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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Materials Physics Applications: The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Search National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, NHMFL Home About Us Organization DIVISION Materials Physics and Applications Division GROUPS Superconductivity Technology Center Condensed Matter and Magnet Science Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Materials Chemistry CONTACTS Group Leader Mike Hundley Director, NHMFL-PFF/Deputy Group Leader Chuck Mielke Head of Users Program Operations Jon Betts Professional Staff Assistant Julie T. Gallegos TA-03 Group Office TA-03, Building 0034, Room 101 Office Administrator Juanita Armijo TA-35 Group Office TA-35, Building 0127, Room C117 Office Administrator Angeline Willow 505-667-5032 National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Pulsed Field Facility The Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, is one of three campuses of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), the other two being at Florida State University, Tallahassee (continuous fields, magnetic resonance, and general headquarters) and the University of Florida ,Gainesville(ultra-low temperatures at high magnetic fields). The NHMFL is sponsored primarily by the National Science Foundation, Division of Materials Research, with additional support from the State of Florida and the US Department of Energy.

2

NHMFL Breaks the 100 Tesla Barrier Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NHMFL Breaks the 100 Tesla Barrier Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. 109no. 31 12404-12407 On March 22nd 2012, the NHMFL ­ Pulsed Field Facility broke the 100T tesla barrier, setting a world record of 100.75 tesla for a non-destructive magnet. By using advanced

Weston, Ken

3

Fermi Surface of Uranium at Ambient Pressure Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fermi Surface of ­Uranium at Ambient Pressure Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory DMR-Award 0654118 DC Field Facility User Program The fermi surface of ­Uranium has been measured surface of alpha-uranium at ambient pressure, Phys. Rev. B Rapid Commun., 80, 241101 (2009). B//c-axis B

Weston, Ken

4

Scientific Image Gallery from the Applied Superconductivity Center at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Applied Superconductivity Center (ASC) is nested with the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. Originally located at the University of Wisconsin, ASC transferred to NHMFL or Magnet Lab in 2003. ASC investigates both low and high-temperature materials. Focus areas include grain boundaries; coated conductors, BSCCO, and a new superconductor known as MgB2. The ASC Image Gallery provides graphs with text descriptions and single images with captions. The single images are organized into collections under scientific titles, such as MgB2 mentioned above. Click on the Videos link to see two 3D videos and be sure to check out the link to image collections at other organizations performing superconductivity research.

5

National Magnetic Anomaly Map  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A record of the conclusions of a three-day meeting and workshop of the Committee for a National Magnetic Anomaly Map held in February 1976 is presented. The purpose of he workshop was to prepare a statement of the benefits, objectives, specifications, and requirements of a NMAM and establish a working plan for producing the map. (ACR)

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Superconducting magnet development capability of the LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) High Field Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the following topics: High-Field Test Facility Equipment at LLNL; FENIX Magnet Facility; High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) 2-m Solenoid; Cryogenic Mechanical Test Facility; Electro-Mechanical Conductor Test Apparatus; Electro-Mechanical Wire Test Apparatus; FENIX/HFTF Data System and Network Topology; Helium Gas Management System (HGMS); Airco Helium Liquefier/Refrigerator; CTI 2800 Helium Liquefier; and MFTF-B/ITER Magnet Test Facility.

Miller, J.R.; Shen, S.; Summers, L.T.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. The original objective of the NFC project was to develop and deploy a national FES ??Grid? (FusionGrid) that would be a system for secure sharing of computation, visualization, and data resources over the Internet. The goal of FusionGrid was to allow scientists at remote sites to participate as fully in experiments and computational activities as if they were working on site thereby creating a unified virtual organization of the geographically dispersed U.S. fusion community. The vision for FusionGrid was that experimental and simulation data, computer codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and remote collaboration tools are to be thought of as network services. In this model, an application service provider (ASP) provides and maintains software resources as well as the necessary hardware resources. The project would create a robust, user-friendly collaborative software environment and make it available to the US FES community. This Grid??s resources would be protected by a shared security infrastructure including strong authentication to identify users and authorization to allow stakeholders to control their own resources. In this environment, access to services is stressed rather than data or software portability.

Schissel, David P.

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

8

A NATIONAL COLLABORATORY TO ADVANCE THE SCIENCE OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA PHYSICS FOR MAGNETIC FUSION  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work of the University of Utah, which was a member of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it the NFC built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was itself a collaboration, itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, and Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. The complete finial report is attached as an addendum. The In the collaboration, the primary technical responsibility of the University of Utah in the collaboration was to develop and deploy an advanced scientific visualization service. To achieve this goal, the SCIRun Problem Solving Environment (PSE) is used on FusionGrid for an advanced scientific visualization service. SCIRun is open source software that gives the user the ability to create complex 3D visualizations and 2D graphics. This capability allows for the exploration of complex simulation results and the comparison of simulation and experimental data. SCIRun on FusionGrid gives the scientist a no-license-cost visualization capability that rivals present day commercial visualization packages. To accelerate the usage of SCIRun within the fusion community, a stand-alone application built on top of SCIRun was developed and deployed. This application, FusionViewer, allows users who are unfamiliar with SCIRun to quickly create visualizations and perform analysis of their simulation data from either the MDSplus data storage environment or from locally stored HDF5 files. More advanced tools for visualization and analysis also were created in collaboration with the SciDAC Center for Extended MHD Modeling. Versions of SCIRun with the FusionViewer have been made available to fusion scientists on the Mac OS X, Linux, and other Unix based platforms and have been downloaded 1163 times. SCIRun has been used with NIMROD, M3D, BOUT fusion simulation data as well as simulation data from other SciDAC application areas (e.g., Astrophysics). The subsequent visualization results - including animations - have been incorporated into invited talks at multiple APS/DPP meetings as well as peer reviewed journal articles. As an example, SCIRun was used for the visualization and analysis of a NIMROD simulation of a disruption that occurred in a DIII-D experiment. The resulting animations and stills were presented as part of invited talks at APS/DPP meetings and the SC04 conference in addition to being highlighted in the NIH/NSF Visualization Research Challenges Report. By achieving its technical goals, the University of Utah played a key role in the successful development of a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. Many of the visualization tools developed as part of the NFC continue to be used by Fusion and other SciDAC application scientists and are currently being supported and expanded through follow-on up on SciDAC projects (Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technology, and the Visualization and Analysis in Support of Fusion SAP).

Allen R. Sanderson; Christopher R. Johnson

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY REPORTSVOLUME 11 N0. 5 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Safety, John Kynoch, reports the most serious damage as a tattered flag at the entrance to our building of the megapixels of digital cameras, in photocopiers, in solar cells, and in digital watch displays. The list goes of eddy current heating and magnetic forces and torques. Our solution to this problem is an entirely non

Weston, Ken

10

MR Microscopy at the Cellular Level Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). (1) Flint et al, Neuroimage 46:1037(2009) (2) Flint et al, Neuroimage. 52:556(2010) (3) Hansen et al, Neuroimage. 57:1458(2011) (4) Flint et al, Submitted (2011) #12;The era of extracting quantitative motor neuron from Magnetic Resonance Microscopic images (grayscale). ADC units are mm2s-1. (1) Flint et

Weston, Ken

11

Superconducting Magnet Division | Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superconducting Magnet Division Superconducting Magnet Division Home Production & Testing LHC Dipole Acceptance APUL Schedule (pdf) Projects Main Projects HTS Magnet Program High Field Magnet R&D Linear Collider Final Focus e Lens Solenoid Correctors for J-PARC Correctors for SuperKEKB IR Magnets LARP APUL Past Projects BEPC-II IR Quadrupoles Bio-Med Variable Field MRI GSI Rapid Cycling Magnets Helical Magnets HERA upgrade LHC IR Dipoles RHIC Publications Search Publications Selected Cryogenic Data Notebook Proceedings of the 1968 Summer Study on Superconducting Devices and Accelerators Meetings & Workshops Safety Environmental, Safety & Health ES&H Documents Lockout-Tagout Personnel Staff Pages Ramesh Gupta Brett Parker Peter Wanderer Pe ter Wanderer, head of Brookhaven's Superconducting Magnet Division,

12

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS ARGONNE NATIONAL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY Y. CHO DEC 2 01985 LS-45 INTRA-LABORATORY MEMO December 20, 1985 TO: Y. Cho HEP FROM: w. praeg(~ ETP SUBJECT: Frequency Response of Storage Ring Magnets, Eddy Current Shielding of Vacuum Chamber It is planned to use feedback to correction coils on ring magnets to reduce beam motion at frequencies of 120 Hz or less. The magnet cores, made from 1.5 mm thick laminations of 1010 steel, will readily carry flux of ~ 400 Hz. However, due to eddy currents, the aluminum vacuum chamber will attenuate verticle ac fields above 8 Hz and horizontal fields above 25 Hz. Eddy currents will also cause phase shifts between the field generated by the correction coils, Bo' and the field inside the vacuum

13

High Field Magnet R&D |Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Field Magnet R&D High Field Magnet R&D The Superconducting Magnet Division is developing advanced magnet designs and magnet-related technologies for high field accelerator magnets. We are currently working on magnets for three inter-related programs: High Field Magnets for Muon Collider Papers, Presentations Common Coil Magnets Papers, Presentations Interaction Region Magnets Papers, Presentations High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) Magnets Papers, Presentations This is part of a multi-lab superconducting magnet development program for new accelerator facilities that would be part of the U.S. High Energy Physics program. These programs (@BNL, @FNAL, @LBNL) are quite complimentary to each other, so that magnet designs and technologies developed at one laboratory can be easily transferred to another. The BNL

14

High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HFMRF Overview HFMRF Overview Section 2-3-1 High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility The High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility (HFMRF) focuses a significant portion of its research on developing a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of biochemical and biological systems and their response to environmental effects. A secondary focus is materials science, including catalysis and chemical mechanisms and processes. Staff and science consultants within this facility offer expertise in the areas of structural biology, solid-state materials characterization, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Research activities in the HFMRF include: * structure determination of large molecular assemblies such as protein-DNA (normal and damaged DNA) and protein-RNA complexes

15

SciDAC Fusiongrid Project--A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was a collaboration itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. Developing a reliable energy system that is economically and environmentally sustainable is the long-term goal of Fusion Energy Science (FES) research. In the U.S., FES experimental research is centered at three large facilities with a replacement value of over $1B. As these experiments have increased in size and complexity, there has been a concurrent growth in the number and importance of collaborations among large groups at the experimental sites and smaller groups located nationwide. Teaming with the experimental community is a theoretical and simulation community whose efforts range from applied analysis of experimental data to fundamental theory (e.g., realistic nonlinear 3D plasma models) that run on massively parallel computers. Looking toward the future, the large-scale experiments needed for FES research are staffed by correspondingly large, globally dispersed teams. The fusion program will be increasingly oriented toward the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) where even now, a decade before operation begins, a large portion of national program efforts are organized around coordinated efforts to develop promising operational scenarios. Substantial efforts to develop integrated plasma modeling codes are also underway in the U.S., Europe and Japan. As a result of the highly collaborative nature of FES research, the community is facing new and unique challenges. While FES has a significant track record for developing and exploiting remote collaborations, with such large investments at stake, there is a clear need to improve the integration and reach of available tools. The NFC Project was initiated to address these challenges by creating and deploying collaborative software tools. The original objective of the NFC project was to develop and deploy a national FES 'Grid' (FusionGrid) that would be a system for secure sharing of computation, visualization, and data resources over the Internet. The goal of FusionGrid was to allow scientists at remote sites to participate as fully in experiments and computational activities as if they were working on site thereby creating a unified virtual organization of the geographically dispersed U.S. fusion community. The vision for FusionGrid was that experimental and simulation data, computer codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and remote collaboration tools are to be thought of as network services. In this model, an application service provider (ASP) provides and maintains software resources as well as the necessary hardware resources. The project would create a robust, user-friendly collaborative software environment and make it available to the US FES community. This Grid's resources would be protected by a shared security infrastructure including strong authentication to identify users and authorization to allow stakeholders to control their own resources. In this environment, access to services is stressed rather than data or software portability.

SCHISSEL, D.P.; ABLA, G.; BURRUSS, J.R.; FEIBUSH, E.; FREDIAN, T.W.; GOODE, M.M.; GREENWALD, M.J.; KEAHEY, K.; LEGGETT, T.; LI, K.; McCUNE, D.C.; PAPKA, M.E.; RANDERSON, L.; SANDERSON, A.; STILLERMAN, J.; THOMPSON, M.R.; URAM, T.; WALLACE, G.

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

SciDAC Fusiongrid Project--A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was a collaboration itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. Developing a reliable energy system that is economically and environmentally sustainable is the long-term goal of Fusion Energy Science (FES) research. In the U.S., FES experimental research is centered at three large facilities with a replacement value of over $1B. As these experiments have increased in size and complexity, there has been a concurrent growth in the number and importance of collaborations among large groups at the experimental sites and smaller groups located nationwide. Teaming with the experimental community is a theoretical and simulation community whose efforts range from applied analysis of experimental data to fundamental theory (e.g., realistic nonlinear 3D plasma models) that run on massively parallel computers. Looking toward the future, the large-scale experiments needed for FES research are staffed by correspondingly large, globally dispersed teams. The fusion program will be increasingly oriented toward the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) where even now, a decade before operation begins, a large portion of national program efforts are organized around coordinated efforts to develop promising operational scenarios. Substantial efforts to develop integrated plasma modeling codes are also underway in the U.S., Europe and Japan. As a result of the highly collaborative nature of FES research, the community is facing new and unique challenges. While FES has a significant track record for developing and exploiting remote collaborations, with such large investments at stake, there is a clear need to improve the integration and reach of available tools. The NFC Project was initiated to address these challenges by creating and deploying collaborative software tools. The original objective of the NFC project was to develop and deploy a national FES 'Grid' (FusionGrid) that would be a system for secure sharing of computation, visualization, and data resources over the Internet. The goal of FusionGrid was to allow scientists at remote sites to participate as fully in experiments and computational activities as if they were working on site thereby creating a unified virtual organization of the geographically dispersed U.S. fusion community. The vision for FusionGrid was that experimental and simulation data, computer codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and remote collaboration tools are to be thought of as network services. In this model, an application service provider (ASP) provides and maintains software resources as well as the necessary hardware resources. The project would create a robust, user-friendly collaborative software environment and make it available to the US FES community. This Grid's resources would be protected by a shared security infrastructure including strong authentication to identify users and authorization to allow stakeholders to control their own resources. In this environment, access to services is stressed rather than data or software portability.

SCHISSEL, D.P.; ABLA, G.; BURRUSS, J.R.; FEIBUSH, E.; FREDIAN, T.W.; GOODE, M.M.; GREENWALD, M.J.; KEAHEY, K.; LEGGETT, T.; LI, K.; McCUNE, D.C.; PAPKA, M.E.; RANDERSON, L.; SANDERSON, A.; STILLERMAN, J.; THOMPSON, M.R.; URAM, T.; WALLACE, G.

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

Strain sensors for high field pulse magnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present an investigation into several strain sensing technologies that are being considered to monitor mechanical deformation within the steel reinforcement shells used in high field pulsed magnets. Such systems generally operate at cryogenic temperatures to mitigate heating issues that are inherent in the coils of nondestructive, high field pulsed magnets. The objective of this preliminary study is to characterize the performance of various strain sensing technologies at liquid nitrogen temperatures (-196 C). Four sensor types are considered in this investigation: fiber Bragg gratings (FBG), resistive foil strain gauges (RFSG), piezoelectric polymers (PVDF), and piezoceramics (PZT). Three operational conditions are considered for each sensor: bond integrity, sensitivity as a function of temperature, and thermal cycling effects. Several experiments were conducted as part of this study, investigating adhesion with various substrate materials (stainless steel, aluminum, and carbon fiber), sensitivity to static (FBG and RFSG) and dynamic (RFSG, PVDF and PZT) load conditions, and sensor diagnostics using PZT sensors. This work has been conducted in collaboration with the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), and the results of this study will be used to identify the set of sensing technologies that would be best suited for integration within high field pulsed magnets at the NHMFL facility.

Martinez, Christian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zheng, Yan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Easton, Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Magnetic Filtering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Coal Mining Water Recovery . Chemical Production Water Recovery . Electronics Manufacturing Water Recovery . Military Water Production . Magnetic ...

19

Superconducting Magnet Division | Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

accuracy of these probes is 1 part in 10,000 at 23 of the magnet inner radius. Hall and NMR probes are also available. generic image The photo shows a magnet cold mass being...

20

LANL sets magnetic record | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sets magnetic record | National Nuclear Security Administration sets magnetic record | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > LANL sets magnetic record LANL sets magnetic record Posted By Office of Public Affairs Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory's biggest magnet facility recently produced magnetic fields in excess of 100 tesla while conducting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

LANL sets magnetic record | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

sets magnetic record | National Nuclear Security Administration sets magnetic record | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > LANL sets magnetic record LANL sets magnetic record Posted By Office of Public Affairs Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory's biggest magnet facility recently produced magnetic fields in excess of 100 tesla while conducting

22

Processing of Soft Magnetic Alloys in High Magnetic Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Magnetic Materials for Use in Energy-efficient Distribution Transformers ... Novel Morphology of Highly Efficient Two-phase Ferrite Cores for Power Systems

23

Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Program | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

24

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Magnetism Combines with...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

around a black hole, including the magnetic force, makes a black hole even better at blasting its surroundings clear than currently thought. "Based on our study we're saying there...

25

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Novel Magnetic, Superconducting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials and Energy Science (SIMES), a joint institute of the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University, opens "exciting possibilities...

26

High Explosives Application Facility | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration High Explosives Application Facility Home > About Us > Our...

27

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory opens High Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

06302011 | NR-11-06-08 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory opens High Performance Computing Innovation Center for collaboration with industry Donald B Johnston, LLNL,...

28

American Heart Month National High Blood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEBRUARY American Heart Month MAY National High Blood Pressure Education Month SEPTEMBER National Cholesterol Education Month Texas AgriLife Extension Service Texas A&M University System Eat Smart for Heart for Heart Health # P2-2 Risk Factors - High Blood Pressure # P2-3 Sodium is needed to. . . # P2-4 Sources

29

Sandia National Laboratories X-ray Tube with Magnetic Electron ...  

... for the U.S. Department of Energys National ... high average power large area X-ray tube provides increased X-ray generation efficiency through ...

30

American Heart Month National High Blood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEBRUARY American Heart Month MAY National High Blood Pressure Education Month SEPTEMBER National Cholesterol Education Month Texas AgriLife Extension Service Texas A&M University System Eat Smart for Heart Health Heart Health - Lesson 1 Contents: Lesson - Heart Health Power Point # P1-1 Eat Smart for Heart

31

American Heart Month National High Blood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEBRUARY American Heart Month MAY National High Blood Pressure Education Month SEPTEMBER National Cholesterol Education Month Texas AgriLife Extension Service Texas A&M University System Eat Smart for Heart-1 Eat Smart for Heart Health - Cholesterol/Saturated Fat # P3-2 Cardiovascular Disease Statistics # P3

32

High Explosives Application Facility | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Explosives Application Facility | National Nuclear Security Explosives Application Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration High Explosives Application Facility Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Research and Development >

33

Magnetism In 3d Transition Metals at High Pressures  

SciTech Connect

This research project examined the changes in electronic and magnetic properties of transition metals and oxides under applied pressures, focusing on complex relationship between magnetism and phase stability in these correlated electron systems. As part of this LDRD project, we developed new measurement techniques and adapted synchrotron-based electronic and magnetic measurements for use in the diamond anvil cell. We have performed state-of-the-art X-ray spectroscopy experiments at the dedicated high-pressure beamline HP-CAT (Sector 16 Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory), maintained in collaboration with of University of Nevada, Las Vegas and Geophysical Laboratory of The Carnegie Institution of Washington. Using these advanced measurements, we determined the evolution of the magnetic order in the ferromagnetic 3d transition metals (Fe, Co and Ni) under pressure, and found that at high densities, 3d band broadening results in diminished long range magnetic coupling. Our experiments have allowed us to paint a unified picture of the effects of pressure on the evolution of magnetic spin in 3d electron systems. The technical and scientific advances made during this LDRD project have been reported at a number of scientific meetings and conferences, and have been submitted for publication in technical journals. Both the technical advances and the physical understanding of correlated systems derived from this LDRD are being applied to research on the 4f and 5f electron systems under pressure.

Iota, V

2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

34

Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology National Science Bowl Champion Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology National Science Bowl Champion May 2,...

35

Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on the "compassionate instinct" Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on the "compassionate instinct"...

36

CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A...

37

CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor...

38

Reference material RM 7811-7 for identification cards with high coercivity high density magnetic stripes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reference material RM 7811-7 for identification cards with high coercivity high density magnetic stripes

Albrecht, M

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Study of Catcher Bearings for High Temperature Magnetic Bearing Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Electron Energy Corporation (EEC) along with National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in collaboration with Vibration Control and Electro mechanics Lab (VCEL), Texas A & M University, College Station, TX are researching on high temperature permanent magnet based magnetic bearings. The magnetic bearings are made of high temperature resistant permanent magnets (up to 1000 degrees F). A test rig has been developed to test these magnetic bearings. The test rig mainly consists of two radial bearings, one axial thrust bearing and two catcher bearings. The test rig that the catcher bearing is inserted in is the first ultra-high temperature rig with permanent magnet biased magnetic bearings and motor. The magnetic bearings are permanent magnet based which is a novel concept. The Graphalloy bearings represent a new approach for ultra-high temperature backup bearing applications. One of the main objectives of this research is to insure the mechanical and electrical integrity for all components of the test rig. Some assemblies and accessories required for the whole assembly need to be designed. The assembly methods need to be designed. The preliminary tests for coefficient of friction, Young's modulus and thermal expansion characteristics for catcher bearing material need to be done. A dynamic model needs to be designed for studying and simulating the rotor drop of the shaft onto the catcher bearing using a finite element approach in MATLAB. The assembly of the test rig was completed successfully by developing assembly fixtures and assembly methods. The components of the test rig were tested before assembly. Other necessary systems like Sensor holder system, Graphalloy press fit system were designed, fabricated and tested. The catcher bearing material (Graphalloy) was tested for coefficient of friction and Young's modulus at room and high temperatures. The rotor drop was simulated by deriving a dynamic model, to study the effect of system parameters like clearance, coefficient of friction, negative stiffness, initial spin speed on system behavior. Increasing the friction increases the backward whirl and decreases the rotor stoppage time. Increasing the clearance reduces the stoppage time and increases the peak bearing force. Increasing the initial spin speed increases the rotor stoppage time. The maximum stress encountered for as built conditions is more than allowable limits.

Narayanaswamy, Ashwanth

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility | Y-12 National Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highly Enriched Uranium ... Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility HEUMF The Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility is our nation's central repository for highly enriched...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

High performance magnetic bearing systems using high temperature superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are a magnetic bearing apparatus and a method for providing at least one stabilizing force in a magnetic bearing structure with a superconducting magnetic assembly and a magnetic assembly, by providing a superconducting magnetic member in the superconducting magnetic assembly with a plurality of domains and arranging said superconducting magnetic member such that at least one domain has a domain C-axis vector alignment angularly disposed relative to a reference axis of the magnetic member in the magnetic assembly. 7 figs.

Abboud, R.G.

1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

42

High performance magnetic bearing systems using high temperature superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic bearing apparatus and a method for providing at least one stabilizing force in a magnetic bearing structure with a superconducting magnetic assembly and a magnetic assembly, by providing a superconducting magnetic member in the superconducting magnetic assembly with a plurality of domains and arranging said superconducting magnetic member such that at least one domain has a domain C-axis vector alignment angularly disposed relative to a reference axis of the magnetic member in the magnetic assembly.

Abboud, Robert G. (Barrington Hills, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

New Model Systems for Studying Highly Frustrated Magnetism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... New Model Systems for Studying Highly Frustrated Magnetism. Ovidiu Garlea, Ames Laboratory. In the field of frustrated ...

44

Learning About Magnets!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Learning About Name A magnet is a material or object that creates a magnetic fi eld. This fi eld is invisible, but it creates a force that can "attract" or "repel" other magnets and magnetic materials, like iron or nickel. What is a Magnet? This bar magnet is a permanent magnet. Permanent magnets can be found in the Earth as rocks and metals. Magnets have

45

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C...

46

Fermilab | Recovery Act | High-field superconducting magnets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

may allow scientists to create high-field superconducting magnets that could exceed 50 Tesla, or more than twice the strength of existing magnets. In the project's first phase,...

47

National Aeronautics and Space Administration MagneticMath  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

data. The problems were designed to be `one-pagers' with a Teacher's Guide and Answer Key as a second://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov 1 #12;Magnetic Math magnetic and electrical attraction, and is credited with coining the term electricity. It was Descartes who ultimately made 'intangible and invisible' magnetic forces visible

48

High Performance Magnets for Energy Efficient Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bonded Magnetocaloric Powders for the Refrigeration Application Coercivity ... Industrial Needs and Applications for Soft Magnetic Materials Industrial...

49

Sandia National Laboratories High Temperature PEM  

subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration. SAND # 2011-6955P TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY

50

Sandia National Laboratories Regional High School Science Bowl...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov California Regions Sandia National Laboratories Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text...

51

Learning About Magnets!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Learning About Name A magnet is a material or object that creates a magnetic fi eld. This fi eld is invisible, but it creates a force...

52

SUPER HIGH-SPEED MINIATURIZED PERMANENT MAGNET SYNCHRONOUS MOTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUPER HIGH-SPEED MINIATURIZED PERMANENT MAGNET SYNCHRONOUS MOTOR by LIPING ZHENG B.S. Shanghai with the design of permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSM) to operate at super-high speed with high efficiency the motor to have an efficiency reaching above 92%. This achieved efficiency indicated a significant

Wu, Shin-Tson

53

Low Loss, High Power Density Magnetics in Inductor/Transformer ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The former power requirements motivate high efficiency materials for use in bulk scale inductors and transformers. The magnetic material requirements include...

54

Amplifying Magnetic Fields in High Energy Density Plasmas | U...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Amplifying Magnetic Fields in High Energy Density Plasmas Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities...

55

Quantum spins mimic refrigerator magnets - Argonne National Laboratories,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights > Quantum spins mimic refrigerator Highlights > Quantum spins mimic refrigerator magnets Quantum spins mimic refrigerator magnets By Joseph Bernstein * October 11, 2012 The behavior of magnetic moments in metal oxides such as layered iridium is dominated by strong spin-orbit coupling effects. In layered compounds such as Sr3Ir2O7 (shown on the left), the direction of these moments (blue arrows) is controlled at the quantum level by dipolar interactions that are akin to those of classical bar magnets. Another outcome is an unprecedented 'magnon gap' (shown at right), which was measured at the Argonne Advanced Photon Source and reveals that these underlying dipolar magnetic interactions are extremely strong. Current electronic devices depend on manipulating charge. Alternative approaches may rely on not only charge but also the spin of electrons.

56

Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage in Trapped Field Magnets of High Temperature Superconductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superconducting permanent magnets for storing high magnetic fields can serve as a means of energy storage and are useful in applications ranging from motors and generators to fault current limiters and circuit breakers. This report presents the results of experimental studies on high temperature superconductors, which were successfully used to trap a record high stable magnetic field of 83,000 G at 54 K and 100,000 G at 42 K.

1995-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

57

Magnetic Microstructures of Novel High Performance Permanent ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nd-Fe-B Permanent Magnets Unique Exchange Bias Induced by Antiferromagnetic Cr-oxide ZnO-graphene Hybrid Quantum Dots Light Emitting Diode...

58

CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Emergency Management Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux

59

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

60

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Nuclear Safety Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope

62

Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Development of a High  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Development of a High Temperature Solid Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Merit Review Meeting Berkeley, CA, May 20, 2003 #12;Idaho National Engineering integration), W (electricity costs) #12;Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory 3 2. Approach

63

Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on Bad...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nano-High, a program of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is a series of free Saturday morning talks by internationally recognized leaders in scientific research....

64

CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a DOE independent oversight assessment of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory programs for oversight of its contractors. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, DOE Oversight - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

65

HIGH-FIELD SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR MAGNETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research , Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, HighOffice of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, High Energy

Taylor, C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Are High Energy Cosmic Rays Magnetic Monopoles?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We argue that magnetic monopoles can not be associated to the highest energy cosmic rays as recently suggested. Both the observed spectrum and the arrival direction disagree with observation.

C. O. Escobar; R. A. Vzquez

1997-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Lithium pellet injection into high pressure magnetically confined plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ablation of solid pellets injected into high temperature magnetically confined plasmas is characterized by rapid oscillations in the ablation rate, and the formation of field aligned filaments in the ablatant. High ...

Bse, Brock (Brock Darrel)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on Materials...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Materials Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on Materials February 23, 2013 10:00AM EST UC Berkeley campus Nano-High, a program of the Lawrence Berkeley...

69

Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on Good...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Good Sugars Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on Good Sugars February 2, 2013 10:00AM EST UC Berkeley Campus Nano-High, a program of the Lawrence Berkeley...

70

NREL: Education Programs - National Science Bowl High School  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Science Bowl - High School A photo of a group of high school students on a stage holding a silver trophy and a blue and white banner that reads, "U.S. Department of Energy...

71

CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

72

CRAD, Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Environmental Compliance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Environmental Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications

73

CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007, A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Configuration Managment Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux

74

CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

75

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. RADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Nuclear Safety - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

76

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

77

CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Configuration Management Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications

78

CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Emergency Management Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Emergency Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

79

Access to High Technology User Facilities at DOE National Laboratories |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Access to High Technology User Facilities at DOE National Access to High Technology User Facilities at DOE National Laboratories Access to High Technology User Facilities at DOE National Laboratories In recognition of the nation's expanding need to engage businesses and universities in the areas of commercial and basic science research, the Department has developed two special types of agreements for use at all DOE National Laboratories with approved designated user facilities. For non-commercial, basic science research, researchers may seek to use the Non-proprietary User Agreement. Under this type of agreement, the user pays its own costs of the research with the DOE laboratory, may access specialized laboratory equipment and collaborate with laboratory scientists. The non-proprietary user and the National Laboratory retain

80

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Occupational Safety and Health Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2006 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Fire Protection program at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications

82

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Industrial Safety and Hygiene Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High

83

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

84

Countintg Extra Dimensions: Magnetic Cherenkov Radiation from High Energy Neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In theories which require a space of dimension d>4, there is a natural mechanism of suppressing neutrino masses: while Standard Model fields are confined to a 3-brane, right handed neutrinos live in the bulk. Due to Kaluza-Klein excitations, the effective magnetic moments of neutrinos are enhanced. The effective magnetic moment is a monotonically growing function of the energy of the neutrino: consequently, high energy neutrinos can emit observable amounts of magnetic Cherenkov radiation. By observing the energy dependence of the magnetic Cherenkov radiation, one may be able to determine the number of compactified dimensions.

G. Domokos; Andrea Erdas; S. Kovesi-Domokos

2002-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

Modeling high gradient magnetic separation from biological fluids.  

SciTech Connect

A proposed portable magnetic separator consists of an array of biocompatible capillary tubing and magnetizable wires immersed in an externally applied homogeneous magnetic field. While subject to the homogeneous magnetic field, the wires create high magnetic field gradients, which aid in the collection of blood-borne magnetic nanospheres from blood flow. In this study, a 3-D numerical model was created using COMSOL Multiphysics 3.2 software to determine the configuration of the wire-tubing array from two possible configurations, one being an array with rows alternating between wires and tubing, and the other being an array where wire and tubing alternate in two directions. The results demonstrated that the second configuration would actually capture more of the magnetic spheres. Experimental data obtained by our group support this numerical result.

Bockenfeld, D.; Chen, H.; Rempfer, D.; Kaminski, M. D.; Rosengart, A. J.; Chemical Engineering; Illinois Inst. of Tech.; Univ. of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on the Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on the "compassionate instinct" Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on the "compassionate instinct" March 23, 2013 10:00AM EDT UC Berkeley campus Nano-High, a program of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is a series of free Saturday morning talks by internationally recognized leaders in scientific research. The talks are designed for all high school students, regardless of primary academic interest, or year in school. All classroom teachers are welcome. Talks are held on the UC Berkeley Campus, at 10am. Register online at their website. Dacher Keltner March 23, 2013 The Compassionate Instinct: A Darwinian Tale of Survival of the Kindest Contact http://www.lbl.gov/LBL-Programs/nanohigh/index.html

87

Cerium-Based Magnets: Novel High Energy Permanent Magnet Without Critical Elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

REACT Project: Ames Laboratory will develop a new class of permanent magnets based on the more commonly available element cerium for use in both EVs and renewable power generators. Cerium is 4 times more abundant and significantly less expensive than the rare earth element neodymium, which is frequently used in todays most powerful magnets. Ames Laboratory will combine other metal elements with cerium to create a new magnet that can remain stable at the high temperatures typically found in electric motors. This new magnetic material will ultimately be demonstrated in a prototype electric motor, representing a cost-effective and efficient alternative to neodymium-based motors.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Makeup and uses of a basic magnet laboratory for characterizing high-temperature permanent magnets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A set of instrumentation for making basic magnetic measurements was assembled in order to characterize high-intrinsic-coercivity, rare-earth permanent magnets with respect to short-term demagnetization resistance and long-term aging at temperatures up to 300{degrees}C. The major specialized components of this set consist of a 13-T-peak-field, capacitor-discharge pulse magnetizer; a 10-in.-pole-size, variable-gap electromagnet; a temperature-controlled oven equipped with iron-cobalt pole piece extensions and a removable paddle that carries the magnetization and field sensing coils; associated electronic integrators; and standards for field intensity H and magnetic moment M calibration. A 1-cm cubic magnet sample, carried by the paddle, fits snugly between the pole piece extensions within the electrically heated aluminum oven, where fields up to 3.2 T can be applied by the electromagnet at temperatures up to 300{degrees}C. A sample set of demagnetization data for the high-energy Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17} type of magnet is given for temperatures up to 300{degrees}C. These data are reduced to the temperature dependence of the M-H knee field and of the field for a given magnetic induction swing, and they are then interpreted to show the limits of safe magnet operation.

Niedra, J.M. [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Brook Park, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center Group; Schwarze, G.E. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

High magnetic field processing of liquid crystalline polymers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of forming bulk articles of oriented liquid crystalline thermoset material, the material characterized as having an enhanced tensile modulus parallel to orientation of an applied magnetic field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field, by curing a liquid crystalline thermoset precursor within a high strength magnetic field of greater than about 2 Tesla, is provided, together with a resultant bulk article of a liquid crystalline thermoset material, said material processed in a high strength magnetic field whereby said material is characterized as having a tensile modulus parallel to orientation of said field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field.

Smith, M.E.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Douglas, E.P.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

90

High magnetic field processing of liquid crystalline polymers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of forming bulk articles of oriented liquid crystalline thermoset material, the material characterized as having an enhanced tensile modulus parallel to orientation of an applied magnetic field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field, by curing a liquid crystalline thermoset precursor within a high strength magnetic field of greater than about 2 Tesla, is provided, together with a resultant bulk article of a liquid crystalline thermoset material, said material processed in a high strength magnetic field whereby said material is characterized as having a tensile modulus parallel to orientation of said field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field.

Smith, Mark E. (Los Alamos, NM); Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM); Douglas, Elliot P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Magnetic Fields in High-Density Stellar Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I briefly review some aspects of the effect of magnetic fields in the high density regime relevant to neutron stars, focusing mainly on compact star structure and composition, superconductivity, combustion processes, and gamma ray bursts.

German Lugones

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

92

CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Safety Basis portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

93

CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Maintenance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

94

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux

95

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Reactor CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2007 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope

96

Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology National Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology National Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology National Science Bowl® Champion Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology National Science Bowl® Champion May 2, 2005 - 12:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- "The Incompleteness Theorem" was the answer to a question on mathematics that today clinched the 2005 National Science Bowl® championship for the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology team from Alexandria, Va. The team received its championship trophy after triumphing over 62 other regional team champions this weekend. The team members are: Logan Kearsley, Matthew Isakowitz, Sam Lederer, Lisa Marrone, Charlotte Seid and coach Sharon Baker. The team also won a research trip to Alaska, three Computer Based Laboratories and $1,000 for their school's science

97

2010 DOE National Science Bowl Photos - Mira Loma High School...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

FeedbackShare Page The Mira Loma High School team, from Sacramento, CA, works on the oil spill challenge at the National Science Bowl in Washington, DC. Left to right: Andrew...

98

2-3 High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HFMRF Overview HFMRF Overview High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility A significant portion of research conducted in the High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility (HFMRF) focuses on developing a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of biochemi- cal and biological systems and their response to environmental effects. A secondary focus is in materials science and catalysis and the chemical mechanisms and processes that operate in these areas. Resident and matrixed research staff within this facility offer expertise in the areas of structural biology, solid-state materials characterization, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Instrumentation & Capabilities NMR * 900-MHz NMR (operational in 2004) * 800-MHz NMR * 750-MHz NMR * 600-MHz NMR (2 systems)

99

Study of HTS Wires at High Magnetic Fields  

SciTech Connect

Fermilab is working on the development of high field magnet systems for ionization cooling of muon beams. The use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials is being considered for these magnets using Helium refrigeration. Critical current (I{sub c}) measurements of HTS conductors were performed at FNAL and at NIMS up to 28 T under magnetic fields at zero to 90 degree with respect to the sample face. A description of the test setups and results on a BSCCO-2223 tape and second generation (2G) coated conductors are presented.

Turrioni, D.; Barzi, E.; Lamm, M.J.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.; Kikuchi, A.; /Fermilab

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Application of high temperature superconductors to high-gradient magnetic separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Gradient Magnetic Separation (HGMS) is a powerful technique which can be used to separate widely dispersed contaminants from a host material, This technology can separate magnetic solids from other solids, liquids or gases. As the name implies HGMS uses large magnetic field gradients to separate ferromagnetic and paramagnetic particles. HGMS separators usually consist of a high-field solenoid magnet, the bore of which contains a fine-structured, ferromagnetic matrix material. The matrix material locally distorts the magnetic field and creates large field gradients in the vicinity of the matrix elements. These elements then become trapping sites for magnetic particles and are the basis for the magnetic separation. In this paper we discuss the design and construction of a prototype HGMS unit using a magnet made with high temperature superconductors (HTS). The prototype consists of an outer vacuum vessel which contains the HTS solenoid magnet The magnet is surrounded by a thermal radiation shield and multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets. The magnet, thermal shield and current leads all operate in a vacuum and are cooled by a cryocooler. High temperature superconducting current leads are used to reduce the heat leak from the ambient environment to the HTS magnet.

Daugherty, M.A.; Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Daney, D.E.; Worl, L.W.; Schake, A.R.; Padilla, D.D.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Magnetic Refrigeration Technology for High Efficiency Air Conditioning  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic refrigeration was investigated as an efficient, environmentally friendly, flexible alternative to conventional residential vapor compression central air conditioning systems. Finite element analysis (FEA) models of advanced geometry active magnetic regenerator (AMR) beds were developed to minimize bed size and thus magnet mass by optimizing geometry for fluid flow and heat transfer and other losses. Conventional and magnetocaloric material (MCM) regenerator fabrication and assembly techniques were developed and advanced geometry passive regenerators were built and tested. A subscale engineering prototype (SEP) magnetic air conditioner was designed, constructed and tested. A model of the AMR cycle, combined with knowledge from passive regenerator experiments and FEA results, was used to design the regenerator beds. A 1.5 Tesla permanent magnet assembly was designed using FEA and the bed structure and plenum design was extensively optimized using FEA. The SEP is a flexible magnetic refrigeration platform, with individually instrumented beds and high flow rate and high frequency capability, although the current advanced regenerator geometry beds do not meet performance expectations, probably due to manufacturing and assembly tolerances. A model of the AMR cycle was used to optimize the design of a 3 ton capacity magnetic air conditioner, and the system design was iterated to minimize external parasitic losses such as heat exchanger pressure drop and fan power. The manufacturing cost for the entire air conditioning system was estimated, and while the estimated SEER efficiency is high, the magnetic air conditioning system is not cost competitive as currently configured. The 3 ton study results indicate that there are other applications where magnetic refrigeration is anticipated to have cost advantages over conventional systems, especially applications where magnetic refrigeration, through the use of its aqueous heat transfer fluid, could eliminate intermediate heat exchangers or oil distribution issues found in traditional vapor compression systems.

Boeder, A; Zimm, C

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

102

Soft Magnetic Nanocomposite for High Frequency Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These results indicate that the annealing temperature may be used to tune the electrical resistivity and grainsize, which may be used to optimize the high...

103

High average power magnetic modulator for metal vapor lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A three-stage magnetic modulator utilizing magnetic pulse compression designed to provide a 60 kV pulse to a copper vapor laser at a 4.5 kHz repetition rate is disclosed. This modulator operates at 34 kW input power. The circuit includes a step up auto transformer and utilizes a rod and plate stack construction technique to achieve a high packing factor.

Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA); Miller, John L. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

National high-level waste systems analysis report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the assessment of budgetary impacts, constraints, and repository availability on the storage and treatment of high-level waste and on both existing and pending negotiated milestones. The impacts of the availabilities of various treatment systems on schedule and throughput at four Department of Energy sites are compared to repository readiness in order to determine the prudent application of resources. The information modeled for each of these sites is integrated with a single national model. The report suggests a high-level-waste model that offers a national perspective on all high-level waste treatment and storage systems managed by the Department of Energy.

Kristofferson, K.; Oholleran, T.P.; Powell, R.H.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Press Release High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Nov 15, 2013 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

106

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Press Release High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Nov 15, 2013 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

107

High Temperature, Buried Permanent Magnet, Brushless DC Motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high temperature magnetic bearing system using high temperature permanent magnets from Electron Energy Corporation (EEC) is under development. The system consists of two radial bearings, one thrust bearing, two radial catcher bearings and one motor. The purpose of this research is to develop one of the critical components of the system, namely, the High Temperature Permanent Magnet motor. A novel High Temperature Permanent Magnet (HTPM) Brushless DC(BLDC) motor capable of operating at 1000 degrees F (538 degrees C) is designed. HTPMs developed at Electron Energy Corporation are buried into the rotor. The high temperature motor is designed to produce 5.1kw of power at a top running speed of 20000 rpm. The numerical values of the motor voltage, power and torque output are predicted from calculations of the nonlinear finite element model of the motor. The motor stator is wound, potted, cured and high potential tested at 1000 degrees F. A servo amplifier from Advanced Motion Control is used to drive the high temperature motor. High temperature displacement sensors are set up for sensing the rotor position to form a closed loop motion control. However, the noise problem of the high temperature sensors causes a failure of this approach. An open loop approach is then developed and this approach succeeds in spinning the rotor with the capability of self-starting. The status of the full system assembling is introduced. Some other components of the system are briefly presented.

Zhang, Zhengxin

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Heat leak testing of a superconducting RHIC dipole magnet at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory is currently performing heat load tests on a superconducting dipole magnet. The magnet is a prototype of the 360, 8 cm bore, arc dipole magnets that will be used in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RMC). An accurate measurement of the heat load is needed to eliminate cumulative errors when determining the REUC cryogenic system load requirements. The test setup consists of a dipole positioned between two quadrupoles in a common vacuum tank and heat shield. Piping and instrumentation are arranged to facilitate measurement of the heat load on the primary 4.6 K magnet load and the secondary 55 K heat shield load. Initial results suggest that the primary heat load is well below design allowances. The secondary load was found to be higher than estimated, but remained close to the budgeted amount. Overall, the dipole performed to specifications.

DeLalio, J.T.; Brown, D.P.; Sondericker, J.H.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Apparatus for storing high magnetic fields having reduced mechanical forces and reduced magnetic pollution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of storing extremely high magnetic fields for the purpose of energy storage or for other uses, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements and the magnetic field pollution produced at locations away from the configuration are both significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by currently proposed techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency.

Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM); Mueller, Fred M. (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, James L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Towards Integrated Design and Modeling of High Field Accelerator Magnets  

SciTech Connect

The next generation of superconducting accelerator magnets will most likely use a brittle conductor (such as Nb{sub 3}Sn), generate fields around 18 T, handle forces that are 3-4 times higher than in the present LHC dipoles, and store energy that starts to make accelerator magnets look like fusion magnets. To meet the challenge and reduce the complexity, magnet design will have to be more innovative and better integrated. The recent design of several high field superconducting magnets have now benefited from the integration between CAD (e.g. ProE), magnetic analysis tools (e.g. TOSCA) and structural analysis tools (e.g. ANSYS). Not only it is now possible to address complex issues such as stress in magnet ends, but the analysis can be better detailed an extended into new areas previously too difficult to address. Integrated thermal, electrical and structural analysis can be followed from assembly and cool-down through excitation and quench propagation. In this paper we report on the integrated design approach, discuss analysis results and point out areas of future interest.

Caspi, S.; Ferracin, P.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Contractor ORR Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2007 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR More Documents & Publications

112

High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

| National Nuclear Security | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog HEDLP High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > University Partnerships / Academic Alliances > High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas

113

SAND2011-6616A Page 1 Session 2: High Energy Density, Plasmas, Magnetic Fields  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

616A 616A Page 1 Session 2: High Energy Density, Plasmas, Magnetic Fields Dynamical Materials Experiments on Sandia's Z Machine: Obtaining Data with High Precision at HED Conditions Thomas R. Mattsson and Seth Root Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM USA Summary: The Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories has successfully been used to study a wide range of materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, we will discuss the methodology resulting in high-pressure measurements at multi-Mbar pressures as well as present experimental data for shock compression of poly methyl-pentene, a hydrocarbon plastic. Introduction During the last few years, there has been a notable increase in the interest of high-pressure science. The increase in interest has been driven by the remarkable capabilities of new and improved platforms like

114

Homogenous BSCCO-2212 Round Wires for Very High Field Magnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance demands on modern particle accelerators generate a relentless push towards higher field magnets. In turn, advanced high field magnet development places increased demands on superconducting materials. Nb3Sn conductors have been used to achieve 16 T in a prototype dipole magnet and are thought to have the capability for {approx}18 T for accelerator magnets (primarily dipoles but also higher order multipole magnets). However there have been suggestions and proposals for such magnets higher than 20 T. The High Energy Physics Community (HEP) has identified important new physics opportunities that are enabled by extremely high field magnets: 20 to 50 T solenoids for muon cooling in a muon collider (impact: understanding of neutrinos and dark matter); and 20+ T dipoles and quadrupoles for high energy hadron colliders (impact: discovery reach far beyond present). This proposal addresses the latest SBIR solicitation that calls for grant applications that seek to develop new or improved superconducting wire technologies for magnets that operate at a minimum of 12 Tesla (T) field, with increases up to 15 to 20 T sought in the near future (three to five years). The long-term development of accelerator magnets with fields greater than 20 T will require superconducting wires having significantly better high-field properties than those possessed by current Nb{sub 3}Sn or other A15 based wires. Given the existing materials science base for Bi-2212 wire processing, we believe that Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (Bi-2212) round wires can be produced in km-long piece lengths with properties suitable to meet both the near term and long term needs of the HEP community. The key advance will be the translation of this materials science base into a robust, high-yield wire technology. While the processing and application of A15 materials have advanced to a much higher level than those of the copper oxide-based, high T{sub c} (HTS) counterparts, the HTS materials have the very significant advantage of an extremely high H{sub c2}. For this reason, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (Bi-2212, or 2212) in the form of a multifilamentary Ag alloy matrix composite is beginning to attract the interest of the magnet community for future extremely high-field magnets or magnet-insert coils for 4.2K operation. Fig. 1 shows an example of excellent JE (engineering current density) in Bi-2212 round wire at fields up to 45 T, demonstrating the potential for high field applications of this material. For comparison, the Nb{sub 3}Sn wires used in magnets in the 16-18 T range typically perform with J{sub E} in the range 200-500 A/mm{sup 2}; the Bi-2212 wire retains this level of performance to fields at least as high as 45 T, and probably significantly higher. Bi-2212 conductors have in fact been used to generate a 25 T field in a superconducting insert magnet. These two factors- the very high field critical current performance of Bi-2212, and the already demonstrated capability of this material for high field magnets up to 25 T, strongly suggest this material as a leading contender for the next generation high field superconducting (HFS) wire. This potential was recognized by the US Academy of Science's Committee on Opportunities in High Magnetic Field Science. Their report of the same name specifically calls out the high field potential for this material, and suggests that 30 T magnets appear feasible based on the performance of 2212. There are several requirements for HFS conductors. The most obvious is J{sub E} (B, T), the engineering current density at the field and temperature of operation. As shown in Fig. 1, Bi-2212 excels in this regard. Stability requirements for magnets dictate that the effective filament diameter should be less than 30 micrometers, something that Bi-2212 multifilamentary wire can uniquely satisfy among the HFS superconducting wire technologies. Additional requirements include mechanical properties that prevent stress limitation of J{sub E} at the operating conditions, resistive transition index (n-value) suffic

Dr. Scott Campbell Dr. Terry Holesinger Dr. Ybing Huang

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

Pantex installs new high explosives equipment | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

high explosives equipment | National Nuclear Security high explosives equipment | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex installs new high explosives equipment Pantex installs new high explosives equipment Posted By Office of Public Affairs Joel Ramos works with the lathe. Big jobs are nothing new for the Projects Division at Pantex, and the

116

Pantex installs new high explosives equipment | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

high explosives equipment | National Nuclear Security high explosives equipment | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex installs new high explosives equipment Pantex installs new high explosives equipment Posted By Office of Public Affairs Joel Ramos works with the lathe. Big jobs are nothing new for the Projects Division at Pantex, and the

117

NNSA Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston | National Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > NNSA Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston Press Release NNSA Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston Nov 22, 2013

118

Presented by the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

travel to our unique lab to use these awesome tools. #12;P Answer Key Page 1 N S Z M N N R E I IL O R D E at Home Is it Attractive? #12;Answer Key Page 2 Basic & Applied Research Attractive Word Search A T R H scenarios: 1. 4. 5. 2. 3. #12;Answer Key Page 3 Spot the Differences Migration Maze Start Finish #12;Answer

Weston, Ken

119

Soft Magnetic Materials for High Power and High Frequency Power ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Advanced Materials for Power Electronics, Power Conditioning, and ... are in high demand for the next generation of miniaturized power electronics.

120

High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and ... High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule Posted By Office of Public Affairs Construction crews prepare to pour concrete at the new High Explosives

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and ... High Explosives Pressing Facility on budget and on schedule Posted By Office of Public Affairs Construction crews prepare to pour concrete at the new High Explosives

122

High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Program | National Nuclear Security Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program Home > High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program Steady advances in increasing the energy, power, and brightness of lasers and particle beams and advances in pulsed power systems have made possible

123

National Best Practices Manual for Building High Performance Schools  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Best Practices Manual Best Practices Manual For Building High Performance Schools Acknowledgements The U.S. Department of Energy would like to acknowledge the help and assistance of the EnergySmart Schools team and the many authors and reviewers that provided input and feedback during the process of developing the report. Those include: US Department of Energy: David Hansen, Daniel Sze; EnergySmart Schools Team: Larry Schoff; US Environmental Protection Agency: Melissa Payne, Bob Thompson; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: Rick Diamond; National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Ren Anderson, Zahra Chaudhry, Jeff Clarke, Kyra Epstein, Tony Jimenez, Patty Kappaz, Patricia Plympton, Byron Stafford, Marcy Stone, John Thornton, Paul Torcellini; Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Andre Desjarlais,

124

Voltage spike detection in high field superconducting accelerator magnets  

SciTech Connect

A measurement system for the detection of small magnetic flux changes in superconducting magnets, which are due to either mechanical motion of the conductor or flux jump, has been developed at Fermilab. These flux changes are detected as small amplitude, short duration voltage spikes, which are {approx}15mV in magnitude and lasts for {approx}30 {micro}sec. The detection system combines an analog circuit for the signal conditioning of two coil segments and a fast data acquisition system for digitizing the results, performing threshold detection, and storing the resultant data. The design of the spike detection system along with the modeling results and noise analysis will be presented. Data from tests of high field Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets at currents up to {approx}20KA will also be shown.

Orris, D.F.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.M.; /Fermilab

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

{open_quotes}High magnetic fields in the USA{close_quotes}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past thirty years research using high magnetic fields has technically evolved in the manner, but not the magnitude, of the so-called big science areas of particle physics, plasma physics, neutron scattering, synchrotron light scattering, and astronomy. Starting from the laboratories of individual researchers it moved to a few larger universities, then to centralized national facilities with research and maintenance staffs, and, finally, to joint international ventures to build unique facilities, as illustrated by the subject of this conference. To better understand the nature of this type of research and its societal justification it is helpful to compare it, in general terms, with the aforementioned big-science fields. High magnetic field research differs from particle physics, plasma physics, and astronomy in three respects: (1) It is generic research that cuts across a wide range of scientific disciplines in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, and engineering; (2) It studies materials and processes that are relevant for a variety of technological applications and it gives insight into biological processes; (3) It has produced, at least, comparably significant results with incomparably smaller resources. Unlike neutron and synchrotron light scattering, which probe matter, high magnetic fields change the thermodynamic state of matter. This change of state is fundamental and independent of other state variables, such as pressure and temperature. After the magnetic field is applied, various techniques are then used to study the new state.

Campbell, L.J.; Parkin, D.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Crow, J.E.; Schneider-Muntau, H.J. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Sullivan, N.S. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Past High School National Science Bowl Winners (1991 - 2012) | U.S. DOE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Winners » Past High School National Science Bowl Winners » Past High School National Science Bowl Winners (1991 - 2012) National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Past National Science Bowl Winners Past High School National Science Bowl Winners (1991 - 2012) Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Year Winning High School Teams

127

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - LaFayette High School | U.S.  

Office of Science (SC) Website

LaFayette High School LaFayette High School National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - LaFayette High School Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The LaFayette High School team tours the National Mall in Washington, DC on

128

Commercial Building Partners Catalyze High Performance Buildings Across the Nation  

SciTech Connect

In 2008 the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the Commercial Buildings Partnership (CBP) project to accelerate market adoption of commercially available energy saving technologies into the design process for new and upgraded commercial buildings. The CBP represents a unique collaboration between industry leaders and DOE to develop high performance buildings as a model for future construction and renovation. CBP was implemented in two stages. This paper focuses on lessons learned at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in the first stage and discusses some partner insights from the second stage. In the first stage, PNNL and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory recruited CBP partners that own large portfolios of buildings. The labs provide assistance to the partners' design teams and make a business case for energy investments.

Baechler, Michael C.; Dillon, Heather E.; Bartlett, Rosemarie

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The effect of highly structured cosmic magnetic fields on ultra-high energy cosmic ray propagation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possibility that the magnetic field is strongly correlated with the large-scale structure of the universe has been recently considered in the literature. In this scenario the intergalactic magnetic field has a strong ($\\mu$G) regular component spanning tens of Mpc but localized in sheets and filaments, while the vast voids in between are almost free of magnetic field. If true, this could have important consequences on the propagation of ultra-high energy cosmic rays, and severely affect our capacity of doing astronomy with charged particles. A quantitative discussion of these effects is given in the present work.

Gustavo Medina Tanco

1998-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

130

High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field.

Mitlitsky, Fred (Livermore, CA); Hoard, Ronald W. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla are disclosed. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field. 4 figures.

Mitlitsky, F.; Hoard, R.W.

1994-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

132

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Little Rock Central High School  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Little Rock Central High School Little Rock Central High School National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Little Rock Central High School Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Little Rock Central High School students from Little Rock, AR tour the

133

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Lexington High School | U.S.  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Lexington High School Lexington High School National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Lexington High School Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Lexington High School from Lexington, MA. competes in the academic

134

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Montgomery Blair High School |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Montgomery Blair High School Montgomery Blair High School National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Montgomery Blair High School Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Secretary of Energy Steven Chu and the Montgomery Blair High School Science

135

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Onate High School | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Onate High School Onate High School National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Onate High School Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Onate High School team from Las Cruces, NM stands before the Apollo

136

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Palo Alto High School | U.S.  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Palo Alto High School Palo Alto High School National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Palo Alto High School Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Palo Alto High School at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum in

137

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - North Hollywood High School |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

North Hollywood High School North Hollywood High School National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - North Hollywood High School Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The North Hollywood High School team from North Hollywood, CA competes in

138

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Vigil I. Grissom High School |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Vigil I. Grissom High School Vigil I. Grissom High School National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Vigil I. Grissom High School Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Vigil I. Grissom High School team, from Huntsville, AL, tours the

139

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - George Walton High School |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

George Walton High School George Walton High School National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - George Walton High School Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Secretary of Energy Steven Chu and the George Walton High School Science

140

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Shasta High School | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Shasta High School Shasta High School National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Shasta High School Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Shasta High School team, from Redding, CA, at work on a challenge at

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Campbell High School | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Campbell High School Campbell High School National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Campbell High School Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Campbell High School team members, from Gillette, WY, work on a challenge

142

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Farmingdale High School | U.S.  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Farmingdale High School Farmingdale High School National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Farmingdale High School Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Farmingdale High School students from Farmingdale, NY take part in the

143

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Hunter College High School |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Hunter College High School Hunter College High School National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Hunter College High School Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Eric Mannes (left) and Pearson Miller do some last minute cramming as they

144

Progress In High Temperature Electrolysis At The Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The United States is considering the development of a domestic hydrogen-based energy economy. Hydrogen is of particular interest as a secondary energy carrier because it has the potential to be storable, transportable, environmentally benign, and useful in many chemical processes. Obviously, before a hydrogen economy can be implemented, an efficient and environmentally friendly means for large scale hydrogen production must be identified, proven, and developed. Hydrogen is now produced primarily via steam reforming of methane. However, from a long-term perspective, methane reforming is not a viable process for large-scale production of hydrogen since such fossil fuel conversion processes consume non-renewable resources and emit greenhouse gases. The U. S. National Research Council has recommended the use of water-splitting technologies to produce hydrogen using energy derived from a nuclear reactor. For the past several years, the Idaho National Laboratory has been actively studying the use of solid oxide fuel cells in conjunction with nuclear power for large-scale, high-temperature, electrolytic hydrogen production.

Carl M. Stoots; James E.O' Brien; J. Steve Herring; Joseph Hartvigsen

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

RECENT ADVANCES IN THE TECHNOLOGY OF SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR MAGNETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accelerator Magnets, Brookhaven National Laboratory,in Superconducting Magnets,- Brookhaven National Laboratory,Accelerator Magnet Wire," Brookhaven National Laboratory,

Taylor, C.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

High tech criminal threats to the national information infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National information infrastructure (NII), vital to the nation's security and economic stability, comprises both physical and electronic infrastructures. Information and communications technologies (ICT) form the backbone of many aspects of the NII and ...

Kim-Kwang Raymond Choo

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Z: A Fast Pulsed Power Generator for Ultra-High Magnetic Field Generation  

SciTech Connect

Advances in fast, pulsed-power technologies have resulted in the development of very high current drivers that have current rise times - 100 ns. The largest such pulsed power drive r today is the new Z accelerator located at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Z is capable of delivering more than 20 MA with a time-to-peak of 105 ns to low inductance (- 1 nH)loads. Such large drivers are capable of directly generating magnetic fields approaching 3 kT in small, 1 -cm3, volumes. In addition to direct field generation, Z can be used to compress an applied, axial seed field with a plasma. Flux compression scheme~: are not new and are, in fact, the basis of all explosive flux-compression generators but we propose the use of plasma armatures rather than solid, conducting armatures. We will present experimental results from the Z accelerator in which magnetic fields - 2 kT are generated and measured with several diagnostics. Issues such as energy loss in solid conductors and dynamic response of current-carrying conductors to very large magnetic fields will be reviewed in context with Z experiments. We will describe planned flux-compression experiments that are expected to create the highest-magnitude uniform-field volumes yet attained in the laboratory.

Asay, J.R.; Bailey, J.E.; Bernard, M.A.; Hall, C.A.; McDaniel, D.H.; Spielman, R.B.; Struve, K.W.; Stygar, W.A.

1998-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

148

High temperature magnetic properties of SmCo{sub 5}/{alpha}-Fe(Co) bulk nanocomposite magnets  

SciTech Connect

To find alternative high temperature magnets containing no heavy rare earths for power applications, SmCo{sub 5}/Fe bulk nanocomposite magnets with enhanced energy density and high thermal stability have been produced by using a ball-milling plus warm-compaction route. Up to 30% of the Fe soft magnetic phase has been added to the composites with grain size <20 nm distributed homogenously in the matrix of the SmCo{sub 5} hard magnetic phase. It was observed that the microstructure does not change with temperature up to 500 Degree-Sign C. It is also observed that the thermal stability of bulk nanocomposite samples is closely related to bulk density. Energy products above 11 MGOe have been obtained at 300 Degree-Sign C in fully dense bulk SmCo{sub 5}/Fe nanocomposite magnets, which is 65% higher than that of a single-phase counterpart at the same temperature.

Rong Chuanbing; Poudyal, Narayan; Liu, X. B.; Ping Liu, J. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas 76019 (United States); Zhang Ying [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas 76019 (United States); Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Ames Laboratory, USDOE, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Kramer, M. J. [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Ames Laboratory, USDOE, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

149

Optimal design of a high-speed slotless permanent magnet synchronous generator with soft magnetic composite stator yoke and rectifier load  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a specific design methodology of a DC generation system using a high-speed slotless generator with surface-mounted magnets and soft magnetic composite (SMC) stator yoke connected to a rectifier. The method is based on an analytical ... Keywords: Eddy currents, High-speed generation system, Optimal design, Permanent magnet machine, Soft magnetic composite material

Ahmed Chebak; Philippe Viarouge; Jrme Cros

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia National Laboratories.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory.

Ward, Kevin S.; Long, Finis W.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia); Kim, Alexandre A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, RUSSIA); Wakeland, Peter Eric (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); McKee, G. Randall; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Struve, Kenneth William; Stygar, William A.; LeChien, Keith R.; Matzen, Maurice Keith

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Brookhaven National Lab Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Brookhaven National Lab Brookhaven National Lab Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov New York Regions Brookhaven National Lab Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Catherine Osiecki Email: Osiecki@bnl.gov Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, January 25, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 20

152

Sandia National Laboratories Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Sandia National Sandia National Laboratories Regional High School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov California Regions Sandia National Laboratories Regional High School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Timothy Shepodd Email: tjshepo@sandia.gov Regional Event Information Date: January 25, 2014

153

Sandia National Laboratories High Efficiency Multiple-Junction ...  

Sandia National Laboratories TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY Single junction solar cells have limited efficiency and fail to extract maximum energy from photons outside of a specific

154

Design of a High Performance Ferrite Magnet-Assisted Synchronous Reluctance Motor for an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design of a High Performance Ferrite Magnet- Assisted Synchronous Reluctance Motor for an Electric) ferrite-based permanent magnet-assisted synchronous reluctance motor has been designed for an electric the ferrite magnets are safe from irreversible demagnetization. Key performance indicators for the motor

Noé, Reinhold

155

A high transmission analyzing magnet for intense high charge state beams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The low energy beam transport (LEBT) for VENUS will provide for extraction, mass analysis and transport to the axial injection line for the 88-Inch Cyclotron. The new LEBT was designed from the beginning to handle high intensity beams where space charge forces strongly affect the transmission. The magnet has a unique design with specially shaped poles to apply sextupole correction in both the horizontal and vertical plane.

Leitner, M.; Abbott, S.R.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C.

2002-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

156

Design of optimal digital controller for stable super-high-speed permanent-magnet synchronous  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design of optimal digital controller for stable super-high-speed permanent-magnet synchronous motor collaborative design scheme of a super-high-speed permanent-magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) and its digital controller is presented, which provides a low-cost but highly efficient motor system with guaranteed

Wu, Shin-Tson

157

Production of Materials with Superior Properties Utilizing High Magnetic Field  

Processing materials in a magnetic field is an innovative and revolutionary means to change materials and structural properties by tailoring the ...

158

Aligned Microstructure by Applying a High Magnetic Field to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical Modeling of Centrifugally Cast HSS Rolls Numerical Simulation of Electro-magnetic Turbulent Inhibitor Technology in a Tundish Optimizing the...

159

2010 DOE National Science Bowl Photos - Campbell High School...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

at the National Science Bowl in Washington, DC. The challenge is to clean up a simulated oil spill while producing as little waste as possible and avoiding leaving any oil in...

160

2010 DOE National Science Bowl Photos - Shasta High School...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

at the National Science Bowl in Washington, DC. The challenge is to clean up a simulated oil spill while producing as little waste as possible. Left to right: Kevin Sto-Parker,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

2010 DOE National Science Bowl Photos - Mira Loma High School...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

team from Sacramento, CA works on the oil spill challenge at the National Science Bowl in Washington, DC. Left to right: Edward Lee, Andrew Chen, Anish Khare, Russ Islam Photograph...

162

High-Energy Composite Permanent Magnets: High-Energy Permanent Magnets for Hybrid Vehicles and Alternative Energy  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: The University of Delaware is developing permanent magnets that contain less rare earth material and produce twice the energy of the strongest rare earth magnets currently available. The University of Delaware is creating these magnets by mixing existing permanent magnet materials with those that are more abundant, like iron. Both materials are first prepared in the form of nanoparticles via techniques ranging from wet chemistry to ball milling. After that, the nanoparticles must be assembled in a 3-D array and consolidated at low temperatures to form a magnet. With small size particles and good contact between these two materials, the best qualities of each allow for the development of exceptionally strong composite magnets.

None

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

The Center for Computational Sciences DOE High Performance Computing Research Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The Center for Computational Sciences DOE High Performance Computing Research Center at Oak Ridge Sciences DOE High Performance Computing Research Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory Outline · CCS for Computational Sciences DOE High Performance Computing Research Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory CCS

164

Applications of high-speed dust injection to magnetic fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is now an established fact that a significant amount of dust is produced in magnetic fusion devices due to plasma-wall interactions. Dust inventory must be controlled, in particular for the next-generation steady-state fusion machines like ITER, as it can pose significant safety hazards and degrade performance. Safety concerns are due to tritium retention, dust radioactivity, toxicity, and flammability. Performance concerns include high-Z impurities carried by dust to the fusion core that can reduce plasma temperature and may even induce sudden termination of the plasma. We have recognized that dust transport, dust-plasma interactions in magnetic fusion devices can be effectively studied experimentally by injection of dust with known properties into fusion plasmas. Other applications of injected dust include diagnosis of fusion plasmas and edge localized mode (ELM)'s pacing. In diagnostic applications, dust can be regarded as a source of transient neutrals before complete ionization. ELM's pacing is a promising scheme to prevent disruptions and type I ELM's that can cause catastrophic damage to fusion machines. Different implementation schemes are available depending on applications of dust injection. One of the simplest dust injection schemes is through gravitational acceleration of dust in vacuum. Experiments at Los Alamos and Princeton will be described, both of which use piezoelectric shakers to deliver dust to plasma. In Princeton experiments, spherical particles (40 micron) have been dropped in a systematic and reproducible manner using a computer-controlled piezoelectric bending actuator operating at an acoustic (0,2) resonance. The circular actuator was constructed with a 2.5 mm diameter central hole. At resonance ({approx} 2 kHz) an applied sinusoidal voltage has been used to control the flux of particles exiting the hole. A simple screw throttle located {approx}1mm above the hole has been used to set the magnitude of the flux achieved for a given voltage. Particle fluxes ranging from a few tens of particle per second up to thousands of particles per second have been achieved using this simple device. To achieve higher dust injection speed, another key consideration is how to accelerate dust at controlled amount. In addition to gravity, other possible acceleration mechanisms include electrostatic, electromagnetic, gas-dragged, plasma-dragged, and laser-ablation-based acceleration. Features and limitations of the different acceleration methods will be discussed. We will also describe laboratory experiments on dust acceleration.

Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Yangfang [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Germany

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

165

Atomic magnetic gradiometer for room temperature high sensitivity magnetic field detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser-based atomic magnetometer (LBAM) apparatus measures magnetic fields, comprising: a plurality of polarization detector cells to detect magnetic fields; a laser source optically coupled to the polarization detector cells; and a signal detector that measures the laser source after being coupled to the polarization detector cells, which may be alkali cells. A single polarization cell may be used for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by prepolarizing the nuclear spins of an analyte, encoding spectroscopic and/or spatial information, and detecting NMR signals from the analyte with a laser-based atomic magnetometer to form NMR spectra and/or magnetic resonance images (MRI). There is no need of a magnetic field or cryogenics in the detection step, as it is detected through the LBAM.

Xu,Shoujun (Berkeley, CA); Lowery, Thomas L. (Belmont, MA); Budker, Dmitry (El Cerrito, CA); Yashchuk, Valeriy V. (Richmond, CA); Wemmer, David E. (Berkeley, CA); Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA)

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

166

SURVEY OF HIGH FIELD SUPERCONDUCTING MATERIAL FOR ACCELERATOR MAGNETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, High EnergyOffice of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, High Energy

Scanlan, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A HIGH GRADIENT QUADRUPOLE MAGNET FOR THE SSC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, High EnergyOffice of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, High Energy

Taylor, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector are described in this paper. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity.

Bonanos, P.

1990-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity. 4 figs.

Bonanos, P.

1992-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

170

Industrial harmonic analysis system for magnetic measurements of SSC collider arc and high energy booster corrector magnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SSCL collider arc and high energy booster corrector magnets are 50 mm bore cryogenic magnets. The integral strength and harmonics will be measured by industry at full current at 4.2 K and at plus and minus 400 mA at room temperature. Dipoles, quadrupoles, and sextupoles have error tolerances of a few tens of units. A prototype harmonic analysis system for magnetic measurements of production and prototype dipole, quadrupole and sextupole magnets has been designed and is being fabricated. We describe the criteria for search coil designs, data acquisition system hardware and software. Radial search coil arrays are being fabricated utilizing multifilar wire. Two digital integrators will allow simultaneous accumulation of unbucked and bucked configurations.

Green, M.I.; Sponsel, R.; Sylvester, C.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Microstructure evaluation for Dy-free Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets with high coercivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nd-Fe-B sinteredmagnets are used for motors of hybrid or electric vehicles due to their high energy products. Dy is added to Nd-Fe-B sinteredmagnets to work in a high temperature environment. Although the addition of Dy decreases the magnetization of Nd-Fe-B magnets

R. Goto; M. Matsuura; S. Sugimoto; N. Tezuka; Y. Une; M. Sagawa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

"Using Magnetic Fields to Create and Control High Energy Density...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. All rights reserved. U.S. Department of Energy Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy national...

173

2528 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 43, NO. 6, JUNE 2007 A Highly Efficient 200 000 RPM Permanent Magnet Motor System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Permanent Magnet Motor System Limei Zhao1, Chan Ham2, Liping Zheng3, Thomas Wu4, Kalpathy Sundaram4, Jay presents the development of an ultra-high-speed permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) that produces effectiveness. Index Terms--Permanent magnet, motor, stability, ultra-high-speed. I. INTRODUCTION DUE

Wu, Shin-Tson

174

Survey of National Programs for Managing High-Level Radioactive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, in particular through the Non-Proliferation Treaty review conference in May 2010 and the International has taken a leading role in national, regional and international non-proliferation and disarmament Commission on Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament (ICNND). This seminar addresses three key themes

175

High Performance computing Data Center (Fact Sheet), NREL (National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

via efficient evaporative cooling towers serving the HPC data center. High Performance Computing Data Center The new high performance computing (HPC) data center in NREL's...

176

High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program Home > High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas...

177

Effect of high solenoidal magnetic fields on breakdown voltages of high vacuum 805 MHz cavities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is an on going international collaboration studying the feasibility and cost of building a muon collider or neutrino factory [1,2]. An important aspect of this study is the full understanding of ionization cooling of muons by many orders of magnitude for the collider case. An important muon ionization cooling experiment, MICE [3], has been proposed to demonstrate and validate the technology that could be used for cooling. Ionization cooling is accomplished by passing a high-emittance muon beam alternately through regions of low Z material, such as liquid hydrogen, and very high accelerating RF Cavities within a multi-Tesla solenoidal field. To determine the effect of very large solenoidal magnetic fields on the generation of dark current, x-rays and on the breakdown voltage gradients of vacuum RF cavities, a test facility has been established at Fermilab in Lab G. This facility consists of a 12 MW 805 MHz RF station and a large warm bore 5 T solenoidal superconducting magnet containing a pill box type cavity with thin removable window apertures. This system allows dark current and breakdown studies of different window configurations and materials. The results of this study will be presented. The study has shown that the peak achievable accelerating gradient is reduced by a factor greater than 2 when solenoidal field of greater than 2 T are applied to the cavity.

Moretti, A.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Qian, Z.; /Fermilab; Norem, J.; /Argonne; Li, D.; Zisman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Torun, Y.; /IIT, Chicago; Rimmer, R.; /Jefferson Lab; Errede,; /Illinois U., Urbana

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

296 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 57, NO. 1, JANUARY 2010 Very-High-Speed Slotless Permanent-Magnet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-High-Speed Slotless Permanent-Magnet Motors: Analytical Modeling, Optimization, Design, and Torque Measurement Methods-high-speed (VHS) slotless permanent-magnet motor design procedure using an analytical model. The model is used TO THEIR high power density, very-high-speed (VHS) permanent-magnet (PM) motors are increasingly requested

Psaltis, Demetri

179

Magnet Technology for Power Converters: Nanocomposite Magnet Technology for High Frequency MW-Scale Power Converters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar ADEPT Project: CMU is developing a new nanoscale magnetic material that will reduce the size, weight, and cost of utility-scale PV solar power conversion systems that connect directly to the grid. Power converters are required to turn the energy that solar power systems create into useable energy for the grid. The power conversion systems made with CMUs nanoscale magnetic material have the potential to be 150 times lighter and significantly smaller than conventional power conversion systems that produce similar amounts of power.

None

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

180

High Gain Observer for Induction Motor in Presence of Magnetic Hysteresis , L. Dugard3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Gain Observer for Induction Motor in Presence of Magnetic Hysteresis H. Ouadi1 , F. Giri2 , L in induction motors is considered in this paper. In most previous works, motor observers have been designed using standard models, neglecting the saturation and hysteretic effects in the machine magnetic circuit

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

High energy neutrino absorption by W production in a strong magnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An influence of a strong external magnetic field on the neutrino self-energy operator is investigated. The width of the neutrino decay into the electron and W boson, and the mean free path of an ultra-high energy neutrino in a strong magnetic field are calculated. A kind of energy cutoff for neutrinos propagating in a strong field is defined.

Kuznetsov, A V; Serghienko, A V

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

High energy neutrino absorption by W production in a strong magnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An influence of a strong external magnetic field on the neutrino self-energy operator is investigated. The width of the neutrino decay into the electron and W boson, and the mean free path of an ultra-high energy neutrino in a strong magnetic field are calculated. A kind of energy cutoff for neutrinos propagating in a strong field is defined.

A. V. Kuznetsov; N. V. Mikheev; A. V. Serghienko

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

183

The spectral density of the scattering matrix of the magnetic Schrodinger operator for high energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The scattering matrix of the Schrodinger operator with smooth short-range electric and magnetic potentials is considered. The asymptotic density of the eigenvalues of this scattering matrix in the high energy regime is determined. An explicit formula for this density is given. This formula involves only the magnetic vector-potential.

Daniel Bulger; Alexander Pushnitski

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

184

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - High-temperature Superconductor...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

evidence yet that a puzzling gap in the electronic structures of some high-temperature superconductors could indicate a new phase of matter. Understanding this "pseudogap" has...

185

High Performancng David Skinner Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performancng Performancng David Skinner Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Feb 12, 2013 Science Gateways @ NERSC Today at NUG * What is a science gateway? * NEWT a web API for HPC * Examples running at NERSC now * Futures / Questions 2 Things people do on NERSC computers and data systems * Authenticate using NERSC credentials * Check machine status * Upload and download files * Submit a compute job * Monitor a job * Get user account information * Store app data (not scientific data) * Issue UNIX commands Q: Do this all in your browser? A: Yes with a science gateway! NEWT API HTTP: the language of HPC? 5 VERB RESOURCE DESCRIPTION POST /queue/R Submits P OST d ata t o q ueue o n R ; r eturns j ob i d GET /file/R/path/ Returns d irectory l is?ng f or / path/ o n R GET

186

2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - C.M. Russell High School | U.S.  

Office of Science (SC) Website

C.M. Russell High School C.M. Russell High School National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - C.M. Russell High School Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page C.M. Russell High School from Great Falls, MT. competes in the academic

187

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL The High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL Aerial of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site The High Flux Isotope Reactor site is located on the south side of the ORNL campus and is about a three-minute drive from her sister neutron facility, the Spallation Neutron Source. Operating at 85 MW, HFIR is the highest flux reactor-based source of neutrons for research in the United States, and it provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world. The thermal and cold neutrons produced by HFIR are used to study physics, chemistry, materials science, engineering, and biology. The intense neutron flux, constant power density, and constant-length fuel cycles are used by more than 500 researchers each year for neutron scattering research into

188

Critical National Need Idea: High-performance Si-based ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These materials can be costly, in part, because of the high cost of single crystalline wafers such as SiC, GaAs, InP, Ge, CdZnTe, and GaSb, that are ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

189

High Performance Anode Material - Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

charging and power release, ... be $1.13BB in 2013 ... charge to 0.1 V Si( +c)-C [3] Yes High cost HT template-impregnation

190

Application of magnetic method to assess the extent of high temperature geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The extent of thermally altered rocks in high temperature geothermal reservoirs hosted by young volcanic rocks can be assessed from magnetic surveys. Magnetic anomalies associated with many geothermal field in New Zealand and Indonesia can be interpreted in terms of thick (up to 1 km) demagnetized reservoir rocks. Demagnetization of these rocks has been confirmed by core studies and is caused by hydrothermal alteration produced from fluid/rock interactions. Models of the demagnetized Wairakei (NZ) and Kamojang (Indonesia) reservoirs are presented which include the productive areas. Magnetic surveys give fast and economical investigations of high temperature prospects if measurements are made from the air. The magnetic interpretation models can provide important constraints for reservoir models. Magnetic ground surveys can also be used to assess the extent of concealed near surface alteration which can be used in site selection of engineering structures.

Soengkono, S.; Hochstein, M.P.

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

191

E33: Influence of High Magnetic Field on Intermediate Phase Growth ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It indicates that high magnetic field of positive gradient promote the growth rate of the .... Mechanical Properties of Low-cost Beta-type Ti-Mn Alloys Fabricated by...

192

High temperature efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With the potential for significant payoffs in chemical processing, separation science, and ``green technology``, inorganic membranes merit the increased attention they are currently receiving. Application of thin film deposition and characterization expertise at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to the fabrication of membranes has led to the development of two new membranes. The first is a zeolitic film formed by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The material deposited is largely amorphous but yields an interesting microporous structure. The pores, roughly 10 to 15 A in diameter, run perpendicular to the substrate and, since the film is typically only a half micron thick, provide excellent flow rates. The PLD material has been deposited on quartz crystal microbalances (QCMS) to investigate its potential as a sensor. As such, it has shown discrimination of simple alcohol isomers. The second membrane, consisting of a composite metal structure, passes hydrogen exclusively. Currently, we are studying the possibility of incorporating the membrane in a hydrogen fuel cell using a methanol reformer.

Peachey, N.; Dye, R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Tokamaks with high-performance resistive magnets: advanced test reactors and prospects for commercial applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Scoping studies have been made of tokamak reactors with high performance resistive magnets which maximize advantages gained from high field operation and reduced shielding requirements, and minimize resistive power requirements. High field operation can provide very high values of fusion power density and n tau/sub e/ while the resistive power losses can be kept relatively small. Relatively high values of Q' = Fusion Power/Magnet Resistive Power can be obtained. The use of high field also facilitates operation in the DD-DT advanced fuel mode. The general engineering and operational features of machines with high performance magnets are discussed. Illustrative parameters are given for advanced test reactors and for possible commercial reactors. Commercial applications that are discussed are the production of fissile fuel, electricity generation with and without fissioning blankets and synthetic fuel production.

Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Williams, J.E.C.; Becker, H.; Leclaire, R.; Yang, T.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

A high-pressure nanoimaging breakthrough | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science Computing, Environment & Life Sciences Energy Engineering & Systems Analysis Photon Sciences Physical Sciences & Engineering Energy Frontier Research Centers Science Highlights Postdoctoral Researchers A high-pressure nanoimaging breakthrough July 16, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint A team of researchers made a major breakthrough in measuring the structure of nanomaterials under extremely high pressures. Bragg coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) is a promising tool to probe the internal strains of nanometer-sized crystals. But for high-pressure studies the x-ray beam must pass through a component of the diamond anvil cell, which can significantly affect the coherence properties of the beam. The researchers have developed a technique to deal with this that could lead to

195

Ultra-high speed permanent magnet axial gap alternator with multiple stators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultra-high speed, axial gap alternator that can provide an output to a plurality of loads, the alternator providing magnetic isolation such that operating conditions in one load will not affect operating conditions of another load. This improved alternator uses a rotor member disposed between a pair of stator members, with magnets disposed in each of the rotor member surfaces facing the stator members. The magnets in one surface of the rotor member, which alternate in polarity, are isolated from the magnets in the other surface of the rotor member by a disk of magnetic material disposed between the two sets of magents. In the preferred embodiment, this disk of magnetic material is laminated between two layers of non-magnetic material that support the magnets, and the magnetic material has a peripheral rim that extends to both surfaces of the rotor member to enhance the structural integrity. The stator members are substantially conventional in construction in that equally-spaced and radially-oriented slots are provided, and winding members are laid in these slots. A unit with multiple rotor members and stator members is also described.

Hawsey, Robert A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bailey, J. Milton (Knoxville, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

High-Temporal-Resolution Capabilities of the National Weather Radar Testbed Phased-Array Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2007 the advancement of the National Weather Radar Testbed Phased-Array Radar (NWRT PAR) hardware and software capabilities has been supporting the implementation of high-temporal-resolution (1 min) sampling. To achieve the increase in ...

Pamela L. Heinselman; Sebastin M. Torres

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on Good Sugars  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Nano-High, a program of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is a series of free Saturday morning talks by internationally recognized leaders in scientific research. The talks are designed...

198

Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on Bad Sugars  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Nano-High, a program of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is a series of free Saturday morning talks by internationally recognized leaders in scientific research. The talks are designed...

199

High frequency transformers and high Q factor inductors formed using epoxy-based magnetic polymer materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical component in the form of an inductor or transformer is disclosed which includes one or more coils and a magnetic polymer material located near the coils or supporting the coils to provide an electromagnetic interaction therewith. The magnetic polymer material is preferably a cured magnetic epoxy which includes a mercaptan derivative having a ferromagnetic atom chemically bonded therein. The ferromagnetic atom can be either a transition metal or rare-earth atom.

Sanchez, Robert O. (Los Lunas, NM); Gunewardena, Shelton (Walnut, CA); Masi, James V. (Cape Elizabeth, ME)

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

200

National Research Council Study on Frontiers in High-Energy-Density Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fusion Fusion Power Associates Washington, DC 19­21 November 2003 #12;E12541 High-energy-density physicsNational Research Council Study on Frontiers in High-Energy-Density Physics David D. Meyerhofer (HEDP) is a rapidly growing research area · Pressures in excess of 1 Mbar constitute high-energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

from Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC NEWS Area High School Teams Compete during DOE's National Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High School Teams Compete during DOE's National Science High School Teams Compete during DOE's National Science Bowl® Regional Championship: Lakeside and Evans High School Finish Second and Third - Dorman Wins AIKEN, S.C. - Feb. 25, 2013 - Using a format similar to the television show "Jeopardy," America's next generation of scientists and engineers put their knowledge to the test at the University of South Carolina Aiken during the DOE National Science Bowl regional compe- tition this past weekend. High School teams from across South Carolina and the greater Augusta, Ga. area relied on their collective knowledge as they participated in one of the coun- try's largest science tournaments. This regional competition, managed by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (SRNS), hosted 120 high school students from 12 high schools. It is the only educational event

202

Magnetic Ties May Explain High-Temp Superconductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... storing and distributing electric energy, superconducting digital routers for high-speed communications, and more efficient generators and motors. ...

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

203

High Entropy Alloys a New Class of Structural Materials: Magnetism ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perspectives on Phonons and Electron-Phonon Scattering in High-Temperature Superconductors Prediction and Design of Materials from Crystal Structures to...

204

High Tc SQUID Circuits Suppress Intrinsic Magnetic Field Noise  

John Clarke and colleagues at Berkeley Lab have eliminated excess low frequency noise in high-transition temperature (Tc) superconducting quantum ...

205

Developing a High-Temperature Superconducting Bulk Magnet for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In addition to these well-developed technologies, high-critical temperature superconductors that show superconductivity at liquid nitrogen are also prospective...

206

Use of High Magnetic Field to Control Microstructural Evolution in ...  

the inside of scrubbers of coal fired power plants, there is a deposit of highly oriented graphite that is currently scraped from the scrubbers and discarded as ...

207

High Spectral Resolution X-ray Observation of Magnetic CVs: EX Hya  

SciTech Connect

In magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs) the primary is a highly magnetized white dwarf (WD) whose field controls the accretion flow close to the WD, leading to a shock and accretion column that radiate chiefly in X-rays. We present preliminary results from a 500 ks Chandra HETG observation of the brightest magnetic CV EX Hya. From the observational dataset we are able to measure the temperature and density at different points of the cooling accretion column using sensitive line ratios. We also construct line-based light curves to search for rotational modulation of the X-ray emission.

Luna, G; Brickhouse, N S; Mauche, C W

2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

208

Ultra high energy cosmic rays and the large scale structure of the galactic magnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the deflection of ultra high energy cosmic ray protons in different models of the regular galactic magnetic field. Such particles have gyroradii well in excess of 1 kpc and their propagation in the galaxy reflects only the large scale structure of the galactic magnetic field. A future large experimental statistics of cosmic rays of energy above 10$^{19}$ eV could be used for a study of the large scale structure of the galactic magnetic field if such cosmic rays are indeed charged nuclei accelerated at powerful astrophysical objects and if the distribution of their sources is not fully isotropic.

Todor Stanev

1996-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

209

J9: Preparation of Oriented by High Magnetic Field BNBT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A18: Effect of Local Alendronate Delivery on In Vivo Osteogenesis From PCL ... A7: On-the-fly System Design for High Precision/Ultra Fast/Wide Area Fabrication .... C19: Dissolution Behavior of Cu Under Bump Metallization in Ball Grid Array ... High Volume and Fast Turnaround Automated Inline TEM Sample Preparation.

210

High gradient magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal via upwardly directed recirculating fluidization  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to an improved device and method for the high gradient magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal, for the purpose of removing sulfur and ash from the coal whereby the product is a dry environmentally acceptable, low-sulfur fuel. The process involves upwardly directed recirculating air fluidization of selectively sized powdered coal in a separator having sections of increasing diameters in the direction of air flow, with magnetic field and flow rates chosen for optimum separations depending upon particulate size.

Eissenberg, David M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Liu, Yin-An (Opelika, AL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

High-pressure Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capability, consisting of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor, a high-pressure loading/reaction chamber for in situ sealing and re-opening of the high-pressure MAS rotor, and a MAS probe with a localized RF coil for background signal suppression, is reported. The unusual technical challenges associated with development of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor are addressed in part by modifying standard ceramics for the rotor sleeve to include micro-groves at the internal surface at both ends of the cylinder. In this way, not only is the advantage of ceramic cylinders for withstanding very high-pressure utilized, but also plastic bushings can be glued tightly in place so that other plastic sealing mechanisms/components and O-rings can be mounted to create the desired high-pressure seal. Using this strategy, sealed internal pressures exceeding 150 bars have been achieved and sustained under ambient external pressure with minimal penetration loss of pressure for 72 hours. As an application example, in situ 13C MAS NMR studies of mineral carbonation reaction intermediates and final products of forsterite (Mg2SiO4) reacted with supercritical CO2 and H2O at 150 bar and 50?C are reported, with relevance to geological sequestration of carbon dioxide.

Hoyt, David W.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Sears, Jesse A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Z.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

High Temperature Superconducting Magnets: Revolutionizing Next Generation Accelerators and Other Applications (466th Brookhaven Lecture)  

SciTech Connect

BNL has always been a leader in the world of superconducting magnets, which are essential to the great modern ccelerators such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL, or the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Switzerland. These magnets are made of material that, cooled to 4 Kelvins (K) (-452 Farenheit) become superconducting, that is, lose essentially all resistance to electricity. For the past decade, however, Lab researchers have been exploring the use of new materials that become superconducting at higher temperatures. These materials can operate at the relatively high temperature of 77 K (-351F), allowing them to be cooled by cheap, plentiful liquid nitrogen, rather than helium, and can create very high magnetic fields. Now far in the lead of this area of research, BNL scientists are exploring avenues for high temperature superconducting magnets that are energy efficient and have magnetic fields that are a million times stronger than the Earths. If successful, these new magnets could potentially revolutionize usage in future accelerators, play a key role in energy efficiency and storage, and make possible new applications such as muon colliders and MRI screening in remote areas.

Gupta, Ramesh (BNL Superconducting Magnet Division)

2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

213

State College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE's National  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE's College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE's National Science Bowl® State College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE's National Science Bowl® May 1, 2006 - 10:34am Addthis WASHINGTON , DC - State College Area High School from State College, Pennsylvania, today won the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Science Bowl®. Teams representing 65 schools from across the United States competed in this "Science Jeopardy" competition, which concluded this afternoon. Members of the winning team include Jason Ma, Ylaine Gerardin, Barry Liu, Galen Lynch, Francois Greer and coach, Julie Gittings. This team won a research trip to France and $1,000 for their school's science department. The answer that clinched the championship was in response to an earth

214

Very high resolution etching of magnetic nanostructures in organic gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two methods for high resolution dry etching of permalloy (NiFe) and iron (Fe) nanostructures are presented and discussed. The first involves the use of carbon monoxide (CO) and ammonia (NH"3) as etching gases, the second uses methane (CH"4), hydrogen ... Keywords: CH4/H2/O2, CO/NH3, Dry etching, Fe, NiFe

X. Kong; D. Krsa; H. P. Zhou; W. Williams; S. McVitie; J. M. R. Weaver; C. D. W. Wilkinson

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Options for Shielding Tokamak Cooling Water Electrical Components against High Magnetic Fields  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) Instrumentation and Control (I&C) components of ITER will be located in areas of relatively high magnetic fields. Previous tests on electrical and I&C components have indicated that shielding will be required to protect these components from such magnetic fields. To accomplish this, studies were performed by AREVA Federal Services (AFS) in support of the TCWS Design project with the intent of identifying an optimal solution for shielding I&C components. This report presents a summary of these studies and presents design options for providing magnetic shielding to ITER TCWS I&C components and electrical equipment that are susceptible to the magnetic fields present.

Korsah, Kofi [ORNL; Michael, Smith [AREVA Federal Services LLC; Kim, Seokho H [ORNL; Charles, Neumeyer [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Los Alamos National Laboratory ships last of high-activity drums to WIPP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ships last ff high-activity drums to WIPP ships last ff high-activity drums to WIPP Los Alamos National Laboratory ships last of high-activity drums to WIPP The November shipment was the final delivery this year to the Carlsbad plant, which is scheduled to undergo facility maintenance through mid-January. November 25, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

217

High-Temperature Superconducting Magnets for NMR and MRI: R&D Activities at the MIT Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the NMR/MRI magnets that are currently being developed at the MIT Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory: 1) a 1.3 GHz NMR magnet; 2) a compact NMR magnet assembled from YBCO annuli; and 3) a persistent-mode, ...

Iwasa, Yukikazu

218

Analysis and Design of a High Power Density Axial Flux Permanent Magnet Linear Synchronous Machine Used for Stirling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

a high power density axial flux permanent magnet linear synchronous machine and the stirling system will be introduced. This machine is a tubular axial flux permanent magnet machine. It comprises two parts: stator and mover. With the 2D finite-element ... Keywords: permanent magnet, stirling engine, linear motor

Ping Zheng; Xuhui Gan; Lin Li

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Los Alamos National Laboratory's high-performance data system  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory is designing a High-Performance Data System (HPDS) that will provide storage for supercomputers requiring large files and fast transfer speeds. The HPDS will meet the performance requirements by managing data transfers from high-speed storage systems connected directly to a high-speed network. File and storage management software will be distributed in workstations. Network protocols will ensure reliable, wide-area network data delivery to support long-distance distributed processing. 3 refs., 2 figs.

Mercier, C.; Chorn, G.; Christman, R.; Collins, B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating Efficiency Enhancemen and Current Drive at Longer Wavelength on the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

SciTech Connect

High harmonic fast wave heating and current drive (CD) are being developed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1435 (2001)] for supporting startup and sustainment of the ST plasma. Considerable enhancement of the core heating efficiency (?) from 44% to 65% has been obtained for CD phasing of the antenna (strap-to-strap ? = -90o, k? = -8 m-1) by increasing the magnetic field from 4.5 kG to 5.5 kG. This increase in efficiency is strongly correlated to moving the location of the onset density for perpendicular fast wave propagation (nonset ? ?? k|| 2/w) away from the antenna face and wall, and hence reducing the propagating surface wave fields. RF waves propagating close to the wall at lower B? and k|| can enhance power losses from both the parametric decay instability (PDI) and wave dissipation in sheaths and structures around the machine. The improved efficiency found here is attributed to a reduction in the latter, as PDI losses are little changed at the higher magnetic field. Under these conditions of higher coupling efficiency, initial measurements of localized CD effects have been made and compared with advanced RF code simulations

J. Hosea, R. E. Bell, B.P. LeBlanc, C.K. Phillips, G. Taylor, E. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, E.F. Jaeger, P.M. Ryan, J. Wilgen, H. Yuh, F. Levinton, S. Sabbagh, K. Tritz, J. Parker, P.T. Bonoli, R. Harvey, and the NSTX Team

2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating Efficiency Enhancement and Current Drive at Longer Wavelength on the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High harmonic fast wave heating and current drive CD are being developed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1435 2001 for supporting startup and sustainment of the spherical torus plasma. Considerable enhancement of the core heating efficiency from 44% to 65% has been obtained for CD phasing of the antenna strap-to-strap = 90 , k= 8 m 1 by increasing the magnetic field from 4.5 to 5.5 kG. This increase in efficiency is strongly correlated to moving the location of the onset density for perpendicular fast wave propagation nonsetBk 2 / away from the antenna face and wall, and hence reducing the propagating surface wave fields. Radio frequency RF waves propagating close to the wall at lower B and k can enhance power losses from both the parametric decay instability PDI and wave dissipation in sheaths and structures around the machine. The improved efficiency found here is attributed to a reduction in the latter, as PDI losses are little changed at the higher magnetic field. Under these conditions of higher coupling efficiency, initial measurements of localized CD effects have been made and compared with advanced RF code simulations.

Hosea, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Bell, R. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); LeBlanc, B [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Phillips, Cynthia [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Taylor, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Valeo, Dr Ernest [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Wilson, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Jaeger, Erwin Frederick [ORNL; Ryan, Philip Michael [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics; Levinton, F. [Fusion Physics and Technology; Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia University; Tritz, K. [Johns Hopkins University; Parker, J. [Cornell University; Bonoli, P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Harvey, R. W. [CompX, Del Mar, CA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

MAGNETIC METHOD FOR PRODUCING HIGH VELOCITY SHOCK WAVES IN GASES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for producing high-energy plasmas comprising a tapered shock tube of dielectric material and having a closed small end, an exceedingly low-inductance coll supported about and axially aligned with the small end of the tapered tube. an elongated multiturn coil supported upon the remninder of the exterior wall of the shock tube. a potential source and switch connected in series with the low-inductance coil, a potential source and switch connected in series with the elongated coil, means for hermetically sealing the large end of the tube, means for purging the tube of gases, and means for admitting a selected gas into the shock tube.

Josephson, V.

1960-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

223

A Permanent-Magnet Microwave Ion Source for a Compact High-Yield Neutron Generator  

SciTech Connect

We present recent work on the development of a microwave ion source that will be used in a high-yield compact neutron generator for active interrogation applications. The sealed tube generator will be capable of producing high neutron yields, 5x1011 n/s for D-T and ~;;1x1010 n/s for D-D reactions, while remaining transportable. We constructed a microwave ion source (2.45 GHz) with permanent magnets to provide the magnetic field strength of 87.5 mT necessary for satisfying the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) condition. Microwave ion sources can produce high extracted beam currents at the low gas pressures required for sealed tube operation and at lower power levels than previously used RF-driven ion sources. A 100 mA deuterium/tritium beam will be extracted through a large slit (60x6 mm2) to spread the beam power over a larger target area. This paper describes the design of the permanent-magnet microwave ion source and discusses the impact of the magnetic field design on the source performance. The required equivalent proton beam current density of 40 mA/cm2 was extracted at a moderate microwave power of 400 W with an optimized magnetic field.

Waldmann, Ole; Ludewigt, Bernhard

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

224

LHC Magnet Program | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnet Program Magnet Program The Superconducting Magnet Division is building a number of dipole magnets for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is now under construction at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. Scheduled to begin operation in 2007, this machine will collide beams of protons with the unprecedented energy of 7 TeV per beam to explore the nature of matter at its most basic level (RHIC can collide beams of protons with energies of 0.25 TeV, but is mostly used to collide heavy ions with energies of 0.1 TeV per nucleon). The magnets are being built as part of the US program, recommended by the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) and approved by Congress, to contribute to the construction and, later, use of that frontier machine by the US high energy physics community. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) and

225

High-Yield Solvothermal Formation of Magnetic CoPt Alloy Nanowires  

SciTech Connect

One-dimensional (1D) magnetic nanomaterials have attracted much attention recently because of their applications in magnetic recording and spintronics. Nevertheless, it remains a challenge to prepare free-standing magnetic nanowires in high yield. This Communication reports the successful high-yield synthesis of an interesting 1D ferromagnetic CoPt alloy by direct decomposition of platinum acetylacetonate and cobalt carbonyl compound in ethylenediamine solvent through a solvothermal reaction. The CoPt alloy nanowires obtained have a tunable diameter of 10-50 nm and a length along the longitudinal axis of up to several microns, depending on crystallization temperature and reaction time. A unique formation mechanism involving coarsening and ripening under solvothermal conditions was discovered. This research opens new opportunities in synthesizing nanomaterials through low-temperature solvothermal processes.

Zhang, Zongtao [ORNL; Blom, Douglas Allen [ORNL; Gai, Zheng [ORNL; Thompson, James R [ORNL; Shen, Jian [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A High-Order Finite-Volume Algorithm for Fokker-Planck Collisions in Magnetized Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

A high-order finite volume algorithm is developed for the Fokker-Planck Operator (FPO) describing Coulomb collisions in strongly magnetized plasmas. The algorithm is based on a general fourth-order reconstruction scheme for an unstructured grid in the velocity space spanned by parallel velocity and magnetic moment. The method provides density conservation and high-order-accurate evaluation of the FPO independent of the choice of the velocity coordinates. As an example, a linearized FPO in constant-of-motion coordinates, i.e. the total energy and the magnetic moment, is developed using the present algorithm combined with a cut-cell merging procedure. Numerical tests include the Spitzer thermalization problem and the return to isotropy for distributions initialized with velocity space loss cones. Utilization of the method for a nonlinear FPO is straightforward but requires evaluation of the Rosenbluth potentials.

Xiong, Z; Cohen, R H; Rognlien, T D; Xu, X Q

2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

227

The magnetic field along the jets of NGC 4258 as deduced from high frequency radio observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present 2.4" resolution, high sensitivity radio continuum observations of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 4258 in total intensity and linear polarization obtained with the Very Large Array at 3.6 cm (8.44 GHz). The radio emission along the northern jet and the center of the galaxy is polarized and allows investigation of the magnetic field. Assuming energy-equipartition between the magnetic field and the relativistic particles and distinguishing between (1) a relativistic electron-proton jet and (2) a relativistic electron-positron jet, we obtain average magnetic field strengths of about (1) 310\\muG and (2) 90\\muG. The rotation measure is determined to range from -400 to -800 rad/m^2 in the northern jet. Correcting the observed E-vectors of polarized intensity for Faraday rotation, the magnetic field along the jet turns out to be orientated mainly along the jet axis. An observed tilt with respect to the jet axis may indicate also a toroidal magnetic field component or a slightly helical magnetic field around the northern jet.

M. Krause; A. L"ohr

2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

228

magnets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I I Painless Physics Articles BEAM COOLING August 2, 1996 By Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affairs ACCELERATION August 16, 1996 By Dave Finley, Accelerator Division Head RF August 30, 1996 By Pat Colestock, Accelerator Division FIXED TARGET PHYSICS September 20, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section FIXED TARGET PHYSICS PART DEUX October 16, 1996 By Peter H. Garbincius, Physics Section and Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris CROSS SECTION November 1, 1996 By Doreen Wackeroth, Theoretical Physics Edited by Leila Belkora, Office of Public Affaris MAGNETS PART I November 15, 1996 By Hank Glass, Technical Support Section Edited by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs MAGNETS PART II January 10, 1997 By Hank Glass, Technical Support Section Edited by Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs

229

Ultra high energy photon showers in magnetic field:angular distribution of produced particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultra high energy (UHE) photons can initiate electromagnetic showers in magnetic field. We analyze the two processes that determine the development of the shower, $e^+ e^-$ pair creation and synchrotron radiation, and derive formulae for the angular distribution of the produced particles. These formulae are necessary to study the three-dimensional development of the shower.

Massimo Coraddu; Marcello Lissia; Giuseppe Mezzorani

2002-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

230

Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor fueling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three separate papers are included which report research progress during this period: (1) A new railgun configuration with perforated sidewalls, (2) development of a fuseless small-bore railgun for injection of high-speed hydrogen pellets into magnetically confined plasmas, and (3) controls and diagnostics on a fuseless railgun for solid hydrogen pellet injection.

Kim, K.; Zhang, J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Magnetic lens apparatus for a low-voltage high-resolution electron microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lens apparatus in which a beam of charged particles of low accelerating voltage is brought to a focus by a magnetic field, the lens being situated behind the target position. The lens comprises an electrically-conducting coil arranged around the axis of the beam and a magnetic pole piece extending along the axis of the beam at least within the space surrounded by the coil. The lens apparatus comprises the sole focusing lens for high-resolution imaging in a low-voltage scanning electron microscope.

Crewe, Albert V. (Palos Park, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Magnetic lens apparatus for use in high-resolution scanning electron microscopes and lithographic processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are lens apparatus in which a beam of charged particlesis brought to a focus by means of a magnetic field, the lens being situated behind the target position. In illustrative embodiments, a lens apparatus is employed in a scanning electron microscopeas the sole lens for high-resolution focusing of an electron beam, and in particular, an electron beam having an accelerating voltage of from about 10 to about 30,000 V. In one embodiment, the lens apparatus comprises an electrically-conducting coil arranged around the axis of the beam and a magnetic pole piece extending along the axis of the beam at least within the space surrounded by the coil. In other embodiments, the lens apparatus comprises a magnetic dipole or virtual magnetic monopole fabricated from a variety of materials, including permanent magnets, superconducting coils, and magnetizable spheres and needles contained within an energy-conducting coil. Multiple-array lens apparatus are also disclosed for simultaneous and/or consecutive imaging of multiple images on single or multiple specimens. The invention further provides apparatus, methods, and devices useful in focusing charged particle beams for lithographic processes.

Crewe, Albert V. (Dune Acres, IN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Simulation of High-Harmonic Fast-Wave Heating on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Images associated with radio-frequency heating of low-confinement mode plasmas in the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment, as calculated by computer simulation, are presented. The AORSA code has been extended to simulate the whole antenna-to-plasma heating system by including both the kinetic physics of the well-confined core plasma and a poorly confined scrape-off plasma and vacuum vessel structure. The images presented show the 3-D electric wave field amplitude for various antenna phasings. Visualization of the simulation results in 3-D makes clear that -30 degrees phasing excites kilo-volt per meter coaxial standing modes in the scrape-off plasma and shows magnetic-field-aligned whispering-gallery type modes localized to the plasma edge.

Green, David L [ORNL; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick [ORNL; Chen, Guangye [ORNL; Berry, Lee A [ORNL; Pugmire, Dave [ORNL; Canik, John [ORNL; Ryan, Philip Michael [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-03-0 FINAL REPORT- INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

HIGH-POWER PRECISION CURRENT SUPPLY IST2-1000M FOR ELEMENTS OF MAGNETIC SYSTEMS OF ACCELERATORS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BF), a detached supply transformer and power switch. Power box PB comprises the following: - a threeHIGH-POWER PRECISION CURRENT SUPPLY IST2-1000M FOR ELEMENTS OF MAGNETIC SYSTEMS OF ACCELERATORS. These supplies are intended to power magnetic systems of accelerators, requiring high stability and low ripples

Kozak, Victor R.

236

Experimental setup for laser spectroscopy of molecules in a high magnetic field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental setup to measure the effects of a high magnetic field on the structure and decay dynamics of molecules is designed and constructed. A vacuum chamber is mounted in the bore of a superconducting magnet. A molecular beam passes in the chamber. Pulsed laser light excites the molecules in the field. The parent or fragment ions are extracted by an electric field parallel to the magnetic field. They are detected by a microchannel plate. Their mass and charge are determined by the time-of-flight method. The performance of the setup was examined using resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization through the X 2 ? A 2 ? + transition of nitric oxide (NO) molecules. The ions were detected with sufficient mass resolution to discriminate the species in a field of up to 10 T. This is the first experiment to succeed in the mass-selective detection of ions by the time-of-flight method in a high magnetic field. By measuring NO + ion current as a function of the laser frequency

Yasuyuki Kimura and Ken Takazawa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

National cyber defense high performance computing and analysis : concepts, planning and roadmap.  

SciTech Connect

There is a national cyber dilemma that threatens the very fabric of government, commercial and private use operations worldwide. Much is written about 'what' the problem is, and though the basis for this paper is an assessment of the problem space, we target the 'how' solution space of the wide-area national information infrastructure through the advancement of science, technology, evaluation and analysis with actionable results intended to produce a more secure national information infrastructure and a comprehensive national cyber defense capability. This cybersecurity High Performance Computing (HPC) analysis concepts, planning and roadmap activity was conducted as an assessment of cybersecurity analysis as a fertile area of research and investment for high value cybersecurity wide-area solutions. This report and a related SAND2010-4765 Assessment of Current Cybersecurity Practices in the Public Domain: Cyber Indications and Warnings Domain report are intended to provoke discussion throughout a broad audience about developing a cohesive HPC centric solution to wide-area cybersecurity problems.

Hamlet, Jason R.; Keliiaa, Curtis M.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Strongest non-destructive magnetic field: world record set at 100-tesla  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strongest non-destructive magnetic field: world record set at Strongest non-destructive magnetic field: world record set at 100-tesla level Strongest non-destructive magnetic field: world record set at 100-tesla level National High Magnetic Field Laboratory magnet achieved a whopping 100.75 tesla-the 100-tesla level is roughly equivalent to 2 million times Earth's magnetic field. March 22, 2012 World record set at National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Los Alamos In 2011, researchers at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory set a new world record for the strongest nondestructive magnet field: 97.4 tesla. The feat positioned them to in March 2012 deliver a magnet capable of achieving the elusive 100-tesla goal, profoundly affecting a range of scientific investigations. Get Expertise Director, Pulsed Field Facility

239

Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

240

Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Implementation Verification Review Processes May 2011 January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Highlighting High Performance: National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Visitors Center, Golden, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory Visitors Center, also known as the Dan Schaefer Federal Building, is a high-performance building located in Golden, Colorado. The 6,400-square-foot building incorporates passive solar heating, energy-efficient lighting, an evaporative cooling system, and other technologies to minimize energy costs and environmental impact. The Visitors Center displays a variety of interactive exhibits on energy efficiency and renewable energy, and the building includes an auditorium, a public reading room, and office space.

Burgert, S.

2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

242

A HIGH-RESOLUTION HIGH-LUMINOSITY BETA-RAY SPECTROMETER DESIGN EMPLOYING AZIMUTHALLY VARYING MAGNETIC FIELDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BETA-RAY SPECTROMETER DESIGN EMPLOYING AZIMUTHALLY VARYING MAGNETIC FIELDSBETA-RAY SPECTROMETER DESIGN EMPLOYING AZIMUTHALLY VARYING MAGNETIC FIELDSfield of the present type. UCRL-16802 Introduction In attempting to find an efficient magnetic beta-

Bergkvist, Karl-Erik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Argonne National Laboratory, High Energy Physics Division, semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1989--December 31, 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses research being conducted at the Argonne National Laboratory in the following areas: Experimental High Energy Physics; Theoretical High Energy Physics; Experimental Facilities Research; Accelerator Research and Development; and SSC Detector Research and Development.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

High magnetic field MHD generator program. Annual report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in a theoretical and experimental program designed to investigate MHD channel phenomena which are important at high magnetic fields is described. The areas of research include nonuniformity effects, boundary layers, Hall field breakdown, the effects on electrode configuration and current concentrations, and studies of steady-state combustion disk and linear channels in an existing 6 Tesla magnet of small dimensions. In the study of the effects of nonuniformities and instabilities, theoretical models have been developed and tested against available data. Experimental facilities, including new diagnostics, have been prepared for forthcoming experiments. Boundary layer measurements and calculations of velocity, temperature, and electron density have been systematically assessed; by accounting for the effect of free-stream turbulence, good agreement is obtained between measurement and theory. An improved laser doppler anemometer has been developed for turbulence damping and velocity profile measurements. Experiments with several insulator designs have shown that conductively cooled insulators can substantially inhibit insulator-induced Hall field breakdown. An improved theoretical model has yielded good agreement with the results of breakdown experiments. Three-dimensional calculations of the effects of electrode configuration on current concentrations have been performed. Reduced current concentrations were found for electrodes with surfaces to the magnetic field. Experiments were conducted at magnetic fields over 5 Tesla for both disk and linear MHD channels.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Magnetic reconnection in high-energy-density laser-produced plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Recently, novel experiments on magnetic reconnection have been conducted in laser-produced plasmas in a high-energy-density regime. Individual plasma bubbles self-generate toroidal, mega-gauss-scale magnetic fields through the Biermann battery effect. When multiple bubbles are created at small separation, they expand into one another, driving reconnection of this field. Reconnection in the experiments was reported to be much faster than allowed by both Sweet-Parker, and even Hall-MHD theories, when normalized to the nominal magnetic fields self-generated by single bubbles. Through particle-in-cell simulations (both with and without a binary collision operator), we model the bubble interaction at parameters and geometry relevant to the experiments. This paper discusses in detail the reconnection regime of the laser-driven experiments and reports the qualitative features of simulations. We find substantial flux-pileup effects, which boost the relevant magnetic field for reconnection in the current sheet. When this is accounted for, the normalized reconnection rates are much more in line with standard two-fluid theory of reconnection. At the largest system sizes, we additionally find that the current sheet is prone to breakup into plasmoids.

Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K. [Center for Integrated Computation and Analysis of Reconnection and Turbulence, and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Discrete variable representation for highly excited states of hydrogen atoms in magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

A discrete variable representation (DVR) appropriate for describing the highly excited states of hydrogen atoms in laboratory-strength magnetic fields is constructed by using a symmetry-adapted direct product of one-dimensional DVR{close_quote}s in parabolic coordinates related to generalized Gauss-Laguerre quadratures. The resulting sparse Hamiltonian matrix is used in an iterative (filter-diagonalization) procedure to obtain eigenvalues and eigenvectors in a given spectral domain. The method is applied to calculate eigenvalues and lifetimes of {open_quotes}circular{close_quotes} Rydberg states, as well as oscillator strengths for the excitation of highly excited states. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Grozdanov, T.P.; Andric, L.; Manescu, C.; McCarroll, R. [Laboratoire de Dynamique des Ions, Atomes et Molecules (URA 774 du CNRS), Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu T12-B75, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Grozdanov, T.P. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory 15kW High Temperature Electrolysis Test Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 15kW high temperature electrolysis test facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This facility is intended to study the technology readiness of using high temperature solid oxide cells for large scale nuclear powered hydrogen production. It is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high temperature gas handling, heat recuperation), multiple-stack hot zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, etc. Heat recuperation and hydrogen recycle are incorporated into the design. The facility was operated for 1080 hours and successfully demonstrated the largest scale high temperature solid-oxide-based production of hydrogen to date.

Carl M. Stoots; Keith G. Condie; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Chandra Observations of the High-Magnetic-Field Radio Pulsar J1718-3718  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-magnetic field pulsars represent an important class of objects for studying the relationship between magnetars and radio pulsars. Here we report on four Chandra observations of the high-magnetic-field pulsar J1718-3718 ($B=7.4\\times10^{13}$ G) taken in 2009 as well as on a re-analysis of 2002 Chandra observations of the region. We detect pulsations at the pulsar's period in the 2009 data, with pulsed fraction 52%$\\pm$13% in the 0.8--2.0 keV band. We found that the X-ray pulse is aligned with the radio pulse. The data from 2002 and 2009 show consistent spectra and fluxes; a merged overall spectrum is well fit by a blackbody of temperature $186^{+19}_{-18}$\\,eV, slightly higher than predicted by standard cooling models and suggestive of heating via magnetic field decay. However, the best-fit neutron star atmosphere model is consistent with standard cooling. We also report an improved radio position for this pulsar.

Zhu, W W; McLaughlin, M A; Pavlov, G G; Ng, C -Y; Manchester, R N; Gaensler, B M; Woods, P M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Center for Integrating Research & LearningCenter for Integrating Research & Learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. How did various sub-populations of students perform? Consider factors such as gender, race, socio of properties and changes of properties in matter. · Transfer of energy Content Standard E: Science-12, all students should develop an understanding of motions and forces. · Conservation of energy

Weston, Ken

250

NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY REPORTSVOLUME 12 N0. 5 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as distributed generation and microgrids. This includes helping power companies determine how new technologies

Weston, Ken

251

NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY REPORTSVOLUME 11 N0.1 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processing methods such as molding, forging, casting, welding, hydroforming, composite layup, and other

Weston, Ken

252

Status and Highlights of Educational Programming Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Research in Science Education Journal. (DOI) 10.1007/s11165-011-9231-8.; Hughes, R. (2010). Keeping women changes in students' and teachers' perception of scientists and attitudes toward science Hughes, R., Dixon-011-9231-8.; Hughes, R. (2010). Keeping women in STEM fields. International Journal of Gender, Science and Technology

Weston, Ken

253

High temperature magnetic ordering in the 4d perovskite SrTcO3  

SciTech Connect

We present evidence for possibly the highest magnetic ordering temperature in any compound without 3d transition elements. Neutron powder diffraction measurements, at both time-of-flight and constant wavelength sources, were performed on two independently prepared SrTcO{sub 3} powders. SrTcO{sub 3} adopts a distorted perovskite structure with G-type antiferromagnetic ordering and has a moment of 1.87(4){mu}{sub B} per Tc cation at room temperature with an extraordinarily high Neel point close to 750 C. Electronic structure calculations reveal extensive mixing between the technetium 4d states and oxygen states proximal to the Fermi level. This hybridization leads to a close relationship between magnetic ordering temperature and moment formation in SrTcO{sub 3}.

Rodriguez, Efrain E. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD; Poineau, Frederic [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Llobet, Anna [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kennedy, Brendan J. [University of Technology Sydney; Avdeev, Maxim [Bragg Institute, ANSTO; Thorogood, Gordon J. [Bragg Institute, ANSTO; Carter, Melody L. [ANSTO; Seshadri, Ram [University of California, Santa Barbara; Singh, David J [ORNL; Cheetham, Anthony K. [University of Cambridge

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Recent Developments in Rare Earth Lean/Free High Energy Magnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fe-rich FeSiBPCu Nano-crystalline Soft Magnetic Alloys Contributable To Energy -saving Fe and Mn Based Materials for Magnetic Refrigeration First-order...

255

High-magnetic-field MHD-generator program. Quarterly report, January 1, 1981-March 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in an experimental and theoretical program designed to investigate MHD channel phenomena which are important at high magnetic fields is reported. The areas of research include nonuniformity effects, boundary layers, Hall field breakdown, the effects of electrode configuration and current concentrations, and studies of steady-state combustion disk and linear channels in an existing 6 Tesla magnet of small dimensions. In the study of the effects of nonuniformities, experiments have been performed to test a multi-channel, fiber optics diagnostic system that yields time-resolved temperature profiles in an MHD channel. For the study of magneto-acoustic fluctuation phenomena, a one-dimensional model has been developed to describe the performance of a non-ideal MHD generator with a generalized electrical configuration. The installation of the hardware for the data acquisition and reduction of the laser Doppler velocimeter data, to be used in the study of turbulence suppression in a magnetic field, has been nearly completed. A two-dimensional MHD computer code has been developed which predicts the dependence on electrode and insulator dimensions of the onset of interelectrode Hall field breakdown. Calculations have been performed of the effects of nonuniformities on the flow and electrical behavior of baseload-sized disk generators.

None

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

High-magnetic-field MHD-generator program. Quarterly report, April 1, 1981-June 30, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in an experimental and theoretical program designed to investigate MHD channel phenomena which are important at high magnetic fields is described. The areas of research include nonuniformity effects, boundary layers, Hall field breakdown, the effects of electrode configuration and current concentrations, and studies of steady-state combustion disk and linear channels in an existing 6 Tesla magnet of small dimensions. In the study of the effects of nonuniformities, experiments have been performed to test a multi-channel, fiber optics diagnostic system that yields time-resolved temperature profiles in an MHD channel. For the study of magneto-acoustic fluctuation phenomena, a one-dimensional model has been developed to describe the performance of a non-ideal MHD generator with a generalized electrical configuration. The installation of the hardware for the data acquisition and reduction of the laser Doppler velocimeter data, to be used in the study of turbulence suppression in a magnetic field, has been nearly completed and preliminary software has been written. A two-dimensional MHD computer code has been developed which predicts the dependence on electrode and insulator dimensions of the onset of interelectrode Hall field breakdown, as initiated either by breakdown in the insulator or in the plasma. There is good agreement between calculation and measurements. Calculations have been performed of the effects of nonuniformities on the flow and electrical behavior of baseload-sized disk generators. Also, predictions of the performance of baseload inflow disk generators have been calculated and compared with linear generators.

Kruger, C.H.; Eustis, R.H.; Mitchner, M.; Self, S.A.; Koester, J.K.; Nakamura, T.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Measurement of a Magnetic Field in a Leading Arm High Velocity Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a recent catalogue of extragalactic Faraday rotation derived from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey we have found an agreement between Faraday rotation structure and the HI emission structure of a High Velocity Cloud (HVC) associated with the Leading Arm of the Magellanic System. We suggest that this morphological agreement is indicative of Faraday rotation through the HVC. Under this assumption we have used 48 rotation measures through the HVC, together with estimates of the electron column density from H-\\alpha\\ measurements and QSO absorption lines to estimate a strength for the line-of-sight component of the coherent magnetic field in the HVC of > 6 {\\rm \\mu G}$. A coherent magnetic field of this strength is more than sufficient to dynamically stabilize the cloud against ram pressure stripping by the Milky Way halo and may also provide thermal insulation for the cold cloud. We estimate an upper limit to the ratio of random to coherent magnetic field of $B_{r}/B_{||} < 0.8$, which suggests that the random ...

McClure-Griffiths, N M; Gaensler, B M; McConnell, D; Schnitzeler, D H F M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Magnetic Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Since the discovery of high-temperature superconductors in 1986 (Ref 10), the demonstration of magnetic flux exclusion

259

CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF THE HIGH-MAGNETIC-FIELD RADIO PULSAR J1718-3718  

SciTech Connect

High-magnetic-field pulsars represent an important class of objects for studying the relationship between magnetars and radio pulsars. Here we report on four Chandra observations of the high-magnetic-field pulsar J1718-3718 (B = 7.4 x 10{sup 13} G) taken in 2009 as well as a reanalysis of 2002 Chandra observations of the region. We also report an improved radio position for this pulsar based on ATCA observations. We detect X-ray pulsations at the pulsar's period in the 2009 data, with a pulsed fraction of 52% {+-} 13% in the 0.8-2.0 keV band. We find that the X-ray pulse is aligned with the radio pulse. The data from 2002 and 2009 show consistent spectra and fluxes: a merged overall spectrum is well fit by a blackbody of temperature 186{sup +19}{sub -18} eV, slightly higher than predicted by standard cooling models; however, the best-fit neutron star atmosphere model is consistent with standard cooling. We find the bolometric luminosity L{sup {infinity}}{sub bb} = 4{sup +5}{sub -2} x 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1} {approx}0.3 E-dot for a distance of 4.5 kpc. We compile measurements of the temperatures of all X-ray-detected high-B pulsars as well as those of low-B radio pulsars and find evidence for the former being hotter on average than the latter.

Zhu, W. W.; Kaspi, V. M.; Ng, C.-Y. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC, H3A 2T8 (Canada); McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Pavlov, G. G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, PA 16802 (United States); Manchester, R. N. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Gaensler, B. M. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A29, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Woods, P. M., E-mail: zhuww@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: vkaspi@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: ncy@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: pavlov@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: dick.manchester@csiro.au [Corvid Technologies, Huntsville, AL 35806 (United States)

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

260

High performance electrical, magnetic, electromagnetic and electrooptical devices enabled by three dimensionally ordered nanodots and nanorods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel articles and methods to fabricate same with self-assembled nanodots and/or nanorods of a single or multicomponent material within another single or multicomponent material for use in electrical, electronic, magnetic, electromagnetic and electrooptical devices is disclosed. Self-assembled nanodots and/or nanorods are ordered arrays wherein ordering occurs due to strain minimization during growth of the materials. A simple method to accomplish this when depositing in-situ films is also disclosed. Device applications of resulting materials are in areas of superconductivity, photovoltaics, ferroelectrics, magnetoresistance, high density storage, solid state lighting, non-volatile memory, photoluminescence, thermoelectrics and in quantum dot lasers.

Goyal, Amit (Knoxville, TN), Kang; Sukill (Knoxville, TN)

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Quantum dots in high magnetic fields: Rotating-Wigner-molecule versus composite-fermion approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exact diagonalization results are reported for the lowest rotational band of N=6 electrons in strong magnetic fields in the range of high angular momenta 70 = nu >= 1/9). A detailed comparison of energetic, spectral, and transport properties (specifically, magic angular momenta, radial electron densities, occupation number distributions, overlaps and total energies, and exponents of current-voltage power law) shows that the recently discovered rotating-electron-molecule wave functions [Phys. Rev. B 66, 115315 (2002)] provide a superior description compared to the composite-fermion/Jastrow-Laughlin ones.

Constantine Yannouleas; Uzi Landman

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

262

MAINTAINING HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY CAPABILITIES FOR NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has a specialized need for analyzing low mass gas species at very high resolutions. The currently preferred analytical method is electromagnetic sector mass spectrometry. This method allows the NNSA Nuclear Security Enterprise (NSE) to resolve species of similar masses down to acceptable minimum detection limits (MDLs). Some examples of these similar masses are helium-4/deuterium and carbon monoxide/nitrogen. Through the 1980s and 1990s, there were two vendors who supplied and supported these instruments. However, with declining procurements and down turns in the economy, the supply of instruments, service and spare parts from these vendors has become less available, and in some cases, nonexistent. The largest NSE user of this capability is the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. The Research and Development Engineering (R&DE) Group in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) investigated the areas of instrument support that were needed to extend the life cycle of these aging instruments. Their conclusions, as to the focus areas of electromagnetic sector mass spectrometers to address, in order of priority, were electronics, software and hardware. Over the past 3-5 years, the R&DE Group has designed state of the art electronics and software that will allow high resolution legacy mass spectrometers, critical to the NNSA mission, to be operated for the foreseeable future. The funding support for this effort has been from several sources, including the SRS Defense Programs, NNSA Readiness Campaign, Pantex Plant and Sandia National Laboratory. To date, electronics systems have been upgraded on one development system at SRNL, two production systems at Pantex and one production system at Sandia National Laboratory. An NSE working group meets periodically to review strategies going forward. The R&DE Group has also applied their work to the electronics for a Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TIMS) instrument, which applies a similar mass spectrometric technology for resolving high mass isotopes, such as plutonium and uranium. Due to non-compete clauses for DOE, all work has been performed and applied to instruments which are obsolete and are no longer supported by the original vendor.

Wyrick, S.; Cordaro, J.; Reeves, G.; Mcintosh, J.; Mauldin, C.; Tietze, K.; Varble, D.

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

263

AFRD - Superconducting Magnets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superconducting Magnets Superconducting Magnets Home Organization Diversity Safety Links Gallery/History Updated July 2008 Ever-stronger magnets (which must be cost-effective as well) are a key to building tomorrow's high-energy accelerators and upgrading today's. Our role— not only a leading R&D group but also the administrators of the multi-institutional National Conductor Development Program— to create both evolutionary improvements and paradigm shifts in the application of accelerator magnets, providing innovative technology that enables new science. Improvements in conductor, innovative structures to solve the challenges of high fields and brittle superconductors, and integration of computerized design and analysis tools are key. The performance requirements of modern accelerators continue to press the

264

High Temperature Solid-Oxide Electrolyzer 2500 Hour Test Results At The Idaho National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing the concept of using solid oxide fuel cells as electrolyzers for large-scale, high-temperature (efficient), hydrogen production. This program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. Utilizing a fuel cell as an electrolyzer introduces some inherent differences in cell operating conditions. In particular, the performance of fuel cells operated as electrolyzers degrades with time faster. This issue of electrolyzer cell and stack performance degradation over time has been identified as a major barrier to technology development. Consequently, the INL has been working together with Ceramatec, Inc. (Salt Lake City, Utah) to improve the long-term performance of high temperature electrolyzers. As part of this research partnership, the INL conducted a 2500 hour test of a Ceramatec designed and produced stack operated in the electrolysis mode. This paper will provide a summary of experimental results to date for this ongoing test.

Carl Stoots; James O'Brien; Stephen Herring; Keith Condie; Lisa Moore-McAteer; Joseph J. Hartvigsen; Dennis Larsen

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

THE HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS PROGRAM AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY: OBSERVATIONS ON PERFORMANCE DEGRADATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the high-temperature electrolysis research and development program at the Idaho National Laboratory, with selected observations of electrolysis cell degradation at the single-cell, small stack and large facility scales. The objective of the INL program is to address the technical and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for hydrogen production from steam. In the envisioned application, high-temperature electrolysis would be coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor for efficient large-scale non-fossil non-greenhouse-gas hydrogen production. The program supports a broad range of activities including small bench-scale experiments, larger scale technology demonstrations, detailed computational fluid dynamic modeling, and system modeling. A summary of the current status of these activities and future plans will be provided, with a focus on the problem of cell and stack degradation.

J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; K. G. Condie; G. K. Housley

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Argonne National Laboratory High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1989--June 30, 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discuss the following areas on High Energy Physics at Argonne National Laboratory: experimental program; theory program; experimental facilities research; accelerator research and development; and SSC detector research and development.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Thin-film alternating current nanocalorimeter for low temperatures and high magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

Thin-film nanocalorimeter for low temperatures and high magnetic fields is described. The calorimeter is based on a commercial microchip module (thermal conductivity vacuum gauge TCG 3880 from Xensor Integration, NL). The gauge consists of submicron silicon nitride membrane with a film-thermopile and a resistive film-heater with dimensions of 50x100 {mu}m{sup 2} located at the center of the membrane. The gauge is mounted in a thermostat filled with helium exchange gas. The method of alternating current (ac) calorimetry is applied for heat capacity measurements. The noise-floor sensitivity of the calorimeter is better than 1 nJ/K below 100 K and about 3 nJ/K at 300 K. This allows for reliable measurements to be performed on sub-microgram samples. It is proved that the method is applicable for heat capacity measurements at temperatures in the range of 5-300 K and in high magnetic fields up to 8 T. We present a theoretical analysis of the thermal processes in the gauge-sample-surrounding gas system. On this basis a calibration method has been developed. We demonstrate that the technique yields correct heat capacity for test samples and that in special cases the thermal conductivity and the magnetostriction of the sample can be measured simultaneously with the heat capacity.

Minakov, A.A.; Roy, S.B.; Bugoslavsky, Y.V.; Cohen, L.F. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Results Of Recent High Temperature Co-Electrolysis Studies At The Idaho National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the past several years, the Idaho National Laboratory and Ceramatec, Inc. have been studying the feasibility of high temperature solid oxide electrolysis for large-scale, nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Parallel to this effort, the INL and Ceramatec have been researching high temperature solid oxide co-electrolysis of steam/CO2 mixtures to produce syngas, the raw material for synthetic fuels production. When powered by nuclear energy, high temperature co-electrolysis offers a carbon-neutral means of syngas production while consuming CO2. The INL has been conducting experiments to characterize the electrochemical performance of co-electrolysis, as well as validate INL-developed computer models. An inline methanation reactor has also been tested to study direct methane production from co-electrolysis products. Testing to date indicate that high temperature steam electrolysis cells perform equally well under co-electrolysis conditions. Process model predictions compare well with measurements for outlet product compositions. The process appears to be a promising technique for large-scale syngas production.

C. M. Stoots; James E. O'Brien; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

High-Pressure Thermodynamic Properties of f-electron Metals, Transition Metal Oxides, and Half-Metallic Magnets  

SciTech Connect

This project involves research into the thermodynamic properties of f-electron metals, transition metal oxides, and half-metallic magnets at high pressure. These materials are ones in which the changing importance of electron-electron interactions as the distance between atoms is varied can tune the system through phase transitions from localized to delocalized electrons, from screened to unscreened magnetic moments, and from normal metal to one in which only a single spin specie can conduct. Three main thrusts are being pursued: (1) Mott transitions in transition metal oxides, (2) magnetism in half-metallic compounds, and (3) large volume-collapse transitions in f-band metals.

Scalettar, Richard T.; Pickett, Warren E.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

High-Pressure Thermodynamic Properties of f-electron Metals, Transition Metal Oxides, and Half-Metallic Magnets  

SciTech Connect

This project involves research into the thermodynamic properties of f-electron metals, transition metal oxides, and half-metallic magnets at high pressure. These materials are ones in which the changing importance of electron-electron interactions as the distance between atoms is varied can tune the system through phase transitions from localized to delocalized electrons, from screened to unscreened magnetic moments, and from normal metal to one in which only a single spin specie can conduct. Three main thrusts are being pursued: (i) Mott transitions in transition metal oxides, (ii) magnetism in half-metallic compounds, and (iii) large volume-collapse transitions in f-band metals.

Richard T. Scalettar; Warren E. Pickett

2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

271

Magnetic lensing of extremely high energy cosmic rays in a galactic wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that in the model of Galactic magnetic wind recently proposed to explain the extremely high energy (EHE) cosmic rays so far observed as originating from a single source (M87 in the Virgo cluster), the magnetic field strongly magnifies the fluxes and produces multiple images of the source. The apparent position on Earth of the principal image moves, for decreasing energies, towards the galactic south. It is typically amplified by an order of magnitude at $E/Z\\sim 2\\times 10^{20}$ eV, but becomes strongly demagnified below $10^{20}$ eV. At energies below $E/Z\\sim 1.3\\times 10^{20}$ eV, all events in the northern galactic hemisphere are due to secondary images, which have huge amplifications ($>10^2$). This model would imply strong asymmetries between the north and south galactic hemispheres, such as a (latitude dependent) upper cut-off value below $2\\times 10^{20}$ eV for CR protons arriving to the south and lower fluxes in the south than in the north above $10^{20}$ eV. The large resulting magnifications reduce the power requirements on the source, but the model needs a significant tunning between the direction to the source and the symmetry axis of the wind. If more modest magnetic field strengths were assumed, a scenario in which the observed EHE events are heavier nuclei whose flux is strongly lensed becomes also plausible and would predict that a transition from a light composition to a heavier one could take place at the highest energies.

Diego Harari; Silvia Mollerach; Esteban Roulet

2000-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

272

High Magnetic Field Processing - A Heat-Free Heat Treating Method  

SciTech Connect

The High and Thermal Magnetic Processing/Electro-magnetic Acoustic Transducer (HTMP/EMAT) technology has been shown to be an enabling disruptive materials processing technology, that can achieve significant improvements in microstructure and consequently material performance beyond that achievable through conventional processing, and will lead to the next generation of advanced performance structural and functional materials. HTMP exposure increased the reaction kinetics enabling refinement of microstructural features such as finer martensite lath size, and finer, more copious, homogeneous dispersions of strengthening carbides leading to combined strength and toughness improvements in bainitic steels. When induction heating is applied in a high magnetic field environment, the induction heating coil is configured so that high intensity acoustic/ultrasonic treatment occurs naturally. The configuration results in a highly effective electromagnetic acoustical transducer (EMAT). HTMP combined with applying high-field EMAT, produce a non-contact ultrasonic treatment that can be used to process metal alloys in either the liquid state resulting in significant microstructural changes over conventional processing. Proof-of-principle experiments on cast irons resulted in homogeneous microstructures in small castings along with improved casting surface appearance. The experiment showed that by exposing liquid metal to the non-contact acoustic/ultrasonic processing technology developed using HMFP/EMAT wrought-like microstructures were developed in cast components. This Energy Intensive Processes (EIP) project sponsored by the DOE EERE Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) demonstrated the following: (1) The reduction of retained austenite in high carbon/high alloy steels with an ambient temperature HTMP process, replacing either a cryogenic or double tempering thermal process normally employed to accomplish retained austenite transformation. HTMP can be described as a 'heat-free', heat treating technology. Lower residual stresses in HTMP treated materials are anticipated since no thermal strains are involved in inducing the transformation of retained austenite to martensite in high alloy steel. (2) The simultaneous increase of 12% in yield strength and 22% in impact energy in a bainitic alloy using HTMP processing. This is a major breakthrough in materials processing for the next generation of structural materials since conventionally processed materials show a reduction in impact toughness with an increase in yield strength. HTMP is a new paradigm to beneficially increase both yield strength and impact energy absorption simultaneously. (3) HTMP processing refined both the martensite lath population and the carbide dispersion in a bainitic steel alloy during Gausstempering. The refinement was believed to be responsible for the simultaneous increase in strength and toughness. Hence, HTMP significantly impacts nucleation and growth phenomenon. (4) HTMP processing developed comparable ultimate tensile strength and twice the impact energy in a lower cost, lower alloy content ({approx}8% alloy content) steel, compared to highly alloyed, (31% alloy elements involving Ni, Co, and Mo) 250-grade margining steel. Future low-cost HTMP alloys appear viable that will exceed the structural performance of highly alloyed materials that are conventionally processed. This economic benefit will enable U.S. industry to reduce cost (better more competitive worldwide) while maintaining or exceeding current performance. (5) EMAT processed cast iron exhibits significantly higher hardness (by 51% for a 9T condition) than a no-field processed sample. (6) EMAT produced microstructures in cast iron resulted in an unique graphite nodule morphology, a modified pearlite content, and unique carbide types, that formed during solidification and cooling. (7) EMAT processed nanoparticle dispersions in Mg resulted in a very fine, unagglomerated distribution of the nanoparticles in the magnesium matrix. This provides a breakthrough technology to make the next generation of

Ludtka, Gerard Michael [ORNL; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz- [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL; Parish, Chad M [ORNL; Rios, Orlando [ORNL; Rogers, Hiram [ORNL; Manuel, Michele [University of Florida, Gainesville; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; Murphy, Bart L [ORNL

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Remedial investigation of the High-Explosives (HE) Process Area, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a Remedial Investigation (RI) to define the extent of high explosives (HE) compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in the soil, rocks, and ground water of the HE Process Area of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300 Facility. The report evaluates potential public health environmental risks associated with these compounds. Hydrogeologic information available before February 15, 1990, is included; however, chemical analyses and water-level data are reported through March 1990. This report is intended to assist the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB)--Central Valley Region and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in evaluating the extent of environmental contamination of the LLNL HE Process Area and ultimately in designing remedial actions. 90 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

Crow, N.B.; Lamarre, A.L.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Final Results from the High-Current, High-Action Closing Switch Test Program at Sandia National Laboratories  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We tested a variety of high-current closing switches for lifetime and reliability on a dedicated 2 MJ, 500 kA capacitor bank facility at Sandia National Laboratories. Our interest was a switch capable of one shot every few minutes, switching a critically damped, DC-charged 6.2 mF bank at 24 kV, with a peak current of 500 kA. The desired lifetime is 24 thousand shots. Typical of high-energy systems, particularly multi-module systems, the primary parameters of interest related to the switch are: (1) reliability, meaning absence of both pre-fires and no-fires, (2) total switch lifetime or number of shots between maintenance, and (3) cost. Cost was given lower priority at this evaluation stage because there are great uncertainties in estimating higher-quantity prices of these devices, most of which have been supplied before in only small quantities. The categories of switches tested are vacuum discharge, high-pressure discharge, and solid-state. Each group varies in terms of triggering ease, ease of maintenance, and tolerance to faults such as excess current and current reversal. We tested at least two variations of each technology group. The total number of shots on the switch test facility is about 50 thousand. We will present the results from the switch testing. The observed lifetime of different switches varied greatly: the shortest life was one shot; one device was still operating after six thousand shots. On several switches we measured the voltage drop during conduction and calculated energy dissipated in the switch; we will show these data also.

Savage, M.E.

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

275

Exploration of High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating on the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

SciTech Connect

High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating has been proposed as a particularly attractive means for plasma heating and current drive in the high-beta plasmas that are achievable in spherical torus (ST) devices. The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono, M., Kaye, S.M., Neumeyer, S., et al., Proceedings, 18th IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering, Albuquerque, 1999, (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ (1999), p. 53.)] is such a device. An radio-frequency (rf) heating system has been installed on NSTX to explore the physics of HHFW heating, current drive via rf waves and for use as a tool to demonstrate the attractiveness of the ST concept as a fusion device. To date, experiments have demonstrated many of the theoretical predictions for HHFW. In particular, strong wave absorption on electrons over a wide range of plasma parameters and wave parallel phase velocities, wave acceleration of energetic ions, and indications of current drive for directed wave spectra have been observed. In addition HHFW heating has been used to explore the energy transport properties of NSTX plasmas, to create H-mode (high-confinement mode) discharges with a large fraction of bootstrap current and to control the plasma current profile during the early stages of the discharge.

J.R. Wilson; R.E. Bell; S. Bernabei; M. Bitter; P. Bonoli; D. Gates; J. Hosea; B. LeBlanc; T.K. Mau; S. Medley; J. Menard; D. Mueller; M. Ono; C.K. Phillips; R.I. Pinsker; R. Raman; A. Rosenberg; P. Ryan; S. Sabbagh; D. Stutman; D. Swain; Y. Takase; J. Wilgen; the NSTX Team

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

276

RECENT ADVANCES IN HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY: STACK TESTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High temperature steam electrolysis is a promising technology for efficient sustainable large-scale hydrogen production. Solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) are able to utilize high temperature heat and electric power from advanced high-temperature nuclear reactors or renewable sources to generate carbon-free hydrogen at large scale. However, long term durability of SOECs needs to be improved significantly before commercialization of this technology. A degradation rate of 1%/khr or lower is proposed as a threshold value for commercialization of this technology. Solid oxide electrolysis stack tests have been conducted at Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate recent improvements in long-term durability of SOECs. Electrolytesupported and electrode-supported SOEC stacks were provided by Ceramatec Inc., Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI), and Saint Gobain Advanced Materials (St. Gobain), respectively for these tests. Long-term durability tests were generally operated for a duration of 1000 hours or more. Stack tests based on technology developed at Ceramatec and MSRI have shown significant improvement in durability in the electrolysis mode. Long-term degradation rates of 3.2%/khr and 4.6%/khr were observed for MSRI and Ceramatec stacks, respectively. One recent Ceramatec stack even showed negative degradation (performance improvement) over 1900 hours of operation. A three-cell short stack provided by St. Gobain, however, showed rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode. Improvements on electrode materials, interconnect coatings, and electrolyteelectrode interface microstructures contribute to better durability of SOEC stacks.

X, Zhang; J. E. O'Brien; R. C. O'Brien; J. J. Hartvigsen; G. Tao; N. Petigny

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

High magnetic field MHD generator program. Final report, July 1, 1976-December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A theoretical and experimental program was undertaken to investigate MHD channel phenomena which are important at high magnetic fields. The areas studied were inhomogeneity effects, boundary layers, Hall field breakdown and electrode configuration and current concentrations. In addition, a program was undertaken to study steady-state combustion disk and linear channels in an existing 6 Tesla magnet of small dimensions. The structure of the inhomogeneities in the Stanford M-2 was characterized and compared with theoretical results from a linearized perturbation analysis. General agreement was obtained and the analysis was used to compute stability regions for large size generators. The Faraday electrical connection was found to be more stable than the Hall or diagonal wall connections. Boundary layer profile measurements were compared with theoretical calculations with good agreement. Extrapolation of the calculations to pilot scale MHD channels indicates that Hartmann effects are important in the analysis of the sidewall, and Joule heating is important in calculating heat transfer and voltage drops for the electrode wall. Hall field breakdown was shown to occur both in the plasma and through the interelectrode insulator with the insulator breakdown threshold voltage lower than the plasma value. The threshold voltage was shown to depend on the interelectrode gap but was relatively independent of plasma conditions. Experiments were performed at 5.5 Tesla with both disk and linear MHD channels.

Eustis, R.H.; Kruger, C.H.; Mitchner, M.; Self, S.A.; Koester, J.K.; Nakamura, T.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

High magnetic field MHD generator program. Quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in an experimental and theoretical program designed to investigate MHD channel phenomena which are important at high magnetic fields. The areas of research include nonuniformity effects, boundary layers, Hall field breakdown, the effects of electrode configuration and current concentrations, and studies of steady-state combustion disk and linear channels in an existing 6 Tesla magnet of small dimensions. In the study of the effects of nonuniformities and instabilities, theoretical models have been further developed and limits of applicability have been established. An improved laser doppler anemometer, which has been designed for turbulence damping and velocity profile measurements, has been tested in the M-2 facility with favorable results. The theoretical model of Hall field breakdown has been modified to include a two-dimensional insulator analysis, along with a detailed description of the plasma flow over the electrode wall. The model has the capability of predicting both insulator and plasma breakdown and has yielded good agreement with the results of breakdown experiments. The performance of electrode configurations with axial conducting fins has been examined using a three-dimensional numerical solution of the MHD electrical equations. Work progressed on the construction of the peg wall disk generator channel, and the main components of the generator test section are now assembled. Theoretical models of boundary layer effects on the insulator wall and the current discharge in the core are being developed. Data from the linear channel experiment at 5 Tesla are being analyzed and interpreted.

Kruger, C.H.; Eustis, R.H.; Mitchner, M.; Self, S.A.; Koester, J.K.; Nakamura, T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Use of high-temperature superconductors in superconducting magnetic energy power sources  

SciTech Connect

The concept of mobile superconducting magnetic energy power sources (SMEPS) is introduced and scrutinized. Use of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) in mobile SMEPS is discussed. Coil scaling and structural-force calculations for small solenoidal and toroidal coil systems are presented, and the efficiency of system refrigeration as a function of mechanical support, insulation, and power lead thermal losses is estimated. Required HTS properties, derived from considerations developed in this paper, are compared to properties of presently available materials or those expected to evolve in the near term. Analysis verifies the possibility of using SMEPS for military and nonmilitary mobile energy storage and power backup. The results show that the evolution of SMEPS will be stimulated by the development of higher-strength, tougher HTS that can operate at current densities greater than 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} in magnetic fields of 4 to 6 T and temperatures of 77 K or higher. Earliest prototype SMEPS may employ coils cooled by liquid helium with HTS power leads or 20--30 K cryorefrigerated HTS materials that are engineered to withstand coil stresses during charge and discharge. 24 refs. 6 figs., 1 tab.

Palmer, D.N. (ABB/Combustion Engineering, Windsor, CT (USA)); Hull, J.R.; Kuzay, T.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Schoenung, S.M. (Schafer (W.J.) Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

High temperature, magnetic field assisted (sub)THz quantum cascade laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate magnetic field assisted, (sub)THz quantum cascade laser operating above 200 K. This is achieved through the application of strong magnetic fields which provide an additional lateral confinement in order to ...

Wade, Aaron

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Tests of a GM Cryocooler and high Tc leads for use on the ALS superbend magnets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TC LEADS FOR USE ON THE ALS SUPERBEND MAGNETS J. Zbasnik, M.TC LEADS FOR USE ON THE ALS SUPERBEND MAGNETS J. Zbasnikl,Geyer, and F. Ottens of the ALS Electrical Engineering group

Zbasnik, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Shock wave formation of superconductive ceramic oxide electric and magnetic circuit elements with improved microstructures and mechanical properties. 10 figs.

Nellis, W.J.; Maple, M.B.; Geballe, T.H.

1987-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

283

MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE TOMOGRAPHY (MR-EIT): A new technique for high resolution conductivity imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a conductor generates a constant magnetic field with flux density jB r . If the current carrying conductor potentials and the magnetic fields produced by the probing current are measured. Surface potentials and the point spread function is not space invariant. On the other hand, magnetic field and electrical current

Eyüboðlu, Murat

284

A permanent-magnet rotor for a high-temperature superconducting bearing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design, fabrication, and performance, of a 1/3-m dia., 10-kg flywheel rotor with only one bearing is discussed. To achieve low-loss energy storage, the rotor`s segmented-ring permanent-magnet (PM) is optimized for levitation and circumferential homogeneity. The magnet`s carbon composite bands enable practical energy storage.

Mulcahy, T.M.; Hull, J.R.; Uherka, K.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Abboud, R.G. [Commonwealth Research Corp., Chicago, IL (United States); Wise, J.H.; Carnegie, D.W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Engineering Science

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Investigation of a high impedance magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator with hollow load  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel high-impedance magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) with greatly restrained power deposition on the anode has been investigated. Methods to increase the MILO impedance and decrease the anode current are discussed. A MILO with impedance of 30 {Omega} and power conversion efficiency of 25% is presented by particle-in-cell simulations. Compared with the previous MILO in our lab, the anode current of the proposed MILO is reduced about 50%, the power conversion efficiency doubles, and the power deposition on anode is reduced nearly one half. Furthermore, considerations for reducing the power deposition on load have also been carried out in MILO design, and the load current is reduced to 4.6 kA, only 17% of the total anode current. Finally, a hollow load was introduced to reduce the power deposition density on the load, without decreasing the power conversion efficiency.

Zhou Heng; Shu Ting; Li Zhiqiang [College of Opto-electric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Hunan 410073 (China)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Electric power high-voltage transmission lines: Design options, cost, and electric and magnetic field levels  

SciTech Connect

This report provides background information about (1) the electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) of high-voltage transmission lines at typical voltages and line configurations and (2) typical transmission line costs to assist on alternatives in environmental documents. EMF strengths at 0 {+-} 200 ft from centerline were calculated for ac overhead lines, and for 345 and 230-kV ac underground line and for a {+-}450-kV dc overhead line. Compacting and height sensitivity factors were computed for the variation in EMFs when line conductors are moved closer or raised. Estimated costs for the lines are presented and discussed so that the impact of using alternative strategies for reducing EMF strengths and the implications of implementing the strategies can be better appreciated.

Stoffel, J.B.; Pentecost, E.D.; Roman, R.D.; Traczyk, P.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Rotor Design for High Pressure Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with a sample spinning rate exceeding 2.1 kHz and pressure greater than 165 bar has never been realized. In this work, a new sample cell design is reported, suitable for constructing cells of different sizes. Using a 7.5 mm high pressure MAS rotor as an example, internal pressure as high as 200 bar at a sample spinning rate of 6 kHz is achieved. The new high pressure MAS rotor is re-usable and compatible with most commercial NMR set-ups, exhibiting low 1H and 13C NMR background and offering maximal NMR sensitivity. As an example of its many possible applications, this new capability is applied to determine reaction products associated with the carbonation reaction of a natural mineral, antigorite ((Mg,Fe2+)3Si2O5(OH)4), in contact with liquid water in water-saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 150 bar and 50 ?C. This mineral is relevant to the deep geologic disposal of CO2, but its iron content results in too many sample spinning sidebands at low spinning rate. Hence, this chemical system is a good case study to demonstrate the utility of the higher sample spinning rates that can be achieved by our new rotor design. We expect this new capability will be useful for exploring solid-state, including interfacial, chemistry at new levels of high-pressure in a wide variety of fields.

Turcu, Romulus VF; Hoyt, David W.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Sears, Jesse A.; Loring, John S.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Z.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Design Procedure for a Very High Speed Slotless Permanent Magnet Motor Pierre-Daniel Pfister, Student Member, IEEE and Yves Perriard, Senior Member, IEEE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design Procedure for a Very High Speed Slotless Permanent Magnet Motor Pierre-Daniel Pfister speed slotless permanent magnet motor design procedure using an analyti- cal model. The multiphysics magnet (PM) motors are increasingly demanded on the market [1]. In a VHS motor, the different parts

Psaltis, Demetri

289

High magnetic shear gain in a liquid sodium stable couette flow experiment A prelude to an alpha - omega dynamo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The {Omega}-phase of the liquid sodium {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo experiment at NMIMT in cooperation with LANL has successfully demonstrated the production of a high toroidal field, B{sub {phi}} {approx_equal} 8 x B{sub r} from the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field, B{sub r}. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by rotational shear in stable Couette Row within liquid sodium at Rm {approx_equal} 120. The small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette Row is caused by Ekman Row where ({delta}v/v){sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -3}. This high {Omega}-gain in low turbulence flow contrasts with a smaller {Omega}-gain in higher turbulence, Helmholtz-unstable shear flows. This result supports the ansatz that large scale astrophysical magnetic fields are created within semi-coherent large scale motions in which turbulence plays a diffusive role that enables magnetic flux linkage.

Colgate, Stirling [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Jui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Finn, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pariev, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beckley, Howard [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH; Si, Jiahe [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Martinic, Joe [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Westpfahl, David [NM INSTIT. OF TECH.; Slutz, James [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Westrom, Zeb [NM INSTIT. OF TECH.; Klein, Brianna [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

290

A Method for Constraining Cosmic Magnetic Field Models Using Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays: The Field Scan Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Galactic magnetic field, locally observed to be on the order of a few $\\mu$G, is sufficiently strong to induce deflections in the arrival directions of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We present a method that establishes measures of self-consistency for hypothesis sets comprised of cosmic magnetic field models and ultra-high energy cosmic ray composition and source distributions. The method uses two independent procedures to compare the backtracked velocity vectors outside the magnetic field model to the distribution of backtracked velocity directions of many isotropic observations with the same primary energies. This allows for an estimate of the statistical consistency between the observed data and simulated isotropic observations. Inconsistency with the isotropic expectation of source correlation in both procedures is interpreted as the hypothesis set providing a self-consistent description of GMF and UHECR properties for the cosmic ray observations.

Michael S. Sutherland; Brian M. Baughman; James J. Beatty

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

291

High-Resolution Imaging and Optical Control of Bose-Einstein Condensates in an Atom Chip Magnetic Trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high-resolution projection and imaging system for ultracold atoms is implemented using a compound silicon and glass atom chip. The atom chip is metalized to enable magnetic trapping while glass regions enable high numerical aperture optical access to atoms residing in the magnetic trap about 100 microns below the chip surface. The atom chip serves as a wall of the vacuum system, which enables the use of commercial microscope components for projection and imaging. Holographically generated light patterns are used to optically slice a cigar-shaped magnetic trap into separate regions; this has been used to simultaneously generate up to four Bose-condensates. Using fluorescence techniques we have demonstrated in-trap imaging resolution down to 2.5 microns

Evan A. Salim; Seth C. Caliga; Jonathan B. Pfeiffer; Dana Z. Anderson

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

292

The Superconducting Horizontal Bend Magnet for the Jefferson Lab's 11 GeV/c Super High Momentum Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

A collaboration between NSCL and Jlab has developed the reference design and coil winding for Jlab's Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) horizontal bend magnet. A warm iron ??C?? type superferric dipole magnet will bend the 12 GeV/c particles horizontally by 3?? to allow the SHMS to reach angles as low as 5.5??. This requires an integral field strength of up to 2.1 T.m. The major challenges are the tight geometry, high and unbalanced forces and a required low fringe field in primary beam path. A coil design based on flattened SSC Rutherford cable that provides a large current margin and commercially available fiberglass prepreg epoxy tape has been developed. A complete test coil has been wound and will be cold tested. This paper present the modified magnet design includes coil forces, coil restraint system and fringe field. In addition, coil properties, quench calculations and the full mechanical details are also presented.

S. Chouhan, J. DeKamp, A. Zeller, P. Brindza, S. Lassiter, M. Fowler, E. Sun

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Research In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA), in collaboration with Ceramatec, Inc. (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA), is actively researching the application of solid oxide fuel cell technology as electrolyzers for large scale hydrogen and syngas production. This technology relies upon electricity and high temperature heat to chemically reduce a steam or steam / CO2 feedstock. Single button cell tests, multi-cell stack, as well as multi-stack testing has been conducted. Stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to ~15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

Carl M. Stoots; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

RECENT ADVANCES IN HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY: SINGLE CELL TESTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental investigation on the performance and durability of single solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory. In order to understand and mitigate the degradation issues in high temperature electrolysis, single SOECs with different configurations from several manufacturers have been evaluated for initial performance and long-term durability. A new test apparatus has been developed for single cell and small stack tests from different vendors. Single cells from Ceramatec Inc. show improved durability compared to our previous stack tests. Single cells from Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI) demonstrate low degradation both in fuel cell and electrolysis modes. Single cells from Saint Gobain Advanced Materials (St. Gobain) show stable performance in fuel cell mode, but rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode. Electrolyte-electrode delamination is found to have significant impact on degradation in some cases. Enhanced bonding between electrolyte and electrode and modification of the microstructure help to mitigate degradation. Polarization scans and AC impedance measurements are performed during the tests to characterize the cell performance and degradation.

X. Zhang; J. E. O'Brien; R. C. O'Brien

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Scientific Upgrades at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy is sponsoring a number of projects that will provide scientific upgrades to the neutron science facilities associated with the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Funding for the first upgrade project was initiated in 1996 and all presently identified upgrade projects are expected to be completed by the end of 2003. The upgrade projects include: (1) larger beam tubes, (2) a new monochromator drum for the HB-1 beam line, (3) a new HB-2 beam line system that includes one thermal guide and a new monochromator drum, (4) new instruments for the HB-2 beamline, (5) a new monochromator drum for the HB-3 beam line, (6) a supercritical hydrogen cold source system to be retrofitted into the HB-4 beam tube, (7) a 3.5 kW refrigeration system at 20 K to support the cold source and a new building to house it, (8) a new HB-4 beam line system composed of four cold neutron guides with various mirror coatings and associated shielding, (9) a number of new instruments for the cold beams including two new SANS instruments, and (10) construction of support buildings. This paper provides a short summary of these projects including their present status and schedule.

Selby, Douglas L [ORNL; Jones, Amy [ORNL; Crow, Lowell [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Shock waves directed on thin layers of materials is used to form superconducting and permanent magnetic materials with improved microstructures. 9 figs.

Nellis, W.J.; Maple, M.B.; Geballe, T.H.

1986-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

297

Magnetic-field shielding of satellites from high-energy-electron environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnet configurations are found that limit the 6-MeV electrons threatening satellite electronics to <1% of the incident flux. Successful configurations of permanent magnets and electromagnets require magnetic energies of {approximately}8 to 12 kJ to protect each liter of electronics volume. The fundamental strength of materials leads to a required minimum mass of {approximately}48 to 64 kg/liter to support the magnetic pressure. With the electronics requiring {approximately}5 liters, several hundred kilograms are needed for this support. Except for protecting small apertures, magnetic shielding provides little, if any, advantage over that obtained by coating with an equivalent mass using traditional methods. 7 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Vittitoe, C.N.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) develop a high-fidelity large-eddy simulation model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

than current models. As the market for wind energy grows, wind turbines and wind plants are becoming wind plants, reduce the cost of wind energy, and save wind plant developers millions of dollars in lostResearchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) develop a high-fidelity large

299

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory High-Level Waste Roadmap. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) High-Level Waste (HLW) Roadmap takes a strategic look at the entire HLW life-cycle starting with generation, through interim storage, treatment and processing, transportation, and on to final disposal. The roadmap is an issue-based planning approach that compares ``where we are now`` to ``where we want and need to be.`` The INEL has been effectively managing HLW for the last 30 years. Calcining operations are continuing to turn liquid HLW into a more manageable form. Although this document recognizes problems concerning HLW at the INEL, there is no imminent risk to the public or environment. By analyzing the INEL current business operations, pertinent laws and regulations, and committed milestones, the INEL HLW Roadmap has identified eight key issues existing at the INEL that must be resolved in order to reach long-term objectives. These issues are as follows: A. The US Department of Energy (DOE) needs a consistent policy for HLW generation, handling, treatment, storage, and disposal. B. The capability for final disposal of HLW does not exist. C. Adequate processes have not been developed or implemented for immobilization and disposal of INEL HLW. D. HLW storage at the INEL is not adequate in terms of capacity and regulatory requirements. E. Waste streams are generated with limited consideration for waste minimization. F. HLW is not adequately characterized for disposal nor, in some cases, for storage. G. Research and development of all process options for INEL HLW treatment and disposal are not being adequately pursued due to resource limitations. H. HLW transportation methods are not selected or implemented. A root-cause analysis uncovered the underlying causes of each of these issues.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Highlighting high performance: Zion National Park Visitor Center, a sustainable building for the future  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Zion National Park Visitor Center incorporated a variety of energy-efficient features into its design to address Zion's specific needs. The design blended with the canyon's unique qualities and will save energy and operation costs at the center.

Torcellini, P.

2000-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Highlighting high performance: Zion National Park Visitor Center, a sustainable building for the future  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Zion National Park Visitor Center incorporated a variety of energy-efficient features into its design to address Zion's specific needs. The design blended with the canyon's unique qualities and will save energy and operation costs at the center.

Torcellini, P.

2000-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

302

High speed internal permanent magnet machine and method of manufacturing the same  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An internal permanent magnet (IPM) machine is provided. The IPM machine includes a stator assembly and a stator core. The stator core also includes multiple stator teeth. The stator assembly is further configured with stator windings to generate a magnetic field when excited with alternating currents and extends along a longitudinal axis with an inner surface defining a cavity. The IPM machine also includes a rotor assembly and a rotor core. The rotor core is disposed inside the cavity and configured to rotate about the longitudinal axis. The rotor assembly further includes a shaft. The shaft further includes multiple protrusions alternately arranged relative to multiple bottom structures provided on the shaft. The rotor assembly also includes multiple stacks of laminations disposed on the protrusions and dovetailed circumferentially around the shaft. The rotor assembly further includes multiple permanent magnets for generating a magnetic field, which interacts with the stator magnetic field to produce torque. The permanent magnets are disposed between the stacks. The rotor assembly also includes multiple bottom wedges disposed on the bottom structures of the shaft and configured to hold the multiple stacks and the multiple permanent magnets.

Alexander, James Pellegrino (Ballston Lake, NY); EL-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi (Niskayuna, NY); Lokhandwalla, Murtuza (Clifton Park, NY); Shah, Manoj Ramprasad (Latham, NY); VanDam, Jeremy Daniel (West Coxsackie, NY)

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

303

Commissioning of a magnetic suspension densitometer for high-accuracy density measurements of natural gas mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-accuracy density measurement data are required to validate equations of state (EOS) for use in custody transfer of natural gas through pipelines. The AGA8-DC92 EOS, which is the current industry standard has already been validated against a databank of natural gas mixtures with compositions containing up to 0.2 mole percent of the heavier C6+ fraction and is expected to predict densities of natural gas mixtures containing higher mole percentages of the C6+ fraction with the same accuracy. With the advances in exploration, drilling and production, natural gas streams containing higher percentages of the C6+ fraction have become available from the deepwater and ultra-deepwater Gulf of Mexico in recent years. High-accuracy, density data for such natural gas mixtures are required to check if the AGA8-DC92 EOS covers the entire range of pressure, temperature and compositions encountered in custody transfer. A state-of-the-art, high pressure, high temperature, compact single-sinker magnetic suspension densitometer has been used to measure densities of two simulated natural gas mixtures named M91C1 and M94C1 after validating its operation by measuring densities of pure argon, nitrogen and methane in the range (270 to 340) K [(26.33 to152.33) oF, (-3.15 to 66.85) oC] and (3.447 to 34.474) MPa [(500 to 5,000) psia]. Measured densities of M91C1, not containing the C6+ fraction show larger than expected relative deviations from the AGA8-DC92 EOS predictions in regions 1 and 2 but agree well with predictions from the recently developed REFPROP EOS, implyingthat the AGA8-DC92 EOS may be unreliable in its present state even for natural gas mixtures not containing the C6+ fraction. Measured densities of M94C1 containing more than 0.2 mole percent of the C6+ fraction deviate from the AGA8-DC92 EOS predictions by more than the expected values in region 1 which is not surprising but the agreement with AGA8-DC92 EOS predictions in region 2 is misleading which becomes evident when the measured densities are compared to the REFPROP EOS predictions. The measured data can be used to recalibrate the parameters of the AGA8-DC92 EOS or to validate an entirely new EOS.

Patil, Prashant Vithal

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NERSC 2011 High Performance Computing Facility Operationalby providing high-performance computing, information, data,s deep knowledge of high performance computing to overcome

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

5098-SR-04-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

306

PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-05-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

E.M. Harpenau

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

BSA 10-20: Iron-based Superconductors for High-field Magnets  

... a material that allows magnetic fields up to 20 Tesla to be achieved at 4.2 Kelvin. However, Nb3Sn wires typically require a post-winding ...

308

Laser-Driven Magnetic-Flux Compression in High-Energy-Density Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demonstration of magnetic field compression to many tens of megagauss in cylindrical implosions of inertial confinement fusion targets is reported for the first time. The OMEGA laser [T.?R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. ...

Gotchev, O. V.

309

Multimodal neuroimaging with simultaneous electroencephalogram and high-field functional magnetic resonance imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simultaneous recording of electroencephalogram (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI) is an important emerging tool in functional neuroimaging with the potential to reveal new mechanisms for brain function ...

Purdon, Patrick L. (Patrick Lee), 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

The National Ignition Facility Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control roo...

Moses, E I

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

THE ROLE OF STRUCTURED MAGNETIC FIELDS ON CONSTRAINING PROPERTIES OF TRANSIENT SOURCES OF ULTRA-HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC RAYS  

SciTech Connect

We study how the properties of transient sources of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) can be accessed by exploiting UHECR experiments, taking into account the propagation of UHECRs in magnetic structures which the sources are embedded in, i.e., clusters of galaxies and filamentary structures. Adopting simplified analytical models, we demonstrate that the structured extragalactic magnetic fields (EGMFs) play crucial roles in unveiling the properties of the transient sources. These EGMFs unavoidably cause significant delay in the arrival time of UHECRs as well as the Galactic magnetic field, even if the strength of magnetic fields in voids is zero. Then, we show that, given good knowledge on the structured EGMFs, UHECR observations with high statistics above 10{sup 20} eV allow us to constrain the generation rate of transient UHECR sources and their energy input per burst, which can be compared with the rates and energy release of known astrophysical phenomena. We also demonstrate that identifying the energy dependence of the apparent number density of UHECR sources at the highest energies is crucial to such transient sources. Future UHECR experiments with extremely large exposure are required to reveal the nature of transient UHECR sources.

Takami, Hajime [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany); Murase, Kohta, E-mail: takami@mpp.mpg.de [Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 W. Woodruff Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

312

Rotational and magnetic shear stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic modes and turbulence in DIII-D high performance discharges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The confinement and the stability properties of the DIII-D tokamak [{ital Plasma} {ital Physics} {ital and} {ital Controlled} {ital Nuclear} {ital Fusion} {ital Research} 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 1, p. 159] high-performance discharges are evaluated in terms of rotational and magnetic shear, with an emphasis on the recent experimental results obtained from the negative central magnetic shear (NCS) experiments. In NCS discharges, a core transport barrier is often observed to form inside the NCS region accompanied by a reduction in core fluctuation amplitudes. Increasing negative magnetic shear contributes to the formation of this core transport barrier, but by itself is not sufficient to fully stabilize the toroidal drift mode (trapped-electron-{eta}{sub {ital i}} mode) to explain this formation. Comparison of the Doppler shift shear rate to the growth rate of the {eta}{sub {ital i}} mode suggests that the large core {ital E}{times}{ital B} flow shear can stabilize this mode and broaden the region of reduced core transport. Ideal and resistive stability analysis indicates the performance of NCS discharges with strongly peaked pressure profiles is limited by the resistive interchange mode to low {beta}{sub {ital N}}{le}2.3. This mode is insensitive to the details of the rotational and the magnetic shear profiles. A new class of discharges, which has a broad region of weak or slightly negative magnetic shear (WNS), is described. The WNS discharges have broader pressure profiles and higher {beta} values than the NCS discharges, together with high confinement and high fusion reactivity. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Lao, L.L.; Burrell, K.H.; Casper, T.S.; Chan, V.S.; Chu, M.S.; DeBoo, J.C.; Doyle, E.J.; Durst, R.D.; Forest, C.B.; Greenfield, C.M.; Groebner, R.J.; Hinton, F.L.; Kawano, Y.; Lazarus, E.A.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Mauel, M.E.; Meyer, W.H.; Miller, R.L.; Navratil, G.A.; Osborne, T.H.; Peng, Q.; Rettig, C.L.; Rewoldt, G.; Rhodes, T.L.; Rice, B.W.; Schissel, D.P.; Stallard, B.W.; Strait, E.J.; Tang, W.M.; Taylor, T.S.; Turnbull, A.D.; Waltz, R.E. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-9784 (United States)] [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-9784 (United States); the DIII-D Team

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Condensed Matter and Magnetic Science, MPA-CMMS: Materials Physics and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

feature banner feature banner banner Condensed Matter and Magnet Science The Condensed Matter and Magnet Science Group (MPA-CMMS) is comprised of research scientists, technicians, postdocs, and students specializing in experimental physics research, with a strong emphasis on fundamental condensed matter physics with complimentary thrusts in correlated electron materials, high magnetic-field science and technology, thermal physics, and actinide chemistry. MPA-CMMS hosts the Pulsed Field Facility of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL-PFF) located at TA-35 while new material synthesis, low temperature expertise, and various low-energy spectroscopies are located at TA-3. Our actinide chemistry activities occur at RC-1 (TA-48). The NHMFL-PFF is a national user facility for high magnetic field science sponsored primarily by the National Science Foundation's Division of Materials Research, with branches at Florida State University, the University of Florida, and Los Alamos National Laboratory. (Check out NHMFL Web site for more details.)

314

Preparations for a high gradient inverse free electron laser experiment at Brookhaven national laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Preparations for an inverse free electron laser experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facilty are presented. Details of the experimental setup including beam and laser transport optics are first discussed. Next, the driving laser pulse structure is investigated and initial diagnostics are explored and compared to simulations. Finally, planned improvements to the experimental setup are discussed.

Duris, J.; Li, R. K.; Musumeci, P.; Sakai, Y.; Threlkeld, E.; Williams, O.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Yakimenko, V. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

315

EPRI Comments on a UK Case-Control Study of Magnetic Fields from High Voltage Power Lines and Childhood Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A paper, entitled "Childhood cancer and magnetic fields from high voltage power lines in England and Wales: a case-control study," was published in the British Journal of Cancer on September 28, 2010. The authors assessed the association between exposure to EMF from power lines at the address of birth and childhood cancer. The current paper provides additional results to a study published earlier from the same data set in 2005. These EPRI comments provide an overview of study findings, conclusions, stren...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

316

Development of a magnetohydrodynamic code for axisymmetric, high-. beta. plasmas with complex magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

The Topolotron is an axisymmetric, toroidal magnetic fusion concept in which two-dimensional effects are important, as well as all three magnetic field components. The particular MHD model employed is basically the one-fluid, two-temperature model using classical Braginskii transport with viscous effects ignored. The model is augmented by Saha-Boltzmann dissociation and partial ionization physics, a simple radiation loss mechanism, and an additional resistivity due to electron-neutral collisions. While retaining all velocity and magnetic field components, the assumption of axisymmetry is made, and the resulting equations are expanded in cylindrical coordinates. The major approximation technique is then applied: spline collocation, which reduces these equations to a set of ordinary differential equations.

Cook, G.O. Jr.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Magnet cold mass high load supports thermal response and performance design correlation  

SciTech Connect

Through General Dynamics Convair Division's experience in the design, detail analysis, and manufacturing of structural supports for superconducting magnet cryostats suspended in a vacuum enclosure, a data base, well suited for the development of correlations of pertinent thermal performance criteria for stainless steel supports, has been created. The thermal requirements of these supports in fusion applications are well defined for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) and have been analyzed in detail for cool-down response and steady-state performance, using Convair's THERMAL ANALYZER computer program. From the output of these thermal conditioning simulations, correlations were developed for magnet LHe heating from supports in terms of strut geometric parameters.

Jones, G.R.; Christensen, E.H.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Radiation-Induced Damage to Microstructure of Parotid Gland: Evaluation Using High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To elucidate the radiation-induced damage to the microstructure of the parotid gland using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods and Materials: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the parotid gland was performed before radiotherapy (RT) and during the RT period or {<=}3 weeks after RT completion for 12 head-and-neck cancer patients using a 1.5-T scanner with a microscopy coil. The maximal cross-sectional area of the gland was evaluated, and changes in the internal architecture of the gland were assessed both visually and quantitatively. Results: Magnetic resonance images were obtained at a median parotid gland dose of 36 Gy (range, 11-64). According to the quantitative analysis, the maximal cross-sectional area of the gland was reduced, the width of the main duct was narrowed, and the intensity ratio of the main duct lumen to background was significantly decreased after RT (p <.0001). According to the visual assessment, the width of the main duct tended to narrow and the contrast of the duct lumen tended to be decreased, but no significant differences were noted. The visibility of the duct branches was unclear in 10 patients (p = .039), and the septum became dense in 11 patients (p = .006) after RT. Conclusion: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive method of evaluating radiation-induced changes to the internal architecture of the parotid gland. Morphologic changes in the irradiated parotid gland were demonstrated during the RT course even when a relatively small dose was delivered to the gland.

Kan, Tomoko, E-mail: tkan@grape.med.tottori-u.ac.j [Department of Radiology, Tottori University Faculty of Medicine, Yonago, Tottori (Japan); Kodani, Kazuhiko; Michimoto, Koichi; Fujii, Shinya; Ogawa, Toshihide [Department of Radiology, Tottori University Faculty of Medicine, Yonago, Tottori (Japan)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

High-precision evaluation of the magnetic moment of the helion  

SciTech Connect

NMR spectra of samples containing a mixture of hydrogen deuteride HD with pressure of about 80 atm and helium-3 with partial pressure of about 1 atm are analyzed. The ratio of the resonance frequencies of the nuclei, F({sup 3}He)/F(H{sub 2}), is determined to be 0.761786594(2), which is equal to the magnetic moment of the helion (bound in a helium atom) in the units of the magnetic moment of a proton (bound in molecular hydrogen). The uncertainty of two digits in the last place corresponds to a relative error of {delta}[F({sup 3}He)/F(H{sub 2})] = 2.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9}. The use of the known calculated data on the shielding of nuclei in the helium-3 atom ({sigma}({sup 3}He) = 59924(2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9}) and on the shielding of protons in hydrogen ({sigma}(H{sub 2}) = 26288(2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9}) yields a value of {mu}({sup 3}He)/{mu}{sub p} = -0.761812217(3) for the free magnetic moment of the helion in the units of the proton magnetic moment.

Neronov, Yu. I., E-mail: yineronov@mail.ru; Seregin, N. N. [Mendeleev All-Russia Research Institute of Metrology (Russian Federation)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Investigation of magnetic reconnection during a sawtooth crash in a high-temperature tokamak plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-temperature Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) plasmas [Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 2986 in a poloidal plane, an observation consistent with the Kadomtsev reconnection theory. On the other hand Test Reactor)17 plasmas (where the magnetic Reynolds number exceeds 107) by a set of nonper- turbative

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ALS superbend magnet system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALS Superbend Magnet System J. Zbasnik , S. T. Wang ,of a High-Field Magnet for the ALS, Transactions AppliedRefrigeration options for the ALS Superbend dipole magnets,

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

We study the interaction of a high frequency AC current with a magnetic field in an YBCO thin film by using time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an applied magnetic field, and a time varying transport current that does not induce any flux inside the thinWe study the interaction of a high frequency AC current with a magnetic field in an YBCO thin film of flux distributions. We find that the total current distribution can be described as the superposition

Lewis, Robert Michael

323

Study of the influence of a strong magnetic field on the composition of nuclear matter at high densities and zero temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetars are neutron stars with a strong surface magnetic field. Observations of soft gamma-ray and anomalous X-ray pulsars pointed out that the surface magnetic field of magnetars is equal or even greater than 10{sup 15} G. In this work we study the influence of a strong magnetic field on the composition of nuclear matter at high densities and zero temperature. We describe the matter through a relativistic mean-field model with eight light baryons (baryon octet), electrons, muons and with magnetic field. As output of the numerical calculations, we obtain the relative population of each species of particles as function of baryon density.

Coelho, Eduardo L.; Chiapparini, Marcelo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 20559-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bracco, Mirian E. [Faculdade de Tecnologia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, 27537-000, Resende, RJ (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

324

Solid-State NMR Studies of Fossil Fuels using One- and Two-Dimensional Methods at High Magnetic Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine the opportunities offered by advancements in solid-state NMR (SSNMR) methods, which increasingly rely on the use of high magnetic fields and fast magic angle spinning (MAS), in the studies of coals and other carbonaceous materials. The sensitivity of one- and two-dimensional experiments tested on several Argonne Premium coal samples is only slightly lower than that of traditional experiments performed at low magnetic fields in large MAS rotors, since higher receptivity per spin and the use of 1H detection of low-gamma nuclei can make up for most of the signal loss due to the small rotor size. The advantages of modern SSNMR methodology in these studies include improved resolution, simplicity of pulse sequences, and the possibility of using J-coupling during mixing.

Althaus, Stacey M.; Mao, Kanmi; Kennedy, Gordon J.; Pruski, Marek

2012-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

325

High Resolution Millimeter-Wave Mapping of Linearly Polarized Dust Emission: Magnetic Field Structure in Orion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present 1.3 and 3.3 mm polarization maps of Orion-KL obtained with the BIMA array at approximately 4 arcsec resolution. Thermal emission from magnetically aligned dust grains produces the polarization. Along the Orion ``ridge'' the polarization position angle varies smoothly from about 10 degrees to 40 degrees, in agreement with previous lower resolution maps. In a small region south of the Orion ``hot core,'' however, the position angle changes by 90 degrees. This abrupt change in polarization direction is not necessarily the signpost of a twisted magnetic field. Rather, in this localized region processes other than the usual Davis-Greenstein mechanism might align the dust grains with their long axes parallel with the field, orthogonal to their normal orientation.

R. Rao; R. M. Crutcher; R. L. Plambeck; M. C. H. Wright

1998-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

326

High-magnetic-field MHD-generator program. Quarterly report, January 1, 1982-March 30, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summaries progress in an experimental and theoretical program designed to investigate a number of important problems in the development of MHD generator channels. The areas of research include nonuniformity and stability effects, boundary layers, Hall field breakdown, the effects of electrode configuration and current concentrations, and studies of steady-state combustion disk and linear channels in a 6-Tesla magnet of small dimensions.

Kruger, C.H.; Eustis, R.H.; Mitchner, M.; Self, S.A.; Koester, J.K.; Nakamura, T.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Shock wave formation of thin layers of materials with improved superconducting and permanent magnetic properties and improved microstructures is disclosed. The material fabrication system includes a sandwiched structure including a powder material placed between two solid members to enable explosive shock consolidation. The two solid members are precooled to about 80--100 K to reduce the residual temperatures attained as a result of the shock wave treatment, and thereby increase the quench rate of the consolidated powder. 9 figs.

Nellis, W.J.; Geballe, T.H.; Maple, M.B.

1990-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

328

Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Shock wave formation of thin layers of materials with improved superconducting and permanent magnetic properties and improved microstructures. The material fabrication system includes a sandwiched structure including a powder material placed between two solid members to enable explosive shock consolidation. The two solid members are precooled to about 80.degree.-100.degree. K. to reduce the residual temperatures attained as a result of the shock wave treatment, and thereby increase the quench rate of the consolidated powder.

Nellis, William J. (Berkeley, CA); Geballe, Theodore H. (Woodside, CA); Maple, M. Brian (Del Mar, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Magnetically operated beam dump for dumping high power beams in a neutral beamline  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of this invention to provide a beam dump system for a neutral beam generator which lowers the time-averaged power density of the beam dump impingement surface. Another object of this invention is to provide a beam dump system for a neutral particle beam based on reionization and subsequent magnetic beam position modulation of the beam onto a beam dump surface to lower the time-averaged power density of the beam dump ion impingement surface.

Dagenhart, W.K.

1984-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

330

High-pressure science gets super-sized | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

leap forward with the discovery of a way to generate super high pressures without using shock waves whose accompanying heat turns solids to liquid. This discovery will allow...

331

New Developments at the XMaS Beamline For Magnetic and High Resolution Diffraction  

SciTech Connect

We report here on a number of developments that include enhancements of the sample environment on the XMaS beamline and the flux available at low energy. A 4 Tesla superconducting magnet has been designed to fit within the Euler cradle of a six circle Huber diffractometer, allowing scattering in both horizontal and vertical planes. The geometry of the magnet allows the application of longitudinal, transverse horizontal, and vertical fields. A further conventional magnet ({approx} 0.1 T) to minimize air absorption at low energies ({approx} 3KeV) has been designed for two circle applications, such as reflectivity. A novel in-vacuum slit screen has been developed, also minimizing absorption at low energies. New equipment for performing in-situ studies of surfaces in the electrochemical environment has been developed to allow control of the solution and sample temperature over the region of -5C to 80C. Preliminary experiments on the surface reconstructions of Au(111) in an electrolyte have been performed, whilst commissioning at the same time a MAR CCD detector for the beamline.

Thompson, P.B.J.; Bouchenoire, L.; Brown, S.D.; Mannix, D.; Paul, D.F. [XMaS, UK-CRG, ESRF, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble CEDEX (France); Lucas, C.; Kervin, J. [Dept of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Cooper, M.J. [Dept of Physics, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Arakawa, P.; Laughon, G. [American Magnetics Inc, P.O. Box 2509, 112 Flint Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-2509 (United States)

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

332

Assuring safety in high-speed magnetically levitated (maglev) systems : the need for a system safety approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnetic levitation is a railway technology that enables vehicles to be magnetically suspended above their tracks. Although this technology is still under development, magnetically levitated (maglev) systems have great ...

Ota, Shuichiro Daniel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

LARGE SUPERCONDUCTING DETECTOR MAGNETS WITH ULTRA THIN COILS FOR USE IN HIGH ENERGY ACCELERATORS AND STORAGE RINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contained 890 kJ of magnetic energy,:and i t iia:~ ,operat:as a functiori of stored magnetic energy' for a number ofabsorbs a portion of the magnetic energy in the process. The

Green, M.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Cyanide clusters of ReII with 3d metal ions and their magnetic properties: incorporating anisotropic ions into metal-cyanide clusters with high spin magnetic ground states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clusters of metal ions that possess large numbers of magnetically coupled unpaired electrons have attracted much interest in recent years due to their fascinating magnetic behavior. With an appreciable component of magnetic anisotropy, these large-spin paramagnetic molecules can exhibit an energy barrier to inversion of their magnetic dipole, leading to spontaneous magnetization and magnetic hysteresis below a critical temperature. Since this behavior is a property of an individual clusters rather than a collection of molecules, this phenomenon has been dubbed ??Single Molecule Magnetism??. Our approach to the study of new high-spin systems has been to exert a measure of synthetic control in the preparation of clusters. Specifically we are employing highly anisotropic metal ions with the anticipation that these ions would engender large overall magnetic anisotropy in the resulting clusters. The first step in this process was the development of the chemistry of two new d5 ReII (S = ??) complexes, namely [ReII(triphos)(CH3CN)3][PF6]2 and [Et4N][ReII(triphos)(CN)3]. The magnetic, optical and electrochemical properties were studied and theoretical models were developed to describe the origin of the large temperature independent paramagnetism that was observed. Next, we successfully employed transition metal cyanide chemistry using the ReII building blocks to prepare a family of isostructural, cubic clusters of the general formula {[MCl]4[Re(triphos)(CN)3]4} M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn whose 3d ions adopt local tetrahedral geometries. Within the clusters, magnetic exchange is observed between the paramagnetic ions, which has been modeled using an Ising exchange model to account for the dominating anisotropy of the ReII ion. Despite the high pseudo-symmetry of the clusters (Td), this work has yielded a rare example of a metal-cyanide single molecule magnet, {[MCl]4[Re(triphos)(CN)3]4} with an S = 8 ground state, D = -0.39 cm-1 and an effective energy barrier for magnetization reversal of Ueff = 8.8 cm-1. The elucidation of this family of isostructural clusters has also allowed us to pursue fundamental work on the structure/property relationships of the exotic, paramagnetic ReII ion. As the clusters are soluble, stable compounds, the future of this chemistry lies in the development of a true building-block approach to ??super-clusters?? that exhibit very high ground state spin values.

Schelter, Eric John

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

High-magnetic-field tests for reduced dimensionality in organic superconductors : just how valid are the Mott-Ioffe-Regel and Anderson criteria?  

SciTech Connect

The interlayer transfer integrals of various organic superconductors have been deduced using high-magnetic-field techniques. The measurements demonstrate the inappropriateness of criteria used to denote incoherent interlayer transport.

Singleton, J.; Goddard, P. A.; Ardavan, A.; Harrison, N.; Blundell, S. J.; Schlueter, J. A.; Kini, A. M.; Materials Science Division; LANL; Clarendon Lab.

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

HIGH-MAGNETIC-FIELD TESTS FOR REDUCED DIMENSIONALITY IN ORGANIC SUPERCONDUCTORS: JUST HOW VALID ARE THE MOTT-IOFFE-REGEL AND ANDERSON CRITERIA?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interlayer transfer integrals of various organic superconductors have been deduced using high-magnetic-field techniques. The measurements demonstrate the inappropriateness of criteria used to denote incoherent interlayer transport. Keywords: layered superconductors, organic metals, interlayer incoherence

Singleton, J. M. (John M.); Goddard, P. (Paul); Ardavan, A.; Harrison, N. (Neil); Blundell, S. J.; Sclueter, J. A.; Kini, A. M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Recent Progress At The Idaho National Laboratory In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the most recent results of experiments conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) studying electrolysis of steam and coelectrolysis of steam / carbon dioxide in solid-oxide electrolysis stacks. Single button cell tests as well as multi-cell stack testing have been conducted. Multi-cell stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec, Inc (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA) and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to 15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

C. Stoots; J. O'Brien; J. Herring; J. Hartvigsen

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

S ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY 19 ON CLOSED SHEIIS IN NUCLEI. II Maria G. Mayer April., 1949 Feenberg (1) ' (2) and Nordlkeim (3) have used the spins and magnetic moments of the even-odd nuclei to determine the angular momentum of the eigenfunction of the odd particle. The tabulations given by them indi- cate that spin orbit coupling favors the state of higher total angular momentum, If - strong spin.orbit coupling' increasing with angular mom- entum is assumed, a level assignment encounters a very few contradictions. with experimental facts and requires no major crossing of the levels from those of a square well potential. The magic numbers O, 82, and 126 occur at the' place of the spin-orbit splitting of levels of high angular momen- tum, Table 1 contains in column two in order

339

The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control room presents facility-wide status and orchestrates experiments using operating parameters predicted by physics models. A network of several hundred front-end processors (FEPs) implements device control. The object-oriented software system is implemented in the Ada and Java languages and emphasizes CORBA distribution of reusable software objects. NIF is currently scheduled to provide first light in 2004 and will be completed in 2008.

E. I. Moses

2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

340

Preliminary Waste Form Compliance Plan for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory High-Level Waste  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has specific technical and documentation requirements for high-level waste (HLW) that is to be placed in a federal repository. This document describes in general terms the strategy to be used at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to demonstrate that vitrified HLW, if produced at the INEEL, meets these requirements. Waste form, canister, quality assurance, and documentation specifications are discussed. Compliance strategy is given, followed by an overview of how this strategy would be implemented for each specification.

B. A. Staples; T. P. O' Holleran

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NERSC 2011: High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment for the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inability to meet DOE IPv6 requirements Med High ImpactMitigation NERSC/DOE has a requirement for IPv6 andscale. Science Requirements Workshops In 2009 NERSC and DOE

Antypas, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Exploration of Quench Initiation Due to Intentional Geometrical Defects in a High Magnetic Field Region of an SRF Cavity  

SciTech Connect

A computer program which was used to simulate and analyze the thermal behaviors of SRF cavities has been developed at Jefferson Lab using C++ code. This code was also used to verify the quench initiation due to geometrical defects in high magnetic field region of SRF cavities. We built a CEBAF single cell cavity with 4 artificial defects near equator, and this cavity has been tested with T-mapping. The preheating behavior and quench initiation analysis of this cavity will be presented here using the computer program.

J. Dai, K. Zhao, G.V. Eremeev, R.L. Geng, A.D. Palczewski; Dai, J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Palczewski, A. D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Eremeev, G. V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Geng, R. L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhao, K. [Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing (China)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

The National Ignition Facility: The Path to Ignition, High Energy Density Science and Inertial Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is a Nd:Glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. This world's most energetic laser system is now operational with the goals of achieving thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and exploring the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in the interiors of planetary and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, NIF performed the first integrated ignition experiment which demonstrated the successful coordination of the laser, the cryogenic target system, the array of diagnostics and the infrastructure required for ignition. Many more experiments have been completed since. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and the international communities are examining the implication of achieving ignition on NIF for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a 10% electrical-optical efficiency laser, as well as further advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection and tracking, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in 10- to 15-years. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) baseline design and examining various technology choices for LIFE power plant This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF, the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the start of fundamental science experiments and plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to researchers around the world. The paper will conclude with a discussion of LIFE, its development path and potential to enable a carbon-free clean energy future.

Moses, E

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

344

Method for improving performance of high temperature superconductors within a magnetic field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides articles including a base substrate including a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure layer thereon; and, a buffer layer upon the oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure layer, the buffer layer having an outwardly facing surface with a surface morphology including particulate outgrowths of from 10 nm to 500 run in size at the surface, such particulate outgrowths serving as flux pinning centers whereby the article maintains higher performance within magnetic fields than similar articles without the necessary density of such outgrowths.

Wang, Haiyan (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM); Maiorov, Boris A. (Los Alamos, NM); Civale, Leonardo (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

345

A high-resolution integrated model of the National Ignition Campaign cryogenic layered experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed simulation-based model of the June 2011 National Ignition Campaign cryogenic DT experiments is presented. The model is based on integrated hohlraum-capsule simulations that utilize the best available models for the hohlraum wall, ablator, and DT equations of state and opacities. The calculated radiation drive was adjusted by changing the input laser power to match the experimentally measured shock speeds, shock merger times, peak implosion velocity, and bangtime. The crossbeam energy transfer model was tuned to match the measured time-dependent symmetry. Mid-mode mix was included by directly modeling the ablator and ice surface perturbations up to mode 60. Simulated experimental values were extracted from the simulation and compared against the experiment. Although by design the model is able to reproduce the 1D in-flight implosion parameters and low-mode asymmetries, it is not able to accurately predict the measured and inferred stagnation properties and levels of mix. In particular, the measured yields were 15%-40% of the calculated yields, and the inferred stagnation pressure is about 3 times lower than simulated.

Jones, O. S.; Cerjan, C. J.; Marinak, M. M.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Springer, P. T.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bond, E. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Dixit, S. M.; Doppner, T.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Dzentitis, E. G.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-399, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

High-magnetic-field MHD-generator program. Quarterly report, July 1, 1981-September 30, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in an experimental and theoretical program designed to investigate a number of important problems in the development of MHD generator channels is described. The areas of reseach include nonuniformity and stability effects, boundary layers, Hall field breakdown, the effects of electrode configuration and current concentrations, and studies of steady-state combustion disk and linear channels in a 6 Tesla magnet of small dimensions. In the area of magneto-acoustic disturbances, a major experiment to study the formation and behavior of propagating waves in a combustion MHD was completed, using the M-2 facility. The results of this experiment are currently being compared with a theoretical model previously developed at Stanford. For the study of the effects of nonuniformities on generator performance, a diagnostic system for measurement of plasma temperature profiles and also a nitrogen injection device were satisfactorily tested in the M-2 flowtrain. An improved laser Doppler velocimeter system for the study of turbulence suppression in a magnetic field has been developed and tested, both on the bench and with the MHD flowtrain. The theoretical model of Hall field breakdown has been modified to better account for the effects of current concentrations. The peg-wall test section of the six-Tesla disk generator has been successfully tested under full thermal and electrical conditions. (WHK)

Kruger, C.H.; Eustis, R.H.; Mitchner, M.; Self, S.A.; Koester, J.K.; Nakamura, T.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Search for Chiral Magnetic Effects in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present measurements of pion elliptic flow ($v_2$) in Au+Au collisions at $\\sNN =$ 200, 62.4, 39, 27 and 19.6 GeV, as a function of event-by-event charge asymmetry ($A_{\\pm}$), based on data from the STAR experiment at RHIC. We find that $\\pi^-$ ($\\pi^+$) elliptic flow linearly increases (decreases) with charge asymmetry for most centrality bins and for all the beam energies under study. The slope parameter ($r$) from $v_2(A_\\pm)$ difference between $\\pi^-$ and $\\pi^+$ shows a centrality dependency similar with the calculations with Chiral Magnetic Wave. The measurements of charge separation with respect to the reaction plane in search of Local Parity Violation and Chiral Magnetic Effect are also presented for Au+Au collisions at $\\sNN =$ 200, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 11.5 and 7.7 GeV, and for U+U collisions at 193 GeV.

Gang Wang; for the STAR collaboration

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

348

Competition between cotunneling, Kondo effect, and direct tunneling in discontinuous high-anisotropy magnetic tunnel junctions  

SciTech Connect

The transition between Kondo and Coulomb blockade effects in discontinuous double magnetic tunnel junctions is explored as a function of the size of the CoPt magnetic clusters embedded between AlO{sub x} tunnel barriers. A gradual competition between cotunneling enhancement of the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and the TMR suppression due to the Kondo effect has been found in these junctions, with both effects having been found to coexist even in the same sample. It is possible to tune between these two states with temperature (at a temperature far below the cluster blocking temperature). In addition, when further decreasing the size of the CoPt clusters, another gradual transition between the Kondo effect and direct tunneling between the electrodes takes place. This second transition shows that the spin-flip processes found in junctions with impurities in the barrier are in fact due to the Kondo effect. A simple theoretical model able to account for these experimental results is proposed.

Ciudad D.; Arena D.; We, Z.-C.; Hindmarch, A.T.; Negusse, E.; Han, X.-F.Han; Marrows, C.H.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

349

Performance evaluation of a permanent magnet brushless DC linear drive for high-speed machining using finite element analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: FEA, coupled magneto-thermal, electric field, electromagnetic, linear motor drives, magnetic field, static

George Abdou; William Tereshkovich

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Process for selecting NEAMS applications for access to Idaho National Laboratory high performance computing resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

INL has agreed to provide participants in the Nuclear Energy Advanced Mod- eling and Simulation (NEAMS) program with access to its high performance computing (HPC) resources under sponsorship of the Enabling Computational Technologies (ECT) program element. This report documents the process used to select applications and the software stack in place at INL.

Michael Pernice

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Lightweight Superconducting Cables for use with High-Field Magnets and Military Applications  

The development of YBCO coated conductors has resulted in high critical current densities, but have been limited by the upper critical field of the superconductor. Achieving higher fields would require the use of high-temperature super conductors, but ...

352

Supported by the National Science Foundation and the State of Florida 1 REPORTSNATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

levitation trains. The other is a collaboration with the Institute for Plasma Research in India to assist with the Institute for Plasma Research in India (IPR-India) to assist with the design and development second major step pursuant to a broad mandate from the Indian government to stimulate plasma research

Weston, Ken

353

Preliminary Physics Motivation and Engineering Design Assessment of the National High Power Torus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In April 2006, Dr. Ray Orbach, Director of the DOE Office of Science, challenged the fusion community to "propose a new facility... which will put the U.S. at the lead in world fusion science." Analysis of the gaps between expected ITER performance and the requirements of a demonstration power plant (Demo) pointed to the critical and urgent need to develop fusion-relvant plasma-material interface (PMI) solutions consistent with sustained high plasma performance. A survey of world fusion program indicated that present and planned experimental devices do not advance the PMI issue beyond ITER, and a major dedicated experimental facility is warranted. Such a facility should provide the flexibility and access needed to solve plasma boundary challenges related to divertor heat flux and particle exhaust while also developing methods to minimize hydrogenic isotope retention and remaining compatible with high plasma performance.

Robert D. Woolley

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

354

A Study to Develop an Industrial-Scale, Computer-Controlled High Magnetic Field Processing (HMFP) System to Assist in Commercializing the Novel, Enabling HMFP Manufacturing Technology  

SciTech Connect

As the original magnet designer and manufacturer of ORNLs 9T, 5-inch ID bore magnet, American Magnetics Inc. (AMI) has collaborated with ORNLs Materials Processing Groups and this partnership has been instrumental in the development of our unique thermo-magnetic facilities and expertise. Consequently, AMI and ORNL have realized that the commercial implementation of the High Magnetic Field Processing (HMFP) technology will require the evolution of robust, automated superconducting (SC) magnet systems that will be cost-effective and easy to operate in an industrial environment. The goal of this project and CRADA is to significantly expedite the timeline for implementing this revolutionary and pervasive cross-cutting technology for future US produced industrial components. The successful completion of this project is anticipated to significantly assist in the timely commercialization and licensing of our HMFP intellectual property for a broad spectrum of industries; and to open up a new market for AMI. One notable outcome of this project is that the ThermoMagnetic Processing Technology WON a prestigious 2009 R&D 100 Awards. This award acknowledges and recognizes our TMP Technology as one of the top 100 innovative US technologies in 2009. By successfully establishing the design requirements for a commercial scale magnetic processing system, this project effort has accomplished a key first step in facilitating the building and demonstration of a superconducting magnetic processing coil, enabling the transition of the High Magnetic Field Processing Technology beyond a laboratory novelty into a commercially viable and industrially scalable Manufacturing Technology.

Lutdka, G. M.; Chourey, A. (American Magnetics, Inc.)

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

355

A gamma- and X-ray detector for cryogenic, high magnetic field applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As part of an experiment to measure the spectrum of photons emitted in beta-decay of the free neutron, we developed and operated a detector consisting of 12 bismuth germanate (BGO) crystals coupled to avalanche photodiodes (APDs). The detector was operated near liquid nitrogen temperature in the bore of a superconducting magnet and registered photons with energies from 5 keV to 1000 keV. To enlarge the detection range, we also directly detected soft X-rays with energies between 0.2 keV and 20 keV with three large area APDs. The construction and operation of the detector is presented, as well as information on operation of APDs at cryogenic temperatures.

Cooper, R L; Bales, M J; Bass, C D; Beise, E J; Breuer, H; Byrne, J; Chupp, T E; Coakley, K J; Dewey, M S; Fu, C; Gentile, T R; Mumm, H P; Nico, J S; O'Neill, B; Pulliam, K; Thompson, A K; Wietfeldt, F E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}N epitaxial films with high magnetization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the fabrication of pseudomorphic wurtzite Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}N grown on GaN with Mn concentrations up to 10% using molecular beam epitaxy. According to Rutherford backscattering, the Mn ions are mainly at the Ga-substitutional positions, and they are homogeneously distributed according to depth-resolved Auger-electron spectroscopy and secondary-ion mass-spectroscopy measurements. A random Mn distribution is indicated by transmission electron microscopy, and no Mn-rich clusters are present for optimized growth conditions. A linear increase of the c-lattice parameter with increasing Mn concentration is found using x-ray diffraction. The ferromagnetic behavior is confirmed by superconducting quantum-interference measurements showing saturation magnetizations of up to 150 emu/cm{sup 3}.

Kunert, G.; Kruse, C.; Figge, S.; Hommel, D. [Semiconductor Epitaxy, Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Dobkowska, S.; Jakiela, R.; Stefanowicz, W.; Sawicki, M. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Science, PL-02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Li, Tian; Bonanni, A. [Institute for Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A 4040 Linz (Austria); Reuther, H.; Grenzer, J.; Borany, J. von [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Bautzner Landstrasse 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Dietl, T. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Science, PL-02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, PL-00-681 Warszawa (Poland)

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

357

Ultra high-current superconducting cables for a 2. 2-Tesla, 300-kilojoule energy storage magnet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These 2.2-T, 300-kJ magnets are to operate at 10 to 12 kA with a safety factor in critical current of about 50 percent at 10 kA. The conductor must exhibit low losses in addition to being stable. Magnetic Corporation of America (MCA) designed a flat conductor using 1224 copper-matrix, monofilament wires combined in two stages of cabling followed by two stages of flat braiding. Two of these conductors were constructed, one with wire already on hand and the second using wire made specifically for this application. Intermagnetics General Corporation (IGC) designed two rectangular conductors using 315 and 319 mixed-matrix multifilament wires combined in three stages of cabling followed by compaction in a Turk's head. The maximum transport current capabilities (I/sub t/) of these cables were measured in hairpin shaped samples with the straight section under test in perpendicularly applied fields. The measured results at 2.5 T for the two MCA cables were 11.7 kA and 15.4 kA, and for the IGC cables were 18.2 kA and 19.3 kA (extrapolated). In addition, samples of the compacted and uncompacted major strands from the IGC cables were tested. The results of these measurements are compred with values of I/sub t/ from the single-wire critical currents taking into account the adjacent conductor fields and the cable self-fields.Several causes of degradation of I/sub t/ in the compacted cable are discussed including those due to experimental factors.

Miranda, G.A.; Rhodenizer, R.; Rackov, P.; Punchard, W.F.B.; de Winter, T.A.

1976-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

358

Numerical investigation of the physical model of a high-power electromagnetic wave in a magnetically insulated transmission line  

SciTech Connect

An efficient numerical code for simulating the propagation of a high-power electromagnetic pulse in a vacuum transmission line is required to study the physical phenomena occurring in such a line, to analyze the operation of present-day megavolt generators at an {approx}10-TW power level, and to design such new devices. The main physical theoretical principles are presented, and the stability of flows in the near-threshold region at the boundary of the regime of magnetic self-insulation is investigated based on one-dimensional telegraph equations with electron losses. Numerical (difference) methods-specifically, a method of characteristics and a finite-difference scheme-are described and their properties and effectiveness are compared by analyzing the high-frequency modes.

Samokhin, A. A. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

RESULTS OF RECENT HIGH TEMPERATURE COELECTROLYSIS STUDIES AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some results of CO2 / H2O electrolysis experiments performed to date using button cells and three different 10-cell planar solid oxide stacks are presented and discussed. These results include electrolysis performance at various temperatures, gas mixtures, and electrical settings. Product gas compositions, as measured via an in-line micro gas chromatograph (GC), are compared to predictions obtained from an INL-developed chemical equilibrium coelectrolysis model (CECM). Better understanding of the feasibility of producing syngas using high temperature electrolysis may initiate the systematic investigation of nuclear-powered synfuel production as a bridge to the future hydrogen economy and ultimate independence from foreign energy resources.

Carl Stoots; James O'Brien; Joseph Hartvigsen

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

title Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

item item title CDATA Scientists Discover Hidden Magnetic Waves in High Temperature Superconductors title description CDATA X ray technique reveals surprising quantum...

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361

Experimental studies in high temperature aqueous chemistry at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental research is conducted and models developed in a long- standing program at Oak Ridge on aqueous chemistry at high temperatures of broad classes of electrolytes emphasizing thermodynamics of reaction equilibria and excess thermodynamic properties of electrolytes. Experimental methods, their capabilities, data analysis, and results are summarized. Relevance of the work to problems in power plants, natural and industrial processes as well as basic solution chemistry and geochemistry are given. Progress in potentiometry, electrical conductivity, flow calorimetry, and isopiestic research is described. Future in this field demands greater precision in measurements and significant gains in our understanding of the solvation phenomena especially in the vicinity and beyond the critical point for water. The communities who do research on scattering, spectroscopy, and computer simulations can help guide these efforts through studies at extreme conditions.

Mesmer, R.E.; Palmer, D.A.; Simonson, J.M.; Holmes, H.F.; Ho, P.C.; Wesolowski, D.J.; Gruszkiewicz, M.S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Spheromak Formation and Sustainment Studies at the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment Using High-Speed Imaging and Magnetic Diagnostics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-speed imaging system with shutter speeds as fast as 2 ns and double frame capability has been used to directly image the formation and evolution of the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX). Reproducible plasma features have been identified with this diagnostic and divided in three groups, according to the stage in the discharge at which they occur: (1) breakdown and ejection, (2) sustainment, and (3) decay. During the first stage, plasma descends into the flux conserver shortly after breakdown and a transient plasma column is formed. The column then rapidly bends and simultaneously becomes too dim to photograph a few microseconds after formation. We conjecture that this rapid bending precedes the transfer of toroidal to poloidal flux. During sustainment, a stable plasma column different from the transient one is observed. It has been possible to measure the column diameter and compare it to CORSICA, an MHD equilibrium reconstruction code which showed good agreement with the measurements. Elongation and velocity measurements were made of cathode patterns also seen during this stage, possibly caused by pressure gradients or E x B drifts. The patterns elongate in a toroidal-only direction which depends on the magnetic field polarity. During the decay stage the column diameter expands as the current ramps down, until it eventually dissolves into filaments. With the use of magnetic probes inserted in the gun region, a X-point which moved axially depending on current level and toroidal mode number, was observed in all the stages of the SSPX plasma discharge.

Romero-Talamas, C A; Holcomb, C; Bellan, P M; Hill, D N

2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

363

LARGE SUPERCONDUCTING DETECTOR MAGNETS WITH ULTRA THIN COILS FOR USE IN HIGH ENERGY ACCELERATORS AND STORAGE RINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of these ,magnets bas proceeded with theThe Lawrence Beme1ey Laboratory bas developed a 1:adtca11. "The PLUTO magnet bas the largest central inductiOn 'and

Green, M.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

On the Fielding of a High Gain, Shock-Ignited Target on the National Ignitiion Facility in the Near Term  

SciTech Connect

Shock ignition, a new concept for igniting thermonuclear fuel, offers the possibility for a near-term ({approx}3-4 years) test of high gain inertial confinement fusion on the National Ignition Facility at less than 1MJ drive energy and without the need for new laser hardware. In shock ignition, compressed fusion fuel is separately ignited by a strong spherically converging shock and, because capsule implosion velocities are significantly lower than those required for conventional hotpot ignition, fusion energy gains of {approx}60 may be achievable on NIF at laser drive energies around {approx}0.5MJ. Because of the simple all-DT target design, its in-flight robustness, the potential need for only 1D SSD beam smoothing, minimal early time LPI preheat, and use of present (indirect drive) laser hardware, this target may be easier to field on NIF than a conventional (polar) direct drive hotspot ignition target. Like fast ignition, shock ignition has the potential for high fusion yields at low drive energy, but requires only a single laser with less demanding timing and spatial focusing requirements. Of course, conventional symmetry and stability constraints still apply. In this paper we present initial target performance simulations, delineate the critical issues and describe the immediate-term R&D program that must be performed in order to test the potential of a high gain shock ignition target on NIF in the near term.

Perkins, L J; Betti, R; Schurtz, G P; Craxton, R S; Dunne, A M; LaFortune, K N; Schmitt, A J; McKenty, P W; Bailey, D S; Lambert, M A; Ribeyre, X; Theobald, W R; Strozzi, D J; Harding, D R; Casner, A; Atzemi, S; Erbert, G V; Andersen, K S; Murakami, M; Comley, A J; Cook, R C; Stephens, R B

2010-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

365

High Temperature Superconducting Magnets for Efficient Low Energy Beam Transport Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern ion accelerators and ion implantation systems need very short, highly versatile, Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) systems. The need for reliable and continuous operation requires LEBT designs to be simple and robust. The energy efficiency of available high temperature superconductors (HTS), with efficient and simple cryocooler refrigeration, is an additional attraction. Innovative, compact LEBT systems based on solenoids designed and built with high-temperature superconductor will be developed using computer models and prototyped. The parameters will be chosen to make this type of LEBT useful in a variety of ion accelerators, ion implantation systems, cancer therapy synchrotrons, and research accelerators, including the ORNL SNS. The benefits of solenoids made with HTS will be evaluated with analytical and numerical calculations for a two-solenoid configuration, as will be used in the SNS prototype LEBT that will replace the electrostatic one at SNS, and a single solenoid configuration, as was proposed...

Popovic, M; Johnson, R P; Nipper, J H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping during magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation of bone marrow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Focal bone tumor treatments include amputation, limb-sparing surgical excision with bone reconstruction, and high-dose external-beam radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is an effective non-invasive thermotherapy for palliative management of bone metastases pain. MR thermometry (MRT) measures the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) of water molecules and produces accurate (<1 Degree-Sign C) and dynamic (<5s) thermal maps in soft tissues. PRFS-MRT is ineffective in fatty tissues such as yellow bone marrow and, since accurate temperature measurements are required in the bone to ensure adequate thermal dose, MR-HIFU is not indicated for primary bone tumor treatments. Magnetic relaxation times are sensitive to lipid temperature and we hypothesize that bone marrow temperature can be determined accurately by measuring changes in T{sub 2}, since T{sub 2} increases linearly in fat during heating. T{sub 2}-mapping using dual echo times during a dynamic turbo spin-echo pulse sequence enabled rapid measurement of T{sub 2}. Calibration of T{sub 2}-based thermal maps involved heating the marrow in a bovine femur and simultaneously measuring T{sub 2} and temperature with a thermocouple. A positive T{sub 2} temperature dependence in bone marrow of 20 ms/ Degree-Sign C was observed. Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping should enable accurate temperature monitoring during MR-HIFU treatment of bone marrow and shows promise for improving the safety and reducing the invasiveness of pediatric bone tumor treatments.

Waspe, Adam C.; Looi, Thomas; Mougenot, Charles; Amaral, Joao; Temple, Michael; Sivaloganathan, Siv; Drake, James M. [Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Philips Healthcare Canada, Markham, ON, L6C 2S3 (Canada); Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada)

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

367

A high-resolution field-emission-gun, scanning electron microscope investigation of anisotropic hydrogen decrepitation in Nd-Fe-B-based sintered magnets  

SciTech Connect

In this investigation commercial magnets based on (Nd,Dy){sub 14}(Fe,Co){sub 79}B{sub 7} were prepared by a conventional powder-metallurgy route with a degree of alignment equal to {approx}90% and then exposed to hydrogen at a pressure of 1 bar. The magnets, in the form of cylinders, were observed to decrepitate exclusively from the ends. High-resolution electron microscopy was able to identify the presence of crack formation within the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains, with the cracks running parallel to the c axis of these grains. Based on the concentration profile for hydrogen in a rare-earth transition-metal material, it is clear that the presence of hydrogen-induced cracks running perpendicular to the ends of the magnet provides for a much more rapidly progressing hydrogen front in this direction than from the sides of the magnet. This results in the magnet exhibiting a macroscopic tendency to decrepitate from the poles of the magnet toward the center. This combination of microstructural modification via particle alignment as part of the sintering process and direct observation via high-resolution electron microscopy has led to a satisfying explanation for the anisotropic hydrogen-decrepitation effect.

Soderznik, Marko; McGuiness, Paul; Zuzek-Rozman, Kristina; Kobe, Spomenka [Department for Nanostructured Materials, Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia); Skulj, Irena [Magneti Ljubljana, d.d., Stegne 37, 1000, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Yan Gaolin [School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Highly ordered magnetic mesoporous silicas for effective elimination of carbon monoxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalysts based on crystalline nanoparticles of Fe metal supported on mesoporous silica have been developed. The synthetic process involves hydrogen reduction processing for high abundant Fe metal nanoparticles within the mesopores, in which impregnated Fe salt in the inner nanopores of mesoporous silica is thermally treated under hydrogen at 500 Degree-Sign C. Detailed characterization was achieved by XRD, XPS, BET, and HR-TEM techniques. The catalytic efficiency was demonstrated as a function of the used amounts and reaction time. The results show that more than 90% of the carbon monoxide was eliminated at room temperature during a period 80 min with 0.5 g of catalyst. - Graphical abstract: Strategy for the preparation of highly abundant Fe nanoparticle embedded MS catalyst by hydrogen reduction process and HR-TEM images of cross-sectional and top view. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MS based heterogeneous catalyst with Fe nanoparticles were demonstrated for CO elimination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highly Fe nanoparticle embedded MS catalyst prepared by hydrogen reduction process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Systematic characterization was achieved by XRD, XPS, BET, and HR-TEM analyses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More than 90% of the CO was eliminated at RT during 80 min with 0.5 g of catalyst.

Lee, Jiho [Korea Institute of Ceramic Engineering and Technology, Seoul 153-801 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Ho Chang, Jeong, E-mail: jhchang@kicet.re.kr [Korea Institute of Ceramic Engineering and Technology, Seoul 153-801 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Magnetic Thin Films and Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... metal atoms that form small magnets with Curie ... a toggle operation of the magnetic state of ... A high-frequency probe driving a microwave waveguide ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

370

Nanostructured Materials for Magnetic Refrigeration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Nd-Fe-B Magnets to the Megawatt Scale Generator for the Wind Turbine ... Low Loss, High Power Density Magnetics in Inductor/Transformer Cores for Army ...

371

Crystal and magnetic structures and physical properties of a new pyroxene NaMnGe2O6 synthesized under high pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new pyroxene NaMnGe2O6 has been synthesized at 3 GPa and 800 C, and fully characterized by x-ray single-crystal diffraction and neutron powder diffraction, measurements of magnetization and specific heat. Like other majority sodium pyroxenes, NaMnGe2O6 crystallizes into a monoclinic C2/c structure with unit-cell parameters a = 9.859(2) , b = 8.7507(18) , c = 5.5724(11) , and =105.64(3) at room temperature. The crystal structure is featured by quasi-one-dimensional chains of skew edge-sharing MnO6 octahedra running along the crystallographic c axis; these chains are connected by non-magnetic GeO4 tetrahedra, so as to lead to a low-dimensional magnetism. The highly distorted MnO6 octahedron consisting of three Mn-O bond lengths, i.e. 1.918 , 1.991 , and 2.198 , is consistent with the Jahn-Teller effect at Mn3+ in a cubic crystal field. A long-range cooperative Jahn-Teller distortion is formed by ordering longest Mn-O bonds between two neighboring octahedra along the chain direction. No orbital order-disorder transition has been found up to 750 K as checked by magnetic susceptibility. Like other alkali-metal pyroxenes with S > , NaMnGe2O6 (S = 2) was found to undergo a long-range antiferromagnetic ordering at TN = 7 K at low magnetic field due to the exchange interactions along and between chains. Due to the peculiar structural features and the corresponding magnetic coupling, the weak AF spin ordering gives way to a ferromagnetic-like state at a sufficiently high magnetic field. Specific-heat measurements demonstrated that a large portion of the magnetic entropy, i.e. > 60 %, has been removed above TN as a result of strong spin correlations within the quasi-one-dimensional Mn3+-spin chains. Neutron powder diffraction study suggests a commensurate magnetic structure defined by k = [0 0 0.5] with Mn moments aligned along the c axis. The present study on NaMnGe2O6 completed the evolution of magnetic properties as a function of the d-orbital occupancy from d1 to d5 in the magnetic pyroxenes.

Yan, Jiaqiang [ORNL; Tian, Wei [ORNL; May, Andrew F [ORNL; Cheng, J G [University of Texas, Austin; Zhou, J.-S. [University of Texas, Austin; Garlea, Vasile O [ORNL; Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL; Steinfink, Hugo [University of Texas, Austin; Lynch, V [University of Texas, Austin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Performance Comparison of Nb3Sn Magnets at LBNL  

SciTech Connect

The Superconducting Magnet group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been successfully developing Nb{sub 3}Sn high-field dipole magnet technology for the last ten years. Noteworthy magnet tests include D20 (50mm bore, 4-layer cos{theta}, 12.8 T, accelerator quality dipole), and recent racetrack dipoles: (1) RTI (2-layer, 12 T, no bore, no training), (2) RD3b (3-layer, 14.7 T, 10mm bore), (3) RD3c (3-layer, 10 T, low-harmonics 35mm bore), and (4) some small Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets that utilized new technology. The performance of these magnets is summarized, comparing (1) cable and magnet geometry parameters, (2) training behavior, (3) ramp rate sensitivity, (4) RRR measurements, (5) peak temperatures and voltages, and (6) fast flux adjustments that occur during ramping.

Chiesa, L.; Caspi, S.; Coccoli, M.; Dietderich, D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia, R.r.; Lietzke, A.F.; McInturff, A.D.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R.M.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Design and performance of an ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope operating at dilution refrigerator temperatures and high magnetic fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the construction and performance of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) capable of taking maps of the tunneling density of states with sub-atomic spatial resolution at dilution refrigerator temperatures and high (14 T) magnetic fields. The fully ultra-high vacuum system features visual access to a two-sample microscope stage at the end of a bottom-loading dilution refrigerator, which facilitates the transfer of in situ prepared tips and samples. The two-sample stage enables location of the best area of the sample under study and extends the experiment lifetime. The successful thermal anchoring of the microscope, described in detail, is confirmed through a base temperature reading of 20 mK, along with a measured electron temperature of 250 mK. Atomically-resolved images, along with complementary vibration measurements, are presented to confirm the effectiveness of the vibration isolation scheme in this instrument. Finally, we demonstrate that the microscope is capable of the same level of perform...

Misra, Shashank; Drozdov, Ilya K; Seo, Jungpil; Gyenis, Andras; Kingsley, Simon C J; Jones, Howard; Yazdani, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Calibration of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Passive-Active Neutron Drum Shuffler for Measurement of Highly Enriched Uranium Oxide  

SciTech Connect

In partial response to a Department of Energy (DOE) request to evaluate the state of measurements of special nuclear material, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) evaluated and classified all highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide items in its inventory. Because of a lack of traceable HEU standards, no items were deemed to fit the category of well measured. A subsequent DOE-HQ sponsored survey by New Brunswick Laboratory resulted in their preparation of certified reference material (CRM) 149 [Uranium (93% Enriched) Oxide-U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Standard for Neutron Counting Measurements], a unit of which was delivered to LLNL in October of 1999. This paper describes the approach to calibration of the LLNL passive-active neutron drum (PAN) shuffler for measurement of poorly measured/unmeasured HEU oxide inventory. Included are discussions of (1) the calibration effort, including the development of the mass calibration curve; (2) the results from an axial and radial mapping of the detector response over a wide region of the PAN shuffler counting chamber, and (3) an error model for the total (systematic + random) uncertainty in the predicted mass that includes the uncertainties in calibration and sample position.

Mount, M.; Glosup, J.; Cochran, C.; Dearborn, D.; Endres, E.

2000-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

375

FIRST 100 T NON-DESTRUCTIVE MAGNET  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first 100 T non-destructive (100 T ND) magnet and power supplies as currently designed are described. This magnet will be installed as part of the user facility research equipment at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 100 T ND magnet will provide a 100 T pulsed field of 5 ms duration (above 90% of full field) in a 15 mm diameter bore once per hour. Magnet operation will be non-destructive. The magnet will consist of a controlled power outer coil set which produces a 47 T platform field in a 225 mm diameter bore. Located within the outer coil set will be a 220 mm outer diameter capacitor powered insert coil. Using inertial energy storage a synchronous motor/generator will provide ac power to a set of seven ac-dc converters rated at 64 MW/80 MVA each. These converters will energize three independent coil circuits to create 170 MJ of field energy in the outer coil set at the platform field of 47 T. The insert will then be energized to produce the balance of the 100 T peak field using a 2.3 MJ, 18 kV (charged to 15 kV), 14.4 mF capacitor bank controlled with solid-state switches. The magnet will be the first of its kind and the first non-destructive, reusable 100 T pulsed magnet. The operation of the magnet will be described along with special features of its design and construction.

J. R. SIMS; ET AL

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Orientation and thickness dependence of magnetization at the interfaces of highly spin-polarized manganite thin films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dr. Michael F. Toney (SSRL) and Brittany Nelson-CheesemanRadiation Laboratory (SSRL), a national user facility

Chopdekar, Rajesh V.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor fueling. Progress report, August 16, 1991--September 30, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three separate papers are included which report research progress during this period: (1) A new railgun configuration with perforated sidewalls, (2) development of a fuseless small-bore railgun for injection of high-speed hydrogen pellets into magnetically confined plasmas, and (3) controls and diagnostics on a fuseless railgun for solid hydrogen pellet injection.

Kim, K.; Zhang, J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling Machines...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling Machines and Switched Reluctance Motors to Replace Permanent Magnets in Electric Vehicles John Hsu, Oak Ridge National...

379

Magnetic liquefier for hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes work done at the Astronautics Technology Center of the Astronautics Corporation of America (ACA) in Phase 1 of a four phase program leading to the development of a magnetic liquefier for hydrogen. The project involves the design, fabrication, installation, and operation of a hydrogen liquefier providing significantly reduced capital and operating costs, compared to present liquefiers. To achieve this goal, magnetic refrigeration, a recently developed, highly efficient refrigeration technology, will be used for the liquefaction process. Phase 1 project tasks included liquefier conceptual design and analysis, preliminary design of promising configurations, design selection, and detailed design of the selected design. Fabrication drawings and vendor specifications for the selected design were completed during detailed design. The design of a subscale, demonstration magnetic hydrogen liquefier represents a significant advance in liquefaction technology. The cost reductions that can be realized in hydrogen liquefaction in both the subscale and, more importantly, in the full-scale device are expected to have considerable impact on the use of liquid hydrogen in transportation, chemical, and electronic industries. The benefits to the nation from this technological advance will continue to have importance well into the 21st century.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays from a Magnetized Strange Star Central Engine for Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) have been tried to be related to the most varied and powerful sources known in the universe. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are natural candidates. Here, we argue that cosmic rays can be accelerated by large amplitude electromagnetic waves (LAEMWs) when the MHD approximation of the field in the wind generated by the GRB's magnetized central engine breaks down. The central engine considered here is a strange star born with differential rotation from the accretion induced conversion of a neutron star into a strange star in a low-mass X-ray binary system. The LAEMWs generated this way accelerate light ions to the highest energies $E = q\\eta\\Delta\\Phi_{max}$ with an efficiency $\\eta \\sim 10^{-1}$ that accounts for all plausible energy losses. Alternatively, we also consider the possibility that, once formed, the LAEMWs are unstable to creation of a relativistically strong electromagnetic turbulence due to an overturn instability. Under this assumption, a lower limit to the efficien...

Esquivel, O

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

SEED BANKS FOR MAGNETIC FLUX COMPRESSION GENERATORS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been conducting experiments that require pulsed high currents to be delivered into inductive loads. The loads fall into two categories (1) pulsed high field magnets and (2) the input stage of Magnetic Flux Compression Generators (MFCG). Three capacitor banks of increasing energy storage and controls sophistication have been designed and constructed to drive these loads. One bank was developed for the magnet driving application (20kV {approx} 30kJ maximum stored energy.) Two banks where constructed as MFCG seed banks (12kV {approx} 43kJ and 26kV {approx} 450kJ). This paper will describe the design of each bank including switching, controls, circuit protection and safety.

Fulkerson, E S

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

382

FABRICATION OF RUTHERFORD-TYPE SUPERCONDUCTING CABLES FOR CONSTRUCTION OF DIPOLE MAGNETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SSC Design D Dipole," Brookhaven National Laboratory Report,Magnets and Cryogenics," Brookhaven National Laboratory (MayBerkeley Laboratory CLBL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (

Scanlan, R.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A Beamline for High-Pressure Studies at the Advanced Light Source with a Superconducting Bending Magnet as the Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a relatively low-energy (keV. The beam size in the ALS is small, due to the smallCompared to the prototype ALS superconducting bend magnet

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

ANTHEM simulation of the early time magnetic field penetration of the plasma surrounding a high density Z-pinch  

SciTech Connect

The early time penetration of magnetic field into the low density coronal plasma of a Z-pinch fiber is studied with the implicit plasma simulation code ANTHEM. Calculations show the emission of electrons from the cathode, pinching of the electron flow, magnetic insulation of the electrons near the anode, and low density ion blow off. PIC-particle ion calculations show a late time clumping of the ion density not seen with a fluid ion treatment. 4 refs., 4 figs.

Mason, R.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Irreversible magnetic switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an irreversible magnetic switch containing a ferromagnetic amorphous metal having a predetermined crystallization temperature in its inductor magnetic path. With the incorporation of such material, the magnetic properties after cooling from a high temperature excursion above its crystallization temperature are only a fraction of the original value. The difference is used to provide a safety feature in the magnetic switch.

Karnowsky, M.M.; Yost, F.G.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Study of hydrogen in coals, polymers, oxides, and muscle water by nuclear magnetic resonance; extension of solid-state high-resolution techniques. [Hydrogen molybdenum bronze  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been an important analytical and physical research tool for several decades. One area of NMR which has undergone considerable development in recent years is high resolution NMR of solids. In particular, high resolution solid state /sup 13/C NMR spectra exhibiting features similar to those observed in liquids are currently achievable using sophisticated pulse techniques. The work described in this thesis develops analogous methods for high resolution /sup 1/H NMR of rigid solids. Applications include characterization of hydrogen aromaticities in fossil fuels, and studies of hydrogen in oxides and bound water in muscle.

Ryan, L.M.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY May  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 9, 1994 Light Source Note: LS{234 Comparison of the APS and UGIMAG Helmholtz Coil Systems David W. Carnegie Accelerator Systems Division Advanced Photon Source Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439-4815 Telephone: (708) 252-6660 FAX: (708) 252-6607 ABSTRACT UGIMAG [1] is manufacturing the NdFeB permanent magnet blocks to be used in undulator A now being assembled by STI Optronics. We would like to be able to compare measurements made at the plant with those made at ANL and potentially with those made at the STI facility. Since there are no permanent magnet standard samples, measurement systems are compared by trading sets of magnets set aside as standards. APS has ten NdFeB permanent magnet blocks supplied by Sumitomo [2] that we use to make these comparisons. These magnet samples have been exten- sively measured on the APS system. The data include the

388

Large-Scale Testing and High-Fidelity Simulation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories to Support Space Power and Propulsion  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, as a Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Agency, has major responsibility to ensure the safety and security needs of nuclear weapons. As such, with an experienced research staff, Sandia maintains a spectrum of modeling and simulation capabilities integrated with experimental and large-scale test capabilities. This expertise and these capabilities offer considerable resources for addressing issues of interest to the space power and propulsion communities. This paper presents Sandia's capability to perform thermal qualification (analysis, test, modeling and simulation) using a representative weapon system as an example demonstrating the potential to support NASA's Lunar Reactor System.

Dobranich, Dean [Thermal and Reactive Processes Department, Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Blanchat, Thomas K. [Fire Science and Technology Department, Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

389

Rare Earth Magnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 8, 2013 ... Current high performance permanent magnets (PM) for traction motors of (hybrid) electric vehicles use substantial amount of Dy in Nd-Fe-B...

390

HTS Magnet Program | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HTS Magnet Program HTS Magnet Program High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) have the potential to revolutionize the field of superconducting magnets for particle accelerators, energy storage and medical applications. This is because of the fact that as compared to the conventional Low Temperature Superconductors (LTS), the critical current density (Jc ) of HTS falls slowly both: as a function of increasing field, and as a function of increasing temperature These unique properties can be utilized to design and build: HTS magnets that produce very high fields (20 - 50 T) HTS magnets that operate at elevated temperatures (20 - 77 K) This is a significant step forward over the convention LTS magnets which generally operate at a temperature of ~4 K and with field usually limited

391

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Gunite and Associated Tanks Stabilization Project-Low-Tech Approach with High-Tech Results  

SciTech Connect

Environmental restoration of the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was a priority to the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) because of their age and deteriorating structure. These eight tanks ranging up to 170,000 gallons in capacity were constructed in 1943 of a Gunite or ''sprayed concrete material'' as part of the Manhattan Project. The tanks initially received highly radioactive waste from the Graphite Reactor and associated chemical processing facilities. The waste was temporarily stored in these tanks to allow for radioactive decay prior to dilution and release into surface waters. Over time, additional wastes from ongoing ORNL operations (e.g., isotope separation and materials research) were discharged to the tanks for storage and treatment. These tanks were taken out of service in the 1970s. Based on the structure integrity of GAAT evaluated in 1995, the worst-case scenario for the tanks, even assuming they are in good condition, is to remain empty. A recently completed interim action conducted from April 1997 through September 2000 removed the tank liquids and residual solids to the extent practical. Interior video surveys of the tanks indicated signs of degradation of the Gunite material. The tanks continued to receive inleakage, which generated a relatively high volume waste stream that required periodic removal, treatment, and disposal. For these reasons, DOE chose in-place stabilization of Tanks W-3 through W-10 as a non-timecritical removal action under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Tank stabilization activities involved removal of liquid from inleakage and placement of a grout mixture or ''flowable fill'' into the tanks to within 3-ft of the ground surface. Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC) awarded Safety and Ecology Corporation (SEC) a subcontract in March 2001 to complete the documentation and fieldwork necessary to achieve tank stabilization in accordance with the Action Memorandum. Tank stabilization activities began on April 23, 2001, and were completed one month ahead of schedule on August 31, 2001. Over 7400 cubic yards of grout were placed in these tanks stabilizing over 4,000 Ci of radioactive material in place. This schedule acceleration was the result of good pre-planning during pre-mobilization by working with BJC, grout vendor, and pumping company, and other subcontractors. This planning allowed refinement of the pump and hose system used to convey the grout and the formulation of the grout mixture. Because of expediting the work, additional activities could be accomplished at the GAAT site that resulted in complete site restoration to a paved area for future parking, which was completed by September 30, 2001. This paper will focus on the following items associated with this successful environmental restoration project: regulatory process; integrated safety management systems used to achieve zero accident performance while expediting the schedule; tank stabilization design and implementation; and implementation strategies involving partnering of multiple subcontractors, DOE, and regulators.

Brill, A.; Alsup, T.; Bolling, D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

392

Advanced Institute for Computational Science (AICS): Japanese National High-Performance Computing Research Institute and its 10-petaflops supercomputer "K"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Institute for Computational Science (AICS) was created in July 2010 at RIKEN under the supervision of Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology (MEXT) in order to establish the national center of excellence (COE) ... Keywords: AICS, K computer, center of excellence, supercomputer

Akinori Yonezawa; Tadashi Watanabe; Mitsuo Yokokawa; Mitsuhisa Sato; Kimihiko Hirao

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

GSI Rapid Cycling Magnets Project | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GSI Rapid Cycling Magnets Project GSI Rapid Cycling Magnets Project While superconducting magnets easily achieve higher magnetic fields at lower cost than conventional electromagnets, it is very difficult to ramp superconducting magnets very quickly. But exactly that is needed at the planned new facility of GSI, the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (Institute for Heavy Ion Research), in Darmstadt, Germany. In the magnets of the SIS 200 ring, one of the components of the new facility, the magnetic field must be ramped from 0.5 Tesla to 4 Tesla at a rate of 1 Tesla per second. This ramp rate is almost 25 times faster than the ramp rate of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) magnets at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), which ramp at a rate of 0.042 Tesla per second. While the SIS 200 magnets also require a slightly higher field strength than the

394

Radio-frequency measurements of UNiX compounds (X= Al, Ga, Ge) in high magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

We performed radio-frequency (RF) skin-depth measurements of antiferromagnetic UNiX compounds (X=Al, Ga, Ge) in magnetic fields up to 60 T and at temperatures between 1.4 to {approx}60 K. Magnetic fields are applied along different crystallographic directions and RF penetration-depth was measured using a tunnel-diode oscillator (TDO) circuit. The sample is coupled to the inductive element of a TDO resonant tank circuit, and the shift in the resonant frequency {Delta}f of the circuit is measured. The UNiX compounds exhibit field-induced magnetic transitions at low temperatures, and those transitions are accompanied by a drastic change in {Delta}f. The results of our skin-depth measurements were compared with previously published B-T phase diagrams for these three compounds.

Mielke, Charles H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcdonald, David R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zapf, Vivien [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Altarawneh, Moaz M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lacerda, Alex H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adak, Sourav [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Karunakar, Kothapalli [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nakotte, Heinrich [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chang, S [NIST; Alsmadi, A M [HASHEMITE UNIV; Alyones, S [HASHEMIT UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

SGR 0418+5729, Swift J1822.3-1606, and 1E 2259+586 as massive fast rotating highly magnetized white dwarfs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following Malheiro et al. (2012) we describe the so-called low magnetic field magnetars, SGR 0418+5729, Swift J1822.3--1606, as well as the AXP prototype 1E 2259+586 as massive fast rotating highly magnetized white dwarfs. We give bounds for the mass, radius, moment of inertia, and magnetic field for these sources by requesting the stability of realistic general relativistic uniformly rotating configurations. Based on these parameters, we improve the theoretical prediction of the lower limit of the spindown rate of SGR 0418+5729; for a white dwarf close to its maximum stable we obtain the very stringent interval for the spindown rate of 4.1E-16set for Swift J1822.3-1606 for which a fully observationally accepted spin-down rate is still lacking. The white dwarf model provides for this source dP/dt> 2.13E-15, if the star is close to its maximum stable mass. We also present the theoretical expectation of the infrared, optical and ultraviolet emission of these objects and show their consistency with the current available observational data. We give in addition the frequencies at which absorption features could be present in the spectrum of these sources as the result of the scattering of photons with the quantized electrons by the surface magnetic field.

K. Boshkayev; L. Izzo; Jorge A. Rueda; R. Ruffini

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

396

DEEP X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE YOUNG HIGH-MAGNETIC-FIELD RADIO PULSAR J1119-6127 AND SUPERNOVA REMNANT G292.2-0.5  

SciTech Connect

High-magnetic-field radio pulsars are important transition objects for understanding the connection between magnetars and conventional radio pulsars. We present a detailed study of the young radio pulsar J1119-6127, which has a characteristic age of 1900 yr and a spin-down-inferred magnetic field of 4.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G, and its associated supernova remnant G292.2-0.5, using deep XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray Observatory exposures of over 120 ks from each telescope. The pulsar emission shows strong modulation below 2.5 keV with a single-peaked profile and a large pulsed fraction of 0.48 {+-} 0.12. Employing a magnetic, partially ionized hydrogen atmosphere model, we find that the observed pulse profile can be produced by a single hot spot of temperature 0.13 keV covering about one-third of the stellar surface, and we place an upper limit of 0.08 keV for an antipodal hot spot with the same area. The non-uniform surface temperature distribution could be the result of anisotropic heat conduction under a strong magnetic field, and a single-peaked profile seems common among high-B radio pulsars. For the associated remnant G292.2-0.5, its large diameter could be attributed to fast expansion in a low-density wind cavity, likely formed by a Wolf-Rayet progenitor, similar to two other high-B radio pulsars.

Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Ho, W. C. G. [School of Mathematics, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Weltevrede, P. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bogdanov, S. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Shannon, R. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Sciences, Australia Telescope National Facility, Marsfield, NSW 2210 (Australia); Gonzalez, M. E., E-mail: ncy@physics.mcgill.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

397

Design of low-power permanent-magnet synchronous motor for use in high-density heat pump  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical model for the functionality of a permanent-magnet synchronous motor is developed. Taking as input a specific geometry, it predicts steady-state losses of a design at an average rate of 0.85 seconds per analysis, ...

Jenicek, David P. (David Pierre)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

0-7803-9280-9/05/$20.00 2005 IEEE. 603 Design of a High-Speed Permanent Magnet Motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a 500 W permanent magnet (PM) machine used to drive the air- compressor of a 5 kW fuel cell (FC machine presented in this paper have theoretically more than 25 % of its working area with an efficiency (oxygen) supply, which often consists of compressor, possibly coupled to a turbine; - the humidifier

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

399

Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future Hadron Colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accelerators organized at Brookhaven National Laboratory inquadrupole magnets (Brookhaven. 1965). the first of a longbeam transport dipoles (Brookhaven. 1973 and Argonne. 1976).

Scanlan, R.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Increasing Magnetic Response of Ferromagnetic Semiconductors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory have manipulated electron mobility and pinpointed the mechanism controlling the strength of magnetic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

HEAT CAPACITY MEASUREMENTS IN PULSED MAGNETIC FIELDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(World Scientific, to be published) The new NHMFL 60T quasi-continuous magnet produces a flat-top field for a period of 100 ms at 60 Tesla, and for longer time at lower fields, e.g. 0.5 s at 35 Tesla. We have developed for the first time the capability to measure heat capacity at very high magnetic fields in the NHMFL 60T quasi-continuous magnet at LANL, using a probe built out of various plastic materials. The field plateau allows us to utilize a heat-pulse method to obtain heat capacity data. Proof-of-principle heat capacity experiments were performed on a variety of correlated electron systems. Both magnet performance characteristics and physical properties of various materials studied hold out a promise of wide application of this new tool. 1 I. TECHNIQUE The 60 Tesla Long-Pulse (60TLP) magnet was recently commissioned at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This magnet produces a flat-top field for a period of 100 ms at 60

M. Jaime; R. Movshovich; J. L. Sarrao; J. Kim; G. Stewart; W. P. Beyermann

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

FIRST 100 T NON-DESTRUCTIVE MAGNET OUTER COIL SET  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The controlled power outer coil set of the first 100 T non-destructive (100 T ND) magnet is described. This magnet will be installed as part of the user facility research equipment at the National High Magnetic Field laboratory (NHMFL) Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 100 T ND controlled power outer coil set consists of seven nested, mechanically independent externally reinforced coils. These coils, in combination, will produce a 47 T platform field in a 225-mm diameter bore. Using inertial energy storage a synchronous motor/generator provides ac power to a set of seven ac-dc converters rated at 64 MW/80 MVA each. These converters energize three independent coil circuits to create 170 MJ of field energy in the outer coil set at the platform field of 47 T. Each coil consists of a multi-layer winding of high strength conductor supported by an external high strength stainless steel shell. Coils with the highest magnetic loads will utilize a reinforcing shell fabricated from highly cold worked 301 stainless steel strip. The autofrettage conditioning method will be used to pre-stress the coils and thereby limit conductor and reinforcement strains to the elastic range. The purpose of pre-stressing the coils is to attain a design life of 10,000 full field pulses. The operation and conditioning of the coil set will be described along with special features of its design, magnetic and structural analyses and construction.

J. BACON; A. BACA; ET AL

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory wild@mcs.anl.gov ABSTRACT Code optimization in the high-performance computing realm has traditionally focused on reducing execution time. The problem, in...

404

Panel discussion: Progress and plans for magnetic fusion: Summary of comments on recent progress in fusion research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in fusion research is marked not so much by a few giant steps as by a continual number of small steps, which yield a steady advance toward the goal of producing a fusion reactor. During the past year, there have been two such steps in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) program: the experimental demonstration of access to the second stable region of beta in the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF); and the acceleration of a frozen hydrogen pellet by an intense electron beam. This paper discusses these steps.

Sheffield, J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

High-temperature studies of the magnetic susceptibility of samarium and the Al{sub 2}Sm compound  

SciTech Connect

The magnetic susceptibility of metallic samarium and the Al{sub 2}Sm intermetallic compound has been experimentally studied by the Faraday method in the temperature range of 300-1800 K. It has been shown that the temperature dependences of the magnetic susceptibility of Sm and Al{sub 2}Sm in a crystalline state can be described in the framework of Van Vleck paramagnetism theory taking into account variable valence and the contribution from the conduction electrons. Using this theoretical interpretation of the data, the effective valence of samarium in the metallic state and in the Al{sub 2}Sm intermetallic compound has been estimated as a function of the temperature.

Uporova, N. S., E-mail: fominans@rambler.ru [Ural State Pedagogical University (Russian Federation); Uporov, S. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metallurgy, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Sidorov, V. E. [Ural State Pedagogical University (Russian Federation)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

High-efficiency cross-beam magnetic electron-impact source for improved miniature Mattauch-Herzog mass spectrometer performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a newly designed cross-beam magnetic electron-impact ion source (CBM-EI). We demonstrate its superiority in comparison with a conventional source (CB-EI) when used with a commercial miniature sector-field-type, non-scanning mass spectrometer featuring Mattauch-Herzog geometry (MH-MS) and a permanent sector-field magnet. This paper clearly shows the value of the CBM-EI for enhancing MH-MS sensitivity. Unlike secondary electron-multiplier type detectors, the pixelated detector (IonCCD Trade-Mark-Sign ) used in the commercial MH-MS has no gain. The MH-MS/IonCCD system is therefore challenged to compete with time-of-flight and quadrupole MS systems due to their higher ion transmissions and detector gains. Using the new CBM-EI, we demonstrate an instrument sensitivity increase of 20-fold to 100-fold relative to the CB-EI-equipped instrument. This remarkable signal increase by the simple addition of the magnet assembly arises from the magnet-induced gyromotion of the thermionic electrons, which vastly increases the effective path length of the electrons through the ionization region, and the collimated nature of the electron flux, which optimizes the ion transmission through the 100-{mu}m object slit of the MH-MS. Some or all of the realized sensitivity increase may be exchanged for an increase in resolution and/or mass range through the use of a narrower object slit, or for a reduction in ion-source pressure to limit quenching. The CBM-EI should facilitate development of a differentially pumped ion source to extend the lifetime of the filament, especially in otherwise intractable applications associated with oxidizing and corrosive samples.

Hadjar, O.; Fowler, W. K. [OI Analytical/CMS Field Products, 2148 Pelham Parkway, Bldg. 400, Pelham, Alabama 35124 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

DEVELOPMENT OF A 40 mm BORE MAGNET CROSS SECTION WITH HIGH FIELD UNIFORMITY FOR THE 6.6T SSC DIPOLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. Femow, "KAG 2," Brookhaven National Lab- oratory, BNLDipole with C5 Coils," Brookhaven National Laboratory, SSCR. Fernow and G. Korgan (Brookhaven National Labor- atory)

Caspi, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...

409

CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Configuration Management - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February...

410

Magnetically applied pressure-shear : a new technique for direct strength measurement at high pressure (final report for LDRD project 117856).  

SciTech Connect

A new experimental technique to measure material shear strength at high pressures has been developed for use on magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) drive pulsed power platforms. By applying an external static magnetic field to the sample region, the MHD drive directly induces a shear stress wave in addition to the usual longitudinal stress wave. Strength is probed by passing this shear wave through a sample material where the transmissible shear stress is limited to the sample strength. The magnitude of the transmitted shear wave is measured via a transverse VISAR system from which the sample strength is determined.

Lamppa, Derek C.; Haill, Thomas A.; Alexander, C. Scott; Asay, James Russell

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

An important challenge in magnetic fusion research is to obtain high energy confinement in a stationary plasma that will be co  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ways to reduce your tokamak heating bill: Gaining control of edge transport Ways to reduce your tokamak heating bill: Gaining control of edge transport barriers on Alcator C-Mod A crucial challenge in magnetic fusion is to obtain high energy confinement in a stationary plasma that is compatible with the engineering requirements of a fusion reactor. The triggering of edge transport barriers at the boundary of confined plasma is a common approach to obtaining high energy confinement, in a regime known as H-mode, which extrapolates to high performance in ITER and other burning plasma devices. However, barriers to energy transport can sometimes be self-defeating, since they also provide a strong barrier to particle transport. This can lead to enhanced confinement of impurities in the plasma core, excessive radiated power and deterioration of performance for a given

412

High-pressure studies of rare earth material could lead to lighter, cheaper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

22013_earth 22013_earth 12/20/2013 A Lawrence Livermore researcher prepares a sample at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Spallation Neutrons and Pressure Diffractometer (SNAP). High-pressure studies of rare earth material could lead to lighter, cheaper magnets Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Sometimes you have to apply a little pressure to get magnetic materials to reveal their secrets. By placing a permanent magnet under high pressures, Lawrence Livermore researchers are exploring how atomic structure enhances magnetic strength and resistance to demagnetization. This fundamental research into magnetic behavior has important implications for engineering stronger, cheaper magnets. Permanent magnets based on rare earth elements are in high demand for

413

A direct search for Dirac magnetic monopoles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnetic monopoles are highly ionizing and curve in the direction of the magnetic field. A new dedicated magnetic monopole trigger at CDF, which requires large light pulses in the scintillators of the time-of-flight system, ...

Mulhearn, Michael James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about Magnetic Resonance Facility capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers as well as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Sandia National Laboratories: Z Pulsed Power Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Z-Machine Z-Machine About Z Z Research Z News Contact Us Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Z-Machine Z Pulsed Power Facility Science serving the nation Created to validate nuclear weapons models, the Z machine is also in the race for viable fusion energy. Z-Machine From Earth's Core to Black Holes Contributing to discovery science by studying matter at conditions found nowhere else on Earth Center of Z About Z Sandia's Z machine is the world's most powerful and efficient laboratory radiation source. It uses high magnetic fields associated with high electrical currents to produce high temperatures, high pressures, and powerful X-rays for research in high energy density science. The Z machine creates conditions found nowhere else on Earth. Z is part of Sandia's Pulsed Power program, which began in the 1960s.

416

Coupled Transient Finite Element Simulation of Quench in Jefferson Lab's 11 GeV Super High Momentum Spectrometer Superconducting Magnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents coupled transient thermal and electromagnetic finite element analysis of quench in the Q2, Q3, and dipole superconducting magnets using Vector Fields Quench code. Detailed temperature distribution within coils and aluminum force collars were computed at each time step. Both normal (quench with dump resistor) and worst-case (quench without dump resistor) scenarios were simulated to investigate the maximum temperatures. Two simulation methods were utilized, and their algorithms, implementation, advantages, and disadvantages are discussed. The first method simulated the coil using nonlinear transient thermal analysis directly linked with the transient circuit analysis. It was faster because only the coil was meshed and no eddy current was modeled. The second method simulated the whole magnet including the coil, the force collar, and the iron yoke. It coupled thermal analysis with transient electromagnetic field analysis which modeled electromagnetic fields including eddy currents within the force collar. Since eddy currents and temperature in the force collars were calculated in various configurations, segmentation of the force collars was optimized under the condition of fast discharge.

E. Sun, P. Brindza, S. Lassiter, M. Fowler, E. Xu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Safety and reliability in superconducting MHD magnets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This compilation adapts studies on safety and reliability in fusion magnets to similar problems in superconducting MHD magnets. MHD base load magnet requirements have been identified from recent Francis Bitter National Laboratory reports and that of other contracts. Information relevant to this subject in recent base load magnet design reports for AVCO - Everett Research Laboratories and Magnetic Corporation of America is included together with some viewpoints from a BNL workshop on structural analysis needed for superconducting coils in magnetic fusion energy. A summary of design codes used in large bubble chamber magnet design is also included.

Laverick, C.; Powell, J.; Hsieh, S.; Reich, M.; Botts, T.; Prodell, A.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Superconducting Magnets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

magnet technology has allowed physicists to attain higher energies in circular accelerators. One can obtain higher magnetic fields because there is no resistance in a...

419

Los Alamos National Laboratory top  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

top top science news of 2012 December 20, 2012 Scientific advances that caught the world's interest LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO, December 20, 2012-In 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory made its scientific mark in a wide variety of areas, and the stories that caught the public's attention and that of the science community reflect those broad capabilities. Top science stories for the year traveled from the canyons of Mars to the high desert forests of New Mexico, from cosmic particles to the structure of proteins and enzymes. Computer models of wildfires, and nuclear magnetic resonance signatures of plutonium, it all was fascinating for those following Los Alamos' science news. - 2 - Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover and ChemCam 2:12 ChemCam rock laser for the Mars Science Laboratory

420

A Proposal to the Department of Energy for The Fabrication of a Very High Energy Polarized Gama Ray Beam Facility and A Program of Medium Energy Physics Research at The National Synchrotron Light Source  

SciTech Connect

This proposal requests support for the fabrication and operation of a modest facility that would provide relatively intense beams of monochromatic and polarized photons with energies in the range of several hundreds of MeV. These {gamma} rays would be produced by Compton backscattering laser light from the electrons circulating in the 2.5-3.0 GeV 'X-RAY' storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The excellent emittance, phase space, and high current of this state-of-the-art storage ring will allow the production of 2 x 10{sup 7} {gamma} rays per second. These photons would be tagged by detecting the scattered electrons, thereby determining the energy to 2.7 MeV for all {gamma}-ray energies. The efficiency of this tagging procedure is 100% and the {gamma}-ray beam would be essentially background free. Tagging will also allow the flexibility of operating with a dynamic range as large as 200 MeV in photon energy while still preserving high resolution and polarization. These beams will permit a fruitful study of important questions in medium-energy nuclear physics. The initial goals of this program are to reach reliable operation with photon energies up to 300 MeV and to develop {gamma}-ray beams with energies up to about 500 MeV. To demonstrate reliable operation, a modest physics program is planned that, for the most part, utilizes existing magnets and detector systems but nonetheless addresses several important outstanding problems. Gamma ray beams of the versatility, intensity, energy, and resolution that can be achieved at this facility are not currently available at any other world facility either existing or under construction. Furthermore, the proposed program would produce the first intense source of medium-energy {gamma} rays that are polarized. Because of the difficulties in producing such polarized beams, it is very unlikely that viable alternate sources can be developed in the near future; at present, no others are planned.

Sandorfi, A.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Giordano, G.; Matone, G.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3: TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-LR-02-0 SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3 TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

E.M. Harpenau

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

EXOTIC MAGNETS FOR ACCELERATORS.  

SciTech Connect

Over the last few years, several novel magnet designs have been introduced to meet the requirements of new, high performance accelerators and beam lines. For example, the FAIR project at GSI requires superconducting magnets ramped at high rates ({approx} 4 T/s) in order to achieve the design intensity. Magnets for the RIA and FAIR projects and for the next generation of LHC interaction regions will need to withstand high doses of radiation. Helical magnets are required to maintain and control the polarization of high energy protons at RHIC. In other cases, novel magnets have been designed in response to limited budgets and space. For example, it is planned to use combined function superconducting magnets for the 50 GeV proton transport line at J-PARC to satisfy both budget and performance requirements. Novel coil winding methods have been developed for short, large aperture magnets such as those used in the insertion region upgrade at BEPC. This paper will highlight the novel features of these exotic magnets.

WANDERER, P.

2005-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

423

THE COMPONENT TEST FACILITY A NATIONAL USER FACILITY FOR TESTING OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR (HTGR) COMPONENTS AND SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and other High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) Projects require research, development, design, construction, and operation of a nuclear plant intended for both high-efficiency electricity production and high-temperature industrial applications, including hydrogen production. During the life cycle stages of an HTGR, plant systems, structures and components (SSCs) will be developed to support this reactor technology. To mitigate technical, schedule, and project risk associated with development of these SSCs, a large-scale test facility is required to support design verification and qualification prior to operational implementation. As a full-scale helium test facility, the Component Test facility (CTF) will provide prototype testing and qualification of heat transfer system components (e.g., Intermediate Heat Exchanger, valves, hot gas ducts), reactor internals, and hydrogen generation processing. It will perform confirmation tests for large-scale effects, validate component performance requirements, perform transient effects tests, and provide production demonstration of hydrogen and other high-temperature applications. Sponsored wholly or in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, the CTF will support NGNP and will also act as a National User Facility to support worldwide development of High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor technologies.

David S. Duncan; Vondell J. Balls; Stephanie L. Austad

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Electromagnetic interactions between the U-25 superconducting magnet and the U-25 B MHD flow train  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fluctuating voltage signals on the potential taps of the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) 5.0 Tesla MHD Superconducting Dipole Magnet have been observed during MHD power generation at the U-25 B Facility at the High Temperature Institute (IVAN), Moscow, U.S.S.R. The voltage fluctuations are analyzed with special emphasis on magnet stability. Various other thermodynamic and electrical parameters of the U-25 B flow train have been recorded and statistical correlations between these signals and the signals observed at the magnet terminals are described.

Smith, R.P.; Niemann, R.C.; Kraimer, M.R.; Zinneman, T.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

A Study On High Voltage AC Power Transmission Line Electric And Magnetic Field Coupling With Nearby Metallic Pipelines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the recent years, there has been a trend to run metallic pipelines carrying petroleum products and high voltage AC power lines parallel to each (more)

Gupta, Abhishek

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

High Level Waste Tank Farm Replacement Project for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Environmental Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0831, for the construction and operation of the High-Level Waste Tank Farm Replacement (HLWTFR) Project for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The HLWTFR Project as originally proposed by the DOE and as analyzed in this EA included: (1) replacement of five high-level liquid waste storage tanks with four new tanks and (2) the upgrading of existing tank relief piping and high-level liquid waste transfer systems. As a result of the April 1992 decision to discontinue the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel at INEL, DOE believes that it is unlikely that the tank replacement aspect of the project will be needed in the near term. Therefore, DOE is not proposing to proceed with the replacement of the tanks as described in this-EA. The DOE`s instant decision involves only the proposed upgrades aspect of the project described in this EA. The upgrades are needed to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act requirements, and the Department`s obligations pursuant to the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement and Consent Order among the Environmental Protection Agency, DOE, and the State of Idaho. The environmental impacts of the proposed upgrades are adequately covered and are bounded by the analysis in this EA. If DOE later proposes to proceed with the tank replacement aspect of the project as described in the EA or as modified, it will undertake appropriate further review pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Apparatus and method for magnetically processing a specimen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for magnetically processing a specimen that couples high field strength magnetic fields with the magnetocaloric effect includes a high field strength magnet capable of generating a magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla and a magnetocaloric insert disposed within a bore of the high field strength magnet. A method for magnetically processing a specimen includes positioning a specimen adjacent to a magnetocaloric insert within a bore of a magnet and applying a high field strength magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla to the specimen and to the magnetocaloric insert. The temperature of the specimen changes during the application of the high field strength magnetic field due to the magnetocaloric effect.

Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Kisner, Roger A; Jaramillo, Roger A

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

428

MagneticsLab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetics Laboratory Magnetics Laboratory Manufacturing Technologies The Magnetics Lab provides customers with design, prototyping, packaging solutions and production of unique magnetic and resistive components from millivolts to extremely high voltage (250KV) components. Capabilities * Design review of specification and requirements * Design and develop from sketches, verbal ideas, or circuit design parameters * Coil windings of any size or configuration * Coil diameter from 0.1 to 24 inches * Low temperature and high temperature coils * Precision resistors from 0.1 ohms to 2 megaohms (non-inductive) * Special high voltage transformers (2KV to 250KV) and high voltage loads (38K ohms to 100K ohms and 2KV to 250KV) Resources * Computer Aided Mechanical Design (Solid Works 3D CAD System) for mechanical

429

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNET DIVISION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MAGNET DIVISION CY 2013 Tier 1 Inspection Schedule Frequency Building Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 S 902B (Offices) 11713 62013 S 902A (Offices) 11713 62013 Q 902-High Bay Shop 22113 5...

430

Roadmapping Process Improvements by Experience at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory High Level Waste Program and Synergistic Interfaces with Decision-Making  

SciTech Connect

Six technology roadmaps were developed for various technologies under consideration for the treatment of sodium bearing liquid and calcine wastes. In the process of creating these roadmaps, a number of process improvements were identified for each of the formal roadmapping phases as described in the Department of Energys draft roadmapping guidance. The lessons learned, presented as beneficial improvements to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) High Level Waste Program, are proposed to be added to the draft guidance. Additionally, synergistic interfaces between the roadmapping and decision-making processes were observed and reported on. With these improvements, technology roadmapping has become an effective integration tool at the INEEL for planning technology development.

Murphy, James Anthony; Olson, Arlin Leland

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Initial performance assessment of the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste stored at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1, Methodology and results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This performance assessment characterized plausible treatment options conceived by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for its spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste and then modeled the performance of the resulting waste forms in two hypothetical, deep, geologic repositories: one in bedded salt and the other in granite. The results of the performance assessment are intended to help guide INEL in its study of how to prepare wastes and spent fuel for eventual permanent disposal. This assessment was part of the Waste Management Technology Development Program designed to help the US Department of Energy develop and demonstrate the capability to dispose of its nuclear waste. Although numerous caveats must be placed on the results, the general findings were as follows: Though the waste form behavior depended upon the repository type, all current and proposed waste forms provided acceptable behavior in the salt and granite repositories.

Rechard, R.P. [ed.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

MEASUREMENT OF THE NEUTRON SPECTRUM OF THE HB-4 COLD SOURCE AT THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of the cold neutron spectrum from the super critical hydrogen cold source at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were made using time-of-flight spectroscopy. Data were collected at reactor power levels of 8.5MW, 42.5MW and 85MW. The moderator temperature was also varied. Data were collected at 17K and 25K while the reactor power was at 8.5MW, 17K and 25K while at 42.5MW and 18K and 22K while at 85MW. The purpose of these measurements was to characterize the brightness of the cold source and to better understand the relationship between reactor power, moderator temperature, and cold neutron production. The authors will discuss the details of the measurement, the changes observed in the neutron spectrum, and the process for determining the source brightness from the measured neutron intensity.

Robertson, Lee [ORNL; Iverson, Erik B [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratories Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) is one of 17 National Laboratories in the United States and is one of the two located in New Mexico. The Laboratory has...

434

Moment free toroidal magnet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A toroidal magnet for confining a high magnetic field for use in fusion reactor research and nuclear particle detection. The magnet includes a series of conductor elements arranged about and fixed at its small major radius portion to the outer surface of a central cylindrical support each conductor element having a geometry such as to maintain the conductor elements in pure tension when a high current flows therein, and a support assembly which redistributes all or part of the tension which would otherwise arise in the small major radius portion of each coil element to the large major radius portion thereof.

Bonanos, Peter (East Brunswick, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Convergence Studies of Thermal and Electromagnetic Transient Quench Analysis of 11 GeV Super High Momentum Spectrometer Superconducting Magnets in Jefferson Lab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents results of convergence studies of transient thermal and electromagnetic quench analysis of five Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) superconducting magnets: HB, Q1, Q2, Q3, and Dipole, using Vector Fields Quench analysis codes. The convergence of the hot spot temperature and solution solve times were used to investigate the effects of element types, mesh densities, and tolerance criteria. The comparisons between tetrahedral elements and hexahedral elements was studied, and their advantages and disadvantages were discussed. Based on the results of convergence studies, a meshing guideline for coils is presented. The impact of iteration tolerance to the hot spot temperature was also explored, and it is found that tight tolerances result in extremely long solve times with only marginal improvements in the results.

Eric Sun, Paul Brindza, Steve Lassiter, Mike Fowler, E. Xu

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling Machines...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flux Coupling Machines and Switched Reluctance Motors to Replace Permanent Magnets in Electric Vehicles John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling Machines and...

437

Los Alamos National Laboratory announces top 10 science stories...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos National Laboratory announces top 10 science stories of 2011 Stories include alternative energy research, magnetic fields, disease tracking, the study of Mars, climate...

438

NATIONAL CONFERENCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Oak Room ... of the Secretariats, the US National Work Groups ... the continued cooperation with the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation ...

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

439

VLHC Meeting | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Second Annual Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) Meeting Second Annual Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) Meeting October 16 - 18, 2000 The Second Annual Meeting of the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) was be held on Monday, October 16 through Wednesday, October 18, 2000. It took place at Danfords in Port Jefferson, NY, about 30 minutes from Brookhaven National Laboratory. The meeting featured reports of the U.S. effort towards a post-LHC hadron collider. The program included an overview of physics in the 100 TeV c.m. regime, reports on superconductor and magnet R&D, as well as studies of accelerators and accelerator systems. The agenda also included a roundtable discussion of plans for future activities. Presentations VLHC Update (pdf), Mike Harrison, BNL Physics at Very High Energies (pdf), Sekhar Chivukula, Boston

440

Phase II Trial of Radiosurgery to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy-Defined High-Risk Tumor Volumes in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) boost to areas of high risk determined by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) functional imaging in addition to standard radiotherapy for patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients in this prospective Phase II trial underwent surgical resection or biopsy for a GBM followed by SRS directed toward areas of MRS-determined high biological activity within 2 cm of the postoperative enhancing surgical bed. The MRS regions were determined by identifying those voxels within the postoperative T2 magnetic resonance imaging volume that contained an elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate ratio in excess of 2:1. These voxels were marked, digitally fused with the SRS planning magnetic resonance image, targeted with an 8-mm isocenter per voxel, and treated using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group SRS dose guidelines. All patients then received conformal radiotherapy to a total dose of 60 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Results: The median survival for the entire cohort was 15.8 months. With 75% of recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 3 patients still alive 18 months after treatment, the median survival for RPA Class 3 has not yet been reached. The median survivals for RPA Class 4, 5, and 6 patients were 18.7, 12.5, and 3.9 months, respectively, compared with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiotherapy-alone historical control survivals of 11.1, 8.9, and 4.6 months. For the 16 of 35 patients who received concurrent temozolomide in addition to protocol radiotherapeutic treatment, the median survival was 20.8 months, compared with European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer historical controls of 14.6 months using radiotherapy and temozolomide. Grade 3/4 toxicities possibly attributable to treatment were 11%. Conclusions: This represents the first prospective trial using selective MRS-targeted functional SRS combined with radiotherapy for patients with GBM. This treatment is feasible, with acceptable toxicity and patient survivals higher than in historical controls. This study can form the basis for a multicenter, randomized trial.

Einstein, Douglas B., E-mail: douglas.einstein@khnetwork.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Wessels, Barry [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Bangert, Barbara [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Fu, Pingfu [Department of Biostatistics, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Nelson, A. Dennis [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Cohen, Mark [Department of Pathology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Pathology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Sagar, Stephen [Department of Neurology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Neurology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Lewin, Jonathan [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Sloan, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Zheng Yiran; Williams, Jordonna; Colussi, Valdir; Vinkler, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Maciunas, Robert [Department of Neurosurgery, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national high magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Initial performance assessment of the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste stored at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect

This performance assessment characterized plausible treatment options conceived by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for its spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste and then modeled the performance of the resulting waste forms in two hypothetical, deep, geologic repositories: one in bedded salt and the other in granite. The results of the performance assessment are intended to help guide INEL in its study of how to prepare wastes and spent fuel for eventual permanent disposal. This assessment was part of the Waste Management Technology Development Program designed to help the US Department of Energy develop and demonstrate the capability to dispose of its nuclear waste, as mandated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The waste forms comprised about 700 metric tons of initial heavy metal (or equivalent units) stored at the INEL: graphite spent fuel, experimental low enriched and highly enriched spent fuel, and high-level waste generated during reprocessing of some spent fuel. Five different waste treatment options were studied; in the analysis, the options and resulting waste forms were analyzed separately and in combination as five waste disposal groups. When the waste forms were studied in combination, the repository was assumed to also contain vitrified high-level waste from three DOE sites for a common basis of comparison and to simulate the impact of the INEL waste forms on a moderate-sized repository, The performance of the waste form was assessed within the context of a whole disposal system, using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, 40 CFR 191, promulgated in 1985. Though the waste form behavior depended upon the repository type, all current and proposed waste forms provided acceptable behavior in the salt and granite repositories.

Rechard, R.P. [ed.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Magnetic Materials for Green Innovation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Magnetic Materials for Use in Energy-efficient Distribution Transformers ... Novel Morphology of Highly Efficient Two-phase Ferrite Cores for Power Systems

443

Magnetic Refrigeration - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 6, 2013 ... Magnetic Refrigeration a 21st Century Highly Efficient and Green Cooling .... In order to advance their incorporation in prototypes and industrial...

444

Textured Polycrystalline Permanent Magnet Nanoflakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... high electrical resistivity, which will reduce eddy current losses and improve motor efficiency. ... Combinatorial Search of Rare-Earth-Free Permanent Magnets

445

Safety of high speed guided ground transportation systems: Comparison of magnetic and electric fields of conventional and advanced electrified transportation systems. Final report, September 1992-March 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns exist regarding the potential safety, environmental and health effects on the public and on transportation workers due to electrification along new or existing rail corridors, and to proposed maglev and high speed rail operations. Therefore, the characterization of electric and magnetic fields (EMF) produced by both steady (dc) and alternating currents (ac) at power frequency (50 Hz in Europe and 60 Hz in the U.S.) and above, in the Extreme Low Frequency (ELF) range (3-3000 Hz) is of interest. The report summarizes and compares the results of a survey of EMF characteristics (spatial, temporal and frequency bands) for representative conventional railroad and transit and advanced high-speed systems including: the German TR-07 maglev system; the Amtrak Northeast Corridor (NEC) and North Jersey Transit (NJT) trains; the Washington, DC Metrorail (WMATA) and the Boston, MA (MBTA) transit systems; and the French TGV-A high speed rail system. This comprehensive comparative EMF survey produced both detailed data and statistical summaries of EMF profiles, and their variability in time and space. EMF ELF levels for WMATA are also compared to those produced by common environmental sources at home, work, and under power lines, but have specific frequency signatures.

Dietrich, F.M.; Feero, W.E.; Jacobs, W.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Technology development for high power induction accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability.

Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

447

Superconducting Magnet Division | Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental, Safety & Health Environmental Management System (EMS) EMS Program Description (pdf) EMS Document Cross Reference Matrix (pdf) Environmental Aspects Matrix (pdf)...

448

DOE/EA-1471: Environmental Assessment for the Transportation of Highly Enriched Uranium from the Russian Federation to the Y-12 National Security Complex and Finding of No Significant Impact (January 2004)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA for the Transportation of Highly Enriched Uranium from the Russian Federation to the Y-12 National Security Complex EA for the Transportation of Highly Enriched Uranium from the Russian Federation to the Y-12 National Security Complex i FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE TRANSPORTATION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM FROM THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION TO THE Y-12 NATIONAL SECURITY COMPLEX ISSUED BY: United States Department of Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to transport highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Russia to a secure storage facility in Oak Ridge, TN. This proposed action would allow the United States and Russia to accelerate the disposition of excess nuclear weapons materials in the interest of promoting nuclear disarmament, strengthening nonproliferation, and combating terrorism. The HEU

449

Magnetic Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... magnetic reversal. As there is no predictive science of geomagnetism, we currently lack even simple forecasts. Our scientific ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

450

Magnetic Imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... data-storage and permanent magnets with increased energy products, in ... Optimization of future materials, including improved yields, requires an ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z