of a lighter-weight vehicle component affects the energy required to ship that component as well as the fuel efficiency of the assembled vehicle. Many energy efficiency opportunities exist to improve manufacturing energy consumption, however comparisons of manufacturing sector energy efficiency investment opportunities tend to exclude any impacts that occur once the product leaves the factory. Expanding the scope of analysis to include energy impacts across different stages of product life-cycle can highlight less obvious opportunities and inform actions that create the greatest economy-wide benefits. We present a methodology and associated analysis tool (LIGHTEnUP Lifecycle Industry GHgas, Technology and Energy through the Use Phase) that aims to capture both the manufacturing sector energy consumption and product life-cycle energy consumption implications of manufacturing innovation measures. The tool architecture incorporates U.S. national energy use data associated with manufacturing, building operations, and transportation. Inputs for technology assessment, both direct energy saving to the manufacturing sector, and indirect energy impacts to additional sectors are estimated through extensive literature review and engineering methods. The result is a transparent and uniform system of comparing manufacturing and use-phase impacts of technologies.

Morrow, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); CreskoEngineering, Joe [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE); Carpenter, Alberta [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Masanet, Eric [Northwestern University, Evanston; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Shehabi, Arman [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Impact of the U.S. National Building Information Model Standard (NBIMS) on Building Energy Performance Simulation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. National Institute for Building Sciences (NIBS) started the development of the National Building Information Model Standard (NBIMS). Its goal is to define standard sets of data required to describe any given building in necessary detail so that any given AECO industry discipline application can find needed data at any point in the building lifecycle. This will include all data that are used in or are pertinent to building energy performance simulation and analysis. This paper describes the background that lead to the development of NBIMS, its goals and development methodology, its Part 1 (Version 1.0), and its probable impact on building energy performance simulation and analysis.

Bazjanac, Vladimir

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Bulk Energy Storage Impact and Value Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is intended for planners, R&D managers, and potential investors who manage or interpret results from value and impact analysis of energy storage. Due to performance improvements and cost reductions of battery technologies and the expectation that energy storage may help to manage potential operational challenges of incorporating variable, renewable energy resources, energy storage systems are under renewed investigation as a future electric system resource. Pumped hydro storage ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

Clean Energy Policy Analyses: Analysis of the Status and Impact...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Energy Policy Analyses: Analysis of the Status and Impact of Clean Energy Policies at the Local Level Clean Energy Policy Analyses: Analysis of the Status and Impact of Clean...

80

Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties Title Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) was prepared pursuant to a Joint Stipulation and Order approved and entered as an order of the court on October 27, 1997, in partial settlement of the lawsuit Civ. No. 97-936 (SS) (D.D.C.), ''Natural Resources Defense Council [NRDC] et al. v. Richardson et al.'' The Joint Stipulation and Order is reproduced at the end of this document as Attachment 1. In the Joint Stipulation and Order, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) agreed to prepare an SEIS to the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SSM PEIS) (DOE/EIS-0236, DOE 1996a) to evaluate the reasonably foreseeable significant adverse environmental impacts of continuing to construct and of operating the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California, with respect to any potential or confirmed contamination in the area by hazardous, toxic, and/or radioactive materials. On September 25, 1998, DOE announced in the ''Federal Register'' the agency's intent to prepare this SEIS for the NIF portion (Volume III, Appendix I) of the SSM PEIS. DOE's need for preparation of this SEIS, consistent with the previously established need for NIF (DOE 1996a, Appendix I), is to determine how the results of characterization studies completed pursuant to the Joint Stipulation and Order should affect the manner in which DOE proceeds with the construction and operation of NIF. On August 5, 1999, DOE issued an amended Notice of Intent to prepare this SEIS, which incorporated changes in schedule resulting from new relevant information. The SSM PEIS addressed alternative plans for DOE's defense program activities related to nuclear weapons stockpile issues at several DOE laboratories, including LLNL. The environmental consequences of construction and operation of NIF were addressed in detail in SSM PEIS Volume III, Appendix I, entitled ''National Ignition Facility Project Specific Analysis'' (NIF PSA). The Record of Decision (ROD) for the SSM PEIS was published in the ''Federal Register'' on December 26, 1996 (61 FR 68014). In the ROD, DOE announced its decision to construct and operate NIF at LLNL. The NIF is an experimental facility that would use laser light to initiate a fusion reaction in very small quantities of hydrogen by a process known as inertial confinement fusion. The start of physical construction of NIF was authorized on March 7, 1997, and groundbreaking for the NIF occurred on May 29, 1997. Construction of the NIF is ongoing; the conventional facilities are over 94% complete and are expected to be completed in late 2001.

N /A

2001-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

82

The National Meteorological Center's Spectral Statistical-Interpolation Analysis System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the National Meteorological Center (NMC), a new analysis system is being extensively tested for possible use in the operational global data assimilation system. This analysis system is called the spectral statistical- interpolation (SSI) ...

David F. Parrish; John C. Derber

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY NATIONAL AWARENESS OF ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY NATIONAL AWARENESS OF ENERGY STAR ® FOR 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements .................................................................................. ii Executive Summary ............................................................................ ES-1 Introduction ............................................................................................... 1 Methodology Overview ............................................................................. 2 Key Findings ............................................................................................. 5 Recognition .................................................................................................................. 5 Understanding ........................................................................................................... 12

84

Designing for Impact IV: Workshop on Building the National ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of directors, and a national advisory panel ... effectiveness by an independent board to drive ... Hogan - Deputy Assistant Secretary Energy Efficiency, US ...

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

85

Designing for Impact IV: Workshop on Building the National ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the 2000s - a job rate loss that exceeds ... the establishment of A National Network for Manufacturing ... competitiveness, and job-creating power of US ...

2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

86

The Housing Transition in Mexico: Local Impacts of National Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CFE) and Mexican Petrol (PEMEX), the two largest state-SHF FOVISSSTE Banks INVI PEMEX C F E SOFOLES Other Number ofproperty. Petróleos Mexicanos (PEMEX), the Mexican national

Monkkonen, Paavo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Oil's Impact on Our National Security | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Our dependence on foreign oil not only impacts hard working Americans at the pump, but it also compromises the...

88

Impacts of Modeled Recommendations of the National Commission on ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

the new CAFE standards, which forces an increase in the sale of hybrid vehicles. The NCEP and the CAFE cases have similar impacts on petroleum consumption and imports,

89

Modeling National Impacts for the Building America Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy (EERE) is supporting the development ofgoals. For the most part EERE program impacts are estimatedcase, which removes any EERE program activities that are

Coughlin, Katie M.; McNeil, Michael A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering...

91

National Water Program Impact Report, 2005-2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in whitebark pine krummholz in the alpine treeline ecotone east of the Continental Divide on the Blackfeet; Divide Peak (48u679N, 113u389W), situated on the border of the Blackfeet Indian Reservation and Glacier National Park and the Blackfeet Nation for arranging collection permits and Ward McCaughey and the Forestry

92

LEDSGP/analysis/impacts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » LEDSGP/analysis/impacts < LEDSGP Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Advancing climate-resilient low emission development around the world Home About Tools Expert Assistance Events Publications Join Us About How We Work > Regional Platforms > Working Groups LEDS GP Members Steering Committee Guiding Structure Contacts Development Impacts Assessment Working Group A LEDS GP Working Group LEDSGP DIA Flyer.pdf LEDS DIA Pamphlet LEDSGP DIA poster 21x27.pdf LEDS DIA Poster 21x27 One of the highest priorities identified by countries and the regional platforms is the need for enhanced peer learning and strengthened tools on

93

Going national with HERS and EEMs: Issues and impacts  

SciTech Connect

This collection of papers is a companion volume to A National Program for Energy-Efficient Mortgages and Home Energy Rating Systems: A Blueprint for Action (NREL/TP-261-4677). The Blueprint reports the findings and recommendations of the National Collaborative on Home Energy Rating Systems and Mortgage Incentives for Energy Efficiency about a voluntary national program linking energy-efficient mortgages and home energy rating systems. This volume provides technical documentation for A Blueprint for Action. It consists of 55 technical issue papers and 13 special papers prepared by the technical advisory committees and some members of the Collaborative Consensus Committee of the National Collaborative. It also contains the bibliography and the glossary written by the members and staff of the National Collaborative.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7891 7891 April 2010 Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative S. Busche and E. Doris National Renewable Energy Laboratory R. Braccio, D. Lippert, P. Finch, D. O'Toole, and J. Fetter Booz Allen Hamilton National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A2-47891 April 2010 Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy

95

Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

891 891 April 2010 Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative S. Busche and E. Doris National Renewable Energy Laboratory R. Braccio, D. Lippert, P. Finch, D. O'Toole, and J. Fetter Booz Allen Hamilton National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A2-47891 April 2010 Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy

96

Nuclear Systems Analysis Multimedia - Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duration: 00:01:12 Watch on YouTube Read related Argonne article on how a team of nuclear engineers and computer scientists at Argonne National Laboratory developed and...

97

Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Finding of No Significant Impact for the Proposed Disposition of the Omega West Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact for the Proposed Disposition of the Omega West Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico U. S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Los Alamos Site Operations 528 35th Street Los Alamos, NM 87544 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECUIRTY ADMINISTRATION FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT Proposed Disposition of the Omega West Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT: The Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Proposed Disposition of the Omega West Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory [DOE/EA- 74 IO) (attached) provides sufficient evidence and analysis to determine that a Finding Of No Significant Impact is appropriate for the Proposed Action (Complete

98

EIS-0387: Y-12 National Security Complex Site-Wide Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

87: Y-12 National Security Complex Site-Wide Environmental 87: Y-12 National Security Complex Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EIS-0387: Y-12 National Security Complex Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Overview NNSA, a separately organized agency within DOE, is responsible for maintaining the safety, reliability, and security of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile to meet national security requirements. NNSA manages nuclear weapons programs and facilities, including those at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This Final Y-12 SWEIS analyzed the potential environmental impacts of the reasonable alternatives for ongoing and foreseeable future operations and activities at Y-12, including alternatives for changes to site infrastructure and

99

National high-level waste systems analysis report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the assessment of budgetary impacts, constraints, and repository availability on the storage and treatment of high-level waste and on both existing and pending negotiated milestones. The impacts of the availabilities of various treatment systems on schedule and throughput at four Department of Energy sites are compared to repository readiness in order to determine the prudent application of resources. The information modeled for each of these sites is integrated with a single national model. The report suggests a high-level-waste model that offers a national perspective on all high-level waste treatment and storage systems managed by the Department of Energy.

Kristofferson, K.; Oholleran, T.P.; Powell, R.H.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Strategic Energy Analysis (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Planning & Analysis NREL Planning & Analysis Dr. Robin Newmark Strategic Energy Analysis Center World Renewable Energy Forum May 16, 2012 Denver, Colorado NREL/PR-6A20-54950 Strategic Energy Analysis Innovation for Our Energy Future National Renewable Energy Laboratory RE Resource Mapping Innovation for Our Energy Future National Renewable Energy Laboratory RE Resource Mapping Innovation for Our Energy Future National Renewable Energy Laboratory RE Resource Mapping Innovation for Our Energy Future National Renewable Energy Laboratory RE Resource Mapping Innovation for Our Energy Future National Renewable Energy Laboratory Resource Solar PV/CSP) Wind Geothermal Water Power Biopower Theoretical Potential 206,000 GW (PV) 11,100GW (CSP) 8,000 GW (onshore)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Testing & Analysis Mission Sandia's Transportation Risk & Packaging Program develops innovative technologies and methodologies to solve transportation and packaging...

102

Technical support document: Energy conservation standards for consumer products: Dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers including: Environmental impacts; regulatory impact analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act as amended (P.L. 94-163), establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of standards on dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers. The economic impact analysis is performed in five major areas: An Engineering Analysis, which establishes technical feasibility and product attributes including costs of design options to improve appliance efficiency. A Consumer Analysis at two levels: national aggregate impacts, and impacts on individuals. The national aggregate impacts include forecasts of appliance sales, efficiencies, energy use, and consumer expenditures. The individual impacts are analyzed by Life-Cycle Cost (LCC), Payback Periods, and Cost of Conserved Energy (CCE), which evaluate the savings in operating expenses relative to increases in purchase price; A Manufacturer Analysis, which provides an estimate of manufacturers' response to the proposed standards. Their response is quantified by changes in several measures of financial performance for a firm. An Industry Impact Analysis shows financial and competitive impacts on the appliance industry. A Utility Analysis that measures the impacts of the altered energy-consumption patterns on electric utilities. A Environmental Effects analysis, which estimates changes in emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur oxides, and nitrogen oxides, due to reduced energy consumption in the home and at the power plant. A Regulatory Impact Analysis collects the results of all the analyses into the net benefits and costs from a national perspective. 47 figs., 171 tabs. (JF)

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Technical support document: Energy conservation standards for consumer products: Dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers including: Environmental impacts; regulatory impact analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act as amended (P.L. 94-163), establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of standards on dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers. The economic impact analysis is performed in five major areas: An Engineering Analysis, which establishes technical feasibility and product attributes including costs of design options to improve appliance efficiency. A Consumer Analysis at two levels: national aggregate impacts, and impacts on individuals. The national aggregate impacts include forecasts of appliance sales, efficiencies, energy use, and consumer expenditures. The individual impacts are analyzed by Life-Cycle Cost (LCC), Payback Periods, and Cost of Conserved Energy (CCE), which evaluate the savings in operating expenses relative to increases in purchase price; A Manufacturer Analysis, which provides an estimate of manufacturers' response to the proposed standards. Their response is quantified by changes in several measures of financial performance for a firm. An Industry Impact Analysis shows financial and competitive impacts on the appliance industry. A Utility Analysis that measures the impacts of the altered energy-consumption patterns on electric utilities. A Environmental Effects analysis, which estimates changes in emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur oxides, and nitrogen oxides, due to reduced energy consumption in the home and at the power plant. A Regulatory Impact Analysis collects the results of all the analyses into the net benefits and costs from a national perspective. 47 figs., 171 tabs. (JF)

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Strategic Sequencing for State Distributed PV Policies: A Quantitative Analysis of Policy Impacts and Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strategic Sequencing for State Strategic Sequencing for State Distributed PV Policies: A Quantitative Analysis of Policy Impacts and Interactions V.A. Krasko and E. Doris National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-7A30-56428 October 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Strategic Sequencing for State Distributed PV Policies: A Quantitative Analysis of Policy Impacts and Interactions V.A. Krasko and E. Doris National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. SM12.1070

105

Energy and Greenhouse Impacts of Biofuels: A Framework for Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels Wang, M. (2001) "Energy & Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels Fuels and MotorLifecycle Analysis of Biofuels." Report UCD-ITS-RR-06-08.

Kammen, Daniel M.; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J.; Jones, Andrew D.; Nemet, Gregory F.; Delucchi, Mark A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

DOE/EIS-0157-SA-01; Supplement Analysis for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis Analysis S-1 March 1999 Findings ♦ This supplement analysis evaluated a set of new and modified projects and proposals and other new information and concluded that no supplementation of the 1992 EIS/EIR for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Livermore, is needed. Either the projected impacts are within the bounds of the 1992 EIS/EIR, the impacts were anticipated by mitigation measures established in the 1992 EIS/EIR, or the incremental differences in impacts are not significant. ♦ While proposed increases in administrative limits for radioactive materials at LLNL might slightly increase radiological releases during accidents, the resulting consequences are expected to remain essentially the same as described in the 1992

107

EIS-0281; Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico, Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Organization of the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Organization of the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement The Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) is divided into a Summary and two volumes. The Summary provides an overview of material presented in the SWEIS, including background, purpose and need, alternatives, existing environment, and environmental impacts. Volume I analyzes the three alternatives (including the No Action Alternative) as they relate to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) missions assigned to Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM): national security, energy resources, environmental quality, science and technology. Volume I contains 15 chapters. Chapter 1 provides introductory information on background, site missions, purpose and need, decisions to be made, related National Environmental Policy Act analyses, and public participation. Chapter 2

108

Going national with HERS and EEMs: Issues and impacts. The collected papers of the national collaborative  

SciTech Connect

This collection of papers is a companion volume to A National Program for Energy-Efficient Mortgages and Home Energy Rating Systems: A Blueprint for Action (NREL/TP-261-4677). The Blueprint reports the findings and recommendations of the National Collaborative on Home Energy Rating Systems and Mortgage Incentives for Energy Efficiency about a voluntary national program linking energy-efficient mortgages and home energy rating systems. This volume provides technical documentation for A Blueprint for Action. It consists of 55 technical issue papers and 13 special papers prepared by the technical advisory committees and some members of the Collaborative Consensus Committee of the National Collaborative. It also contains the bibliography and the glossary written by the members and staff of the National Collaborative.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Photovoltaics and the National Park Service : an institutional analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is one of a series resulting from institutional analysis of photovoltaic (PV) acceptance. The case reported here involves the acceptance of PV by the National Park Service. As part of the Department of the ...

Nutt-Powell, Thomas E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Draft Environmental Impact Report LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Impacts, and Mitigation Measures IV-1 A. Aesthetics and Visual Quality IV.A-1 B. Air Quality IV.B-1 C. Utilities, Service Systems, and Energy IV.M-1 #12;Table of Contents Page LBNL LRDP EIR ii ESA / 201074 and Run-on to LBNL Site IV.G-5 IV.G-4 Strawberry Canyon Subwatersheds IV.G-6 IV.I-1 Noise Measurement

Lee, Jason R.

111

Analysis of Impacts on Prime or Unique Agricultural Lands in Implementing NEPA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) memorandum on Analysis of Impacts on Prime or Unique Agricultural Lands in Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act was developed in cooperation with the Department of Agriculture. It updates and supersedes CEQ's previous memorandum on this subject of August 1976.

112

Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-1992/01eis0157_a.html[6/27/2011 9:53:34 AM] 2-1992/01eis0157_a.html[6/27/2011 9:53:34 AM] APPENDIX A DESCRIPTION OF MAJOR PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES Appendix A describes the programs, infrastructures, facilities, and future plans of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Sandia National Laboratories at Livermore (SNL, Livermore). It provides information on existing activities and facilities, as well as information on those activities anticipated to occur or facilities to be constructed over the next 5 to 10 years. The purpose of this appendix is to: present information that can be used to evaluate the proposed action and other EIS/EIR alternatives, identify activities that are part of the proposed action, distinguish proposed action activities from no action alternative activities, and

113

LANL:CPO: Los Alamos National Laboratory Impacts and Investments in Taos County  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos National Laboratory Impacts and Investments in Taos County Los Alamos National Laboratory Impacts and Investments in Taos County LA-UR 11-02376 (2/13/13) Los Alamos National Laboratory Impacts and Investments in Taos County Taos County is home to 138 LANL employees and contractors. As of February 2013, $9,341,197 in annual base salaries was being paid to LANL employees (excluding contractors and craft employees) in Taos County. Taos is one of seven northern New Mexico counties identified in the Lab's maintenance and operations contract with NNSA that is targeted for education, economic development, and charitable giving programs through the LANS, LLC Community Commitment Plan. Education The Laboratory's goal in education is to enhance regional Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education and enrichment initiatives through Workforce Development,

114

LANL:CPO: Los Alamos National Laboratory Impacts and Investments in Los Alamos County  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos National Laboratory Impacts and Investments in Los Alamos County Los Alamos National Laboratory Impacts and Investments in Los Alamos County LA-UR 11-02574 (4/25/13) Los Alamos National Laboratory Impacts and Investments in Los Alamos County Los Alamos County is home to 3,772 LANL employees and contractors. As of February 2013, $414,431,455 in annual base salaries was being paid to LANL employees (excluding contractors and craft employees) in Los Alamos County. In FY12, LANL purchased $193,827,533 in products and services from Los Alamos County businesses. Los Alamos is one of seven northern New Mexico counties identified in the Lab's maintenance and operations contract with NNSA that is targeted for education, economic development, and charitable giving programs through the LANS, LLC Community Commitment Plan.

115

NREL: Energy Analysis: Impacts of Conventional Generators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts on Conventional Generators Impacts on Conventional Generators Impacts of Renewable Electricity Generation on Efficiency and Emissions of Conventional Generators With increasing penetration of wind and solar generation, conventional fossil-fired power plants may be required to adjust their output level, start up, or shut down more frequently to accommodate the variability and uncertainty of these technologies. These operational changes can negatively impact plant efficiency and emissions. NREL's analyses are focused on understanding and quantifying the emissions and costs associated with these operational changes. NREL's impacts of renewable electricity generation on conventional generators analyses show that: While the emissions impacts of generator cycling and part-loading can be significant (e.g., combined cycle generators), these impacts are

116

NISAC | National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center | NISAC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Logo Logo National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center Search Btn search this site... Overview Fact Sheets Capabilities Chemical Supply Chain Analysis Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems (CASoS) National Transportation Fuels Model Network Optimization Models (RNAS and ATOM) NISAC Agent-Based Laboratory for Economics (N-ABLE(tm)) Publications Contacts Home Featured Previous National Transportatio... National Transportation Fuels Model This model informs analyses of the availability of transportation fuel in the event the fuel supply chain is disrupted. The portion of the fuel supply system represented by the network model (see figure) spans from oil fields to fuel distribution terminals. Different components of this system (e.g., crude oil import terminals, refineries,... Read More

117

Economic Impact Analysis for EGS Geothermal Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impact Analysis for EGS Geothermal Project Impact Analysis for EGS Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Economic Impact Analysis for EGS Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Analysis Project Description This proposed study will involve studying the impacts associated with jobs, energy and environment (as a result of investments in geothermal industry and specific EGS technologies) through the creation of a Geothermal Economic Calculator tool (GEC). The study will cover Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), conventional hydrothermal, low temperature geothermal and coproduced fluid technologies resulting in electric power production. The GEC created will be capable of helping end users (public and the industry) perform region specific economic impact analyses using a web platform that will be hosted by EGI for different geothermal technologies under EGS that will be used for electric power production.

118

Analysis Activities at Idaho National Engineering & Environmental Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Systems Analysis Finis Southworth, PhD Department Manager Systems & Decision Science DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program Systems Analysis Workshop July 28-29, 2004 Washington, D.C. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Charter Systems & Decision Science Mission: Develop and apply science-based systems, systems engineering, and decision science capabilities that result in successful projects and effective, defensible decisions Systems & Decision Science Funding: 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 $M National & Homeland Security Systems Integration and Analysis Other (YMP, Cleanup, etc.) Energy Current S&DS Funding = $18M FY04 FY03 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

119

AN ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES IN THE UNITED STATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 AN ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES IN THE UNITED STATES Stacy C. Davis Lorena F. Truett August 2000 Prepared for the Office of Transportation Technologies U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6073 managed by UT-BATTELLE, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 iii An Analysis of SUV Impacts TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES AND FIGURES ............................................................................... iv ABSTRACT.................................................................................................................... v 1 INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................1

120

The Recent National Academy of Sciences Study on the Economic and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Recent National Academy of Sciences Study on the Economic and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel, Renewable Fuel Standard: Potential Economic and Environmental Effects of U.S. Biofuel Policy. Professor was that the U.S. is unlikely to meet the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) for 2022 for cellulosic biofuels. Wally

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA) Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Partnership for Economic Policy Sector: Climate, Energy Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.pep-net.org/programs/mpia/ Cost: Free Related Tools Asia-Pacific Integrated Model (AIM) SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook Poverty Social Impact Analysis ... further results A computable general equilibrium model that accounts for the interactions among sectors and institutions, and their links with the global economy. A

122

Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and the Airborne Visible/IR Image Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data were used to characterize hot spring deposits in the Lower, Midway, and Upper Geyser Basins of Yellowstone National Park from the visible/near infrared (VNIR) to thermal infrared (TIR) wavelengths. Field observations of these basins provided the critical ground-truth for comparison with the

123

An environmental impact analysis of grinding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis was intended to investigate the environmental impact of grinding in the United States manufacturing industry. Grinding is an ideal method for producing parts with a fine surface finish and high dimensional ...

Baniszewski, Beth (Beth Ellen)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Burbank Transportation Management Organization: Impact Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Burbank Transportation Management Organization (BTMO), a private, membership-based, nonprofit organization dedicated to traffic reduction and air quality improvement, contracted with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a U.S. Department of Energy-owned, contractor-operated national laboratory, to analyze its member programs and their benefits and effects. This report uses trip data collected by the BTMO, and defines and implements a methodology for quantifying non-traffic benefits such as gasoline savings, productivity, and pollution reduction.

Brown, E.; Aabakken, J.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laborat... Laborat... file:///I|/Data%20Migration%20Task/EIS-0157-FEIS-03-1992/05eis0157_f.html[6/27/2011 9:57:50 AM] APPENDIX F ECOLOGY AND BIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT This appendix contains two major sections. Section F.1 is a discussion of the ecological characteristics at the LLNL Livermore site, LLNL Site 300, and SNL, Livermore (referred to collectively as the study sites); and presents information and data on the flora and fauna in the upland areas (see Appendix G for a detailed analysis of wetlands at the study sites). This section focuses on the biological features of LLNL Site 300 because this 7000-acre site is largely undeveloped and represents the most biologically diverse area under study. In contrast, the LLNL Livermore site and SNL, Livermore are developed areas that provide only marginal wildlife habitat because of the high degree of human activity and the few

126

Center for Transportation Analysis News Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for Transportation Analysis News Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2360.cta.ornl.gov/cta Pat Hu named Director of the Bureau of Transportation Statistics January 14, 2011 - Patricia Hu has been named as the Director of the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) by Peter H. Appel

127

DOE/EIS-0203-SA-01; Supplement Analysis of the INEEL Portion of the April 1995 Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operations Office 850 Energy Drive Idaho Falls, Idaho 83401-1563 November 2002 SUBJECT: Conclusions of the Supplement Analysis of the DOE Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and INEL Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs EIS (1995 EIS) ~ Dear Citizen: The Record of Decision (ROD) for the DOE Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and INEL Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs EIS (1995 EIS) left several decisions concerning INEEL proposed actions outstanding. That is, decisions were deferred .pending further project definition, funding priorities, or appropriate review under NEPA" In May 2000 a team of DOE-ID program representatives and subject area technical specialists (interdisciplinary

128

Analysis: Economic Impacts of Wind Applications in Rural Communities; June 18, 2004 -- January 31, 2005  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Analysis: Economic Impacts Analysis: Economic Impacts of Wind Applications in Rural Communities June 18, 2004 - January 31, 2005 M. Pedden Eugene, Oregon Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-39099 January 2006 Analysis: Economic Impacts of Wind Applications in Rural Communities June 18, 2004 - January 31, 2005 M. Pedden Eugene, Oregon NREL Technical Monitor: L. Flowers Prepared under Subcontract No(s). LEE-4-44834-01 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-39099 January 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

129

EIS-0236-SA6; Draft Supplemental Analysis: Pit Manufacturing Facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Stockpile, Stewardship  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6/25/99 6/25/99 DRAFT SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS: PIT MANUFACTURING FACILITIES AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY, STOCKPILE STEWARDSHIP AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT June 1999 SUMMARY ............................................................................................................................... 3 INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 3 Purpose of this Document .................................................................................................................................. 3 Background - SSM PEIS ...................................................................................................................................

130

An enhanced archive facilitating climate impacts and adaptation analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capsule: We describe an expanded archive of downscaled model-based projections of future changes in regional climate, with a user-friendly web interface, to facilitate analysis of climate change impacts and adaptation.

Maurer; E.P.Brekke; L.Pruitt; T.Thrasher; B.Long; J.Duffy; P.Dettinger; M.Cayan; D.Arnold; J.

131

Analysis of the Younger Dryas Impact Layer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have uncovered a thin layer of magnetic grains and microspherules, carbon spherules, and glass-like carbon at nine sites across North America, a site in Belgium, and throughout the rims of 16 Carolina Bays. It is consistent with the ejecta layer from an impact event and has been dated to 12.9 ka BP coinciding with the onset of Younger Dryas (YD) cooling and widespread megafaunal extinctions in North America. At many locations the impact layer is directly below a black mat marking the sudden disappearance of the megafauna and Clovis people. The distribution pattern of the Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) ejecta layer is consistent with an impact near the Great Lakes that deposited terrestrial-like ejecta near the impact site and unusual, titanium-rich projectile-like ejecta further away. High water content associated with the ejecta, up to 28 at. percent hydrogen (H), suggests the impact occurred over the Laurentide Ice Sheet. YDB microspherules and magnetic grains are highly enriched in TiO{sub 2}. Magnetic grains from several sites are enriched in iridium (Ir), up to 117 ppb. The TiO{sub 2}/FeO, K/Th, TiO{sub 2}/Zr, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeO+MgO, CaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, REE/ chondrite, FeO/MnO ratios and SiO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, K{sub 2}O, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni, Co, U, Th and other trace element abundances are inconsistent with all terrestrial and extraterrestrial (ET) sources except for KREEP, a lunar igneous rock rich in potassium (K), rare-earth elements (REE), phosphorus (P), and other incompatible elements including U and Th. Normal Fe, Ti, and {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U isotopic abundances were found in the magnetic grains, but {sup 234}U was enriched over equilibrium values by 50 percent in Murray Springs and by 130 percent in Belgium. 40K abundance is enriched by up to 100 percent in YDB sediments and Clovis chert artifacts. Highly vesicular carbon spherules containing nanodiamonds, glass-like carbon, charcoal and soot found in large quantities in the YDB layer are consistent with an impact followed by intense burning. Four holes in the Great Lakes, some deeper than Death Valley, are proposed as possible craters produced by the airburst breakup of a loosely aggregated projectile.

Firestone, Richard B.; West, Allen; Revay, Zsolt; Hagstrum, Jonathon T,; Belgya, Thomas; Hee, Shane S. Que; Smith, Alan R.

2010-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

132

Pipe-to-pipe impact analysis - Nuclear Engineering Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pipe-to-pipe impact analysis Pipe-to-pipe impact analysis Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Engineering Analysis Multimedia Bookmark and Share EA Multimedia, a collection of videos and audios featuring activities related to the Engineering Analysis Department Pipe-to-pipe impact analysis Quicktime video Quicktime Format - High Bandwidth | Size: 12 MB | Bit Rate:

133

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Analyses of eight well samples taken consecutively during the flow test showed an inverse correlation between NH3 and Cl_ concentrations. The last sample taken had a pH of 8.35 and contained 2100 ppm Cl_ and 0.55 ppm NH3. Ratios of Na+/K+ and Na+/Cl_ remained nearly constant throughout the flow test. Cation geothermometers (with inherent uncertainties of at least

134

U.S. Department of Energy Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0290-D  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E-1-1 E-1-1 APPENDIX E TECHNICAL METHODOLOGIES AND KEY DATA E-1 SOCIOECONOMICS E-1.1 Methodology and Key Assumptions for Socioeconomics The socioeconomic impact analysis evaluates both the impacts on regional economic activity, as measured by changes in employment and earnings, and the impacts on communities surrounding Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), as measured by changes in population and the demand for housing and public services. The study area comprises a seven-county Region of Influence (ROI) and socioeconomic impacts are estimated for each of the proposed Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) alternatives. The methodology employed for the AMWTP Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is similar to that used in the Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and

135

Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables and Energy Storage (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GREAT MINDS THINK ELECTRIC / WWW.EVS26.ORG GREAT MINDS THINK ELECTRIC / WWW.EVS26.ORG Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables and Energy Storage Mike Simpson National Renewable Energy Laboratory 8 May 2012 NREL/PR-5400-55080 GREAT MINDS THINK ELECTRIC / WWW.EVS26.ORG Electric Vehicle Grid Integration 2 Cross Cutting Enablers Grid / Renewables Communities Vehicles SMART GRID & COMMUNI- CATION RENEWABLE GENERATION INTERMITTENCY POWER ELECTRONICS EFFICIENCY INFRASTRUCTURE CODES & STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY MANAGE- MENT GRID OPERATION & RELIABILITY ENERGY STORAGE LIFE & COST STRATEGIC ENERGY ANALYSIS VEHICLE SYSTEMS ANALYSIS & TESTING DEPLOYMENT & PARTNERSHIPS Tx Tx Tx GREAT MINDS THINK ELECTRIC / WWW.EVS26.ORG 3 Vehicle Test Facilities at NREL

136

IMPACT OF TARGET MATERIAL ACTIVATION ON PERSONNEL EXPOSURE AND RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION IN THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed activation analyses are performed for the different materials under consideration for use in the target capsules and hohlraums used during the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility. Results of the target material activation were additionally used to estimate the levels of contamination within the NIF target chamber and the workplace controls necessary for safe operation. The analysis examined the impact of using Be-Cu and Ge-doped CH capsules on the external dose received by workers during maintenance activities. Five days following a 20 MJ shot, dose rates inside the Target Chamber (TC) due to the two proposed capsule materials are small ({approx} 1 {micro}rem/h). Gold and depleted-uranium (DU) are considered as potential hohlraum materials. Following a shot, gold will most probably get deposited on the TC first wall. On the other hand, while noble-gas precursors from the DU are expected to stay in the TC, most of the noble gases are pumped out of the chamber and end up on the cryopumps. The dose rates inside the TC due to activated gold or DU, at 5 days following a 20 MJ shot, are about 1 mrem/h. Dose rates in the vicinity of the cryo-pumps (containing noble 'fission' gases) drop-off to about 1 mrem/h during the first 12 hours following the shot. Contamination from activation of NIF targets will result in the NIF target chamber exceeding DOE surface contamination limits. Objects removed from the TC will need to be managed as radioactive material. However, the results suggest that airborne contamination from resuspension of surface contamination will not be significant and is at levels that can be managed by negative ventilation when accessing the TC attachments.

Khater, H; Epperson, P; Thacker, R; Beale, R; Kohut, T; Brereton, S

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

137

Environmental analysis of the operation of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (X-10 site)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An environmental analysis of the operation of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) facilities in Bethel Valley and Melton Valley was conducted to present to the public information concerning the extent to which recognizable effects, or potential effects, on the environment may occur. The analysis addresses current operations of the ORNL X-10 site and completed operations that may continue to have residual effects. Solid wastes from ORNL operations at the Y-12 site which are transported to the X-10 site for burial (e.g., Biology Division animal wastes) are included as part of X-10 site operation. Socioeconomic effects are associated primarily with the communities where employees live and with the Knoxville Bureau of Economic Analysis economic area as a whole. Therefore, ORNL employees at both Y-12 and X-10 sites are included in the ORNL socioeconomic impact analysis. An extensive base of environmental data was accumulated for this report. Over 80 reports related to ORNL facilities and/or operations are cited as well as many open-literature citations. Environmental effects of the operation of ORNL result from operational discharges from the onsite facilities; construction and/or modification of facilities, transportation to and from the site of persons, goods and services; socioeconomic impacts to the local, regional, and general population; and accidental discharges if they should occur. Operational discharges to the environnment are constrained by federal, state, and local regulations and by criteria established by the US Department of Energy to minimize adverse impacts. It is the purpose of this document to evaluate the operation of the ORNL insofar as impacts beyond the site boundary may occur or have the potential for occurrence.

Boyle, J.W.; Blumberg, R.; Cotter, S.J.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL# 5793E LBNL# 5793E Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties Jason P. Brown 1 USDA, Economic Research Service 355 E St. SW, Washington, D.C. 20024 jbrown@ers.usda.gov John Pender USDA, Economic Research Service 355 E St. SW, Washington, D.C. 20024 jpender@ers.usda.gov Ryan Wiser Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 RHWiser@lbl.gov Eric Lantz National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, CO 80401 eric.lantz@nrel.gov Ben Hoen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 20 Sawmill Road, Milan, NY 1257 BHoen@lbl.gov Pre-print of article submitted for publication to Energy Economics. Download from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140988312001466

139

EPA: Consideration of Cumulative Impacts in EPA Review of NEPA...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

how cumulative impacts are assessed in environmental impact analysis, CEQ developed a handbook entitled "Considering Cumulative Effects under the National Environmental Policy Act"...

140

Economic analysis of PV hybrid power system: Pinnacles National Monument  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PV hybrid electric power systems can offer an economically competitive alternative to engine generator (genset) systems in many off-grid applications. Besides the obvious `green` advantages of producing less noise and emissions, the PV hybrid can, in some cases, offer a lower life-cycle cost (LCC) then the genset. This paper evaluates the LCC of the 9.6 kWp PV hybrid power system installed by the National Park Services (NPS) at Pinnacles National Monument, CA. NPS motivation for installation of this hybrid was not based on economics, but rather the need to replace two aging diesel gensets with an alternative that would be quieter, fuel efficient, and more in keeping with new NPS emphasis on sustainable design and operations. In fact, economic analysis shows a lower 20-year LCC for the installed PV hybrid than for simple replacement of the two gensets. The analysis projects are net savings by the PV hybrid system of $83,561 and over 162,000 gallons of propane when compared with the genset-only system. This net savings is independent of the costs associated with environmental emissions. The effects of including emissions costs, according to NPS guidelines, is also discussed. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Rosenthal, A.; Durand, S. [Southwest Technology Development Institute, Las Cruces, NM (United States); Thomas, M.; Post, H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Analysis Activities at Fossil Energy/ National Energy Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Related Analytical Studies Office of Fossil Energy and National Energy Technology Laboratory John Ruether, Senior Advisor National Energy Technology Laboratory DOE...

142

Analysis of the Impact of Fuel Cell Vehicles on Energy Systems...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AgencyCompany Organization Tohoku University Focus Area Fuels & Efficiency, Hydrogen Topics Analysis Tools, Policy Impacts, Policy Impacts Website http:www.iaee.org...

143

Department of Energy finding of no significant impact, Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the DOE`s need to maintain the capability of producing tritium in support of its historic and near-term stewardship of the nation`s nuclear weapons stockpile, the agency has recently completed a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Tritium Supply and Recycling. The Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) at Technical Area (TA) 53, LANL, Los Alamos, New Mexico (DOE-EA-1147), March 1996, analyzes the DOE proposal to design, build, and test critical prototypical components of the accelerator system for tritium production, specifically the front-end, low-energy section of the accelerator at LANL. LEDA would be incrementally developed and tested in five separate stages over the next seven years. LEDA would be located at an existing building at TA-53; the LEDA components would be tested in order to verify equipment and prototype design and resolve related performance and production issues for future full-scale operation at Savannah River Site (SRS) in the event the APT plant is built. Production operations would not occur at LANL under the proposed action. The US DOE finds that there would be no significant impact from proceeding with its proposal to design, build, and test critical prototypical components of the accelerator system for tritium production, specifically the front-end, low-energy section of the accelerator, at TA-53, LANL. Based on the environmental assessment that analyses the potential environmental effects that would be expected to occur if the DOE were to design, build, and test prototypical components of the accelerator system for tritium production, the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action which would significantly affect the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, no environmental impact statement is required for this proposal.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the ..Section..1603 Treasury Grant Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This analysis responds to a request from the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the direct and indirect jobs and economic impacts of projects supported by the Section 1603 Treasury grant program. The analysis employs the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models to estimate the gross jobs, earnings, and economic output supported by the construction and operation of the large wind (greater than 1 MW) and solar photovoltaic (PV) projects funded by the Section 1603 grant program.

Steinberg, D.; Porro, G.; Goldberg, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption Report to Congress  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Pub. L. No. 109-58; EPAct 2005) amended the Uniform Time Act of 1966 (Pub. L. No. 89-387) to increase the portion of the year that is subject to Daylight Saving Time. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) EPAct 2005 extended the duration of Daylight Saving Time in the spring by changing its start date from the first Sunday in April to the second Sunday in March, and in the fall by changing its end date from the last Sunday in October to the first Sunday in November. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) EPAct 2005 also called for the Department of Energy to evaluate the impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on energy consumption in the United States and to submit a report to Congress. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) This report presents the results of impacts of Extended Daylight Saving Time on the national energy consumption in the United States. The key findings are: (1) The total electricity savings of Extended Daylight Saving Time were about 1.3 Tera Watt-hour (TWh). This corresponds to 0.5 percent per each day of Extended Daylight Saving Time, or 0.03 percent of electricity consumption over the year. In reference, the total 2007 electricity consumption in the United States was 3,900 TWh. (2) In terms of national primary energy consumption, the electricity savings translate to a reduction of 17 Trillion Btu (TBtu) over the spring and fall Extended Daylight Saving Time periods, or roughly 0.02 percent of total U.S. energy consumption during 2007 of 101,000 TBtu. (3) During Extended Daylight Saving Time, electricity savings generally occurred over a three- to five-hour period in the evening with small increases in usage during the early-morning hours. On a daily percentage basis, electricity savings were slightly greater during the March (spring) extension of Extended Daylight Saving Time than the November (fall) extension. On a regional basis, some southern portions of the United States exhibited slightly smaller impacts of Extended Daylight Saving Time on energy savings compared to the northern regions, a result possibly due to a small, offsetting increase in household air conditioning usage. (4) Changes in national traffic volume and motor gasoline consumption for passenger vehicles in 2007 were determined to be statistically insignificant and therefore, could not be attributed to Extended Daylight Saving Time.

Belzer, D. B.; Hadley, S. W.; Chin, S-M.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

National Preparedness Goal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... impact on security, national economic security, national public health or ... technology; national monuments and icons; nuclear reactors, material, and ...

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

147

The Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security.  

SciTech Connect

The Arctic region is rapidly changing in a way that will affect the rest of the world. Parts of Alaska, western Canada, and Siberia are currently warming at twice the global rate. This warming trend is accelerating permafrost deterioration, coastal erosion, snow and ice loss, and other changes that are a direct consequence of climate change. Climatologists have long understood that changes in the Arctic would be faster and more intense than elsewhere on the planet, but the degree and speed of the changes were underestimated compared to recent observations. Policy makers have not yet had time to examine the latest evidence or appreciate the nature of the consequences. Thus, the abruptness and severity of an unfolding Arctic climate crisis has not been incorporated into long-range planning. The purpose of this report is to briefly review the physical basis for global climate change and Arctic amplification, summarize the ongoing observations, discuss the potential consequences, explain the need for an objective risk assessment, develop scenarios for future change, review existing modeling capabilities and the need for better regional models, and finally to make recommendations for Sandia's future role in preparing our leaders to deal with impacts of Arctic climate change on national security. Accurate and credible regional-scale climate models are still several years in the future, and those models are essential for estimating climate impacts around the globe. This study demonstrates how a scenario-based method may be used to give insights into climate impacts on a regional scale and possible mitigation. Because of our experience in the Arctic and widespread recognition of the Arctic's importance in the Earth climate system we chose the Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security. Sandia can make a swift and significant contribution by applying modeling and simulation tools with internal collaborations as well as with outside organizations. Because changes in the Arctic environment are happening so rapidly, a successful program will be one that can adapt very quickly to new information as it becomes available, and can provide decision makers with projections on the 1-5 year time scale over which the most disruptive, high-consequence changes are likely to occur. The greatest short-term impact would be to initiate exploratory simulations to discover new emergent and robust phenomena associated with one or more of the following changing systems: Arctic hydrological cycle, sea ice extent, ocean and atmospheric circulation, permafrost deterioration, carbon mobilization, Greenland ice sheet stability, and coastal erosion. Sandia can also contribute to new technology solutions for improved observations in the Arctic, which is currently a data-sparse region. Sensitivity analyses have the potential to identify thresholds which would enable the collaborative development of 'early warning' sensor systems to seek predicted phenomena that might be precursory to major, high-consequence changes. Much of this work will require improved regional climate models and advanced computing capabilities. Socio-economic modeling tools can help define human and national security consequences. Formal uncertainty quantification must be an integral part of any results that emerge from this work.

Taylor, Mark A.; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Backus, George A.; Ivey, Mark D.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Innovation Impact: Breakthrough Research Results (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INNOVATION INNOVATION IMPACT Breakthrough Research Results NREL's campus in Golden, Colorado, is a model of sustainable energy and energy efficiency. INNOVATION IMPACT NREL has a rich history of scientific innovation and partnering with industry in research and development to bring new products and technologies into manufacturing production. In these pages we have captured key breakthrough results across our primary areas of renewable energy and energy efficiency research: solar, wind, bioenergy, transportation, buildings, analysis, and manufacturing technologies. It is our hope that these examples convey the breadth of research at NREL. Under the stewardship of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL is focused

149

Final Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Supplemental Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I I Chapters 1 through 12 Prepared by: COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration TITLE: Final Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Supplemental Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0348 and DOE/EIS-0236-S3) CONTACT: For further information on this EIS, For general information on the DOE Call: 1-877-388-4930, or contact National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, write or call: Thomas Grim Carol Borgstrom, Director Livermore Site Office Document Manager Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance NNSA (EH-42) 7000 East Avenue U.S. Department of Energy

150

Final Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Supplemental Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Summary Prepared by: COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration TITLE: Final Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Supplemental Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0348 and DOE/EIS-0236-S3) CONTACT: For further information on this EIS, For general information on the DOE Call: 1-877-388-4930, or contact National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, write or call: Thomas Grim Carol Borgstrom, Director Livermore Site Office Document Manager Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance NNSA (EH-42) 7000 East Avenue U.S. Department of Energy MS L-293 1000 Independence Avenue, SW

151

Final Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Supplemental Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

III III Appendix E through P Prepared by: COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration TITLE: Final Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Supplemental Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0348 and DOE/EIS-0236-S3) CONTACT: For further information on this EIS, For general information on the DOE Call: 1-877-388-4930, or contact National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, write or call: Thomas Grim Carol Borgstrom, Director Livermore Site Office Document Manager Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance NNSA (EH-42) 7000 East Avenue U.S. Department of Energy

152

Final Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Supplemental Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

II II Appendix A through D Prepared by: COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration TITLE: Final Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Supplemental Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0348 and DOE/EIS-0236-S3) CONTACT: For further information on this EIS, For general information on the DOE Call: 1-877-388-4930, or contact National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, write or call: Thomas Grim Carol Borgstrom, Director Livermore Site Office Document Manager Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance NNSA (EH-42) 7000 East Avenue U.S. Department of Energy

153

DOE/EIS-0236-S1F; National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (January 2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUMMARY SUMMARY 1 This Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) was prepared pursuant to a Joint Stipulation and Order approved and entered as an order of the court on October 27, 1997, in partial settlement of the lawsuit Civ. No. 97-936 (SS) (D.D.C.), Natural Resources Defense Council [NRDC] et al. v. Richardson et al. The Joint Stipulation and Order is reproduced at the end of this document as Attachment 1. In the Joint Stipulation and Order, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) agreed to prepare an SEIS to the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SSM PEIS) (DOE/EIS-0236, DOE 1996a) to evaluate the reasonably foreseeable significant adverse environmental impacts of continuing to construct and of operating the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National

154

Supplement Analysis for the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 2002, DOE issued the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) (DOE 2002) that provided an analysis of the potential environmental consequences of alternatives/options for the management and disposition of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW), High-Level Waste (HL W) calcine, and HLW facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), now known as the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and referred to hereafter as the Idaho Site. Subsequent to the issuance of the Final EIS, DOE included the requirement for treatment of SBW in the Request for Proposals for Environmental Management activities on the Idaho Site. The new Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) Contractor identified Steam Reforming as their proposed method to treat SBW; a method analyzed in the Final EIS as an option to treat SBW. The proposed Steam Reforming process for SBW is the same as in the Final EIS for retrieval, treatment process, waste form and transportation for disposal. In addition, DOE has updated the characterization data for both the HLW Calcine (BBWI 2005a) and SBW (BBWI 2004 and BBWI 2005b) and identified two areas where new calculation methods are being used to determine health and safety impacts. Because of those changes, DOE has prepared this supplement analysis to determine whether there are ''substantial changes in the proposed action that are relevant to environmental concerns'' or ''significant new circumstances or information'' within the meaning of the Council of Environmental Quality and DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9 (c) and 10 CFR 1021.314) that would require preparation of a Supplemental EIS. Specifically, this analysis is intended to determine if: (1) the Steam Reforming Option identified in the Final EIS adequately bounds impacts from the Steam Reforming Process proposed by the new ICP Contractor using the new characterization data, (2) the new characterization data is significantly different than the data presented in the Final EIS, (3) the new calculation methods present a significant change to the impacts described in the Final EIS, and (4) would the updated characterization data cause significant changes in the environmental impacts for the action alternatives/options presented in the Final EIS. There are no other aspects of the Final EIS that require additional review because DOE has not identified any additional new significant circumstances or information that would warrant such a review.

N /A

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) influences the market for plumbing fixtures and fittings by encouraging consumers to purchase products that carry the WaterSense label, which certifies those products as performing at low flow rates compared to unlabeled fixtures and fittings. As consumers decide to purchase water-efficient products, water consumption will decline nationwide. Decreased water consumption should prolong the operating life of water and wastewater treatment facilities.This report describes the method used to calculate national water savings attributable to EPA?s WaterSense program. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet model, the National Water Savings (NWS) analysis model, accompanies this methodology report. Version 1.0 of the NWS model evaluates indoor residential water consumption. Two additional documents, a Users? Guide to the spreadsheet model and an Impacts Report, accompany the NWS model and this methodology document. Altogether, these four documents represent Phase One of this project. The Users? Guide leads policy makers through the spreadsheet options available for projecting the water savings that result from various policy scenarios. The Impacts Report shows national water savings that will result from differing degrees of market saturation of high-efficiency water-using products.This detailed methodology report describes the NWS analysis model, which examines the effects of WaterSense by tracking the shipments of products that WaterSense has designated as water-efficient. The model estimates market penetration of products that carry the WaterSense label. Market penetration is calculated for both existing and new construction. The NWS model estimates savings based on an accounting analysis of water-using products and of building stock. Estimates of future national water savings will help policy makers further direct the focus of WaterSense and calculate stakeholder impacts from the program.Calculating the total gallons of water the WaterSense program saves nationwide involves integrating two components, or modules, of the NWS model. Module 1 calculates the baseline national water consumption of typical fixtures, fittings, and appliances prior to the program (as described in Section 2.0 of this report). Module 2 develops trends in efficiency for water-using products both in the business-as-usual case and as a result of the program (Section 3.0). The NWS model combines the two modules to calculate total gallons saved by the WaterSense program (Section 4.0). Figure 1 illustrates the modules and the process involved in modeling for the NWS model analysis.The output of the NWS model provides the base case for each end use, as well as a prediction of total residential indoor water consumption during the next two decades. Based on the calculations described in Section 4.0, we can project a timeline of water savings attributable to the WaterSense program. The savings increase each year as the program results in the installation of greater numbers of efficient products, which come to compose more and more of the product stock in households throughout the United States.

Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; McNeil, Michael; Dunham_Whitehead, Camilla; Letschert, Virginie; della_Cava, Mirka

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

156

Utility DSM Rebates for electronic ballasts: National estimates and assessment of market impact (1992 - 1997)  

SciTech Connect

In this report we present national estimates of utility Demand-Side Management (DSM) rebates for electronic fluorescent lamp ballasts during the period of 1992 - 1997. We then compare these trends with developments in the fluorescent ballast market from 1993 - 1998. The analysis indicates that DSM rebates for electronic ballasts peaked in the mid-1990s and declined sharply in 1996 and 1997. In a parallel trend, electronic ballast sales and market share both increased significantly during 1993 - 1994 and increased more slowly in 1996 -1997.

Busch, C.B.; Atkinson, B.A.; Eto, J.H.; Turiel, I.; McMahon, J.E.

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

An Analysis of the Impact of Sport Utility Vehicles in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of the Impact of Sport Utility Vehicles in the United States Analysis of the Impact of Sport Utility Vehicles in the United States Word Count: 7,493 Stacy C. Davis Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008, Bldg. 3156, MS-6073 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6073 Phone: 865-574-5957 Fax: 865-574-3851 Email: davissc@ornl.gov Lorena F. Truett Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008, Bldg. 4500N, MS-6207 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6207 Phone: 865-574-4225 Fax: 865-574-3895 Email: truettlf@ornl.gov Stacy C. Davis and Lorena F. Truett 1 ABSTRACT During the 1990s, sport utility vehicles (SUVs) became the fastest growing segment of the auto industry. In 1999, SUV sales reached almost 19% of the total light vehicle market and the mix of SUVs on the road was about 8.7%. Some has called this popularity a passing fad, but the continued increases in SUV sales seem to indicate a more

158

Analysis of the National Ignition Facility Ignition Hohlraum Energetics Experiments  

SciTech Connect

A series of forty experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] to study energy balance and implosion symmetry in reduced- and full-scale ignition hohlraums was shot at energies up to 1.3 MJ. This paper reports the findings of the analysis of the ensemble of experimental data obtained that has produced an improved model for simulating ignition hohlraums. Last year the first observation in a NIF hohlraum of energy transfer between cones of beams as a function of wavelength shift between those cones was reported [P. Michel, et al, Phys of Plasmas, 17, 056305, (2010)]. Detailed analysis of hohlraum wall emission as measured through the laser entrance hole (LEH) has allowed the amount of energy transferred versus wavelength shift to be quantified. The change in outer beam brightness is found to be quantitatively consistent with LASNEX [G. B. Zimmerman and W. L. Kruer, Comments Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 2, 51 (1975)] simulations using the predicted energy transfer when possible saturation of the plasma wave mediating the transfer is included. The effect of the predicted energy transfer on implosion symmetry is also found to be in good agreement with gated x-ray framing camera images. Hohlraum energy balance, as measured by x-ray power escaping the LEH, is quantitatively consistent with revised estimates of backscatter and incident laser energy combined with a more rigorous non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium atomic physics model with greater emissivity than the simpler average-atom model used in the original design of NIF targets.

Town, R J; Rosen, M D; Michel, P A; Divol, L; Moody, J D; Kyrala, G A; Schneider, M B; Kline, J L; Thomas, C A; Milovich, J L; Callahan, D A; Meezan, N B; Hinkel, D E; Williams, E A; Berger, R L; Edwards, M J; Suter, L J; Haan, S W; Lindl, J D; Dixit, S; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Moses, E I; Scott, H A; Harte, J A; Zimmerman, G B

2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

159

Phase 2 safety analysis report: National Synchrotron Light Source  

SciTech Connect

The Phase II program was established in order to provide additional space for experiments, and also staging and equipment storage areas. It also provides additional office space and new types of advanced instrumentation for users. This document will deal with the new safety issues resulting from this extensive expansion program, and should be used as a supplement to BNL Report No. 51584 ''National Synchrotron Light Source Safety Analysis Report,'' July 1982 (hereafter referred to as the Phase I SAR). The initial NSLS facility is described in the Phase I SAR. It comprises two electron storage rings, an injection system common to both, experimental beam lines and equipment, and office and support areas, all of which are housed in a 74,000 sq. ft. building. The X-ray Ring provides for 28 primary beam ports and the VUV Ring, 16. Each port is capable of division into 2 or 3 separate beam lines. All ports receive their synchrotron light from conventional bending magnet sources, the magnets being part of the storage ring lattice. 4 refs.

Stefan, P. (ed.)

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Using lattice of class and method dependence for change impact analysis of object oriented programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software change impact analysis (CIA) is a key technique to identify unpredicted and potential effects caused by software changes. In this paper, we propose a new CIA technique based on a compact and effective representation for object oriented programs, ... Keywords: change impact analysis, formal concept analysis, impact factor, lattice of class and method dependence

Xiaobing Sun; Bixin Li; Sai Zhang; Chuanqi Tao; Xiang Chen; Wanzhi Wen

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Clean Energy Policy Analyses: Analysis of the Status and Impact of Clean Energy Policies at the Local Level  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Energy Policy Analyses: Clean Energy Policy Analyses: Analysis of the Status and Impact of Clean Energy Policies at the Local Level S. Busche Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-49720 December 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Clean Energy Policy Analyses: Analysis of the Status and Impact of Clean Energy Policies at the Local Level S. Busche Prepared under Task No. IGST.0103 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-49720 December 2010 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

162

Clean Energy Policy Analyses: Analysis of the Status and Impact of Clean Energy Policies at the Local Level  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy Analyses: Policy Analyses: Analysis of the Status and Impact of Clean Energy Policies at the Local Level S. Busche Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-49720 December 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Clean Energy Policy Analyses: Analysis of the Status and Impact of Clean Energy Policies at the Local Level S. Busche Prepared under Task No. IGST.0103 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-49720 December 2010 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

163

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. Michael Thompson (1985) Chemistry Of Thermal And Nonthermal Springs In The Vicinity Of Lassen Volcanic National Park...

164

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/home.cfm?attr=24 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/canadian-national-energy-use-database Language: "English,French" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

165

SOLAR GLARE HAZARD ANALYSIS TOOL ( SGHAT ) - Sandia National ...  

With growing numbers of solar energy systems being proposed and installed throughout the United States, the potential impact of glint and glare from ...

166

The economic impacts of the September 11 terrorist attacks: a computable general equilibrium analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper develops a bottom-up approach that focuses on behavioral responses in estimating the total economic impacts of the September 11, 2001, World Trade Center (WTC) attacks. The estimation includes several new features. First, is the collection of data on the relocation of firms displaced by the attack, the major source of resilience in muting the direct impacts of the event. Second, is a new estimate of the major source of impacts off-site -- the ensuing decline of air travel and related tourism in the U.S. due to the social amplification of the fear of terrorism. Third, the estimation is performed for the first time using Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) analysis, including a new approach to reflecting the direct effects of external shocks. This modeling framework has many advantages in this application, such as the ability to include behavioral responses of individual businesses and households, to incorporate features of inherent and adaptive resilience at the level of the individual decision maker and the market, and to gauge quantity and price interaction effects across sectors of the regional and national economies. We find that the total business interruption losses from the WTC attacks on the U.S. economy were only slightly over $100 billion, or less than 1.0% of Gross Domestic Product. The impacts were only a loss of $14 billion of Gross Regional Product for the New York Metropolitan Area.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Rose, Adam [University of Southern California, Los Angeles; Bumsoo, Lee [University of Illinois; Asay, Gary [University of Southern California

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Multi-Year Analysis of Renewable Energy Impacts in California: Results from the Renewable Portfolio Standards Integration Cost Analysis; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

California's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS, Senate Bill 1078) requires the state's investor-owned utilities to obtain 20% of their energy mix from renewable generation sources. To facilitate the imminent increase in the penetration of renewables, the California Energy Commission (CEC), in support of the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC), initiated a study of integration costs in the context of RPS implementation. This effort estimated the impact of renewable generation in the regulation and load-following time scales and calculated the capacity value of renewable energy sources using a reliability model. The analysis team, consisting of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the California Wind Energy Collaborative (CWEC), performed the study in cooperation with the California Independent System Operator (CaISO), the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), and Southern California Edison (SCE). The study was conducted over three phases and was followed by an analysis of a multi-year period. This paper presents results from the multi-year analysis and the Phase III recommendations.

Milligan, M.; Shiu, H.; Kirby, B.; Jackson, K.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

The socio-economic impact of tourism in the Karoo National Park / Madelien Ferreira.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Literature on ecotourism and sustainable tourism emphasises the responsibilities and opportunities in protecting national parks through appropriate tourism development. National parks assist in addressing the… (more)

Ferreira, Madelien

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

EIS-0189: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis to support a determination on the need for additional National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis. Based on this Supplement Analysis, the potential impacts for...

170

Analysis of the Impact of Snow on Daily Weather Variability in Mountainous Regions Using MM5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of snow on daily weather variability, as well as the mechanisms of snowmelt over the Sierra Nevada, California–Nevada, mountainous region, were studied using the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for ...

Jiming Jin; Norman L. Miller

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels: A Framework for Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels Wang, M. (2001) "Energy & Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels Fuels and MotorLifecycle Analysis of Biofuels." Report UCD-ITS-RR-06-08.

Kammen, Daniel M.; Farrell, Alexander E; Plevin, Richard J; Jones, Andrew; Nemet, Gregory F; Delucchi, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Analysis of the Impact of Fuel Cell Vehicles on Energy Systems in the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis of the Impact of Fuel Cell Vehicles on Energy Systems in the Analysis of the Impact of Fuel Cell Vehicles on Energy Systems in the Transportation Sector in Japan Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Analysis of the Impact of Fuel Cell Vehicles on Energy Systems in the Transportation Sector in Japan Agency/Company /Organization: Tohoku University Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency, Hydrogen Topics: Analysis Tools, Policy Impacts, Policy Impacts Website: www.iaee.org/documents/Aberdeen/a02nakata.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/analysis-impact-fuel-cell-vehicles-en Language: English Policies: Financial Incentives This report examines the recent advances in fuel cell vehicles. The report then evaluates the impact of such vehicles on energy systems in the transportation sector in Japan and effectiveness of government subsidies in

173

DOE/EIS-0236-S1; National Ignition Facility Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the SSM PEIS, October 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Ignition Facility Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the SSM PEIS Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office Oakland, California October 1999 [This page intentionally left blank.] iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy TITLE: National Ignition Facility Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the SSM PEIS CONTACT: For additional information on For general information on the NEPA this statement write or call: process at DOE, write or call: Mr. Richard Scott, Document Manager Ms. Carol M. Borgstrom, Director U.S. Department of Energy, L-293 Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance, EH-42 7000 East Avenue, P.O. Box 808 U.S. Department of Energy Livermore, CA 94550 1000 Independence Avenue, SW

174

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Analysis Doug Ammerman, (505) 845-8158 Structural analysis utilizes computer design and analysis tools to provide package designers and certifiers with the most accurate method of determining package response to transportation environments. Computer analysis is an application of known engineering principles that take advantage of high-power computing capabilities in solving the response of computer models to various environments with complex mathematical calculations. It can be used for package certification by generating a computer model of a test object (package) and subjecting it to an accident environment to understand its response. A computer model must be constructed with the same weights, dimensions, hardnesses, specific heat, conduction, etc. as an

175

Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Argonne National Laboratory DC Offices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Argonne National Laboratory DC Offices 955 REPORT Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting December 12, 2006 955 L'Enfant Plaza research community involved in systems analysis of hydrogen storage materials and processes for information

176

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RMIR (Radioactive Materials Incident Report) Database Transportation RMIR (Radioactive Materials Incident Report) Database Transportation Accident and Incident Experience,1971-1999 Access Hazardous Materials Information System (HMIS) the primary source of national data for the Federal, state, and local governmental agencies responsible for the safety of hazardous materials transportation. Rail Transport Highway Transport Air Transport The Radioactive Material Incident Report (RMIR) Database was developed in 1981 at the Transportation Technology Center of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to support its research and development activities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This database contains information about radioactive materials transportation incidents that have occurred in the U.S. from 1971 through 1999. These data were drawn from the U.S.

177

DOE/EIS-0281; Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement, October 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

here to return to the Main Menu here to return to the Main Menu Volume I, Chapters 1-15 Volume II, Appendixes A- H Volume III, Comments and Responses Summary Contacts SANDIA NA TIONAL LABORA TORIES/NEW MEXICO FINAL SITE-WIDE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STA TEMENT Summary COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) COOPERATING AGENCY: U.S. AIR FORCE TITLE: Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (DOE/EIS-0281) CONTACT: For further information concerning the Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS), contact Julianne Levings, NEPA Document Manager U.S. DOE, Albuquerque Operations Office P.O. Box 5400, Albuquerque, NM 87185 Telephone: 1-888-635-7305, Fax: 505-845-6392 For further information by way of electronic mail, contact

178

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Testing Doug Ammerman, (505) 845-8158 Type B packages that transport radioactive materials must survive a sequence of full-scale (actual physical size) impact, puncture, fire, and immersion tests designed to replicate transportation accident conditions. The Hypothetical Accident Conditions (six tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.73) tests 1 through 4 (Drop, Crush, Puncture and Fire) are sequential, test 5 (Immersion) is performed on either a previously tested or untested package. Free Drop Test Crush Test Puncture Test Thermal Test Immersion Test [drop] Click to view picture [crush] Click to view picture [puncture] Click to view picture [thermal] Click to view picture [immersion] Click to view picture Dropping a package from 30 feet onto an unyielding target. (the unyielding target forces all of the deformation to be in the package, none in the target). The speed on impact is 44 feet per second or 30 miles per hour. Dropping a 1100 pound steel plate from 30 feet onto a package. This test is only required for packages weighing less than 1100 pounds. The speed on impact is 44 feet per second or 30 miles per hour. Dropping a package from 40 inches onto a welded, 6 inch diameter, steel spike. The speed on impact is 14.6 feet per second or 10 miles per hour. Placing a package 40 inches above a pool of burning fuel for 30 minutes at 800 degrees Celsius (1475 degrees Fahrenheit). Placing a package under 50 feet of water for 8 hours. Fissile material packages are also immersed under 3 feet of water for 8 hours sequentially after tests 1 through 4

179

Compositional Analysis Laboratory (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compositional Analysis Laboratory Compositional Analysis Laboratory * Provide customized analytical method development for a wide variety of feedstocks and process intermediates * Derive comprehensive biomass analysis results backed by 20 years of experience supporting the biomass conversion industry * Write publicly available Laboratory Analytical Procedures, several of which have been adapted by ASTM International and used and referenced worldwide * Provide training classes on biomass analysis and method development to help companies and institutions rapidly improve their analytical results * For analyzing solid samples to measure structural carbohydrates (glucose, xylose, galactose, arabinose, and mannose), lignin, extractable materials, protein, and ash * For analyzing liquid samples to measure oligomeric and monomeric

180

DIY: Do-it-Yourself Analysis | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DIY: Do-it-Yourself Analysis Configurable data partitioning, scalable data exchange, and efficient parallel IO are the main components of DIY. Configurable data partitioning,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Analysis of the Impacts of an Early Start for Compliance with the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting ... Committee on Science, EIA analyzed the likely impacts of the Kyoto Protocol on U.S. energy prices, energy use,

182

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Fact Sheet)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to biofuels, concentrating solar power, coal, and natural gas power plants. Based on project-specific and default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area (usually a state) that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction

183

Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Both fluid and gas isotopic analysis. References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two

184

Analysis and Selection of Analytical Tools to Assess National-Interest  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis and Selection of Analytical Tools to Assess Analysis and Selection of Analytical Tools to Assess National-Interest Transmission Bottlenecks Final Report Analysis and Selection of Analytical Tools to Assess National-Interest Transmission Bottlenecks Final Report This work described in this report was coordinated by the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electric Transmission and Distribution under Contract No. DE AC03-76SF00098. Analysis and Selection of Analytical Tools to Assess National-Interest Transmission Bottlenecks Final Report More Documents & Publications THE VALUE OF ECONOMIC DISPATCH A REPORT TO CONGRESS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1234 OF THE ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 2006 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study and Related Materials

185

The Regional Analysis and Forecast System of the National Meteorological Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three components of the Regional Analysis and Forecast System (RAFS) of the National Meteorological Center (NMC) are described. This system was implemented in March 1985 to supplement guidance from NMC's limited-area fine-mesh model (LFM), ...

James E. Hoke; Norman A. Phillips; Geoffrey J. Dimego; James J. Tuccillo; Joseph G. Sela

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Evolution of Objective Analysis Methodology at the National Meteorological Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective analysis of meteorological variables has been routinely performed at the National Meteorological Center (NMC) since October 1955. In the first few years, much attention was devoted to incorporating three principles of subjective ...

Clifford H. Dey

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Critical assessment of economic impact analyses at selected national festivals / Lukas Johannes Meyer van Wyk.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Festivals have become a global phenomenon and now serve as a platform to promote the leisure and tourism industry within a nation. These events have… (more)

Van Wyk, Lukas Johannes Meyer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

DOE/EIS-0236-S1F; National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (January 2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I: Main Text I: Main Text Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office Oakland, California January 2001 [This page intentionally left blank] iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy TITLE: National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement CONTACT: For additional information on For general information on the NEPA this statement, write or call: process at DOE, write or call: Mr. Richard Scott, Document Manager Ms. Carol M. Borgstrom, Director U.S. Department of Energy, L-467 Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, EH-42 7000 East Avenue, P.O. Box 808 U.S. Department of Energy Livermore, CA 94550 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Telephone: (925) 423-3022

189

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Impact of Program Goals on...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Date U.S. Department of Energy Impact of Program Goals on Hydrogen Vehicles: Market Prospect, Costs, and Benefits Project Summary Full Title: Impact of Program Goals on...

190

RISKIND: An enhanced computer code for National Environmental Policy Act transportation consequence analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The RISKIND computer program was developed for the analysis of radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the collective population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or other radioactive materials. The code is intended to provide scenario-specific analyses when evaluating alternatives for environmental assessment activities, including those for major federal actions involving radioactive material transport as required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). As such, rigorous procedures have been implemented to enhance the code`s credibility and strenuous efforts have been made to enhance ease of use of the code. To increase the code`s reliability and credibility, a new version of RISKIND was produced under a quality assurance plan that covered code development and testing, and a peer review process was conducted. During development of the new version, the flexibility and ease of use of RISKIND were enhanced through several major changes: (1) a Windows{sup {trademark}} point-and-click interface replaced the old DOS menu system, (2) the remaining model input parameters were added to the interface, (3) databases were updated, (4) the program output was revised, and (5) on-line help has been added. RISKIND has been well received by users and has been established as a key component in radiological transportation risk assessments through its acceptance by the U.S. Department of Energy community in recent environmental impact statements (EISs) and its continued use in the current preparation of several EISs.

Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Characterization Materials Characterization Paul McConnell, (505) 844-8361 The purpose of hazardous and radioactive materials, i.e., mixed waste, packaging is to enable this waste type to be transported without posing a threat to the health or property of the general public. To achieve this goal, regulations have been written establishing general design requirement for such packagings. Based on these regulatory requirements, a Mixed Waste Chemical Compatibility Testing Program is intended to assure regulatory bodies that the issue of packaging compatibility towards hazardous and radioactive materials has been addressed. Such a testing program has been developed in the Transportation Systems Department at Sandia National Laboratories. Materials Characterization Capabilities

192

Utility DSM Rebates for electronic ballasts: National estimates and market impact (1992 - 1997)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIST OF TABLES Table 1: Table 2: Table 3: Table 4: Table 5: Total Energy Efficiency Spending of Utilitieslists the percentage of national EE expenditures represented by the nine utilitieslists the percentage of national EE expenditures represented by the total energy efficiency spending of the six utilities

Busch, C.B.; Atkinson, B.A.; Eto, J.H.; Turiel, I.; McMahon, J.E.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Staff roster for 1979: National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication is a compilation of resumes from the current staff of the National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems. The Center, founded in January 1976, is one of four areas within the Department of Energy and Environment at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The emphasis of programs at the Center is on energy policy and planning studies at the regional, national, and international levels, involving quantitative, interdisciplinary studies of the technological, economic, social, and environmental aspects of energy systems. To perform these studies the Center has assembled a staff of experts in the areas of science, technology, economics planning, health and safety, information systems, and quantitative analysis.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Sensitivity Analysis Plant Sensitivity Analysis Abstract NREL Wind Energy Systems Engineering Tool Sensitivity Analysis and Results Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy K. Dykes, A. Ning, P. Graf, G. Scott, R. Damiani, M. Hand, R. Meadows, W. Musial, P. Moriarty, P. Veers * National Renewable Energy Laboratory * Golden, Colorado K. Dykes, A. Ning, P. Graf, G. Scott, R. Damiani, M. Hand, R. Meadows, W. Musial, P. Moriarty, P. Veers * National Renewable Energy Laboratory * Golden, Colorado Introduction OFFSHORE WINDPOWER 2012, Virginia Beach, October 911, 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL/PO-5000-56411

195

DOE/SEA-03; Special Environmental Analysis for the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Actions Taken in Response to the Cerro Grande Fire at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (September 2000)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis for Actions Taken in Response to the Cerro Grande Fire at LANL Analysis for Actions Taken in Response to the Cerro Grande Fire at LANL DOE/LAAO September 2000 S-1 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration, is issuing this special environmental analysis (SEA) to document its assessment of impacts associated with emergency activities conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos County, New Mexico, in response to major disaster conditions caused by the recent wildfire known as the Cerro Grande Fire. This wildfire burned about 7,650 1 acres (ac) (3,061 hectares [ha]) within the boundaries of LANL and about an additional 35,500 ac (14,200 ha) in neighboring areas. DOE's emergency response to the threat of this fire began with certain preventative actions undertaken immediately before

196

Impact of a Revised Analysis Algorithm on an Operational Data Assimilation System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The improvement of analysis and data assimilation techniques can have a large impact, as shown here in the context of the Canadian global and regional data assimilation systems. Both of these systems utilize the same analysis component that was ...

Herschel L. Mitchell; Clément Chouinard; Cécilien Charette; Richard Hogue; Steven J. Lambert

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Testing Carlos Lopez, (505) 845-9545 Packages transporting the larger "Type B" quantities of radioactive materials must be qualified and certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71, or under the equivalent international standard ST-1 issued by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The principal thermal qualification test is the 30 minute pool fire. As part of the National Transportation Program, the Transportation Risk & Packaging Program at Sandia can plan and conduct these tests for DOE and other package suppliers. Test Plans, QA plans and other necessary test documents can be prepared for customer and regulatory approval. Tests may be conducted with a variety of available facilities at Sandia, including large pools, an indoor fire facility, and a radiant heat test

198

Summary of failure analysis activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory has for many years conducted examinations related to the failures of nuclear materials and components. These examinations included the confirmation of root cause analyses, the determination of the causes of failure, identification of the species that accelerate corrosion, and comparison of the results of nondestructive examinations with those obtained by destructive examination. The results of those examinations, which had previously appeared in various formats (formal and informal reports, journal articles, etc.), have been collected together and summarized in the present report. The report is divided into sections according to the general subject matter (for example, corrosion, fatigue, etc.). Each section presents summaries of the information contained in specific reports and publications, all of which are fully identified as to title, authors, report number or journal reference, date of publication, and FIN number under which the work was performed.

Cowgill, M.G.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Franz, E.M.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Prototype dish testing and analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past year, Sandia National Laboratories performed on-sun testing of several dish concentrator concepts. These tests were undertaken at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF). Two of the tests were performed in support of the DOE Concentrator Receiver Development Program. The first was on-sun testing of the single-element stretched-membrane dish; this 7-meter diameter dish uses a single preformed metal membrane with an aluminized polyester optical surface and shows potential for future dish-Stirling systems. The next involved two prototype facets from the Faceted Stretched-Membrane Dish Program. These facets, representing competitive design concepts, are closest to commercialization. Five 1-meter triangular facets were tested on-sun as part of the development program for a solar dynamic system on Space Station Freedom. While unique in character, all the tests utilized the Beam Characterization System (BCS) as the main measurement tool and all were analyzed using the Sandia-developed CIRCE2 computer code. The BCS is used to capture and digitize an image of the reflected concentrator beam that is incident on a target surface. The CIRCE2 program provides a computational tool, which when given the geometry of the concentrator and target as well as other design parameters will predict the flux distribution of the reflected beam. One of these parameters, slope error, is the variable that has a major effect in determining the quality of the reflected beam. The methodology used to combine these two tools to predict uniform slope errors for the dishes is discussed in this document. As the Concentrator Development Programs continue, Sandia will test and evaluate two prototype dish systems. The first, the faceted stretched-membrane dish, is expected to be tested in 1992, followed by the full-scale single-element stretched-membrane dish in 1993. These tests will use the tools and methodology discussed in this document. 14 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

Grossman, J.W.; Houser, R.M.; Erdman, W.W.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

EIS-0426: Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Department of Energy / National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada National Security Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Site-Wide EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of proposed alternatives for continued management and operation of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site) and other U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA)-managed sites in Nevada.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Spatial Resolution Impacts on National Meteorological Center Nested Grid Model Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forecasts from different resolution versions of the National Meteorological Center Nested Grid Model (NGM) are compared for two case studies to assess an optimal ratio of model vertical and horizontal resolutions. Four combinations are considered:...

David D. Houghton; Ralph A. Petersen; Richard L. Wobus

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Aviation environmental policy effects on national- and regional-scale air quality, noise, and climate impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The continued growth of the aviation industry poses a challenge to policy-makers and industry stakeholders as each decision represents a trade-off on efficiency, equity, and environmental impact. The Aviation environmental ...

Wolfe, Philip J. (Philip James)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to biofuels, concentrating solar power, coal, and natural gas power plants. Based on project-specific and default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area (usually a state) that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind farm. This fact sheet provides an overview of the JEDI model as it pertains to wind energy projects.

Not Available

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The Positive Impact on Gomchen Tradition on Achieving and Maintaining Gross National Happiness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to attain this goal of Gross National Happiness. The gomchen or lay priest community is a unique source for * Director, National Museum of Bhutan, Paro Journal of Bhutan Studies 76 this type... of the community and results in fewer negative circumstances to disturb the communal mind. Because the gomchens are foremost dharma teachers with several lay practitioner in communities that are positively effected by their spiritual teachings and services...

Tashi, Khenpo Phuntsok

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Environmental Impacts of Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full Title: Evaluation of the Potential Environmental Impacts from Large-Scale Use and Production of Hydrogen in Energy and Transportation Applications Project ID: 247 Principal...

206

NREL: Energy Analysis - Jobs and Economic Development Impact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and biofuel plants at the local and state levels. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy impacts, JEDI has been expanded to analyze...

207

Analysis of the potential impacts of shale gas development.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to analyze the considerations regarding the environmental impacts of shale gas development by a rational, objective, fact-based assessment. Flowback… (more)

Yi, Hyukjoong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

EIS-0391: Supplement Analysis of an Environmental Impact Statement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of an Environmental Impact Statement Draft Tank Closure and Waste Management for the Hanford Site, Richland, WA Based on the analyses in this SA, DOE concluded that updated,...

209

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Risk & Packaging Contacts Transportation Risk & Packaging Contacts Ken Sorenson Program Manager (505) 844-0074 kbsoren@sandia.gov David Miller Operations Manager (505) 284-2574 drmille@sandia.gov Administrative Assistant Pat Tode (505) 845-8339, 845-7800 pprippl@sandia.gov Financial Analyst Laurel Taylor (505) 845-8598 ljtaylo@sandia.gov Risk Assessment Ruth Weiner (505) 284-8406 rfweine@sandia.gov Jeremy Sprung (505) 844-0314 jlsprun@sandia.gov Doug Osborn (505) 284-6416 dosborn@sandia.gov RADTRAN Ruth Weiner (505) 284-8406 rfweine@sandia.gov GIS Mapping Doug Osborn (505) 284-6416 dosborn@sandia.gov Structural Analysis Doug Ammerman (505) 845-8158 djammer@sandia.gov Bob Kalan (505) 844-0244 rjkalan@sandia.gov Jeff Smith (505) 845-0299 jasmith@sandia.gov Thermal Analysis Carlos Lopez

210

EA-1266: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Decontamination and Disassembly of the Argonne Thermal Source Reactor (ATSR) At Argonne National Laboratory Based on the analysis in...

211

Visual Resource Analysis to Identify and Mitigate Visual Impacts of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visual Impacts of Energy Facilities Visual Impacts of Energy Facilities The potential visual effects of utility-scale energy facilities on the nation's scenic, cultural, and historic resources have become a factor in slowing or halting energy and electric transmission projects. Concerns about the potential visual effects of utility-scale energy facilities on the nation's scenic, cultural, and historic resources have become a factor in slowing or halting energy and electric transmission projects. Because these projects are so important to the nation's energy supply, their potential visual impacts need to be identified and mitigated. The EVS Division has undertaken a number of studies to analyze visual resources. Detailed information about this work is online at http://visualimpact.anl.gov/.

212

Impacts of the Cerro Grande fire on Homestead era and Manhattan Project properties at Los Alamos National Laboratory.  

SciTech Connect

In May of 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned approximately 8,000 acres of Department of Energy (DOE) managed land at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Although the fire was generally of low intensity, it impacted a significant number of LANL's cultural resources. Historic wooden properties were affected more heavily than prehistoric archaeological sites. This paper will provide an overview of the Homestead and Manhattan Project Periods at LANL and will discuss the effects of the Cerro Grande Fire on historic wooden properties. Post-fire cultural resource management issues will also be discussed.

McGehee, E. D. (Ellen D.); Isaacson, J. (John)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Impacts of the Cerro Grande fire on Homestead era and Manhattan Project properties at Los Alamos National Laboratory.  

SciTech Connect

In May of 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned approximately 8,000 acres of Department of Energy (DOE) managed land at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Although the fire was generally of low intensity, it impacted a significant number of LANL's cultural resources. Historic wooden properties were affected more heavily than prehistoric archaeological sites. This paper will provide an overview of the Homestead and Manhattan Project Periods at LANL and will discuss the effects of the Cerro Grande Fire on historic wooden properties. Post-fire cultural resource management issues will also be discussed.

McGehee, E. D. (Ellen D.); Isaacson, J. (John)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

APPENDIX A ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS METHODOLOGIES This appendix briefly describes the methods used to assess the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of the alternatives in this Environmental Impact Statement for the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (CMRR EIS). Included are impact assessment methods for land use and visual resources, site infrastructure, air quality, noise, geology and soils, surface and groundwater, water quality, ecological resources, cultural and paleontological resources, socioeconomics, waste management and pollution prevention, and cumulative impacts. Each section includes descriptions of the affected resources, region of influence, and impact assessment methods. Descriptions of the

215

Wind Farm Power Fluctuations, Ancillary Services, and System Operating Impact Analysis Activities in the United States: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

With ever increasing penetration of wind capacity and growing interest in wind power by electric utilities and other power providers, questions about the impacts and costs associated with maintaining a stable grid is receiving lots of attention. These issues are important, both in competitive and regulated monopoly markets.To evaluate the range of ancillary service impact of wind power plants, wind power plant output fluctuations on the order of seconds to minutes must be known. However, the data required for a credible analysis has not been widely available. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), through its own efforts, and in conjunction with a wide group of stakeholders including other national labs, consultants, developers, utilities, and the non-profit Utility Wind Interest Group, has initiated measurement and analysis activities. The efforts are ongoing. While final system-cost results are not available, this paper will describe the progress to date and present typical results and statistical analysis. In addition, methods will be explained with the aim of soliciting feedback from others looking at similar issues worldwide.

Parsons, B. K. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Wan, Y. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Kirby, B. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility. The analysis was prepared to support the National Environmental Policy Act environmental assessment for the top two ranked sites for the proposed disposal facility. A four-phase screening and analysis approach was documented and applied. Phase I screening was site independent and applied a radionuclide half-life cut-off of 1 year. Phase II screening applied the National Council on Radiation Protection analysis approach and was site independent. Phase III screening used a simplified transport model and site-specific geologic and hydrologic parameters. Phase III neglected the infiltration-reducing engineered cover, the sorption influence of the vault system, dispersion in the vadose zone, vertical dispersion in the aquifer, and the release of radionuclides from specific waste forms. These conservatisms were relaxed in the Phase IV analysis which used a different model with more realistic parameters and assumptions. Phase I screening eliminated 143 of the 246 radionuclides in the inventory from further consideration because each had a half-life less than 1 year. An additional 13 were removed because there was no ingestion dose coefficient available. Of the 90 radionuclides carried forward from Phase I, 57 radionuclides had simulated Phase II screening doses exceeding 0.4 mrem/year. Phase III and IV screening compared the maximum predicted radionuclide concentration in the aquifer to maximum contaminant levels. Of the 57 radionuclides carried forward from Phase II, six radionuclides were identified in Phase III as having simulated future aquifer concentrations exceeding maximum contaminant limits. An additional seven radionuclides had simulated Phase III groundwater concentrations exceeding 1/100th of their respective maximum contaminant levels and were also retained for Phase IV analysis. The Phase IV analysis predicted that none of the thirteen remaining radionuclides would exceed the maximum contaminant levels for either site location. The predicted cumulative effective dose equivalent from all 13 radionuclides also was less than the dose criteria set forth in Department of Energy Order 435.1 for each site location. An evaluation of composite impacts showed one site is preferable over the other based on the potential for commingling of groundwater contamination with other facilities.

Annette Schafer, Arthur S. Rood, A. Jeffrey Sondrup

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

217

National Electric Transmission Study 2006 Western Interconnection Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Interconnection Western Interconnection 2006 Congestion Assessment Study Prepared by the Western Congestion Analysis Task Force May 08, 2006 2 Western Interconnection 2006 Congestion Study - DOE Task 3 - 1. 2008 Modeling Study 2. 2015 Modeling Study - 2015 Planned Resource Development (IRPs and RPS) 3. W.I. Historical Path Usage Studies - 1999 thru 2005 - Physical congestion - Commercial congestion 3 WCATF Modeling Studies ABB Gridview Model * Model uses WECC 2005 L&R load forecast, modified with NPCC data for the NW, RMATS load forecasts for the Rocky Mtn area and the latest CEC load forecast for California * Hourly load shapes were developed using FERC 714 * Incremental transmission was added to a WECC 2008 case to represent 2015 network topology * WECC path ratings were used, modified as necessary to more closely

218

Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (05/2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 * Book 1 2 * Book 1 Appendices A through H Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico DOE/EIS-0380 May 2008 iii COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Title: Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0380) Location: Los Alamos, New Mexico For additional information or for copies of the SWEIS, contact: Elizabeth Withers, EIS Document Manager NNSA Service Center - Albuquerque

219

The Real-Time Mesoscale Analysis at NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Prediction: Current Status and Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) implemented the Real-Time Mesoscale Analysis (RTMA) in collaboration with the Earth System Research Laboratory and the National Environmental, Satellite, and Data Information ...

Manuel S. F. V. De Pondeca; Geoffrey S. Manikin; Geoff DiMego; Stanley G. Benjamin; David F. Parrish; R. James Purser; Wan-Shu Wu; John D. Horel; David T. Myrick; Ying Lin; Robert M. Aune; Dennis Keyser; Brad Colman; Greg Mann; Jamie Vavra

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Energy and Greenhouse Impacts of Biofuels: A Framework for Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Manufacture of Corn Ethanol." National Corn GrowersThermodynamics of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle." CriticalNet Energy Balance of Corn-Ethanol. Corn Utilization and

Kammen, Daniel M.; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J.; Jones, Andrew D.; Nemet, Gregory F.; Delucchi, Mark A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Analysis of the energy impacts of the DOE Appropriate Energy Technology Small Grants Program: methods and results  

SciTech Connect

The study outlines methods for assessing the energy savings of projects funded by DOE in the Appropriate Technology Program (AT) and the way to apply these methods to obtain estimates of energy impacts. The energy savings potential was assessed for 57 projects from a national population of 584. Program energy savings were estimated from project savings using statistical inference. Details of the approach are discussed. Chapter 2 presents and discusses estimates of direct energy savings and Chapter 3 discusses methods and results of the economic analysis. Chapter 4 examines the indirect energy savings. Chapter 5 presents estimates of program energy savings and the methods used to obtain them. The report concludes with a discussion of how improved project selection can increase program energy savings and presents two approaches for conducting future energy impact studies. (MCW)

Lucarelli, B.; Kessel, J.; Kay, J.; Linse, J.; Tompson, S.; Homer, M.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Impact of Recent Constraints on Intellectual Freedom on Science and Technology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was created in 1952 to meet the nation's need for an expanded nuclear weapons research and development (R&D) capability. LLNL quickly grew to become a full-fledged nuclear weapons design laboratory with a broad range of technical capabilities similar to those of our sister laboratory--Los Alamos--with which we shared mission responsibilities. By its very nature, nuclear weapons R&D requires some of the most advanced science and technology (S&T). Accordingly, there is an obvious need for careful attention to ensure that appropriate security measures exist to deal with the sensitive aspects of nuclear weapons development. The trade-off between advancing S&T at the Laboratory and the need for security is a complex issue that has always been with us, As Edward Teller noted in a recent commentary in a May, 1999 editorial in the New York Times: ''The reaction of President Harry Truman to the leaking of information is well known. He imposed no additional measures for security. Instead, we have clear knowledge that the disclosures by (Klaus) Fuchs caused Truman to call for accelerated work on all aspects of nuclear weapons. The right prescription for safety is not reaction to dangers that are arising, but rather action leading to more knowledge and, one hopes, toward positive interaction between nations.'' To explore the issue of intellectual freedom at a national security laboratory such as LLNL, one must understand the type of activities we pursue and how our research portfolio has evolved since the Laboratory was established. Our mission affects the workforce skills, capabilities, and security measures that the Laboratory requires. The national security needs of the US have evolved, along with the S&T community in which the Laboratory resides and to which it contributes. These factors give rise to a greater need for the Laboratory to interact with universities, industry, and other national laboratories. Intellectual freedom at the Laboratory and constraints on it can be understood only within the context of our mission, our necessary interactions with other entities; and our need for an exceptional multidisciplinary workforce.

Wadsworth, J

2000-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

223

The RACER (risk analysis, communication, evaluation, and reduction) stakeholder environmental data transparency project for Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The RACER (Risk Analysis, Communication, Evaluation, and Reduction) project was created in 2003, as an effort to enhance the Los Alamos National Laboratory's ability to effectively communicate the data and processes used to evaluate environmental risks to the public and the environment. The RACER project staff consists of members of Risk Assessment Corporation, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). RACER staff worked closely with members of the community, tribal governments, and others within NMED and LANL to create innovative tools and a process that could provide information to regulators, LANL and the community about the sources of public health risk and ecological impact from LAN L operations. The RACER Data Analysis Tool (DA T) provides the public with webbased access to environmental measurement data collected in and around the LANL site. Its purpose is to provide a 'transparent' view to the public of all data collected by LANL and NMED regarding the LANL site. The DAT is available to the public at 'www.racernm.com'.

Echohawk, John Chris [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dorries, Alison M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eberhart, Craig F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Werdel, Nancy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Evaluation of the National Financial and Economic Impacts of a Closed-Cycle Cooling Retrofit Requirement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is investigating the implications of a potential U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Clean Water Act 316(b) rulemaking that would establish "best technology available" (BTA) based on closed-cycle cooling retrofits for facilities with once-through cooling. This report focuses on the financial impacts that can potentially result from a requirement for use of closed-cycle cooling systems.

2011-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

225

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Potential Environmental Impacts of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Environmental Impacts of Hydrogen-Based Transportation & Power Potential Environmental Impacts of Hydrogen-Based Transportation & Power Systems Project Summary Full Title: Potential Environmental Impacts of Hydrogen-Based Transportation & Power Systems Project ID: 245 Principal Investigator: Thomas Grieb Brief Description: The goal of this project is to analyze the effects of emissions of hydrogen, the six criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases on climate, human health, ecosystems, and structures. Purpose The overall goal of the project is to compare emissions of hydrogen, the six criteria pollutants (CO, SOX, NO2, particulate matter, ozone, and lead), and greenhouse gases from near- and long-term methods of generating hydrogen for vehicles and stationary power systems, and the effects of those emissions on climate, human health, the ecosystem, and structures.

226

A Principal Component Analysis of 39 Scientific Impact Johan Bollen1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sompel1 , Aric Hagberg2. , Ryan Chute1. 1 Digital Library Research and Prototyping Team, Research Library, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, United States of America, 2 Theoretical Division, Mathematical Modeling and Analysis Group, and Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National

Hagberg, Aric

227

1 Energy Markets and Policy Group Energy Analysis Department The Impact of Wind Power Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Energy Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis Department The Impact of Wind Power Projects, Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program #12;2 Energy Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis · Conclusions and Further Research #12;3 Energy Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis Department Proximity

228

Energy Analysis Department Electricity Markets and Policy Group The Impact of Rate Design and Net  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Analysis Department Electricity Markets and Policy Group The Impact of Rate Design and Net of Energy #12;Energy Analysis Department Electricity Markets and Policy Group 2 Project Overview Context alternative compensation mechanisms #12;Energy Analysis Department Electricity Markets and Policy Group 3

229

OIL PRICE IMPACT ON FINANCIAL MARKETS: CO-SPECTRAL ANALYSIS FOR EXPORTING VERSUS IMPORTING COUNTRIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL PRICE IMPACT ON FINANCIAL MARKETS: CO-SPECTRAL ANALYSIS FOR EXPORTING VERSUS IMPORTING://www.economie.polytechnique.edu/ mailto:chantal.poujouly@polytechnique.edu hal-00822070,version1-14May2013 #12;1 Oil price impact Khaled Guesmi3 Abstract The aim of this paper is to study the degree of interdependence between oil price

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

230

Cost Analysis of Proposed National Regulation of Coal Combustion Residuals from the Electric Generating Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis quantifies the potential cost to the coal-fired electric generation industry from EPA's proposed rule on the disposal of coal combustion residuals. It includes an assessment of the incremental compliance costs of the Subtitle C proposed regulatory option. Costs for this analysis were developed at the individual generating unit and plant level and aggregated to develop a national industry cost estimate. The analytical model used to estimate the costs utilizes a Monte Carlo framework to accou...

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

231

Impact of the energy-related inventions program on the national economy  

SciTech Connect

The market entry, sales, and employment data presented in this paper suggest that ERIP has been able to efficiently produce positive economic impacts. It is likely that the documented successes of ERIP's inventors will be even greater as their projects mature and more current commercialization information is collected. Survey data presented elsewhere indicate that the ERIP financial support, endorsement, encouragement, and commercialization education are viewed by participants as the most important benefits of the program (Brown, Morell, Snell, Soderstrom, and Friggle, 1987). Other federal, state, and local programs might profit substantially from modelling the composition and delivery of their assistance after the Energy-Related Inventions Program.

Brown, M.A.; Morell, J.A.; Snell, S.A.; Kerley, C.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

A Comparison of Analysis and Forecast Correction Techniques:Impact of Negative Dissipation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of negative dissipation on posttime analysis and forecast correction techniques is examined in a simplified context. The experiments are conducted using a three-level quasigeostrophic model (with a nonsingular tangent propagator matrix)...

Carolyn A. Reynolds

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Incorporating operational flexibility into electric generation planning : impacts and methods for system design and policy analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation demonstrates how flexibility in hourly electricity operations can impact long-term planning and analysis for future power systems, particularly those with substantial variable renewables (e.g., wind) or ...

Palmintier, Bryan S. (Bryan Stephen)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Analysis of Sub-Hourly Ramping Impacts of Wind Energy and Balancing Area Size (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

WindPower 2008 conference sponsored by AWEA held in Houston, TX on June 1-4 2008. This poster illustrates the data collected for an analysis of sub-hourly ramping impacts of wind energy and balancing area size.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Analysis of Energy Saving Impacts of New Commercial Energy Codes for the Gulf Coast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Report on an analysis of the energy savings and cost impacts associated with the use of newer and more efficiently commercial building energy codes in the states of Louisiana and Mississippi.

Halverson, Mark A.; Gowri, Krishnan; Richman, Eric E.

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

National Woodfuels and Wood Energy Information Analysis Prepared by: Muhammad Iqbal Sial PhD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2nd Draft Desk Study on National Woodfuels and Wood Energy Information Analysis PAKISTAN Prepared. FUELWOOD TRANSPORT, TRADE AND MARKETING 14 4.1. Collection 14 4.1.1. For household use 14 4.4.2. Wholesalers 18 4.4.3. Retailers 28 4.5. Woodfuel marketing 19 5. CONTRIBUTION OF WOODFUELS TO COUNTRY'S TOTAL

237

National Woodfuels and Wood Energy Information Analysis Prepared by: Koh Mok Poh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desk Study on National Woodfuels and Wood Energy Information Analysis MALAYSIA Prepared by: Koh Mok.(Hoi, 1991) With the urbanisation of the population and an increasing standard of living, the energy shift firewood and charcoal industry. The Firewood Industry and Market The utilisation of bakau (mangrove

238

Spatial analysis and delineation of ecological landtype phases for the Hoosier National Forest, Indiana, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Forest Service adopted the National Hierarchical Framework of Ecological Units in 1993 with the ecological landtype (ELT) and ecological landtype phase (ELTP) forming the lowest levels of the hierarchy. This study examines the potential of computer ... Keywords: Ecological landtypes, Forest ecosystems, Forest management, GIS, Landform mapping, Landscape analysis

Andriy V. Zhalnin; George R. Parker

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Presented at the National Conference on Applied Techniques for Analysis and Management of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1/ Presented at the National Conference on Applied Techniques for Analysis and Management Management (VRM) processes for their own agencies. Training Course The Federal Highway Administration contracted with Jones & Jones, a Seattle planning and design firm, to develop and conduct the training course

Standiford, Richard B.

240

Supplement Analysis for the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of the Pantex Plant and Associated Storage of Nuclear Weapon Components  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

D D E P A R T M E N T O F E N E R G Y U N I T E D S T A T E S O F A M E R I C A SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR THE CONTINUED OPERATION OF THE PANTEX PLANT AND ASSOCIATED STORAGE OF NUCLEAR WEAPON COMPONENTS DOE/EIS-0225/SA-03 United States Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Site Operations P.O. Box 30030 Amarillo, Texas 79120-0030 February 2003 i Summary The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementing Procedures at 10 CFR 1021.330(d) require evaluation of its site-wide environmental impact statements (EISs) at least every 5 years by preparation of a supplement analysis (SA), as provided in 10 CFR 1021.314. Based on the SA, a determination is made as to whether the existing EIS remains

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Geothermal Impact Analysis Geothermal Project | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Clean Energy Economy Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network Geothermal Incentives and Policies International Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development...

242

Liquid impact erosion mechanism and theoretical impact stress analysis in TiN-coated steam turbine blade materials  

SciTech Connect

Coating of TiN film was done by reactive magnetron sputter ion plating to improve the liquid impact erosion resistance of steam turbine blade materials, 12Cr steel and Stellite 6B, for nuclear power plant application. TiN-coated blade materials were initially deformed with depressions due to plastic deformation of the ductile substrate. The increase in the curvature in the depressions induced stress concentration with increasing number of impacts, followed by circumferential fracture of the TiN coating due to the circular propagation of cracks. The liquid impact erosion resistance of the blade materials was greatly improved by TiN coating done with the optimum ion plating condition. Damage decreased with increasing TiN coating thickness. According to the theoretical analysis of stresses generated by liquid impact, TiN coating alleviated the impact stress of 12Cr steel and Stellite 6B due to stress attenuation and stress wave reactions such as reflection and transmission at the coating-substrate interface.

Lee, M.K.; Kim, W.W.; Rhee, C.K.; Lee, W.J. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Health impact assessment: A comparison of 45 local, national, and international guidelines  

SciTech Connect

This article provides a comparison of health impact assessment (HIA) guidelines from around the world and for multiple geographic scales. We identify commonalities and differences within HIA guides to discuss the plausibility of consensus guidelines and to inform guideline development. The practice of HIA has grown over the last two decades with a concurrent growth of HIA guides. This study expands on earlier review work and includes guides published since 2007 (Mindell, Boltong and Forde, 2008). From April 2010 to October 2011, 45 HIA guides were identified through an internet search and review of previous research. Common characteristics, key features, and the HIA process were analyzed. The 45 documents recommended similar but not identical processes for conducting HIAs. These analyses suggest that guidelines for HIAs are similar in many areas of the world and that new HIA practitioners can use these findings to inform their approach. Further discussion is needed to determine if the approaches established in these guidelines are followed and if one set of common guidelines could be written for use in numerous countries and regions. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyze 45 health impact assessment (HIA) guidelines worldwide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine similarities and unique attributes of each guideline. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of developing consensus guidelines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identifying additional guidelines aides in future HIA work and evaluation.

Hebert, Katherine A., E-mail: jsx3@cdc.gov; Wendel, Arthur M., E-mail: dvq6@cdc.gov; Kennedy, Sarah K., E-mail: heaton.sarah@gmail.com; Dannenberg, Andrew L., E-mail: adannenberg2@gmail.com

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Automating Natural Disaster Impact Analysis: An Open Resource to Visually Estimate a Hurricane s Impact on the Electric Grid  

SciTech Connect

An ORNL team working on the Energy Awareness and Resiliency Standardized Services (EARSS) project developed a fully automated procedure to take wind speed and location estimates provided by hurricane forecasters and provide a geospatial estimate on the impact to the electric grid in terms of outage areas and projected duration of outages. Hurricane Sandy was one of the worst US storms ever, with reported injuries and deaths, millions of people without power for several days, and billions of dollars in economic impact. Hurricane advisories were released for Sandy from October 22 through 31, 2012. The fact that the geoprocessing was automated was significant there were 64 advisories for Sandy. Manual analysis typically takes about one hour for each advisory. During a storm event, advisories are released every two to three hours around the clock, and an analyst capable of performing the manual analysis has other tasks they would like to focus on. Initial predictions of a big impact and landfall usually occur three days in advance, so time is of the essence to prepare for utility repair. Automated processing developed at ORNL allowed this analysis to be completed and made publicly available within minutes of each new advisory being released.

Barker, Alan M [ORNL; Freer, Eva B [ORNL; Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Fernandez, Steven J [ORNL; Chinthavali, Supriya [ORNL; Kodysh, Jeffrey B [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Notice of Intent to Prepare a Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

697 697 Federal Register / Vol. 60, No. 92 / Friday, May 12, 1995 / Notices associated with the construction and operation of those facilities and infrastructure necessary to support the CVN and preserve the existing capability to accommodate one transient CVN. Homeporting a CVN will require dredging of the berthing areas and the San Diego Bay channel, a new berthing wharf involving bay fill, construction of new propulsion plant and ship maintenance facilities, and expanded utilities. The EIS describes and evaluates potential homeport sites in San Diego Bay, three alternative berthing arrangements, dredge material disposal alternatives, and the ''no action'' alternative as required by NEPA. The EIS analyzes potential project specific impacts associated with a number of projects proposed for implementation

246

Analysis of sheltering and evacuation strategies for a national capital region nuclear detonation scenario.  

SciTech Connect

Development of an effective strategy for shelter and evacuation is among the most important planning tasks in preparation for response to a low yield, nuclear detonation in an urban area. Extensive studies have been performed and guidance published that highlight the key principles for saving lives following such an event. However, region-specific data are important in the planning process as well. This study examines some of the unique regional factors that impact planning for a 10 kT detonation in the National Capital Region. The work utilizes a single scenario to examine regional impacts as well as the shelter-evacuate decision alternatives at one exemplary point. For most Washington, DC neighborhoods, the excellent assessed shelter quality available make shelter-in-place or selective transit to a nearby shelter a compelling post-detonation strategy.

Yoshimura, Ann S.; Brandt, Larry D.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

PV Installation Labor Market Analysis and PV JEDI Tool Developments (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PV Installation Labor Market Analysis PV Installation Labor Market Analysis and PV JEDI Tool Developments Barry Friedman NREL Strategic Energy Analysis Center May 16, 2012 World Renewable Energy Forum Denver, Colorado NREL/PR-6A20-55130 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Disclaimer 2 DISCLAIMER AGREEMENT These information ("Data") are provided by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy LLC ("Alliance") for the U.S. Department of Energy (the "DOE"). It is recognized that disclosure of these Data is provided under the following conditions and warnings: (1) these Data have been prepared for reference purposes only; (2) these Data consist of forecasts, estimates or assumptions made on a best-

248

National cyber defense high performance computing and analysis : concepts, planning and roadmap.  

SciTech Connect

There is a national cyber dilemma that threatens the very fabric of government, commercial and private use operations worldwide. Much is written about 'what' the problem is, and though the basis for this paper is an assessment of the problem space, we target the 'how' solution space of the wide-area national information infrastructure through the advancement of science, technology, evaluation and analysis with actionable results intended to produce a more secure national information infrastructure and a comprehensive national cyber defense capability. This cybersecurity High Performance Computing (HPC) analysis concepts, planning and roadmap activity was conducted as an assessment of cybersecurity analysis as a fertile area of research and investment for high value cybersecurity wide-area solutions. This report and a related SAND2010-4765 Assessment of Current Cybersecurity Practices in the Public Domain: Cyber Indications and Warnings Domain report are intended to provoke discussion throughout a broad audience about developing a cohesive HPC centric solution to wide-area cybersecurity problems.

Hamlet, Jason R.; Keliiaa, Curtis M.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Impacts Analyses Supporting the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the Resumption of Transient Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and health impacts are presented for activities associated with transient testing of nuclear fuel and material using two candidate test reactors. Transient testing involves irradiation of nuclear fuel or materials for short time-periods under high neutron flux rates. The transient testing process includes transportation of nuclear fuel or materials inside a robust shipping cask to a hot cell, removal from the shipping cask, pre-irradiation examination of the nuclear materials, assembly of an experiment assembly, transportation of the experiment assembly to the test reactor, irradiation in the test reactor, transport back to the hot cell, and post-irradiation examination of the nuclear fuel or material. The potential for environmental or health consequences during the transportation, examination, and irradiation actions are assessed for normal operations, off-normal (accident) scenarios, and transportation. Impacts to the environment (air, soil, and groundwater), are assessed during each phase of the transient testing process. This report documents the evaluation of potential consequences to the general public. This document supports the Environmental Assessment (EA) required by the U.S. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 USC Subsection 4321 et seq.).

Annette L. Schafer; Lloyd C. Brown; David C. Carathers; Boyd D. Christensen; James J. Dahl; Mark L. Miller; Cathy Ottinger Farnum; Steven Peterson; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Peter V. Subaiya; Daniel M. Wachs; Ruth F. Weiner

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Impact of the January-February 1980 earthquake sequence on various structures at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

On January 24, 1980, California's Livermore Valley was rocked by a moderate earthquake that caused some damage to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The earthquake, which measured 5.5 on the Richter scale and was centered about 20 km (12 mi) northwest of the Laboratory, produced estimated peak horizontal ground acceleration at LLNL of between 0.15 and 0.3 g. The earthquake was part of a sequence that included two sharp aftershocks (magnitudes 5.2 and 4.2) within 1.5 minutes of the initial event. A second earthquake (magnitude 5.8) struck on January 26, and several lesser earthquakes occurred during the next few weeks. This paper describes the damage impact of the January 24 earthquake, including: background information on LLNL, discussion of pre-earthquake seismic safety philosophy, and description of the impact of the January 24 earthquake, including a description of the seismic setting of the Laboratory, a discussion of the ground motion, and a summary of damage. This paper also describes a data gathering and reduction effort at LLNL in the aftermath of the January earthquakes.

Murray, R.C.; Nelson, T.A.; Coats, D.W.; Ng, D.S.; Weaver, H.J.

1981-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

251

Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (05/2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Section 3 (pages 3-562 through 3-1089) and Section 4 Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico DOE/EIS-0380 May 2008 Reader's Guide This Comment Response Document (CRD) for the Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (LANL SWEIS or SWEIS) consists of four sections: * Chapter 1 - Overview of the Public Comment Process This section describes the public comment process for the Draft LANL SWEIS; the format

252

Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (05/2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Sections 1, 2, and 3 (pages 3-1 through 3-561) Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico DOE/EIS-0380 May 2008 Reader's Guide This Comment Response Document (CRD) for the Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (LANL SWEIS or SWEIS) consists of four sections: * Chapter 1 - Overview of the Public Comment Process This section describes the public comment process for the Draft LANL SWEIS; the format

253

An input-output procedure for calculating economy-wide economic impacts in supply chains using homeland security consequence analysis tools.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has developed several models to analyze potential consequences of homeland security incidents. Two of these models (the National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center Agent-Based Laboratory for Economics, N-ABLE{trademark}, and Loki) simulate detailed facility- and product-level consequences of simulated disruptions to supply chains. Disruptions in supply chains are likely to reduce production of some commodities, which may reduce economic activity across many other types of supply chains throughout the national economy. The detailed nature of Sandia's models means that simulations are limited to specific supply chains in which detailed facility-level data has been collected, but policymakers are often concerned with the national-level economic impacts of supply-chain disruptions. A preliminary input-output methodology has been developed to estimate national-level economic impacts based upon the results of supply-chain-level simulations. This methodology overcomes two primary challenges. First, the methodology must be relatively simple to integrate successfully with existing models; it must be easily understood, easily applied to the supply-chain models without user intervention, and run quickly. The second challenge is more fundamental: the methodology must account for both upstream and downstream impacts that result from supply-chain disruptions. Input-output modeling typically estimates only upstream impacts, but shortages resulting from disruptions in many supply chains (for example, energy, communications, and chemicals) are likely to have large downstream impacts. In overcoming these challenges, the input-output methodology makes strong assumptions about technology and substitution. This paper concludes by applying the methodology to chemical supply chains.

Smith, Braeton J.; Vugrin, Eric D.; Loose, Verne W.; Warren, Drake E.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Impact of early diagenesis of Eolian reservoirs, Great Sand Dunes National Monument, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Dune and associated alluvial and playa deposits at Great Sand Dunes National Monument, Colorado, provide an excellent opportunity to study early diagenetic development of vertical and horizontal permeability barriers in recent eolian deposits (> 10 ka). Cements observed include calcite, aragonite, protodolomite(.), amorphous silica, iron hydroxide, smectite, trona, and halite. Cementation is controlled by the availability of water, with several hydrologic subenvironments producing different cements. Evaporative cementation in dunes adjacent to playas is commonly dominated by trona and halite, but calcite, aragonite, and amorphous silica also bind the sediment. These cements are generally most concentrated in fine laminations where capillary action has pulled water into dunes. Iron hydroxides, calcite, and amorphous silica precipitate at the interface between ground water and streams or lakes, where the pH gradient may exceed 5 pH units (pH 5.7-11.5). Subsequent movement of the ground-water table can result in cross-cutting cement zones. Early cementation in dunes prevents deflation and provides a mechanism for preservation of the reservoir unit. Intense cementation may permanently occlude porosity, or leaching may reestablish well-interconnected porosity. An understanding of the extent and composition of early cement zones can be used to improve hydrodynamic models for production and enhanced recovery.

Krystinik, L.F.; Andrews, S.; Fryberger, S.G.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Enhanced Computational Infrastructure for Data Analysis at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility  

SciTech Connect

Recently a number of enhancements to the computer hardware infrastructure have been implemented at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility. Utilizing these improvements to the hardware infrastructure, software enhancements are focusing on streamlined analysis, automation, and graphical user interface (GUI) systems to enlarge the user base. The adoption of the load balancing software package LSF Suite by Platform Computing has dramatically increased the availability of CPU cycles and the efficiency of their use. Streamlined analysis has been aided by the adoption of the MDSplus system to provide a unified interface to analyzed DIII-D data. The majority of MDSplus data is made available in between pulses giving the researcher critical information before setting up the next pulse. Work on data viewing and analysis tools focuses on efficient GUI design with object-oriented programming (OOP) for maximum code flexibility. Work to enhance the computational infrastructure at DIII-D has included a significant effort to aid the remote collaborator since the DIII-D National Team consists of scientists from 9 national laboratories, 19 foreign laboratories, 16 universities, and 5 industrial partnerships. As a result of this work, DIII-D data is available on a 24 x 7 basis from a set of viewing and analysis tools that can be run either on the collaborators' or DIII-Ds computer systems. Additionally, a Web based data and code documentation system has been created to aid the novice and expert user alike.

Schissel, D.P.; Peng, Q.; Schachter, J.; Terpstra, T.B.; Casper, T.A.; Freeman, J.; Jong, R.; Keith, K.M.; Meyer, W.H.; Parker, C.T.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Technical Challenges of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles and Impacts to the US Power System: Distribution System Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE) to address three basic questions concerning how typical existing electrical distribution systems would be impacted by the addition of PHEVs to residential loads.

Gerkensmeyer, Clint; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; DeSteese, John G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

DOE/EIS-0380: 2008 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory Mitigation Action Plan (December 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Title: Title: 2008 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (DOE/EIS 0380) Mitigation Action Plan U.S. Department of Energy Date: December 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory, an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer, is operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. By acceptance of this article, the publisher recognizes that the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or to allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes. Los Alamos National Laboratory requests that the publisher identify this

258

Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations Into Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations Into Environmental Impact Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations Into Environmental Impact Analysis Under NEPA Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations Into Environmental Impact Analysis Under NEPA This Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) report is intended to provide background on the emerging, complex subject of biodiversity, outline some general concepts that underlie biological diversity analysis and management, describe how the issue is currently addressed in NEPA analyses, and provide options for agencies undertaking NEPA analyses that consider biodiversity. Council on Environmental Quality: Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations Into Environmental Impact Analysis Under the National Environmental Policy Act More Documents & Publications Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental Impact

259

Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations Into Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations Into Environmental Impact Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations Into Environmental Impact Analysis Under NEPA Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations Into Environmental Impact Analysis Under NEPA This Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) report is intended to provide background on the emerging, complex subject of biodiversity, outline some general concepts that underlie biological diversity analysis and management, describe how the issue is currently addressed in NEPA analyses, and provide options for agencies undertaking NEPA analyses that consider biodiversity. Council on Environmental Quality: Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations Into Environmental Impact Analysis Under the National Environmental Policy Act More Documents & Publications Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental Impact

260

Economic impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In federal fiscal year 2000 (FY00), Berkeley Lab had 4,347 full- and part-time employees. In addition, at any given time of the year, there were more than 1,000 Laboratory guests. These guests, who also reside locally, have an important economic impact on the nine-county Bay Area. However, Berkeley Lab's total economic impact transcends the direct effects of payroll and purchasing. The direct dollars paid to the Lab's employees in the form of wages, salaries, and benefits, and payments made to contractors for goods and services, are respent by employees and contractors again and again in the local and greater economy. Further, while Berkeley Lab has a strong reputation for basic scientific research, many of the Lab's scientific discoveries and inventions have had direct application in industry, spawning new businesses and creating new opportunities for existing firms. This analysis updates the Economic Impact Analysis done in 1996, and its purpose is to describe the economic and geographic impact of Laboratory expenditures and to provide a qualitative understanding of how Berkeley Lab impacts and supports the local community. It is intended as a guide for state, local, and national policy makers as well as local community members. Unless otherwise noted, this analysis uses data from FY00, the most recent year for which full data are available.

Technology Transfer Department

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Analysis of Crude Oil Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Analysis of Crude Oil Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge May 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester. Contacts

262

Impact of Wind Energy on Hourly Load Following Requirements: An Hourly and Seasonal Analysis; Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of wind energy on the power system grid can be decomposed into several time scales that include regulation, load following, and unit commitment. Techniques for evaluating the impacts on these time scales are still evolving, and as wind energy becomes a larger part of the electricity supply, valuable experience will be gained that will help refine these methods. Studies that estimated the impact of wind in the load following time scale found differing results and costs, ranging from near zero to approximately $2.50/megawatt-hour (MWh). Part of the reason for these differences is the different interpretation of the impacts that would be allocated to this ancillary service. Because of the low correlation between changes in load and wind, long-term analyses of the load following impact of wind may find low impacts. During the daily load cycle, there is a tremendous variability in load following requirements in systems without wind. When significant levels of wind generation are added to the resource mix, relatively small changes in wind output can complicate the task of balancing the system during periods of large load swings. This paper analyzes the load following impacts of wind by segregating these critical time periods of the day and separating the analysis by season. The analysis compares wind generation at geographically dispersed sites to wind generation based primarily at a single site, and for a large penetration of wind (more than 20% wind capacity to peak load).

Krich, A.; Milligan, M.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D, Part B: Naval spent nuclear fuel management  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the following attachments: transportation of Naval spent nuclear fuel; description of Naval spent nuclear receipt and handling at the Expended Core Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; comparison of storage in new water pools versus dry container storage; description of storage of Naval spent nuclear fuel at servicing locations; description of receipt, handling, and examination of Naval spent nuclear fuel at alternate DOE facilities; analysis of normal operations and accident conditions; and comparison of the Naval spent nuclear fuel storage environmental assessment and this environmental impact statement.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Financial incentives research and lending market impact analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration has been authorized by recent legislation to enter into loan guaranty and interest assistance agreements related to specific energy programs. These loan guaranty programs are designed to encourage the private sector to participate in the development of alternative energy sources and the conservation of energy. Two programs are currently authorized: one dealing with geothermal energy; the other dealing with electric and hybrid vehicles. A third program currently under consideration by the Congress addresses the conversion of organic waste products into alternative fuels. An introductory overview provides a brief summary of: energy legislation, ERDA loan guaranty programs, basis of and purpose for the investigation, and scope. Subsequent sections of this report address related background information; methodology employed; data collection and analysis of the information obtained; and specific recommendations based upon the results of the analysis. Supporting information and reference data are included as appendices. (MCW)

Smith, R.F.; Bryant, P.S.; Cour, E.E.; Kouchoukos, P.C.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Macroeconomic impacts of clean coal technologies and acid rain legislation: A comparative analysis  

SciTech Connect

In 1987, the National Association of Manufacturers published a study documenting the negative macroeconomic impacts that could occur if proposed acid rain legislation were passed (NAM 1987). These negative impacts would result from the substantially higher electricity rates that would be needed to finance conventional pollution-control retrofits. The US Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE) wanted to evaluate the macroeconomic impacts of nonregulatory approaches to reduce the emissions of acid rain precursors. DOE/FE therefore directed Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to determine the potential for clean coal technologies (CCTs) to satisfy future electric load growth and achieve greater long-term reductions in emissions at a lower cost than could be achieved through a legislative mandate. This study documents the macroeconomic impacts of CCT deployment without acid rain legislation and compares these results with the corresponding impacts of using conventional technologies and meeting mandatory emission reductions. The Argonne Utility Simulation (ARGUS) model was used to determine the least-cost solution and incremental levelized system costs* over the period 1995-2030 for three scenarios: (1) a baseline scenario, in which no acid rain controls are mandated and no CCTs are deployed; (2) an acid rain (AR) scenario, in which legislation (S. 1894, 100th Congress) is mandated but no CCTs are deployed; and (3) a CCT scenario, in which maximum CCT deployment (specifically, integrated gasification combined-cycle or IGCC technology in repowering and new or greenfield'' applications) occurs but no acid rain legislation is mandated. The Data Resources Inc. (DRI) annual macroeconomic model (which was extended from 2010 to 2030) was used to compute the macroeconomic impacts of the AR and CCT scenarios. 2 refs., 28 figs.

Edwards, B.K.; South, D.W.; Veselka, T.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.); Gault, N.J. (DRI/McGraw-Hill Energy Service, Lexington, MA (USA))

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

Myers, D. R.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Impact of globalisation and trade liberalisation on the Indian industry : a case analysis of the Indian pharmaceutical industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The study is designed to carry out the impact of trade liberalization and globalisation on the Indian industry with the help of a case analysis… (more)

Vishwajit, Vibha.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

o o n c e p t u a l D r a w i n g of t h e C M R R F a c i l i t y Draft Environmental Impact Statement For the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico DOE/EIS-0350D May 2003 SUMMARY CMR Building TA-6 TA-55 U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Site Office General questions regarding this EIS or for a copy of this EIS, please contact: AVAILABILITY OF THE DRAFT CMRR EIS Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Elizabeth Withers, EIS Document Manager U.S. Department of Energy Office of Los Alamos Site Operations 528 35th Street Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544-2201 Telephone: 1-877-491-4957 National Nuclear Security Administration iii COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: United States Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security

269

Environmental impact analysis of electric and hybrid vehicle batteries. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This environmental impact analysis of electric and hybrid vehicle batteries is intended to identify principal environmental impacts resulting directly or indirectly from the development of electric vehicle batteries. Thus, the result of this study could be used to determine the appropriate following step in the U.S. DOE's EIA process. The environmental impacts considered in this document are the incremental impacts generated during the various phases in the battery life cycle. The processes investigated include mining, milling, smelting, and refining of metallic materials for electrode components; manufacturing processes of inorganic chemicals and other materials for electrolytes and other hardware components; battery assembly processes; operation and maintenance of batteries; and recycling and disposal of used batteries. The severity of the incremental impacts is quantified to the extent consistent with the state-of-knowledge. Many of the industrial processes involve proprietary or patent information; thus, in many cases, the associated environmental impacts could not be determined. In addition, most candidate battery systems are still in the development phase. Thus, the manufacturing and recycling processes for most battery systems either have not been developed by industry, or the information is not available. For these cases, the associated environmental impact evaluations could only be qualitative, and the need for further investigations is indicated. 26 figures, 27 tables. (RWR)

Not Available

1977-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

270

Strategic Sequencing for State Distributed PV Policies: A Quantitative Analysis of Policy Impacts and Interactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

State and local policymakers show increasing interest in spurring the development of customer-sited distributed generation (DG), in particular solar photovoltaic (PV) markets. Prompted by that interest, this analysis examines the use of state policy as a tool to support the development of a robust private investment market. This analysis builds on previous studies that focus on government subsidies to reduce installation costs of individual projects and provides an evaluation of the impacts of policies on stimulating private market development.

Doris, E.; Krasko, V.A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Introducing National Center for Genome Resources (NCGR) Informatics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

John Crow from the National Center for Genome Resources discusses his organization's informatics at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

Crow, John [National Center for Genome Resources

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Highway Electrification And Automation Technologies - Regional Impacts Analysis Project: Phase I: Baseline Scenario Data Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Demand for Electric Cars", Journal of Economics,Impact of Future Use of Electric Cars in the Los Anqeles5-year period to introduce electric cars into the commercial

Scag; Path

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF) is a facility safety reference document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) environmental restoration activities. The BSAF contains information and guidance for safety analysis documentation required by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for environmental restoration (ER) activities, including: Characterization of potentially contaminated sites. Remedial investigations to identify and remedial actions to clean up existing and potential releases from inactive waste sites Decontamination and dismantlement of surplus facilities. The information is INEL-specific and is in the format required by DOE-EM-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports. An author of safety analysis documentation need only write information concerning that activity and refer to BSAF for further information or copy applicable chapters and sections. The information and guidance provided are suitable for: {sm_bullet} Nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480-23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) with hazards that meet the Category 3 threshold (DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) {sm_bullet} Radiological facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94, Hazard Baseline Documentation) Nonnuclear facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94) that are classified as {open_quotes}low{close_quotes} hazard facilities (DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System). Additionally, the BSAF could be used as an information source for Health and Safety Plans and for Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for nuclear facilities with hazards equal to or greater than the Category 2 thresholds, or for nonnuclear facilities with {open_quotes}moderate{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} hazard classifications.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Impact of Eliminating Biofuels Production on US Gasoline Prices: An Equilibrium Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of Eliminating Biofuels Production on US Gasoline Prices: An Equilibrium Analysis Joshua to encourage biofuel production. Recent demands for reduced federal spending have increased scrutiny are employed in the US to encourage biofuel production and consumption. The Energy Independence and Security

275

Analysis of Energy Saving Impacts of New Residential Energy Codes for the Gulf Coast  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the Government Accountability Office (GAO), DOE’s Building Energy Codes Program performed an analysis of the energy savings and cost impacts associated with the use of newer and more efficient residential building energy codes in the states of Louisiana and Mississippi.

Lucas, Robert G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Impact of Operational Practices on Rail Line Capacity: A Simulation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(AASHTO) predicts that freight rail service will increase 84% based on ton-miles by 2035 (1). In addition trains on certain freight rail corridors, as will commuter rail service in some metropolitan areasImpact of Operational Practices on Rail Line Capacity: A Simulation Analysis Mark Dingler1* , Yung

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

277

Negative impact of noise on the principal component analysis of NMR data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Negative impact of noise on the principal component analysis of NMR data Steven Halouska, Robert (PCA) is routinely applied to the study of NMR based metabolomic data. PCA is used to simplify of metabolites to identify trends or character- istics within the NMR data that permits discrimination between

Powers, Robert

278

Safety analysis of IFR fuel processing in the Argonne National Laboratory Fuel Cycle Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) includes on-site processing and recycling of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process is being demonstrated in the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) at ANL`s Idaho site. This paper describes the safety analyses that were performed in support of the FCF program; the resulting safety analysis report was the vehicle used to secure authorization to operate the facility and carry out the program, which is now under way. This work also provided some insights into safety-related issues of a commercial IFR fuel processing facility. These are also discussed.

Charak, I; Pedersen, D.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Forrester, R.J.; Phipps, R.D. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Small Wind: JEDI Model in the Works (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation covers the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's role in economic impact analysis for wind power Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, JEDI results, small wind JEDI specifics, and a request for information to complete the model.

Tegen, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

The German National Analysis Facility as a tool for ATLAS analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2008 the German National Analysis Facility (NAF) at DESY was established. It is attached to and builds on top of the DESY Grid infrastructure. The facility was designed to provide the best possible analysis infrastructure for high energy particle physics of the ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and ILC experiments. The Grid and local infrastructure of the German NAF will be reviewed with a focus on the ATLAS part. Both parts include large scale storage and a batch system. The main emphasis of this presentation is the ATLAS specific customisation and utilisation of the NAF. This refers not only to the NAF components but also to the different components of the ATLAS analysis framework. Experience from operating and supporting ATLAS users on the German NAF will be presented. The ATLAS usage of the different components will be shown including some typical use cases of user analysis. Finally, the question will be addressed if the design of the NAF meets the ATLAS expectations for efficient data analysis in the era of LHC data t...

Mehlhase, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Leffhalm, K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

1 The German National Analysis Facility as a tool for ATLAS analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2008 the German National Analysis Facility (NAF) at DESY was established. It is attached to and builds on top of DESY Grid infrastructure. The facility is designed to provide the best possible analysis infrastructure for high energy particle physics of the ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and ILC experiments. The Grid and local infrastructure of the NAF is reviewed with a focus on the ATLAS part. Both parts include large scale storage and a batch system. Emphasis is put on ATLAS specific customisation and utilisation of the NAF. This refers not only to the NAF components but also to the di erent components of the ATLAS analysis framework. Experience from operating and supporting ATLAS users on the NAF is presented in this paper. The ATLAS usage of the di erent components are shown including some typical use cases of user analysis. Finally, the question is addressed, if the design of the NAF meets the ATLAS expectations for effcient data analysis in the era of LHC data taking.

Mehlhase, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Leffhalm, K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Analysis of Oil and Gas Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4-04 4-04 Analysis of Oil and Gas Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge March 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This Service Report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requestor.

283

Finding of No Significant Impact for the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Stormwater Compliance Alternatives at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Stormwater Compliance Alternatives at the Savannah River Site Agency: U.S. Department of Energy Action: Finding of No Significant Impact Summary: The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1563) to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed and alternative actions to protect the quality of State waters at 38 stormwater outfalls located at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The draft EA was made available to the States of South Carolina and Georgia, and to the public, for a 30-day comment period. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within

284

Using Factor Analysis to Attribute Health Impacts to Particulate Pollution Sources1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factor Analysis to Attribute Health Impacts to Particulate Factor Analysis to Attribute Health Impacts to Particulate Pollution Sources 1 Thomas Grahame U. S. Department of Energy Washington, DC George Hidy Envair/Aerochem Placitas, NM ABSTRACT Laden et al. (2000) recently reported results of applying factor analysis to data taken in six cities from1979 to1988, identifying airborne particle sources potentially affecting daily mortality. These authors sought relationships between source groups and risk measures using source tracer elements, Se (coal combustion), Pb (light duty motor vehicle sources), and Si (crustal--soil dispersion). Combined data analyses of this kind may overlook the complexity of source contributions, which have common tracer elements. In one of the cities, Boston for example, the authors found coal combustion

285

Update of Part 61 Impacts Analysis Methodology. Methodology report. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under contract to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Envirosphere Company has expanded and updated the impacts analysis methodology used during the development of the 10 CFR Part 61 rule to allow improved consideration of the costs and impacts of treatment and disposal of low-level waste that is close to or exceeds Class C concentrations. The modifications described in this report principally include: (1) an update of the low-level radioactive waste source term, (2) consideration of additional alternative disposal technologies, (3) expansion of the methodology used to calculate disposal costs, (4) consideration of an additional exposure pathway involving direct human contact with disposed waste due to a hypothetical drilling scenario, and (5) use of updated health physics analysis procedures (ICRP-30). Volume 1 of this report describes the calculational algorithms of the updated analysis methodology.

Oztunali, O.I.; Roles, G.W.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Destructive analysis capabilities for plutonium and uranium characterization at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Actinide Analytical Chemistry (AAC) group has been in existence since the Manhattan Project. It maintains a complete set of analytical capabilities for performing complete characterization (elemental assay, isotopic, metallic and non metallic trace impurities) of uranium and plutonium samples in different forms. For a majority of the customers there are strong quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) objectives including highest accuracy and precision with well defined uncertainties associated with the analytical results. Los Alamos participates in various international and national programs such as the Plutonium Metal Exchange Program, New Brunswick Laboratory's (NBL' s) Safeguards Measurement Evaluation Program (SME) and several other inter-laboratory round robin exercises to monitor and evaluate the data quality generated by AAC. These programs also provide independent verification of analytical measurement capabilities, and allow any technical problems with analytical measurements to be identified and corrected. This presentation will focus on key analytical capabilities for destructive analysis in AAC and also comparative data between LANL and peer groups for Pu assay and isotopic analysis.

Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kuhn, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Drake, Lawrence R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Decker, Diana L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Walker, Laurie F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Colletti, Lisa M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spencer, Khalil J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peterson, Dominic S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Herrera, Jaclyn A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wong, Amy S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Data Analysis Software Tools for Enhanced Collaboration at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility  

SciTech Connect

Data analysis at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility is simplified by the use of two software packages in analysis codes. The first is GAP1otObj, an IDL-based object-oriented library used in visualization tools for dynamic plotting. GAPlotObj gives users the ability to manipulate graphs directly through mouse and keyboard-driven commands. The second software package is MDSplus, which is used at DIED as a central repository for analyzed data. GAPlotObj and MDSplus reduce the effort required for a collaborator to become familiar with the DIII-D analysis environment by providing uniform interfaces for data display and retrieval. Two visualization tools at DIII-D that benefit from them are ReviewPlus and EFITviewer. ReviewPlus is capable of displaying interactive 2D and 3D graphs of raw, analyzed, and simulation code data. EFITviewer is used to display results from the EFIT analysis code together with kinetic profiles and machine geometry. Both bring new possibilities for data exploration to the user, and are able to plot data from any fusion research site with an MDSplus data server.

Schachter, J.; Peng, Q.; Schissel, D.P.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Macroalgae Analysis A National GIS-based Analysis of Macroalgae Production Potential Summary Report and Project Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall project objective is to conduct a strategic analysis to assess the state of macroalgae as a feedstock for biofuels production. The objective in FY11 is to develop a multi-year systematic national assessment to evaluate the U.S. potential for macroalgae production using a GIS-based assessment tool and biophysical growth model developed as part of these activities. The initial model development for both resource assessment and constraints was completed and applied to the demonstration areas. The model for macroalgal growth was extended to the EEZ off the East and West Coasts of the United States, and a plan to merge the findings for an initial composite assessment was developed. In parallel, an assessment of land-based, port, and offshore infrastructure needs based on published and grey literature was conducted. Major information gaps and challenges encountered during this analysis were identified. Also conducted was an analysis of the type of local, state, and federal requirements that pertain to permitting land-based facilities and nearshore/offshore culture operations

Roesijadi, Guritno; Coleman, Andre M.; Judd, Chaeli; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Thom, Ronald M.; Buenau, Kate E.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Ward, Jeffrey A.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power: A Comparative Analysis of Impacts within the Western Governors' Association States; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper uses NREL's newest Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI II) model to assess economic impacts from alternative power technologies, with a focus on wind energy, for a variety of states.

Tegen, S.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power: A Comparative Analysis of Impacts within the Western Governors' Association States; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper uses NREL's newest Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI II) model to assess economic impacts from alternative power technologies, with a focus on wind energy, for a variety of states.

Tegen, S.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

EIS-0380-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Laboratory: Proposed Transport of Low Level Radioactive Waste by Truck and Rail This analysis is prepared to determine if the Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact...

292

The social impact of the Klein Karoo National Arts Festival : a comparison between white and coloured communities / E. Adendorff.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The primary objective of this study was to determine the social impacts of arts festivals with reference to the KKNK and to make a comparison… (more)

Adendorff, Erika

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Analysis of the environmental impact of China based on STIRPAT model  

SciTech Connect

Assuming that energy consumption is the main source of GHG emissions in China, this paper analyses the effect of population, urbanisation level, GDP per capita, industrialisation level and energy intensity on the country's environmental impact using the STIRPAT model with data for 1978-2006. The analysis shows that population has the largest potential effect on environmental impact, followed by urbanisation level, industrialisation level, GDP per capita and energy intensity. Hence, China's One Child Policy, which restrains rapid population growth, has been an effective way of reducing the country's environmental impact. However, due to the difference in growth rates, GDP per capita had a higher effect on the environmental impact, contributing to 38% of its increase (while population's contribution was at 32%). The rapid decrease in energy intensity was the main factor restraining the increase in China's environmental impact but recently it has also been rising. Against this background, the future of the country looks bleak unless a change in human behaviour towards more ecologically sensitive economic choices occurs.

Lin Shoufu, E-mail: linshf2003@126.co [School of Economics, FuJian Normal University, Fuzhou City, 350007, Fujian Province (China) and School of Management, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei City, 230026, Anhui Province (China) and Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute, Curtin University of Technology, GPO BoxU1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Zhao Dingtao, E-mail: box@ustc.edu.c [School of Management, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei City, 230026, Anhui Province (China); Marinova, Dora, E-mail: D.Marinova@curtin.edu.a [Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute, Curtin University of Technology, GPO BoxU1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Analysis of Emissions Calculators for a National Center of Excellence on Displaced Emissions Reductions (CEDER)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In August 2004, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued guidance on quantifying the air emissions benefits from electric sector energy efficiency and renewable energy. Because there was no clear best strategy, the EPA’s guidance provided a framework and the basic requirements needed to demonstrate air quality improvements or emissions reductions with adequate certainty to be incorporated into a State Implementation Plan (SIP) for achieving or maintaining National ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). The Energy Systems Laboratory, with guidance from both the US EPA and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), developed the first a comprehensive engineering toolkit and database that satisfies the EPA guidance. The value of this unique tool was demonstrated in 2005 when the ESL, at the request of the TCEQ, used it to develop integrated emissions estimates for all state agencies participating in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP). Building on this expertise, the US EPA has established a National Center of Excellence on Displaced Emissions Reductions (CEDER) at the Energy Systems Laboratory to research and gather the state-of-the-art air pollution quantification techniques for Energy Efficiency / Renewable Energy (EE/RE) projects; provide technical support and customized analysis for state and local agencies seeking to estimate the environmental benefits from clean energy policies and programs; and document how a user-friendly tool, based on e2Calc, can be used by clients to fulfill their needs to quantify emissions reductions from energy efficiency and renewable energy measures.

Im, P.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

295

DOE/EIS-0293 Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Conveyance and Transfer of Certain Land Tracts Administered by the U.S. Department of Energy and Located at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos and Santa Fe Counties, New Mexico (Oct. 1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ABOUT THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT ABOUT THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] §4321 et seq.) was enacted to ensure that Federal decisionmakers consider the effects of proposed actions on the human environment and to lay their decisionmaking process open for public scrutiny. NEPA also created the President's Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ). The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) NEPA regulations (10 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 1021) augment the CEQ regulations (40 CFR 1500 through 1508). Under NEPA, an environmental impact statement (EIS) documents a Federal agency's analysis of the environmental consequences that might be caused by major Federal actions, defined as those proposed actions that may result in a significant impact to the environment. An EIS also:

296

Analysis of Energy Saving Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2004 for New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and New York State Department of State (DOS) requested the help of DOE’s Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) in estimating the annual building energy savings and cost impacts of adopting ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 (ASHRAE 2004) requirements. This report summarizes the analysis methodology and results of energy simulation in response to that request.

Gowri, Krishnan; Halverson, Mark A.; Richman, Eric E.

2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

297

Analysis methodology for passive heating systems in the NSDN. [National Solar Data Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Solar Data Network (NSDN) has been continuously monitoring the performance of solar energy systems in buildings throughout the country on a 24-hour basis for the past three years. The data collected from this program is analyzed and performance evaluation reports are published monthly and seasonally for each site. The passive systems in the NSDN are instrumented with an average of 90 sensors to measure weather; heat loss and gain, auxiliary energy and electrical energy consumption; operation of windows, doors, vents, and movable insulation, temperatures and relative humidity of the rooms; and surface and gradient temperatures of all thermal storage masses. The sensors are scanned at 30 second or 5 minute intervals continuously. Performance factors are calculated on the scan, hourly, daily, monthly and annual level. The approach to the performance analysis of passive solar heating systems is presented.

Spears, J.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The outlook for natural gas imports: Supporting analysis for the National Energy Strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Net imports of natural gas increased by about 4.5 percent in 1989 to almost 1.3 trillion cubic feet, the highest level ever recorded. Most of this gas came from Canada, but liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports reached a level unseen since 1983. The increase in pipeline imports from Canada continued a trend begun in 1987 and 1988. Import volumes as a share of consumption have increased somewhat erratically, but over the last 3 years, they are at the highest relative level in history with the exception of 1979. This study documents analysis undertaken in support of the National Energy Strategy Study, and focuses on an evaluation of the: Potential flow of pipeline imports into the United States, given a favorable environment, and potential flow of LNG imports into the United States, recognizing the various factors that influence the level of LNG imports into this country. Analysis of natural gas import potential was developed for two National Energy Strategy scenarios: the Reference case and the Expanded LNG Import Capacity case. Pipeline imports are invariant between the two cases, because the chief determining factor over the extended projection period is the expected volume and attributes of the recoverable resource base for either Canada or Mexico. The flow of LNG imports into the United States varies between the two cases in the period after 2010. Projected LNG imports increase through 2010 with reactivation of existing import facilities and capacity expansion at those sites. Higher rates of flow thereafter are achieved only with additional LNG facilities constructed on sites other than those with currently existing facilities. The rate of new construction differs, reflecting the variation in optimism regarding the likelihood of these facilities being built and differences in the level of gas prices in each case. 5 figs., 15 tabs.

Not Available

1991-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

299

NEW GUN CAPABILITY WITH INTERCHANGABLE BARRELS TO INVESTIGATE LOW VELOCITY IMPACT REGIMES AT THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH EXPLOSIVES APPLICATIONS FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

A new gas gun capability is being activated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories located in the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF). The single stage light gas (dry air, nitrogen, or helium) gun has interchangeable barrels ranging from 25.4 mm to 76.2 mm in diameter with 1.8 meters in length and is being fabricated by Physics Applications, Inc. Because it is being used for safety studies involving explosives, the gun is planned for operation inside a large enclosed firing tank, with typical velocities planned in the range of 10-300 m/s. Three applications planned for this gun include: low velocity impact of detonator or detonator/booster assemblies with various projectile shapes, the Steven Impact test that involves impact initiation of a cased explosive target, and the Taylor impact test using a cylindrical explosive sample impacted onto a rigid anvil for fracture studies of energetic materials. A highlight of the gun features, outline on work in progress for implementing this capability, and discussion of the planned areas of research will be included.

Vandersall, K S; Behn, A; Gresshoff, M; Jr., L F; Chiao, P I

2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

300

Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and freezers including draft environmental assessment, regulatory impact analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended by the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 (P.L. 100-12) and by the National Appliance Energy Conservation Amendments of 1988 (P.L. 100-357), and by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486), provides energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products` covered by the Act, and authorizes the Secretary of Energy to prescribe amended or new energy standards for each type (or class) of covered product. The assessment of the proposed standards for refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and freezers presented in this document is designed to evaluate their economic impacts according to the criteria in the Act. It includes an engineering analysis of the cost and performance of design options to improve the efficiency of the products; forecasts of the number and average efficiency of products sold, the amount of energy the products will consume, and their prices and operating expenses; a determination of change in investment, revenues, and costs to manufacturers of the products; a calculation of the costs and benefits to consumers, electric utilities, and the nation as a whole; and an assessment of the environmental impacts of the proposed standards.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Impacts of Sedimentation from Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds of the Allegheny National Forest of Northwestern Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect

Fritz, Kelley'*, Steven Harris', Harry Edenborn2, and James Sams2. 'Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA 16214, 2National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Impacts a/Sedimentation/rom Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds a/the Allegheny National Forest a/Northwestern Pennsylvania - The Allegheny National Forest (ANF), located in northwestern Pennsy Ivania, is a multiuse forest combining commercial development with recreational and conservation activities. As such, portions of the ANF have been heavily logged and are now the subject of widespread oil and gas development. This rapid increase in oil and gas development has led to concerns about sediment runoff from the dirt and gravel roads associated with development and the potential impact on the aquatic biota of the receiving streams. We examined and compared the benthic macroinvertebrate communities in two adjacent watersheds of similar size and topography in the ANF; the Hedgehog Run watershed has no oil and gas development, while the adjacent Grunder Run watershed has extensive oil and gas development. In Hedgehog and Grunder Run, we collected monthly kicknet samples from riffles and glides at two sites from April to October 2010. At the same intervals, we measured standard water quality parameters, including conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results have indicated much higher turbidity in Grunder Run, but little difference in the diversity and abundance of benthic macro invertebrates inhabiting the two streams.

Fritz, K.; Harris, S.; Edenborn, H.M.; Sams, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Part B  

SciTech Connect

Two types of projects in the spent nuclear fuel and environmental restoration and waste management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are described. These are: foreseeable proposed projects where some funding for preliminary planning and/or conceptual design may already be authorized, but detailed design or planning will not begin until the Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act process for the project have been completed; planned or ongoing projects not yet completed but whose National Environmental Policy Act documentation is already completed or is expected to be completed before the Record of Decision for this Envirorunental Impact Statement (EIS) is issued. The section on project summaries describe the projects (both foreseeable proposed and ongoing).They provide specific information necessary to analyze the environmental impacts of these projects. Chapter 3 describes which alternative(s) each project supports. Summaries are included for (a) spent nuclear fuel projects, (b) environmental remediation projects, (c) the decontamination and decommissioning of surplus INEL facilities, (d) the construction, upgrade, or replacement of existing waste management facilities, (e) infrastructure projects supporting waste management activities, and (f) research and development projects supporting waste management activities.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Long-Duration Drought Variability and Impacts on Ecosystem Services: A Case Study from Glacier National Park, Montana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrumental climate records suggest that summer precipitation and winter snowpack in Glacier National Park (Glacier NP), Montana, vary significantly over decadal to multidecadal time scales. Because instrumental records for the region are ...

Gregory T. Pederson; Stephen T. Gray; Daniel B. Fagre; Lisa J. Graumlich

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

EIS-0380: Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Site-Wide EIS evaluates the continued operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). NNSA identified and assessed three alternatives for continued operation of LANL: (1) No Action, (2) Reduced Operations, and (3) Expanded Operations.

305

User's Guide for the NREL Teetering Rotor Analysis Program (STRAP). [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following report gives the reader an overview of instructions on the proper use of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute, or SERI) teetering Rotor Analysis Program (STRAP version 2.20). STRAP is a derivative of the Force and Loads Analysis program (FLAP). It is intended as a tool for prediction of rotor and blade loads and response for only two-bladed teetering hub wind turbines. The effects of delta-3, undersling, hub mass, and wind turbulence are accounted for. The objectives of the report are to give an overview of the code and also show the methods of data input and correct code execution steps in order to model an example two-bladed teetering hub turbine. A large portion of the discussion (Sections 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0) is devoted to the subject of inputting and running the code for wind turbulence effects. The ability to include turbulent wind effects is perhaps the biggest change in the code since the release of FLAP version 2.01 in 1988. This report is intended to be a user's guide. It does not contain a theoretical discussion on equations of motion, assumptions, underlying theory, etc. It is intended to be used in conjunction with Wright, Buhl, and Thresher (1988).

Wright, A.D.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

New analysis techniques for estimating impacts of federal appliance efficiency standards  

SciTech Connect

Impacts of U.S. appliance and equipment standards have been described previously. Since 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has updated standards for clothes washers, water heaters, and residential central air conditioners and heat pumps. A revised estimate of the aggregate impacts of all the residential appliance standards in the United States shows that existing standards will reduce residential primary energy consumption and associated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions by 89 percent in 2020 compared to the levels expected without any standards. Studies of possible new standards are underway for residential furnaces and boilers, as well as a number of products in the commercial (tertiary) sector, such as distribution transformers and unitary air conditioners. The analysis of standards has evolved in response to critiques and in an attempt to develop more precise estimates of costs and benefits of these regulations. The newer analysis elements include: (1) valuing energy savings by using marginal (rather than average) energy prices specific to an end-use; (2) simulating the impacts of energy efficiency increases over a sample population of consumers to quantify the proportion of households having net benefits or net costs over the life of the appliance; and (3) calculating marginal markups in distribution channels to derive the incremental change in retail prices associated with increased manufacturing costs for improving energy efficiency.

McMahon, James E.

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

307

Greenhouse Gas Initiatives - Analysis of McCain-Lieberman Bill S.280 ‘The ClimateStewardship and Innovation Act of 2007’ Using the National Energy Modeling System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Members of Congress have proposed a number of new aggressive plans for the reduction of greenhouse gases in the United States. Many of these proposals require reductions of 30% below current levels by 2020 and 60-80% reductions from current levels by 2050. While it is clear that achieving these proposed reductions will require major changes in U.S. energy infrastructure and technology implementation; it is only recently that quantitative analyses of the potential implications have become available. One of the critical questions to be addressed is the implications for various energy sources and technologies and the impact on energy prices to end users. This paper reports on the impacts of pending GHG legislation on energy supply, demand, and prices, and the technologies and market mechanisms that are likely to be employed to reduce CO2 emissions. The paper also reports on the results of analysis of GHG bills performed by SAIC using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS is an economy-wide, integrated energy model that analyzes energy supply, conversion, and demand. NEMS is used by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide US energy market forecasts through 2030, and is the principal tool for the analysis of energy and greenhouse gas policies used by the U.S. government.

Ellsworth, C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Finding of No Significant Impact for the Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Consolidation and Expansion of Idaho National Laboratory Reseach and Development at a Science and Technology Campus  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE PROPOSED CONSOLIDATION AND EXPANSION OF IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AT A SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CAMPUS Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Action: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Summary: DOE prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Proposed Consolidation and Expansion of the Idaho National Laboratory Research and Development at a Science and Technology Campus (STC) (DOEIEA-1555). The proposed action consists of consolidating and expanding existing laboratory and business capabilities and operations within a single geographic area, or central campus. The proposed action would accommodate anticipated program growth while allowing for the consolidation of various activities located in the Idaho

309

SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts on Sandia and the Nation Impacts on Sandia and the Nation 2 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES 3 LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation For further information, contact: Wendy R. Cieslak Senior Manager, Science, Technology, and Engineering Strategic Initiatives wrciesl@sandia.gov (505) 844-8633 or Henry R. Westrich LDRD Program Manager hrwestr@sandia.gov 505-844-9092 LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation ABOUT THE COVER: Images from some of the case studies in this brochure: a near-UV light- emitting diode (LED), a cell membrane, a NISAC model, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image of Washington, D.C. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 4 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES 5 LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation Sandia National Laboratories' Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program:

310

Analysis of the Impacts of an Early Start for Compliance with the Kyoto Protocol  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Analysis of the Impacts of an Early Start for Compliance with the Kyoto Protocol July 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester. Preface The analysis in this report was undertaken at the request of the Committee on Science of the U.S.

311

Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed RH-LLW disposal facility. A four-step analysis approach was documented and applied. This assessment compared the predicted groundwater ingestion dose to the more restrictive of either the 25 mrem/yr all pathway dose performance objective, or the maximum contaminant limit performance objective. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives. The analysis was prepared to support the NEPA-EA for the top two ranking of the proposed RH-LLW sites. As such, site-specific conditions were incorporated for each set of results generated. These site-specific conditions were included to account for the transport of radionuclides through the vadose zone and through the aquifer at each site. Site-specific parameters included the thickness of vadose zone sediments and basalts, moisture characteristics of the sediments, and aquifer velocity. Sorption parameters (Kd) were assumed to be very conservative values used in Track II analysis of CERCLA sites at INL. Infiltration was also conservatively assumed to represent higher rates corresponding to disturbed soil conditions. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives.

Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed RH-LLW disposal facility. A four-step analysis approach was documented and applied. This assessment compared the predicted groundwater ingestion dose to the more restrictive of either the 25 mrem/yr all pathway dose performance objective, or the maximum contaminant limit performance objective. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives. The analysis was prepared to support the NEPA-EA for the top two ranking of the proposed RH-LLW sites. As such, site-specific conditions were incorporated for each set of results generated. These site-specific conditions were included to account for the transport of radionuclides through the vadose zone and through the aquifer at each site. Site-specific parameters included the thickness of vadose zone sediments and basalts, moisture characteristics of the sediments, and aquifer velocity. Sorption parameters (Kd) were assumed to be very conservative values used in Track II analysis of CERCLA sites at INL. Infiltration was also conservatively assumed to represent higher rates corresponding to disturbed soil conditions. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives.

Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Quantifying the Local Economic Growth Impact of Hurricane Strikes: An Analysis from Outer Space for the Caribbean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of the impact of hurricanes on economic activity typically are restricted to a very aggregate level of analysis because of the lack of spatially disaggregated data. In this paper nightlight satellite imagery is employed as a measure of ...

Luisito Bertinelli; Eric Strobl

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Quantifying the Local Economic Growth Impact of Hurricane Strikes: An Analysis from Outer Space for the Caribbean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of the impact of hurricanes on economic activity typically are restricted to very aggregate analysis due to lack of spatially disaggregated data. In this paper we employ nightlight satellite imagery as a measure of local economic activity ...

Luisito Bertinelli; Eric Strobl

315

Second National Climate Assessment (2009)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Print E-mail alt What is the Second National Climate Assessment? The Second National Climate Assessment, entitled Global Change Impacts in the United States, was published in...

316

EA-1455: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Enhanced Operations of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory-East, Argonne, Illinois Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE...

317

DOE/SEA-03; Special Environmental Analysis for the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Actions Taken in Response to the Cerro Grande Fire at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (September 2000)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis Analysis Actions taken in Response to the Cerro Grande Fire at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico September 2000 U.S. Department of Energy Los Alamos Area Office Los Alamos, New Mexico for the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration DOE/SEA-03 COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Title: Special Environmental Analysis for the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Actions Taken in Response to the Cerro Grande Fire at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico Contacts: For further information on this Special Environmental Analysis (SEA) or to provide comments contact: Ms. Elizabeth Withers SEA Document Manager Los Alamos Area Office,

318

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) Apparatus for Nuclear Diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The RAGS (Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples) diagnostic apparatus was recently installed at the National Ignition Facility. Following a NIF shot, RAGS is used to pump the gas load from the NIF chamber for purification and isolation of the noble gases. After collection, the activated gaseous species are counted via gamma spectroscopy for measurement of the capsule areal density and fuel-ablator mix. Collection efficiency was determined by injecting a known amount of {sup 135}Xe into the NIF chamber, which was then collected with RAGS. Commissioning was performed with an exploding pusher capsule filled with isotopically enriched {sup 124}Xe and {sup 126}Xe added to the DT gas fill. Activated xenon species were recovered post-shot and counted via gamma spectroscopy. Results from the collection and commissioning tests are presented. The performance of RAGS allows us to establish a noble gas collection method for measurement of noble gas species produced via neutron and charged particle reactions in a NIF capsule.

Shaughnessy, D A; Velsko, C A; Jedlovec, D R; Yeamans, C B; Moody, K J; Tereshatov, E; Stoeffl, W; Riddle, A

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

319

An analysis of radioactive waste minimization efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LANL will be the primary DOE facility for plutonium research and development and plutonium processing. A summary of the currently generated waste types, volumes, generating facilities or programs, and disposal costs are given in this report along with future waste generation projections. Several key existing technologies have been identified that could be introduced to reduce the generated waste at LANL. Four of these are discussed in detail in this report: (1) electrolytic surface decontamination, (2) electrochemical treatment of mixed wastes, (3) Long Range Alpha Detection (LRAD), and (4) Segmented Gate and Containerized Vat Leach System (SGS/CVL). These technologies may be implemented as modifications in upstream processes as well as more efficient volume reduction and segregation. The four technologies are mature enough to be implemented in the next two to three years and can be done so with the support for capital and operational costs. Also discussed in this report is a small sample of some of the recent waste minimization success stories that have been implemented. Several technologies are presented that are either currently being investigated or on hold due to lack of funding at LANL but show potential for making significant gains in waste minimization. This report is intended to provide a review of the waste minimization issues and analysis of the impact of implementing a few of these technologies.

Voit, S.L.; Boerigter, S.T.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

EIS-0466: Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for Ongoing Operations at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Site-Wide EIS evaluates the continued operation of the DOE/NNSA activities at Sandia National Laboratories. The SWEIS will consider a No Action Alternative, which is to continue current operations through implementation of the 1999 Record of Decision and subsequent NEPA decisions, and three action alternatives proposed for consideration.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

..viii ..viii List of Tables..............................................................................................................................................................viii Acronyms, Abbreviations, and Conversion Charts ...................................................................................................... xi S.1 Background ...................................................................................................................................................S-1 S.2 Purpose and Need for Agency Action..........................................................................................................S-4 S.3 Scope of the New Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement................................................................S-5

322

Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment of Three Site Development Projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory South Table Mountain Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT AND FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT AND FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF THREE SITE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS AT THE NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY SOUTH TABLE MOUNTAIN SITE July 2007 U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y G o l d e n F i e l d O f f i c e N a t i o n a l R e n e w a b l e E n e r g y L a b o r a t o r y 1 6 1 7 C o l e B o u l e v a r d G o l d e n , C o l o r a d o 8 0 4 0 1 DOE/EA-1573 Final Environmental Assessment of Three Site Development Projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory South Table Mountain Site i TABLE OF CONTENTS ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ....................................................................................................iv EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ..........................................................................................................................

323

Enhanced Computational Infrastructure for Data Analysis at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DIII-D National Team consists of about 120 operating staff and 100 research scientists drawn from 9 U.S. National Laboratories, 19 foreign laboratories, 16 universities, and 5 industrial partnerships. This multi-institution collaboration carries out the integrated DIII-D program mission which is to establish the scientific basis for the optimization of the tokamak approach to fusion energy production. Presently, about two-thirds of the research physics staff are from the national and international collaborating institutions.

Schissel, D.P.; Peng, Q.; Schachter, J.; Tepstra, T.B.; Casper, T.A.; Freeman, J.; Jong, R.; Keith, K.M.; McHarg, B.B., Jr; Meyer, W.H.; Parker, C.T.; Warner, A.M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Thermodynamic analysis on heavy metals partitioning impacted by moisture during the MSW incineration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Partitioning of HMs affected by moisture was investigated by thermodynamic analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increase in moisture and in temperature was opposite impact on HMs contribution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The extent of temperature decreased by increase in moisture determines the impact. - Abstract: A thermodynamic calculation was carried out to predict the behavior and speciation of heavy metals (HMs), Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cd, during municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration with the different moisture levels. The calculation was based on the minimization of the total Gibbs free energy of the multi-components and multi-phases closed system reaching chemical equilibrium. The calculation also indicated the reaction directions and tendencies of HMs components. The impacts of chlorine additives (No PVC, 1%PVC, and 5%PVC) and moisture on the behavior of HMs were investigated at different temperature levels in the system (750 Degree-Sign C, 950 Degree-Sign C, and 1150 Degree-Sign C). Furthermore, because the incineration temperature falls down with the increase in moisture in waste, the co-influence of moisture and temperature in combusting MSW on the HMs was also studied with the given chlorine (as 1%PVC + 0.5%NaCl). The results showed that in the non-chlorine system, the impact of the moisture on Pb, Zn, and Cu was not significant, and the ratio of compound transformation was less than 10%, except the Cd compounds at 950 Degree-Sign C and 1150 Degree-Sign C. In the system with low chlorine (as 1%PVC) at constant temperature, the chlorides of HMs (Cd, Pb, Zn, and Cu) transferred to oxides, and when the content of chlorine rose up (as 5%PVC), the ratio of the chlorides of HMs (Cd, Pb, Zn, and Cu) transferring to oxides fell down noticeably. When the moisture varied together with the temperature, the Zn and Cu compounds transferred from chlorides to oxides with increase in moisture as well as decrease in temperature. At the temperature of 700-1000 Degree-Sign C, the impact of temperature on Pb and Cd was little and the moisture was the main factor; while at the temperature of 1000-1200 Degree-Sign C, the impact of increase in moisture and decrease in temperature on Pb and Cd was almost equal and reversed.

Zhang Yanguo; Li Qinghai; Jia Jinyan [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Meng Aihong, E-mail: mengah@tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Notice of Availability for the National Ignition Facility Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (11/5/99)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30 30 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 214 / Friday, November 5, 1999 / Notices natural or human environment. Because no significant environmental impacts will result from implementation of the proposed action, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and will not be prepared. The Army will not initiate the proposed action for 15 days following the completion of the EA and FNSI and publication of a public notice in a local newspaper. This EA is available for review at the following repositories: Lassen Community College Library, Highway 139, P.O. Box 3000, Susanville, CA 96130; Lassen County Public Works, 707 Nevada Street, Suite 2, Susanville, CA 96130; and the Washoe County Library, Downtown Branch, 301 South Center Street, Reno NV 89501. Dated: November 1, 1999.

326

NGFAST: a simulation model for rapid assessment of impacts of natural gas pipeline breaks and flow reductions at U.S. state borders and import points  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes NGfast, the new simulation and impact-analysis tool developed by Argonne National Laboratory for rapid, first-stage assessments of impacts of major pipeline breaks. The methodology, calculation logic, and main assumptions are discussed. ...

Edgar C. Portante; Brian A. Craig; Stephen M. Folga

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

DOE/EIS-0236-S1; National Ignition Facility Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the SSM PEIS, October 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 East Avenue S o u t h e r n P a c i f i c R . R . A r r o y o S e c o 580 Vasco Road Patterson Pass Road Greenville Road Arroyo Las Positas S o u t h L i v e r m o r e A v e n u e A r r o y o M o c h o 0 Scale: Miles 1 0.5 Springtown Tesla Road A r r o y o La s P o si ta s Sandia National Laboratories Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 0 1 2 Scale: Kilometers N MLA11861 * * Indicates approximate location of the NIF construction area. FIGURE 3.1 Surface Water Features near Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 3-7 FIGURE 3.3 Eastern Portion of the Livermore Site Showing Groundwater Wells and Approximate Area Containing VOCs over the Maximum Contaminant Levels in 1998 3-11 MLA6906 PCB (ppm) Tritium (pCi/g) Freon 11 (ppb) Carbon tetrachloride (ppb) PCE (ppb) TCE (ppb) 1x10 -1 1x10 0 1x10 1 1x10 2 1x10 3 1x10 4 1x10 5 18 0.53 520 23 1,600 6,100 540 EPA Industrial PRG

328

Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Operation of a Biosafety Level 3 Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (DOE/EIS-0388) (11/29/05)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

90 Federal Register 90 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 228 / Tuesday, November 29, 2005 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Nuclear Security Administration Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Operation of a Biosafety Level 3 Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM AGENCY: Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration. ACTION: Notice of intent. SUMMARY: The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), an agency within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), announces its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to evaluate the operation of a Biosafety Level 3 Facility (BSL-3 Facility) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, New Mexico. This EIS is being prepared and considered in accordance

329

National Woodfuels and Wood Energy Information Analysis Prepared by: Sok Bun Heng  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supplies. - 90 % of wood energy is consumed by households. - Industry is only a very small consumer of wood % Charcoal 1.2 %, other biomass 1.7 % and imported petroleum product. The most recent national energy supply balance indicates traditional fuels contribute 85 % of the national energy supply, of which 80

330

Economic analysis of nuclear power reactor dissemination to less developed nations with implications for nuclear proliferation  

SciTech Connect

An economic model is applied to the transfer of nuclear-power reactors from industrialized nations to the less developed nations. The model includes demand and supply factors and predicts the success of US nonproliferation positions and policies. It is concluded that economic forces dominate the transfer of power reactors to less developed nations. Our study shows that attempts to either restrict or promote the spread of nuclear-power technology by ignoring natural economic incentives would have only limited effect. If US policy is too restrictive, less developed nations will seek other suppliers and thereby lower US Influence substantially. Allowing less developed nations to develop nuclear-power technology as dictated by economic forces will result in a modest rate of transfer that should comply with nuclear-proliferation objectives.

Gustavson, R.L.; Howard, J.S. II

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Landscape futures analysis: Assessing the impacts of environmental targets under alternative spatial policy options and future scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental targets are often used in planning for sustainable agricultural landscapes but their impacts are rarely known. In this paper we introduce landscape futures analysis as a method which combines linear programming optimisation with scenario ... Keywords: Futures analysis, GIS, Integrated assessment, Landscape planning, Optimisation, Regional, Scenarios

Brett A. Bryan; Neville D. Crossman; Darran King; Wayne S. Meyer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hydraulic manipulator design, analysis, and control at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned to hydraulics as a means of actuation. Hydraulics have always been the actuator of choice when designing heavy-life construction and mining equipment such as bulldozers, backhoes, and tunneling devices. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem) sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. To support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The hydraulics laboratory at ORNL has three different manipulators. First is a 6-Degree-of-Freedom (6-DoF), multi-planer, teleoperated, flexible controls test bed used for the development of waste tank clean-up manipulator controls, thermal studies, system characterization, and manipulator tracking. Finally, is a human amplifier test bed used for the development of an entire new class of teleoperated systems. To compliment the hardware in the hydraulics laboratory, ORNL has developed a hydraulics simulation capability including a custom package to model the hydraulic systems and manipulators for performance studies and control development. This paper outlines the history of hydraulic manipulator developments at ORNL, describes the hydraulics laboratory, discusses the use of the equipment within the laboratory, and presents some of the initial results from experiments and modeling associated with these hydraulic manipulators. Included are some of the results from the development of the human amplifier/de-amplifier concepts, the characterization of the thermal sensitivity of hydraulic systems, and end-point tracking accuracy studies. Experimental and analytical results are included.

Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Robotics and Process Systems Div.; Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Basher, A.M.H. [South Carolina State Univ., Orangeburg, SC (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

DOE/EIS-0200-SA-03: Supplement Analysis for the Treatment of Transuranic Waste at the Idaho National Laboratory (DOE/EIS-0200-SA-03) (02/08)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the the Treatment of Transuranic Waste at the Idaho National Laboratory February 2008 U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office Su~plement Analysis for the Treatment of Transuranic Waste at the Idaho National Laboratorv This page intentionally blank S u ~ ~ l e m e n t Analysis for the Treatment o f Transuranic Waste at the Idaho National Laboratow TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................. 1 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR ACTION ............................................................................. 1 PROPOSED ACTION ........................................................................................................ 2 INL TREATMENT AND CHARACTERIZATION .......................................................... 3

334

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels: A Framework for Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roundtable – Energy & Greenhouse Gas Impacts of BiofuelsEnergy Use, and Greenhouse Gases,” Journal of Power SourcesRoundtable – Energy & Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels

Kammen, Daniel M; Farrell, Alexander E; Plevin, Richard J; Jones, Andrew D; Nemet, Gregory F; Delucchi, Mark A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

An Ecological Analysis of the Impact of Weather, Land Cover and Politics on Childhood Pneumonia in Tanzania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pneumonia is the main killer of under-five children worldwide. The developing nations suffer the most. But within such countries, the spatial and temporal distribution of pneumonia cases is not uniform; yet little is known of the spatial and temporal distribution of pneumonia or the factors that might affect spatial and temporal variability. This dissertation explores the causes of spatial and temporal variation in under-five pneumonia morbidity in Tanzania. This study uses an ecological analysis to explore weather, land cover and politics as potential drivers of the observed differences in the distribution of pneumonia. A study is at an ecological level when it examines the population-level health aspects. That is, ecological analyses in health studies evaluate groups of people rather than individuals. The current study found that weather variables such as temperature and atmospheric pressure partially explained pneumonia variance. The strength of weather-pneumonia association varies over space and time in both seasonal elements (temporal factors) and broadly-defined climate zones (spatial factors). For example, the prevalence rate was higher in the regions with bimodal rainfall compared with the regions with unimodal rainfall, with a statistically difference 117.3 (95% confidence interval: 36.6 to 198.0) cases per 100,000. In addition, within the regions (mikoa) with unimodal rainfall regime, however, the rainy season (msimu) had lower rates of pneumonia compared to the dry season (kiangazi). Land use and land cover also were partial drivers of pneumonia. Some land cover types—particularly urban areas and croplands—were associated with high rates of childhood pneumonia. In addition, districts (wilaya) categorized as urban land cover had high rates of pneumonia compared to those categorized as only rural. To determine the associations between politics and pneumonia, this study compared the pneumonia cases in the administrative locations that received less central government funding with those locations that were financially rewarded for voting for the ruling party. The locations with lower funding generally had higher rates of childhood pneumonia. However, it is unclear whether these locations had higher rates of childhood pneumonia because of, or in addition, to their funding gaps. In sum, this dissertation evaluated population-level factors affecting distribution of childhood pneumonia. Like other similarly population-level studies, this dissertation provides an understanding of the coarse-scale dynamics related to childhood pneumonia. By so doing, it contributes to the pneumonia etiology scientific literature. That is, this dissertation contributes to the understanding of within-nation pneumonia distribution in developing nations. It is the first in Tanzania to evaluate the impact of weather, land cover and politics on childhood pneumonia. By evaluating the impact of weather and land cover, this dissertation also provides an example of non socio-economic factors affecting health inequalities. By analyzing a large landmass of two main climatic types, this dissertation also contributes appreciation of non-stationarity of temporal variations of childhood pneumonia, in addition to the commonly-evaluated spatial variations.

Mgendi, Mlenge 1971-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Surface Weather Analysis at the National Meteorological Center: Current Procedures and Future Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The preparation of surface weather analyses at the National Meteorological Center (NMC) is currently under review. The availability of advanced graphics workstations and consideration of revisions to conceptual models of cyclogenesis and frontal ...

Paul J. Kocin; David A. Olson; Arthur C. Wick; Robert D. Harner

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Analysis of Fluctuating Static Pressure Measurements in the National Transonic Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic measurements of fluctuating static pressure levels were taken with flush-mounted, high-frequency response pressure transducers at 11 locations in the circuit of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) across the complete operating range of this ...

Igoe William B.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Analysis of the performance and space-conditioning impacts of dedicated heat-pump water heaters  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of the development and testing of the newly-marketed dedicated heat pump water heater (HPWH), and an analysis is presented of its performance and space conditioning impacts. This system utilizes an air-to-water heat pump, costs about $1000 installed, and obtains a coefficient of performance (COP) of about 2.0 in laboratory and field tests. Since a HPWH is usually installed indoors and extracts heat from the air, its operation is a space conditioning benefit if an air conditioning load exists and a penalty if a space heating load exists. To investigate HPWH performance and a space conditioning impacts, a simulation has been developed to model the thermal performance of a residence with resistance baseboard heat, air conditioning, and either heat pump or resistance water heating. The building characteristics are adapted for three US geographical areas (Madison, Wisconsin; Washington, DC; and Ft. Worth, Texas), and the system is simulated for a year with typical weather data. For each city, HPWH COPs are calculated monthly and yearly. In addition, the water heating and space conditioning energy requirements of HPWH operation are compared with those of resistance water heater operation to determine the relative performance ratio (RPR) of the HPWH. The annual simulated RPRs range from 1.5 to 1.7, which indicate a substantial space heating penalty of HPWH operation in these cities.

Morrison, L.; Swisher, J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

An interregional hedonic analysis of noxious facility impacts on local wages and property values  

SciTech Connect

Claims of property value loss are commonly raised by homeowners when noxious facilities are sited or when new information about the hazards of existing facilities is made public. While the capitalization of externalities into land values is consistent with economic theory, empirical measurement of impacts has not generated consistent results. This is true both for hedonic measurements as well as other types of econometric analyses. While it is well established that job and site risks have similar impacts on regional labor markets, there are no studies relating the presence of a broad range of noxious facilities to local wage premiums. In contrast, this study employs an interregional framework in a hedonic analysis of both wage and property markets and considers eight different facility classifications. This paper discusses the development of the hedonic model employed in this study. It develops more fully the theoretical advantages of the intercity model and alternative methods of deriving implicit prices for environmental amenities and disamenities. The unique data base and the structure of the estimated model are described. It also includes a discussion of the research findings. Major conclusions and suggestions for further research are presented.

Clark, D.E.; Nieves, L.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

An interregional hedonic analysis of noxious facility impacts on local wages and property values  

SciTech Connect

Claims of property value loss are commonly raised by homeowners when noxious facilities are sited or when new information about the hazards of existing facilities is made public. While the capitalization of externalities into land values is consistent with economic theory, empirical measurement of impacts has not generated consistent results. This is true both for hedonic measurements as well as other types of econometric analyses. While it is well established that job and site risks have similar impacts on regional labor markets, there are no studies relating the presence of a broad range of noxious facilities to local wage premiums. In contrast, this study employs an interregional framework in a hedonic analysis of both wage and property markets and considers eight different facility classifications. This paper discusses the development of the hedonic model employed in this study. It develops more fully the theoretical advantages of the intercity model and alternative methods of deriving implicit prices for environmental amenities and disamenities. The unique data base and the structure of the estimated model are described. It also includes a discussion of the research findings. Major conclusions and suggestions for further research are presented.

Clark, D.E.; Nieves, L.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Final Environmental Impact Statement for Treating Transuranic (TRU)/Alpha Low-level Waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The DOE proposes to construct, operate, and decontaminate/decommission a TRU Waste Treatment Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The four waste types that would be treated at the proposed facility would be remote-handled TRU mixed waste sludge, liquid low-level waste associated with the sludge, contact-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids, and remote-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids. The mixed waste sludge and some of the solid waste contain metals regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and may be classified as mixed waste. This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with five alternatives--No Action, the Low-Temperature Drying Alternative (Preferred Alternative), the Vitrification Alternative, the Cementation Alternative, and the Treatment and Waste Storage at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Alternative.

N /A

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

Air quality analysis of the potential impact of offshore oil and gas development in central and northern California. Technical analysis. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the detailed results of a study prepared for the Bureau of Land Management on the anticipated air quality impacts of the oil and gas development activities associated with proposed OCS Sale No. 53 off central and northern California. The report examines the air quality regulations and standards applicable to Sale No. 53 activities, the air emmissions likely to result from the various phase of the proposed development, their potential impacts on onshore receptor areas, and mitigating measures and strategies available to minimize perceived impacts. The air quality modeling analysis includes both inert and reactive pollutant modeling.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

DOE/EA-1440-S-1: Finding of No Significant Impact for Final Supplement to the Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex (5/15/08)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 Cole Boulevard 7 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 -3305 May 14,2008 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT for SUPPLEMENT TO FINAL SITE-WIDE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF THE NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY'S SOUTH TABLE MOUNTAIN COMPLEX AGENCY: Department of Energy, Golden Field Office ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: 111 accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementing regulations, DOE evaluated the potential environniental impacts that would result from three actions at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) South Table Mountain (STM) site: Proposed Construction and Operation o f Research Suppol-t Facilities (RSF), Infrastructure Improvements (Phase I), Upgrades to tlie Thermochemical User Facility (TCUF) and addition of the

344

DOE/EA-1310: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Couples Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE DECONTAMINATION AND FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE DECONTAMINATION AND DISMANTLEMENT OF THE ADVANCED REACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FACILITY AND COUPLED FAST REACTIVITY MEASUREMENTS FACILITY AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY Agency: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Action: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Summary: The DOE prepared a Draft Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed "Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurement Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory" (DOE/EA-1310). The EA was prepared in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the

345

An Impact Analysis of Emergency Event on Stock Market Based on Web Search Data: A Case from 723 Yongwen Railway Accident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The occurrence of major emergencies would have a certain impact on the production of related enterprises, industry outlook, even on national macroeconomic situation. The impact is presented as price fluctuation of event-related enterprises' stock. Fortunately, ... Keywords: web search data, major emergency, EMU (Electric Multiple Units) accident, railway accident, stock market

Yang Xin; Lv Benfu; Sun Yi; Peng Geng

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Guenter Conzelmann | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guenter Conzelmann Guenter Conzelmann Guenter Conzelmann Director - Center for Energy, Environmental, and Economic Systems Analysis Guenter Conzelmann is the Director of the Center for Energy, Environmental, and Economic Systems Analysis in the Decision & Information Sciences Division at Argonne National Laboratory. His research focuses on the development and application of modeling and simulation tools to study strategic energy and power sector issues, including energy efficiency of buildings, renewable energy integration, advanced conventional energy, smart grid implementation, and environmental impacts of energy production. Mr. Conzelmann is also leading Argonne's Wind Power Technologies and Analysis Program and is actively engaged in Argonne's Smart Grid activities. He is the author/co-author of numerous publications,

347

Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume 3, Appendix A: Public response to revised NOI, Appendix B: Environmental restoration, Appendix C, Environmental impact analysis methods, Appendix D, Risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume three contains appendices for the following: Public comments do DOE`s proposed revisions to the scope of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement; Environmental restoration sensitivity analysis; Environmental impacts analysis methods; and Waste management facility human health risk estimates.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Analysis of drought impacts on electricity production in the Western and Texas interconnections of the United States.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity generation relies heavily on water resources and their availability. To examine the interdependence of energy and water in the electricity context, the impacts of a severe drought to assess the risk posed by drought to electricity generation within the western and Texas interconnections has been examined. The historical drought patterns in the western United States were analyzed, and the risk posed by drought to electricity generation within the region was evaluated. The results of this effort will be used to develop scenarios for medium- and long-term transmission modeling and planning efforts by the Western Electricity Coordination Council (WECC) and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT). The study was performed in response to a request developed by the Western Governors Association in conjunction with the transmission modeling teams at the participating interconnections. It is part of a U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored, national laboratory-led research effort to develop tools related to the interdependency of energy and water as part of a larger interconnection-wide transmission planning project funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. This study accomplished three main objectives. It provided a thorough literature review of recent studies of drought and the potential implications for electricity generation. It analyzed historical drought patterns in the western United States and used the results to develop three design drought scenarios. Finally, it quantified the risk to electricity generation for each of eight basins for each of the three drought scenarios and considered the implications for transmission planning. Literature on drought impacts on electricity generation describes a number of examples where hydroelectric generation capacity has been limited because of drought but only a few examples of impact on thermoelectric generation. In all documented cases, shortfalls of generation were met by purchasing power from the market, albeit at higher prices. However, sufficient excess generation and transmission must be available for this strategy to work. Although power purchase was the most commonly discussed drought mitigation strategy, a total of 12 response strategies were identified in the literature, falling into four main categories: electricity supply, electricity demand response, alternative water supplies, and water demand response. Three hydrological drought scenarios were developed based on a literature review and historical data analysis. The literature review helped to identify key drought parameters and data on drought frequency and severity. Historical hydrological drought data were analyzed for the western United States to identify potential drought correlations and estimate drought parameters. The first scenario was a West-wide drought occurring in 1977; it represented a severe drought in five of the eight basins in the study area. A second drought scenario was artificially defined by selecting the conditions from the 10th-percentile drought year for each individual basin; this drought was defined in this way to allow more consistent analysis of risk to electricity generation in each basin. The final scenario was based upon the current low-flow hydro modeling scenario defined by WECC, which uses conditions from the year 2001. These scenarios were then used to quantify the risk to electricity generation in each basin. The risk calculations represent a first-order estimate of the maximum amount of electricity generation that might be lost from both hydroelectric and thermoelectric sources under a worst-case scenario. Even with the conservative methodology used, the majority of basins showed a limited amount of risk under most scenarios. The level of risk in these basins is likely to be amenable to mitigation by known strategies, combined with existing reserve generation and transmission capacity. However, the risks to the Pacific Northwest and Texas Basins require further study. The Pacific Northwest is vulnerable because of its heavy reliance on hydroelectri

Harto, C. B.; Yan, Y. E.; Demissie, Y. K.; Elcock, D.; Tidwell, V. C.; Hallett, K.; Macknick, J.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Tesfa, T. K. (Environmental Science Division); (Sandia National Laboratory); (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

349

Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. The two map products described in this report are (1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and (2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

Tagestad, Jerry D.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge. The two map products described in this report are 1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and 2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

Tagestad, Jerry D.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and PostgreSQL database hosting. The second resource was the DOE-JGCRI 'Evergreen' cluster, capable of executing millions of simulations in relatively short periods. ARRA funding also supported a PhD student from UMD who worked on creating the geodatabases and executing some of the simulations in this study. Using a physically based classification of marginal lands, we simulated production of cellulosic feedstocks from perennial mixtures grown on these lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands in the western states of the US Midwest appear to have significant potential to supply feedstocks to a cellulosic biofuel industry. Similar results were obtained with simulations of N-fertilized perennial mixtures. A detailed spatial analysis allowed for the identification of possible locations for the establishment of 34 cellulosic ethanol biorefineries with an annual production capacity of 5.6 billion gallons. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided simulation results on the potential of perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. The results of this study will be submitted to the USDOE Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework as a way to contribute to the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and PostgreSQL database hosting. The second resource was the DOE-JGCRI 'Evergreen' cluster, capable of executing millions of simulations in relatively short periods. ARRA funding also supported a PhD student from UMD who worked on creating the geodatabases and executing some of the simulations in this study. Using a physically based classification of marginal lands, we simulated production of cellulosic feedstocks from perennial mixtures grown on these lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands in the western states of the US Midwest appear to have significant potential to supply feedstocks to a cellulosic biofuel industry. Similar results were obtained with simulations of N-fertilized perennial mixtures. A detailed spatial analysis allowed for the identification of possible locations for the establishment of 34 cellulosic ethanol biorefineries with an annual production capacity of 5.6 billion gallons. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided simulation results on the potential of perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. The results of this study will be submitted to the USDOE Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework as a way to contribute to the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act This handbook presents the results of research and consultations by the Council on Environmental Quality concerning the consideration of cumulative effects in analyses prepared under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). It introduces the NEPA practitioner and other interested parties to the complex issue of cumulative effects, outlines general principles, presents useful steps, and provides information on methods of cumulative effects analysis and data sources. Considering Cumulative Effects Under the National Environmental Policy Act More Documents & Publications EIS-0333: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

354

National Laboratories Supporting Building America | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratories Laboratories Supporting Building America National Laboratories Supporting Building America The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) national laboratories work very closely with the Building America research teams to achieve program goals. The laboratories offer extensive scientific and technical R&D expertise for building technologies and improved building practices. Following is a brief description of the laboratories involved with Building America. Logo for the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD) performs analysis, research, and development leading to improved energy technologies and reduction of adverse energy-related environmental impacts. EETD conducts research in advanced energy

355

Poverty and Social Impact Analysis—Linking Macroeconomic Policies to Poverty Outcomes: Summary of Early Experiences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The views expressed in this Working Paper are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of the IMF or IMF policy. Working Papers describe research in progress by the author(s) and are published to elicit comments and to further debate. The objective of this paper is to present some early experiences of poverty and social impact analysis (PSIA) from the PRGF-supported programs in the African Department. The paper illustrates that many staff country reports have taken a first step toward PSIA by making more explicit the links between poverty and policies. Various examples highlight that even though relationships can be complex and analysis, as a result, may not be definitive, it is possible to assess some of the potential poverty effects even in countries with limited data, and therefore contribute to a more informed policy debate and design. The paper concludes that PSIA can help design policies that are more propoor, better define compensatory and complementary measures where appropriate, and support country ownership of reforms by promoting a public debate on trade-offs between policy choices. In light of this, the paper suggests that PRGF policy advice would benefit from more systematic PSIA and that staff country reports could report more on the potential policy trade-offs and poverty

Prepared Caroline; M. Robb

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs, Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D: Part A, Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Management  

SciTech Connect

Volume 1 to the Department of Energy`s Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement evaluates a range of alternatives for managing naval spent nuclear fuel expected to be removed from US Navy nuclear-powered vessels and prototype reactors through the year 2035. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) considers a range of alternatives for examining and storing naval spent nuclear fuel, including alternatives that terminate examination and involve storage close to the refueling or defueling site. The EIS covers the potential environmental impacts of each alternative, as well as cost impacts and impacts to the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program mission. This Appendix covers aspects of the alternatives that involve managing naval spent nuclear fuel at four naval shipyards and the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Kesselring Site in West Milton, New York. This Appendix also covers the impacts of alternatives that involve examining naval spent nuclear fuel at the Expended Core Facility in Idaho and the potential impacts of constructing and operating an inspection facility at any of the Department of Energy (DOE) facilities considered in the EIS. This Appendix also considers the impacts of the alternative involving limited spent nuclear fuel examinations at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. This Appendix does not address the impacts associated with storing naval spent nuclear fuel after it has been inspected and transferred to DOE facilities. These impacts are addressed in separate appendices for each DOE site.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Brookhaven National Laboratory/ LIGHT SOURCES DIRECTORATE Subject: Building 729 Fire Hazard Assessment/ Fire Hazard Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alarm Code, NFPA 72, 2002 Life Safety Code, NFPA 101, 2006 Emergency and Standby Power Systems, NFPA 110 Code, NFPA 70, 2008. Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, NFPA 70E, 2004 National Fire in accordance with NFPA 780 and UL 96A. 10.4.6 Cathodic protection: Cathodic protection will not be provided. 10

Ohta, Shigemi

358

Results for the Independent Sampling and Analysis of Used Oil Drums at the Impact Services Facility in Oak Ridge, TN  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), via the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, perform independent sampling and analysis of used oils contained within eight 55 gallon drums stored at the former IMPACT Services facility, located at the East Tennessee Technology Park in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These drums were originally delivered by LATA Sharp Remediation Services (LSRS) to IMPACT Services on January 11, 2011 as part of the Bldg. K-33 demolition project, and the drums plus contents should have been processed as non-hazardous non-radiological waste by IMPACT Services. LSRS received a certificate of destruction on August 29, 2012 (LSRS 2012a). However, IMPACT Services declared bankruptcy and abandoned the site later in 2012, and eight of the original eleven K-33 drums are currently stored at the facility. The content of these drums is the subject of this investigation. The original drum contents were sampled by LSRS in 2010 and analyzed for gross alpha, gross beta, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), using both compositing and grab sampling techniques. The objective of this 2013 sample and analysis effort was to duplicate, to the extent possible, the 2010 sampling and analysis event to support final disposition decisions. Part of that decision process includes either verifying or refuting the assertion that oils that are currently stored in drums at the IMPACT Services facility originated from Bldg. K-33 equipment.

none,

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

359

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Impact of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles on the Electric Grid Project Summary Full Title: Impact of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles on the Electric Grid Project ID: 228 Principal Investigator:...

360

Microsoft Word - supplement Analysis SWEIS82302.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

38SA2 38SA2 Supplement Analysis Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory Modification of Management Methods for Transuranic Waste Characterization at Los Alamos National Laboratory August 13, 2002 Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Site Office Supplement Analysis for the SWEIS Page 1 August 13, 2002 Introduction This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) adequately addresses the environmental effects of a waste management proposal for installing and operating modular units for the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

DOE Issues Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Issues Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the DOE Issues Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada National Security Site DOE Issues Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada National Security Site February 22, 2013 - 2:38pm Addthis DOE Issues Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Nevada National Security Site The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has issued the Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and Off-Site Locations in Nevada. This document presents an analysis of the potential environmental impacts of continued management and operation of the NNSS (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site), the Tonopah Test Range, and two locations in Las

362

Solar PV Manufacturing Cost Analysis: U.S. Competitiveness in a Global Industry (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar PV Manufacturing Cost Analysis: Solar PV Manufacturing Cost Analysis: U.S. Competitiveness in a Global Industry Stanford University: Precourt Institute for Energy Alan Goodrich † , Ted James † , and Michael Woodhouse October 10, 2011 † Corresponding authors: alan.goodrich@nrel.gov, ted.james@nrel.gov NREL/PR-6A20-53938 2 Analysis Disclaimer DISCLAIMER AGREEMENT These manufacturing cost model results ("Data") are provided by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy LLC ("Alliance") for the U.S. Department of Energy (the "DOE"). It is recognized that disclosure of these Data is provided under the following conditions and warnings: (1) these Data have been prepared for reference purposes only; (2) these Data consist of forecasts, estimates or assumptions made on a best-

363

To: NIST Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office I ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... contribute to national goals of energy independence, jobs creation in rural ... impacts on national goals of job creation, economic growth ...

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

364

Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (DOE/EIS-0350)(5/15/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

96 96 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 94 / Thursday, May 15, 2003 / Notices [FR Doc. 03-12161 Filed 5-14-03; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6450-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Nuclear Security Administration Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration. ACTION: Notice of availability and public hearings. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), and the DOE Regulations Implementing NEPA (10 CFR part 1021), the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), an agency

365

Preliminary Feasibility, Design, and Hazard Analysis of a Boiling Water Test Loop Within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A Boiling Water Test Loop (BWTL) is being designed for one of the irradiation test positions within the. The objective of the new loop will be to simulate boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions to support clad corrosion and related reactor material testing. Further it will accommodate power ramping tests of candidate high burn-up fuels and fuel pins/rods for the commercial BWR utilities. The BWTL will be much like the pressurized water loops already in service in 5 of the 9 “flux traps” (region of enhanced neutron flux) in the ATR. The loop coolant will be isolated from the primary coolant system so that the loop’s temperature, pressure, flow rate, and water chemistry can be independently controlled. This paper presents the proposed general design of the in-core and auxiliary BWTL systems; the preliminary results of the neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses; and the preliminary hazard analysis for safe normal and transient BWTL and ATR operation.

Douglas M. Gerstner

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Interim Report on the Analysis of Argonne National Laboratory LOCA Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments being conducted at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) will provide information on how light water reactor (LWR) fuel exposed to high burnups will respond to design-basis hypothetical accidents such as the loss of coolant accident (LOCA). EPRI is participating in this program by providing fuel specimens for the tests, analytical support for the design of test configurations, and an independent evaluation of test results in order to determine whether current LOCA criteria remain applicable a...

2003-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

367

The comparative impact of the market penetration of energy-efficient measures: A sensitivity analysis of its impact on minority households  

SciTech Connect

A sensitivity study was made of the potential market penetration of residential energy efficiency as energy service ratio (ESR) improvements occurred in minority households, by age of house. The study followed a Minority Energy Assessment Model analysis of the National Energy Strategy projections of household energy consumption and prices, with majority, black, and Hispanic subgroup divisions. Electricity and total energy consumption and expenditure patterns were evaluated when the households` ESR improvement followed a logistic negative growth (i.e., market penetration) path. Earlier occurrence of ESR improvements meant greater discounted savings over the 22-year period.

Bozinovich, L.V.; Poyer, D.A.; Anderson, J.L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

National Air & Space Intelligence Center Holds Program About Empowering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Air & Space Intelligence Center Holds Program About National Air & Space Intelligence Center Holds Program About Empowering Women in the Workplace National Air & Space Intelligence Center Holds Program About Empowering Women in the Workplace September 30, 2013 - 4:52pm Addthis Dot Harris, Director of the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, speaks with Aurea Rivera, President and CEO of Imagineering Results Analysis Corp., Kathleen Tucker, Director of the Information Exploitation Squadron, Global Exploitation Intelligence Group, NAISC, and Ann Carbonell, Chief of the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency Support Team in September 2013. Photo by National Air and Space Intelligence Center. Dot Harris, Director of the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, speaks with Aurea Rivera, President and CEO of Imagineering Results Analysis

369

Modelling of environmental impacts of solid waste landfilling within the life-cycle analysis program EASEWASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new computer-based life-cycle assessment model (EASEWASTE) has been developed to evaluate resource and environmental consequences of solid waste management systems. This paper describes the landfilling sub-model used in the life-cycle assessment program EASEWASTE, and examines some of the implications of this sub-model. All quantities and concentrations of leachate and landfill gas can be modified by the user in order to bring them in agreement with the actual landfill that is assessed by the model. All emissions, except the generation of landfill gas, are process specific. The landfill gas generation is calculated on the basis of organic matter in the landfilled waste. A landfill assessment example is provided. For this example, the normalised environmental effects of landfill gas on global warming and photochemical smog are much greater than the environmental effects for landfill leachate or for landfill construction. A sensitivity analysis for this example indicates that the overall environmental impact is sensitive to the gas collection efficiency and the use of the gas, but not to the amount of leachate generated, or the amount of soil or liner material used in construction. The landfill model can be used for evaluating different technologies with different liners, gas and leachate collection efficiencies, and to compare the environmental consequences of landfilling with alternative waste treatment options such as incineration or anaerobic digestion.

Kirkeby, Janus T.; Birgisdottir, Harpa [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Bhander, Gurbakash Singh; Hauschild, Michael [Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management, Technical University of Denmark, Building 424, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)], E-mail: thc@er.dtu.dk

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

DOE/EA-1651: FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT Uranium-233 Material Downblending and Disposition Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (01/13/10)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

URANIUM-233 MATERIAL DOWNBLENDING AND DISPOSITION PROJECT URANIUM-233 MATERIAL DOWNBLENDING AND DISPOSITION PROJECT AT THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: DOE has completed the Final Environmental Assessment for U-233 Material Downblending and Disposition Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory [DOE/EA-1651]. This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the impacts of planned activities to modify selected Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) facilities; process the ORNL inventory of uranium-233 (U-233); and transport the processed material to a long-term disposal facility. Small quantities of similar material currently stored at other DOE sites may also be included in this initiative. The

371

DOE/EA-1471: Environmental Assessment for the Transportation of Highly Enriched Uranium from the Russian Federation to the Y-12 National Security Complex and Finding of No Significant Impact (January 2004)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA for the Transportation of Highly Enriched Uranium from the Russian Federation to the Y-12 National Security Complex EA for the Transportation of Highly Enriched Uranium from the Russian Federation to the Y-12 National Security Complex i FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE TRANSPORTATION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM FROM THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION TO THE Y-12 NATIONAL SECURITY COMPLEX ISSUED BY: United States Department of Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to transport highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Russia to a secure storage facility in Oak Ridge, TN. This proposed action would allow the United States and Russia to accelerate the disposition of excess nuclear weapons materials in the interest of promoting nuclear disarmament, strengthening nonproliferation, and combating terrorism. The HEU

372

DOE/EA-1488: Finding of No Significant Impact U-233 Disposition, Medical Isotope Production, and Building 3019 Complex Shutdown at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (12/10/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT U-233 DISPOSITION, MEDICAL ISOTOPE PRODUCTION, AND BUILDING 3019 COMPLEX SHUTDOWN AT THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE AGENCY: U. S. Department of Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact. SUMMARY: The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an Environmental Assessment (EA) [DOE/EA-1488] that evaluates the processing of uranium-233 ( 233 U) stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and other small quantities of similar material currently stored at other DOE sites in order to render it suitable for safe, long-term, economical storage. The 233 U is stored within Bldg. 3019A, which is part of the Bldg. 3019 Complex. Additionally, the proposed action would increase the availability of medical

373

DOE/EIS-0305-D; Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Treating Transuranic/Alpha Low-Level Waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee (February 2000)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

05-D 05-D DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT (DEIS) FOR TREATING TRANSURANIC (TRU)/ALPHA LOW-LEVEL WASTE AT THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE February 2000 TRU Waste Treatment Project, DRAFT Environmental Impact Statement COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Treating Transuranic (TRU)/Alpha Low-Level Waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee CONTACT: For further information on this document, write or call: Dr. Clayton Gist, Waste Management Integration Team Leader U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations 55 Jefferson Avenue P. O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Telephone: (865) 241-3498 * Facsimile: (865) 576-5333 * E-Mail: gistcs@oro.doe.gov

374

Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in Summit County, Utah  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in Summit County, Utah David J. Ratliff, Captain United States Air Force Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Center for the Market Diffusion of Renewable Energy and Clean Technology Jon M. Huntsman School of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 DOE/GO-102009-2918 October 2009 The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the United States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. The authors thank Marshall Goldberg and Elise Brown for assistance with data collection and analysis and Sandra Reategui and Sara Baldwin for the helpful comments on an earlier draft of

375

Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in San Juan County, Utah  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in San Juan County, Utah David J. Ratliff, Captain United States Air Force Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Center for the Market Diffusion of Renewable Energy and Clean Technology Jon M. Huntsman School of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 DOE/GO-102010-3005 March 2010 The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the United States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. The authors thank Marshall Goldberg and Elise Brown for assistance with data collection and analysis and Sandra Reategui, Suzanne Tegen, and Sara Baldwin for the helpful comments on

376

Miscellaneous multimedia - Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multimedia Multimedia Nuclear Systems Analysis Engineering Analysis Nonproliferation and National Security Detection & Diagnostic Systems Engineering Development & Applications...

377

The impact of two Department of Energy orders on the design and cost of select plutonium facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a research and development facility in northern New Mexico, owned by the federal government and operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the University of California (UC). LANL conducts research and experiments in many arenas including plutonium. Its plutonium facilities are required to meet the facility design and safety criteria of applicable DOE orders as specified in the UC contract. Although DOE 420.1, Facility Safety, superseded DOE 6430.1A, General Design Criteria, the UC contract requires LANL to adhere to DOE 6430.1A, Division 13 in its special nuclear facilities. A comparison of costs and savings relative to installation of double-wall piping at two LANL plutonium facilities is demonstrated. DOE 6430.1A is prescriptive in its design criteria whereas DOE 420.1 is a performance-based directive. The differences in these orders impact time and design costs in nuclear construction projects. LANL`s approach to integrated quality and conduct of operations for design, needs to be re-evaluated. In conclusion, there is a need for highly-technical, knowledgeable people and an integrated, quality/conduct of operations-based approach to assure that nuclear facilities are designed and constructed in a safe and cost-effective manner.

Rey, V.C.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report provides detailed analyses of the following policies to determine the impact they may have on ratepayers, businesses, and the state in terms of energy saved, clean energy generated, and the financial costs and benefits.

379

Federal Register Notice: National Nuclear Security Administration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Register Notice: National Nuclear Security Administration Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNLNM) Federal Register Notice:...

380

State and National Energy and Environmental Risk Analysis Systems for underground injection control. Summary annual report, April 1992--April 1993  

SciTech Connect

ICF Resources` project, entitled {open_quotes}State and National Energy and Environmental Risk Analysis Systems for Underground Injection Control{close_quotes} includes two primary tasks (development of state and national systems respectively) and a technology transfer element. The state system was designed to assist states with data management related to underground injection control (UIC). However, during the current period, external changes (primarily pending regulatory changes at the federal level) have made the risk assessment protocol aspect of the state system of increased importance relative to data management. This protocol would assess the relative risk of groundwater contamination due to UIC activities in various areas of the state. The risk assessment system could be used to assist states in allocating scarce resources and potentially could form the analytical basis of a state variance program to respond to pending federal regulatory changes. Consequently, a substantial portion of the effort to date has been focused on this aspect of the project, The national energy and environmental risk analysis system (EERAS) is designed to enhance DOE`s analytical capabilities. This concept will be demonstrated using UIC data. The initial system design for EERAS has been completed but may be revised based on input from DOE and on the pending UIC regulatory changes. Data have been collected and organized and can be input once the file structure is finalized. The further development options for EERAS defined as part of this project will allow for the full development of the system beyond the current prototype phase which will enhance DOE`s analytical capabilities for responding to regulatory initiatives and for evaluating the benefits of risk-based regulatory approaches.

Haas, M.R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DOE/EIS-0222-SA-O1 Supplement Analysis Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22-SA-O1 22-SA-O1 Supplement Analysis Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Richland, Washington 99352 June 2008 DOE/EIS-0222-SA-0 1 SUMMARY In September 1999 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (HCP) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0222-F). The HCP EIS analyzed the impacts of alternatives for implementing a land-use plan for the DOE's Hanford Site for at least the next 50-year planning period and lasting for as long as DOE retains legal control of some portion of the real estate. In November 1999 DOE issued its Record of Decision (ROD), establishing the Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (CLUP), which consisted of four key elements:

382

Assessment of impact of degree of automation on human roles: the experts' analysis using gaming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of the two assessments performed to evaluate the impact of increasing levels of automation (LoA) on Human Factors aspects and the impact on their responsibilities and interactions. This activity has been developed within ... Keywords: ATM, assessment, automation, gaming, human factors

R. Casar, A. Arranz, B. Escribano, A. Grosskreutz, R. Garcia, R. Suikat, M. Jipp, G. D. R. Zon, M. Joosse

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Analysis of the impact of bus implemented EDCs on on-chip SSN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we analyze the impact of error detecting codes, implemented on an on-chip bus, on the on-chip simultaneous switching noise (SSN). First, we analyze in detail how SSN is impacted by different bus transitions, pointing out its dependency ...

Daniele Rossi; Carlo Steiner; Cecilia Metra

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

NYCCS | Economic Impact  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

biotechnology, national security and finance, is accomplished through high performance computing. Some examples of impactful areas are listed below: Modeling, simulation and...

385

Radionuclide contaminant analysis of small mammals at Area G, TA-54, Los Alamos National Laboratory, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At Los Alamos National Laboratory, small mammals were sampled at two waste burial sites (Site 1-recently disturbed and Site 2-partially disturbed) at Area G, Technical Area 54 and a control site on Frijoles Mesa (Site 4) in 1995. Our objectives were (1) to identify radionuclides that are present within surface and subsurface soils at waste burial sites, (2) to compare the amount of radionuclide uptake by small mammals at waste burial sites to a control site, and (3) to identify if the primary mode of contamination to small mammals is by surface contact or ingestion/inhalation. Three composite samples of at least rive animals per sample were collected at each site. Pelts and carcasses of each animal were separated and analyzed independently. Samples were analyzed for {sup 241}Am, {sup 90}Sr , {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, total U, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 3}H. Significantly higher (parametric West at p=0.05) levels of total U, {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu were detected in pelts than in carcasses of small mammals at TA-54. Concentrations of other measured radionuclides in carcasses were nearly equal to or exceeded the mean concentrations in the pelts. Our results show higher concentrations in pelts compared to carcasses, which is similar to what has been found at waste burial/contaminated sites outside of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Site 1 had a significantly higher (alpha=0.05, P=0.0125) mean tritium concentration in carcasses than Site 2 or Site 4. In addition Site 1 also had a significantly higher (alpha=0.05, p=0.0024) mean tritium concentration in pelts than Site 2 or Site 4. Site 2 had a significantly higher (alpha=0.05, P=0.0499) mean {sup 239}Pu concentration in carcasses than either Site 1 or Site 4.

Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.; Fresquez, P.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Evaluating energy and non-energy impacts of energy conservation programs: A supply curve framework of analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, the evaluation of energy conservation programs has focused primarily on energy savings and costs. The recent, increased interest in global environmental problems (e.g., acid rain, ozone depletion, and the greenhouse effect), has made decision makers, as well as program evaluators, sensitive to the environmental impacts of all programs, including energy conservation programs. Economic impacts of programs remain important policy concerns. Many state and local jurisdictions are concerned with the net effects of energy policies on economic growth, jobs, and tax revenues, as well as the impacts of growth and development on local energy issues (e.g., construction of new power plants). Consequently, policy makers need a methodology to compare easily the energy and non-energy impacts of a specific program in a consistent way, for both retrospective analysis and for prospective planning. We present the general concepts of a proposed new approach to multi-attribute analysis, as an extension of the concept of ''supply curves of conserved energy.'' In their simplest form, energy conservation supply curves rank and display the savings from conservation measures in order of their cost-effectiveness. This simple concept is extended to reflect multiple decision criteria and some important linkages between energy and non-energy policy decisions (e.g., a ''supply curve of reduced carbon emissions, ''or a ''supply curve of net local job-creation''). The framework is flexible enough, so that policy makers can weigh and compare each of the impacts to reflect their concerns, and see the results in terms of program rankings. The advantages of this analysis framework are that it is simple to use, flexible, and replicable. 15 refs., 6 figs.

Vine, E.; Harris, J.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Compiler Analysis for Cache Coherence: Interprocedural Array Data-Flow Analysis and Its Impact on Cache Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract¿In this paper, we present compiler algorithms for detecting references to stale data in shared-memory multiprocessors. The algorithm consists of two key analysis techniques, stale reference detection and locality preserving analysis. While the ... Keywords: Compiler, interprocedural analysis, data-flow analysis, cache coherence, shared-memory multiprocessors.

Lynn Choi; Pen-Chung Yew

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix O: Economic and Social Impact.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Appendix O of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System measures the economic and social effects of the alternative system operation strategies and includes both geographic and methodology components. Areas discussed in detail include the following: purpose, scope and process; an economic history of the Columbia River Basin and its use today including the Columbia River and Socio-economic development in the Northwest and Major uses of the River System; Analysis procedures and methodologies including national economic evaluation, the concepts, analysis of assumptions, analysis for specific river uses, water quality, Regional evaluation, analysis, and social impacts; alternatives and impacts including implementation costs, andromous fish, resident fish and wildlife, flood control, irrigation and municipal and industrial water supply, navigation impacts, power, recreation, annual costs, regional economic analysis. Extensive comparison of alternatives is included.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

EA-1483: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

483: Finding of No Significant Impact 483: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1483: Finding of No Significant Impact Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East Argonne, Illinois DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1483, evaluating the decontamination and decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E), in Argonne, Illinois. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Finding of No Significant Impact for the Proposed Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Juggernaut Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory -

390

Special Analysis of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the methods and results of a special analysis (SA) of the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The purpose of the SA is to determine if the approved performance assessment (PA) and composite analysis (CA) (Shott et al., 2001) remain valid. The Area 3 RWMS PA and CA were prepared as a single document and received conditional approval on October 6, 1999. A conditional Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) for the Area 3 RWMS was issued on October 20, 1999. Since preparation of the approved PA and CA, new information and additional environmental monitoring data have been used to update the PA and CA. At the same time, continual advancements in computer processors and software have allowed improvement to the PA and CA models. Annual reviews of the PA and CA required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE O 435.1 have documented multiple changes occurring since preparation of the PA and CA. Potentially important changes include: Development of a new and improved baseline PA and CA model implemented in the probabilistic GoldSim simulation platform. A significant increase in the waste inventory disposed at the site. Revision and updating of model parameters based on additional years of site monitoring data and new research and development results. Although changes have occurred, many important PA/CA issues remain unchanged, including the site conceptual model, important features, events, and processes, and the points of compliance. The SA is performed to document the current status of the PA/CA model and to quantitatively assess the impact of cumulative changes on the PA and CA results. The results of the SA are used to assess the validity of the approved PA/CA and make a determination if revision of the PA or CA is necessary. The SA was performed using the Area 3 RWMS, version 2.102, GoldSim model, the current baseline PA/CA model. Comparison of the maximum SA results with the PA performance objectives indicates that there continues to be a reasonable expectation of compliance. The resident exposure scenario was evaluated for compliance with the air pathway and all-pathways annual total effective dose (TED) performance objectives. The maximum mean air pathway TED, 7E-6 millisievert (mSv) at 1,000 years (y) has decreased relative to the approved PA and is significantly less than the 0.1 mSv limit. The maximum mean all-pathways annual TED, 7E-5 mSv at 1,000 y has increased but remains a small fraction of the 0.25 mSv limit. The SA maximum mean radon-222 (222Rn) flux density, 0.03 becquerel per square meter per second (Bq m-2 s-1), has increased relative to the PA results but is significantly less than the 0.74 Bq m-2 s-1 limit. The SA results continue to support a conclusion that the disposed waste inventory is protective of intruders and groundwater resources. The maximum mean intruder TED, 0.01 mSv for an acute construction scenario at the U-3ah/at disposal unit, was less than the 5 mSv performance measure. Site monitoring data and research results continue to support a conclusion that a groundwater pathway will not exist within the 1,000 y compliance period. Projected releases to the environment are a small fraction of the performance objectives. Cost-effective options for reducing releases further are unlikely to exist. Therefore, releases from the Area 3 RWMS are judged to be as low as reasonably achievable. Comparison of the maximum CA result with the 0.3 mSv CA dose constraint indicates that no action is required to reduce the dose from the Area 3 RWMS and all interacting sources of residual radioactive contamination. The SA maximum mean CA annual TED, 0.02 mSv at 1,000 y, has increased from the approved CA result but remains less than 10% of the dose constraint. The CA TED continues to be due predominantly to inhalation of plutonium-239 resuspended from soils contaminated by nuclear weapons tests conducted near the Area 3 RWMS. The SA results estimated with the Area 3 RWMS version 2.102 model indicate that changes to the PA and CA do not

National Security Technologies, LLC, Environmental Management

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

391

Impact of Hydrogen Production on U.S. Energy Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production on Impact of Hydrogen Production on Hydrogen Production on Impact of Hydrogen Production on U.S. Energy Markets U.S. Energy Markets Presented to: Presented to: DOE Hydrogen Transition DOE Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop Analysis Workshop Washington DC Washington DC January 26, 2006 January 26, 2006 Prepared by: Prepared by: E. Harry Vidas, Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. E. Harry Vidas, Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. Paul Friley, Brookhaven National Laboratory Paul Friley, Brookhaven National Laboratory AZ CA Project Scope Project Scope * Focus will be on competition between hydrogen production and distribution technologies with respect to hydrogen fuel demand, technology cost, regional mix, and impact on feedstock prices. * Evaluate impacts on U.S. energy markets including price

392

Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI)  

SciTech Connect

This report provides detailed analyses of 21 clean energy policy options considered by the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative working groups for recommendation to the 2010 Hawaii State Legislature. The report considers the impact each policy may have on ratepayers, businesses, and the state in terms of energy saved, clean energy generated, and the financial costs and benefits. The analyses provide insight into the possible impacts, both qualitative and quantitative, that these policies may have in Hawaii based on the experience with these policies elsewhere. As much as possible, the analyses incorporate Hawaii-specific context to reflect the many unique aspects of energy use in the State of Hawaii.

Busche, S.; Doris, E.; Braccio, R.; Lippert, D.; Finch, P.; O' Toole, D.; Fetter, J.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

EA-1409: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09: Finding of No Significant Impact 09: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1409: Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Issuance of an Easement to Public Service Company of New Mexico for the Construction and Operation of a 12-inch Natural Gas Pipeline within Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM The Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Proposed issuance of an Easement to Public Service Company of New Mexico for the Construction and Operation of a 72-inch Natural Gas Pipeline within Los Alamos National Labora ory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (DOE/EA- 7409) (attached) provides sufficient evidence and analysis to determine that a Finding Of No Significant Impact is appropriate for the Proposed Action. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Finding of No Significant Impact for the Proposed Issuance of an Easement to the Public

394

Built Environment Energy Analysis Tool Overview (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Built Environment Built Environment Energy Analysis Tool Overview Prepared by: Chris Porter Cambridge Systematics, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts NREL Technical Monitor: Laura Vimmerstedt March 2013 NREL/PR-6A20-58101 2 Built Environment Energy Analysis Tool Overview Subcontractor: Chris Porter Cambridge Systematics, Inc. 100 Cambridge Park Drive, Suite 400 Cambridge, MA 02140 Period of Performance: June 2011-February 2013 NREL Technical Monitor: Laura Vimmerstedt Prepared under Subcontract No. DGJ-1-11857-01 This publication was reproduced from the best available copy submitted by the subcontractor and received no editorial review at NREL. NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the

395

Preliminary safety analysis report for the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) will be a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility used to characterize, treat, and repackage radioactive and mixed material and waste for reuse, recycling, or ultimate disposal. A significant upgrade to a previous facility, the Temporary Hot Cell, will be implemented to perform this mission. The following major features will be added: a permanent shield wall; eight floor silos; new roof portals in the hot-cell roof; an upgraded ventilation system; and upgraded hot-cell jib crane; and video cameras to record operations and facilitate remote-handled operations. No safety-class systems, structures, and components will be present in the AHCF. There will be five safety-significant SSCs: hot cell structure, permanent shield wall, shield plugs, ventilation system, and HEPA filters. The type and quantity of radionuclides that could be located in the AHCF are defined primarily by SNL/NM's legacy materials, which include radioactive, transuranic, and mixed waste. The risk to the public or the environment presented by the AHCF is minor due to the inventory limitations of the Hazard Category 3 classification. Potential doses at the exclusion boundary are well below the evaluation guidelines of 25 rem. Potential for worker exposure is limited by the passive design features incorporated in the AHCF and by SNL's radiation protection program. There is no potential for exposure of the public to chemical hazards above the Emergency Response Protection Guidelines Level 2.

OSCAR,DEBBY S.; WALKER,SHARON ANN; HUNTER,REGINA LEE; WALKER,CHERYL A.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels: A Framework for Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Manufacture of Corn Ethanol." National Corn GrowersThermodynamics of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle." CriticalNet Energy Balance of Corn-Ethanol. Corn Utilization and

Kammen, Daniel M.; Farrell, Alexander E; Plevin, Richard J; Jones, Andrew; Nemet, Gregory F; Delucchi, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Analysis of Financial News Impact on Stock Based on a Statistical Learning Method with News Density  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the investors often react to news and consequently make stock prices move, financial news has an impact on stock prices. However, the price adjustment process is a complex one. In this paper, a statistical learning methodology has been proposed ...

Feng Wang; Xiaodong Li; Chenxiao Dou

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Environmental Analysis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is volume 1 of the final environmental impact statement of the Bonneville Power Administration Information is included on the following: Purpose of and need for action; alternatives including the proposed action; affected environment; and environmental consequences.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Model-based spectroscopic analysis of the oral cavity: impact of anatomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to evaluate the impact of anatomy on the spectral properties of oral tissue, we used reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize nine different anatomic sites. All spectra were collected in vivo ...

McGee, Sasha

400

SELECTION OF MODAL BEA REGIONS FOR URBAN AND COMMUNITY IMPACT ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil reserves. shale plays oil shale an important role in theus to examine the impacts of oil shale development on twoThere are also extensive oil shale Nebraska, are major grain

Ruderman, Henry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Adjoint sensitivity analysis of the intercontinental impacts of aviation emissions on air quality and health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over 10,000 premature mortalities per year globally are attributed to the exposure to particulate matter caused by aircraft emissions. Unlike previous studies that focus on the regional impacts from the aircraft emissions ...

Koo, Jamin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

An Analysis of Government Policy Impacts in the Ethanol and Sugar Markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ABSTRACT This study determines the impact of U.S. government policies on U.S. ethanol market and its consequences for the U.S. corn, sugar, and HFCS markets.… (more)

Marzoughi_Ardakani, Hassan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

A decadal satellite analysis of the origins and impacts of smoke in Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the record of aerosol optical depth (AOD) measured by the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra satellite in combination with surface PM[subscript 2.5] to investigate the impact ...

Val Martin, M.

404

The climate impacts of high-speed rail and air transportation : a global comparative analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growing concerns about the energy use and climate impacts of the transportation sector have prompted policymakers to consider a variety of options to meet the future mobility needs of the world's population, while ...

Clewlow, Regina Ruby Lee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Towards a Risk Analysis Framework for Extreme Weather Impacts on Electric Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transmission and distribution planning community has realized that while significantly improved regional climate models and projections are necessary to facilitate meaningful analyses and responses, they may prove well-served by investigative research to increase understanding of potential impacts of changing weather and extreme weather events on relatively vulnerable components of the electricity system. The state of science on extreme weather impacts on the electric power industry is being extended...

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

406

Application of the ORIGEN Fallout Analysis Tool and the DELFIC Fallout Planning Tool to National Technical Nuclear Forensics  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to provide a robust fallout analysis and planning tool for the National Technical Nuclear Forensics interagency ground sample collection team. Their application called for a fast-running, portable mission-planning tool for use in response to emerging improvised nuclear device (IND) post-detonation situations. The project met those goals by research and development of models to predict the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of fallout debris. ORNL has developed new graphical user interfaces for two existing codes, the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code and the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC). ORIGEN is a validated, radionuclide production and decay code that has been implemented into the Fallout Analysis Tool to predict the fallout source term nuclide inventory after the detonation of an IND. DELFIC is a validated, physics-based, research reference fallout prediction software package. It has been implemented into the Fallout Planning Tool and is used to predict the fractionated isotope concentrations in fallout, particle sizes, fractionation ratios, dose rate, and integrated dose over the planned collection routes - information vital to ensure quality samples for nuclear forensic analysis while predicting dose to the sample collectors. DELFIC contains a particle activity module, which models the radiochemical fractionation of the elements in a cooling fireball as they condense into and onto particles to predict the fractionated activity size distribution for a given scenario. This provides the most detailed physics-based characterization of the fallout source term phenomenology available in an operational fallout model.

Jodoin, Vincent J [ORNL; Lee, Ronald W [ORNL; Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL; Lefebvre, Jordan P [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Analysis of Emissions Calculators for the National Center of Excellence on Displaced Emission Reductions (CEDER): Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In August 2004, the USEPA issued guidance on quantifying the air emission benefits from electric sector energy efficiency and renewable energy. Because there was no clear best strategy, the EPA’s guidance provided a framework and the basic requirements needed to demonstrate air quality improvements or emission reductions with adequate certainty to be incorporated into a State Implementation Plan (SIP) for achieving or maintaining National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). The Energy Systems Laboratory, with guidance from both the US EPA and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), developed the first comprehensive engineering toolkit and database that satisfies the EPA guidelines. The value of this unique tool was demonstrated in 2005 when the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL), at the request of the TCEQ, used it to develop integrated emissions estimates for all state agencies participating in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP). Building on this expertise, the US EPA has established a National Center of Excellence on Displaced Emission Reductions (CEDER) at the Energy Systems Laboratory to research and gather the state-of-the-art on air pollution quantification techniques for Energy Efficiency / Renewable Energy (EE/RE) projects; provide technical support and customized analysis for state and local agencies seeking to estimate the environmental benefits from clean energy policies and programs; and to document how a user-friendly tool, based on e2Calc, can be used by clients to fulfill their needs to quantify emission reductions from energy efficiency and renewable energy measures.

Yazdani, Bahman; Culp, Charles; Haberl, Jeff; Baltazar, Juan-Carlos; Do, Sung Lok

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

SUBJECT: National Nuclear Security Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Nuclear Security Administration Sandia Site Ofce P. 0. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185 JAN O=P= ONP= Annual National Environmental Policy Act Planning Sumary 2013 Attached is: the Annual National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Planning Summary for the National Nuclear Security Administation, Sandia Site Ofce (SSO). Currently, there are two environmental assessments planned and one environmental impact statement in progess for the

409

Coordination Meeting with National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Field Office Safety Basis Review Team Leader for Transuranic Waste Facility Preiminary Documented Safety Analysis Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HIAR-LANL-2013-04-08 HIAR-LANL-2013-04-08 Site: Los Alamos National Laboratory Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Coordination Meeting with National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Field Office Safety Basis Review Team Leader for Transuranic Waste Facility Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis Report Dates of Activity : 04/08/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) staff visited the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to coordinate with the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Los Alamos Field Office (NA-00-LA) Safety Basis Review Team (SBRT) Leader for review of the revised preliminary documented safety analysis (PDSA) for the Transuranic Waste

410

Coordination Meeting with National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Field Office Safety Basis Review Team Leader for Transuranic Waste Facility Preiminary Documented Safety Analysis Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HIAR-LANL-2013-04-08 HIAR-LANL-2013-04-08 Site: Los Alamos National Laboratory Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Coordination Meeting with National Nuclear Security Administration Los Alamos Field Office Safety Basis Review Team Leader for Transuranic Waste Facility Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis Report Dates of Activity : 04/08/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) staff visited the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to coordinate with the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Los Alamos Field Office (NA-00-LA) Safety Basis Review Team (SBRT) Leader for review of the revised preliminary documented safety analysis (PDSA) for the Transuranic Waste

411

Idaho National Laboratory - Hydropower Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Army Corps of Engineers Bureau of Reclamation Bureau of Land Management National Hydropower Association Low Impact Hydropower Institute Conservation Biology Institute Tools &...

412

Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With wind energy expanding rapidly in the U.S. and abroad, and with an increasing number of communities considering wind power development nearby, there is an urgent need to empirically investigate common community concerns about wind project development. The concern that property values will be adversely affected by wind energy facilities is commonly put forth by stakeholders. Although this concern is not unreasonable, given property value impacts that have been found near high voltage transmission lines and other electric generation facilities, the impacts of wind energy facilities on residential property values had not previously been investigated thoroughly. The present research collected data on almost 7,500 sales of singlefamily homes situated within 10 miles of 24 existing wind facilities in nine different U.S. states. The conclusions of the study are drawn from eight different hedonic pricing models, as well as both repeat sales and sales volume models. The various analyses are strongly consistent in that none of the models uncovers conclusive evidence of the existence of any widespread property value impacts that might be present in communities surrounding wind energy facilities. Specifically, neither the view of the wind facilities nor the distance of the home to those facilities is found to have any consistent, measurable, and statistically significant effect on home sales prices. Although the analysis cannot dismiss the possibility that individual homes or small numbers of homes have been or could be negatively impacted, it finds that if these impacts do exist, they are either too small and/or too infrequent to result in any widespread, statistically observable impact.

Hoen, Ben; Wiser, Ryan; Cappers, Peter; Thayer, Mark; Sethi, Gautam

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

414

Use of incident databases for cause and consequence analysis and national estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many incidents have occurred because industries have ignored past incidents or failed to learn lessons from the past. Incident databases provide an effective option for managing large amounts of information about the past incidents. Analysis of data stored in existing databases can lead to useful conclusions and reduction of chemical incidents and consequences of incidents. An incident database is a knowledge based system that can give an insight to the situation which led to an incident. Effective analysis of data from a database can help in development of information that can help reduce future incidents: cause of an incident, critical equipment, the type of chemical released, and the type of injury and victim. In this research, Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES) database has been analyzed focusing on manufacturing events in Texas from 1993-2004. Between thirteen to sixteen states have participated in the HSEES incident reporting system and it does not include all the near miss incidents. Petroleum related incidents are also excluded from the HSEES system. Studies show that HSEES covers only 37% of all incidents in the US. This scaling ratio was used to estimate the total universe size.

Obidullah, A.S.M.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

An analysis of job placement variables of foreign national Master of Business Administration (MBA) students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foreign national (international) students studying business at universities in the United States gain a valuable education, but they have a very difficult time finding work in the U.S because of a variety of cultural, communication, and employment visa issues. Campus career centers need to address the unique needs and concerns of their international student population in order to most effectively assist this select group in their job search. The purpose of this study was to examine the job placement variables of international students graduating from MBA programs across the United States in the 2001 class. A thorough review of the literature summarized the adjustment challenges facing international students, career services, and the job search challenges for international MBA students in particular. Data from 2570 international MBA students were examined to see whether there were differences in post-graduation jobs based on the students?? country of origin, years of work experience prior to the MBA program, and undergraduate major. The dependent variables examined were the base salary of the post-MBA job, the amount of signing bonus, the functional area of the student??s employment, the industry of the employer, and the geographic location of the new job. This study found that students from the North American region earned slightly higher salaries than students from Asia, and that European, North American and South American students received slightly higher signing bonuses than Asian students. The international students entered into similar functions and industries regardless of their country of origin. The majority of students, regardless of country of origin, stayed in the U.S. for employment. There was a direct correlation found between the number of years of prior work experience and the base salary of the student. Students with an undergraduate major in technology earned slightly higher salaries and signing bonuses. The results of this study will assist MBA career services professionals in how they counsel their international students in the job search and salary negotiations. The results may also assist MBA admissions professionals in deciding who to admit to their programs, as placement results are important measures of an MBA program??s success.

Scism, Darby Claire

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Analysis of background distributions of metals in the soil at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of its Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (CAP), the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Environmental Restoration Program conducted an evaluation of naturally occurring metals in soils at the facility. The purpose of the evaluation was to provide a basis for determining if soils at specific locations contained elevated concentrations of metals relative to ambient conditions. Ambient conditions (sometimes referred to as 'local background') are defined as concentrations of metals in the vicinity of a site, but which are unaffected by site-related activities (Cal-EPA 1997). Local background concentrations of 17 metals were initially estimated by LBNL using data from 498 soil samples collected from borings made during the construction of 71 groundwater monitoring wells (LBNL 1995). These concentration values were estimated using the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA's) guidance that was available at that time (USEPA 1989). Since that time, many more soil samples were collected and analyzed for metals by the Environmental Restoration Program. In addition, the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal-EPA) subsequently published a recommended approach for calculating background concentrations of metals at hazardous waste sites and permitted facilities (Cal-EPA 1997). This more recent approach differs from that recommended by the USEPA and used initially by LBNL (LBNL 2002). The purpose of the 2002 report was to apply the recommended Cal-EPA procedure to the expanded data set for metals that was available at LBNL. This revision to the 2002 report has been updated to include more rigorous tests of normality, revisions to the statistical methods used for some metals based on the results of the normality tests, and consideration of the depth-dependence of some sample results. As a result of these modifications, estimated background concentrations for some metals have been slightly revised from those presented in the original 2002 report. In cases where estimated background concentrations were reduced, site data were reviewed to assess whether significant changes to results of the RCRA CAP findings would result. This assessment indicated that no significant changes in RCRA CAP findings would result from the revisions.

Diamond, David; Baskin, David; Brown, Dennis; Lund, Loren; Najita, Julie; Javandel, Iraj

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

EIS-0350-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Nuclear Facility Portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Supplemental EIS evaluates the completion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement (CMRR) Project, which consists of constructing the nuclear facility portion (CMRR-NF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The CMRR Project provides the analytical chemistry and materials characterization capabilities currently or previously performed in the existing Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building. Because of recent detailed site geotechnical investigations, certain aspects of the CMRR-NR project have changed resulting in change to the environmental impacts.

418

Development of an improved commercial sector energy model for national policy analysis  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory provided support to the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy (CE), under the Office of Planning and Assessment, to develop improved energy and environmental analysis tools. Commercial building sector energy models from the past decade were analyzed in order to provoke comment and stimulate discussion between potential model users and developers as to the appropriate structure and capability of a commercial sector energy model supported by CE. Three specific areas were examined during this review. These areas provide (1) a look at recent suggestions and guidance as to what constitutes a minimal set of requirements and capabilities for a commercial buildings energy model for CE, (2) a review of several existing models in terms of their general structure and how they match up with the requirements listed previously, and (3) an overview of a proposed improved commercial sector energy model.

Belzer, D.B.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Environment and energy in Iceland: A comparative analysis of values and impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within an Icelandic framework plan for energy, environmental values and impacts were estimated in multicriteria analyses for 19 hydroelectric and 22 geothermal developments. Four natural environment classes were defined (geology + hydrology, species, ecosystems + soils, landscape + wilderness) with cultural heritage as the fifth class. Values and impacts were assessed through 6 agglomerated attributes: richness/diversity, rarity, size/continuity/pristineness, information/symbolic value, international responsibility and visual value. The project offers a unique opportunity for comparing environmental values and impacts within a large sample of sites and energy alternatives treated within a common methodological framework. Total values were higher in hydroelectric than in geothermal areas. Hydroelectric areas scored high for cultural heritage (particularly in rarity and information value), landscape and wilderness. Geothermal areas had high bedrock and hydrological diversity and information values, and a high landscape visual value but little cultural heritage. High values were correlated among some classes of the natural environment, all of which are likely to reflect functional relationships. In contrast, cultural heritage values were not related to natural environment values. Overall, landscape and wilderness had the highest mean value and were also most affected by energy development. Over 40% of the hydroelectric development had a predicted mean impact value of > 4 (out of a maximum of 10), compared with 10% of the geothermal projects. Excluding two outsized hydropower options, there was a significant correlation between plant capacity and impact on geology and hydrology but not with other environmental variables.

Thorhallsdottir, Thora Ellen [Institute of Biology (Iceland)]. E-mail: theth@hi.is

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Impacts of different data averaging times on statistical analysis of distributed domestic photovoltaic systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The trend of increasing application of distributed generation with solar photovoltaics (PV-DG) suggests that a widespread integration in existing low-voltage (LV) grids is possible in the future. With massive integration in LV grids, a major concern is the possible negative impacts of excess power injection from on-site generation. For power-flow simulations of such grid impacts, an important consideration is the time resolution of demand and generation data. This paper investigates the impact of time averaging on high-resolution data series of domestic electricity demand and PV-DG output and on voltages in a simulated LV grid. Effects of 10-minutely and hourly averaging on descriptive statistics and duration curves were determined. Although time averaging has a considerable impact on statistical properties of the demand in individual households, the impact is smaller on aggregate demand, already smoothed from random coincidence, and on PV-DG output. Consequently, the statistical distribution of simulated grid voltages was also robust against time averaging. The overall judgement is that statistical investigation of voltage variations in the presence of PV-DG does not require higher resolution than hourly. (author)

Widen, Joakim; Waeckelgaard, Ewa [Department of Engineering Sciences, The Aangstroem Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Paatero, Jukka; Lund, Peter [Advanced Energy Systems, Helsinki University of Technology, P.O. Box 2200, FI-02015 HUT (Finland)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national impact analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards:A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

SciTech Connect

State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. Collectively, these policies now apply to roughly 40% of U.S. electricity load, and may have substantial impacts on electricity markets, ratepayers, and local economies. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on projecting cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic and environmental effects. This report synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 28 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 18 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the costs and benefits of RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, assess the attributes of different modeling approaches, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analysis.

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

422

The Impact of Satellite Soundings on the National Meteorological Center's Analysis and Forecast System—The Data Systems Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to assess the value of remote sounding data for numerical weather prediction, parallel sets of analyses were produced with (SAT) and without (NOSAT) the sounding data from the experimental Nimbus-6 and operational NOAA-4 satellites for ...

M. S. Tracton; A. J. Desmarais; R. J. Van Haaren; R. D. McPherson

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Analysis: Economic Impacts of Wind Applications in Rural Communities; June 18, 2004 -- January 31, 2005  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to compile completed studies on the economic impact of wind farms in rural communities and then to compare these studies. By summarizing the studies in an Excel spreadsheet, the raw data from a study is easily compared with the data from other studies. In this way, graphs can be made and conclusions drawn. Additionally, the creation of a database in which economic impact studies are summarized allows a greater understanding of the type of information gathered in an economic impact study, the type of information that is most helpful in using these studies to promote wind energy development in rural communities, and the limitations on collecting data for these studies.

Pedden, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

EA-1087: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

87: Finding of No Significant Impact 87: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1087: Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California Based on the information and analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposal to construct and operate the Induction Linac System Experiments project does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, a Finding of No Significant Impact is made and an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. EA-1087-FONSI-1995.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1087: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1065: Finding of No Significant Impact

425

Facies correlation and basin analysis of Ivishak Formation, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ivishak Formation forms a regressive-transgressive deposit. The stratigraphic divisions are (1) a lower prograding deltaic unit of massive sandstone; (2) a middle fluvial unit of sandstone, shale, and minor conglomerate; and (3) an upper destructive deltaic unit of thin-bedded to massive sandstone, these Ivishak units defined in ANWR are recognized in the subsurface and traced over much of the North Slope. Basin analysis consisted of isopach and percent-sandstone mapping and paleocurrent measurement of 15 outcrops. Formation thickness averages 400 ft (120 m) with a northeast-trending depocenter axis through the Romanzof Mountains. Paleocurrent data define two main provenances of quartz-chert sands: northeast and east. Paleocurrents are oriented normal to, and dip toward, the basin axis. Outcrops located within the axis record bidirectional transport. A Lower Cretaceous unconformity (LCU) truncates the Ivishak in the Sadlerochit Mountains. Here, Neocomian pebble shale rests atop the Ivishak, with Shublik through Kingak formations missing. The LCU truncation is part of a regional unconformity that occurs along the north side of the North Slope. Ivishak units thin near the unconformity, suggesting an older high, which the authors term the Nularvik high. This high is part of a regional trend extending through ANWR from the Point Thomson area to bathtub syncline.

McMillen, K.J.; Colvin, M.D.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Extension of Comment Period on the Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (DOE/EIS-0380) (08/31/06)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 Federal Register 10 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 169 / Thursday, August 31, 2006 / Notices Coordinator, at the address and phone number listed above. Issued at Washington, DC on August 24, 2006. Carol Matthews, Acting Advisory Committee Management Officer. [FR Doc. 06-7304 Filed 8-30-06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6450-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Nuclear Security Administration Extension of Comment Period on the Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). ACTION: Notice of comment period extension. SUMMARY: On July 7, 2006, NNSA published a Notice of Availability for the Draft Site-wide Environmental

427

An Economic Analysis of Photovoltaics versus Traditional Energy Sources: Where are We Now and Where Might We Be in the Near Future? (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic Analysis of Photovoltaics versus Traditional Economic Analysis of Photovoltaics versus Traditional Energy Sources: Where are We Now and Where Might We Be in the Near Future? NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Michael Woodhouse Additional NREL Authors: Alan Goodrich, Ted James, Robert Margolis, David Feldman, and Tony Markel 2 Strategic Energy Analysis Center and 2 Electric Vehicles Program The National Renewable Energy Laboratory Analysis Funding Provided by The United States DOE, Solar Energy Technologies Program Presented at the IEEE Photovoltaic Specialist Conference (PVSC) 2011, June 19-24, 2011, Seattle, Washington NREL/PR-6A20-52311 Analysis Disclaimer DISCLAIMER AGREEMENT

428

Analysis of the Impact of Balancing Area Cooperation on the Operation of the Western Interconnection with Wind and Solar Generation (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes the analysis of the impact of balancing area cooperation on the operation of the Western Interconnection with wind and solar generation, including a discussion of operating reserves, ramping, production simulation, and conclusions.

Milligan, M.; Lew, D.; Jordan, G.; Piwko, R.; Kirby, B.; King, J.; Beuning, S.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Impact of TRMM SSTs on a Climate-Scale SST Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior efforts have produced a sea surface temperature (SST) optimum interpolation (OI) analysis that is widely used, especially for climate purposes. The analysis uses in situ (ship and buoy) and infrared (IR) satellite data from the Advanced ...

Richard W. Reynolds; Chelle L. Gentemann; Frank Wentz

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

NREL: Energy Analysis - Wind Technology Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind and Hydropower Technology Analysis Wind and Hydropower Technology Analysis Wind and hydropower analysis supports advanced technologies that convert more of the nation's wind into electricity. Grid Operational Impact Analysis The wind program will address the variable, normally uncontrollable nature of wind power plant output, and the additional needs that its operation imposes on the overall grid. At present, the generation and transmission operational impacts that occur due to wind variability are not well quantified. This research will include efforts to quantify and fairly allocate impacts in both an engineering and cost sense. Methods of analysis are at an early stage of development. Without realistic analysis and cost allocation, utilities tend to overestimate imposed operational costs,

431

A fuzzy cognitive mapping analysis of the impacts of an eco-industrial park  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuzzy cognitive maps are used as an automated decision aid to better assess how change in one component of a system affects the other components of the same system. To illustrate the advantage of this method, a conceptual model of an eco-industrial park ... Keywords: eco-industrial parks, fuzzy cognitive mapping, impact assessment, sustainable development

Sumita Fons; Gopal Achari; Timothy Ross

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Impact of Performance-Based Contracting on Product Reliability: An Empirical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a proprietary data set provided by a major manufacturer of aircraft engines, we empirically investigate how product reliability is impacted by the use of two different types of after-sales maintenance support contracts: time and material contracts ... Keywords: aerospace industry, empirical operations management, maintenance repairs, reliability, supply chain contracting

Jose A. Guajardo; Morris A. Cohen; Sang-Hyun Kim; Serguei Netessine

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Potential Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Reflections on the Perryman Group Analysis from Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Reflections on the Perryman Group The exploration and development of the Marcellus Shale natural gas play has significant potential to affect in the Barnett Shale region of north Texas. The Barnett Shale play is very similar in geology to the Marcellus

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

434

Cutting the energy bills of Internet Service Providers and telecoms through power management: An impact analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy consumption of the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector has been increasing recently; this sector is estimated to account for 2% of the total energy consumption. An even more aggressively increasing trend is the volume of ... Keywords: Energy saving, Green networking, Impact model, Power management

Raffaele Bolla; Roberto Bruschi; Alessandro Carrega; Franco Davoli; Diego Suino; Constantinos Vassilakis; Anastasios Zafeiropoulos

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

An analysis of the differences between national and local coverage determinations of medical procedures in the US  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medicare coverage policies of medical procedures can be promulgated at a national level by the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) as National Coverage Determinations (NCDs) or at a local level by Medicare ...

Díaz Treviño, Rafael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

National Transportation Policy Options: A Time for Choice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

connectivity, new technology, and a set of difficult environmental problems. Meanwhile, the existing program and transit mobility. National purpose has been an option, rather than a focus. Systematic analysis of mobility and other impacts is almost entirely absent. This mismatch has become increasingly evident to more

Minnesota, University of

437

Quantifying National Energy Savings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Alison Williams, Barbara Atkinson, Karina Garbesi and Francis Rubinstein Energy Analysis...