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1

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - National Ignition Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

national-ignition-facility National Ignition Facility en Summary of Assessment of Prospects for Inertial Fusion Energy http:www.pppl.govnode1361

2

Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility...

3

June 11, 1999: National Ignition Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

June 11, 1999Secretary Richardson dedicates the National Ignition Facility target chamber at DOE's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

4

National Ignition Facility (NIF): Under Pressure: Ramp-Compression...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Ignition Facility (NIF): Under Pressure: Ramp-Compression Smashes Record American Fusion News Category: National Ignition Facility Link: National Ignition Facility (NIF):...

5

Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility May 29, 1997 Livermore, CA Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility

6

The National Ignition Facility: Status of Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bruce Warner Deputy Associate Director, NIF Programs Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory October 11, 2005 #12;NIF-0605-10997 27EIM/cld NIF-0605-10997-L2 27EIM/cld P LLNLLLNL P9266 #12;NIF-0605-10997 27EIM/cld NIF-0605-10997-L28 27EIM/cld P LLNLLLNL National Ignition FacilityNational Ignition Facility P9292 San

7

National Ignition Facility Target Chamber  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This was necessary to achieve the overall schedule. Plans had to be developed for the precise location and alignment of laser beam ports. Upon completion of the fabrication of the aluminum target chamber in a temporary structure the 130 ton sphere was moved from the temporary construction enclosure to its final location in the target building. Prior to the installation of a concrete shield and after completion of the welding of the chamber penetrations vacuum leak checking was performed to insure the vacuum integrity of target chamber. The entire spherical chamber external surface supports a 40 cm thick reinforced concrete shield after installation in the target building. The final task is a total survey of the laser ports and the contour machining of spacer plates so that laser devices attached to these ports meet the alignment criteria.

Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

8

Preparing for Ignition Experiments on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility presently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for performing ignition experiments for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density (HED) science. NIF will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light ({lambda} = 351 nm) making it the world's largest and most powerful laser system. NIF will be the world's preeminent facility for the study of matter at extreme temperatures and densities for producing and developing ICF. The ignition studies will be an essential step in developing inertial fusion energy (IFE). the NIF Project is over 93% complete and scheduled for completion in 2009. Experiments using one beam have demonstrated that NIF can meet all of its performance goals. A detailed plan called the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been developed to begin ignition experiments in 2010. The plan includes the target physics and the equipment such as diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator and user optics required for the ignition experiment. Target designs have been developed that calculate to ignite at energy as low as 1 MJ. Plans are under way to make NIF a national user facility for experiments on HED physics and nuclear science, including experiments relevant to the development of IFE.

Moses, E; Meier, W

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

9

Ignition and Inertial Confinement Fusion at The National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and for studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is now conducting experiments to commission the laser drive, the hohlraum and the capsule and to develop the infrastructure needed to begin the first ignition experiments in FY 2010. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. NIF will achieve this by concentrating the energy from the 192 beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target and igniting a deuterium-tritium mix, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reaction. NIF's ignition program is a national effort managed via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC has two major goals: execution of DT ignition experiments starting in FY2010 with the goal of demonstrating ignition and a reliable, repeatable ignition platform by the conclusion of the NIC at the end of FY2012. The NIC will also develop the infrastructure and the processes required to operate NIF as a national user facility. The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on laser fusion as a viable energy option. A laser fusion-based energy concept that builds on NIF, known as LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy), is currently under development. LIFE is inherently safe and can provide a global carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This paper describes recent progress on NIF, NIC, and the LIFE concept.

Moses, E

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Target Visualization at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

As the National Ignition Facility continues its campaign to achieve ignition, new methods and tools will be required to measure the quality of the targets used to achieve this goal. Techniques have been developed to measure target surface features using a phase-shifting diffraction interferometer and Leica Microsystems confocal microscope. Using these techniques we are able to produce a detailed view of the shell surface, which in turn allows us to refine target manufacturing and cleaning processes. However, the volume of data produced limits the methods by which this data can be effectively viewed by a user. This paper introduces an image-based visualization system for data exploration of target shells at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It aims to combine multiple image sets into a single visualization to provide a method of navigating the data in ways that are not possible with existing tools.

Potter, D

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

11

Director of the National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Director of the National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Director of the National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Edward Moses Director of the National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

12

UCRL-PRES-225531 National ignition facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title Page UCRL-PRES-225531 #12;National ignition facility #12;NIF is 705,000 #12;NIF laser system #12;NIF us 885 #12;NIF-0506-11956 Laser bay 2 #12;Switchyard 2 #12;Target chamber in the air #12 experiments on NIF have demonstrated #12;21 1 MJ shaping results: Comparison of requested vs measured 3 pulse

13

National Ignition Facility Title II Design Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This National Ignition Facility (NIF) Title II Design Plan defines the work to be performed by the NIF Project Team between November 1996, when the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reviewed Title I design and authorized the initiation of Title H design and specific long-lead procurements, and September 1998, when Title 11 design will be completed.

Kumpan, S

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

IGNITION AND FRONTIER SCIENCE ON THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF construction Project was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 30, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility, will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of light at the third-harmonic, ultraviolet light of 351 nm. On March 10, 2009, a total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and for broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect drive ignition will begin in FY2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a 1.7 billion dollar national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments include diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational and integrated into the facility and be ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and will likely focus the world's attention on the possibility of an ICF energy option. NIF experiments to demonstrate ignition and gain will use central-hot-spot (CHS) ignition, where a spherical fuel capsule is simultaneously compressed and ignited. The scientific basis for CHS has been intensively developed and has high probability of success. Achieving ignition with CHS will open the door for other advanced concepts, such as the use of high-yield pulses of visible wavelength rather than ultraviolet and Fast Ignition concepts. Moreover, NIF will have important scientific applications in such diverse fields as astrophysics, nuclear physics and materials science. The NIC will develop the full set of capabilities required to operate NIF as a major national and international user facility. A solicitation for NIF frontier science experiments to be conducted by the academic community is planned for summer 2009. This paper summarizes the design, performance, and status of NIF, experimental plans for NIC, and will present a brief discussion of the unparalleled opportunities to explore frontier basic science that will be available on the NIF.

Moses, E

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

15

The National Ignition Facility and the Ignition Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(atm-s) Indirect drive on the NIF is within a factor of 2-3 of the conditions required for ignition Callahan -- AAAS, February 14-18, 2013 82013-047661s2.ppt NIF Ignition #12;2013-047661s2.ppt Callahan -- AAAS and initiated operation of NIF as the world's premier HED science facility Story of NIF and Ignition 102013

16

National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The scope of the plan describes the procurement activities and acquisition strategy for the following phases of the NIF Project, each of which receives either plant and capital equipment (PACE) or other project cost (OPC) funds: Title 1 and 2 design and Title 3 engineering (PACE); Optics manufacturing facilitization and pilot production (OPC); Convention facility construction (PACE); Procurement, installation, and acceptance testing of equipment (PACE); and Start-up (OPC). Activities that are part of the base Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program are not included in this plan. The University of California (UC), operating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lockheed-Martin, which operates Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR-LLE), will conduct the acquisition of needed products and services in support of their assigned responsibilities within the NIF Project structure in accordance with their prime contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). LLNL, designated as the lead Laboratory, will have responsibility for all procurements required for construction, installation, activation, and startup of the NIF.

Callaghan, R.W.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Precision Shock Tuning on the National Ignition Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ignition implosions on the National Ignition Facility [ J.?D. Lindl et al. Phys. Plasmas 11 339 (2004)] are underway with the goal of compressing deuterium-tritium fuel to a sufficiently high areal density (?R) to sustain ...

Frenje, Johan A.

18

Stockpile Stewardship and the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's most energetic laser system, is operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Since the completion of the construction project in March 2009, NIF has completed nearly 150 target experiments for the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), High Energy Density Stewardship Science (HEDSS) in the areas of radiation transport, material dynamics at high pressure in the solid state, as well as fundamental science and other national security missions. NIF capabilities and infrastructure are in place to support all of its missions with over 50 X-ray, optical and nuclear diagnostic systems and the ability to shoot cryogenic targets and DT layered capsules. NIF is now qualified for use of tritium and other special materials as well as to perform high yield experiments and classified experiments. DT implosions with record indirect-drive neutron yield of 4.5 x 10{sup 14} neutrons have been achieved. A series of 43 experiments were successfully executed over a 27-day period, demonstrating the ability to perform precise experiments in new regimes of interest to HEDSS. This talk will provide an update of the progress on the NIF capabilities, NIC accomplishments, as well as HEDSS and fundamental science experimental results and an update of the experimental plans for the coming year.

Moses, E

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

19

Progress Toward Ignition on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The principal approach to ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is indirect drive. A schematic of an ignition target is shown in Figure 1. The laser beams are focused through laser entrance holes at each end of a high-Z cylindrical case, or hohlraum. The lasers irradiate the hohlraum walls producing x-rays that ablate and compress the fuel capsule in the center of the hohlraum. The hohlraum is made of Au, U, or other high-Z material. For ignition targets, the hohlraum is {approx}0.5 cm diameter by {approx}1 cm in length. The hohlraum absorbs the incident laser energy producing x-rays for symmetrically imploding the capsule. The fuel capsule is a {approx}2-mm-diameter spherical shell of CH, Be, or C filled with DT fuel. The DT fuel is in the form of a cryogenic layer on the inside of the capsule. X-rays ablate the outside of the capsule, producing a spherical implosion. The imploding shell stagnates in the center, igniting the DT fuel. NIC has overseen installation of all of the hardware for performing ignition experiments, including commissioning of approximately 50 diagnostic systems in NIF. The diagnostics measure scattered optical light, x-rays from the hohlraum over the energy range from 100 eV to 500 keV, and x-rays, neutrons, and charged particles from the implosion. An example of a diagnostic is the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) built by a collaboration of scientists from MIT, UR-LLE, and LLNL shown in Figure 2. MRS measures the neutron spectrum from the implosion, providing information on the neutron yield and areal density that are metrics of the quality of the implosion. Experiments on NIF extend ICF research to unexplored regimes in target physics. NIF can produce more than 50 times the laser energy and more than 20 times the power of any previous ICF facility. Ignition scale hohlraum targets are three to four times larger than targets used at smaller facilities, and the ignition drive pulses are two to five times longer. The larger targets and longer pulse lengths produce unique plasma conditions for laser-plasma instabilities that could reduce hohlraum coupling efficiency. Initial experiments have demonstrated efficient coupling of laser energy to x-rays. X-ray drive greater than 300 eV has been measured in gas-filled ignition hohlraum and shows the expected scaling with laser energy and hohlraum scale size. Experiments are now optimizing capsule implosions for ignition. Ignition conditions require assembling the fuel with sufficient density and temperature for thermonuclear burn. X-rays ablate the outside of the capsule, accelerating and spherically compressing the capsule for assembling the fuel. The implosion stagnates, heating the central core and producing a hot spot that ignites and burns the surrounding fuel. The four main characteristics of the implosion are shell velocity, central hot spot shape, fuel adiabat, and mix. Experiments studying these four characteristics of implosions are used to optimize the implosion. Integrated experiments using cryogenic fuel layer experiments demonstrate the quality of the implosion as the optimization experiments progress. The final compressed fuel conditions are diagnosed by measuring the x-ray emission from the hot core and the neutrons and charged particles produced in the fusion reactions. Metrics of the quality of the implosion are the neutron yield and the shell areal density, as well as the size and shape of the core. The yield depends on the amount of fuel in the hot core and its temperature and is a gauge of the energy coupling to the fuel. The areal density, the density of the fuel times its thickness, diagnoses the fuel assembly, which is measured using the fraction of neutrons that are down scattered passing through the dense shell. The yield and fraction of down scattered neutrons, or shell rho-r, from the cryogenic layered implosions are shown in Figure 3. The different sets of data represent results after a series of implosion optimization experiments. Both yield and areal density show significant increases as a result of the optimiza

Kauffman, R L

2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

20

Analysis of the National Ignition Facility Ignition Hohlraum Energetics Experiments  

SciTech Connect

A series of forty experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] to study energy balance and implosion symmetry in reduced- and full-scale ignition hohlraums was shot at energies up to 1.3 MJ. This paper reports the findings of the analysis of the ensemble of experimental data obtained that has produced an improved model for simulating ignition hohlraums. Last year the first observation in a NIF hohlraum of energy transfer between cones of beams as a function of wavelength shift between those cones was reported [P. Michel, et al, Phys of Plasmas, 17, 056305, (2010)]. Detailed analysis of hohlraum wall emission as measured through the laser entrance hole (LEH) has allowed the amount of energy transferred versus wavelength shift to be quantified. The change in outer beam brightness is found to be quantitatively consistent with LASNEX [G. B. Zimmerman and W. L. Kruer, Comments Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 2, 51 (1975)] simulations using the predicted energy transfer when possible saturation of the plasma wave mediating the transfer is included. The effect of the predicted energy transfer on implosion symmetry is also found to be in good agreement with gated x-ray framing camera images. Hohlraum energy balance, as measured by x-ray power escaping the LEH, is quantitatively consistent with revised estimates of backscatter and incident laser energy combined with a more rigorous non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium atomic physics model with greater emissivity than the simpler average-atom model used in the original design of NIF targets.

Town, R J; Rosen, M D; Michel, P A; Divol, L; Moody, J D; Kyrala, G A; Schneider, M B; Kline, J L; Thomas, C A; Milovich, J L; Callahan, D A; Meezan, N B; Hinkel, D E; Williams, E A; Berger, R L; Edwards, M J; Suter, L J; Haan, S W; Lindl, J D; Dixit, S; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Moses, E I; Scott, H A; Harte, J A; Zimmerman, G B

2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national ignition facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Development of nuclear diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility ,,invited...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 2006; published online 5 October 2006 The National Ignition Facility NIF will provide up to 1.8 MJ of laser energy for imploding inertial confinement fusion ICF targets. Ignited NIF targets are expected of nuclear diagnostics in ICF experiments. In 2005, the suite of nuclear-ignition diagnostics for the NIF

22

National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test Capabilities and Evaluation > Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion > Facilities >...

23

National Ignition Facility makes history with record 500 terawatt...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Ignition Facility makes history with record 500 terawatt shot Breanna Bishop, LLNL, (925) 423-9802, bishop33@llnl.gov Printer-friendly The preamplifiers of the National...

24

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the National Ignition Campaign (NIC)  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). NIF construction was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 27, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd:glass laser facility, will ultimately produce 1.8-MJ, 500-TW of 351-nm third-harmonic, ultraviolet light. On March 10, 2009, total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect-drive ignition began in August 2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments includes diagnostics, a cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational, integrated into the facility, and ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and will likely focus the world's attention on the possibility of an ICF energy option. NIF experiments to demonstrate ignition and gain will use central-hot-spot (CHS) ignition, where a spherical fuel capsule is simultaneously compressed and ignited. The scientific basis for CHS has been intensively developed. Achieving ignition with CHS will open the door for other advanced concepts, such as the use of high-yield pulses of visible wavelength rather than ultraviolet and Fast Ignition concepts. Moreover, NIF will have important scientific applications in such diverse fields as astrophysics, nuclear physics and materials science. The NIC will develop the full set of capabilities required to operate NIF as a major national and international user facility. A solicitation for NIF frontier science experiments is planned for summer 2009. This paper summarizes the design, performance, and status of NIF and plans for the NIF ignition experimental program. A brief summary of the overall NIF experimental program is also presented.

Moses, E

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

25

National Ignition Facility faces an uncertain future David Kramer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the National Ignition Facility to achieve a self-sustaining fusion reaction fell short. Now NIF stands to lose that were specified for NIF when the massive laser facility was ap- proved for construction in 1996. President Obama's fiscal year 2014 budget request calls for the end of NIF support for experiments proposed

26

The National Ignition Facility and the Path to Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is operational and conducting experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental facility with 192 beams capable of delivering 1.8 megajoules of 500-terawatt ultraviolet laser energy, over 60 times more energy than any previous laser system. The NIF can create temperatures of more than 100 million degrees and pressures more than 100 billion times Earth's atmospheric pressure. These conditions, similar to those at the center of the sun, have never been created in the laboratory and will allow scientists to probe the physics of planetary interiors, supernovae, black holes, and other phenomena. The NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to the conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. Experiments on the NIF are focusing on demonstrating fusion ignition and burn via inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The ignition program is conducted via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) - a partnership among LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and General Atomics. The NIC program has also established collaborations with the Atomic Weapons Establishment in the United Kingdom, Commissariat a Energie Atomique in France, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and many others. Ignition experiments have begun that form the basis of the overall NIF strategy for achieving ignition. Accomplishing this goal will demonstrate the feasibility of fusion as a source of limitless, clean energy for the future. This paper discusses the current status of the NIC, the experimental steps needed toward achieving ignition and the steps required to demonstrate and enable the delivery of fusion energy as a viable carbon-free energy source.

Moses, E

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

27

Video Gallery of the National Ignition Facility  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

NIF houses the world’s largest and highest-energy laser, which has the goal of achieving nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory for the first time - in essence, creating a miniature star on Earth. NIF, a program of the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) focuses the intense energy of 192 giant laser beams on a BB-sized target filled with hydrogen fuel, fusing the hydrogen atoms' nuclei and releasing many times more energy than it took to initiate the fusion reaction. NIF is capable of creating temperatures and pressures similar to those that exist only in the cores of stars and giant planets and inside nuclear weapons. Achieving nuclear fusion in the laboratory is at the heart of three complementary missions: 1) Helping ensure the nation’s security without nuclear weapons testing; 2) Blazing the path to a safe, virtually unlimited, carbon-free energy future; and 3) Achieving breakthroughs in a wide variety of scientific disciplines, including astrophysics, materials science, the use of lasers in medicine, radioactive and hazardous waste treatment, particle physics and X-ray and neutron science [taken, with editing, from https://lasers.llnl.gov/about/]. NIF’s Video Gallery presents several narrated clips from the construction phase and short videos about the science behind NIF. These include, “The Power of Light,” “From the Sun to a Sun,” and “A Legacy of Lasers.” One of the videos allows the user to watch a synthetic seed crystal grow into an 800 pound potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystal for use in the facility. The most unique clip is “Stellar Gest,” the narration of a poem by Charan Sue Wollard, Poet Laureate for the city of Livermore, home of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and NIF.

28

Diagnosing implosion performance at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by means of neutron spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diagnosing implosion performance at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by means of neutron.1088/0029-5515/53/4/043014 Diagnosing implosion performance at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by means of neutron spectrometry J at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) provides essential information about the implosion performance. From

29

Heating National Ignition Facility, Realistic Financial Planning...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Essential Lessons Learned Report Apr 2010.pdf More Documents & Publications Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes Late...Lessons Learned Report, NNSA,...

30

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) A Path to Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

Fusion energy has long been considered a promising clean, nearly inexhaustible source of energy. Power production by fusion micro-explosions of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets has been a long term research goal since the invention of the first laser in 1960. The NIF is poised to take the next important step in the journey by beginning experiments researching ICF ignition. Ignition on NIF will be the culmination of over thirty years of ICF research on high-powered laser systems such as the Nova laser at LLNL and the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester as well as smaller systems around the world. NIF is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility at LLNL that is more than 90% complete. The first cluster of 48 beams is operational in the laser bay, the second cluster is now being commissioned, and the beam path to the target chamber is being installed. The Project will be completed in 2009 and ignition experiments will start in 2010. When completed NIF will produce up to 1.8 MJ of 0.35 {micro}m light in highly shaped pulses required for ignition. It will have beam stability and control to higher precision than any other laser fusion facility. Experiments using one of the beams of NIF have demonstrated that NIF can meet its beam performance goals. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been established to manage the ignition effort on NIF. NIC has all of the research and development required to execute the ignition plan and to develop NIF into a fully operational facility. NIF will explore the ignition space, including direct drive, 2{omega} ignition, and fast ignition, to optimize target efficiency for developing fusion as an energy source. In addition to efficient target performance, fusion energy requires significant advances in high repetition rate lasers and fusion reactor technology. The Mercury laser at LLNL is a high repetition rate Nd-glass laser for fusion energy driver development. Mercury uses state-o-the art technology such as ceramic laser slabs and light diode pumping for improved efficiency and thermal management. Progress in NIF, NIC, Mercury, and the path forward for fusion energy will be presented.

Moses, E

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

31

National Ignition Facility | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

32

NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

33

Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: First Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental campaign to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) was initiated in late 2010. The experiments use a NIF ignition-scale hohlraum and capsule that employs a reentrant cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with velocity interferometry that provides target performance data used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions that follow. From the start, these measurements yielded significant new information on target performance, leading to improvements in the target design. We describe the results and interpretation of the initial tuning experiments.

Celliers, P M; Robey, H F; Boehly, T R; Alger, E; Azevedo, S; Berzins, L V; Bhandarkar, S D; Bowers, M W; Brereton, S J; Callahan, D; Castro, C; Chandrasekaran, H; Choate, C; Clark, D; Coffee, K R; Datte, P S; Dewald, E L; DiNicola, P; Dixit, S; Doeppner, T; Dzenitis, E; Edwards, M J; Eggert, J H; Fair, J; Farley, D R; Frieders, G; Gibson, C R; Giraldez, E; Haan, S; Haid, B; Hamza, A V; Haynam, C; Hicks, D G; Holunga, D M; Horner, J B; Jancaitis, K; Jones, O S; Kalantar, D; Kline, J L; Krauter, K G; Kroll, J J; LaFortune, K N; Pape, S L; Malsbury, T; Maypoles, E R; Milovich, J L; Moody, J D; Moreno, K; Munro, D H; Nikroo, A; Olson, R E; Parham, T; Pollaine, S; Radousky, H B; Ross, G F; Sater, J; Schneider, M B; Shaw, M; Smith, R F; Thomas, C A; Throop, A; Town, R J; Trummer, D; Van Wonterghem, B M; Walters, C F; Widmann, K; Widmayer, C; Young, B K; Atherton, L J; Collins, G W; Landen, O L; Lindl, J D; MacGowan, B J; Meyerhofer, D D; Moses, E I

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

34

Design of a deuterium and tritium-ablator shock ignition target for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Shock ignition presents a viable path to ignition and high gain on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this paper, we describe the development of the 1D design of 0.5 MJ class, all-deuterium and tritium (fuel and ablator) shock ignition target that should be reasonably robust to Rayleigh-Taylor fluid instabilities, mistiming, and hot electron preheat. The target assumes 'day one' NIF hardware and produces a yield of 31 MJ with reasonable allowances for laser backscatter, absorption efficiency, and polar drive power variation. The energetics of polar drive laser absorption require a beam configuration with half of the NIF quads dedicated to launching the ignitor shock, while the remaining quads drive the target compression. Hydrodynamic scaling of the target suggests that gains of 75 and yields 70 MJ may be possible.

Terry, Matthew R.; Perkins, L. John; Sepke, Scott M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Inertial Confinement Fusion and the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

SciTech Connect

Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) seeks to provide sustainable fusion energy by compressing frozen deuterium and tritium fuel to extremely high densities. The advantages of fusion vs. fission are discussed, including total energy per reaction and energy per nucleon. The Lawson Criterion, defining the requirements for ignition, is derived and explained. Different confinement methods and their implications are discussed. The feasibility of creating a power plant using ICF is analyzed using realistic and feasible numbers. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is shown as a significant step forward toward making a fusion power plant based on ICF. NIF is the world’s largest laser, delivering 1.8 MJ of energy, with a peak power greater than 500 TW. NIF is actively striving toward the goal of fusion energy. Other uses for NIF are discussed.

Ross, P.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

36

Power conditioning development for the National Ignition Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high energy glass laser system and target chamber that will be used for research in inertial confinement fusion. The 192 beams of the NIF laser system are pumped by over 8600 Xenon flashlamps. The power conditioning system for NIF must deliver nearly 300 MJ of energy to the flashlamps in a cost effective and reliable manner. The present system design has over 200 capacitive energy storage modules that store approximately 1.7 MJ each and deliver that energy through a single switch assembly to 20 parallel sets of two series flashlamps. Although there are many possible system designs, few will meet the aggressive cost goals necessary to make the system affordable. Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are developing the system and component technologies that will be required to build the power conditioning system for the National Ignition Facility. This paper will describe the ongoing development activities for the NIF power conditioning system.

Newton, M.A.; Larson, D.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Wilson, J.M.; Harjes, H.C.; Savage, M.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, R.L. [American Controls, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

National Ignition Facility Project Completion and Control System Status  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. Completed in 2009, NIF is a stadium-sized facility containing a 1.8-MJ, 500-TW 192-beam ultraviolet laser and target chamber. A cryogenic tritium target system and suite of optical, X-ray and nuclear diagnostics will support experiments in a strategy to achieve fusion ignition starting in 2010. Automatic control of NIF is performed by the large-scale Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS), which is implemented by 2 MSLOC of Java and Ada running on 1300 front-end processors and servers. The ICCS framework uses CORBA distribution for interoperation between heterogeneous languages and computers. Laser setup is guided by a physics model and shots are coordinated by data-driven distributed workflow engines. The NIF information system includes operational tools and a peta-scale repository for provisioning experimental results. This paper discusses results achieved and the effort now underway to conduct full-scale operations and prepare for ignition.

Van Arsdall, P J; Azevedo, S G; Beeler, R G; Bryant, R M; Carey, R W; Demaret, R D; Fisher, J M; Frazier, T M; Lagin, L J; Ludwigsen, A P; Marshall, C D; Mathisen, D G; Reed, R K

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

38

The First Experiments on the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first set of laser-plasma interaction, hohlraum energetics and hydrodynamic experiments have been performed using the first 4 beams of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High Energy Density Physics (HEDP). In parallel, a robust set of optical and x-ray spectrometers, interferometer, calorimeters and imagers have been activated. The experiments have been undertaken with laser powers and energies of up to 8 TW and 17 kJ in flattop and shaped 1-9 ns pulses focused with various beam smoothing options.

Landen, O L; Glenzer, S; Froula, D; Dewald, E; Suter, L J; Schneider, M; Hinkel, D; Fernandez, J; Kline, J; Goldman, S; Braun, D; Celliers, P; Moon, S; Robey, H; Lanier, N; Glendinning, G; Blue, B; Wilde, B; Jones, O; Schein, J; Divol, L; Kalantar, D; Campbell, K; Holder, J; MacDonald, J; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A; Collins, R; Bradley, D; Eggert, J; Hicks, D; Gregori, G; Kirkwood, R; Young, B; Foster, J; Hansen, F; Perry, T; Munro, D; Baldis, H; Grim, G; Heeter, R; Hegelich, B; Montgomery, D; Rochau, G; Olson, R; Turner, R; Workman, J; Berger, R; Cohen, B; Kruer, W; Langdon, B; Langer, S; Meezan, N; Rose, H; Still, B; Williams, E; Dodd, E; Edwards, J; Monteil, M; Stevenson, M; Thomas, B; Coker, R; Magelssen, G; Rosen, P; Stry, P; Woods, D; Weber, S; Alvarez, S; Armstrong, G; Bahr, R; Bourgade, J; Bower, D; Celeste, J; Chrisp, M; Compton, S; Cox, J; Constantin, C; Costa, R; Duncan, J; Ellis, A; Emig, J; Gautier, C; Greenwood, A; Griffith, R; Holdner, F; Holtmeier, G; Hargrove, D; James, T; Kamperschroer, J; Kimbrough, J; Landon, M; Lee, D; Malone, R; May, M; Montelongo, S; Moody, J; Ng, E; Nikitin, A; Pellinen, D; Piston, K; Poole, M; Rekow, V; Rhodes, M; Shepherd, R; Shiromizu, S; Voloshin, D; Warrick, A; Watts, P; Weber, F; Young, P; Arnold, P; Atherton, L J; Bardsley, G; Bonanno, R; Borger, T; Bowers, M; Bryant, R; Buckman, S; Burkhart, S; Cooper, F; Dixit, S; Erbert, G; Eder, D; Ehrlich, B; Felker, B; Fornes, J; Frieders, G; Gardner, S; Gates, C; Gonzalez, M; Grace, S; Hall, T; Haynam, C; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Hermann, M; Hermes, G; Huber, S; Jancaitis, K; Johnson, S; Kauffman, B; Kelleher, T; Kohut, T; Koniges, A E; Labiak, T; Latray, D; Lee, A; Lund, D; Mahavandi, S; Manes, K R; Marshall, C; McBride, J; McCarville, T; McGrew, L; Menapace, J; Mertens, E; Munro, D; Murray, J; Neumann, J; Newton, M; Opsahl, P; Padilla, E; Parham, T; Parrish, G; Petty, C; Polk, M; Powell, C; Reinbachs, I; Rinnert, R; Riordan, B; Ross, G; Robert, V; Tobin, M; Sailors, S; Saunders, R; Schmitt, M; Shaw, M; Singh, M; Spaeth, M; Stephens, A; Tietbohl, G; Tuck, J; Van Wonterghem, B; Vidal, R; Wegner, P; Whitman, P; Williams, K; Winward, K; Work, K

2005-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

39

Demonstration of the shock-timing technique for ignition targets on the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-performance inertial confinement fusion capsule is compressed by multiple shock waves before it implodes. To minimize the entropy acquired by the fuel, the strength and timing of those shock waves must be accurately controlled. Ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will employ surrogate targets designed to mimic ignition targets while making it possible to measure the shock velocities inside the capsule. A series of experiments on the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] validated those targets and the diagnostic techniques proposed. Quartz was selected for the diagnostic window and shock-velocity measurements were demonstrated in Hohlraum targets heated to 180 eV. Cryogenic experiments using targets filled with liquid deuterium further demonstrated the entire timing technique in a Hohlraum environment. Direct-drive cryogenic targets with multiple spherical shocks were used to further validate this technique, including convergence effects at relevant pressures (velocities) and sizes. These results provide confidence that shock velocity and timing can be measured in NIF ignition targets, allowing these critical parameters to be optimized.

Boehly, T. R.; Hu, S. X.; Morozas, J. A.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14645 (United States); Munro, D.; Celliers, P. M.; Hicks, D. G.; Collins, G. W.; Robey, H. F.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Olson, R. E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Goncharov, V. N. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14645 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, New York 14645 (United States); Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14645 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, New York 14645 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, New York 14645 (United States)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

The national ignition facility: early operational experience with a large Ada control system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt laser being built by the Department of Energy and the National ...

Robert W. Carey; Paul J. Van Arsdall; John P. Woodruff

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national ignition facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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41

Implosion dynamics measurements at the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements have been made of the in-flight dynamics of imploding capsules indirectly driven by laser energies of 1-1.7 MJ at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)]. These experiments were part of the National Ignition Campaign [Landen et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051002 (2011)] to iteratively optimize the inputs required to achieve thermonuclear ignition in the laboratory. Using gated or streaked hard x-ray radiography, a suite of ablator performance parameters, including the time-resolved radius, velocity, mass, and thickness, have been determined throughout the acceleration history of surrogate gas-filled implosions. These measurements have been used to establish a dynamically consistent model of the ablative drive history and shell compressibility throughout the implosion trajectory. First results showed that the peak velocity of the original 1.3-MJ Ge-doped polymer (CH) point design using Au hohlraums reached only 75% of the required ignition velocity. Several capsule, hohlraum, and laser pulse changes were then implemented to improve this and other aspects of implosion performance and a dedicated effort was undertaken to test the sensitivity of the ablative drive to the rise time and length of the main laser pulse. Changing to Si rather than Ge-doped inner ablator layers and increasing the pulse length together raised peak velocity to 93% {+-} 5% of the ignition goal using a 1.5 MJ, 420 TW pulse. Further lengthening the pulse so that the laser remained on until the capsule reached 30% (rather than 60%-70%) of its initial radius, reduced the shell thickness and improved the final fuel {rho}R on companion shots with a cryogenic hydrogen fuel layer. Improved drive efficiency was observed using U rather than Au hohlraums, which was expected, and by slowing the rise time of laser pulse, which was not. The effect of changing the Si-dopant concentration and distribution, as well as the effect of using a larger initial shell thickness were also examined, both of which indicated that instabilities seeded at the ablation front are a significant source of hydrodynamic mix into the central hot spot. Additionally, a direct test of the surrogacy of cryogenic fuel layered versus gas-filled targets was performed. Together all these measurements have established the fundamental ablative-rocket relationship describing the dependence of implosion velocity on fractional ablator mass remaining. This curve shows a lower-than-expected ablator mass at a given velocity, making the capsule more susceptible to feedthrough of instabilities from the ablation front into the fuel and hot spot. This combination of low velocity and low ablator mass indicates that reaching ignition on the NIF will require >20 {mu}m ({approx}10%) thicker targets and laser powers at or beyond facility limits.

Hicks, D. G.; Meezan, N. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Callahan, D. A.; Doeppner, T.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Di Nicola, P.; Dixit, S. N.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Eggert, J. E.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S. M.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A. V.; Heeter, R. F.; Holder, J. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

The Neutron Imaging System Fielded at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

Merrill, F E; Buckles, R; Clark, D D; Danly, C R; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Fatherley, V E; Fittinghoff, D N; Gallegos, R; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Loomis, E N; Lutz, S; Malone, R M; Martinson, D D; Mares, D; Morley, D J; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Tregillis, I L; Volegov, P L; Weiss, P B; Wilde, C H

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Visualization of Target Inspection data at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

As the National Ignition Facility continues its campaign to achieve ignition, new methods and tools will be required to measure the quality of the target capsules used to achieve this goal. Techniques have been developed to measure capsule surface features using a phase-shifting diffraction interferometer and Leica Microsystems confocal microscope. These instruments produce multi-gigabyte datasets which consist of tens to hundreds of files. Existing software can handle viewing a small subset of an entire dataset, but none can view a dataset in its entirety. Additionally, without an established mode of transport that keeps the target capsules properly aligned throughout the assembly process, a means of aligning the two dataset coordinate systems is needed. The goal of this project is to develop web based software utilizing WebGL which will provide high level overview visualization of an entire dataset, with the capability to retrieve finer details on demand, in addition to facilitating alignment of multiple datasets with one another based on common features that have been visually identified by users of the system.

Potter, D; Antipa, N

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

44

National Ignition Facility and Managing Location, Component, and State  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system coupled with a 10-meter diameter target chamber. There are over 6,200 Line Replaceable Units (LRUs) comprised of more than 104,000 serialized parts that make up the NIF. Each LRU is a modular unit typically composed of a mechanical housing, laser optics (glass, lenses, or mirrors), and utilities. To date, there are more than 120,000 data sets created to characterize the attributes of these parts. Greater than 51,000 Work Permits have been issued to install, maintain, and troubleshoot the components. One integrated system is used to manage these data, and more. The Location Component and State (LoCoS) system is a web application built using Java Enterprise Edition technologies and is accessed by over 1,200 users. It is either directly or indirectly involved with each aspect of NIF work activity, and interfaces with ten external systems including the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) and the Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM). Besides providing business functionality, LoCoS also acts as the NIF enterprise service bus. In this role, numerous integration approaches had to be adopted including: file exchange, database sharing, queuing, and web services in order to accommodate various business, technical, and security requirements. Architecture and implementation decisions are discussed.

Foxworthy, C; Fung, T; Beeler, R; Li, J; Dugorepec, J; Chang, C

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

45

The National Ignition Facility: The Path to Ignition, High Energy Density Science and Inertial Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is a Nd:Glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. This world's most energetic laser system is now operational with the goals of achieving thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and exploring the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in the interiors of planetary and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, NIF performed the first integrated ignition experiment which demonstrated the successful coordination of the laser, the cryogenic target system, the array of diagnostics and the infrastructure required for ignition. Many more experiments have been completed since. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and the international communities are examining the implication of achieving ignition on NIF for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a 10% electrical-optical efficiency laser, as well as further advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection and tracking, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in 10- to 15-years. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) baseline design and examining various technology choices for LIFE power plant This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF, the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the start of fundamental science experiments and plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to researchers around the world. The paper will conclude with a discussion of LIFE, its development path and potential to enable a carbon-free clean energy future.

Moses, E

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

46

Imaging VISAR diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires diagnostics to analyze high-energy density physics experiments. A VISAR (Velocity Interferometry System for Any Reflector) diagnostic has been designed to measure shock velocities, shock breakout times, and shock emission of targets with sizes from 1 to 5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter vacuum chamber. The optical relay sends the image out an equatorial port, through a 2-inch-thick vacuum window, and into two interferometers. A 60-kW VISAR probe laser operates at 659.5 nm with variable pulse width. Special coatings on the mirrors and cutoff filters are used to reject the NIF drive laser wavelengths and to pass a band of wavelengths for VISAR, passive shock breakout light, or thermal imaging light (bypassing the interferometers). The first triplet can be no closer than 500 mm from the target chamber center and is protected from debris by a blast window that is replaced after every event. The front end of the optical relay can be temporarily removed from the equatorial port, allowing other experimenters to use that port. A unique resolution pattern has been designed to validate the VISAR diagnostic before each use. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that the pointing accuracy of the optical axis can be checked. Seven CCD cameras monitor the diagnostic alignment.

Malone, R M; Bower, J R; Bradley, D K; Capelle, G A; Celeste, J R; Celliers, P M; Collins, G W; Eckart, M J; Eggert, J H; Frogget, B C; Guyton, R L; Hicks, D G; Kaufman, M I; MacGowan, B J; Montelongo, S; Ng, E W; Robinson, R B; Tunnell, T W; Watts, P W; Zapata, P G

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

47

Frequency converter development for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The design of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) incorporates a type I/type II third harmonic generator to convert the 1.053-{micro}m fundamental wavelength of the laser amplifier to a wavelength of 0.351 {micro}m for target irradiation. To understand and control the tolerances in the converter design, we have developed a comprehensive error budget that accounts for effects that are known to influence conversion efficiency, including variations in amplitude and phase of the incident laser pulse, temporal bandwidth of the incident laser pulse, crystal surface figure and bulk non-uniformities, angular alignment errors, Fresnel losses, polarization errors and crystal temperature variations. The error budget provides specifications for the detailed design of the NIF final optics assembly (FOA) and the fabrication of optical components. Validation is accomplished through both modeling and measurement, including full-scale Beamlet tests of a 37-cm aperture frequency converter in a NIF prototype final optics cell. The prototype cell incorporates full-perimeter clamping to support the crystals, and resides in a vacuum environment as per the NIF design.

Auerbach, J M; Barker, C E; Burkhart, S C; Couture, S A; DeYoreo, J J; Hackel, L A; Hibbard, R L; Liou, L W; Norton, M A; Wegner, P J; Whitman, P A

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

Cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments with equimolar deuterium-tritium thermonuclear fuel have been performed on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments use 0.17 mg of fuel with the potential for ignition and significant fusion yield conditions. The thermonuclear fuel has been fielded as a cryogenic layer on the inside of a spherical plastic capsule that is mounted in the center of a cylindrical gold hohlraum. Heating the hohlraum with 192 laser beams for a total laser energy of 1.6 MJ produces a soft x-ray field with 300 eV temperature. The ablation pressure produced by the radiation field compresses the initially 2.2-mm diameter capsule by a factor of 30 to a spherical dense fuel shell that surrounds a central hot-spot plasma of 50 {mu}m diameter. While an extensive set of x-ray and neutron diagnostics has been applied to characterize hot spot formation from the x-ray emission and 14.1 MeV deuterium-tritium primary fusion neutrons, thermonuclear fuel assembly is studied by measuring the down-scattered neutrons with energies in the range of 10 to 12 MeV. X-ray and neutron imaging of the compressed core and fuel indicate a fuel thickness of (14 {+-} 3) {mu}m, which combined with magnetic recoil spectrometer measurements of the fuel areal density of (1 {+-} 0.09) g cm{sup -2} result in fuel densities approaching 600 g cm{sup -3}. The fuel surrounds a hot-spot plasma with average ion temperatures of (3.5 {+-} 0.1) keV that is measured with neutron time of flight spectra. The hot-spot plasma produces a total fusion neutron yield of 10{sup 15} that is measured with the magnetic recoil spectrometer and nuclear activation diagnostics that indicate a 14.1 MeV yield of (7.5{+-}0.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} which is 70% to 75% of the total fusion yield due to the high areal density. Gamma ray measurements provide the duration of nuclear activity of (170 {+-} 30) ps. These indirect-drive implosions result in the highest areal densities and neutron yields achieved on laser facilities to date. This achievement is the result of the first hohlraum and capsule tuning experiments where the stagnation pressures have been systematically increased by more than a factor of 10 by fielding low-entropy implosions through the control of radiation symmetry, small hot electron production, and proper shock timing. The stagnation pressure is above 100 Gbars resulting in high Lawson-type confinement parameters of P{tau} Asymptotically-Equal-To 10 atm s. Comparisons with radiation-hydrodynamic simulations indicate that the pressure is within a factor of three required for reaching ignition and high yield. This will be the focus of future higher-velocity implosions that will employ additional optimizations of hohlraum, capsule and laser pulse shape conditions.

Glenzer, S. H.; Callahan, D. A.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Alger, E. T.; Berger, R. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bradley, D. K.; Burkhart, S. C.; Burr, R.; Caggiano, J. A.; Castro, C.; Choate, C.; Clark, D. S.; Celliers, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; DiNicola, P.; DiNicola, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

"New Results from the National Ignition Facility", Dr. John Lindl...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dr. John Lindl, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Since completion of the NIF construction project in March 2009, a wide variety of diagnostics, facility...

50

National Ignition Facility monthly status report-January 2000  

SciTech Connect

The Project provides for the design, procurement, construction, assembly, installation, and acceptance testing of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), an experimental inertial confinement fusion facility intended to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion in the laboratory by imploding a small capsule containing a mixture of the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium. The NIF will be constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, California as determined by the Record of Decision made on December 19, 1996, as a part of the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. Safety: On January 13, 2000, a worker received a back injury when a 42-in.-diameter duct fell during installation. He was taken by helicopter to the hospital and released on January 16, 2000. All work in the area was suspended, and the construction contractors went through a thorough safety review before work was started. A DOE occurrence report was filed. An independent LLNL Incident Analysis Team is reviewing the cause of the accident and will report out on March 1. A Project management review team is reviewing construction line management and safety support and will also report out on March 1. Several changes in work planning and site management have been incorporated to increase site safety. Technical Status: The general status of the technologies underlying the NIF Project remains satisfactory. The issues currently being addressed are (1) cleanliness for installation, assembly, and activation of the laser system by Systems Engineering; (2) laser glass--a second pilot run at one of the two commercial suppliers is ongoing; and (3) operational costs associated with final optics assembly (FOA) optics components--methods are being developed to mitigate 3 {omega}damage and resolve beam rotation issues. Schedule: The completion of the Title II design of laser equipment is now approximately 80% complete. The Beampath Infrastructure System is on the critical schedule path. The procurement strategy is being evaluated by commercial construction management and Architectural/Engineering (A/E) contractors with a report presented to a panel of independent experts, the Beampath Infrastructure System Implementation Review Committee Advisory Group who wrote a set of recommendations for proceeding with this critical path activity. In January, a briefing was given to DOE Oakland (OAK) Field Manager who then arranged briefings for the DOE OAK Procurement organization with the LLNL Procurement organization to review the proposed procurement strategies. The next step is to review the strategy with DOE Headquarters (HQ) procurement. The construction status of the Conventional Facilities at the end of January is 83% complete and is projected to finish within budget and on schedule. Cost: The NIF Project Total Project Cost (TPC) is $1.2B. The Project has obligated 73% of the TPC funds. The remaining contingency is $21.8M. Because of schedule delays and projected increases in the design, construction management, assembly, and installation of the system infrastructure, cost growth of the TPC is anticipated and will remain a major concern until the budget rebaseline process is completed.

Moses, E

2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

DOE/EIS-0236, Oakland Operations Office, National Ignition Facility Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EIS-0236, Oakland Operations Office, National Ignition Facility DOE/EIS-0236, Oakland Operations Office, National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Volume II: Response to Public Comments (January 2 DOE/EIS-0236, Oakland Operations Office, National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Volume II: Response to Public Comments (January 2 DOE issued the Draft SEIS for public review and comment by mailings to stakeholders and by announcements in the Federal Register (FR) on November 5, 1999, (64 FR 60430) (Attachment 4 of Volume I) and on November 12, 1999 (64 FR 61635) correcting a document title (Attachment 5 of Volume I). On

52

The National Ignition Facility: The Path to a Carbon-Free Energy Future  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF will enable exploration of scientific problems in national strategic security, basic science and fusion energy. One of the early NIF goals centers on achieving laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and energy gain, demonstrating the feasibility of laser fusion as a viable source of clean, carbon-free energy. This talk will discuss the precision technology and engineering challenges of building the NIF and those we must overcome to make fusion energy a commercial reality.

Stolz, C J

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

53

Nuclear diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility ,,invited... Thomas J. Murphy,a)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility ,,invited... Thomas J. Murphy,a) Cris W unprecedented opportunities for the use of nuclear diagnostics in inertial confinement fusion experiments to produce up to 1019 DT neutrons. In addition to a basic set of nuclear diagnostics based on previous

54

National Ignition Facility computational fluid dynamics modeling and light fixture case studies  

SciTech Connect

This report serves as a guide to the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as a design tool for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) program Title I and Title II design phases at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In particular, this report provides general guidelines on the technical approach to performing and interpreting any and all CFD calculations. In addition, a complete CFD analysis is presented to illustrate these guidelines on a NIF-related thermal problem.

Martin, R.; Bernardin, J.; Parietti, L.; Dennison, B.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Status of the National Ignition Facility Project, IG-0598 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

conventional facility; laser system; target experimental system; integrated computers and controls; assembly, installation, and refurbishment equipment; and utilities. To...

56

National Ignition Facility & Photon Science - Bringing Star Power to Earth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NIF Go NIF Go LLNL Logo Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LLNL Home NIF Home LIFE Home Jobs Site Map Contact News Press Releases In the News Status Update Media Assistance About Us National Ignition Facility About NIF How NIF Works The Seven Wonders of NIF Building NIF An Engineering Marvel NIFFY Early Light Collaborators Status Visiting NIF Missions National Security Energy for the Future Understanding the Universe People The People of NIF Awards NIF Professor Sabbatical Opportunities NIF Online Store Programs National Ignition Campaign How to Make a Star (ICF) Target Physics Target Fabrication Cryogenic Target System Diagnostics Participants Photon Science & Applications Advanced Optics Advanced Radiography Directed Energy Fusion Energy Inertial Fusion Energy How IFE Works Science at the Extremes

57

Activation of Air and Utilities in the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed 3-D modeling of the NIF facility is developed to accurately simulate the radiation environment within the NIF. Neutrons streaming outside the NIF Target Chamber will activate the air present inside the Target Bay and the Ar gas inside the laser tubes. Smaller levels of activity are also generated in the Switchyard air and in the Ar portion of the SY laser beam path. The impact of neutron activation of utilities located inside the Target Bay is analyzed for variety of shot types. The impact of activating TB utilities on dose received by maintenance personnel post-shot is analyzed. The current NIF facility model includes all important features of the Target Chamber, shielding system, and building configuration. Flow of activated air from the Target Bay is controlled by the HVAC system. The amount of activated Target Bay air released through the stack is very small and does not pose significant hazard to personnel or the environment. Activation of Switchyard air is negligible. Activation of Target Bay utilities result in a manageable dose rate environment post high yield (20 MJ) shots. The levels of activation generated in air and utilities during D-D and THD shots are small and do not impact work planning post shots.

Khater, H; Pohl, B; Brererton, S

2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

58

The National Ignition Facility Data Requirements Tim Frazier and Alice Koniges, LLNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ignition Facility Data Requirements Ignition Facility Data Requirements Tim Frazier and Alice Koniges, LLNL SC08 BOF: Computing with Massive and Persistent Data LLNL-PRES-408909. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52- 07NA27344 2 Target chamber One Terabyte of data to be downloaded in ~50 Minutes for each shot. 5 Full Aperture Backscatter Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator (DIM) Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator (DIM) X-ray imager Streaked x-ray detector VISAR Velocity Measurements Static x-ray imager FFLEX Hard x-ray spectrometer Near Backscatter Imager DANTE Soft x-ray temperature Diagnostic Alignment System Cross Timing System Each Diagnostic Produces Data that Requires Analysis 6 Tools are being built to manage and integrate:

59

Summary of the first neutron image data collected at the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary of data and results from the first neutron images produced by the National Ignition Facility (NIF), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, USA are presented. An overview of the neutron imaging technique is presented, as well as a synopsis of the data collected and measurements made to date. Data form directly driven, DT filled microballoons, as well as, indirectly driven, cryogenically layered ignition experiments are presented. The data presented show that the primary cores from directly driven implosions are approximately twice as large, 64 {+-} 3 {mu}m, as indirect cores 25 {+-} 4 and 29 {+-} 4 {mu}m and more asymmetric, P2/P0 = 47% vs. -14% and 7%. Further, comparison with the size and shape of X-ray image data on the same implosions show good agreement, indicating X-ray emission is dominated by the hot regions of the implosion.

Grim, G P; Archuleta, T N; Aragonez, R J; Atkinson, D P; Batha, S H; Barrios, M A; Bower, D E; Bradley, D K; Buckles, R A; Clark, D D; Clark, D J; Cradick, J R; Danly, C; Drury, O B; Fatherley, V E; Finch, J P; Garcia, F P; Gallegos, R A; Guler, N; Glenn, S M; Hsu, A H; Izumi, N; Jaramillo, S A; Kyrala, G A; Pape, S L; Loomis, E N; Mares, D; Martinson, D D; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A J; Merrill, F E; Morgan, G L; Munson, C; Murphy, T J; Polk, P J; Schmidt, D W; Tommasini, T; Tregillis, I L; Valdez, A C; Volegov, P L; Wang, T F; Wilde, C H; Wilke, M D; Wilson, D C; Dzenitis, J M; Felker, B; Fittinghoff, D N; Frank, M; Liddick, S N; Moran, M J; Roberson, G P; Weiss, P B; Kauffman, M I; Lutz, S S; Malone, R M; Traille, A

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: the first precision tuning series  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ignition implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] are driven with a very carefully tailored sequence of four shock waves that must be timed to very high precision in order to keep the fuel on a low adiabat. The first series of precision tuning experiments on NIF have been performed. These experiments use optical diagnostics to directly measure the strength and timing of all four shocks inside the hohlraum-driven, cryogenic deuterium-filled capsule interior. The results of these experiments are presented demonstrating a significant decrease in the fuel adiabat over previously un-tuned implosions. The impact of the improved adiabat on fuel compression is confirmed in related deuterium-tritium (DT) layered capsule implosions by measurement of fuel areal density (rR), which show the highest fuel compression (rR {approx} 1.0 g/cm{sup 2}) measured to date.

Robey, H F; Celliers, P M; Kline, J L; Mackinnon, A J

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national ignition facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Asymmetric directly driven capsule implosions: Modeling and experiments-A requirement for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Direct-drive experiments at the University of Rochester's OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly, R. L. McCrory, C. P. Verdon et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 44, 35 (1999)] have been performed to prototype eventual campaigns on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses and C. R. Wuest, Fusion Sci. Technol. 43, 420 (2003)] to investigate the mixing of target materials. Spherical-implosion targets with equatorial defects have been irradiated with polar direct drive, a requirement for direct-drive experiments at NIF. The physics question addressed by these results is whether simulations can match data on 0th-order hydrodynamics and implosion symmetry, the most basic implosion features, with and without the defect. The successful testing of hydrodynamic simulations leads to better designs for experiments and guides accurate planning for polar-direct-drive-ignition studies on the NIF platform.

Cobble, J. A.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Krashenninikova, N. S.; Obrey, K. A.; Hsu, S. C.; Tregillis, I. L.; Magelssen, G. R.; Wysocki, F. J.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop E527, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

The Gated X-ray Detector for the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two new gated x-ray imaging cameras have recently been designed, constructed and delivered to the National Ignition Facility in Livermore, CA. These Gated X-ray Detectors are each designed to fit within an aluminum airbox with a large capacity cooling plane and are fitted with an array of environmental housekeeping sensors. These instruments are significant different from earlier generations of gated x-ray images due in parts to an innovative impendence matching scheme, advanced phosphor screens, pulsed phosphor circuits, precision assembly fixturing, unique system monitoring and complete remote computer control. Preliminary characterization has shown repeatable uniformity between imaging strips, improved spatial resolution and no detectable impendence reflections.

Oertel, J A; Barnes, C; Archuleta, T; Casper, L; Fatherley, V; Heinrichs, T; King, R; Landers, D; Lopez, F; Sanchez, P; Sandoval, G; Schrank, L; Walsh, P; Bell, P; Brown, M; Costa, R; Holder, J; Montalongo, S; Pederson, N

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

63

Software solutions manage the definition, operation, maintenance and configuration control of the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest laser composed of millions of individual parts brought together to form one massive assembly. Maintaining control of the physical definition, status and configuration of this structure is a monumental undertaking yet critical to the validity of the shot experiment data and the safe operation of the facility. The NIF business application suite of software provides the means to effectively manage the definition, build, operation, maintenance and configuration control of all components of the National Ignition Facility. State of the art Computer Aided Design software applications are used to generate a virtual model and assemblies. Engineering bills of material are controlled through the Enterprise Configuration Management System. This data structure is passed to the Enterprise Resource Planning system to create a manufacturing bill of material. Specific parts are serialized then tracked along their entire lifecycle providing visibility to the location and status of optical, target and diagnostic components that are key to assessing pre-shot machine readiness. Nearly forty thousand items requiring preventive, reactive and calibration maintenance are tracked through the System Maintenance & Reliability Tracking application to ensure proper operation. Radiological tracking applications ensure proper stewardship of radiological and hazardous materials and help provide a safe working environment for NIF personnel.

Dobson, D; Churby, A; Krieger, E; Maloy, D; White, K

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

64

Assessment and Mitigation of Diagnostic-Generated Electromagnetic Interference at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Electromagnetic interference (EMI) is an ever-present challenge at laser facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The major source of EMI at such facilities is laser-target interaction that can generate intense electromagnetic fields within, and outside of, the laser target chamber. In addition, the diagnostics themselves can be a source of EMI, even interfering with themselves. In this paper we describe EMI generated by ARIANE and DIXI, present measurements, and discuss effects of the diagnostic-generated EMI on ARIANE's CCD and on a PMT nearby DIXI. Finally we present some of the efforts we have made to mitigate the effects of diagnostic-generated EMI on NIF diagnostics.

Brown, C G; Ayers, M J; Felker, B; Ferguson, W; Holder, J P; Nagel, S R; Piston, K W; Simanovskaia, N; Throop, A L; Chung, M; Hilsabeck, T

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

65

A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors (GXD) it records sixteen time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000eV with 100ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and VUV beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), evidence a <100{micro}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10eV at photon energies of 300eV.

Moore, A S; Guymer, T M; Kline, J L; Morton, J; Taccetti, M; Lanier, N E; Bentley, C; Workman, J; Peterson, B; Mussack, K; Cowan, J; Prasad, R; Richardson, M; Burns, S; Kalantar, D H; Benedetti, L R; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Hsing, W; Stevenson, M

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors it records 16 time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000 eV with 100 ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300 eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and vacuum ultraviolet beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source, evidence a <100 {mu}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10 eV at photon energies of 300 eV.

Moore, A. S.; Guymer, T. M.; Morton, J.; Bentley, C.; Stevenson, M. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kline, J. L.; Taccetti, M.; Lanier, N. E.; Workman, J.; Peterson, B.; Mussack, K.; Cowan, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Prasad, R.; Richardson, M.; Burns, S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D.; Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

On the Fielding of a High Gain, Shock-Ignited Target on the National Ignitiion Facility in the Near Term  

SciTech Connect

Shock ignition, a new concept for igniting thermonuclear fuel, offers the possibility for a near-term ({approx}3-4 years) test of high gain inertial confinement fusion on the National Ignition Facility at less than 1MJ drive energy and without the need for new laser hardware. In shock ignition, compressed fusion fuel is separately ignited by a strong spherically converging shock and, because capsule implosion velocities are significantly lower than those required for conventional hotpot ignition, fusion energy gains of {approx}60 may be achievable on NIF at laser drive energies around {approx}0.5MJ. Because of the simple all-DT target design, its in-flight robustness, the potential need for only 1D SSD beam smoothing, minimal early time LPI preheat, and use of present (indirect drive) laser hardware, this target may be easier to field on NIF than a conventional (polar) direct drive hotspot ignition target. Like fast ignition, shock ignition has the potential for high fusion yields at low drive energy, but requires only a single laser with less demanding timing and spatial focusing requirements. Of course, conventional symmetry and stability constraints still apply. In this paper we present initial target performance simulations, delineate the critical issues and describe the immediate-term R&D program that must be performed in order to test the potential of a high gain shock ignition target on NIF in the near term.

Perkins, L J; Betti, R; Schurtz, G P; Craxton, R S; Dunne, A M; LaFortune, K N; Schmitt, A J; McKenty, P W; Bailey, D S; Lambert, M A; Ribeyre, X; Theobald, W R; Strozzi, D J; Harding, D R; Casner, A; Atzemi, S; Erbert, G V; Andersen, K S; Murakami, M; Comley, A J; Cook, R C; Stephens, R B

2010-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

68

ENERGY PARTITIONING, ENERGY COUPLING (EPEC) EXPERIMENTS AT THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy-partitioning, energy-coupling (EPEC) experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will simultaneously measure the coupling of energy into both ground shock and air-blast overpressure from a laser-driven target. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of seismic and air-blast phenomena caused by a nuclear weapon. In what follows, we discuss the motivation for our investigation and briefly describe NIF. Then, we introduce the EPEC experiments, including diagnostics, in more detail.

Fournier, K B; Brown, C G; May, M J; Dunlop, W H; Compton, S M; Kane, J O; Mirkarimi, P B; Guyton, R L; Huffman, E

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

69

Initial Activation and Operation of the Power Conditioning System for the National Ignition Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NIF Power Conditioning System (PCS) resides in four Capacitor Bays, supplying energy to the Master and Power Amplifiers which reside in the two adjacent laser bays. Each capacitor bay will initially house 48 individual power conditioning modules, shown in Figure 2, with space reserved for expansion to 54 modules. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Power Conditioning System (PCS) is a modular capacitive energy storage system that will be capable of storing nearly 400 MJ of electrical energy and delivering that energy to the nearly 8000 flashlamps in the NIF laser. The first sixteen modules of the power conditioning system have been built, tested and installed. Activation of the first nine power conditioning modules has been completed and commissioning of the first ''bundle'' of laser beamlines has begun. This paper will provide an overview of the power conditioning system design and describe the status and results of initial testing and activation of the first ''bundle'' of power conditioning modules.

Newton, M A; Kamm, R E; Fulkerson, E S; Hulsey, S D; Lao, N; Parrish, G L; Pendleton, D L; Petersen, D E; Polk, M; Tuck, J M; Ullery, G T; Moore, W B

2003-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

70

Overview of the Gamma Reaction History Diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) has a need for measuring gamma radiation as part of a nuclear diagnostic program. A new gamma-detection diagnostic uses 90º off-axis parabolic mirrors to relay Cherenkov light from a volume of pressurized gas. This nonimaging optical system has the high-speed detector placed at a stop position with the Cherenkov light delayed until after the prompt gammas have passed through the detector. Because of the wavelength range (250 to 700 nm), the optical element surface finish was a key design constraint. A cluster of four channels (each set to a different gas pressure) will collect the time histories for different energy ranges of gammas.

Malone, R M; Frogget, B C; Kaufman, M I; Tibbitts, A; Tunnell, T W; Evans, S C; Herrmann, H W; Kim, Y H; Mack, J M; Young, C S; McGillivray, K D; Palagi, M J

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Overview and Status of the Power Conditioning System for the National Ignition Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Power Conditioning System (PCS) is a modular capacitive energy storage system that provides over 34 kilojoules of energy to each of the nearly 8000 flashlamps in the NIF laser. Up to 400 megajoules of energy can be stored in the NIF PCS system, discharged through spark gaps and delivered to the flashlamps through a coaxial transmission line system requiring nearly 100 miles of high-voltage cable. The NIF PCS has been under development for nearly 4 years. During this time, the system was developed and designed by Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM (SNLA) in conjunction with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Extensive reliability testing was performed at SNLA on the First Article NIF Test Module (FANTM) test facility and design improvements were implemented based on FANTM test results, leading to the final design presently undergoing system reliability testing at LLNL. Low-cost energy-storage capacitors, charging power supplies, and reliable, fault-tolerant components were developed through partnerships with numerous contractors. Extensive reliability and fault testing of components has also been performed. This paper will provide an overview of the many efforts that have culminated in the final design of the NIF PCS. The PCS system design will be described and the cost tradeoffs discussed. Plans for fabrication and installation of the NIF PCS system over the next 6 years will be presented.

Newton, M A; Fulkerson, E S; Hulsey, S D; Kamm, R E; Pendleton, D L; Petersen, D E; Smith, C R; Ullery, G T; McKay, P F; Moore, W B; Muirhead, D A

2001-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

72

Neutron spectrometry - An essential tool for diagnosing implosions at the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DT neutron yield (Y{sub n}), ion temperature (T{sub i}) and down-scatter ratio (dsr) determined from measured neutron spectra are essential metrics for diagnosing the performance of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A suite of neutron-Time-Of-Flight (nTOF) spectrometers and a Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) have been implemented in different locations around the NIF target chamber, providing good implosion coverage and the redundancy required for reliable measurements of Yn, Ti and dsr. From the measured dsr value, an areal density ({rho}R) is determined from the relationship {rho}R{sub tot} (g/cm{sup 2}) = (20.4 {+-} 0.6) x dsr{sub 10-12 MeV}. The proportionality constant is determined considering implosion geometry, neutron attenuation and energy range used for the dsr measurement. To ensure high accuracy in the measurements, a series of commissioning experiments using exploding pushers have been used for in situ calibration. The spectrometers are now performing to the required accuracy, as indicated by the good agreement between the different measurements over several commissioning shots. In addition, recent data obtained with the MRS and nTOFs indicate that the implosion performance of cryogenically layered DT implosions, characterized by the experimental Ignition Threshold Factor (ITFx) which is a function of dsr (or fuel {rho}R) and Y{sub n}, has improved almost two orders of magnitude since the first shot in September, 2010.

Mackinnon, A J; Johnson, M G; Frenje, J A; Casey, D T; Li, C K; Seguin, F H; Petrasso, R; Ashabranner, R; Cerjan, C; Clancy, T J; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Bond, E J; Caggiano, J A; Capenter, A; Eckart, M J; Edwards, M J; Friedrich, S; Glenzer, S H; Haan, S W; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Hachett, S P; McKernan, M; Jones, O; Lepape, S; Lerche, R A; Landen, O L; Moran, M; Moses, E; Munro, D; McNaney, J; Rygg, J R; Sepke, S; Spears, B; Springer, P; Yeamans, C; Farrell, M; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A; Paguio, R; Knauer, J; Glebov, V; Sangster, T; Betti, R; Stoeckl, C; Magoon, J; Shoup, M J; Grim, G P; Moran, G L; Murphy, T J; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

73

2011 Status of the Automatic Alignment System for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Automated alignment for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is accomplished using a large-scale parallel control system that directs 192 laser beams along the 300-m optical path. The beams are then focused down to a 50-micron spot in the middle of the target chamber. The entire process is completed in less than 50 minutes. The alignment system commands 9,000 stepping motors for highly accurate adjustment of mirrors and other optics. 41 control loops per beamline perform parallel processing services running on a LINUX cluster to analyze high-resolution images of the beams and their references. This paper describes the status the NIF automatic alignment system and the challenges encountered as NIF development has transitioned from building the laser, to becoming a research project supporting a 24 hour, 7 day laser facility. NIF is now a continuously operated system where performance monitoring is increasingly more critical for operation, maintenance, and commissioning tasks. Equipment wear and the effects of high energy neutrons from fusion experiments are issues which alter alignment efficiency and accuracy. New sensors needing automatic alignment assistance are common. System modifications to improve efficiency and accuracy are prevalent. Handling these evolving alignment and maintenance needs while minimizing the impact on NIF experiment schedule is expected to be an on-going challenge for the planned 30 year operational life of NIF.

Wilhelmsen, K; Awwal, A; Burkhart, S; McGuigan, D; Kamm, V M; Leach, R; Lowe-Webb, R; Wilson, R

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

74

Experimental validation of a diagnostic technique for tuning the fourth shock timing on National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] will be driven with a carefully tailored sequence of four shock waves that must be timed to very high precision in order to keep the fuel on a low adiabat. The Hohlraum conditions present during the first three shocks allow for a very accurate and direct diagnosis of the strength and timing of each individual shock by velocity interferometry. Experimental validation of this diagnostic technique on the OMEGA Laser Facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] has been reported in [Boehly et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056302 (2009)]. The Hohlraum environment present during the launch and propagation of the final shock, by contrast, is much more severe and will not permit diagnosis by the same technique. A new, closely related technique has been proposed for measuring and tuning the strength and timing of the fourth shock. Experiments to test this technique under NIF-relevant conditions have also been performed on OMEGA. The result of these experiments and a comparison to numerical simulations is presented, validating this concept.

Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Boehly, T. R.; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14645 (United States); Olson, R. E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

IMPACT OF TARGET MATERIAL ACTIVATION ON PERSONNEL EXPOSURE AND RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION IN THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed activation analyses are performed for the different materials under consideration for use in the target capsules and hohlraums used during the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility. Results of the target material activation were additionally used to estimate the levels of contamination within the NIF target chamber and the workplace controls necessary for safe operation. The analysis examined the impact of using Be-Cu and Ge-doped CH capsules on the external dose received by workers during maintenance activities. Five days following a 20 MJ shot, dose rates inside the Target Chamber (TC) due to the two proposed capsule materials are small ({approx} 1 {micro}rem/h). Gold and depleted-uranium (DU) are considered as potential hohlraum materials. Following a shot, gold will most probably get deposited on the TC first wall. On the other hand, while noble-gas precursors from the DU are expected to stay in the TC, most of the noble gases are pumped out of the chamber and end up on the cryopumps. The dose rates inside the TC due to activated gold or DU, at 5 days following a 20 MJ shot, are about 1 mrem/h. Dose rates in the vicinity of the cryo-pumps (containing noble 'fission' gases) drop-off to about 1 mrem/h during the first 12 hours following the shot. Contamination from activation of NIF targets will result in the NIF target chamber exceeding DOE surface contamination limits. Objects removed from the TC will need to be managed as radioactive material. However, the results suggest that airborne contamination from resuspension of surface contamination will not be significant and is at levels that can be managed by negative ventilation when accessing the TC attachments.

Khater, H; Epperson, P; Thacker, R; Beale, R; Kohut, T; Brereton, S

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) Apparatus for Nuclear Diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The RAGS (Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples) diagnostic apparatus was recently installed at the National Ignition Facility. Following a NIF shot, RAGS is used to pump the gas load from the NIF chamber for purification and isolation of the noble gases. After collection, the activated gaseous species are counted via gamma spectroscopy for measurement of the capsule areal density and fuel-ablator mix. Collection efficiency was determined by injecting a known amount of {sup 135}Xe into the NIF chamber, which was then collected with RAGS. Commissioning was performed with an exploding pusher capsule filled with isotopically enriched {sup 124}Xe and {sup 126}Xe added to the DT gas fill. Activated xenon species were recovered post-shot and counted via gamma spectroscopy. Results from the collection and commissioning tests are presented. The performance of RAGS allows us to establish a noble gas collection method for measurement of noble gas species produced via neutron and charged particle reactions in a NIF capsule.

Shaughnessy, D A; Velsko, C A; Jedlovec, D R; Yeamans, C B; Moody, K J; Tereshatov, E; Stoeffl, W; Riddle, A

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

77

Fielding of an Imaging VISAR Diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires diagnostics to analyze high-energy density physics experiments. As a core NIF early light diagnostic, this system measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and shock emission of targets with sizes from 1 to 5 mm. A 659.5 nm VISAR probe laser illuminates the target. An 8-inch-diameter fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 33-foot-diameter vacuum chamber. The optical relay sends the image out an equatorial port, through a 2-inch-thick vacuum window, and into two VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) interferometers. Both streak cameras and CCD cameras record the images. Total track is 75 feet. The front end of the optical relay can be temporarily removed from the equatorial port, allowing for other experimenters to use that port. The first triplet can be no closer than 500 mm from the target chamber center and is protected from debris by a blast window that is replaced after every event. Along with special coatings on the mirrors, cutoff filters reject the NIF drive laser wavelengths and pass a band of wavelengths for VISAR, for passive shock breakout light, or for thermal imaging light (bypassing the interferometers). Finite Element Analysis was performed on all mounting structures. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts, so that the pointing accuracy of the optical axis can be checked. A two-color laser alignment scheme is discussed.

Malone, R; Bower, J; Capelle, G; Celeste, J; Celliers, P; Frogget, B C; Guyton, R L; Kauffman, M; Lare, G; Lee, T; MacGowan, B; Montelongo, S; Thomas, T; Tunnell, T; Watts, P

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

78

Polar-drive designs for optimizing neutron yields on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Polar-drive designs are proposed for producing symmetric implosions of thin-shell, DT gas-filled targets leading to high fusion-neutron yields for neutron-diagnostic development. The designs can be implemented as soon as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell and W. J. Hogan, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41, B39 (1999)] is operational as they use indirect-drive phase plates. Two-dimensional simulations using the hydrodynamics code SAGE [R. S. Craxton and R. L. McCrory, J. Appl. Phys. 56, 108 (1984)] have shown that good low-mode uniformity can be obtained by choosing combinations of pointing and defocusing of the beams, including pointing offsets of individual beams within some of the NIF laser-beam quads. The optimizations have been carried out for total laser energies ranging from 350 kJ to 1.5 MJ, enabling the optimum pointing and defocusing parameters to be determined through interpolation for any given laser energy in this range. Neutron yields in the range of 10{sup 15}-10{sup 16} are expected.

Cok, A. M.; Craxton, R. S.; McKenty, P. W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

X-ray conversion efficiency in vacuum hohlraum experiments at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

X-ray fluxes measured in the first 96 and 192 beam vacuum hohlraum experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) were significantly higher than predicted by computational simulations employing XSN average atom atomic physics and highly flux-limited electron heat conduction. For agreement with experimental data, it was found that the coronal plasma emissivity must be simulated with a detailed configuration accounting model that accounts for x-ray emission involving all of the significant ionization states. It was also found that an electron heat conduction flux limit of f= 0.05 is too restrictive, and that a flux limit of f= 0.15 results in a much better match with the NIF vacuum hohlraum experimental data. The combination of increased plasma emissivity and increased electron heat conduction in this new high flux hohlraum model results in a reduction in coronal plasma energy and, hence, an explanation for the high ({approx}85%-90%) x-ray conversion efficiencies observed in the 235 < T{sub r} < 345 eV NIF vacuum hohlraum experiments.

Olson, R. E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Suter, L. J.; Callahan, D. A.; Rosen, M. D.; Dixit, S. N.; Landen, O. L.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Thomas, C. A.; Warrick, A.; Widmann, K.; Williams, E. A.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Kline, J. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

DOE/EIS-0236-S1; National Ignition Facility Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the SSM PEIS, October 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Ignition Facility Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the SSM PEIS Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office Oakland, California October 1999 [This page intentionally left blank.] iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy TITLE: National Ignition Facility Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the SSM PEIS CONTACT: For additional information on For general information on the NEPA this statement write or call: process at DOE, write or call: Mr. Richard Scott, Document Manager Ms. Carol M. Borgstrom, Director U.S. Department of Energy, L-293 Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance, EH-42 7000 East Avenue, P.O. Box 808 U.S. Department of Energy Livermore, CA 94550 1000 Independence Avenue, SW

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81

Optical design of the National Ignition Facility main laser and switchyard/target area beam transport system  

SciTech Connect

The optical design of the main laser and transport mirror sections of the National Ignition Facility are described. For the main laser the configuration, layout constraints, multiple beam arrangement, pinhole layout and beam paths, clear aperture budget, ray trace models, alignment constraints, lens designs, wavefront performance, and pupil aberrations are discussed. For the transport mirror system the layout, alignment controls and clear aperture budget are describe

English, R E; Korniski, R J; Miller, J L; Rodgers, J M

1998-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

82

Performance Improvements to the Neutron Imaging System at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A team headed by LANL and including many members from LLNL and NSTec LO and NSTec LAO fielded a neutron imaging system (NIS) at the National Ignition Facility at the start of 2011. The NIS consists of a pinhole array that is located 32.5 cm from the source and that creates an image of the source in a segmented scintillator 28 m from the source. The scintillator is viewed by two gated, optical imaging systems: one that is fiber coupled, and one that is lens coupled. While there are a number of other pieces to the system related to pinhole alignment, collimation, shielding and data acquisition, those pieces are discussed elsewhere and are not relevant here. The system is operational and has successfully obtained data on more that ten imaging shots. This remainder of this whitepaper is divided in five main sections. In Section II, we identify three critical areas of improvement that we believe should be pursued to improve the performance of the system for future experiments: spatial resolution, temporal response and signal-to-noise ratio. In Section III, we discuss technologies that could be used to improve these critical performance areas. In Section IV, we describe a path to evolve the current system to achieve improved performance with minimal impact on the ability of the system to operate on shots. In Section V, we discuss the abilities, scope and timescales of the current teams and the Commissariat energie atomique (CEA). In Section VI, we summarize and make specific recommendations for collaboration on improvements to the NIS.

Fittinghoff, D N; Bower, D E; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Hatarik, R; Merrill, F E; Grim, G P; Wilde, C H; Wilson, D C; Landoas, O; Caillaud, T; Bourgade, J; Buckles, R A; Lee, J; Weiss, P B

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

83

"Defense-in-Depth" Laser Safety and the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the largest and most energetic laser in the world contained in a complex the size of a football stadium. From the initial laser pulse, provided by telecommunication style infrared nanoJoule pulsed lasers, to the final 192 laser beams (1.8 Mega Joules total energy in the ultraviolet) converging on a target the size of a pencil eraser, laser safety is of paramount concern. In addition to this, there are numerous high-powered (Class 3B and 4) diagnostic lasers in use that can potentially send their laser radiation travelling throughout the facility. With individual beam paths of up to 1500 meters and a workforce of more than one thousand, the potential for exposure is significant. Simple laser safety practices utilized in typical laser labs just don't apply. To mitigate these hazards, NIF incorporates a multi layered approach to laser safety or 'Defense in Depth.' Most typical high-powered laser operations are contained and controlled within a single room using relatively simplistic controls to protect both the worker and the public. Laser workers are trained, use a standard operating procedure, and are required to wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) such as Laser Protective Eyewear (LPE) if the system is not fully enclosed. Non-workers are protected by means of posting the room with a warning sign and a flashing light. In the best of cases, a Safety Interlock System (SIS) will be employed which will 'safe' the laser in the case of unauthorized access. This type of laser operation is relatively easy to employ and manage. As the operation becomes more complex, higher levels of control are required to ensure personnel safety. Examples requiring enhanced controls are outdoor and multi-room laser operations. At the NIF there are 192 beam lines and numerous other Class 4 diagnostic lasers that can potentially deliver their hazardous energy to locations far from the laser source. This presents a serious and complex potential hazard to personnel. Because of this, a multilayered approach to safety is taken. This paper presents the philosophy and approach taken at the NIF in the multi-layered 'defense-in-depth' approach to laser safety.

King, J J

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

84

Interactive Game for Teaching Laser Amplification Used at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to create an interactive game to expose high school students to concepts in laser amplification by demonstrating the National Ignition Facility's main amplifier at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. To succeed, the game had to be able to communicate effectively the basic concepts of laser amplification as accurately as possible and to be capable of exposing as many students as possible. Since concepts need to be communicated in a way that students understand, the Science Content Standards for California Public Schools were used to make assumptions about high school students knowledge of light. Effectively communicating a new concept necessitates the omission on terminology and symbolism. Therefore, creating a powerful experience was ideal for communicating this material. Various methods of reinforcing this experience ranging from color choice to abstractions kept the student focused on the game to maximize concept retention. The program was created in Java to allow the creation of a Java Applet that can be embedded onto a webpage, which is a perfect medium for mass exposure. Because a game requires interaction, the game animations had to be easily manipulated to enable the program to respond to user input. Image sprites, as opposed to image folders, were used in these animations to minimize the number of Hypertext Transfer Protocol connections, and thus, significantly reduce the transfer time of necessary animation files. These image sprites were loaded and cropped into a list of animation frames. Since the caching of large transition animations caused the Java Virtual Machine to run out of memory, large animations were implemented as animated Graphics Interchange Format images since transitions require no interaction, and thus, no frame manipulation was needed. This reduced the animation's memory footprint. The first version of this game was completed during this project. Future work for the project could include the creation of focus groups to assess the effectiveness of communicating material through an interactive game. Numerical assessments programmed into the game could also be used to collect statistics that reflect difficulty or level of frustration that students experience.

Lin, E

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

85

Interactive Game for Teaching Laser Amplification Used at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to create an interactive game to expose high school students to concepts in laser amplification by demonstrating the National Ignition Facility's main amplifier at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. To succeed, the game had to be able to communicate effectively the basic concepts of laser amplification as accurately as possible and to be capable of exposing as many students as possible. Since concepts need to be communicated in a way that students understand, the Science Content Standards for California Public Schools were used to make assumptions about high school students knowledge of light. Effectively communicating a new concept necessitates the omission on terminology and symbolism. Therefore, creating a powerful experience was ideal for communicating this material. Various methods of reinforcing this experience ranging from color choice to abstractions kept the student focused on the game to maximize concept retention. The program was created in Java to allow the creation of a Java Applet that can be embedded onto a webpage, which is a perfect medium for mass exposure. Because a game requires interaction, the game animations had to be easily manipulated to enable the program to respond to user input. Image sprites, as opposed to image folders, were used in these animations to minimize the number of Hypertext Transfer Protocol connections, and thus, significantly reduce the transfer time of necessary animation files. These image sprites were loaded and cropped into a list of animation frames. Since the caching of large transition animations caused the Java Virtual Machine to run out of memory, large animations were implemented as animated Graphics Interchange Format images since transitions require no interaction, and thus, no frame manipulation was needed. This reduced the animation's memory footprint. The first version of this game was completed during this project. Future work for the project could include the creation of focus groups to assess the effectiveness of communicating material through an interactive game. Numerical assessments programmed into the game could also be used to collect statistics that reflect difficulty or level of frustration that students experience.

Lin, E

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

86

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the issue of nonproliferation. Final study  

SciTech Connect

NIF, the next step proposed by DOE in a progression of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) facilities, is expected to reach the goal of ICF capsule ignition in the laboratory. This report is in response to a request of a Congressman that DOE resolve the question of whether NIF will aid or hinder U.S. nonproliferation efforts. Both technical and policy aspects are addressed, and public participation was part of the decision process. Since the technical proliferation concerns at NIF are manageable and can be made acceptable, and NIF can contribute positively to U.S. arms control and nonproliferation policy goals, it is concluded that NIF supports the nuclear nonproliferation objectives of the United States.

1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

87

Use of the target diagnostic control system in the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The extreme physics of targets shocked by NIF's 192-beam laser are observed by a diverse suite of diagnostics including optical backscatter, time-integrated, time resolved and gated X-ray sensors, laser velocity interferometry, and neutron time of flight. Diagnostics to diagnose fusion ignition implosion and neutron emissions have been developed. A Diagnostic Control System (DCS) for both hardware and software facilitates development and eases integration. Each complex diagnostic typically uses an ensemble of electronic instruments attached to sensors, digitizers, cameras, and other devices. In the DCS architecture each instrument is interfaced to a low-cost Window XP processor and Java application. Instruments are aggregated as needed in the supervisory system to form an integrated diagnostic. The Java framework provides data management, control services and operator GUI generation. During the past several years, over thirty-six diagnostics have been deployed using this architecture in support of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The DCS architecture facilitates the expected additions and upgrades to diagnostics as more experiments are performed. This paper presents the DCS architecture, framework and our experiences in using it during the NIC to operate, upgrade and maintain a large set of diagnostic instruments.

Shelton, R; Lagin, L; Nelson, J

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

88

The National Ignition Facility Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control roo...

Moses, E I

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Orchestrating shots for the national ignition racility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8 Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultra-violet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter ... Keywords: Ada95, CORBA, XML, architecture, concurrency, data driven, framework, java, model-based, multi-threaded, state machine, workflow

David G. Mathisen; Robert W. Carey

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control room presents facility-wide status and orchestrates experiments using operating parameters predicted by physics models. A network of several hundred front-end processors (FEPs) implements device control. The object-oriented software system is implemented in the Ada and Java languages and emphasizes CORBA distribution of reusable software objects. NIF is currently scheduled to provide first light in 2004 and will be completed in 2008.

E. I. Moses

2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

91

National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) was prepared pursuant to a Joint Stipulation and Order approved and entered as an order of the court on October 27, 1997, in partial settlement of the lawsuit Civ. No. 97-936 (SS) (D.D.C.), ''Natural Resources Defense Council [NRDC] et al. v. Richardson et al.'' The Joint Stipulation and Order is reproduced at the end of this document as Attachment 1. In the Joint Stipulation and Order, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) agreed to prepare an SEIS to the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SSM PEIS) (DOE/EIS-0236, DOE 1996a) to evaluate the reasonably foreseeable significant adverse environmental impacts of continuing to construct and of operating the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California, with respect to any potential or confirmed contamination in the area by hazardous, toxic, and/or radioactive materials. On September 25, 1998, DOE announced in the ''Federal Register'' the agency's intent to prepare this SEIS for the NIF portion (Volume III, Appendix I) of the SSM PEIS. DOE's need for preparation of this SEIS, consistent with the previously established need for NIF (DOE 1996a, Appendix I), is to determine how the results of characterization studies completed pursuant to the Joint Stipulation and Order should affect the manner in which DOE proceeds with the construction and operation of NIF. On August 5, 1999, DOE issued an amended Notice of Intent to prepare this SEIS, which incorporated changes in schedule resulting from new relevant information. The SSM PEIS addressed alternative plans for DOE's defense program activities related to nuclear weapons stockpile issues at several DOE laboratories, including LLNL. The environmental consequences of construction and operation of NIF were addressed in detail in SSM PEIS Volume III, Appendix I, entitled ''National Ignition Facility Project Specific Analysis'' (NIF PSA). The Record of Decision (ROD) for the SSM PEIS was published in the ''Federal Register'' on December 26, 1996 (61 FR 68014). In the ROD, DOE announced its decision to construct and operate NIF at LLNL. The NIF is an experimental facility that would use laser light to initiate a fusion reaction in very small quantities of hydrogen by a process known as inertial confinement fusion. The start of physical construction of NIF was authorized on March 7, 1997, and groundbreaking for the NIF occurred on May 29, 1997. Construction of the NIF is ongoing; the conventional facilities are over 94% complete and are expected to be completed in late 2001.

N /A

2001-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

92

The Design and Implementation of the Integrated Timing System to be Used in the National Ignition Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility, or NIF, currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will contain the world's most powerful laser. By the year 2003 the NIF laser will be a research tool allowing scientists a glimpse into plasma interactions that are equivalent to those found in the center of the sun. Every eight hours the NIF will generate 1.8 MJ of 351-nm light carried by 192 pulsed laser beams and focus it onto a pea-sized target. This will result in a fusion reaction between two isotopes of hydrogen, creating for a few hundred picoseconds stellar conditions. Synchronizing the beams and diagnosing the fusion reaction requires generation and delivery of over 1000 precisely timed triggers to a multitude of systems. The NIF Integrated Timing System (ITS) was developed to provide reliable, accurately timed triggers that allow each client system to operate independently during periods of shot preparation and maintenance, yet be coordinated to a few tens of picoseconds during the experiment. The ITS applies technologies developed for fiber communications and Two-Way Time Transfer, and integrates them by way of a computer communications network to achieve distributed control, dynamically configurable coordination and independent among timing channels, and integrated self-diagnostics.

Coutts, G.W.; Wiedwald, J.D.; Sewall, N.; Lagin, L.

1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

93

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) apparatus for nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (invited)  

SciTech Connect

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) diagnostic apparatus was recently installed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Following a NIF shot, RAGS is used to pump the gas load from the NIF chamber for purification and isolation of the noble gases. After collection, the activated gaseous species are counted via gamma spectroscopy for measurement of the capsule areal density and fuel-ablator mix. Collection efficiency was determined by injecting a known amount of {sup 135}Xe into the NIF chamber, which was then collected with RAGS. Commissioning was performed with an exploding pusher capsule filled with isotopically enriched {sup 124}Xe and {sup 126}Xe added to the DT gas fill. Activated xenon species were recovered post-shot and counted via gamma spectroscopy. Results from the collection and commissioning tests are presented. The performance of RAGS allows us to establish a noble gas collection method for measurement of noble gas species produced via neutron and charged particle reactions in a NIF capsule.

Shaughnessy, D. A.; Velsko, C. A.; Jedlovec, D. R.; Yeamans, C. B.; Moody, K. J.; Tereshatov, E.; Stoeffl, W.; Riddle, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808, L-236, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Adaptation of a cubic smoothing spline algortihm for multi-channel data stitching at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Some diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), including the Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic, require multiple channels of data to achieve the required dynamic range. These channels need to be stitched together into a single time series, and they may have non-uniform and redundant time samples. We chose to apply the popular cubic smoothing spline technique to our stitching problem because we needed a general non-parametric method. We adapted one of the algorithms in the literature, by Hutchinson and deHoog, to our needs. The modified algorithm and the resulting code perform a cubic smoothing spline fit to multiple data channels with redundant time samples and missing data points. The data channels can have different, time-varying, zero-mean white noise characteristics. The method we employ automatically determines an optimal smoothing level by minimizing the Generalized Cross Validation (GCV) score. In order to automatically validate the smoothing level selection, the Weighted Sum-Squared Residual (WSSR) and zero-mean tests are performed on the residuals. Further, confidence intervals, both analytical and Monte Carlo, are also calculated. In this paper, we describe the derivation of our cubic smoothing spline algorithm. We outline the algorithm and test it with simulated and experimental data.

Brown, C; Adcock, A; Azevedo, S; Liebman, J; Bond, E

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

95

Gamma bang time/reaction history diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility using 90 deg. off-axis parabolic mirrors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas Cherenkov detectors (GCDs) have been used to convert fusion gamma into photons to achieve gamma bang time and reaction history measurements. The GCDs designed for OMEGA used Cassegrain reflector optics in order to fit inside a 10 in. manipulator. A novel design for the National Ignition Facility using 90 deg. off-axis parabolic mirrors will increase light collection efficiency from fusion gammas and achieve minimum time dispersion. The broadband Cherenkov light (from 200 to 800 nm) is relayed into a high-speed detector using three parabolic mirrors. Because light is collected from many source planes throughout the CO{sub 2} gas volume, the detector is positioned at the stop position rather than at an image position. The stop diameter and its position are independent of the light-generation location along the gas cell. The current design collects light from a 100 mm diameter by 500 mm long gas volume. Optical ray tracings demonstrate how light can be collected from different angled trajectories of the Compton electrons as they fly through the CO{sub 2} gas volume. A cluster of four channels will allow for increased dynamic range as well as for different gamma energy threshold sensitivities.

Malone, R. M. [National Security Technologies, P.O. Box 809, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Herrmann, H. W.; Mack, J. M.; Young, C. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Stoeffl, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Target Diagnostic Instrument-Based Controls Framework for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extreme physics of targets shocked by NIF's 192-beam laser are observed by a diverse suite of diagnostics including optical backscatter, time-integrated and gated X-ray sensors, and laser velocity interferometry. Diagnostics to diagnose fusion ignition implosion and neutron emissions are being planned. Many diagnostics will be developed by collaborators at other sites, but ad hoc controls could lead to unreliable and costly operations. An instrument-based controls (I-BC) framework for both hardware and software facilitates development and eases integration. Each complex diagnostic typically uses an ensemble of electronic instruments attached to sensors, digitizers, cameras, and other devices. In the I-BC architecture each instrument is interfaced to a low-cost Windows XP processor and Java application. Each instrument is aggregated with others as needed in the supervisory system to form an integrated diagnostic. The Java framework provides data management, control services and operator GUI generation. I-BCs are reusable by replication and reconfiguration for specific diagnostics in XML. Advantages include minimal application code, easy testing, and better reliability. Collaborators save costs by assembling diagnostics with existing I-BCs. This paper discusses target diagnostic instrumentation used on NIF and presents the I-BC architecture and framework.

Shelton, R T; O'Brien, D W; Kamperschroer, J H; Nelson, J R

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

97

"Basic Research Directions Workshop on User Science at the National Ignition Facility"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Strong NIF shot demand reflects scientific opportunities discussed in recent federal reports 2Keane--CIS Technical Review, April 13-15, 2011NIF-0311-21167.ppt The importance of access to NNSA facilities is emphasized in these reports- NIF is developing processes and infrastructure to support

98

Target Diagnostic Instrument-Based Controls Framework for the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIF target diagnostics are being developed to observe and measure the extreme physics of targets irradiated by the 192-beam laser. The response time of target materials can be on the order of 100ps--the time it takes light to travel 3 cm--temperatures more than 100 times hotter than the surface of the sun, and pressures that exceed 109 atmospheres. Optical and x-ray diagnostics were developed and fielded to observe and record the results of the first 4-beam experiments at NIF. Hard and soft x-ray spectra were measured, and time-integrated and gated x-ray images of hydrodynamics experiments were recorded. Optical diagnostics recorded backscatter from the target, and VISAR laser velocimetry measurements were taken of laser-shocked target surfaces. Additional diagnostics are being developed and commissioned to observe and diagnose ignition implosions, including various neutron and activation diagnostics. NIF's diagnostics are being developed at LLNL and with collaborators at other sites. To accommodate the growing number of target diagnostics, an Instrument-Based Controls hardware-software framework has been developed to facilitate development and ease integration into the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). Individual WindowsXP PC controllers for each digitizer, power supply and camera (i.e., instruments) execute controls software unique to each instrument model. Each hardware-software controller manages a single instrument, in contrast to the complexity of combining all the controls software needed for a diagnostic into a single controller. Because of this simplification, controllers can be more easily tested on the actual hardware, evaluating all normal and off-normal conditions. Each target diagnostic is then supported by a number of instruments, each with its own hardware-software instrument-based controller. Advantages of the instrument-based control architecture and framework include reusability, testability, and improved reliability of the deployed hardware and software. Since the same instruments are commonly used on many different diagnostics, the controllers are reusable by replicating the hardware and software as a unit and reconfiguring the controller using configuration files for the specific diagnostic. Diagnostics are fully integrated and interoperable with ICCS supervisory and shot controls using these configuration files to drive the diagnostics' instrument-based controllers.

Shelton, R; O'Brien, D; Nelson, J; Kamperschroer, J

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

99

Combining a thermal-imaging diagnostic with an existing imaging VISAR diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical diagnostics are currently being designed to analyze high-energy density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Two independent line-imaging Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) interferometers have been fielded to measure shock velocities, breakout times, and emission of targets having sizes of 1-5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter, fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter NIF vacuum chamber. VISAR recordings use a 659.5-nm probe laser. By adding a specially coated beam splitter to the interferometer table, light at wavelengths from 540 to 645 nm is spilt into a thermal-imaging diagnostic. Because fused silica lenses are used in the first triplet relay, the intermediate image planes for different wavelengths separate by considerable distances. A corrector lens on the interferometer table reunites these separated wavelength planes to provide a good image. Thermal imaging collects light at f/5 from a 2-mm object placed at Target Chamber Center (TCC). Streak cameras perform VISAR and thermal-imaging recording. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that pointing accuracy of the optical axis may be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) are used to align both diagnostics. The red alignment laser is selected to be at the 50 percent reflection point of the beam splitter. This alignment laser is introduced at the recording streak cameras for both diagnostics and passes through this special beam splitter on its way into the NIF vacuum chamber.

Malone, R; Celeste, J; Celliers, P; Frogget, B; Guyton, R L; Kaufman, M; Lee, T; MacGowan, B; Ng, E W; Reinbachs, I P; Robinson, R B; Seppala, L; Tunnell, T W; Watts, P

2005-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

100

Combining a thermal-imaging diagnostic with an existing imaging VISAR diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical diagnostics are currently being designed to analyze high-energy density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Two independent line-imaging Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) interferometers have been fielded to measure shock velocities, breakout times, and emission of targets having sizes of 1–5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter, fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter NIF vacuum chamber. VISAR recordings use a 659.5-nm probe laser. By adding a specially coated beam splitter to the interferometer table, light at wavelengths from 540 to 645 nm is spilt into a thermal-imaging diagnostic. Because fused silica lenses are used in the first triplet relay, the intermediate image planes for different wavelengths separate by considerable distances. A corrector lens on the interferometer table reunites these separated wavelength planes to provide a good image. Thermal imaging collects light at f/5 from a 2-mm object placed at Target Chamber Center (TCC). Streak cameras perform VISAR and thermal-imaging recording. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that pointing accuracy of the optical axis may be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) are used to align both diagnostics. The red alignment laser is selected to be at the 50 percent reflection point of the beam splitter. This alignment laser is introduced at the recording streak cameras for both diagnostics and passes through this special beam splitter on its way into the NIF vacuum chamber.

Robert M. Malone; John R. Celesteb; Peter M. Celliers; Brent C. Froggeta; Robert L. Guyton; Morris I. Kaufman; Tony L. Lee; Brian J. MacGowan; Edmund W. Ng; Imants P. Reinbachs; Ronald B. Robinson; Lynn G. Seppala; Tom W. Tunnell; Phillip W. Watts

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national ignition facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

An initial assessment of three-dimensional polar direct drive capsule asymmetries for implosions at the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) provides a unique opportunity to study implosion physics with nuclear yield. The use of polar direct drive (PDD) [A. M. Cok, R. S. Craxton, and P. W. McKenty, Phys. Plasmas 15, 082705 (2008)] provides a simple platform for the experimental studies without expensive optics upgrades to NIF. To determine the optimum PDD laser pointing geometry on NIF and provide a baseline for validating inertial confinement fusion codes against experiments for symmetric and asymmetric implosions, computer simulations using the 3D radiation-hydrodynamics code hydra[M. M. Marinak, R. E. Tipton, O. L. Landen, T. J. Murphy, P. Amendt, S. W. Haan, S. P. Hatchett, C. J. Keane, R. McEachern, and R. Wallace, Phys. Plasmas 3, 2070 (1996)] were preformed. The upper hemisphere of a DT-filled CH capsule was imploded by 96 NIF beams in a PDD configuration. Asymmetries in both polar and equatorial directions around the capsule were observed, with the former dominating the latter. Analysis of the simulation results indicates that the lack of symmetry in the initial power density profile (during the first 200 ps of the implosion) is a primary cause of late-time asymmetry in the implosion as well as decreased yield. By adjusting the laser pointings, the symmetry and total neutron yield were improved. Simulations with dropped quads (four of the NIF laser system's 192 beamlines) without repointing worsen the overall symmetry by a factor of 10 (with respect to rms radial variation around the capsule) and reduce neutron yield by a factor of 2. Both of these degraded implosion characteristics are restored by azimuthal repointing of the remaining quads.

Krasheninnikova, Natalia S.; Finnegan, Sean M.; Schmitt, Mark J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Capsule performance optimization in the National Ignition Campaign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A capsule performance optimization campaign will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] to substantially increase the probability of ignition by laser-driven hohlraums [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)]. The campaign will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition attempts. The required tuning techniques using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates have been demonstrated at the OMEGA facility under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design and shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. In addition, a roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget.

Landen, O. L.; Bradley, D. K.; Braun, D. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A.; Hicks, D. G.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J.; Munro, D. H.; Robey, H. F.; Spears, B. K.; Thomas, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Calibration of X-ray detectors in the 8 to 115 keV energy range and their application to diagnostics on the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The calibration of X-ray diagnostics is of paramount importance to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) fills this need by providing a wide variety of calibration and diagnostic development services in support of the ongoing research efforts at NIF. The X-ray source in the High Energy X-ray lab utilizes induced fluorescence in a variety of metal foils to produce a beam of characteristic X rays ranging from 8 to 111 keV. Presented are the methods used for calibrating a High Purity Germanium detector, which has been absolutely calibrated using radioactive check sources, compared against a silicon photodiode calibrated at Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Also included is a limited presentation of results from the recent calibration of the upgraded Filter Fluorescer X ray Spectrometer.

J. J. Lee, M. J. Haugh, G. LaCaille, and P. Torres

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

DOE/EIS-0236-S1F; National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (January 2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUMMARY SUMMARY 1 This Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) was prepared pursuant to a Joint Stipulation and Order approved and entered as an order of the court on October 27, 1997, in partial settlement of the lawsuit Civ. No. 97-936 (SS) (D.D.C.), Natural Resources Defense Council [NRDC] et al. v. Richardson et al. The Joint Stipulation and Order is reproduced at the end of this document as Attachment 1. In the Joint Stipulation and Order, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) agreed to prepare an SEIS to the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SSM PEIS) (DOE/EIS-0236, DOE 1996a) to evaluate the reasonably foreseeable significant adverse environmental impacts of continuing to construct and of operating the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National

105

Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Inertial Confinement Fusion Inertial Confinement Fusion Facilities Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion > Facilities Facilities Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion, Facilities ICF operates a set of world-class experimental facilities to create HEDP conditions and to obtain quantitative data in support of its numerous stockpile stewardship-related activities. To learn about three high energy experimental facilities and two small lasers that provide ICF capabilities, select the links below. National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OMEGA and OMEGA EP, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics Z Machine, Sandia National Laboratories

106

DOE/EIS-0236-S1F; National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (January 2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I: Main Text I: Main Text Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office Oakland, California January 2001 [This page intentionally left blank] iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy TITLE: National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement CONTACT: For additional information on For general information on the NEPA this statement, write or call: process at DOE, write or call: Mr. Richard Scott, Document Manager Ms. Carol M. Borgstrom, Director U.S. Department of Energy, L-467 Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, EH-42 7000 East Avenue, P.O. Box 808 U.S. Department of Energy Livermore, CA 94550 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Telephone: (925) 423-3022

107

Optical alignment techniques for line-imaging velocity interferometry and line-imaging self-emission of targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires optical diagnostics for measuring shock velocities in shock physics experiments. The nature of the NIF facility requires the alignment of complex three-dimensional optical systems of very long distances. Access to the alignment mechanisms can be limited, and any alignment system must be operator friendly. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and emission of 1- to 5-mm targets at a location remote to the NIF target chamber. Three optical systems using the same vacuum chamber port each have a total track of 21 m. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts or sliding rails, enabling pointing accuracy of the optical axis to be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) align these diagnostics to a listing of tolerances. Movable aperture cards, placed before and after lens groups, show the spread of alignment spots created by the orange and red alignment lasers. Optical elements include 1-in. to 15-in. diameter mirrors, lenses with up to 10.5-in. diameters, beamsplitters, etalons, dove prisms, filters, and pellicles. Alignment of more than 75 optical elements must be verified before each target shot. Archived images from eight alignment cameras prove proper alignment before each shot.

Malone, Robert; Celeste, John; Celliers, Peter; Frogget, Brent; Robert Guyton,,; Kaufman, Morris; Lee, Tony; MacGowan, Brian; Ng, Edmend; Reinbachs, Imants; Robinson, Ronald; Tunnell, Thomas; Watts, Phillip

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Optical Alignment Techniques for Line-Imaging Velocity Interferometry and Line-Imaging Self-Emission of Targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires optical diagnostics for measuring shock velocities in shock physics experiments. The nature of the NIF facility requires the alignment of complex three-dimensional optical systems of very long distances. Access to the alignment mechanisms can be limited, and any alignment system must be operator friendly. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and emission of 1- to 5-mm targets at a location remote to the NIF target chamber. Three optical systems using the same vacuum chamber port each have a total track of 21 meters. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts or sliding rails, enabling pointing accuracy of the optical axis to be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) align these diagnostics to a listing of tolerances. Movable aperture cards, placed before and after lens groups, show the spread of alignment spots created by the orange and red alignment lasers. Optical elements include 1-in. to 15-in. diameter mirrors, lenses with up to 10.5-in. diameters, beamsplitters, etalons, dove prisms, filters, and pellicles. Alignment of more than 75 optical elements must be verified before each target shot. Archived images from eight alignment cameras prove proper alignment before each shot.

Malone, R M; Celeste, J R; Celliers, P M; Frogget, B .; Guyton, R L; Kaufman, M I; Lee, T L; MacGowan, B J; Ng, E W; Reinbachs, I P; Robinson, R B; Tunnell, T W; Watts, P W

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

X-ray Streak Camera Cathode Development and Timing Accuracy of the 4w UV Fiducial System at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The convergent ablator experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are designed to measure the peak velocity and remaining ablator mass of an indirectly driven imploding capsule. Such a measurement can be performed using an x-ray source to backlight the capsule and an x-ray streak camera to record the capsule as it implodes. The ultimate goal of this experiment is to achieve an accuracy of 2% in the velocity measurement, which translates to a {+-}2 ps temporal accuracy over any 300 ps interval for the streak camera. In order to achieve this, a 4-{omega} (263nm) temporal fiducial system has been implemented for the x-ray streak camera at NIF. Aluminum, Titanium, Gold and Silver photocathode materials have been tested. Aluminum showed the highest quantum efficiency, with five times more peak signal counts per fiducial pulse when compared to Gold. The fiducial pulse data was analyzed to determine the centroiding a statistical accuracy for incident laser pulse energies of 1 and 10 nJ, showing an accuracy of {+-}1.6 ps and {+-}0.7 ps respectively.

Opachich, Y P; Palmer, N; Homoelle, D; Hatch, B W; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Kalantar, D; Browning, D; Landen, O

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

110

X-ray streak camera cathode development and timing accuracy of the 4{omega} ultraviolet fiducial system at the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The convergent ablator experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are designed to measure the peak velocity and remaining ablator mass of an indirectly driven imploding capsule. Such a measurement can be performed using an x-ray source to backlight the capsule and an x-ray streak camera to record the capsule as it implodes. The ultimate goal of this experiment is to achieve an accuracy of 2% in the velocity measurement, which translates to a {+-}2 ps temporal accuracy over any 300 ps interval for the streak camera. In order to achieve this, a 4{omega} (263 nm) temporal fiducial system has been implemented for the x-ray streak camera at NIF. Aluminum, titanium, gold, and silver photocathode materials have been tested. Aluminum showed the highest relative quantum efficiency, with five times more peak signal counts per fiducial pulse when compared to Gold. The fiducial pulse data were analyzed to determine the centroiding statistical accuracy for incident laser pulse energies of 1 and 10 nJ, showing an accuracy of {+-}1.6 ps and {+-}0.7 ps, respectively.

Opachich, Y. P.; Palmer, N.; Homoelle, D.; Hatch, B.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D.; Kalantar, D.; Browning, D.; Landen, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Zuegel, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Gamma Bang Time/Reaction History Diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Using 90-degree Off-axis Parabolic Mirrors  

SciTech Connect

Gas Cherenkov detectors (GCD) have been used to convert fusion gamma into photons to achieve gamma bang time (GBT) and reaction history measurements. The GCD designed for Omega used Cassegrain reflector optics in order to fit inside a 10-inch manipulator. A novel design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using 90º off-axis parabolic (OAP) mirrors will increase light collection efficiency from fusion gammas and achieve minimum time dispersion. The broadband Cherenkov light (from 200 to 800 nm) is relayed into a high-speed detector using three parabolic mirrors. Because light is collected from many source planes throughout the CO2 gas volume, the detector is positioned at the stop position rather than an image position. The stop diameter and its position are independent of the light-generation location along the gas cell. The current design collects light from a 100-mm-diameter by 500-mm-long gas volume. Optical ray tracings demonstrate how light can be collected from different angled trajectories of the Compton electrons as they fly through the CO2 gas volume. A cluster of four channels will allow for increased dynamic range, as well as different gamma energy threshold sensitivities.

R.M. Malone, H.W. Herrmann, J.M. Mack, C.S. Young, W. Stoeffl

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Gamma Bang Time/Reaction History Diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Using 90-degree Off-axis Parabolic Mirrors  

SciTech Connect

Gas Cherenkov detectors (GCD) have been used to convert fusion gamma into photons to achieve gamma bang time (GBT) and reaction history measurements. The GCD designed for Omega used Cassegrain reflector optics in order to fit inside a ten-inch manipulator. A novel design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using 90º Off-Axis Parabolic (OAP) mirrors will increase light collection efficiency from fusion gammas and achieve minimum time dispersion. The broadband Cherenkov light (from 200 to 800 nm) is relayed into a high-speed detector using three parabolic mirrors. Because light is collected from many source planes throughout the CO2 gas volume, the detector is positioned at the stop position rather than an image position. The stop diameter and its position are independent of the light-generation location along the gas cell. The current design collects light from a 100-mm diameter by 500-mm-long gas volume. Optical ray tracings demonstrate how light can be collected from different angled trajectories of the Compton electrons as they fly through the CO2 gas volume. A cluster of four channels will allow for increased dynamic range as well as different gamma energy threshold sensitivities. 52.70.La, 29.40.Ka, 42.15.Eq, 07.60.-j, 07.85.-m

H.W. Herrmann, R.M. Malone, W. Stoeffl, J.M. Mack, C.S. Young

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

DOE/EIS-0236-S1; National Ignition Facility Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the SSM PEIS, October 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 East Avenue S o u t h e r n P a c i f i c R . R . A r r o y o S e c o 580 Vasco Road Patterson Pass Road Greenville Road Arroyo Las Positas S o u t h L i v e r m o r e A v e n u e A r r o y o M o c h o 0 Scale: Miles 1 0.5 Springtown Tesla Road A r r o y o La s P o si ta s Sandia National Laboratories Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 0 1 2 Scale: Kilometers N MLA11861 * * Indicates approximate location of the NIF construction area. FIGURE 3.1 Surface Water Features near Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 3-7 FIGURE 3.3 Eastern Portion of the Livermore Site Showing Groundwater Wells and Approximate Area Containing VOCs over the Maximum Contaminant Levels in 1998 3-11 MLA6906 PCB (ppm) Tritium (pCi/g) Freon 11 (ppb) Carbon tetrachloride (ppb) PCE (ppb) TCE (ppb) 1x10 -1 1x10 0 1x10 1 1x10 2 1x10 3 1x10 4 1x10 5 18 0.53 520 23 1,600 6,100 540 EPA Industrial PRG

114

Planning for the National Ignition Campaign on NIF Presentation to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planning for the National Ignition Campaign on NIF Presentation to Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting Dec 3-4, 2008 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory John Lindl NIF Programs Chief Scientist a clearly defined path forward to achievement of ignition on NIF ·An extensive scientific data base forms

115

NIF achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition | National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition | National achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NIF achieves record laser energy in pursuit ... NIF achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Blog The NNSA's National Ignition Facility (NIF) surpassed a critical

116

Capsule implosion optimization during the indirect-drive National Ignition Campaign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capsule performance optimization campaigns will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] to substantially increase the probability of ignition. The campaigns will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition experiments. The quantitative goals and technique options and down selections for the tuning campaigns are first explained. The computationally derived sensitivities to key laser and target parameters are compared to simple analytic models to gain further insight into the physics of the tuning techniques. The results of the validation of the tuning techniques at the OMEGA facility [J. M. Soures et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2108 (1996)] under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design are shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. A roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget. Finally, we show how the tuning precision will be improved after a number of shots and iterations to meet an acceptable level of residual uncertainty.

Landen, O. L.; Edwards, J.; Haan, S. W.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J.; Spears, B. K.; Weber, S. V.; Clark, D. S.; Lindl, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Moses, E. I.; Atherton, J.; Amendt, P. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Braun, D. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

HYDROGEN IGNITION MECHANISM FOR EXPLOSIONS IN NUCLEAR FACILITY PIPE SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions exist. Pipe ruptures at nuclear facilities were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, in nuclear facilities, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents an ignition source for hydrogen was questionable, but these accidents, demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein.

Leishear, R

2010-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

118

Secure Facilities & Capabilities | National Security | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Events and Conferences Supporting Organizations National Security Home | Science & Discovery | National Security | Facilities SHARE Secure Facilities and Capabilities...

119

Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

The National Nuclear Security Administration Facilities Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Test...

120

National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This is a brief report about a Sandia National Laboratory facility which can provide high-thermal flux for simulation of nuclear thermal flash, measurements of the effects of aerodynamic heating on radar transmission, etc

Cameron, C.P.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national ignition facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Office of Defense Science Office of Defense Science Facilities Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Research and Development > Facilities Facilities Office of Research and Development, Facilities The Office of Research and Development manages and oversees the operation of an exceptional suite of science, technology, and engineering facilities that support and further the national stockpile stewardship agenda. Of varying size, scope and capabilities, the facilities work in a concert to accomplish the following activities: Annual assessment of the stockpile in the face of increasing challenges due to aging or remanufacture, Reduced response times for resolving stockpile issues, Timely and certifiable completion of Life Extension Programs,

122

Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, USA, is one of ten national laboratories under the aegis of the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It is managed and operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC. The primary facility at Jefferson Lab is the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) as shown in an aerial photograph in Figure 1. Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 as CEBAF and started operations for physics in 1995. The accelerator uses superconducting radio-frequency (srf) techniques to generate high-quality beams of electrons with high-intensity, well-controlled polarization. The technology has enabled ancillary facilities to be created. The CEBAF facility is used by an international user community of more than 1200 physicists for a program of exploration and study of nuclear, hadronic matter, the strong interaction and quantum chromodynamics. Additionally, the exceptional quality of the beams facilitates studies of the fundamental symmetries of nature, which complement those of atomic physics on the one hand and of high-energy particle physics on the other. The facility is in the midst of a project to double the energy of the facility and to enhance and expand its experimental facilities. Studies are also pursued with a Free-Electron Laser produced by an energy-recovering linear accelerator.

Joseph Grames, Douglas Higinbotham, Hugh Montgomery

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Overview of ICF Program SNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion and the NIF Project National Nuclear Security Administration December 5, 2007 #12;2 Agenda · Mission/Strategic Objectives · National Ignition Facility (NIF) · National Ignition Campaign (NIC · The National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser is on track for completion in FY09. · The National Ignition Campaign

124

Brookhaven National Laboratory Federal Facility Agreement, February...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brookhaven National Laboratory Agreement Name Brookhaven National Laboratory Federal Facility Agreement Under CERCLA Section 120, February 28, 1992 State New York Agreement Type...

125

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Contact Us  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Environmental Sciences Education Program Energy Engineering Industrial Partnerships, Tech Transfer Internships Jobs Lasers National Ignition Facility Nonproliferation,...

126

DOE Selects Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC to Manage...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

enterprise-wide activities; completing construction of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and operating NIF as a national user facility to support NNSA missions as well as the...

127

Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility at Idaho National Laboratory ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility at Idaho National Laboratory Summary - Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) at Idaho National Laboratory More Documents & Publications Environmental Management...

128

User Facilities | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Facilities Advanced Photon Source Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System Center for Nanoscale Materials Electron Microscopy Center...

129

A HYDROGEN IGNITION MECHANISM FOR EXPLOSIONS IN NUCLEAR FACILITY PIPING SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein. Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions may occur. Pipe ruptures in nuclear reactor cooling systems were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents, an ignition source for hydrogen was not clearly demonstrated, but these accidents demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. A new theory to identify an ignition source and explosion cause is presented here, and further research is recommended to fully understand this explosion mechanism.

Leishear, R.

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

130

High Explosives Application Facility | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration High Explosives Application Facility Home > About Us > Our...

131

Chemical Sciences Division: National Facilities & Centers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& CENTERS RESEARCH STUDENT & POSTDOCTORAL OPPORTUNITIES NEWS & EVENTS CSD CONTACTS LBNL HOME Privacy & Security Notice DOE UC Berkeley National Facilities and Centers Chemical...

132

The National Ignition Facility National Ignition Campaign Short Pulse Lasers High-Average-Power Laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Average-Power Laser NIF-1005-11471 07BEW/dj P9765 Agenda #12;P9516NIF-0805-11197 01EIM/dj Stockpile Stewardship #12;P9504NIF-0404-08345r2 27EIM/ld Basic Science and Cosmology #12;NIF-0702-05346rIFSA Fusion Energy Campaign and point design NIF-0305-10564 23MLS/cld P8719 The NIF Laser User Optics Physics Operations

133

Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ECISEnergyRenewable EnergySolar EnergyConcentrating Solar Power ECISEnergyRenewable EnergySolar EnergyConcentrating Solar Power (CSP)National Solar Thermal Test Facility National Solar Thermal Test Facility NSTTF Interactive Tour National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) Operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) is the only test facility of this type in the United States. The NSTTF's primary goal is to provide experimental engineering data for the design, construction, and operation of unique components and systems in proposed solar thermal electrical plants planned for large-scale power generation. In addition, the site was built and instrumented to provide test facilities for a variety of solar and nonsolar applications. The facility can provide

134

Comparison of the Recently proposed Super Marx Generator Approach to Thermonuclear Ignition with the DT Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid Concept by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recently proposed Super Marx generator pure deuterium micro-detonation ignition concept is compared to the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) Laser DT fusion-fission hybrid concept (LiFE) [1]. In a Super Marx generator a large number of ordinary Marx generators charge up a much larger second stage ultra-high voltage Marx generator, from which for the ignition of a pure deuterium micro-explosion an intense GeV ion beam can be extracted. A typical example of the LiFE concept is a fusion gain of 30, and a fission gain of 10, making up for a total gain of 300, with about 10 times more energy released into fission as compared to fusion. This means a substantial release of fission products, as in fusion-less pure fission reactors. In the Super Marx approach for the ignition of a pure deuterium micro-detonation a gain of the same magnitude can in theory be reached [2]. If feasible, the Super Marx generator deuterium ignition approach would make lasers obsolete as a means for the ignition of ther...

Winterberg, Friedwardt

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

National Laser User Facilities Program | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

User Facilities Program | National Nuclear Security User Facilities Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog National Laser User Facilities Program Home > National Laser User Facilities Program National Laser User Facilities Program National Laser Users' Facility Grant Program Overview The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester

136

National Laser User Facilities Program | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser User Facilities Program | National Nuclear Security Laser User Facilities Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog National Laser User Facilities Program Home > National Laser User Facilities Program National Laser User Facilities Program National Laser Users' Facility Grant Program Overview The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester

137

Contained Firing Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Contained Firing Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Contained Firing Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Contained Firing Facility Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Research and Development > Facilities > Contained Firing Facility

138

Infrastructure and Facilities Management | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Infrastructure and Facilities Management | National Nuclear Security Infrastructure and Facilities Management | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Infrastructure and Facilities Management Home > content > Infrastructure and Facilities Management Infrastructure and Facilities Management NNSA restores, rebuilds, and revitalizes the physical infrastructure of the

139

National Ignition Campaign (NIC) Precision Tuning Series Shock Timing Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of precision shock timing experiments have been performed on NIF. These experiments continue to adjust the laser pulse shape and employ the adjusted cone fraction (CF) in the picket (1st 2 ns of the laser pulse) as determined from the re-emit experiment series. The NIF ignition laser pulse is precisely shaped and consists of a series of four impulses, which drive a corresponding series of shock waves of increasing strength to accelerate and compress the capsule ablator and fuel layer. To optimize the implosion, they tune not only the strength (or power) but also, to sub-nanosecond accuracy, the timing of the shock waves. In a well-tuned implosion, the shock waves work together to compress and heat the fuel. For the shock timing experiments, a re-entrant cone is inserted through both the hohlraum wall and the capsule ablator allowing a direct optical view of the propagating shocks in the capsule interior using the VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) diagnostic from outside the hohlraum. To emulate the DT ice of an ignition capsule, the inside of the cone and the capsule are filled with liquid deuterium.

Robey, H F; Celliers, P M

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

140

Berkeley Lab National User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Energy Sciences Network) Joint Genome Institute The Molecular Foundry National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national ignition facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Office of Defense Science Facilities Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test Capabilities and Evaluation > Office of Research and...

142

Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Office of Defense Science Facilities Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Research and Development...

143

Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test Capabilities and Evaluation > Office of Test Capabilities and Evaluation > Facilities...

144

Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Inertial Confinement Fusion Facilities Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Inertial Confinement...

145

User Facilities | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

instrumentation and infrastructure for interdisciplinary nanoscience and nanotechnology research. The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory...

146

High Explosives Application Facility | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Explosives Application Facility | National Nuclear Security Explosives Application Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration High Explosives Application Facility Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Research and Development >

147

Laser Shocking of Materials: Toward the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Producing Metal Parts with Selective Laser Sintering/Hot Isostatic Pressing .... ?, based on experimental measurements of dislocation cell sizes: ? ? P1/2.

148

Director of the National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

after working on a number of laser research projects at Hughes Aircraft and LLNL. He led the development of the Peregine radiation therapy planning tool for the treatment of...

149

Target Diagnostic Control System Implementation for the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extreme physics of targets shocked by NIF's 192-beam laser are observed by a diverse suite of diagnostics. Many diagnostics are being developed by collaborators at other sites, but ad hoc controls could lead to unreliable and costly operations. A Diagnostic Control System (DCS) framework for both hardware and software facilitates development and eases integration. Each complex diagnostic typically uses an ensemble of electronic instruments attached to sensors, digitizers, cameras, and other devices. In the DCS architecture each instrument is interfaced to a low-cost Windows XP processor and Java application. Each instrument is aggregated with others as needed in the supervisory system to form an integrated diagnostic. The Java framework provides data management, control services and operator GUI generation. DCS instruments are reusable by replication with reconfiguration for specific diagnostics in XML. Advantages include minimal application code, easy testing, and high reliability. Collaborators save costs by assembling diagnostics with existing DCS instruments. This talk discusses target diagnostic instrumentation used on NIF and presents the DCS architecture and framework.

Shelton, R T; Kamperschroer, J H; Lagin, L J; Nelson, J R; O'Brien, D W

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

150

A spheromak ignition experiment reusing Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on available experimental results and theory, a scenario is presented to achieve ohmic ignition in a spheromak by slow ({approximately} 10 sec.) helicity injection using power from the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) substation. Some of the other parts needed (vacuum vessel, coils, power supplies, pumps, shielded building space) might also be obtained from MFTF or other salvage, as well as some components needed for intermediate experiments for additional verification of the concept (especially confinement scaling). The proposed ignition experiment would serve as proof-of-principle for the spheromak DT fusion reactor design published by Hagenson and Krakowski, with a nuclear island cost about ten times less than a tokamak of comparable power. Designs at even higher power density and lower cost might be possible using Christofilos` concept of a liquid lithium blanket. Since all structures would be protected from neutrons by the lithium blanket and the tritium inventory can be reduced by continuous removal from the liquid blanket, environmental and safety characteristics appear to be favorable.

Fowler, T.K.

1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

151

National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design.

Heaton, R.; Peterson, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, P. [Smith (P.A.) Concepts and Designs (United States)

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Los Alamos National Laboratory opens new waste repackaging facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL opens new waste repackaging facility Los Alamos National Laboratory opens new waste repackaging facility The Laboratory has brought a third waste repackaging facility online...

153

Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility at Idaho National Laboratory ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility at Idaho National Laboratory Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility at Idaho National Laboratory Full Document and Summary Versions are available for...

154

PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor...

155

National Laser Users' Facility Grant Program | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Users' Facility Grant Program | National Nuclear Security Users' Facility Grant Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog NLUF National Laser Users' Facility Grant Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > University Partnerships / Academic Alliances > National Laser Users' Facility Grant Program

156

Underground Facility at Nevada National Security Site | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog U1A Underground Facility at Nevada National Security Site Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research,...

157

Public Reading Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reading Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration Reading Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Public Reading Facilities Home > About Us > Our Operations > NNSA Office of General Counsel > Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) > Public Reading Facilities Public Reading Facilities The FOIA and E-FOIA require that specific types of records as well as

158

Sandia National Laboratories: Working at the Livermore Valley...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

such as the Combustion Research Facility (CRF), the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and long-standing leadership in state-of-the art computing systems. Transportation...

159

OMEGA ICF experiments and preparation for direct drive ignition on NIF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OMEGA ICF experiments and preparation for direct drive ignition on NIF R.L. McCrorya , R.E. Bahra) is investigating various theoretical aspects of a direct drive National Ignition Facility (NIF) ignition target equivalent to those planned for the NIF. The current experimental studies on OMEGA address the essential

160

Newsletters | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Efficiency, Savings NNSA Nonproliferation Program Develops Cutting-edge Dental Implant Technology Pantex Authorized to Begin Work on B53 Big Month for National Ignition Facility...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national ignition facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NNSA Announces 2013 Sustainability Awards | Y-12 National Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Pollution Prevention: Active Risk Management at LLNL's National Ignition Facility (NIF) Results in Lower Consumption and Less Waste. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)...

162

National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research: fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H{sup -}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +}). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H{sup -} cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes.

Schafer, R.

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

163

Ignition on the National Ignition Facility: A Path Towards Inertial Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Arial 18 pt bold Name here Title or division here Date 00, 2008 LLNL-PRES-407907 #12;NIF-1208-15666.ppt Moses_Fusion Power Associates, 12/03/08 2 Two major possibilities for fusion energy #12;NIF-1208-15666.ppt Moses_Fusion Power Associates, 12/03/08 3 The NIF is nearing completion and will be conducting

164

Ignition Capsules with Aerogel-Supported Liquid DT Fuel For The National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

For high repetition-rate fusion power plant applications, capsules with aerogel-supported liquid DT fuel can have much reduced fill time compared to {beta}-layering a solid DT fuel layer. The melting point of liquid DT can be lowered once liquid DT is embedded in an aerogel matrix, and the DT vapor density is consequently closer to the desired density for optimal capsule design requirement. We present design for NIF-scale aerogel-filled capsules based on 1-D and 2-D simulations. An optimal configuration is obtained when the outer radius is increased until the clean fuel fraction is within 65-75% at peak velocity. A scan (in ablator and fuel thickness parameter space) is used to optimize the capsule configurations. The optimized aerogel-filled capsule has good low-mode robustness and acceptable high-mode mix.

Ho, D D; Salmonson, J D; Clark, D S; Lindl, J D; Haan, S W; Amendt, P; Wu, K J

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

165

Facility Operations Office, Brookhaven National Laboratory, BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Operations Office Facility Operations Office Safely supporting the missions of the laboratory... The Facility Operations Office addresses key issues in work planning, maintenance engineering, service-delivery models, and annual facility-work plans. Facility Operations Center: The Facility Operations Center provides computer programs designed to assist in the planning, management and administrative procedures required for an effective maintenance and asset management process. As an information technology tool for managing the maintenance process, a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) is a mission-essential part of any organization, and a tool for success. Infrastructure Management: IM's goal is to ensure Brookhaven National Laboratory real property assets are planned for, managed, tracked, and upgraded as required in order to meet BNL's current and future programmatic needs. To accomplish this IM performs site and utilities master planning, manages BNL's new project request and prioritization system (3PBP), maintains utilities maps, manages BNL's space and facilities data base, and provides program management for BNL's GPP, Line Item and Operating Funded Project programs.

166

National Scientific User Facility Purpose and Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007. This designation allows the ATR to become a cornerstone of nuclear energy research and development (R&D) within the U.S. by making it easier for universities, the commercial power industry, other national laboratories, and international organizations to conduct nuclear energy R&D. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide nuclear energy researchers access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology within the U.S. In support of this mission, hot cell laboratories are being upgraded. These upgrades include a set of lead shielded cells that will house Irradiated Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) test rigs and construction of a shielded laboratory facility. A primary function of this shielded laboratory is to provide a state of the art type laboratory facility that is functional, efficient and flexible that is dedicated to the analysis and characterization of nuclear and non-nuclear materials. The facility shall be relatively easy to reconfigure to provide laboratory scale hot cave space for housing current and future nuclear material scientific research instruments.

K. E. Rosenberg; T. R. Allen; J. C. Haley; M. K. Meyer

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

User Facilities .Managing National User Facilities Berkeley Lab has been afour DOE national user facilities. The focus of Berkeley Lab

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

President Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility The Reagan Administration announces a nuclear energy policy that anticipates the establishment of a facility for the storage of...

169

Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility | Y-12 National Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highly Enriched Uranium ... Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility HEUMF The Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility is our nation's central repository for highly enriched...

170

Shock Timing Techniques for Ignition Capsules on the NIF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from a series of shock trajectory measurements in planar liquid deuterium targets will set the pulse shape they use for ignition capsules at the National Ignition Facility. They discuss outstanding issues for this concept, in particular, ideas for certifying that the drive on a planar sample is the same as on a spherical capsule.

Munro, D H; Haan, S W; Collins, G W; Celliers, P M

2003-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

171

Facility Operations and User Support | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Above image: Red Storm supercomputer at Sandia National LaboratoriesNew Mexico. (Sandia National Laboratories) This sub-program provides both necessary physical facility and...

172

Facilities, Central Fabrication Services, Brookhaven National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central Fabrication Services Division's capabilities range from a large Electron Beam Welding facility, to a state of the art cleaning facility, to a large fabricating facility...

173

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

LANL | TT | User Facilities - Los Alamos National Lab: National ...  

Superconductivity Technology Center; Supercritical Fluids Experimental Facility; Trident Laser Laboratory; Weapons Neutron Research Facility; Back to ...

175

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Validation Facility Radiation Detection Materials Characterization Laboratory Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility (STAR) Weapon and Force Protection Center...

176

CRAD, Maintenance - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility CRAD, Maintenance - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Maintenance program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Maintenance - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility CRAD, Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST

177

Sandia National Laboratories: Z Pulsed Power Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Z-Machine Z-Machine About Z Z Research Z News Contact Us Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Z-Machine Z Pulsed Power Facility Science serving the nation Created to validate nuclear weapons models, the Z machine is also in the race for viable fusion energy. Z-Machine From Earth's Core to Black Holes Contributing to discovery science by studying matter at conditions found nowhere else on Earth Center of Z About Z Sandia's Z machine is the world's most powerful and efficient laboratory radiation source. It uses high magnetic fields associated with high electrical currents to produce high temperatures, high pressures, and powerful X-rays for research in high energy density science. The Z machine creates conditions found nowhere else on Earth. Z is part of Sandia's Pulsed Power program, which began in the 1960s.

178

Description of Facilities and Resources Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Description of Facilities and Resources Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the UT-ORNL Joint National Laboratory (ORNL) hosts three petascale computing facilities: the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Center (NCRC), formed as collaboration between ORNL and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric

179

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology Deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) Technology Deployment Centers Advanced Power Sources Laboratory Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) Trisonic Wind Tunnel Hypersonic Wind Tunnel High Altitude Chamber Explosive Components Facility Ion Beam Laboratory Materials Science and Engineering Center Pulsed Power and Systems Validation Facility Radiation Detection Materials Characterization Laboratory Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility (STAR) Weapon and Force Protection Center Design, Evaluation and Test Technology Facility Research Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) The ESEF complex contains several independent laboratories for experiments and advanced diagnostics in the fields of thermodynamics, heat transfer,

180

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Annular Core...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annular Core Research Reactor facility Nuclear science photo At the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) facility, Sandia researchers can subject various test objects to a mixed...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national ignition facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility (STAR) The STAR facility, within Sandia's Solid Dynamic Physics Department, is one of a few institutions in the world with a major...

182

PLANNING STUDY FOR ADVANCED NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON-RADIATION FACILITIES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FOR ADVANCED NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON-RADIATION FACILITIES Printed March 14, 1984 The report of a study sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and...

183

Newest LANL Facility Receives LEED Gold Certification | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Newest LANL Facility Receives LEED Gold Certification | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

184

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Carbon Fiber Technology Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Low-Cost Carbon Fiber | Proposal Guidelines Proposal Guidelines Proposals should be no more than 5 single spaced...

185

Page Name: Subject/Program/Project, Acronym: Los Alamos National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in off-site, state-of-the-art experimental facilities at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the OMEGA laser facility in Rochester, New York. Featured science Fusion target...

186

Status of the US National Inertial Fusion ProgramSNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for inertial fusion and high energy density physics · NIF 81% complete, first ignition experiments planned Ignition Facility is 85 % complete NIF concentrates 1.8 Mega Joules of energy into a mm3 size target -- it needs to be flush left -- keep horizontal within Title/Logo limits at the top #12;7 NIF has executed

187

A high-resolution integrated model of the National Ignition Campaign cryogenic layered experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed simulation-based model of the June 2011 National Ignition Campaign cryogenic DT experiments is presented. The model is based on integrated hohlraum-capsule simulations that utilize the best available models for the hohlraum wall, ablator, and DT equations of state and opacities. The calculated radiation drive was adjusted by changing the input laser power to match the experimentally measured shock speeds, shock merger times, peak implosion velocity, and bangtime. The crossbeam energy transfer model was tuned to match the measured time-dependent symmetry. Mid-mode mix was included by directly modeling the ablator and ice surface perturbations up to mode 60. Simulated experimental values were extracted from the simulation and compared against the experiment. Although by design the model is able to reproduce the 1D in-flight implosion parameters and low-mode asymmetries, it is not able to accurately predict the measured and inferred stagnation properties and levels of mix. In particular, the measured yields were 15%-40% of the calculated yields, and the inferred stagnation pressure is about 3 times lower than simulated.

Jones, O. S.; Cerjan, C. J.; Marinak, M. M.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Springer, P. T.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bond, E. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Dixit, S. M.; Doppner, T.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Dzentitis, E. G.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-399, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

NREL Facility Named One of Nation's Top Sustainable Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NREL Facility Named One of Nation's Top Sustainable Buildings NREL Facility Named One of Nation's Top Sustainable Buildings NREL Facility Named One of Nation's Top Sustainable Buildings June 24, 2011 - 12:31pm Addthis The 222,000 sq. ft. RSF has been recognized for its innovative construction and efficiency. | Courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory staff photographer. The 222,000 sq. ft. RSF has been recognized for its innovative construction and efficiency. | Courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory staff photographer. Eric Escudero Eric Escudero Senior Public Affairs Specialist & Contractor, Golden Field Office It's been a little over a year since the Energy Department's Research Support Facility (RSF) opened on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus in Colorado. The innovative approach taken in the design and

189

NREL Facility Named One of Nation's Top Sustainable Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NREL Facility Named One of Nation's Top Sustainable Buildings NREL Facility Named One of Nation's Top Sustainable Buildings NREL Facility Named One of Nation's Top Sustainable Buildings June 24, 2011 - 12:31pm Addthis The 222,000 sq. ft. RSF has been recognized for its innovative construction and efficiency. | Courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory staff photographer. The 222,000 sq. ft. RSF has been recognized for its innovative construction and efficiency. | Courtesy of Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory staff photographer. Eric Escudero Eric Escudero Senior Public Affairs Specialist & Contractor, Golden Field Office It's been a little over a year since the Energy Department's Research Support Facility (RSF) opened on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus in Colorado. The innovative approach taken in the design and

190

Access to High Technology User Facilities at DOE National Laboratories |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Access to High Technology User Facilities at DOE National Access to High Technology User Facilities at DOE National Laboratories Access to High Technology User Facilities at DOE National Laboratories In recognition of the nation's expanding need to engage businesses and universities in the areas of commercial and basic science research, the Department has developed two special types of agreements for use at all DOE National Laboratories with approved designated user facilities. For non-commercial, basic science research, researchers may seek to use the Non-proprietary User Agreement. Under this type of agreement, the user pays its own costs of the research with the DOE laboratory, may access specialized laboratory equipment and collaborate with laboratory scientists. The non-proprietary user and the National Laboratory retain

191

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology Deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Explosive Components Facility Explosive Components Facility The 98,000 square foot Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is a state-of-the-art facility that provides a full-range of chemical, material, and performance analysis capabilities for energetic materials and explosive components: advanced design of energetic devices and subsystems optical ordnance energetic materials testing of explosives and explosive components and subsystems advanced explosives diagnostics reliability analyses failure modes evaluation safety evaluation The ECF has the full-range of capabilities necessary to support the understanding of energetic materials and components: Optical and Semiconductor Bridge (SCB) Initiation Laboratories Characterization Laboratories thermal properties gas analyses powder characterization

192

Contained Firing Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test Capabilities and Evaluation > Office of Research and Development > Facilities >...

193

Support Facilities | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

maintenance shops, waste management and storage facilities, guard portals and posts, cooling towers and chiller buildings - with an emphasis on sustainment, cost savings and...

194

Transforming our Nation's Energy System, Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF)  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) on the campus of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will soon be the nation's first facility that can conduct integrated megawatt-scale testing of the components and strategies needed in order to safely move clean energy technologies onto the electrical grid 'in-flight' at the speed and scale required to meet national goals.

Not Available

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science and Technology Operations - Facility Operations Director Managed Facilities, August 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review Report Review Report Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science and Technology Operations - Facility Operations Director Managed Facilities May 2011 August 2011 Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Table of Contents Background ................................................................................................................................................... 1 Results ........................................................................................................................................................... 2 Conduct of the FCA ......................................................................................................................... 2

196

Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science and Technology Operations - Facility Operations Director Managed Facilities, August 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review Report Review Report Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science and Technology Operations - Facility Operations Director Managed Facilities May 2011 August 2011 Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Table of Contents Background ................................................................................................................................................... 1 Results ........................................................................................................................................................... 2 Conduct of the FCA ......................................................................................................................... 2

197

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Gamma Irradiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Irradiation Facility Gamma Irradiation Facility Photo of Gamma Irradiation Facility The Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) provides high-fidelity simulation of nuclear radiation environments for materials and component testing. The low-dose irradiation facility also offers an environment for long-duration testing of materials and electronic components. Such testing may take place over a number of months or even years. Research and other activities The single-structure GIF can house a wide variety of gamma irradiation experiments with various test configurations and at different dose and dose rate levels. Radiation fields at the GIF are produced by high-intensity gamma-ray sources. To induce ionizing radiation effects and damage in test objects, the objects are subjected to high-energy photons from gamma-source

198

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology Deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility (STAR) Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility (STAR) The STAR facility, within Sandia's Solid Dynamic Physics Department, is one of a few institutions in the world with a major shock-physics program. This is the only experimental test facility in the world that can cover the full range of pressure (bars to multi-Mbar) for material property study utilizing gas/propellant launchers, ramp-loading pulsers, and ballistic applications. Material Characterization Shock wave experiments are an established technique to determine the equation of state at high pressures and temperature, which can be applied to virtually all materials. This technique allows the probing of the internal structure of the material as it undergoes deformation. This provides a better understanding of the material properties for development

199

Sandia National Laboratories: Locations: Kauai Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test Facility P.O. Box 308 Waimea, Kauai HI 96796-0308 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Hawaii-Aleutian Standard Time, M - F Steven Lautenschleger, Manager (505) 845-9234,...

200

National Cemetery Administration (NCA) Facilities Design ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... For relatively larger facilities, evaluate the use of a hot water heating system (with natural gas and/or No. 2 oil as the fuel) and a chilled water ...

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national ignition facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Facility Resources - National Transportation Research Center...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

can then be certified by one of several regulatory authorities, usually DOE, the National Nuclear Security Administration, or the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, for use on the...

202

Oak Ridge National Laboratory - User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Search Go Find People Contact Site Index Comments Home News News Releases Story Tips Features Contacts ORNL Review Magazine ORNL in the News...

203

National Laser Users' Facility Grant Program | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test Capabilities and Evaluation > University Partnerships Academic Alliances > National...

204

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility 2010 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the 2010 ATR National Scientific User Facility Annual Report. This report provides an overview of the program for 2010, along with individual project reports from each of the university principal investigators. The report also describes the capabilities offered to university researchers here at INL and at the ATR NSUF partner facilities.

Mary Catherine Thelen; Todd R. Allen

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

A Description of the CSU–CHILL National Radar Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject of this paper is the Colorado State University–University of Chicago–Illinois State Water Survey (CSU–CHILL) National Radar Facility’s S-band polarimetric research radar. Key features of this system include polarization agility (...

David Brunkow; V. N. Bringi; Patrick C. Kennedy; Steven A. Rutledge; V. Chandrasekar; E. A. Mueller; Robert K. Bowie

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

President Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility | Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > President Reagan Calls for a National Spent ... President Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility October 08, 1981

207

Uranium Processing Facility | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About / Transforming Y-12 / Uranium Processing Facility About / Transforming Y-12 / Uranium Processing Facility Uranium Processing Facility UPF will be a state-of-the-art, consolidated facility for enriched uranium operations including assembly, disassembly, dismantlement, quality evaluation, and product certification. An integral part of Y-12's transformation efforts and a key component of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Uranium Center of Excellence, the Uranium Processing Facility is one of two facilities at Y-12 whose joint mission will be to accomplish the storage and processing of all enriched uranium in one much smaller, centralized area. Safety, security and flexibility are key design attributes of the facility, which is in the preliminary design phase of work. UPF will be built to modern standards and engage new technologies through a responsive and agile

208

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

process contact the user liaison. User liaison James Aubert jhaubert@sandia.gov Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800 MS-0886 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0886 phone:...

209

Adaptive Comfort in Mixed-Mode Buildings: Research Support Facility, National Renewable Energy Lab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Support Facility, National Renewable Energy Lab Gail Brager,Facility of the National Renewable Energy Lab in Golden, CO.for energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. The

Brager, Gail; Pigman, Margaret

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology Deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Deployment Centers Technology Deployment Centers CRF Many of Sandia's unique research centers are available for use by U.S. industry, universities, academia, other laboratories, state and local governments, and the scientific community in general. Technology deployment centers are a unique set of scientific research capabilities and resources. The primary function of technology deployment centers is to satisfy Department of Energy programmatic needs, while remaining accessible to outside users. Contact For more information about Sandia technology deployment centers or for help in selecting a center to meet your needs, contact Mary Monson at mamonso@sandia.gov, (505) 844-3289. Advanced Power Sources Laboratory Combustion Research Facility Design, Evaluation, and Test Technology Facility

211

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology Deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Detection Materials Characterization Laboratory Radiation Detection Materials Characterization Laboratory This facility provides assistance to users from federal laboratories, U.S. industry and academia in the following areas: (1) testing and characterizing radiation detector materials and devices; and (2) determining the relationships between the physical properties of the detector materials and the device response. Systems of interest include scintillators and room-temperature semiconductors for detection arrays of x-rays, gamma rays and neutrons. User Support The facility's special capabilities include: low-noise environment to test solid-state detectors for x-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron response mass spectrometry to quantify contaminants in detectors and detector-grade materials photoluminescence and thermally-stimulated current to measure

212

KCP celebrates production milestone at new facility | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

celebrates production milestone at new facility | National Nuclear celebrates production milestone at new facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > KCP celebrates production milestone at new facility KCP celebrates production milestone at new facility Posted By Office of Public Affairs The Kansas City Plant celebrated yet another milestone at the National

213

NNSA Holds Groundbreaking at MOX Facility | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Groundbreaking at MOX Facility | National Nuclear Security Groundbreaking at MOX Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > NNSA Holds Groundbreaking at MOX Facility NNSA Holds Groundbreaking at MOX Facility October 14, 2005 Aiken, SC NNSA Holds Groundbreaking at MOX Facility

214

Summary - Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) at Idaho National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INL, Idaho INL, Idaho EM Project: Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility ETR Report Date: December 2007 ETR-10 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) At Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) is a land disposal facility that is used to dispose of LLW and MLW generated from remedial activities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Components of the ICDF include a landfill that is used for disposal of solid waste, an evaporation pond that is used to manage leachate from the landfill and other aqueous wastes (8.3 million L capacity), and a staging and treatment facility. The ICDF is located near the southwest

215

Newest LANL Facility Receives LEED Gold Certification | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Newest LANL Facility Receives LEED Gold Certification | National Nuclear Newest LANL Facility Receives LEED Gold Certification | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Newest LANL Facility Receives LEED Gold Certification Newest LANL Facility Receives LEED Gold Certification Posted By Office of Public Affairs RULOB LANL's newest facility, the Radiological Laboratory Utility Office

216

Laser Ignition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ignition Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel...

217

Sandia National Laboratories' Readiness in Technical Base and Facilities Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sandia National Laboratories' Sandia National Laboratories' Readiness in Technical Base and Facilities Program OAS-L-13-13 September 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 5, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, SANDIA FIELD OFFICE FROM: David Sedillo, Director Western Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Sandia National Laboratories' Readiness in Technical Base and Facilities Program" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's (Department) Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is a Government-owned, contractor operated Laboratory that is part of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) nuclear weapons complex. One of Sandia's key missions is to ensure the safety, reliability and performance of the Nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. To accomplish

218

Overview of Idaho National Laboratory's Hot Fuels Examination Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) of the Idaho National Laboratory was constructed in the 1960’s and opened for operation in the 1975 in support of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor research. Specifically the facility was designed to handle spent fuel and irradiated experiments from the Experimental Breeder Reactor EBRII, the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT). HFEF is a large alpha-gamma facility designed to remotely characterize highly radioactive materials. In the late 1980’s the facility also began support of the US DOE waste characterization including characterizing contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste. A description of the hot cell as well as some of its primary capabilities are discussed herein.

Adam B. Robinson; R. Paul Lind; Daniel M. Wachs

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

DOE LABORATORY, DOE USER FACILITY EMSL is a national scientific user facility located at Pacific  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Northwest National Laboratory. EMSL'S USEr FaciLity PrograM How to Become a User www.EMSL.PNNL.gOv EMSL-emsl_announcements@lyris.pnl.gov. For general proposal inquiries, contact the EMSL User Support Office: emsl@pnnl.gov 509-371-6003 Geochemistry. PNNL's mission is to deliver leadership and advancements in science, energy, national security

220

Hanford, WA Selected as Plutonium Production Facility | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Hanford, WA Selected as Plutonium Production Facility | National Nuclear Hanford, WA Selected as Plutonium Production Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Hanford, WA Selected as Plutonium Production Facility Hanford, WA Selected as Plutonium Production Facility January 16, 1943 Hanford, WA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national ignition facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hot Springs National Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hot Springs National Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hot Springs National Park Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Hot Springs, Arkansas Coordinates 34.5037004°, -93.0551795° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

222

High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and ... High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule Posted By Office of Public Affairs Construction crews prepare to pour concrete at the new High Explosives

223

High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and ... High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule Posted By Office of Public Affairs Construction crews prepare to pour concrete at the new High Explosives

224

The velocity campaign for ignition on NIF  

SciTech Connect

Achieving inertial confinement fusion ignition requires a symmetric, high velocity implosion. Experiments show that we can reach 95 {+-} 5% of the required velocity by using a 420 TW, 1.6 MJ laser pulse. In addition, experiments with a depleted uranium hohlraum show an increase in capsule performance which suggests an additional 18 {+-} 5 {mu}m/ns of velocity with uranium hohlraums over gold hohlraums. Combining these two would give 99 {+-} 5% of the ignition velocity. Experiments show that we have the ability to tune symmetry using crossbeam transfer. We can control the second Legendre mode (P2) by changing the wavelength separation between the inner and outer cones of laser beams. We can control the azimuthal m = 4 asymmetry by changing the wavelength separation between the 23.5 and 30 degree beams on NIF. This paper describes our 'first pass' tuning the implosion velocity and shape on the National Ignition Facility laser [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas, 16, 041006 (2009)].

Callahan, D. A.; Meezan, N. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celeste, J. R.; Celliers, P. M.; Dixit, S. N.; Doeppner, T.; Dzentitis, E. G.; Glenn, S.; Haan, S. W.; Haynam, C. A.; Hicks, D. G.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Landen, O. L.; London, R. A.; MacPhee, A. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Consolidated Transportation Facility. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0822, addressing environmental impacts that could result from siting, construction, and operation of a consolidated transportation facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho. The DOE proposes to construct and operate a new transportation facility at the Central Facilities Area (CFA) at the INEL. The proposed facility would replace outdated facilities and consolidate in one location operations that are conducted at six different locations at the CFA. The proposed facility would be used for vehicle and equipment maintenance and repair, administrative support, bus parking, and bus driver accommodation. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this finding of no significant impact.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships  

SciTech Connect

In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (8) Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) Materials Research Collaborative Access Team (MRCAT) beamline at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source; and (9) Nanoindenter in the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) Nuclear Engineering laboratory Materials have been analyzed for ATR NSUF users at the Advanced Photon Source at the MRCAT beam, the NIST Center for Neutron Research in Gaithersburg, MD, the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and the SHaRE user facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Additionally, ORNL has been accepted as a partner facility to enable ATR NSUF users to access the facilities at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and related facilities.

Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Labs at-a-Glance: Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Thomas Jefferson Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratories Ames Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Laboratory Policy and Evaluation Safety, Security and Infrastructure Laboratory Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 Labs at-a-Glance: Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Logo

228

The National Labs on Flickr | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flickr Flickr The National Labs on Flickr The interior of the National Ignition Facility target chamber at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The service module carrying technicians can be seen on the left. The target positioner, which holds the target, is on the right. | Photo courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The interior of the National Ignition Facility target chamber at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The service module carrying technicians can be seen on the left. The target positioner, which holds the target, is on the right. | Photo courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. EXPLORE THE NATIONAL LABS ON FLICKR Ames Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

229

Isotopes facilities deactivation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production and distribution of radioisotopes for medical, scientific, and industrial applications has been a major activity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since the late 1940s. As the demand for many of these isotopes grew and their sale became profitable, the technology for the production of the isotopes was transferred to private industry, and thus, many of the production facilities at ORNL became underutilized. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) instructed ORNL to identify and prepare various isotopes production facilities for safe shutdown. In response, ORNL identified 19 candidate facilities for shutdown and established the Isotopes Facilities Shutdown Program. In 1993, responsibility for the program was transitioned from the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy to the DOE Office of Environmental Management and Uranium Enrichment Operation`s Office of Facility Transition and Management. The program was retitled the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP), and implementation responsibility was transferred from ORNL to the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES), Environmental Restoration (ER) Program.

Eversole, R.E.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility at Idaho National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Operations Idaho Operations Review of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) at Idaho National Laboratory By Craig H. Benson, PhD, PE; William H. Albright, PhD; David P. Ray, PE, and John Smegal Sponsored by: The Office of Engineering and Technology (EM-20) 5 December 2007 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. OBJECTIVE AND SCOPE 1 3. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 1 2 3.1 Containerized Waste 2 3.2 Compacted Mixtures of Soil and Debris 3 3.3 Final Cover Settlement 3 3.4 Leachate Collection System and Leak Detection Zone Monitoring 4 4. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 2 4 5. LINE OF INQUIRY NO. 3 5 6. SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS 6 7. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 6 FIGURES 7 1 1. INTRODUCTION The Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) is a land disposal facility authorized by the US

231

Argonne National Laboratory Terahertz- and Millimeter-Wave Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROFILE: PROFILE: Argonne Homeland Security Technologies APPLICATIONS A R G O N N E N A T I O N A L L A B O R A T O R Y Terahertz- and Millimeter-Wave Test Facility B E N E F I T S Detect Terrorist-Related Contraband with Terahertz Technology * Spectral "fingerprints" uniquely identify materials * Can identify the factory where explosives and other chemicals were manufactured * Detects minute amounts of chemicals from a distance * Identifies materials in seconds Companies that develop or manufacture instruments to detect terrorist contraband can benefit by using a unique facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory. Called the Terahertz Test Facility, its sensitive, new instruments - developed at Argonne and available nowhere else in the world - can obtain spectral "fingerprints" that uniquely

232

Laser Ignition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Ignition Laser Ignition Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In two embodiments the beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion

233

LANL | Partnering | User Facility - Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Organization; Home; Collaborative Agreements; Licensing; Partnering; ... Back to Facility Directory; Combustion-Driven Supersonic Flow Facility. Facility Description.

234

Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of Research & Development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the Hanford Site. Facility effluent monitoring plans (FEMPs) have been developed to document the facility effluent monitoring portion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan (DOE 2000) for the Hanford Site. Three of PNNL’s R&D facilities, the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling, and individual FEMPs were developed for these facilities in the past. In addition, a balance-of-plant (BOP) FEMP was developed for all other DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site. Recent changes, including shutdown of buildings and transition of PNNL facilities to the Office of Science, have resulted in retiring the 3720 FEMP and combining the 331 FEMP into the BOP FEMP. This version of the BOP FEMP addresses all DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities at the Hanford Site, excepting the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, which has its own FEMP because of the unique nature of the building and operations. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R&D. R&D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in Appendix A. Potential radioactive airborne emissions in the BOP facilities are estimated annually using a building inventory-based approach provided in federal regulations. Sampling at individual BOP facilities is based on a potential-to-emit assessment. Some of these facilities are considered minor emission points and thus are sampled routinely, but not continuously, to confirm the low emission potential. One facility, the 331 Life Sciences Laboratory, has a major emission point and is sampled continuously. Sampling systems are located downstream of control technologies and just before discharge to the atmosphere. The need for monitoring airborne emissions of hazardous chemicals is established in the Hanford Site Air Operating Permit and in notices of construction. Based on the current potential-to-emit, the Hanford Site Air Operating Permit does not contain general monitoring requirements for BOP facilities. However, the permit identifies monitoring requirements for specific projects and buildings. Needs for future monitoring will be established by future permits issued pursuant to the applicable state and federal regulations. A number of liquid-effluent discharge systems serve the BOP facilities: sanitary sewer, process sewer, retention process sewer, and aquaculture system. Only the latter system discharges to the environment; the rest either discharge to treatment plants or to long-term storage. Routine compliance sampling of liquid effluents is only required at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. Liquid effluents from other BOP facilities may be sampled or monitored to characterize facility effluents or to investigate discharges of concern. Effluent sampling and monitoring for the BOP facilities depends on the inventories, activities, and environmental permits in place for each facility. A description of routine compliance monitoring for BOP facilities is described in the BOP FEMP.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Independent Oversight Review, Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility- January 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility Fire Suppression Vital Safety System

236

DOE/EIS-0236-S1F; National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

required, which could lead to certain measures being imposed, such as prohibition of blasting during the nesting season or within a certain distance from the nest. Response 1-30...

237

Developing Depleted Uranium and Gold Hohlraums for the National Ignition Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 339 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999613300

Wilkens, H.L.

2008-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

238

Post-Shot Radiation Environment Following Low-Yield Shots Inside the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety & Environment / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 2)

S. Sitaraman et al.

239

So Far Unfruitful, Fusion Project Faces a Frugal Congress National Ignition Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's architects and supporters at the Livermore lab defended the device as working beautifully and pointed

240

Pathway from the National Ignition Facility to an operational LIFE power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

next step, after NIF, is construction of a full-scale power plant NIF-1111-23807.ppt 4 #12 delivery #12;7NIF-1111-23807.ppt #12;Principle of LIFE plant operation Heat transfer DT fuel cycle for high plant availability NIF-based fusion performance, with low tritium inventory in the plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national ignition facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Performance of the beamlet laser, a testbed for the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present initial performance studies for Beamlet, a single-beam prototype for megajoule-class neodymium-glass laser fusion drivers using a multipass main amplifier, adaptive optics, and efficient, high-fluence conversion to the third harmonic. The Beamlet final amplifier uses Brewsters-angle glass slabs with a square 39 {times} 39 cm{sup 2} aperture and a full-aperture plasma-electrode Pockels cell switch. The laser has been tested at the fundamental wavelength over a range of pulselengths from 1-10 ns up to energies of 5.8 kJ at 10 ns and 17.3 kJ at 10 ns at a beam area of 35 {times} 35 cm{sup 2}. A 39-actuator deformable mirror system corrects the beam to a Strehl ratio of 0.4.

van Wonterghem, B.M.; Caird, J.A.; Barker, C.E.; Campbell, J.H.; Murray, J.R.; Speck, D.R.

1995-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

242

The National Ignition Facility and the Promise of Inertial Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plenary / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

E. I. Moses

243

Production Manufacturing of Gold-Depleted Uranium Layered Hohlraums for the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Selected papers from 20th Target Fabrication Meeting, May 20-24, 2012, Santa Fe, NM, Guest Editor: Robert C. Cook

N. A. Hein; H. L. Wilkens; A. Nikroo; H.-C. B. Chen; H. H. Streckert; K. Quan; J. R. Wall; T. A. Fuller; M. R. Jackson; E. M. Giraldez; S. J. Price; R. J. Sohn; M. Stadermann

244

DOE/EIS-0236-S1F; National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-30 Responses to Issues Identified in Document 16 (Letter from Cathie Brown, Mayor, City of Livermore, December 6, 1999) ......

245

Measurement of electron temperature of imploded capsules at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The electron and ion temperatures of the imploded core plasma are two of the most important metrics of inertial confinement fusion experiments. We have developed a technique for inferring electron temperatures from the contrast of x-ray images observed through a group of x-ray filters. Generally, the plasma electron temperature exhibits spatial and temporal variations, so time-averaged and time-resolved measurements are expected to yield somewhat different results. By analyzing the intensity of images observed with both a time-integrated detector (imaging plates) and a time-resolved detector (gated micro-channel plate), we found the electron temperature observed from x-ray images to be systematically higher than the ion temperature inferred from fusion neutron spectroscopy.

Izumi, N.; Ma, T.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Callahan, D.; Cerjan, C.; Edwards, J.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S.; Landen, O. L.; Springer, P.; Suter, L.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kilkenny, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Kline, J.; Kyrala, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); and others

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

BASIC RESEARCH DIRECTIONS for User Science at the National Ignition Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(K.O.H.). XAS data were measured at the Stanford Synchro- tron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL), which is supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The SSRL Structural Molecular

Stewart, Sarah T.

247

Target diagnostic control system implementation for the National Ignition Facility (invited)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extreme physics of targets shocked by NIF's 192-beam laser is observed by a diverse suite of diagnostics. Many diagnostics are being developed by collaborators at other sites, but ad hoc controls could lead to unreliable and costly operations. A diagnostic control system (DCS) framework for both hardware and software facilitates development and eases integration. Each complex diagnostic typically uses an ensemble of electronic instruments attached to sensors, digitizers, cameras, and other devices. In the DCS architecture each instrument is interfaced to a low-cost WINDOWS XP processor and JAVA application. Each instrument is aggregated with others as needed in the supervisory system to form an integrated diagnostic. The JAVA framework provides data management, control services, and operator graphical user interface generation. DCS instruments are reusable by replication with reconfiguration for specific diagnostics in extensible markup language. Advantages include minimal application code, easy testing, and high reliability. Collaborators save costs by assembling diagnostics with existing DCS instruments. This talk discusses target diagnostic instrumentation used on NIF and presents the DCS architecture and framework.

Shelton, R. T.; Kamperschroer, J. H.; Lagin, L. J.; Nelson, J. R.; O'Brien, D. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Study of the neutron damage on electronics at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The NIF environment is very complex leading to a large and non trivial radiation background. A shield surrounding the electronics is required to lower the neutron background to less than 1e7 n/cm{sup 2}. Moving electronics to behind the 6 foot-thick target bay wall is the best shield.

Dauffy, L S; Mcnaney, J M; Khater, H Y

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

249

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2007, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), was designated by the Department of Energy (DOE) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by approved researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide those researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer’s physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, obtained access to additional PIE equipment, taken steps to enable the most advanced post-irradiation analysis possible, and initiated an educational program and digital learning library to help potential users better understand the critical issues in reactor technology and how a test reactor facility could be used to address this critical research. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program invited universities to nominate their capability to become part of a broader user facility. Any university is eligible to self-nominate. Any nomination is then peer reviewed to ensure that the addition of the university facilities adds useful capability to the NSUF. Once added to the NSUF team, the university capability is then integral to the NSUF operations and is available to all users via the proposal process. So far, six universities have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these university capabilities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user’s technical needs. The current NSUF partners are shown in Figure 1. This article describes the ATR as well as the expanded capabilities, partnerships, and services that allow researchers to take full advantage of this national resource.

Todd R. Allen; Collin J. Knight; Jeff B. Benson; Frances M. Marshall; Mitchell K. Meyer; Mary Catherine Thelen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Delivering Innovations That Create Jobs: National Lab Ignites Business for Entrepreneurs   

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Tapping the entrepreneurial spirit of its Silicon Valley surroundings, Lawrence Livermore National Lab has a legacy that includes the launch of hundreds of successful companies. During just the past 20 years, five entrepreneurs from the Lab have founded four companies with a current market capitalization of $8.4 billion.

251

Sandia National Laboratories, California proposed CREATE facility environmental baseline survey.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, Environmental Programs completed an environmental baseline survey (EBS) of 12.6 acres located at Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) in support of the proposed Collaboration in Research and Engineering for Advanced Technology and Education (CREATE) Facility. The survey area is comprised of several parcels of land within SNL/CA, County of Alameda, California. The survey area is located within T 3S, R 2E, Section 13. The purpose of this EBS is to document the nature, magnitude, and extent of any environmental contamination of the property; identify potential environmental contamination liabilities associated with the property; develop sufficient information to assess the health and safety risks; and ensure adequate protection for human health and the environment related to a specific property.

Catechis, Christopher Spyros

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Sandia National Laboratories  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

into the facts and circumstances associated with the inadvertent ignition of a rocket motor at the 1O,000-foot sled track facility at Sandia National LaboratorieslNew Mexico site...

253

LANL | Partnering | User Facility - Los Alamos National Lab ...  

User Facility Agreements Program (505) 665-9090; Back to Facility Directory; Los Alamos Radioisotopes and Analytical Resource.

254

Conceptual Design - Polar Drive Ignition Campaign  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester is proposing a collaborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and General Atomics (GA) with the goal of developing a cryogenic polar drive (PD) ignition platform on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The scope of this proposed project requires close discourse among theorists, experimentalists, and laser and system engineers. This document describes how this proposed project can be broken into a series of parallel independent activities that, if implemented, could deliver this goal in the 2017 timeframe. This Conceptual Design document is arranged into two sections: mission need and design requirements. Design requirements are divided into four subsystems: (1) A point design that details the necessary target specifications and laser pulse requirements; (2) The beam smoothing subsystem that describes the MultiFM 1D smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD); (3) New optical elements that include continuous phase plates (CPP's) and distributed polarization rotators (DPR's); and (4) The cryogenic target handling and insertion subsystem, which includes the design, fabrication, testing, and deployment of a dedicated PD ignition target insertion cryostat (PD-ITIC). This document includes appendices covering: the primary criteria and functional requirements, the system design requirements, the work breakdown structure, the target point design, the experimental implementation plan, the theoretical unknowns and technical implementation risks, the estimated cost and schedule, the development plan for the DPR's, the development plan for MultiFM 1D SSD, and a list of acronym definitions. While work on the facility modifications required for PD ignition has been in progress for some time, some of the technical details required to define the specific modifications for a Conceptual Design Review (CDR) remain to be defined. In all cases, the facility modifications represent functional changes to existing systems or capabilities. The bulk of the scope yet to be identified is associated with the DPR's and MultiFM beam smoothing. Detailed development plans for these two subsystems are provided in Appendices H and I; additional discussion of subsystem requirements based on the physics of PD ignition is given in Section 3. Accordingly, LLE will work closely with LLNL to develop detailed conceptual designs for the PD-specific facility modifications, including assessments of the operational impact of implementation (e.g., changing optics for direct rather than indirect-drive illumination and swapping from a hohlraum-based ITIC to one that supports PD). Furthermore, the experimental implementation plan represents the current best understanding of the experimental campaigns required to achieve PD ignition. This plan will evolve based on the lessons learned from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) and ongoing indirect-drive ignition experiments. The plan does not take the operational realities of the PD configuration into account; configuration planning for the proposed PD experiments is beyond the scope of this document.

Hansen, R

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

255

Conceptual Design - Polar Drive Ignition Campaign  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester is proposing a collaborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and General Atomics (GA) with the goal of developing a cryogenic polar drive (PD) ignition platform on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The scope of this proposed project requires close discourse among theorists, experimentalists, and laser and system engineers. This document describes how this proposed project can be broken into a series of parallel independent activities that, if implemented, could deliver this goal in the 2017 timeframe. This Conceptual Design document is arranged into two sections: mission need and design requirements. Design requirements are divided into four subsystems: (1) A point design that details the necessary target specifications and laser pulse requirements; (2) The beam smoothing subsystem that describes the MultiFM 1D smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD); (3) New optical elements that include continuous phase plates (CPP's) and distributed polarization rotators (DPR's); and (4) The cryogenic target handling and insertion subsystem, which includes the design, fabrication, testing, and deployment of a dedicated PD ignition target insertion cryostat (PD-ITIC). This document includes appendices covering: the primary criteria and functional requirements, the system design requirements, the work breakdown structure, the target point design, the experimental implementation plan, the theoretical unknowns and technical implementation risks, the estimated cost and schedule, the development plan for the DPR's, the development plan for MultiFM 1D SSD, and a list of acronym definitions. While work on the facility modifications required for PD ignition has been in progress for some time, some of the technical details required to define the specific modifications for a Conceptual Design Review (CDR) remain to be defined. In all cases, the facility modifications represent functional changes to existing systems or capabilities. The bulk of the scope yet to be identified is associated with the DPR's and MultiFM beam smoothing. Detailed development plans for these two subsystems are provided in Appendices H and I; additional discussion of subsystem requirements based on the physics of PD ignition is given in Section 3. Accordingly, LLE will work closely with LLNL to develop detailed conceptual designs for the PD-specific facility modifications, including assessments of the operational impact of implementation (e.g., changing optics for direct rather than indirect-drive illumination and swapping from a hohlraum-based ITIC to one that supports PD). Furthermore, the experimental implementation plan represents the current best understanding of the experimental campaigns required to achieve PD ignition. This plan will evolve based on the lessons learned from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) and ongoing indirect-drive ignition experiments. The plan does not take the operational realities of the PD configuration into account; configuration planning for the proposed PD experiments is beyond the scope of this document.

Hansen, R

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

256

Electron generation and transport in intense relativistic laser-plasma interactions relevant to fast ignition ICF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ix Figure 1.10: (a) The NIF ignition scale cone-guided FINational Ignition Facility (NIF) experiments will focus onthe injection Figure 1.10: (a) The NIF ignition scale cone-

Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Facilities LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Some LANL facilities are available to researchers at other laboratories, universities, and industry. Unique facilities foster experimental science, support LANL's security mission DARHT accelerator DARHT's electron accelerators use large, circular aluminum structures to create magnetic fields that focus and steer a stream of electrons down the length of the accelerator. Tremendous electrical energy is added along the way. When the stream of high-speed electrons exits the accelerator it is

258

Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System  

Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System Opportunity The Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners ...

259

Design of the Uranium Storage Facility at the Y-12 National Security...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In 1998, the Department of Energy determined that a new facility to store highly enriched uranium materials at the Y-12 National Security Complex was needed. The new facility...

260

Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee, Facility Subcommittee visit to Idaho National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee, Facility Subcommittee visited the Idaho National Laboratory on 19-20 May 2010 to tour the nuclear infrastructure and to discuss the INL plans for facility...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national ignition facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CRAD, Quality Assurance - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TA 55 SST TA 55 SST Facility CRAD, Quality Assurance - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Quality Assurance Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Quality Assurance - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Quality Assurance - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility CRAD, Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility

262

LANL | Partnering | User Facility - Los Alamos National Lab ...  

The facility's runs a pulse standard certification program for outside users. The HSEL facilities comprise over 1,200 square feet of laboratory and office space.

263

Tag: uranium processing facility | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility project has received approval to begin field work. More... Category: News From aging infrastructure to the unaparalleled UPF The proposed Uranium Processing Facility...

264

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Progress  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is one of the world’s premier test reactors for studying the effects of intense neutron radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR began operation in 1967, and has operated continuously since then, averaging approximately 250 operating days per year. The combination of high flux, large test volumes, and multiple experiment configuration options provide unique testing opportunities for nuclear fuels and material researchers. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water moderated and cooled, beryllium-reflected highly-enriched uranium fueled, reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The ATR peak thermal flux can reach 1.0 x1015 n/cm2-sec, and the core configuration creates five main reactor power lobes (regions) that can be operated at different powers during the same operating cycle. In addition to these nine flux traps there are 68 irradiation positions in the reactor core reflector tank. The test positions range from 0.5” to 5.0” in diameter and are all 48” in length, the active length of the fuel. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. Goals of the ATR NSUF are to define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light water reactors, and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. The ATR NSUF has developed partnerships with other universities and national laboratories to enable ATR NSUF researchers to perform research at these other facilities, when the research objectives cannot be met using the INL facilities. The ATR NSUF program includes a robust education program enabling students to participate in their research at INL and the partner facilities, attend the ATR NSUF annual User Week, and compete for prizes at sponsored conferences. Development of additional research capabilities is also a key component of the ATR NSUF Program; researchers are encouraged to propose research projects leading to these enhanced capabilities. Some ATR irradiation experiment projects irradiate more specimens than are tested, resulting in irradiated materials available for post irradiation examination by other researchers. These “extra” specimens comprise the ATR NSUF Sample Library. This presentation will highlight the ATR NSUF Sample Library and the process open to researchers who want to access these materials and how to propose research projects using them. This presentation will provide the current status of all the ATR NSUF Program elements. Many of these were not envisioned in 2007, when DOE established the ATR NSUF.

Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; James I. Cole; Jeff B. Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

LANL | Partnering | User Facility - Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Contacts Event Calendar Maps Organization Phonebook Policy Center Emergency. NEWS. LIBRARY. JOBS. Technology Transfer, TT . ... Back to Facility Directory;

266

LANL | Partnering | User Facility - Los Alamos National Lab ...  

Data acquisition developed in-house, which integrates data acquisition from all chambers Facility Access. The Personal Protective ...

267

LANL | Partnering | User Facility - Los Alamos National Lab ...  

explosives loading and assembling facility; laser velocity interferometry; electronic and mechanical streak and framing cameras; ... beamcode laser special profiles;

268

Independent Oversight Review of the Idaho National Laboratory Fuel Conditioning Facility Safety Basis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT REVIEW OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY FUEL CONDITIONING FACILITY SAFETY BASIS April 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Independent Oversight i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT REVIEW OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY FUEL CONDITIONING FACILITY SAFETY BASIS Table of Contents Acronyms ............................................................................................................................ ii Executive Summary ........................................................................................................... iii 1.0 Introduction ..................................................................................................................1

269

LANL | Partnering | User Facility - Los Alamos National Lab ...  

Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA. Inside | © Copyright 2010-11 Los Alamos National Security, ...

270

Prediction of ignition of glass-metal mixture  

SciTech Connect

The integral fast reactor concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory includes on-site processing and recycling of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process will be demonstrated using the fuel cycle facility (FCF) located at ANL's Idaho facility. One of the processing steps is the casting of metal-fuel alloy slugs. Although alternate techniques are being developed, the current reference calls for casting the metal into quartz molds. During the slug demolding process, however, some of the fuel alloy remains attached to the quartz and becomes waste. Other finely divided particles of alloy from this operation also become mixed with the glass-fuel waste. This waste material is temporarily stored in cylindrical cans filled with argon gas to prevent oxidation and pyrophoric ignition. However, this mixture may come into contact with air as result of an accident and ignite. The ignition of the mixture depends significantly on the heat transfer characteristics of the waste can, which loses heat to the environment by natural convection and radiation. Heat is generated in the fuel by self-heating due both to its plutonium content and residual fission products and by heating due to oxidation. If the heat generation rate is higher than the heat loss rate, the system may experience a breakaway oxidation reaction, which is termed ignition.

Parlatan, Y. (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge (United States)); Charak, I. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Guidance for User Facility Agreements Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Energy™s Albuquerque Operations Office ... Pricing Policy - It is DOE policy to establish prices and charges for the facility, materials, and services provided

272

Review of the Los Alamos National Laoratory Nuclear Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CM Configuration Management CMR Chemistry and Metallurgy Research CSE Cognizant System Engineer DNFSB Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board DOE U.S. Department of Energy...

273

Advanced Free Electron Laser Facility - Los Alamos National Lab ...  

The AFEL Facility is used for applications requiring high-brightness electron beams or a tunable source of high-energy infrared light pulses in the wavelength range ...

274

Summary - Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) at Idaho National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INL, Idaho EM Project: Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility ETR Report Date: December 2007 ETR-10 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External...

275

LANL | Partnering | User Facility - Los Alamos National Lab ...  

The NHMFL at Los Alamos is a user facility for pulsed magnetic field up to 60 tesla and is available to qualified researchers through a proposal review process.

276

Review of the Los Alamos National Laoratory Nuclear Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

facility configuration management (CM) program in conjunction with a Los Alamos Site Office (LASO) scheduled assessment. Field activities focused on review of the generation and...

277

Omega Laser Facility Completes Record 25,000 Experiments | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > Omega Laser Facility Completes Record 25,000...

278

Transforming our Nation's Energy System, Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF)  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) on the campus of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will soon be the nation's first facility that can conduct integrated megawatt-scale testing of the components and strategies needed in order to safely move clean energy technologies onto the electrical grid 'in-flight' at the speed and scale required to meet national goals.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Inertial fusion target development for ignition and energy  

SciTech Connect

The target needs of the next ICF experiments that will lead toward ignition and energy are different from those of today`s experiments. The future experiments on OMEGA Upgrade, GEKKO XII Upgrade, the National Ignition Facility and Megajoule will need large, precise, cryogenic targets. Development is needed on a number of aspects of these targets, including shell fabrication, characterization, cryogenic layering and target handling. However, coordinated R and D programs are in place and work is in process to carry out the needed development. It is vital to the success of inertial fusion that this work be sustained. Coordinated effort, like the National Cryogenic Target Program in the USA, will help make the development activities as efficient and effective as possible, and should be encouraged.

Schultz, K.R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Norimatsu, T. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Bauer named Facilities, Infrastructure and Services head | Y-12 National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bauer named Facilities, ... Bauer named Facilities, ... Bauer named Facilities, Infrastructure and Services head Posted: August 27, 2012 - 1:01pm B&W Y-12 President and General Manager Chuck Spencer has named Linda Bauer as vice president of Facilities, Infrastructure and Services (FI&S). Bauer most recently served as senior vice president with Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc. helping direct large-scale government and private endeavors, such as the Portsmouth Environmental Restoration Project and the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Project. Linda Bauer, vice president of Facilities, Infrastructure and Services With 24 years of experience, she also has held positions such as senior operations manager for the Babcock and Wilcox Technical Services Group and multiple management roles at BWXT Savannah River Company.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national ignition facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Sandia Pulsed Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments Sandia scientist John Ford places fuel rods in the Seven Percent Critical Experiment (7uPCX) at the Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility Critical Experiments (SPRF/CX) test reactor - a reactor stripped down to its simplest form. The Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments (SPRF/CX) provides a flexible, shielded location for performing critical experiments that employ different reactor core configurations and fuel types. The facility is also available for hands-on nuclear criticality safety training. Research and other activities The 7% series, an evaluation of various core characteristics for higher commercial-fuel enrichment, is currently under way at the SPRF/CX. Past critical experiments at the SPRF/CX have included the Burnup Credit

282

Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee, Facility Subcommittee visit to Idaho National Laboratory May 19-20, 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Committee, Facility Subcommittee visit to Idaho National Committee, Facility Subcommittee visit to Idaho National Laboratory May 19-20, 2010 The Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee, Facility Subcommittee visited the Idaho National Laboratory on 19-20 May 2010 to tour the nuclear infrastructure and to discuss the INL plans for facility modernization as a dimension of the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy's (NE) mission. Team Members: Dr. John Ahearne, Sigma Xi, Research Triangle Park, NC Dr. Dana Christensen, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Dr. Thomas Cochran, Natural Resource Defense Council, Washington DC Dr. Andrew Klein, Oregon State University (second day only) Mr. Paul Murray, AREVA Federal Services Dr. John I. Sackett, Idaho National Laboratory, Retired, Support: Andrew Griffith, DOE/NE

283

ATR National Scientific User Facility 2009 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes activities of the ATR NSUF from FY-2008 through FY-2009 and includes information on partner facilities, calls for proposals, users week and education programs. The report also contains project information on university research projects that were awarded by ATR NSUF in the fiscal years 2008 & 2009. This research is university-proposed researcher under a user facility agreement. All intellectual property from these experiments belongs to the university per the user agreement.

Todd R. Allen; Mitchell K. Meyer; Frances Marshall; Mary Catherine Thelen; Jeff Benson

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Powerline Conductor Accelerated Testing Facility (PCAT) The Powerline Conductor Accelerated Testing facility (PCAT) at Oak Ridge National  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

associated with electricity transmission reliability and security in the US. Figures 1 and 2 show a view). The facility consists of five 161kV-rated steel transmission poles, which have extensive support to ensure of Energy's (DOE) National Transmission Technology Research Center (NTTRC). PCAT is part of DOE's effort

285

Physical Sciences Facility at the Pacific Northwest National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

iii Proposed Action: Construction and Operation of Research Buildings and Supporting Infrastructure, on the North Federal Campus, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site,...

286

Workshop on a National Irradiation Sciences User Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2009 * SNS * Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Materials Irradiation Home Materials Irradiation & HFIR Agenda Registration Hotel Registration CommitteeContacts Workshop on a National...

287

Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Facilities and Operations Directorate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Search Go Find People Contact Site Index Comments Home News News Releases Story Tips Features Contacts ORNL Review Magazine ORNL in the News...

288

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance ... U.S. Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific ...

289

The Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radioactive Liquid Waste Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory OAS-L-13-15 September 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 26, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ASSOCIATE ADMINISTRATOR FOR ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT MANAGER LOS ALAMOS FIELD OFFICE FROM: David Sedillo Western Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) is a Government- owned, contractor operated Laboratory that is part of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) nuclear weapons complex. Los Alamos' primary responsibility is to

290

Analysis of Fluctuating Static Pressure Measurements in the National Transonic Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic measurements of fluctuating static pressure levels were taken with flush-mounted, high-frequency response pressure transducers at 11 locations in the circuit of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) across the complete operating range of this ...

Igoe William B.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

The National Criticality Experiments Research Center at the Device Assembly Facility, Nevada National Security Site: Status and Capabilities, Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) was officially opened on August 29, 2011. Located within the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), the NCERC has become a consolidation facility within the United States for critical configuration testing, particularly those involving highly enriched uranium (HEU). The DAF is a Department of Energy (DOE) owned facility that is operated by the National Nuclear Security Agency/Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). User laboratories include the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Personnel bring their home lab qualifications and procedures with them to the DAF, such that non-site specific training need not be repeated to conduct work at DAF. The NNSS Management and Operating contractor is National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) and the NNSS Safeguards and Security contractor is Wackenhut Services. The complete report provides an overview and status of the available laboratories and test bays at NCERC, available test materials and test support configurations, and test requirements and limitations for performing sub-critical and critical tests. The current summary provides a brief summary of the facility status and the method by which experiments may be introduced to NCERC.

S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Bess; J. Werner

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Facilities Disposition Project Integrated Facilities Disposition Project Technical Assistance Page 1 of 2 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Y-12 National Security Complex Tennessee Tennessee Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at ORNL & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM Challenge In December 2007, the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program Secretarial Offices (PSOs) of Nuclear Energy (NE), Science (SC), and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental Management (EM) for final disposition or deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). In parallel with the EM-1 initiative, the Oak Ridge Reservation was conducting a Critical

293

: The Resumption of Criticality Experiments Facility Operations at the Nevada National Security Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resumption of Criticality Resumption of Criticality Experiments Facility Operations at the Nevada National Security Site OAS-M-13-09 September 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 30, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE PRINCIPAL DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FROM: George W. Collard Assistant Inspector General for Audits Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Resumption of Criticality Experiments Facility Operations at the Nevada National Security Site" BACKGROUND The mission of the Criticality Experiments Facility, located at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) was to conduct nuclear criticality experiments and hands-on training in nuclear safeguards, criticality safety and emergency response in support of the National

294

Observation of strong electromagnetic fields around laser-entrance holes of ignition-scale hohlraums in inertial-confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy spectra and spectrally resolved one-dimensional fluence images of self-emitted charged-fusion products (14.7 MeV D[superscript 3]He protons) are routinely measured from indirectly driven inertial-confinement fusion ...

Li, C. K.

295

Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities | Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities Innovative cement helps DOE safeguard nuclear facilities By Jared Sagoff * April 25, 2008 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - When Argonne materials scientists Arun Wagh and Dileep Singh initially developed Ceramicrete®, a novel phosphate cement that stabilizes radioactive waste streams, they did not immediately recognize that with one or two extra ingredients, the cement could solve another problem in the nuclear complex. In the course of the development of the Ceramicrete technology, Wagh and Singh formed a multilayered collaboration among Argonne, the Russian Federal Nuclear Center (VNIIEF) in Sarov, Russia, and Ceradyne Boron Products LLC. This international scientific partnership created an unusually efficient nuclear shield that blocks the neutrons and gamma rays

296

Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Facility Subcommittee visit to Oak Ridge National  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Subcommittee visit to Oak Ridge National Facility Subcommittee visit to Oak Ridge National Laboratory 26 August 2010 The NEAC Facilities Subcommittee made a site visit to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on August 26, 2010. Subcommittee members included John Ahearne (Vice Chairman of NEAC and Facilities Subcommittee Chairman), Dana Christensen (ORNL), Thomas B. Cochran (Natural Resources Defense Council), Michael Corradini, (University of Wisconsin-Madison), and Andrew Klein (Oregon State University). Tansel Selekler (Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy) accompanied the Subcommittee. The visit was well-coordinated by Sherrell Greene, who insured that briefings were on time and that Cochran, Corridini, and Ahearne could get to the airport on time to catch departing flights.

297

Operational Awareness Oversight of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility, July 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ANL-2012-07-20 ANL-2012-07-20 Site: Argonne National Laboratory Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) Activity Report for Operational Awareness Oversight of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility Dates of Activity : 07/17/2012 - 07/20/2012 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The purpose of this Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) activity was to shadow the Argonne Site Office (ASO) Facility Representative (FR) performing a review of the technical safety requirements (TSRs) for the Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility (AGHCF), a hazard category 2 nuclear facility. The ASO review evaluated the flow down of the TSRs into the facility documentation of surveillance procedures, datasheets, and the performance of the surveillance.

298

Operational Awareness Oversight of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility, July 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANL-2012-07-20 ANL-2012-07-20 Site: Argonne National Laboratory Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) Activity Report for Operational Awareness Oversight of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility Dates of Activity : 07/17/2012 - 07/20/2012 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The purpose of this Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) activity was to shadow the Argonne Site Office (ASO) Facility Representative (FR) performing a review of the technical safety requirements (TSRs) for the Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility (AGHCF), a hazard category 2 nuclear facility. The ASO review evaluated the flow down of the TSRs into the facility documentation of surveillance procedures, datasheets, and the performance of the surveillance.

299

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) proposes to create a National Facility for Advanced Computational Science (NFACS) and to establish a new partnership between the American computer industry and a national consortium of laboratories, universities, and computing facilities. NFACS will provide leadership-class scientific computing capability to scientists and engineers nationwide, independent of their institutional affiliation or source of funding. This partnership will bring into existence a new class of computational capability in the United States that is optimal for science and will create a sustainable path towards petaflops performance.

Simon, Horst; Kramer, William; Saphir, William; Shalf, John; Bailey, David; Oliker, Leonid; Banda, Michael; McCurdy, C. William; Hules, John; Canning, Andrew; Day, Marc; Colella, Philip; Serafini, David; Wehner, Michael; Nugent, Peter

2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

300

Emergency Management Standards and Schools National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are no nationally-adopted emergency management standards for schools, but the U.S. Department of Education’s Practical Information on Crisis Planning: A Guide for Schools and Communities, which provides a four-phase approach to school emergency planning activities, is widely used throughout the country. In addition, many states and local school districts have their own emergency management mandates, policies, and procedures, often based on this guide. A number of emergency management standards intended for voluntary adoption by emergency response organizations are produced by standards-making organizations such as the National Fire Protection

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national ignition facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

California’s Energy Future: The View to 2050 - Summary Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Ignition Facility (NIF) and its associated researchdiode LWR Light water reactor NIF National Ignition Facility

Yang, Christopher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

California's Energy Future - The View to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Ignition Facility (NIF) and its associated researchdiode LWR Light water reactor NIF National Ignition Facility

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Operational Philosophy for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

SciTech Connect

In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). At its core, the ATR NSUF Program combines access to a portion of the available ATR radiation capability, the associated required examination and analysis facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and INL staff expertise with novel ideas provided by external contributors (universities, laboratories, and industry). These collaborations define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high-temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light-water reactors (LWRs), and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. To make possible the broadest access to key national capability, the ATR NSUF formed a partnership program that also makes available access to critical facilities outside of the INL. Finally, the ATR NSUF has established a sample library that allows access to pre-irradiated samples as needed by national research teams.

J. Benson; J. Cole; J. Jackson; F. Marshall; D. Ogden; J. Rempe; M. C. Thelen

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Finding of No Significant Impact Improvements at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Newsport News, Virginia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IMPROVEMENTS AT THE THOMAS JEFFERSON NATIONAL ACCELERATOR FACILITY IMPROVEMENTS AT THE THOMAS JEFFERSON NATIONAL ACCELERATOR FACILITY NEWPORT NEWS, VIRGINIA AGENCY: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ACTION: FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1384) for proposed Improvements at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). Newport News, Virginia. Based on the results of the impacts analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the context of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not necessary, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No

305

Particle-beam fusion research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia research in inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) is based on pulse-power capabilities that grew out of earlier developments of intense relativistic electron-beam (e-beam) radiation sources for weapon effects studies. ICF involves irradiating a deuterium-tritium pellet with either laser light or particle beams until the center of the pellet is compressed and heated to the point of nuclear fusion. This publication focuses on the use of particle beams to achieve fusion, and on the various facilities that are used in support of the particle-beam fusion (PBF) program.

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Site Tour - Accelerator Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Counting House Free Electron Accelerator Facility Machine Control Center Physics Storage Building North Linear Accelerator South Linear Accelerator VEPCO Substation Machine Control Center Annex Machine Control Center Annex II North Access Building South Access Building Central Helium Liquefier Injector Hall A Truck Ramp Hall B Truck Ramp Hall C Truck Ramp Experimental Hall A Experimental Hall B Experimental Hall C East Arc West Arc Counting House Free Electron Accelerator Facility Machine Control Center Physics Storage Building North Linear Accelerator South Linear Accelerator VEPCO Substation Machine Control Center Annex Machine Control Center Annex II North Access Building South Access Building Central Helium Liquefier Injector Hall A Truck Ramp Hall B Truck Ramp Hall C Truck Ramp Experimental Hall A Experimental Hall B Experimental Hall C East Arc West Arc Science Education Jefferson Lab Jefferson Lab Home Search Jefferson Lab Contact Jefferson Lab Science Education Home Teacher Resources Student Zone Games and Puzzles Science Cinema Programs and Events Search Education Privacy and Security Notice Jefferson Lab Site Tour Guided Tour Site Map Accelerator Area Map Administrative Area Map Tour Index

307

Sandia National Laboratories: Z Pulsed Power Facility: About Z  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Z About Z Picture of Z Machine Sandia's Z machine is Earth's most powerful pulsed-power facility and X-ray generator. Z compresses energy in time and space to achieve extreme powers and intensities, found nowhere else on Earth. In approximately 200 shots Z fires every year, the machine uses currents of about 26 million amps to reach peak X-ray emissions of 350 terawatts and an X-ray output of 2.7 megajoules. The Z machine is located in Albuquerque, N.M., and is part of Sandia's Pulsed Power Program, which began in the 1960s. Pulsed power is a technology that concentrates electrical energy and turns it into short pulses of enormous power, which are then used to generate X-rays and gamma rays. Produced in the laboratory, this controlled radiation creates conditions similar to those caused by the detonation of nuclear weapons,

308

NIF achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

309

Omega Laser Facility Completes Record 25,000 Experiments | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Omega Laser Facility Completes Record 25,000 Experiments | National Nuclear Omega Laser Facility Completes Record 25,000 Experiments | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > Omega Laser Facility Completes Record 25,000 Experiments Press Release Omega Laser Facility Completes Record 25,000 Experiments Nov 5, 2013

310

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, December 9, 1991  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering Laboratory ("INEL") Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, December 9, 1991 Engineering Laboratory ("INEL") Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, December 9, 1991 EM Home | Regulatory Compliance | Environmental Compliance Agreements Idaho National Engineering Laboratory ("INEL") Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, December 9, 1991 THE UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY, REGION 10, THE STATE OF IDAHO, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE, AND THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY IN THE MATTER OF: ) FEDERAL FACILITY AGREEMENT ) AND CONSENT ORDER THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ) IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING ) LABORATORY ("INEL"), ) ) Administrative Docket Number: ) 1088-06-120 Idaho Falls, Idaho ) Table of Contents I. Jurisdiction II. Definitions III. Parties IV. Statement Of Purpose

311

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video About Operational Excellence Facilities Facilities...

312

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Federal Facility Compliance Order, February 24, 1997 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Facility Compliance Act Order for Lawrence Federal Facility Compliance Act Order for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Compliance Order HWCA 96/97-5002 State California Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) FFCAct Scope Summary Require compliance by the DOE with a Site Treatment Plan for the treatment of mixed waste at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Parties DOE; State of California Environmental Protection Agency (Department of Toxic Substances Control) Date 2/24/1997 SCOPE * Require compliance by the DOE with a Site Treatment Plan for the treatment of mixed waste at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. * Address LDR requirements pertaining to storage and treatment of covered waste at LLNL. ESTABLISHING MILESTONES * The Compliance Plan Volume of the STP provides overall schedules for achieving

313

Sandia National Laboratories: Z Pulsed Power Facility: Z News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Z News Z News Dry-run experiments verify key aspect of Sandia nuclear fusion concept View All News Releases News Releases Fusion instabilities lessened by unexpected effect Jan. 9, 2014 Japanese city councilor journeys to end furor over Sandia Z tests May 23, 2013 Sandia physicist wins two national awards Nov. 29, 2012 Dry-run experiments verify key aspect of Sandia nuclear fusion concept Sept. 17, 2012 Nuclear fusion simulation shows high-gain energy output March 20, 2012 Z researcher Dan Sinars awarded $2.5 million DOE Early Career grant May 25, 2011 Second Z plutonium "shot" safely tests materials for NNSA May 11, 2011 Sandia effort images the sea monster of nuclear fusion: the Rayleigh-Taylor instability Nov. 11, 2010 Image Gallery Video Z In the News Triple-threat method sparks hope for fusion

314

Sandia National Laboratories: Z Pulsed Power Facility: Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Z-Machine Z-Machine About Z Z Research Z News Contact Us Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Top Z News Publications Z-Machine Publications Archive Inertial Confinement Fusion Dynamic Hohlraums Thomas W. L. Sanford, "Overview of the Dynamic-Hohlraum X-ray Source at Sandia National Laboratories," April 2007 (1.5 MB PDF) T.W.L. Sanford, "Comparative properties of the Interior and Blowoff Plasmas in a dynamic Hohlraum," April 2007 (1.39 KB PDF) Tom Nash, "Current Scaling of Axially Radiated Power in dynamic Hohlraums and Dynamic Hohlraum Load Design for ZR," March 2007 (2.15 PDF) R. A. Vesey, "Target Design for High Fusion Yield with the Double Z-pinch driven Hohlraums," March 2007 (1.65 PDF) T.W.L. Sanford, "Wire Initiation Critical for Radiation symmetry

315

Safety analysis of IFR fuel processing in the Argonne National Laboratory Fuel Cycle Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) includes on-site processing and recycling of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process is being demonstrated in the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) at ANL`s Idaho site. This paper describes the safety analyses that were performed in support of the FCF program; the resulting safety analysis report was the vehicle used to secure authorization to operate the facility and carry out the program, which is now under way. This work also provided some insights into safety-related issues of a commercial IFR fuel processing facility. These are also discussed.

Charak, I; Pedersen, D.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Forrester, R.J.; Phipps, R.D. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

The explosive components facility - fulfilling its role as a national resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is a major, low-hazard, non-nuclear, research and development facility of the Sandia National Laboratories/Albuquerque (SNL). Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed-Martin, operates this designated User Facility for the Department of Energy (DOE). The ECF consolidates many SNL energetic-materials activities and provides a unique combination of explosive-technologies, neutronic-components, batteries, and weapons-evaluation capabilities. This paper describes the project objectives, the basic building features, programmatic capabilities, and the processes used to beneficially occupy and assess readiness to operate.

Johnson, D.R.; Bonzon, L.L.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Construction and operation of an improved radiation calibration facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Environmental assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calibration of instruments used to detect and measure ionizing radiation has been conducted over the last 20 years at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) Radiation Calibration Facility, Building 348. Growth of research facilities, projects in progress, and more stringent Department of Energy (DOE) orders which involve exposure to nuclear radiation have placed substantial burdens on the existing radiation calibration facility. The facility currently does not meet the requirements of DOE Order 5480.4 or American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N323-1978, which establish calibration methods for portable radiation protection instruments used in the detection and measurement of levels of ionizing radiation fields or levels of radioactive surface contaminations. Failure to comply with this standard could mean instrumentation is not being calibrated to necessary levels of sensitivity. The Laboratory has also recently obtained a new neutron source and gamma beam irradiator which can not be made operational at existing facilities because of geometry and shielding inadequacies. These sources are needed to perform routine periodic calibrations of radiation detecting instruments used by scientific and technical personnel and to meet BNL`s substantial increase in demand for radiation monitoring capabilities. To place these new sources into operation, it is proposed to construct an addition to the existing radiation calibration facility that would house all calibration sources and bring BNL calibration activities into compliance with DOE and ANSI standards. The purpose of this assessment is to identify potential significant environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of an improved radiation calibration facility at BNL.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Notice of Availability for the National Ignition Facility Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (11/5/99)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30 30 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 214 / Friday, November 5, 1999 / Notices natural or human environment. Because no significant environmental impacts will result from implementation of the proposed action, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and will not be prepared. The Army will not initiate the proposed action for 15 days following the completion of the EA and FNSI and publication of a public notice in a local newspaper. This EA is available for review at the following repositories: Lassen Community College Library, Highway 139, P.O. Box 3000, Susanville, CA 96130; Lassen County Public Works, 707 Nevada Street, Suite 2, Susanville, CA 96130; and the Washoe County Library, Downtown Branch, 301 South Center Street, Reno NV 89501. Dated: November 1, 1999.

319

Summary of Blast Shield and Material Testing for Development of Solid Debris Collection at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

SciTech Connect

The ability to collect solid debris from the target chamber following a NIF shot has application for both capsule diagnostics, particularly for fuel-ablator mix, and measuring cross sections relevant to the Stockpile Stewardship program and nuclear astrophysics. Simulations have shown that doping the capsule with up to 10{sup 15} atoms of an impurity not otherwise found in the capsule does not affect its performance. The dopant is an element that will undergo nuclear activations during the NIF implosion, forming radioactive species that can be collected and measured after extraction from the target chamber. For diagnostics, deuteron or alpha induced reactions can be used to probe the fuel-ablator mix. For measuring neutron cross sections, the dopant should be something that is sensitive to the 14 MeV neutrons produced through the fusion of deuterium and tritium. Developing the collector is a challenge due to the extreme environment of the NIF chamber. The collector surface is exposed to a large photon flux from x-rays and unconverted laser light before it is exposed to a debris wind that is formed from vaporized material from the target chamber center. The photons will ablate the collector surface to some extent, possibly impeding the debris from reaching the collector and sticking. In addition, the collector itself must be mechanically strong enough to withstand the large amount of energy it will be exposed to, and it should be something that will be easy to count and chemically process. In order to select the best material for the collector, a variety of different metals have been tested in the NIF chamber. They were exposed to high-energy laser shots in order to evaluate their postshot surface characterization, morphology, degree of melt, and their ability to retain debris from the chamber center. The first set of samples consisted of 1 mm thick pieces of aluminum that had been fielded in the chamber as blast shields protecting the neutron activation diagnostic. Ten of these pieces were fielded at the equator and one was fielded on the pole. The shields were analyzed using a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), x-ray fluorescence (XRF), neutron activation analysis (NAA) and chemical leaching followed by mass spectrometry. On each shield, gold debris originating from the gold hohlraum was observed, as well as large quantities of debris that were present in the center of the target chamber at the time of the shot (i.e., stainless steel, indium, copper, etc.) Debris was visible in the SEM as large blobs or splats of material that had encountered the surface of the aluminum and stuck. The aluminum itself had obviously melted and condensed, and some of the large debris splats arrived after the surface had already hardened. Melt depth was determined by cross sectioning the pieces and measuring the melted surface layers via SEM. After the SEM analysis was completed, the pieces were sent for NAA at the USGS reactor and were analyzed by U. Greife at the Colorado School of Mines. The NAA showed that the majority of gold mass present on the shields was not in the form of large blobs and splats, but was present as small particulates that had most likely formed as condensed vapor. Further analysis showed that the gold was entrained in the melted aluminum surface layers and did not extend down into the bulk of the aluminum. Once the gold mass was accounted for from the NAA, it was determined that the aluminum fielded at the equator was collecting a fraction of the total gold hohlraum mass equivalent to 120% {+-} 10% of the solid angle subtended by the shield. The attached presentation has more information on the results of the aluminum blast shield analysis. In addition to the information given in the presentation, the surfaces of the shields have been chemically leached and submitted for mass spectrometric analysis. The results from that analysis are expected to arrive after the due date of this report and will be written up at a later time. Based on the results of the aluminum b

Shaughnessy, D A; Gostic, J M; Moody, K J; Grant, P M; Lewis, L A; Hutcheon, I D

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

320

Recent National Solar Thermal Test Facility activities, in partnership with industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA conducts testing of solar thermal components and systems, funded primarily by the US Department of Energy. Activities are conducted in support of Central Receiver Technology, Distributed Receiver Technology and Design Assistance projects. All activities are performed in support of various cost-shared government/industry joint ventures and, on a design assistance basis, in support of a number of other industry partners.

Ghanbari, C.; Cameron, C.P.; Ralph, M.E.; Pacheco, J.E.; Rawlinson, K.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evans, L.R. [Ewing Technical Design, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national ignition facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Advanced ignition and propulsion technology program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Reliable engine re-ignition plays a crucial role in enabling commercial and military aircraft to fly safely at high altitudes. This project addressed research elements critical to the optimization of laser-based igniter. The effort initially involved a collaborative research and development agreement with B.F. Goodrich Aerospace and Laser Fare, Inc. The work involved integrated experiments with theoretical modeling to provide a basic understanding of the chemistry and physics controlling the laser-induced ignition of fuel aerosols produced by turbojet engine injectors. In addition, the authors defined advanced laser igniter configurations that minimize laser packaging size, weight, complexity and power consumption. These innovative ignition concepts were shown to reliably ignite jet fuel aerosols over a broad range of fuel/air mixture and a t fuel temperatures as low as -40 deg F. The demonstrated fuel ignition performance was highly superior to that obtained by the state-of-the-art, laser-spark ignition method utilizing comparable laser energy. The authors also developed a laser-based method that effectively removes optically opaque deposits of fuel hydrocarbon combustion residues from laser window surfaces. Seven patents have been either issued or are pending that resulted from the technology developments within this project.

Oldenborg, R.; Early, J.; Lester, C.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Environmental Assessment Proposed Improvements at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Newport News, Virginia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

84 84 Environmental Assessment Proposed Improvements at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Newport News, Virginia June 2002 U. S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Oak Ridge, Tennessee DOE/EA-1384 i TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary.....................................................................................................................1 1. INTRODUCTION..................................................................................................................... 6 1.1 PREVIOUS ACTIONS ............................................................................................................................................. 6 1.2 SCOPE OF THIS PROPOSED ACTION..............................................................................................................

323

The WIPP is the nation's first geologic facility designed for permanent disposal of transuranic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The WIPP is the nation's first geologic facility designed for permanent disposal of transuranic, New Mexico to dispose of this waste. The TRU waste being disposed at the WIPP is packaged into drums-level waste and spent nuclear fuel. The WIPP has a total capacity of 6.2 million cubic feet of TRU waste

324

The Sanford Underground Research Facility at Homestake U.C Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). With the National Science Board's decision to halt development of a NSF directly. A dedicated 1500 kVA substation provides sufficient capacity for the experiment and facility. !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ! "!Lesko, K.T., et al., "Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory - Preliminary Design Report

325

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Facility Radionuclide Emission Points and Sampling Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Battelle—Pacific Northwest Division operates numerous research and development laboratories in Richland, Washington, including those associated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Department of Energy’s Hanford Site that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. The National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP 40 CFR 61, Subparts H and I) requires an assessment of all effluent release points that have the potential for radionuclide emissions. Potential emissions are assessed annually. Sampling, monitoring, and other regulatory compliance requirements are designated based upon the potential-to-emit dose criteria found in the regulations. The purpose of this document is to describe the facility radionuclide air emission sampling program and provide current and historical facility emission point system performance, operation, and design information. A description of the buildings, exhaust points, control technologies, and sample extraction details is provided for each registered or deregistered facility emission point. Additionally, applicable stack sampler configuration drawings, figures, and photographs are provided.

Barfuss, Brad C.; Barnett, J. M.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

326

The mixed waste management facility: Cost-benefit for the Mixed Waste Management Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Mixed Waste Management Facility, or MWMF, has been proposed as a national testbed facility for the demonstration and evaluation of technologies that are alternatives to incineration for the treatment of mixed low-level waste. The facility design will enable evaluation of technologies at pilot scale, including all aspects of the processes, from receiving and feed preparation to the preparation of final forms for disposal. The MWMF will reduce the risk of deploying such technologies by addressing the following: (1) Engineering development and scale-up. (2) Process integration and activation of the treatment systems. (3) Permitting and stakeholder issues. In light of the severe financial constraints imposed on the DOE and federal programs, DOE/HQ requested a study to assess the cost benefit for the MWMF given other potential alternatives to meet waste treatment needs. The MVVMF Project was asked to consider alternatives specifically associated with commercialization and privatization of the DOE site waste treatment operations and the acceptability (or lack of acceptability) of incineration as a waste treatment process. The result of this study will be one of the key elements for a DOE decision on proceeding with the MWMF into Final Design (KD-2) vs. proceeding with other options.

Brinker, S.D.; Streit, R.D.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Laser preheat enhanced ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for enhancing fuel ignition performance by preheating the fuel with laser light at a wavelength that is absorbable by the fuel prior to ignition with a second laser is provided.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Review at the Nevada National Security Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NNSS-2011-001 NNSS-2011-001 Site: Nevada National Security Site Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Review at the Nevada National Security Site Dates of Activity 02/14/2011 - 02/17/2011 Report Preparer William Macon Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), visited the Nevada Site Office (NSO) and the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) from February 14-17, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to observe the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) review and maintain operational awareness of NNSS activities. Result:

329

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Operational Drill at the B332 Plutonium Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR LLNL-2013-02-27 Site: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Operational Drill at the B332 Plutonium Facility Date of Activity: 02/27/2013 Report Preparer: Thomas Rogers Activity Description/Purpose: The Livermore Site Office (LSO) and Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS) requested personnel from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) to observe an operational drill at the Plutonium Facility in Building 332 (B332). LSO and LLNS desired HS-45's participation to help

330

EIS-0388: Operation of a Biosafety Level 3 Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluates the operation of a Biosafety Level 3 Facility (BSL–3 Facility) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A BSL-2 Alternative, an existing BSL-2 permitted facility, and a No Action Alternative will be analyzed. The EIS is currently on hold.

331

Project Management Plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP) is to place former isotopes production facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance (S&M) and as quickly and economically as possible. Implementation and completion of the deactivation project will further reduce the already small risks to the environment and to public safety and health. Furthermore, the project should result in significant S&M cost savings in the future. The IFDP management plan has been prepared to document the project objectives, define organizational relationships and responsibilities, and outline the management control systems to be employed in the management of the project. The project has adopted a strategy to deactivate the simple facilities first, to reduce the scope of the project, and to gain experience before addressing more difficult facilities. A decision support system is being developed to identify those activities, that best promote the project mission and result in largest cost savings. The Work Plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Energy Systems 1994) defines the project schedule, the cost estimate, and the technical approach for the project.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Federal Facility Agreement, June 29, 1992 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site 300) Site 300) Agreement Name Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Federal Facility Agreement Under CERCLA Section 120, June 29, 1992 State California Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA Scope Summary Establish a procedural framework and schedule for developing, implementing, and monitoring appropriate response actions at the Site Parties DOE; USEPA; California Department of Toxic Substances Control; Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board Date 6/29/1992 SCOPE * Establish a procedural framework and schedule for developing, implementing, and monitoring appropriate response actions at the Site. * Identify operable units (OUs) which are appropriate at the Site prior to the implementation of final remedial action(s).

333

Measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility in Support of Global Security Mission Space  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility at Technical Area (TA) 55 is one of a few nuclear facilities in the United States where Research & Development measurements can be performed on Safeguards Category-I (CAT-I) quantities of nuclear material. This capability allows us to incorporate measurements of CAT-IV through CAT-I materials as a component of detector characterization campaigns and training courses conducted at Los Alamos. A wider range of measurements can be supported. We will present an overview of recent measurements conducted in support of nuclear emergency response, nuclear counterterrorism, and international and domestic safeguards. This work was supported by the NNSA Office of Counterterrorism.

Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mayo, Douglas R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Herrera, Gary D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McLaughlin, Anastasia D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Charles M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quihuis, Becky A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Julio B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Van Pelt, Craig E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wenz, Tracy R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

334

Thermal ignition combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

335

The Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility at the Nevada National Security Site, OAS-L-12-05  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Actinide Shock Physics Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility at the Nevada National Security Site OAS-L-12-05 April 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 April 23, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, NEVADA SITE OFFICE FROM: David Sedillo, Director Western Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility at the Nevada National Security Site" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration's, Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) facility plays an integral role in the certification of the Nation's nuclear weapons stockpile by providing a method to generate and measure data

336

Remote Technology for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that will undergo deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) over the next several years include highly contaminated hot cell facilities, reactor facilities, process facilities, and a variety of other buildings. The D and D effort will require physical, chemical, and radiological characterization as well as decontamination, material sorting, size reduction, dismantlement, and waste removal and packaging. D and D planning for ORNL facilities includes recognizing that a significant number of the facilities contain hazards that prevent the use of safe manual D and D techniques. These hazards include seriously deteriorated structural integrity as well as very high dose rates (some in the hundreds of R/hr). The hazards also include high levels of fixed and removable radioactive contamination on facility surfaces and in equipment as well as chemically hazardous materials. Thus, manned entry may be highly restricted. In these situations, remotely operated technologies will be required to complete the necessary D and D activities, minimize dose and protect workers. To prepare to use remote technologies, it is first necessary to understand the tasks typically required to complete D and D of these facilities as well as the availability, applicability, and sustainability of previously deployed remote technologies. Technologies of specific interest included remote inspection, characterization, decontamination, and dismantlement. The Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University (FIU), in partnership with NuVision Engineering (NVE, formerly AEA Technology), assessed the requirements for remotely operated technologies to support D and D at ORNL. FIU-ARC and NVE then identified existing technologies that can meet the expected requirements and performed a gap analysis between the D and D needs and currently available technologies. (authors)

Shoffner, P.A.; Lagos, L.E.; Varona, J. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); Faldowski, J.A.; Vesco, D. [NuVision Engineering, Inc., Road, Mooresville, NC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Urnaium Processing Facility Project, June 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project May 2011 June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Independent Oversight Assessment of Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope and Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 2 3.0 Results and Conclusions ....................................................................................................................... 3

338

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Urnaium Processing Facility Project, June 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project May 2011 June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Independent Oversight Assessment of Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope and Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 2 3.0 Results and Conclusions ....................................................................................................................... 3

339

Factsheet Overview The Savannah River National Laboratory's Shielded Cells Facility gives the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview The Savannah River National Laboratory's Shielded Cells Facility gives the laboratory the ability to safely work with a wide variety of highly radioactive samples and items in support of various research and development initiatives. Skilled operators, standing safely outside the cells, use manipulator arms to perform work inside the cells. The facility consists of sixteen 6-foot by 6-foot work stations or cells with the following features: The exterior walls of the facility are made of 3-foot-thick high-density * concrete with a 1/8-inch thick stainless steel liner. Each cell has a 3' x3' shielding window. Shielding windows are 3-foot thick * leaded glass, filled with mineral oil for optimal viewing capabilities.

340

Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory 15kW High Temperature Electrolysis Test Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 15kW high temperature electrolysis test facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This facility is intended to study the technology readiness of using high temperature solid oxide cells for large scale nuclear powered hydrogen production. It is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high temperature gas handling, heat recuperation), multiple-stack hot zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, etc. Heat recuperation and hydrogen recycle are incorporated into the design. The facility was operated for 1080 hours and successfully demonstrated the largest scale high temperature solid-oxide-based production of hydrogen to date.

Carl M. Stoots; Keith G. Condie; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national ignition facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Removal site evaluation report for the Isotope Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This removal site evaluation (RmSE) report of the Isotope Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was prepared to provide the Environmental Restoration Program with information necessary to evaluate whether hazardous and/or radiological contaminants in and around the Isotopes Facility pose a substantial risk to human health or the environment and if remedial site evaluations (RSEs) or removal actions are required. The scope of the project included: (1) a review of historical evidence regarding operations and use of the facility; (2) interviews with facility personnel concerning current and past operating practices; (3) a site inspection; and (4) identification of hazard areas requiring maintenance, removal, or remedial actions. The results of RmSE indicate that no substantial risks exist from contaminants present in the Isotope Facilities because adequate controls and practices exist to protect human health and the environment. The recommended correction from the RmSE are being conducted as maintenance actions; accordingly, this RmSE is considered complete and terminated.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Environmental assessment: Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility (CPP-633), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to close the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF). The WCF is a surplus DOE facility located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Six facility components in the WCF have been identified as Resource Conservation and Recovery Ace (RCRA)-units in the INEL RCRA Part A application. The WCF is an interim status facility. Consequently, the proposed WCF closure must comply with Idaho Rules and Standards for Hazardous Waste contained in the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA) Section 16.01.05. These state regulations, in addition to prescribing other requirements, incorporate by reference the federal regulations, found at 40 CFR Part 265, that prescribe the requirements for facilities granted interim status pursuant to the RCRA. The purpose of the proposed action is to reduce the risk of radioactive exposure and release of hazardous constituents and eliminate the need for extensive long-term surveillance and maintenance. DOE has determined that the closure is needed to reduce potential risks to human health and the environment, and to comply with the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) requirements.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Work plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP) is to place former isotopes production facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition; suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance (S&M) and as quickly and economical as possible. Implementation and completion of the deactivation project will further reduce the risks to the environment and to public safety and health. Furthermore, completion of the project will result in significant S&M cost savings in future years. The IFDP work plan defines the project schedule, the cost estimate, and the technical approach for the project. A companion document, the IFDP management plan, has been prepared to document the project objectives, define organizational relationships and responsibilities, and outline the management control systems to be employed in the management of the project. The project has adopted the strategy of deactivating the simple facilities first, to reduce the scope of the project and to gain experience before addressing more difficult facilities. A decision support system is being developed to identify the activities that best promote the project mission and result in the largest cost savings. This work plan will be reviewed and revised annually. Deactivation of IFDP facilities was initiated in FY 1994 and will be completed in FY 1999. The schedule for deactivation of facilities is shown. The total cost of the project is estimated to be $36M. The costs are summarized. Upon completion of deactivation, annual S&M costs of these facilities will be reduced from the current level of $5M per year to less than $1M per year.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Work plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP) is to place former isotopes production facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition; suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance (S and M) and as quickly and economical as possible. Implementation and completion of the deactivation project will further reduce the risks to the environment and to public safety and health. Furthermore, completion of the project will result in significant S and M cost savings in future years. The IFDP work plan defines the project schedule, the cost estimate, and the technical approach for the project. A companion document, the EFDP management plan, has been prepared to document the project objectives, define organizational relationships and responsibilities, and outline the management control systems to be employed in the management of the project. The project has adopted the strategy of deactivating the simple facilities first, to reduce the scope of the project and to gain experience before addressing more difficult facilities. A decision support system is being developed to identify the activities that best promote the project mission and result in the largest cost savings. This work plan will be reviewed and revised annually. Deactivation of EFDP Facilities was initiated in FY 1994 and will be completed in FY 2000. The schedule for deactivation of facilities is shown. The total cost of the project is estimated to be $51M. The costs are summarized. Upon completion of deactivation, annual S and M costs of these facilities will be reduced from the current level of $5M per year to less than $1M per year.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

CYCLE-BY-CYCLE COMBUSTION VARIATIONS IN SPARK-IGNITED ENGINES Engineering Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-8088 USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CYCLE-BY-CYCLE COMBUSTION VARIATIONS IN SPARK-IGNITED ENGINES C.S. DAW Engineering Technology-2053 USA ABSTRACT Under constant nominal operating conditions, internal combustion engines can exhibit sub- stantial variation in combustion efficiency from one cycle to the next. Previous researchers have attempted

Tennessee, University of

347

Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spark Distribution and Ignition System Spark Distribution and Ignition System Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implement- ing United States Patent Number 7,421,166 entitled "Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System." Disclosed in this patent is NETL's laser spark distribution and ignition system, which reduces the high-power optical requirements normally needed for such a system by using optical fibers to deliver low-peak-energy pumping pulses to a laser amplifier or laser oscillator. Laser spark generators then produce a high-peak-power laser spark from a single low power pulse. The system has ap- plications in natural gas fueled reciprocating engines, turbine combustors, explosives, and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy diagnostic sensors.

348

Compact Ignition Tokamak Program: issues to be resolved by January  

SciTech Connect

This Compact Ignition Tokamak Program report addresses unresolved issues concerning: concept configuration; design space characterization; facility/device layouts; auxiliary system development; cost; R and D; and alternate sites. (JDB)

Flanagan, C.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

2010 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2009, through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2010 permit year, approximately 2.2 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

Mike lewis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

2012 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2011, through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of compliance conditions and activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2012 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The Ignition Physics Study Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the US magnetic fusion program there have been relatively few standing committees of experts, with the mandate to review a particular sub-area on a continuing basis. Generally, ad hoc committees of experts have been assembled to advise on a particular issue. There has been a lack of broad, systematic and continuing review and analysis, combining the wisdom of experts in the field, in support of decision making. The Ignition Physics Study Group (IPSG) provides one forum for the systematic discussion of fusion science, complementing the other exchanges of information, and providing a most important continuity in this critical area. In a similar manner to the European program, this continuity of discussion and the focus provided by a national effort, Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), and international effort, Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), are helping to lower those barriers which previously were an impediment to rational debate.

Sheffield, J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials with Particles and Components Testing (IMPACT) facility and the Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) Radiochemistry Processing Laboratory (RPL) and PIE facilities were added. The ATR NSUF annually hosts a weeklong event called User’s Week in which students and faculty from universities as well as other interested parties from regulatory agencies or industry convene in Idaho Falls, Idaho to see presentations from ATR NSUF staff as well as select researchers from the materials research field. User’s week provides an overview of current materials research topics of interest and an opportunity for young researchers to understand the process of performing work through ATR NSUF. Additionally, to increase the number of researchers engaged in LWR materials issues, a series of workshops are in progress to introduce research staff to stress corrosion cracking, zirconium alloy degradation, and uranium dioxide degradation during in-reactor use.

John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Convective heating analysis of an IFE target in a high temperature, low Reynolds number xenon environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the National Ignition Facility (NIF),” Proceedings of 9 ththe National Ignition Facility (NIF),” Proceedings of 9 thFacility, NIF ..

Holdener, Dain Steffen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Ground Broken for New Job-Creating Accelerator Research Facility at DOE’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, ground was broken for a new accelerator research facility being built at the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia,...

355

Brookhaven National Laboratory is home to world-class research facilities and sc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is home to world-class research facilities and scientific is home to world-class research facilities and scientific departments which attract resident and visiting scientists in many fields. This outstanding mix of machine- and mind-power has on seven occasions produced research deemed worthy of the greatest honor in science: the Nobel Prize. 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, of the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, UK, a former employee in Brookhaven's Biology Department, and a long-time user of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University, also a long-time NSLS user, shared the prize with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science for studying the structure and function of the ribosome.

356

Grouting at the Idaho National Laboratory Tank Farm Facility, R. Mark Shaw  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grouting at the Grouting at the Idaho National Laboratory Tank Farm Facility R. Mark Shaw, U. S. Department of Energy safety v performance v cleanup v closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management 2 Topics/Agenda * Tank Farm Overview * Tank and Vault Grouting * Cooling Coil and Transfer Line Grouting safety v performance v cleanup v closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management 3 INTEC TANK FARM CLOSURE INTEC TANK FARM CLOSURE VES-WM-103 VES-WM-104 VES-WM-105 VES-WM-106 182 183 185 186 187 189 190 188 184 181 180 Tank Farm Facility Octagon Vaults: WM-180, WM-181 Pillar and Panel Vaults: WM-182, WM-183, WM-184, WM-185, WM-186 Square Vaults: WM-187, WM-188, WM-189, WM-190 GV99 0008 safety v performance v cleanup v closure M E Environmental Management

357

Review of the Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Disposition Project, September 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Centered Assessment of the Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Disposition Project September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Results .................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Conclusions ............................................................................................................................ 7

358

Review of the Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Disposition Project, September 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Centered Assessment of the Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Disposition Project September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Results .................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Conclusions ............................................................................................................................ 7

359

Data Sharing Report Characterization of Isotope Row Facilities Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge TN  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support using funds provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested ORAU to plan and implement a survey approach, focused on characterizing the Isotope Row Facilities located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for future determination of an appropriate disposition pathway for building debris and systems, should the buildings be demolished. The characterization effort was designed to identify and quantify radiological and chemical contamination associated with building structures and process systems. The Isotope Row Facilities discussed in this report include Bldgs. 3030, 3031, 3032, 3033, 3033A, 3034, 3036, 3093, and 3118, and are located in the northeast quadrant of the main ORNL campus area, between Hillside and Central Avenues. Construction of the isotope production facilities was initiated in the late 1940s, with the exception of Bldgs. 3033A and 3118, which were enclosed in the early 1960s. The Isotope Row facilities were intended for the purpose of light industrial use for the processing, assemblage, and storage of radionuclides used for a variety of applications (ORNL 1952 and ORAU 2013). The Isotope Row Facilities provided laboratory and support services as part of the Isotopes Production and Distribution Program until 1989 when DOE mandated their shutdown (ORNL 1990). These facilities performed diverse research and developmental experiments in support of isotopes production. As a result of the many years of operations, various projects, and final cessation of operations, production was followed by inclusion into the surveillance and maintenance (S&M) project for eventual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The process for D&D and final dismantlement of facilities requires that the known contaminants of concern (COCs) be evaluated and quantified and to identify and quantify any additional contaminants in order to satisfy the waste acceptance criteria requirements for the desired disposal pathway. Known facility contaminants include, but are not limited to, asbestos-containing material (ACM), radiological contaminants, and chemical contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and metals.

Weaver, Phyllis C

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

360

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Advancing Nuclear Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team projects and faculty/staff exchanges. In June of 2008, the first week-long ATR NSUF Summer Session was attended by 68 students, university faculty and industry representatives. The Summer Session featured presentations by 19 technical experts from across the country and covered topics including irradiation damage mechanisms, degradation of reactor materials, LWR and gas reactor fuels, and non-destructive evaluation. High impact research results from leveraging the entire research infrastructure, including universities, industry, small business, and the national laboratories. To increase overall research capability, ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. Current partner facilities include the MIT Reactor, the University of Michigan Irradiated Materials Testing Laboratory, the University of Wisconsin Characterization Laboratory, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas transmission Electron Microscope User Facility. Needs for irradiation of material specimens at tightly controlled temperatures are being met by dedication of a large in-pile pressurized water loop facility for use by ATR NSUF users. Several environmental mechanical testing systems are under construction to determine crack growth rates and fracture toughness on irradiated test systems.

T. R. Allen; J. B. Benson; J. A. Foster; F. M. Marshall; M. K. Meyer; M. C. Thelen

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national ignition facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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361

Electrical Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrical Characterization Electrical Characterization Laboratory may include: * Equipment manufacturers * Universities * Other National laboratories Contact Us If you are interested in working with NREL's Energy Systems Integration Laboratory, please contact: ESIF Manager Carolyn Elam Carolyn.Elam@nrel.gov 303-275-4311 Electrical Characterization Laboratory Electrical Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) focuses on the detailed electrical characterization of components and systems. This laboratory allows researchers to test the ability of equipment to withstand high voltage surges and high current faults, including equipment using

362

Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Materials Storage Materials Laboratory may include: * CSP technology developers * Utilities * Certification laboratories * Government agencies * Universities * Other National laboratories Contact Us If you are interested in working with NREL's Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory, please contact: ESIF Manager Carolyn Elam Carolyn.Elam@nrel.gov 303-275-4311 Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory The Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) investigates materials that can be used as high-temperature heat transfer fluids or thermal energy storage media in concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Research objectives include the discovery and evaluation of

363

Buildings to Grid Integration Technical Meeting: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Energy Systems Integration Facility, Golden, CO  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings to Grid Integration Buildings to Grid Integration Technical Meeting: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Energy Systems Integration Facility Golden, CO December 2012 1 WELCOME Welcome to the Buildings to Grid Integration Technical Meeting and to Golden, Colorado. On behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program, I would like to thank you for attending and for your active participation. I look forward to meeting you and hearing your perspective on enabling significant buildings to grid integration. Everyone is here because we are working to make efficient transactions between buildings and the grid a commercial reality, whether it is through

364

Preparation for Ignition Experiments on the NIF Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preparation for Ignition Experiments on the NIF Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting December 4-5, 2007 John Lindl NIF and Photon Science Directorate Chief Scientist Lawrence Livermore National chance for ignition in early NIF operations · The initial ignition experiments only scratch the surface

365

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 Things You Didn't Know About Lawrence Livermore National 0 Things You Didn't Know About Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory December 6, 2013 - 6:18pm Addthis The photo above is of a cryogenically cooled target in the National Ignition Facility as "seen" by the laser through the hohlraum's laser entrance hole. | Photo courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The photo above is of a cryogenically cooled target in the National Ignition Facility as "seen" by the laser through the hohlraum's laser entrance hole. | Photo courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Ben Dotson Ben Dotson Project Coordinator for Digital Reform, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Founded in 1952, Lawrence Livermore National Lab is one of the

366

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Lawrence Livermore National Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory December 6, 2013 - 6:18pm Addthis The photo above is of a cryogenically cooled target in the National Ignition Facility as "seen" by the laser through the hohlraum's laser entrance hole. | Photo courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The photo above is of a cryogenically cooled target in the National Ignition Facility as "seen" by the laser through the hohlraum's laser entrance hole. | Photo courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Ben Dotson Ben Dotson Project Coordinator for Digital Reform, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Founded in 1952, Lawrence Livermore National Lab is one of the

367

Prompt Beta Spectroscopy as a Diagnostic for Mix in Ignited NIF Capsules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) technology is designed to drive deuterium-tritium (DT) internal confinement fusion (ICF) targets to ignition using indirect radiation from laser beam energy captured in a hohlraum. Hydrodynamical instabilities at interfaces in the ICF capsule leading to mix between the DT fue l and the ablator shell material are of fundamental physical interest and can affect the performance characteristics of the capsule. In this Letter we describe new radiochemical diagnostics for mix processes in ICF capsules with plastic or Be (0.9%Cu) ablator shells. Reactions of high-energy tritons with shell material produce high-energy $\\beta$-emitters. We show that mix between the DT fuel and the shell material enhances high-energy prompt beta emission from these reactions by more than an order of magnitude over that expected in the absence of mix.

A. C. Hayes; G. Jungman; J. C. Solem; P. A. Bradley; R. S. Rundberg

2004-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

368

Ignition Rate Measurement of Laser-Ignited Coals  

SciTech Connect

We established a novel experiment to study the ignition of pulverized coals under conditions relevant to utility boilers. Specifically, we determined the ignition mechanism of pulverized-coal particles under various conditions of particle size, coal type, and freestream oxygen concentration. We also measured the ignition rate constant of a Pittsburgh #8 high-volatile bituminous coal by direct measurement of the particle temperature at ignition, and incorporating this measurement into a mathematical model for the ignition process. The model, called Distributed Activation Energy Model of Ignition, was developed previously by our group to interpret conventional drop-tube ignition experiments, and was modified to accommodate the present study.

John C. Chen; Vinayak Kabadi

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

2011 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2010, through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Site description; (2) Facility and system description; (3) Permit required monitoring data and loading rates; (4) Status of special compliance conditions and activities; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 permit year, approximately 1.22 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

Michael G. Lewis

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Performance Assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This performance assessment for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of low-level radioactive waste at the facility. This assessment evaluates compliance with the applicable radiological criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involve modeling transport of radionuclides from buried waste to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses are calculated for both offsite receptors and individuals who inadvertently intrude into the waste after site closure. The results of the calculations are used to evaluate the future performance of the low-level radioactive waste disposal facility and to provide input for establishment of waste acceptance criteria. In addition, one-factor-at-a-time, Monte Carlo, and rank correlation analyses are included for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The comparison of the performance assessment results to the applicable performance objectives provides reasonable expectation that the performance objectives will be met

Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Arthur S. Rood

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Preliminary safety analysis report for the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) will be a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility used to characterize, treat, and repackage radioactive and mixed material and waste for reuse, recycling, or ultimate disposal. A significant upgrade to a previous facility, the Temporary Hot Cell, will be implemented to perform this mission. The following major features will be added: a permanent shield wall; eight floor silos; new roof portals in the hot-cell roof; an upgraded ventilation system; and upgraded hot-cell jib crane; and video cameras to record operations and facilitate remote-handled operations. No safety-class systems, structures, and components will be present in the AHCF. There will be five safety-significant SSCs: hot cell structure, permanent shield wall, shield plugs, ventilation system, and HEPA filters. The type and quantity of radionuclides that could be located in the AHCF are defined primarily by SNL/NM's legacy materials, which include radioactive, transuranic, and mixed waste. The risk to the public or the environment presented by the AHCF is minor due to the inventory limitations of the Hazard Category 3 classification. Potential doses at the exclusion boundary are well below the evaluation guidelines of 25 rem. Potential for worker exposure is limited by the passive design features incorporated in the AHCF and by SNL's radiation protection program. There is no potential for exposure of the public to chemical hazards above the Emergency Response Protection Guidelines Level 2.

OSCAR,DEBBY S.; WALKER,SHARON ANN; HUNTER,REGINA LEE; WALKER,CHERYL A.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Facility Radionuclide Emissions Units and Sampling Systems  

SciTech Connect

Battelle-Pacific Northwest Division operates numerous research and development (R and D) laboratories in Richland, WA, including those associated with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Hanford Site and PNNL Site that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. The National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP 40 CFR 61, Subparts H and I) requires an assessment of all emission units that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. Potential emissions are assessed annually by PNNL staff members. Sampling, monitoring, and other regulatory compliance requirements are designated based upon the potential-to-emit dose criteria found in the regulations. The purpose of this document is to describe the facility radionuclide air emission sampling program and provide current and historical facility emission unit system performance, operation, and design information. For sampled systems, a description of the buildings, exhaust units, control technologies, and sample extraction details is provided for each registered emission unit. Additionally, applicable stack sampler configuration drawings, figures, and photographs are provided. Deregistered emission unit details are provided as necessary for up to 5 years post closure.

Barnett, J. M.; Brown, Jason H.; Walker, Brian A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The Use of Staff Augmentation Subcontracts at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility, IG-0887  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Use of Staff Augmentation The Use of Staff Augmentation Subcontracts at National Nuclear Security Administration's Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility DOE/IG-0887 May 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 May 15, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Use of Staff Augmentation Subcontracts at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility" BACKGROUND Shaw AREVA MOX Services, LLC (MOX Services) is responsible for the design and construction of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) nearly $5 billion Mixed

374

Audit of the radioactive liquid waste treatment facility operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) generates radioactive and liquid wastes that must be treated before being discharged to the environment. Presently, the liquid wastes are treated in the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (Treatment Facility), which is over 30 years old and in need of repair or replacement. However, there are various ways to satisfy the treatment need. The objective of the audit was to determine whether Los Alamos cost effectively managed its Treatment Facility operations. The audit determined that Los Alamos` treatment costs were significantly higher when compared to similar costs incurred by the private sector. This situation occurred because Los Alamos did not perform a complete analysis of privatization or prepare a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan for its treatment operations, although a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan requirement was incorporated into the contract in 1996. As a result, Los Alamos may be spending $2.15 million more than necessary each year and could needlessly spend $10.75 million over the next five years to treat its radioactive liquid waste. In addition, Los Alamos has proposed to spend $13 million for a new treatment facility that may not be needed if privatization proves to be a cost effective alternative. We recommended that the Manager, Albuquerque Operations Office (Albuquerque), (1) require Los Alamos to prepare a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan for its radioactive liquid waste treatment operations, (2) review the plan for approval, and (3) direct Los Alamos to select the most cost effective method of operations while also considering other factors such as mission support, reliability, and long-term program needs. Albuquerque concurred with the recommendations.

1997-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

375

Technical Considerations for NRC/National Academy Proposed Study of Cancer Risks in Populations Living near Nuclear Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), is updating the 1990 U.S. National Institutes of Health - National Cancer Institute (NCI) report, "Cancer in Populations Living near Nuclear Facilities." The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed a committee of scientists and professionals in the fields of epidemiology, radiation biology, nuclear plant effluents, and environmental risk assessment to provide study design considerations to the NAS commit...

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

376

DOE/EA-1310: Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Couples Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 March 2000 Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory DOE/EA-1310 Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Published March 2000 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office iii CONTENTS ACRONYMS ............................................................................................................................... v HELPFUL INFORMATION ........................................................................................................

377

Enhanced Computational Infrastructure for Data Analysis at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility  

SciTech Connect

Recently a number of enhancements to the computer hardware infrastructure have been implemented at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility. Utilizing these improvements to the hardware infrastructure, software enhancements are focusing on streamlined analysis, automation, and graphical user interface (GUI) systems to enlarge the user base. The adoption of the load balancing software package LSF Suite by Platform Computing has dramatically increased the availability of CPU cycles and the efficiency of their use. Streamlined analysis has been aided by the adoption of the MDSplus system to provide a unified interface to analyzed DIII-D data. The majority of MDSplus data is made available in between pulses giving the researcher critical information before setting up the next pulse. Work on data viewing and analysis tools focuses on efficient GUI design with object-oriented programming (OOP) for maximum code flexibility. Work to enhance the computational infrastructure at DIII-D has included a significant effort to aid the remote collaborator since the DIII-D National Team consists of scientists from 9 national laboratories, 19 foreign laboratories, 16 universities, and 5 industrial partnerships. As a result of this work, DIII-D data is available on a 24 x 7 basis from a set of viewing and analysis tools that can be run either on the collaborators' or DIII-Ds computer systems. Additionally, a Web based data and code documentation system has been created to aid the novice and expert user alike.

Schissel, D.P.; Peng, Q.; Schachter, J.; Terpstra, T.B.; Casper, T.A.; Freeman, J.; Jong, R.; Keith, K.M.; Meyer, W.H.; Parker, C.T.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Sandia National Laboratories support of the Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program.  

SciTech Connect

Because of past military operations, lack of upkeep and looting there are now enormous radioactive waste problems in Iraq. These waste problems include destroyed nuclear facilities, uncharacterized radioactive wastes, liquid radioactive waste in underground tanks, wastes related to the production of yellow cake, sealed radioactive sources, activated metals and contaminated metals that must be constantly guarded. Iraq currently lacks the trained personnel, regulatory and physical infrastructure to safely and securely manage these facilities and wastes. In 2005 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) agreed to organize an international cooperative program to assist Iraq with these issues. Soon after, the Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program (the NDs Program) was initiated by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to support the IAEA and assist the Government of Iraq (GOI) in eliminating the threats from poorly controlled radioactive materials. The Iraq NDs Program is providing support for the IAEA plus training, consultation and limited equipment to the GOI. The GOI owns the problems and will be responsible for implementation of the Iraq NDs Program. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is a part of the DOS's team implementing the Iraq NDs Program. This report documents Sandia's support of the Iraq NDs Program, which has developed into three principal work streams: (1) training and technical consultation; (2) introducing Iraqis to modern decommissioning and waste management practices; and (3) supporting the IAEA, as they assist the GOI. Examples of each of these work streams include: (1) presentation of a three-day training workshop on 'Practical Concepts for Safe Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste in Arid Settings;' (2) leading GOI representatives on a tour of two operating low level radioactive waste disposal facilities in the U.S.; and (3) supporting the IAEA's Technical Meeting with the GOI from April 21-25, 2008. As noted in the report, there was significant teaming between the various participants to best help the GOI. On-the-ground progress is the focus of the Iraq NDs Program and much of the work is a transfer of technical and practical skills and knowledge that Sandia uses day-to-day. On-the-ground progress was achieved in July of 2008 when the GOI began the physical cleanup and dismantlement of the Active Metallurgical Testing Laboratory (LAMA) facility at Al Tuwaitha, near Baghdad.

Cochran, John Russell; Danneels, Jeffrey John

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Review of Safety Basis Development for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of6 of6 Subject: Review of Safety Basis HS: HSS CRAD 45-59 U.S. Department of Development for the Los Alamos Rev: 0 National Laboratory Transuranic Eff. Date: May 6, 2013 Energy Waste Facility - Criteria and Review Approach Document Office of Safety and ~ Emergency Management Acting Djector, Of~e of Safety and Evaluations Emergency Management Evaluations Date: May 6, 2013 firo,~ Page 1of6 Criteria and Review e;dJatnes 0. Low Approach Document Date: May 6, 2013 1.0 PURPOSE Within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), the Office of Enforcement and Oversight, Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) mission is to assess the effectiveness of the environment, safety, health, and emergency management systems and practices used by line and

380

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) THOMAS JEFFERSON NATIONAL ACCELERATOR FACILITY (JEFFERSON LAB)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- 2014 JSAT Application Package - 2014 JSAT Application Package Page 1 of 6 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) THOMAS JEFFERSON NATIONAL ACCELERATOR FACILITY (JEFFERSON LAB) JLAB SCIENCE ACTIVITIES FOR TEACHERS (JSAT) ATTENTION ALL 5 th , 6 th AND 8 th GRADE MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE TEACHERS! THIS PROGRAM IS FOR YOU! What is it? JSAT is an after school program for 5 th , 6 th and 8 th grade science teachers designed to build teachers' skills in the physical sciences, funded by the Jefferson Science Associates Initiatives Fund. What will I do? The 2013-2014 program will include interactive activities to enhance physical science instruction at the middle school level and lectures by Jefferson Lab staff on the applications of science. And, yes, teachers WILL receive class sets of some activities!

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national ignition facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Federal Facility Compliance Act: Conceptual Site Treatment Plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by section 3021(b) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (the Act), to prepare plans describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste. The Act requires site treatment plans (STPs or plans) to be developed for each site at which DOE generates or stores mixed waste and submitted to the State or EPA for approval, approval with modification, or disapproval. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) is the preliminary version of the plan required by the Act and is being provided to California, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and others for review. A list of the other DOE sites preparing CSTPs is included in Appendix 1.1 of this document. Please note that Appendix 1.1 appears as Appendix A, pages A-1 and A-2 in this document.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The German National Analysis Facility as a tool for ATLAS analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2008 the German National Analysis Facility (NAF) at DESY was established. It is attached to and builds on top of the DESY Grid infrastructure. The facility was designed to provide the best possible analysis infrastructure for high energy particle physics of the ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and ILC experiments. The Grid and local infrastructure of the German NAF will be reviewed with a focus on the ATLAS part. Both parts include large scale storage and a batch system. The main emphasis of this presentation is the ATLAS specific customisation and utilisation of the NAF. This refers not only to the NAF components but also to the different components of the ATLAS analysis framework. Experience from operating and supporting ATLAS users on the German NAF will be presented. The ATLAS usage of the different components will be shown including some typical use cases of user analysis. Finally, the question will be addressed if the design of the NAF meets the ATLAS expectations for efficient data analysis in the era of LHC data t...

Mehlhase, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Leffhalm, K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

1 The German National Analysis Facility as a tool for ATLAS analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2008 the German National Analysis Facility (NAF) at DESY was established. It is attached to and builds on top of DESY Grid infrastructure. The facility is designed to provide the best possible analysis infrastructure for high energy particle physics of the ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and ILC experiments. The Grid and local infrastructure of the NAF is reviewed with a focus on the ATLAS part. Both parts include large scale storage and a batch system. Emphasis is put on ATLAS specific customisation and utilisation of the NAF. This refers not only to the NAF components but also to the di erent components of the ATLAS analysis framework. Experience from operating and supporting ATLAS users on the NAF is presented in this paper. The ATLAS usage of the di erent components are shown including some typical use cases of user analysis. Finally, the question is addressed, if the design of the NAF meets the ATLAS expectations for effcient data analysis in the era of LHC data taking.

Mehlhase, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Leffhalm, K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Material handling for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Material Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

This paper will present the design and application of material handling and automation systems currently being developed for the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Nuclear Material Storage Facility (NMSF) renovation project. The NMSF is a long-term storage facility for nuclear material in various forms. The material is stored within tubes in a rack called a basket. The material handling equipment range from simple lift assist devices to more sophisticated fully automated robots, and are split into three basic systems: a Vault Automation System, an NDA automation System, and a Drum handling System. The Vault Automation system provides a mechanism to handle a basket of material cans and to load/unload storage tubes within the material vault. In addition, another robot is provided to load/unload material cans within the baskets. The NDA Automation System provides a mechanism to move material within the small canister NDA laboratory and to load/unload the NDA instruments. The Drum Handling System consists of a series of off the shelf components used to assist in lifting heavy objects such as pallets of material or drums and barrels.

Pittman, P.; Roybal, J.; Durrer, R.; Gordon, D.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

DOE/EA-1149; Environmental Assessment: Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility, Idaho Nation Engineering Laboratory (and FONSI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 July 1996 Environmental Assessment Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility (CPP-633), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE CLOSURE OF THE WASTE CALCINING FACILITY AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY Agency: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Action: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The DOE-Idaho Operations Office has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the environmental impacts of closing the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the action is to reduce the risk of radioactive exposure and release of radioactive and hazardous constituents and eliminate the need for extensive long-term surveillance and maintenance. DOE has determined that the closure is needed to reduce the risks to human

386

User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's National User Facilities are available for cooperative research with institutions and the private sector worldwide. The Environmental...

387

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SC), the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA),network) NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SC), the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA),NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE program)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Annual report -- 1992: Environmental surveillance for EG & G Idaho Waste Management Facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the 1992 environmental surveillance activities of the Environmental Monitoring Unit of EG&G Idaho, Inc., at EG&G Idaho-operated Waste Management facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The major facilities monitored include the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility, the Mixed Waste Storage Facility, and two surplus facilities. Included are some results of the sampling performed by the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory and the United States Geological Survey. The primary purposes of monitoring are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to ensure compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1992 environmental surveillance data with DOE derived concentration guides, and with data from previous years.

Wilhelmsen, R.N.; Wright, K.C.; McBride, D.W.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Draft environmental assessment -- Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility (CPP-633), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The DOE-Idaho Operations Office has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the environmental impacts of closing the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the action is to reduce the risk of radioactive exposure and release of radioactive and hazardous constituents and eliminate the need for extensive long-term surveillance and maintenance. DOE has determined that the closure is needed to reduce these risks to human health and the environment and to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements. The WCF closure project is described in the DOE Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact Statement (Programmatic EIS). DOE determined in the Programmatic EIS Record of Decision (ROD) that certain actions would be implemented and other actions deferred. The EA examined the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and evaluated reasonable alternatives, including the no action alternative in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations. Based on the analysis in the EA, the action will not have a significant effect on the human environment.

Braun, J.B.; Irving, J.S.; Staley, C.S.; Stanley, N.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Argonne and Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facilitieslike Leadership Computing Facilities at Argonne and Oak

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Review of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility Readiness Assessment (Implementation Verification Review Sections), Novvember 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility Readiness Assessment (Implementation Verification Review Sections) May 2011 November 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1

393

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Videos on YouTube  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

LLNL established its current channel on YouTube in June of 2009. While many of the video clips concern the National Ignition Facility and are also available at the LLNL website, other offerings include quick looks at research discoveries such as Element 117 and medical advancements such as the artificial retina.

394

Superconducting magnet development capability of the LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) High Field Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the following topics: High-Field Test Facility Equipment at LLNL; FENIX Magnet Facility; High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) 2-m Solenoid; Cryogenic Mechanical Test Facility; Electro-Mechanical Conductor Test Apparatus; Electro-Mechanical Wire Test Apparatus; FENIX/HFTF Data System and Network Topology; Helium Gas Management System (HGMS); Airco Helium Liquefier/Refrigerator; CTI 2800 Helium Liquefier; and MFTF-B/ITER Magnet Test Facility.

Miller, J.R.; Shen, S.; Summers, L.T.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Absolute, soft x-ray calorimetry on the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Simple and reliable x-ray fluence measurements, in addition to time-resolved diagnostics, are needed to understand the physics of hot Z-pinch plasmas. A commercially available laser calorimeter has been modified for measuring soft x-ray fluence from the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The x-ray absorber of this calorimeter is an aluminum disk, attached to a two-dimensional thermopile and surrounded by an isoperibol shroud. The time-integral and the maximum of the thermopile voltage signal are both proportional to the x-ray energy deposited. Data are collected for 90 seconds, and the instrument has, thus far, been used in the 1--25 mJ range. A wider dynamic measuring range for x-ray fluence (energy/area) can be achieved by varying the area of the defining aperture. The calorimeter is calibrated by an electrical substitution method. Calibrations are performed before and after each x-ray experiment on the Z facility. The calibration of the time-integral of the thermopile voltage vs. energy deposited (or the peak of thermopile voltage vs. energy deposited) is linear with zero offset at the 95% confidence level. The irreproducibility of the calibration is <2%, and the imprecision in the measurement of the incident x-ray energy (inferred from signal noise and the calibration) is estimated to be {approximately}0.9 mJ (95% confidence level). The inaccuracy is estimated at {+-}10%, due to correctable systematic errors (e.g., baseline shifts). Comparisons have been made of the calorimeter to time-resolved x-ray diagnostics, e.g., bolometers and XRD (x-ray diode) arrays, by integrating the flux measured by these instruments over time.

Fehl, D.L.; Muron, D.J.; Leeper, R.J.; Chandler, G.A.; Deeney, C.; Spielman, R.B.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility Fire Suppression Vital Safety System, January 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility Fire Suppression Vital Safety System January 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1

397

Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility Fire Suppression Vital Safety System, January 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility Fire Suppression Vital Safety System January 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1

398

EIS-0236-SA6; Draft Supplemental Analysis: Pit Manufacturing Facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Stockpile, Stewardship  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6/25/99 6/25/99 DRAFT SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS: PIT MANUFACTURING FACILITIES AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY, STOCKPILE STEWARDSHIP AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT June 1999 SUMMARY ............................................................................................................................... 3 INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 3 Purpose of this Document .................................................................................................................................. 3 Background - SSM PEIS ...................................................................................................................................

399

National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Strategy for the Remote-Handled Low-level Waste Disposal Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to have disposal capability for remote-handled low level waste (LLW) generated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) at the time the existing disposal facility is full or must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the INL Subsurface Disposal Area in approximately the year 2017.

Peggy Hinman

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Preliminary assessment report for Virginia Army National Guard Army Aviation Support Facility, Richmond International Airport, Installation 51230, Sandston, Virginia  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Virginia Army National Guard (VaARNG) property in Sandston, Virginia. The Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) is contiguous with the Richmond International Airport. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The PA is designed to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF, originally constructed as an active Air Force interceptor base, provides maintenance support for VaARNG aircraft. Hazardous materials used and stored at the facility include JP-4 jet fuel, diesel fuel, gasoline, liquid propane gas, heating oil, and motor oil.

Dennis, C.B.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national ignition facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

REP&V TO ATTNJF: NE-23 SUWECC Commercial Facilities Used by National Lead Company of Ohio in Support  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

REP&V TO REP&V TO ATTNJF: NE-23 SUWECC Commercial Facilities Used by National Lead Company of Ohio in Support 'of FMPC Operations TO: Robert E. Lynch Procuresnent and CorXracts Division, AD-42 Oak Ridge Operations Office The Division of Facility and Site Decormnissioning Projects (DFSP) is responsible for managing the Department's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The purposes of FUSRAP are (1) to identify facilities formerly operated for or by the Manhattan Engineer District (NED) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) which may have been radioactively contaminated as a result of these operations, (2) to determine if the facilities require remedial action, and (3) where DOE has authority, to conduct the remedial action. Authority for remedial action under FUSRAP is

402

New Sensors for In-Pile Temperature Measurement at the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. research in nuclear science and technology. As a user facility, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nation’s energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy for determining what instrumentation is needed and the program for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available and under development for in-pile detection of temperature at various irradiation locations in the ATR.

J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; J. E. Daw; K. G. Condie

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Lifecycle baseline summary for ADS 6504IS isotopes facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scope of this Activity Data Sheet (ADS) is to provide a detailed plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This project places the former isotopes production facilities in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance (S&M) until the facilities are included in the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program. The facilities included within this deactivation project are Buildings 3026-C, 3026-D, 3028, 3029, 3038-AHF, 3038-E, 3038-M, 3047, 3517, 7025, and the Center Circle Facilities (Buildings 3030, 3031, 3032, 3033, 3033-A, 3034, and 3118). The scope of deactivation identified in this Baseline Report include surveillance and maintenance activities for each facility, engineering, contamination control and structural stabilization of each facility, radioluminescent (RL) light removal in Building 3026, re-roofing Buildings 3030, 3118, and 3031, Hot Cells Cleanup in Buildings 3047 and 3517, Yttrium (Y) Cell and Barricades Cleanup in Building 3038, Glove Boxes & Hoods Removal in Buildings 3038 and 3047, and Inventory Transfer in Building 3517. For a detailed description of activities within this Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) element, see the Level 6 and Level 7 Element Definitions in Section 3.2 of this report.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Data Analysis Software Tools for Enhanced Collaboration at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility  

SciTech Connect

Data analysis at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility is simplified by the use of two software packages in analysis codes. The first is GAP1otObj, an IDL-based object-oriented library used in visualization tools for dynamic plotting. GAPlotObj gives users the ability to manipulate graphs directly through mouse and keyboard-driven commands. The second software package is MDSplus, which is used at DIED as a central repository for analyzed data. GAPlotObj and MDSplus reduce the effort required for a collaborator to become familiar with the DIII-D analysis environment by providing uniform interfaces for data display and retrieval. Two visualization tools at DIII-D that benefit from them are ReviewPlus and EFITviewer. ReviewPlus is capable of displaying interactive 2D and 3D graphs of raw, analyzed, and simulation code data. EFITviewer is used to display results from the EFIT analysis code together with kinetic profiles and machine geometry. Both bring new possibilities for data exploration to the user, and are able to plot data from any fusion research site with an MDSplus data server.

Schachter, J.; Peng, Q.; Schissel, D.P.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Air quality investigations of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The air quality implications of the test and evaluation activities at the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility are examined. All facets of the activity that affect air quality are considered. Air contaminants produced directly include exhaust products of rocket motors used to accelerate test articles, dust and gas from chemical explosives, and exhaust gases from electricity generators in the test arenas. Air contaminants produced indirectly include fugitive dust and exhaust contaminants from vehicles used to transport personnel and material to the test area, and effluents produced by equipment used to heat the project buildings. Both the ongoing program and the proposed changes in the program are considered. Using a reliable estimate of th maximum annual testing level, the quantities of contaminants released by project activities ar computed either from known characteristics of test items or from EPA-approved emission factors Atmospheric concentrations of air contaminants are predicted using EPA dispersion models. The predicted quantities and concentrations are evaluated in relation to Federal, New Mexico, an Bernalillo County air quality regulations and the human health and safety standards of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists.

Gutman, W.M.; Silver, R.J. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Physical Science Lab.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Lithium Polarization Spectroscopy: Making Precision Plasma Current Measurements in the DIII-D National Fusion Facility  

SciTech Connect

Due to several favorable atomic properties (including a simple spectral structure, the existence of a visible resonance line, large excitation cross section, and ease of beam formation), beams of atomic lithium have been used for many years to diagnose various plasma parameters. Using techniques of active (beam-based) spectroscopy, lithium beams can provide localized measurements of plasma density, ion temperature and impurity concentration, plasma fluctuations, and intrinsic magnetic fields. In this paper we present recent results on polarization spectroscopy from the LIBEAM diagnostic, a 30 keV, multi-mA lithium beam system deployed on the DIII-D National Fusion Facility tokamak. In particular, by utilizing the Zeeman splitting and known polarization characteristics of the collisionally excited 670.8 nm Li resonance line we are able to measure accurately the spatio-temporal dependence of the edge current density, a parameter of basic importance to the stability of high performance tokamaks. We discuss the basic atomic beam performance, spectral lineshape filtering, and polarization analysis requirements that were necessary to attain such measurements. Observations made under a variety of plasma conditions have demonstrated the close relationship between the edge current and plasma pressure, as expected from neoclassical theory.

Thomas, D. M. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

407

Hazards and accident analyses, an integrated approach, for the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an integrated approach to perform hazards and accident analyses for the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A comprehensive hazards analysis methodology was developed that extends the scope of the preliminary/process hazard analysis methods described in the AIChE Guidelines for Hazard Evaluations. Results fro the semi-quantitative approach constitute a full spectrum of hazards. For each accident scenario identified, there is a binning assigned for the event likelihood and consequence severity. In addition, each accident scenario is analyzed for four possible sectors (workers, on-site personnel, public, and environment). A screening process was developed to link the hazard analysis to the accident analysis. Specifically the 840 accident scenarios were screened down to about 15 accident scenarios for a more through deterministic analysis to define the operational safety envelope. The mechanics of the screening process in the selection of final scenarios for each representative accident category, i.e., fire, explosion, criticality, and spill, is described.

Pan, P.Y.; Goen, L.K.; Letellier, B.C.; Sasser, M.K.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Status and Plans for the National Spherical Torus Experimental Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the research capabilities and the future plans on the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton is presented. NSTX research is exploring the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more conventional aspect ratio devices, such as the tokamak. The relevant scientific issues pursued on NSTX include energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta, non-inductive sustainment, solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In support of the NSTX research goal, research tools are being developed by the NSTX team. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a high beta Demo device based on the ST, are being considered. For these, it is essential to develop high performance (high beta and high confinement), steady-state (non-inductively driven) ST operational scenarios and an efficient solenoid-free start-up concept. We will also briefly describe the Next-Step-ST (NSST) device being designed to address these issues in fusion-relevant plasma conditions.

M. Ono; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; J.M. Bialek; T. Bigelow; M. Bitter; plus 148 additional authors

2005-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

409

THE COMPONENT TEST FACILITY – A NATIONAL USER FACILITY FOR TESTING OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR (HTGR) COMPONENTS AND SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and other High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) Projects require research, development, design, construction, and operation of a nuclear plant intended for both high-efficiency electricity production and high-temperature industrial applications, including hydrogen production. During the life cycle stages of an HTGR, plant systems, structures and components (SSCs) will be developed to support this reactor technology. To mitigate technical, schedule, and project risk associated with development of these SSCs, a large-scale test facility is required to support design verification and qualification prior to operational implementation. As a full-scale helium test facility, the Component Test facility (CTF) will provide prototype testing and qualification of heat transfer system components (e.g., Intermediate Heat Exchanger, valves, hot gas ducts), reactor internals, and hydrogen generation processing. It will perform confirmation tests for large-scale effects, validate component performance requirements, perform transient effects tests, and provide production demonstration of hydrogen and other high-temperature applications. Sponsored wholly or in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, the CTF will support NGNP and will also act as a National User Facility to support worldwide development of High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor technologies.

David S. Duncan; Vondell J. Balls; Stephanie L. Austad

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Transforming our Nation's Energy System, Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transforming our Nation's Transforming our Nation's Energy System With all the benefits associated with renewable energy, why hasn't the grid already been modernized to accommodate these clean sources of energy? The short answer is: Megawatt-scale integration is hard to find. Our nation's existing power grid is crucial to our way of life and cannot be shut down, overhauled, and started back up again. Yet, critical to moving clean energy technologies onto the electrical grid is the ability to carry out research, development, and megawatt-scale testing of the complex integrated systems, devices, and concepts of future electric supply and demand systems. The Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) on the campus of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy

411

Project management plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP) is to place nineteen former isotopes production facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition suitable for an extended period of minimum surveillance and maintenance (S&M) and as quickly and economically as possible. Implementation and completion of the deactivation project win further reduce the already small risks to the environment and to public safety and health. Furthermore, the project should result in significant S&M cost savings in the future. The IFDP management plan has been prepared to document the project objectives, define organizational relationships and responsibilities, and outline the management control systems to be employed in the management of the project. The project has adopted a strategy to deactivate the simple facilities first, to reduce the scope of the project, and to gain experience before addressing more difficult facilities. A decision support system is being developed to identify those activities that best promote the project mission and result in largest cost savings. The Work Plan for the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Energy Systems 1994) defines the project schedule, the cost estimate, and the technical approach for the project.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Sensitivity of NIF-scale backlit thin shell implosions to hohlraum symmetry in the foot of the ignition drive pulse  

SciTech Connect

A necessary condition for igniting indirectly-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) spherical capsules on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is controlling drive flux asymmetry to the 1% level time-integrated over the pulse and with < 10%/ns swings during the pulse [J. D. Lindl et al., 'The Physics Basis for Ignition using Indirect Drive Targets on the National Ignition Facility', Physics of Plasmas 11, 339 (2003)]. While drive symmetry during the first 2 ns of the pulse can be inferred by using the re-emission pattern from a surrogate high Z sphere [E. Dewald et al. to be published in Rev. Sci. Inst.] and symmetry during the last 5 ns inferred from the shape of fully imploded capsules [A. Hauer, N. Delamater, D. Ress et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 66, 672-7 (1995)], the midportion ({approx} 2-10 ns) has been shown to be amenable to detection by the in-flight shape of x-ray backlit thin shell capsules [Pollaine et. al., Physics of Plasmas 8 2357 (2001)]. In this paper, we present sensitivity studies conducted on the University of Rochester's OMEGA laser of the thin shell symmetry measurement technique at near NIF-scale for two candidate capsule ablator materials, Ge-doped CH and Cu-doped Be. These experiments use both point and area backlighting to cast 4.7 keV radiographs of thin 1.4 mm initial-diameter Ge-doped CH and Cu-doped Be shells when converged a factor of {approx} 0.5 x in radius. Distortions in the position of the transmission limb of the shells resulting from drive asymmetries are measured to an accuracy of a few {micro}ms, meeting requirements. The promising results to date allow us to compare measured and predicted distortions and by inference drive asymmetries for the first 4 asymmetry modes as a function of hohlraum illumination conditions.

Kirkwood, R K; Milovich, J; Bradley, D K; Schmitt, M; Goldman, S R; Kalantar, D H; Meeker, D; Jones, O S; Pollaine, S M; Amendt, P A; Dewald, E; Edwards, J; Landen, O L; Nikroo, A

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

413

Target Diagnostics Supports NIF's Path to Ignition  

SciTech Connect

The physics requirements derived from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) experimental campaigns are leading to a wide variety of target diagnostics. Software development for the control and analysis of these diagnostics is included in the NIF Integrated Computer Control System, Diagnostic Control System and Data Visualization. These projects implement the configuration, controls, data analysis and visual representation of most of these diagnostics. To date, over 40 target diagnostics have been developed to support NIF experiments. In 2011 diagnostics were developed or enhanced to measure Ignition performance in a high neutron yield environment. Performance is optimized around four key variables: Adiabat (a) which is the strength and timing of four shocks delivered to the target, Velocity (V) of the imploding target, Mix (M) is the uniformity of the burn, and the Shape (S) of the imploding Deuterium Tritium (DT) hot spot. The diagnostics used to measure each of these parameters is shown in figure 1. Adiabat is measured using the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) diagnostic consisting of three streak cameras. To provide for more accurate adiabat measurements the VISAR streak cameras were enhanced in FY11 with a ten comb fiducial signal controller to allow for post shot correction of the streak camera sweep non-linearity. Mix is measured by the Neutron Time of Flight (NTOF) and Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) diagnostics. To accommodate high neutron yield shots, NTOF diagnostic controls are being modified to use Mach Zehnder interferometer signals to allow the digitizers to be moved from near the target chamber to the neutron shielded diagnostic mezzanine. In December 2011 the first phase of RAGS diagnostic commissioning will be completed. This diagnostic will analyze the tracers that are added to NIF target capsules that undergo nuclear reactions during the shot. These gases are collected and purified for nuclear counting by the RAGS system. Three new instrument controllers were developed and commissioned to support this diagnostic. A residual-gas analyzer (RGA) instrument measures the gas content at various points in the system. The Digital Gamma Spectrometer instrument measures the radiological spectrum of the decaying gas isotopes. A final instrument controller was developed to interface to a PLC based Gas collection system. In order to support the implosion velocity measurements an additional Gated X-ray Detector (GXD) diagnostic was tested and commissioned. This third GXD views the target through a slit contained in its snout and allows the other GXD diagnostics to be used for measuring the shape on the same shot. In order to measure the implosion shape in a high neutron environment, Actide Readout In A Neutron Environment (ARIANE) and Neutron Imaging (NI) diagnostics were commissioned. The controls for ARIANE, a fixed port gated x-ray imager, contain a neutron shielded camera and micro channel plate pulser with its neutron sensitive electronics located in the diagnostic mezzanine. The NI diagnostic is composed of two Spectral Instruments SI-1000 cameras located 20M from the target and provides neutron images of the DT hot spot for high yield shots. The development and commissioning of these new or enhanced diagnostics in FY11 have provided meaningful insight that facilitates the optimization of the four key Ignition variables. In FY12 they will be adding three new diagnostics and enhancing four existing diagnostics in support of the continuing optimization series of campaigns.

Shelton, R

2011-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

414

Cold test plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility tank contents removal project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) Tanks Contents Removal Project Cold Test Plan describes the activities to be conducted during the cold test of the OHF sluicing and pumping system at the Tank Technology Cold Test Facility (TTCTF). The TTCTF is located at the Robotics and Process Systems Complex at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The cold test will demonstrate performance of the pumping and sluicing system, fine-tune operating instructions, and train the personnel in the actual work to be performed. After completion of the cold test a Technical Memorandum will be prepared documenting completion of the cold test, and the equipment will be relocated to the OHF site.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 15, 2008 Facility News Future of User Facility Discussed at Fall Workshop As a national user facility, ARM is accessible to scientists around the globe for...

416

Criticality safety strategy for the Fuel Cycle Facility electrorefiner at Argonne National Laboratory, West  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Integral Fast Reactor being developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) combines the advantages of metal-fueled, liquid-metal-cooled reactors and a closed fuel cycle. Presently, the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) at ANL-West in Idaho Falls, Idaho is being modified to recycle spent metallic fuel from Experimental Breeder Reactor II as part of a demonstration project sponsored by the Department of Energy. A key component of the FCF is the electrorefiner (ER) in which the actinides are separated from the fission products. In the electrorefining process, the metal fuel is anodically dissolved into a high-temperature molten salt and refined uranium or uranium/plutonium products are deposited at cathodes. In this report, the criticality safety strategy for the FCF ER is summarized. FCF ER operations and processes formed the basis for evaluating criticality safety and control during actinide metal fuel refining. In order to show criticality safety for the FCF ER, the reference operating conditions for the ER had to be defined. Normal operating envelopes (NOES) were then defined to bracket the important operating conditions. To keep the operating conditions within their NOES, process controls were identified that can be used to regulate the actinide forms and content within the ER. A series of operational checks were developed for each operation that wig verify the extent or success of an operation. The criticality analysis considered the ER operating conditions at their NOE values as the point of departure for credible and incredible failure modes. As a result of the analysis, FCF ER operations were found to be safe with respect to criticality.

Mariani, R.D.; Benedict, R.W. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lell, R.M.; Turski, R.B.; Fujita, E.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Biological investigations of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides results of a comprehensive biological field survey performed on the Sandia National Laboratories Aerial Cable Facility, at the east end of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB), Bernalillo County, New Mexico. This survey was conducted late September through October, 1991. ACF occupies a 440-acre tract of land withdrawn by the US Forest Service (USFS) for use by KAFB, and in turn placed under operational control of SNL by the Department of Energy (DOE). All land used by SNL for ACF is part of a 15,851-acre tract of land withdrawn by the US Forest Service. In addition, a number of different organizations use the 15,851-acre area. The project area used by SNL encompasses portions of approximately six sections (3,840 acres) of US Forest Service land located within the foothills of the west side of the Manzano Mountains (East Mesa). The biological study area is used by the KAFB, the US Department of Interior, and SNL. This area includes: (1) Sol se Mete Springs and Canyon, (2) East Anchor Access Road, (3) East Anchor Site, (4) Rocket Sled Track, (5) North Arena, (6) East Instrumentation Site and Access Road, (7) West Anchor Access Road, (8) West Anchor Site, (9) South Arena, (10) Winch Sites, (11) West Instrumentation Sites, (12) Explosive Assembly Building, (13) Control Building, (14) Lurance Canyon Road and vicinity. Although portions of approximately 960 acres of withdrawn US Forest Service land have been altered, only 700 acres have been disturbed by activities associated with ACF; approximately 2,880 acres consist of natural habitat. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative lack of human disturbance have allowed this area to remain in a more natural vegetative state relative to the condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found on ACF, as well as a comprehensive assessment of biological habitats.

Sullivan, R.M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NERSC 2011 High Performance Computing Facility Operationalby providing high-performance computing, information, data,s deep knowledge of high performance computing to overcome

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilizes a separate link to ESnet to provide data-rich largecontinues to partner with ESnet in providing quality networksignificant collaboration with ESnet and other facility

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

REP&V TO ATTNOF: NE-23 SUBJECT: Commercial Facilities Used by National Lead Company of Ohio in Support  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

x:Y" x:Y" . .' 3023 I\ \ 'a' '. Unita? -&&s Coverament , ,Q,.l. ),&, ,(>.. Department of Energy riGmorandum / d6a 2/. $3 DATE: JL(L 2 8 ;;$5 co. /3 .-J/ co,/3 REP&V TO ATTNOF: NE-23 SUBJECT: Commercial Facilities Used by National Lead Company of Ohio in Support of FMPC Operations TO: Robert E. Lynch Procuremnent and Contracts Division, AD-42 Oak Ridge Operations Office The Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects (DFSD) is responsible for managing the Department's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FuSRAP). The purposes of FUSRAP are (1) to identify facilities formerly operated for or by the Manhattan Engineer District (NED) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) which may have been radioactively contaminated as a result of these operations, (2) to determine if the

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421

Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods, and provides the results, for the assessment performed in 2001.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Shields, Keith D.; Edwards, Daniel R.

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

423

Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for MicroFab and SiFab facilities at Sandia National Laboratories.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the MicroFab and SiFab facilities at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico in Fiscal Year 2011. The primary purpose of this PPOA is to provide recommendations to assist organizations in reducing the generation of waste and improving the efficiency of their processes and procedures. This report contains a summary of the information collected, the analyses performed, and recommended options for implementation. The Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Management System (EMS) and Pollution Prevention (P2) staff will continue to work with the organizations to implement the recommendations.

Gerard, Morgan Evan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Safety System Oversight Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility Tritium Gas Handling System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Visit Report Site Visit Report Safety System Oversight Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility Tritium Gas Handling System INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW This report documents the results of the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) review of a safety system oversight (SSO) assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) tritium gas handling system (TGHS). The assessment evaluated the TGHS's ability to perform as required by safety bases and other applicable requirements. The assessment was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Los Alamos Site Office (LASO) and was conducted October 25 - November 5, 2010. LASO was the overall lead organization for the evaluation, which included independent

425

Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility Tritium Gas Containment Vital Safety System, January 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility Tritium Gas Containment Vital Safety System January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose............................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background...................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................ 1

426

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 [as amended March 2010]). CAU 116 consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 25 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 consisted of Building 3210 and the attached concrete shield wall. CAS 25-23-20 consisted of the nuclear furnace piping and tanks. Closure activities began in January 2007 and were completed in August 2011. Activities were conducted according to Revision 1 of the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 116 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2008). This CR provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provides data confirming that closure objectives for CAU 116 were met. Site characterization data and process knowledge indicated that surface areas were radiologically contaminated above release limits and that regulated and/or hazardous wastes were present in the facility.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

427

Engines - Spark Ignition Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spark Ignition Engines Spark Ignition Engines Thomas Wallner and omni engine Thomas Wallner and the omnivorous engine Background Today the United States import more than 60% of its crude oil and petroleum products. Transportation accounts for a major portion of these imports. Research in this field is focused on reducing the dependency on foreign oil by increasing the engine efficiency on the one hand and blending gasoline with renewable domestic fuels, such as ethanol, on the other. Argonne's Research The main focus of research is on evaluation of advanced combustion concepts and effects of fuel properties on engine efficiency, performance and emissions. The platforms used are a single-cylinder research engine as well as an automotive-size four-cylinder engine with direct fuel injection.

428

Review of the Los Alamos National Laoratory Nuclear Facility Coonfiguration Management Program - March 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Facility Nuclear Facility Configuration Management Program March 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Results ................................................................................................................................................... 2

429

Review of the Los Alamos National Laoratory Nuclear Facility Coonfiguration Management Program - March 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Facility Nuclear Facility Configuration Management Program March 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Results ................................................................................................................................................... 2

430

DESIGN FEATURES AND OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES FOR THE NEW BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY RADIATION LAUNDRY AND RECLAMATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Facilities and procedures for the decontamination, reclamation, or disposal of radioactively contaminated tools, equipment, and clothing are described. For safety and economy these operations are grouped in a facility with specially designed ventilation and controls under the supervision of a health physicist. (auth)

Pearsall, S.f Gemmell, L.

1961-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Burner ignition system  

SciTech Connect

An electronic ignition system for a gas burner is battery operated. The battery voltage is applied through a DC-DC chopper to a step-up transformer to charge a capacitor which provides the ignition spark. The step-up transformer has a significant leakage reactance in order to limit current flow from the battery during initial charging of the capacitor. A tank circuit at the input of the transformer returns magnetizing current resulting from the leakage reactance to the primary in succeeding cycles. An SCR in the output circuit is gated through a voltage divider which senses current flow through a flame. Once the flame is sensed, further sparks are precluded. The same flame sensor enables a thermopile driven main valve actuating circuit. A safety valve in series with the main gas valve responds to a control pressure thermostatically applied through a diaphragm. The valve closes after a predetermined delay determined by a time delay orifice if the pilot gas is not ignited.

Carignan, Forest J. (Bedford, MA)

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

432