National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for national high magnetic

  1. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory moves closer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    researchers to carefully tune material parameters while perfectly reproducing the non-invasive magnetic field. Such high magnetic fields confine electrons to nanometer scale...

  2. magnets | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    magnets NNSA-lab-created new magnets will power renewable technology The Ion Beam Materials Laboratory at NNSA's Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) works to characterize and ...

  3. A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schissel, David P.; Abla, G.; Burruss, J. R.; Feibush, E.; Fredian, T. W.; Goode, M. M.; Greenwald, M. J.; Keahey, K.; Leggett, T.; Li, K.; McCune, D. C.; Papka, M. E.; Randerson, L.; Sanderson, A.; Stillerman, J.; Thompson, M. R.; Uram, T.; Wallace, G.

    2012-12-20

    This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. The original objective of the NFC project was to develop and deploy a national FES Grid (FusionGrid) that would be a system for secure sharing of computation, visualization, and data resources over the Internet. The goal of FusionGrid was to allow scientists at remote sites to participate as fully in experiments and computational activities as if they were working on site thereby creating a unified virtual organization of the geographically dispersed U.S. fusion community. The vision for FusionGrid was that experimental and simulation data, computer codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and remote collaboration tools are to be thought of as network services. In this model, an application service provider (ASP provides and maintains software resources as well as the necessary hardware resources. The project would create a robust, user-friendly collaborative software environment and make it available to the US FES community. This Grid's resources would be protected by a shared security infrastructure including strong authentication to identify users and authorization to allow stakeholders to control their own resources. In this environment, access to services is stressed rather than data or software portability.

  4. Design and preliminary test results of the 40 MW power supply at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boenig, H.J.; Bogdan, F.; Morris, G.C.; Ferner, J.A.; Schneider-Muntau, H.J.; Rumrill, R.H.; Rumrill, R.S.

    1993-11-01

    Four highly stabilized, steady-state, 10 MW power supplies have been installed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, FL. Each supply consists of a 12.5 kV vacuum circuit breaker, two three-winding, step-down transformers, a 24-pulse rectifier with interphase reactors and freewheeling diodes, and a passive and an active filter. Two different transformer tap settings allow dc supply output voltages of 400 and 500 V. The rated current of a supply is 17 kA and each supply has a one hour overload capability of 20 kA. The power supply output bus system, including a reversing switch at the input and 2 {times} 16 disconnect switches at the output, connects each supply to 16 different magnet cells. The design of the power supply is described and preliminary test results with a supply feeding a 10 MW resistive load are presented.

  5. Magnetized Target Fusion project with high density FRC at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Intrator, T.; Park, J. Y.; Wurden, G. A.; Taccetti, J. M.; Tuszewski, M.; Zhang, S. Y.; Waganaar, W.; Furno, I.; Hsu, S.; Tejero, E.; Leonard, M.; Bass, C.; Grabowski, C.; Degnan, J. H.

    2003-08-13

    We describe a program to demonstrate the scientific basis of Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF). MTF is a potentially low cost path to fusion which is intermediate in plasma regime between magnetic (MFE) and inertial fusion energy (IFE). MTF involves the compression of a magnetized target plasma and PdV heating to fusion relevant conditions inside a converging flux conserving boundary. We have chosen to demonstrate MTF by using a field-reversed configuration (FRC) as our magnetized target plasma and an imploding metal liner for compression. These choices take advantage of significant past scientific and technical accomplishments in MFE and Defense Programs research and should yield substantial plasma performance (n{tau}>10{sup 13}s-cm{sup -3}>5 keV) using an available pulsed-power implosion facility at modest cost. We have recently shown this FRC to be within a factor of 2-3 of required pressure and lifetime.

  6. Magnetic hydrogel with high coercivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szeri, H.; Alvero?lu, E.; Kurtan, U.; ?enel, M.; Baykal, A.

    2013-08-01

    Highlights: Polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels containing magnetic BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoparticles have been prepared. Magnetization measurements reveal that hydrogels have hard magnetic properties with high coercivity. Magnetic nanoparticles makes the gel more homogeneous and do not diffuse out of the gel during water intake. These gels are useful in applications as wastewater treatment once gels are magnetized before its usage. - Abstract: This study investigates the synthesis and characterization of polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels containing magnetic BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoparticles. Structural, electrical, and magnetic characterization of the gels have been performed with X-ray powder diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, DC conductivity, magnetization and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The preparation and characterization of polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels that contain 5 and 10 mg BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} (16 and 21 nm diameter) nanoparticles are described herein. It is seen from the fluorescence spectra that, nanoparticles surrounded to pyranine molecules so that some of pyranine molecules could not bound to the polymer strands. Electrical measurements show that presence of nanoparticles make the gel more homogeneous. Magnetization measurements reveal that hydrogels have hard magnetic properties with quite high coercivity of 4.2 kOe, which does not change with swelling. This feature makes these gels useful in applications as wastewater treatment if they are magnetized before use.

  7. Magnetic Nanotube Composite Membranes | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Nanotube Composite Membranes Technology available for licensing: Argonne has developed a prototype nanocomposite membrane made from magnetic nanotubes embedded onto a microporous support. The perm-selective layer is comprised of high aspect ratio nanotubes that function as pores/nanochannels embedded in a nonporous encapsulating polymer. Benefits: Hydrophilic surface provides improved antifouling properties, as increased hydrophilicity has been correlated with a decrease in fouling;

  8. 4 Tesla Magnet Facility | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Tesla Magnet Facility 4 Tesla Magnet Facility Argonne researchers recently acquired two decommissioned magnets from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners from hospitals in ...

  9. Novel magnets and superconductors studied by high precision magnetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Novel magnets and superconductors studied by high precision magnetic susceptometer under pressure An Inductor-capacitor circuit (LC circuit) is a simple, text-book level electric...

  10. High-resolution measurements of the DT neutron spectrum using new CD foils in the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Eckart, M. J.; Farrell, M. P.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoppe, M.; et al

    2016-08-09

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility measures the DT neutron spectrum from cryogenically layered inertial confinement fusion implosions. Yield, areal density, apparent ion temperature, and directional fluid flow are inferred from the MRS data. Here, this paper describes recent advances in MRS measurements of the primary peak using new, thinner, reduced-area deuterated plastic (CD) conversion foils. The new foils allow operation of MRS at yields 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously possible, at a resolution down to ~200 keV FWHM.

  11. CMI Unique Facility: Thermal Analysis in High Magnetic Fields | Critical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Institute Thermal Analysis in High Magnetic Fields The ability to measure Thermal Analysis in High Magnetic Fields is one of more than a dozen unique facilities developed by the Critical Materials Institute, an Energy Innovation Hub of the U.S. Department of Energy. CMI researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are able to measure materials over a wider range of conditions because they adapted commercial thermal analysis components to be compatible with high magnetic fields and

  12. Production of Materials with Superior Properties Utilizing High Magnetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Field - Energy Innovation Portal Electricity Transmission Electricity Transmission Early Stage R&D Early Stage R&D Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Production of Materials with Superior Properties Utilizing High Magnetic Field Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication UT-B ID 200401490 Magnetic 7 29 12.pdf (291 KB) Technology Marketing SummaryProcessing materials in a magnetic

  13. Argonne National Laboratory Partners with Advanced Magnet Lab to Develop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    First Fully Superconducting Direct-Drive Generator | Department of Energy Partners with Advanced Magnet Lab to Develop First Fully Superconducting Direct-Drive Generator Argonne National Laboratory Partners with Advanced Magnet Lab to Develop First Fully Superconducting Direct-Drive Generator December 19, 2011 - 9:24am Addthis This is an excerpt from the Fourth Quarter 2011 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. The Department of Energy (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is

  14. Scientists create 'magnetic charge ice' | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    create 'magnetic charge ice' By Jared Sagoff * May 25, 2016 Tweet EmailPrint A team of scientists working at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory has created a new material, called "rewritable magnetic charge ice," that permits an unprecedented degree of control over local magnetic fields and could pave the way for new computing technologies. The scientists' research report on development of magnetic charge ice is published in the May 20 issue of the

  15. Quantitative Modeling of High Temperature Magnetization Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shufeng

    2009-03-01

    Final Technical Report Project title: Quantitative Modeling of High Temperature Magnetization Dynamics DOE/Office of Science Program Manager Contact: Dr. James Davenport

  16. Memorandum Approval of a Permanenet Variance Regarding Static Magnetic Fields at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Variance 1021)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Approval of a Permanenet Variance Regarding Static Magnetic Fields at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Variance 1021)

  17. Lattice coupling to electronic and magnetic instabilities in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, J.D.; Graf, T.; Hundley, M.; Neumeier, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Lacerda, A. [National High Magnetic Field Lab., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Lawrence, J. [California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States); Phillips, N. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project focused on understanding electronic and magnetic instabilities in broad classes of materials in which the instabilities are coupled to the underlying crystallographic structure. Explaining these properties of materials poses outstanding theoretical and experimental challenges that are at the forefront of materials science/condensed matter physics. Very high magnetic fields available at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) are a key parameter in helping to provide this understanding. We have developed new experimental capabilities (thermal- expansion/magnetostriction, uniaxial stress and high-field heat capacity) needed to characterize how structure couples to the instabilities.

  18. Tuning magnetic disorder in diluted magnetic semiconductors using high fields to 89 Tesla

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crooker, Scott A; Samarth, Nitin

    2008-01-01

    We describe recent and ongoing studies at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos using the new '100 Tesla Multi-Shot Magnet', which is presently delivering fields up to {approx}89 T during its commissioning. We discuss the first experiments performed in this magnet system, wherein the linewidth of low-temperature photoluminescence spectra was used to directly reveal the degree of magnetic alloy disorder 'seen' by excitons in single Zn{sub 0.80}Cd{sub 0.22}Mn{sub 0.08}Se quantum wells. The magnetic potential landscape in II-VI diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) is typically smoothed when the embedded Mn{sup 2+} spins align in an applied field. However, an important (but heretofore untested) prediction of current models of compositional disorder is that magnetic alloy fluctuations in many DMS compounds should increase again in very large magnetic fields approaching 100 T. We observed precisely this increase above {approx}70 T, in agreement with a simple model of magnetic alloy disorder.

  19. Cryogenic properties of dispersion strengthened copper for high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toplosky, V. J.; Han, K.; Walsh, R. P.; Swenson, C. A.

    2014-01-27

    Cold deformed copper matrix composite conductors, developed for use in the 100 tesla multi-shot pulsed magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), have been characterized. The conductors are alumina strengthened copper which is fabricated by cold drawing that introduces high dislocation densities and high internal stresses. Both alumina particles and high density of dislocations provide us with high tensile strength and fatigue endurance. The conductors also have high electrical conductivities because alumina has limited solubility in Cu and dislocations have little scattering effect on conduction electrons. Such a combination of high strength and high conductivity makes it an excellent candidate over other resistive magnet materials. Thus, characterization is carried out by tensile testing and fully reversible fatigue testing. In tensile tests, the material exceeds the design criteria parameters. In the fatigue tests, both the load and displacement were measured and used to control the amplitude of the tests to simulate the various loading conditions in the pulsed magnet which is operated at 77 K in a non-destructive mode. In order to properly simulate the pulsed magnet operation, strain-controlled tests were more suitable than load controlled tests. For the dispersion strengthened coppers, the strengthening mechanism of the aluminum oxide provided better tensile and fatigue properties over convention copper.

  20. 15 Years of R&D on high field accelerator magnets at FNAL

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barzi, Emanuela; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2016-07-01

    The High Field Magnet (HFM) Program at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) has been developing Nb3Sn superconducting magnets, materials and technologies for present and future particle accelerators since the late 1990s. This paper summarizes the main results of the Nb3Sn accelerator magnet and superconductor R&D at FNAL and outlines the Program next steps.

  1. Argonne X-rays validate quantum magnetism model | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory X-rays validate quantum magnetism model May 20, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, Germany have validated a theorized model of quantum magnetism by observing it firsthand in a honeycomb lattice. The research is featured in an article titled "Direct evidence for dominant bond-directional interactions in a honeycomb lattice iridate Na2IrO3" published

  2. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.

    2015-03-24

    The work concentrates on few important tasks in enabling techniques for search of superconducting compressed hydrogen compounds and pure hydrogen, investigation of mechanisms of high-Tc superconductivity, and exploring new superconducting materials. Along that route we performed several challenging tasks, including discovery of new forms of polyhydrides of alkali metal Na at very high pressures. These experiments help us to establish the experimental environment that will provide important information on the high-pressure properties of hydrogen-rich compounds. Our recent progress in RIXS measurements opens a whole field of strongly correlated 3d materials. We have developed a systematic approach to measure major electronic parameters, like Hubbard energy U, and charge transfer energy Δ, as function of pressure. This technique will enable also RIXS studies of magnetic excitations in iridates and other 5d materials at the L edge, which attract a lot of interest recently. We have developed new magnetic sensing technique based on optically detected magnetic resonance from NV centers in diamond. The technique can be applied to study superconductivity in high-TC materials, to search for magnetic transitions in strongly correlated and itinerant magnetic materials under pressure. Summary of Project Activities; development of high-pressure experimentation platform for exploration of new potential superconductors, metal polyhydrides (including newly discovered alkali metal polyhydrides), and already known superconductors at the limit of static high-pressure techniques; investigation of special classes of superconducting compounds (high-Tc superconductors, new superconducting materials), that may provide new fundamental knowledge and may prove important for application as high-temperature/high-critical parameter superconductors; investigation of the pressure dependence of superconductivity and magnetic/phase transformations in 3d transition metal compounds, including

  3. Highly Charged Ions in Magnetic Fusion Plasmas: Research Opportunities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Highly Charged Ions in Magnetic Fusion Plasmas: Research Opportunities and Diagnostic Necessities Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Highly Charged Ions in Magnetic Fusion ...

  4. Electronic & magnetic materials and devices at the CNM | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Electronic & magnetic materials and devices at the CNM Graphene Micrograph 1 of 24 Graphene Micrograph Ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy image of a point defect in graphene that has been epitaxially grown on 6H-SiC(0001) (Nathan Guisinger, EMMD Group) at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials. Image: Photo courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory Graphene Micrograph 1 of 24 Graphene Micrograph Ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy image of a point

  5. highly enriched uranium | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    highly enriched uranium NNSA Announces Elimination of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) from Indonesia All of Southeast Asia Now HEU-Free (WASHINGTON, D.C.) - The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Indonesian Nuclear Industry, LLC (PT INUKI), the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), and the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) of the... NNSA deputy administrator travels to Ukraine Earlier this month, Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear

  6. A novel platform to study magnetized high-velocity collisionless...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A novel platform to study magnetized high-velocity collisionless shocks This content will become publicly available on March 12, 2017 Title: A novel platform to study magnetized ...

  7. Tiny Particles with Big Magnetic Power | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tiny Particles with Big Magnetic Power "Magnetic nanofibers" are special not only for their inherent properties as individual magnets, but also for their ability to be manipulated...

  8. High magnetic field ohmically decoupled non-contact technology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilgen, John [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard [Oak Ridge, TN; Ludtka, Gail [Oak Ridge, TN; Jaramillo, Roger [Knoxville, TN

    2009-05-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for high magnetic field ohmically decoupled non-contact treatment of conductive materials in a high magnetic field. A method includes applying a high magnetic field to at least a portion of a conductive material; and applying an inductive magnetic field to at least a fraction of the conductive material to induce a surface current within the fraction of the conductive material, the surface current generating a substantially bi-directional force that defines a vibration. The high magnetic field and the inductive magnetic field are substantially confocal, the fraction of the conductive material is located within the portion of the conductive material and ohmic heating from the surface current is ohmically decoupled from the vibration. An apparatus includes a high magnetic field coil defining an applied high magnetic field; an inductive magnetic field coil coupled to the high magnetic field coil, the inductive magnetic field coil defining an applied inductive magnetic field; and a processing zone located within both the applied high magnetic field and the applied inductive magnetic field. The high magnetic field and the inductive magnetic field are substantially confocal, and ohmic heating of a conductive material located in the processing zone is ohmically decoupled from a vibration of the conductive material.

  9. Permanent magnet design for high-speed superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.; Uherka, K.L.; Abdoud, R.G.

    1996-09-10

    A high temperature superconducting bearing including a permanent magnet rotor levitated by a high temperature superconducting structure is disclosed. The rotor preferably includes one or more concentric permanent magnet rings coupled to permanent magnet ring structures having substantially triangular and quadrangular cross-sections. Both alternating and single direction polarity magnet structures can be used in the bearing. 9 figs.

  10. Permanent magnet design for high-speed superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.; Uherka, Kenneth L.; Abdoud, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting bearing including a permanent magnet rotor levitated by a high temperature superconducting structure. The rotor preferably includes one or more concentric permanent magnet rings coupled to permanent magnet ring structures having substantially triangular and quadrangular cross-sections. Both alternating and single direction polarity magnet structures can be used in the bearing.

  11. Memorandum, Approval of a Permanent Variance Regarding Static Magnetic Fields at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Variance 102 1)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Approval of a Permanenet Variance Regarding Static Magnetic Fields at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Variance 1021)

  12. High average power magnetic modulator for copper lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, E.G.; Ball, D.G.; Birx, D.L.; Branum, J.D.; Peluso, S.E.; Langford, M.D.; Speer, R.D.; Sullivan, J.R.; Woods, P.G.

    1991-06-14

    Magnetic compression circuits show the promise of long life for operation at high average powers and high repetition rates. When the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory needed new modulators to drive their higher power copper lasers in the Laser Demonstration Facility (LDF), existing technology using thyratron switched capacitor inversion circuits did not meet the goal for long lifetimes at the required power levels. We have demonstrated that magnetic compression circuits can achieve this goal. Improving thyratron lifetime is achieved by increasing the thyratron conduction time, thereby reducing the effect of cathode depletion. This paper describes a three stage magnetic modulator designed to provide a 60 kV pulse to a copper laser at a 4. 5 kHz repetition rate. This modulator operates at 34 kW input power and has exhibited MTBF of {approx}1000 hours when using thyratrons and even longer MTBFs with a series of stack of SCRs for the main switch. Within this paper, the electrical and mechanical designs for the magnetic compression circuits are discussed as are the important performance parameters of lifetime and jitter. Ancillary circuits such as the charge circuit and reset circuit are shown. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. High performance hybrid magnetic structure for biotechnology applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Humphries, David E.; Pollard, Martin J.; Elkin, Christopher J.

    2006-12-12

    The present disclosure provides a high performance hybrid magnetic structure made from a combination of permanent magnets and ferromagnetic pole materials which are assembled in a predetermined array. The hybrid magnetic structure provides for separation and other biotechnology applications involving holding, manipulation, or separation of magnetic or magnetizable molecular structures and targets. Also disclosed are: a method of assembling the hybrid magnetic plates, a high throughput protocol featuring the hybrid magnetic structure, and other embodiments of the ferromagnetic pole shape, attachment and adapter interfaces for adapting the use of the hybrid magnetic structure for use with liquid handling and other robots for use in high throughput processes.

  14. Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology National Science Bowl Champion Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology National Science Bowl Champion May 2,...

  15. High Temperature Polymer Membrane Development at Argonne National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Temperature Polymer Membrane Development at Argonne National Laboratory High Temperature Polymer Membrane Development at Argonne National Laboratory Summary of ANL's high ...

  16. High performance magnetic bearing systems using high temperature superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abboud, R.G.

    1998-05-05

    Disclosed are a magnetic bearing apparatus and a method for providing at least one stabilizing force in a magnetic bearing structure with a superconducting magnetic assembly and a magnetic assembly, by providing a superconducting magnetic member in the superconducting magnetic assembly with a plurality of domains and arranging said superconducting magnetic member such that at least one domain has a domain C-axis vector alignment angularly disposed relative to a reference axis of the magnetic member in the magnetic assembly. 7 figs.

  17. High performance magnetic bearing systems using high temperature superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abboud, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    A magnetic bearing apparatus and a method for providing at least one stabilizing force in a magnetic bearing structure with a superconducting magnetic assembly and a magnetic assembly, by providing a superconducting magnetic member in the superconducting magnetic assembly with a plurality of domains and arranging said superconducting magnetic member such that at least one domain has a domain C-axis vector alignment angularly disposed relative to a reference axis of the magnetic member in the magnetic assembly.

  18. High Energy Physics | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News & Events Upcoming Events Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Videos Downloads About HEP at Work Career Opportunities Staff Directory About HEP at Work Career Opportunities Staff Directory Argonne National Laboratory High Energy Physics Research Facilities Capabilities Initiatives Publications News & Events Accelerator Technology Taking collider physics to higher energies More ATLAS at the LHC Colliding protons to learn about universal forces More Cosmology & Astrophysics

  19. High performance hybrid magnetic structure for biotechnology applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Humphries, David E; Pollard, Martin J; Elkin, Christopher J

    2005-10-11

    The present disclosure provides a high performance hybrid magnetic structure made from a combination of permanent magnets and ferromagnetic pole materials which are assembled in a predetermined array. The hybrid magnetic structure provides means for separation and other biotechnology applications involving holding, manipulation, or separation of magnetizable molecular structures and targets. Also disclosed are: a method of assembling the hybrid magnetic plates, a high throughput protocol featuring the hybrid magnetic structure, and other embodiments of the ferromagnetic pole shape, attachment and adapter interfaces for adapting the use of the hybrid magnetic structure for use with liquid handling and other robots for use in high throughput processes.

  20. Mitigated-force carriage for high magnetic field environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Ludtka, Gail M.; Wilgen, John B.; Murphy, Bart L.

    2015-05-19

    A carriage for high magnetic field environments includes a plurality of work-piece separators disposed in an operable relationship with a work-piece processing magnet having a magnetic field strength of at least 1 Tesla for supporting and separating a plurality of work-pieces by a preselected, essentially equal spacing, so that, as a first work-piece is inserted into the magnetic field, a second work-piece is simultaneously withdrawn from the magnetic field, so that an attractive magnetic force imparted on the first work-piece offsets a resistive magnetic force imparted on the second work-piece.

  1. High performance hybrid magnetic structure for biotechnology applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Humphries, David E.; Pollard, Martin J.; Elkin, Christopher J.

    2009-02-03

    The present disclosure provides a high performance hybrid magnetic structure made from a combination of permanent magnets and ferromagnetic pole materials which are assembled in a predetermined array. The hybrid magnetic structure provides means for separation and other biotechnology applications involving holding, manipulation, or separation of magnetic or magnetizable molecular structures and targets. Also disclosed are further improvements to aspects of the hybrid magnetic structure, including additional elements and for adapting the use of the hybrid magnetic structure for use in biotechnology and high throughput processes.

  2. Cryocooler applications for high-temperature superconductor magnetic bearings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemann, R. C.

    1998-05-22

    The efficiency and stability of rotational magnetic suspension systems are enhanced by the use of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) magnetic bearings. Fundamental aspects of the HTS magnetic bearings and rotational magnetic suspension are presented. HTS cooling can be by liquid cryogen bath immersion or by direct conduction, and thus there are various applications and integration issues for cryocoolers. Among the numerous cryocooler aspects to be considered are installation; operating temperature; losses; and vacuum pumping.

  3. Highly Charged Ions in Magnetic Fusion Plasmas: Research Opportunities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Highly Charged Ions in Magnetic Fusion Plasmas: Research Opportunities and Diagnostic ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  4. Ronald McNair Magnet School Wins National Science Competition - News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Releases | NREL Ronald McNair Magnet School Wins National Science Competition June 19, 2004 Golden, Colo. - Four middle school students from Ronald McNair Magnet School in Cocoa, Fla., showed their mastery of science today, winning the National Middle School Science Bowl by a landslide (geologic phenomena). Winners in the stock and open class model hydrogen fuel cell car competitions also were announced today. Doolen Middle School from Tucson, Ariz., will take home the trophy for the fastest

  5. Magnetic relaxation in highly anisotropic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedro, A.J.; Dunlap, B.D.

    1985-01-01

    Using the Mori formalism, a general theory is developed for the calculation of paramagnetic relaxation effects in a general crystal field doublet. For systems with extreme magnetic anisotropy, the relaxation rates show a strong angular dependence, being severely peaked in a direction perpendicular to the magnetic easy axis. Application to the RRh/sub 4/B/sub 4/ (R = rare-earth) compounds is discussed. 5 refs.

  6. high performance computing | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), announced her retirement last week after 15 years of leading Livermore's Computation Directorate. "Dona has successfully led a ...

  7. Helium gas bubble trapped in liquid helium in high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, H. Hannahs, S. T.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Weijers, H. W.

    2014-03-31

    High magnetic field magnets are used widely in the area of the condensed matter physics, material science, chemistry, geochemistry, and biology at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. New high field magnets of state-of-the-art are being pursued and developed at the lab, such as the current developing 32 T, 32 mm bore fully superconducting magnet. Liquid Helium (LHe) is used as the coolant for superconducting magnets or samples tested in a high magnetic field. When the magnetic field reaches a relatively high value the boil-off helium gas bubble generated by heat losses in the cryostat can be trapped in the LHe bath in the region where BzdBz/dz is less than negative 2100 T{sup 2}/m, instead of floating up to the top of LHe. Then the magnet or sample in the trapped bubble region may lose efficient cooling. In the development of the 32 T magnet, a prototype Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide coil of 6 double pancakes with an inner diameter of 40 mm and an outer diameter of 140 mm was fabricated and tested in a resistive magnet providing a background field of 15 T. The trapped gas bubble was observed in the tests when the prototype coil was ramped up to 7.5 T at a current of 200 A. This letter reports the test results on the trapped gas bubble and the comparison with the analytical results which shows they are in a good agreement.

  8. High precision magnetic susceptibility of novel magnets and supercondu...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    resistance region due to the effect of quantum mechanical tunneling, one can make a high resolution resonator (fundamental frequency of about 10 MHz) with a noise level of...

  9. Mitigated-force carriage for high magnetic field environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Murphy, Bart L

    2014-05-20

    A carriage for high magnetic field environments includes a first work-piece holding means for holding a first work-piece, the first work-piece holding means being disposed in an operable relationship with a work-piece processing magnet having a magnetic field strength of at least 1 Tesla. The first work-piece holding means is further disposed in operable connection with a second work-piece holding means for holding a second work-piece so that, as the first work-piece is inserted into the magnetic field, the second work-piece is simultaneously withdrawn from the magnetic field, so that an attractive magnetic force imparted on the first work-piece offsets a resistive magnetic force imparted on the second work-piece.

  10. New Osage Nation Facilities Deliver High Energy Performance,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Osage Nations new state-of-the-art Welcome Center is elegant, inviting, and highly energy efficient. The Osage Nation's new state-of-the-art Welcome Center is elegant, ...

  11. The largest and highest powered magnet lab in the world - MagLab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnet Time Search Staff Search Publications Search Site The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Main Menu User Facilities DC Field Electron Magnetic Resonance High BT Ion...

  12. Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Congressmen tour Y-12 facilities During a recent visit to the Y-12 National Security Complex, Rep. Mike Simpson (R-Idaho), chairman of the House Energy and Water Appropriations ...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: High Consequence, Automation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Consequence Automation Robotics Homepage About Robotics Research & Development Advanced Controls Advanced Manipulation Cybernetics High-Consequence Automation Demilitarization...

  14. Cerium-Based Magnets: Novel High Energy Permanent Magnet Without Critical Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: Ames Laboratory will develop a new class of permanent magnets based on the more commonly available element cerium for use in both EVs and renewable power generators. Cerium is 4 times more abundant and significantly less expensive than the rare earth element neodymium, which is frequently used in today’s most powerful magnets. Ames Laboratory will combine other metal elements with cerium to create a new magnet that can remain stable at the high temperatures typically found in electric motors. This new magnetic material will ultimately be demonstrated in a prototype electric motor, representing a cost-effective and efficient alternative to neodymium-based motors.

  15. Modeling high gradient magnetic separation from biological fluids.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bockenfeld, D.; Chen, H.; Rempfer, D.; Kaminski, M. D.; Rosengart, A. J.; Chemical Engineering; Illinois Inst. of Tech.; Univ. of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine

    2006-01-01

    A proposed portable magnetic separator consists of an array of biocompatible capillary tubing and magnetizable wires immersed in an externally applied homogeneous magnetic field. While subject to the homogeneous magnetic field, the wires create high magnetic field gradients, which aid in the collection of blood-borne magnetic nanospheres from blood flow. In this study, a 3-D numerical model was created using COMSOL Multiphysics 3.2 software to determine the configuration of the wire-tubing array from two possible configurations, one being an array with rows alternating between wires and tubing, and the other being an array where wire and tubing alternate in two directions. The results demonstrated that the second configuration would actually capture more of the magnetic spheres. Experimental data obtained by our group support this numerical result.

  16. Survey of Processing Methods for High Strength High Conductivity Wires for High Field Magnet Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, K.; Embury, J.D.

    1998-10-01

    This paper will deal with the basic concepts of attaining combination of high strength and high conductivity in pure materials, in-situ composites and macrocomposites. It will survey current attainments, and outline where some future developments may lie in developing wire products that are close to the theoretical strength of future magnet applications.

  17. High magnetic field processing of liquid crystalline polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, M.E.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Douglas, E.P.

    1998-11-24

    A process of forming bulk articles of oriented liquid crystalline thermoset material, the material characterized as having an enhanced tensile modulus parallel to orientation of an applied magnetic field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field, by curing a liquid crystalline thermoset precursor within a high strength magnetic field of greater than about 2 Tesla, is provided, together with a resultant bulk article of a liquid crystalline thermoset material, said material processed in a high strength magnetic field whereby said material is characterized as having a tensile modulus parallel to orientation of said field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field.

  18. High magnetic field processing of liquid crystalline polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Mark E.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Douglas, Elliot P.

    1998-01-01

    A process of forming bulk articles of oriented liquid crystalline thermoset material, the material characterized as having an enhanced tensile modulus parallel to orientation of an applied magnetic field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field, by curing a liquid crystalline thermoset precursor within a high strength magnetic field of greater than about 2 Tesla, is provided, together with a resultant bulk article of a liquid crystalline thermoset material, said material processed in a high strength magnetic field whereby said material is characterized as having a tensile modulus parallel to orientation of said field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field.

  19. Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility | Y-12 National Security...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    uranium, a vital national security asset. HEUMF is a massive concrete and steel structure that provides maximum security for the highly enriched uranium material that it protects. ...

  20. Theoretical High Energy Physics | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Accelerator Technology ATLAS at the LHC Cosmology & Astrophysics Instrumentation Precision Muon Physics Neutrino Physics Theoretical High Energy Physics Theoretical High Energy Physics Theoretical High Energy Physics Much of the work of high-energy physics concentrates on the interplay between theory and experiment. The theory group of Argonne's High Energy Physics Division performs high-precision calculations of Standard Model processes, interprets experimental data in terms of

  1. Magnetic Refrigeration Technology for High Efficiency Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boeder, A; Zimm, C

    2006-09-30

    Magnetic refrigeration was investigated as an efficient, environmentally friendly, flexible alternative to conventional residential vapor compression central air conditioning systems. Finite element analysis (FEA) models of advanced geometry active magnetic regenerator (AMR) beds were developed to minimize bed size and thus magnet mass by optimizing geometry for fluid flow and heat transfer and other losses. Conventional and magnetocaloric material (MCM) regenerator fabrication and assembly techniques were developed and advanced geometry passive regenerators were built and tested. A subscale engineering prototype (SEP) magnetic air conditioner was designed, constructed and tested. A model of the AMR cycle, combined with knowledge from passive regenerator experiments and FEA results, was used to design the regenerator beds. A 1.5 Tesla permanent magnet assembly was designed using FEA and the bed structure and plenum design was extensively optimized using FEA. The SEP is a flexible magnetic refrigeration platform, with individually instrumented beds and high flow rate and high frequency capability, although the current advanced regenerator geometry beds do not meet performance expectations, probably due to manufacturing and assembly tolerances. A model of the AMR cycle was used to optimize the design of a 3 ton capacity magnetic air conditioner, and the system design was iterated to minimize external parasitic losses such as heat exchanger pressure drop and fan power. The manufacturing cost for the entire air conditioning system was estimated, and while the estimated SEER efficiency is high, the magnetic air conditioning system is not cost competitive as currently configured. The 3 ton study results indicate that there are other applications where magnetic refrigeration is anticipated to have cost advantages over conventional systems, especially applications where magnetic refrigeration, through the use of its aqueous heat transfer fluid, could eliminate intermediate

  2. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet), National Bioenergy Center Laboratory Capabilities (NBCLC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resonance Facility Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers. NREL's state-of-the-art Magnetic Resonance Facility provides: *

  3. Magnetic tweezers with high permeability electromagnets for fast actuation of magnetic beads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, La; Offenhusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-15

    As a powerful and versatile scientific instrument, magnetic tweezers have been widely used in biophysical research areas, such as mechanical cell properties and single molecule manipulation. If one wants to steer bead position, the nonlinearity of magnetic properties and the strong position dependence of the magnetic field in most magnetic tweezers lead to quite a challenge in their control. In this article, we report multi-pole electromagnetic tweezers with high permeability cores yielding high force output, good maneuverability, and flexible design. For modeling, we adopted a piece-wise linear dependence of magnetization on field to characterize the magnetic beads. We implemented a bi-linear interpolation of magnetic field in the work space, based on a lookup table obtained from finite element simulation. The electronics and software were custom-made to achieve high performance. In addition, the effects of dimension and defect on structure of magnetic tips also were inspected. In a workspace with size of 0.1 0.1 mm{sup 2}, a force of up to 400 pN can be applied on a 2.8 ?m superparamagnetic bead in any direction within the plane. Because the magnetic particle is always pulled towards a tip, the pulling forces from the pole tips have to be well balanced in order to achieve control of the particles position. Active video tracking based feedback control is implemented, which is able to work at a speed of up to 1 kHz, yielding good maneuverability of the magnetic beads.

  4. High Explosives Application Facility | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) High Explosives Application Facility A Livermore scientist uses a laser spectroscopic method with a diamond anvil DOE/NNSA has identified LLNL's High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF) as the complex-wide "Center of Excellence" for High-Explosives Research and Development. In this capacity, HEAF is a source of subject matter expertise for high explosives and other energetic materials. Its mission is to provide this expertise to serve multiple government

  5. 15 Years of R&D on High Field Accelerator Magnets at FNAL (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    15 Years of R&D on High Field Accelerator Magnets at FNAL Citation Details In-Document Search Title: 15 Years of R&D on High Field Accelerator Magnets at FNAL The High Field Magnet ...

  6. High Field Magnets for a Future High Energy Proton-proton Collider...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    brief review of current progress, the talk will describe the key issues facing future development and present a roadmap for moving high field accelerator magnet technology forward...

  7. high explosives pressing facility | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    pressing facility high explosives pressing facility Thornberry hosts House Majority Leader at Pantex visit Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Texas, hosted Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy,...

  8. Superconductor Requirements and Characterization for High Field Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barzi, E.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    The 2014 Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel (P5) strategic plan for U.S. High Energy Physics (HEP) endorses a continued world leadership role in superconducting magnet technology for future Energy Frontier Programs. This includes 10 to 15 T Nb3Sn accelerator magnets for LHC upgrades and a future 100 TeV scale pp collider, and as ultimate goal that of developing magnet technologies above 20 T based on both High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) and Low Temperature Superconductors (LTS) for accelerator magnets. To achieve these objectives, a sound conductor development and characterization program is needed and is herein described. This program is intended to be conducted in close collaboration with U.S. and International labs, Universities and Industry.

  9. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Campbell High School...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Campbell High School National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National ...

  10. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Onate High School ...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Onate High School National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National ...

  11. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Shasta High School...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Shasta High School National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National ...

  12. High average power magnetic modulator for metal vapor lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ball, Don G.; Birx, Daniel L.; Cook, Edward G.; Miller, John L.

    1994-01-01

    A three-stage magnetic modulator utilizing magnetic pulse compression designed to provide a 60 kV pulse to a copper vapor laser at a 4.5 kHz repetition rate is disclosed. This modulator operates at 34 kW input power. The circuit includes a step up auto transformer and utilizes a rod and plate stack construction technique to achieve a high packing factor.

  13. Frontiers in Planetary and Stellar Magnetism through High-Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility image is a schematic of Earth interior and some magnetic field lines from a model This image is a schematic of Earth interior and some magnetic field lines from a model of planetary dynamo action. We will be carrying out super high res simulations of such processes via our INCITE award, allowing us for the first time to simulate planetary and astrophysical dynamo action in turbulent fluids with realistic fluid properties. Credit: Lorraine

  14. High-performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory High-performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:September 2015 all issues All Issues » submit High-performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory New high-performance computer system, called Wolf, will be used for unclassified research September 2, 2014 New insights to changing the atomic structure of metals The Wolf computer system modernizes

  15. High Temperature Polymer Membrane Development at Argonne National

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory | Department of Energy Temperature Polymer Membrane Development at Argonne National Laboratory High Temperature Polymer Membrane Development at Argonne National Laboratory Summary of ANL's high temperature polymer membrane work presented to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, Orlando FL, October 17, 2003 membrane_wrk_grp_mt.pdf (587.66 KB) More Documents & Publications Polyphenylene Sulfonic Acid: a new PEM Higher Temperature PEM Composite Systems for Fuel

  16. Apparatus for storing high magnetic fields having reduced mechanical forces and reduced magnetic pollution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, M.L.; Mueller, F.M.; Smith, J.L.

    1991-04-09

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of storing extremely high magnetic fields for the purpose of energy storage or for other uses, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements and the magnetic field pollution produced at locations away from the configuration are both significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by currently proposed techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency. 15 figures.

  17. Apparatus for storing high magnetic fields having reduced mechanical forces and reduced magnetic pollution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, Melvin L.; Mueller, Fred M.; Smith, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of storing extremely high magnetic fields for the purpose of energy storage or for other uses, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements and the magnetic field pollution produced at locations away from the configuration are both significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by currently proposed techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency.

  18. high explosives | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    high explosives NNSA honors Pantex explosives experts A group of explosives experts have been honored with a Defense Programs Award of Excellence for their help in securing supply of a critical material for the Departments of Energy and Defense. The four Pantexans, Tod Botcher, Tony Dutton, Ken Franklin and Kathy Mitchell, played a leadership role in

  19. Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology National Science

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bowl® Champion | Department of Energy Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology National Science Bowl® Champion Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology National Science Bowl® Champion May 2, 2005 - 12:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- "The Incompleteness Theorem" was the answer to a question on mathematics that today clinched the 2005 National Science Bowl® championship for the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology team from

  20. High Energy Physics | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerator Technology Taking collider physics to higher energies More ATLAS at the LHC Colliding protons to learn about universal forces More Cosmology & Astrophysics Looking at the dawn and evolution of the universe More Instrumentation Innovative detectors for next-generation experiments More Precision Muon Physics Muons as a probe for new physics More Neutrino Physics Studying the elusive, but second most abundant particle in the universe More Theoretical High Energy Physics Motivating

  1. High and ulta-high gradient quadrupole magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunk, W.O.; Walz, D.R.

    1985-05-01

    Small bore conventional dc quadrupoles with apertures from 1 to 2.578cm were designed and prototypes built and measured. New fabrication techniques including the use of wire electric discharge milling (EDM) to economically generate the pole tip contours and aperture tolerances are described. Magnetic measurement data from a prototype of a 1cm aperture quadrupole with possible use in future e/sup +//e/sup -/ super colliders are presented. At a current of 400A, the lens achieved a gradient of 2.475 T/cm, and had an efficiency of 76.6%.

  2. High Performance Computing | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Performance Computing A visualization of a simulated collision event in the ATLAS detector. This simulation, containing a Z boson and five hadronic jets, is an example of an event that is too complex to be simulated in bulk using ordinary PC-based computing grids. A visualization of a simulated collision event in the ATLAS detector. This simulation, containing a Z boson and five hadronic jets, is an example of an event that is too complex to be simulated in bulk using ordinary PC-based

  3. Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Nano-High, a program of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is a series of free Saturday morning talks by internationally recognized leaders in scientific research. The talks are designed...

  4. Methods of high current magnetic field generator for transcranial magnetic stimulation application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouda, N. R. Pritchard, J.; Weber, R. J.; Mina, M.

    2015-05-07

    This paper describes the design procedures and underlying concepts of a novel High Current Magnetic Field Generator (HCMFG) with adjustable pulse width for transcranial magnetic stimulation applications. This is achieved by utilizing two different switching devices, the MOSFET and insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT). Results indicate that currents as high as 1200 A can be generated with inputs of +/?20?V. Special attention to tradeoffs between field generators utilizing IGBT circuits (HCMFG{sub 1}) and MOSFET circuits (HCMFG{sub 2}) was considered. The theory of operation, design, experimental results, and electronic setup are presented and analyzed.

  5. Apparatus having reduced mechanical forces for supporting high magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, Melvin L.; Mueller, Fred M.; Smith, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of supporting extremely high magnetic fields suitable for plasma confinement, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements are significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by conventional techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency.

  6. Superconducting magnets in high-radiation environment at supercolliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Chichili, D.R.; Gourlay, S.A.; Van Sciver, S.; Zeller, A.

    2006-07-01

    The principal challenges arising from beam-induced energy deposition in superconducting (SC) magnets at high-energy high-luminosity hadron and lepton colliders are described. Radiation constraints are analyzed that include quench stability, dynamic heat loads on the cryogenic system, radiation damage limiting the component lifetime, and residual dose rates related to hands-on maintenance. These issues are especially challenging for the interaction regions (IR), particularly for the considered upgrade layouts of the Large Hadron Collider. Up to a few kW of beam power can dissipate in a single SC magnet, and a local peak power density can substantially exceed the quench levels. Just formally, the magnet lifetime is limited to a few months under these conditions. Possible solutions and the ways to mitigate these problems are described in this paper along with R&D needed.

  7. The Current Status and Future Direction of High Magnetic Field Science in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancaster, James

    2013-11-01

    This grant provided partial support for the National Research Council (NRC) study that assesses the current status of high magnetic field research in the United States and provides recommendations to guide the future of research and technology development for this area given the needs of user communities and in the context of other programs worldwide.. A pdf version of the report is available for download, for free, at http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=18355. The science drivers fall into 4 broad areas—(1) condensed matter and materials physics; (2) chemistry, biochemistry, and biology; (3) medical and life science studies; and (4) other fields such as high-energy physics, plasma physics, and particle astrophysics. Among the topics covered in the report’s findings, conclusions, and recommendations are a recognition that there is a continuing need for a centralized facility but also that clear benefits will flow to research communities from decentralized facilities. According to the report, support agencies should evaluate whether to establish such facilities when 32 Tesla superconducting magnets become available. The report also recommends the provision of facilities that combine magnetic fields with scattering facilities and THz radiation sources, and sets out specific magnet goals for magnets needed in several areas of research.

  8. High Energy Physics Organization Chart | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Career Opportunities Staff Directory About HEP at Work Career Opportunities Staff Directory Argonne National Laboratory High Energy Physics Research Facilities Capabilities Initiatives Publications News & Events News & Events Upcoming Events Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Videos Downloads High Energy Physics Organization Chart PDF icon Org Chart 08-04-16.pdf

  9. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - George Walton High...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    George Walton High School National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past ...

  10. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - C.M. Russell High School...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    C.M. Russell High School National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past ...

  11. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - LaFayette High School...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    LaFayette High School National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past ...

  12. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Lexington High School...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Lexington High School National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past ...

  13. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Montgomery Blair High...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Montgomery Blair High School National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past ...

  14. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Vigil I. Grissom High...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Vigil I. Grissom High School National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past ...

  15. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Hunter College High...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Hunter College High School National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past ...

  16. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Farmingdale High School...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Farmingdale High School National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past ...

  17. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - North Hollywood High...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    North Hollywood High School National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past ...

  18. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Palo Alto High School...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Palo Alto High School National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past ...

  19. High-performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory High-performance computer system installed at Lab High-performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory New high-performance computer system, called Wolf, will be used for unclassified research. June 17, 2014 The Wolf computer system modernizes mid-tier resources for Los Alamos scientists. The Wolf computer system modernizes mid-tier resources for Los Alamos scientists. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "This machine

  20. Progress with high-field superconducting magnets for high-energy colliders

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Apollinari, Giorgio; Prestemon, Soren; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2015-10-01

    One of the possible next steps for high-energy physics research relies on a high-energy hadron or muon collider. The energy of a circular collider is limited by the strength of bending dipoles, and its maximum luminosity is determined by the strength of final focus quadrupoles. For this reason, the high-energy physics and accelerator communities have shown much interest in higher-field and higher-gradient superconducting accelerator magnets. The maximum field of NbTi magnets used in all present high-energy machines, including the LHC, is limited to ~10 T at 1.9 K. Fields above 10 T became possible with the use of Nb$_3$Sn superconductors.more » Nb$_3$Sn accelerator magnets can provide operating fields up to ~15 T and can significantly increase the coil temperature margin. Accelerator magnets with operating fields above 15 T require high-temperature superconductors. Furthermore, this review discusses the status and main results of Nb$_3$Sn accelerator magnet research and development and work toward 20-T magnets.« less

  1. Progress with high-field superconducting magnets for high-energy colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apollinari, Giorgio; Prestemon, Soren; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2015-10-01

    One of the possible next steps for high-energy physics research relies on a high-energy hadron or muon collider. The energy of a circular collider is limited by the strength of bending dipoles, and its maximum luminosity is determined by the strength of final focus quadrupoles. For this reason, the high-energy physics and accelerator communities have shown much interest in higher-field and higher-gradient superconducting accelerator magnets. The maximum field of NbTi magnets used in all present high-energy machines, including the LHC, is limited to ~10 T at 1.9 K. Fields above 10 T became possible with the use of Nb$_3$Sn superconductors. Nb$_3$Sn accelerator magnets can provide operating fields up to ~15 T and can significantly increase the coil temperature margin. Accelerator magnets with operating fields above 15 T require high-temperature superconductors. Furthermore, this review discusses the status and main results of Nb$_3$Sn accelerator magnet research and development and work toward 20-T magnets.

  2. High-entropy bulk metallic glasses as promising magnetic refrigerants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huo, Juntao; Huo, Lishan; Li, Jiawei; Men, He; Wang, Xinmin; Chang, Chuntao E-mail: jqwang@nimte.ac.cn; Wang, Jun-Qiang E-mail: jqwang@nimte.ac.cn; Li, Run-Wei; Inoue, Akihisa

    2015-02-21

    In this paper, the Ho{sub 20}Er{sub 20}Co{sub 20}Al{sub 20}RE{sub 20} (RE = Gd, Dy, and Tm) high-entropy bulk metallic glasses (HE-BMGs) with good magnetocaloric properties are fabricated successfully. The HE-BMGs exhibit a second-order magnetic phase transition. The peak of magnetic entropy change (ΔS{sub M}{sup pk}) and refrigerant capacity (RC) reaches 15.0 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1} and 627 J kg{sup −1} at 5 T, respectively, which is larger than most rare earth based BMGs. The heterogeneous nature of glasses also contributes to the large ΔS{sub M}{sup pk} and RC. In addition, the magnetic ordering temperature, ΔS{sub M}{sup pk} and RC can be widely tuned by alloying different rare earth elements. These results suggest that the HE-BMGs are promising magnetic refrigerant at low temperatures.

  3. High temperature spin dynamics in linear magnetic chains, molecular rings, and segments by nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adelnia, Fatemeh; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Mariani, Manuel; Ammannato, Luca; Caneschi, Andrea; Rovai, Donella; Winpenny, Richard; Timco, Grigore; Corti, Maurizio Borsa, Ferdinando

    2015-05-07

    We present the room temperature proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) results in two 1D spin chains: the Heisenberg antiferromagnetic (AFM) Eu(hfac){sub 3}NITEt and the magnetically frustrated Gd(hfac){sub 3}NITEt. The NSLR as a function of external magnetic field can be interpreted very well in terms of high temperature spin dynamics dominated by a long time persistence of the decay of the two-spin correlation function due to the conservation of the total spin value for isotropic Heisenberg chains. The high temperature spin dynamics are also investigated in Heisenberg AFM molecular rings. In both Cr{sub 8} closed ring and in Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 8}Zn open rings, i.e., model systems for a finite spin segment, an enhancement of the low frequency spectral density is found consistent with spin diffusion but the high cut-off frequency due to intermolecular anisotropic interactions prevents a detailed analysis of the spin diffusion regime.

  4. Preparation of magnetic anomaly profile and contour maps from DOE-NURE aerial survey data. Volume I: processing procedures. [National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tinnel, E.P.; Hinze, W.J.

    1981-09-01

    Total intensity magnetic anomaly data acquired as a supplement to radiometric data in the DOE National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program are useful in preparing regional profile and contour maps. Survey-contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data are subjected to a multiprocess, computer-based procedure which prepares these data for presentation. This procedure is used to produce the following machine plotted maps of National Topographic Map Series quadrangle units at a 1:250,000 scale: (1) profile map of contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data, (2) profile map of high-cut filtered data with contour levels of each profile marked and annotated on the associated flight track, (3) profile map of critical-point data with contour levels indicated, and (4) contour map of filtered and selected data. These quadrangle maps are supplemented with a range of statistical measures of the data which are useful in quality evaluation.

  5. CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  6. CRAD, Training- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  7. CRAD, Maintenance- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  8. CRAD, Engineering- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  9. US, Kazakhstan Cooperate to Eliminate Highly Enriched Uranium | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) US, Kazakhstan Cooperate to Eliminate Highly Enriched Uranium January 07, 2015 WASHINGTON D.C - The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) announced today the removal of 36 kilograms (approximately 80 pounds) of highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent fuel from the Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) in Almaty, Kazakhstan. The HEU was transported via two air shipments to a secure facility in Russia for permanent

  10. Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Program | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Program November 13, 2013 The U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Program reduces nuclear risk by monitoring the conversion of 500 metric tons (MT) of Russian HEU, enough material for 20,000 nuclear weapons, into low enriched uranium (LEU). This LEU is put into peaceful use in the United States, generating nearly 10% of all U.S. electrical power. The HEU Purchase

  11. Synthesis of high magnetization Fe and FeCo nanoparticles by high temperature chemical reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandapallil, B; Colborn, RE; Bonitatibus, PJ; Johnson, F

    2015-03-15

    Fe and FeCo ferromagnetic nanoparticles in the 5-10 nm size regimes featuring high magnetization were synthesized using a modified chemical reduction method. The structure and morphology of these nanoparticles were confirmed by XRD and TOM analysis. These small, monodisperse and phase pure nanoparticles exhibited magnetic saturation of 210 emu/g (Fe) and 220 emu/g (Fe+Co) for Fe and FeCo nanoparticles respectively. The magnetization was found to be dependent on the temperature at which the reducing agent was introduced. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved,

  12. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey, San Angelo National Topographic Map: Texas, West Texas Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The results of analyses of the airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic field survey flown for the region identified as the San Angelo National Topographic Map NH14-1 are presented. The airborne data gathered are reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the basic uranium, thorium, and potassium equivalent gamma radiation intensities, ratios of these intensities, aircraft altitude above the earth's surface, total gamma ray and earth's magnetic field intensity, correlated as a function of geologic units. The distribution of data within each geologic unit, for all surveyed map lines and tie lines, has been calculated and is included. Two sets of profiled data for each line are included, with one set displaying the above-cited data. The second set includes only flight line magnetic field, temperature, pressure, altitude data plus magnetic field data as measured at a base station. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic units and the corresponding airborne data, is included.

  13. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey: Hobbs National Topographic Map, New Mexico/Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The results of analyses of the airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic field survey flown for the region identified as the Hobbs National Topographic Map NI13-12 are presented in this report. The airborne data gathered are reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the basic uranium, thorium and potassium equivalent gamma radiation intensities, ratios of these intensities, aircraft altitude above the earth's surface, total gamma ray and earth's magnetic field intensity, correlated as a function of geologic units. The distribution of data within each geologic unit, for all surveyed map lines and tie lines, has been calculated and is included. Two sets of profiled data for each line are included, with one set displaying the above-cited data. The second set includes only flight line magnetic field, temperature, pressure, altitude data plus magnetic field data as measured at a base station. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic units and the corresponding airborne data, is included also.

  14. Research on ambient temperature passive magnetic bearings at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, R.F.; Ryitov, D.D.` Smith, J.R.; Tung, L.S.

    1997-04-01

    Research performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on the equilibrium and stability of a new class of ambient-temperature passive bearing systems is described. The basic concepts involved are: (1) Stability of the rotating system is only achieved in the rotating state. That is, disengaging mechanical systems are used to insure stable levitation at rest (when Earnshaw`s theorem applies). (2) Stable levitation by passive magnetic elements can be achieved if the vector sum of the force derivatives of the several elements of the system is net negative (i.e. restoring) for axial, transverse, and tilt-type perturbations from equilibrium. To satisfy the requirements of (2) using only permanent magnet elements we have employed periodic ``Halbach arrays.`` These interact with passive inductive loaded circuits and act as stabilizers, with the primary forces arising from axially symmetric permanent-magnet elements. Stabilizers and other elements needed to create compact passive magnetic bearing systems have been constructed. Novel passive means for stabilizing classes of rotor-dynamic instabilities in such systems have also been investigated.

  15. Magnetic shielding of Hall thrusters at high discharge voltages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G. Hofer, Richard R.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.

    2014-08-07

    A series of numerical simulations and experiments have been performed to assess the effectiveness of magnetic shielding in a Hall thruster operating in the discharge voltage range of 300–700 V (I{sub sp} ≈ 2000–2700 s) at 6 kW, and 800 V (I{sub sp} ≈ 3000) at 9 kW. At 6 kW, the magnetic field topology with which highly effective magnetic shielding was previously demonstrated at 300 V has been retained for all other discharge voltages; only the magnitude of the field has been changed to achieve optimum thruster performance. It is found that magnetic shielding remains highly effective for all discharge voltages studied. This is because the channel is long enough to allow hot electrons near the channel exit to cool significantly upon reaching the anode. Thus, despite the rise of the maximum electron temperature in the channel with discharge voltage, the electrons along the grazing lines of force remain cold enough to eliminate or reduce significantly parallel gradients of the plasma potential near the walls. Computed maximum erosion rates in the range of 300–700 V are found not to exceed 10{sup −2} mm/kh. Such rates are ∼3 orders of magnitude less than those observed in the unshielded version of the same thruster at 300 V. At 9 kW and 800 V, saturation of the magnetic circuit did not allow for precisely the same magnetic shielding topology as that employed during the 6-kW operation since this thruster was not designed to operate at this condition. Consequently, the maximum erosion rate at the inner wall is found to be ∼1 order of magnitude higher (∼10{sup −1} mm/kh) than that at 6 kW. At the outer wall, the ion energy is found to be below the sputtering yield threshold so no measurable erosion is expected.

  16. OVERVIEW OF HIGH-DENSITY FRC RESEARCH ON FRX-L AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taccetti, J. M.; Zhang, S. Y.; Wurden, G. A.; Maqueda, R. J.; Tuszewski, M.; Siemon, R.; Begay, D.; Mignardot, E.; Sanchez, P.; Waganaar, B.; Degnan, J. H.; Sommars, W.; Grabowski, C.

    2002-10-07

    We present an overview of the FRC research on the Field Reversed configuration eXperiment – Liner (FRX-L) device at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This is a target plasma ‘injector’ to be used for magnetized target fusion (MTF) applications. MTF is an approach to fusion wherein a magnetized target plasma is compressed to fusion conditions. Our target plasma is an FRC because it has the required closed-field-line topology, and is translatable and compressible. The existing empirical database also indicates that the type of FRC required for MTF would be achievable. FRX-L includes the formation and translation of the FRC into a mock target chamber. We are currently in the process of forming the high-density FRC.

  17. 15 Years of R&D on High Field Accelerator Magnets at FNAL (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    15 Years of R&D on High Field Accelerator Magnets at FNAL Citation Details In-Document Search Title: 15 Years of R&D on High Field Accelerator Magnets at FNAL You are accessing ...

  18. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitlitsky, F.; Hoard, R.W.

    1994-05-10

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla are disclosed. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field. 4 figures.

  19. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Hoard, Ronald W.

    1994-01-01

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field.

  20. Magnetic separator having high rate of field change capability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tillotson, J.A.; Crowe, K.M.

    1990-12-18

    This paper describes a combination of a large magnet for classifying magnetic particles from a passing fluid stream of magnetic and nonmagnetic particles. The large magnet including a central canister having a diameter exceeding 60-inches. It comprises: first and second manifolds for communicating; magnetic coils; a magnetic field; a power supply; first solid state rectifier circuit; second solid state rectifier circuit; first power supply drive means; and, second power supply drive means.

  1. Plasmoid instability in high-Lundquist-number magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Yi-Min; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2013-05-15

    Our understanding of magnetic reconnection in resistive magnetohydrodynamics has gone through a fundamental change in recent years. The conventional wisdom is that magnetic reconnection mediated by resistivity is slow in laminar high Lundquist (S) plasmas, constrained by the scaling of the reconnection rate predicted by Sweet-Parker theory. However, recent studies have shown that when S exceeds a critical value ∼10{sup 4}, the Sweet-Parker current sheet is unstable to a super-Alfvénic plasmoid instability, with a linear growth rate that scales as S{sup 1/4}. In the fully developed statistical steady state of two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations, the normalized average reconnection rate is approximately 0.01, nearly independent of S, and the distribution function f(ψ) of plasmoid magnetic flux ψ follows a power law f(ψ)∼ψ{sup −1}. When Hall effects are included, the plasmoid instability may trigger onset of Hall reconnection even when the conventional criterion for onset is not satisfied. The rich variety of possible reconnection dynamics is organized in the framework of a phase diagram.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: High Consequence, Automation, &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robotics: Urban Hopper Urban Hopper Urban Hopper As part of an ongoing Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) project, Sandia National Laboratories has developed a small, shoebox-sized, GPS guided, unmanned ground vehicle that can jump over and onto obstacles more than 6 meters high. With an estimated range of 2 kilometers, the robot can drive using motor-driven wheels or it can hop using a rotatable combustion-driven piston actuator. Mobility Challenge In general, small robots or

  3. Physics of forced magnetic reconnection in coaxial helicity injection experiments in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebrahimi, F.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Raman, R.; Hooper, E. B.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2014-05-15

    We numerically examine the physics of fast flux closure in transient coaxial helicity injection (CHI) experiments in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). By performing resistive Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with poloidal injector coil currents held constant in time, we find that closed flux surfaces are formed through forced magnetic reconnection. Through a local Sweet-Parker type reconnection with an elongated current sheet in the injector region, closed flux surfaces expand in the NSTX global domain. Simulations demonstrate outflows approaching poloidally Alfvénic flows and reconnection times consistent with the Sweet-Parker model. Critical requirements for magnetic reconnection and flux closure are studied in detail. These primary effects, which are magnetic diffusivity, injector flux, injector flux footprint width, and rate of injector voltage reduction, are simulated for transient CHI experiments. The relevant time scales for effective reconnection are τ{sub V}<τ{sub rec}≈τ{sub A}√(S)(1+Pm){sup 1/4}<τ{sub R}, where τ{sub V} is the time for the injector voltage reduction, τ{sub A} is the poloidal Alfvén transit time, τ{sub R} is the global resistive diffusion time, and Pm and S are Prandtl and Lundquist numbers.

  4. LANL installs high-performance computer system | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) LANL installs high-performance computer system Friday, June 20, 2014 - 10:29am Los Alamos National Laboratory recently installed a new high-performance computer system, called Wolf, which will be used for unclassified research. Wolf will help modernize mid-tier resources available to the lab and can be used to advance many fields of science. Wolf, manufactured by Cray Inc., has 616 compute nodes, each with two 8-core 2.6 GHz Intel "Sandybridge" processors,

  5. Reliable, high repetition rate thyratron grid driver used with a magnetic modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, J.V.; Ball, D.G.; Garrett, D.N.

    1991-06-14

    The Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory uses a magnetic modulator switched by a high voltage thyratron to drive a gas discharge laser. The thyratron trigger source must provide an extremely reliable, low jitter, high- rep-rate grid pulse. This paper describes a thyratron grid driver which delivers a 1.2 kV, 80 ns rise time grid pulse into a 50 ohm load at up to 4.5 kHz repetition rate and has demonstrated approximately 10,000 hours MTBF. Since the thyratron is used with a magnetic compression circuit having a delay time of 1.4 ms this grid driver incorporates a jitter compensation circuit to adjust the trigger timing of the thyratron to provide overall modulator/laser jitter of less than {plus minus} 2 ns. The specific grid driver requirements will be discussed followed by a description of the circuit design and theory of operation. Construction comments will be followed by performance data (for a specific thyratron and magnetic compression circuit), including pulse shape, jitter, and lifetime. 1 ref., 10 figs.

  6. Ultra-High Intensity Magnetic Field Generation in Dense Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2014-01-08

    I. Grant Objective The main objective of this grant proposal was to explore the efficient generation of intense currents. Whereasthefficient generation of electric current in low-­‐energy-­‐ density plasma has occupied the attention of the magnetic fusion community for several decades, scant attention has been paid to carrying over to high-­‐energy-­‐ density plasma the ideas for steady-­‐state current drive developed for low-­‐energy-­‐ density plasma, or, for that matter, to inventing new methodologies for generating electric current in high-­‐energy-­‐density plasma. What we proposed to do was to identify new mechanisms to accomplish current generation, and to assess the operation, physics, and engineering basis of new forms of current drive in regimes appropriate for new fusion concepts.

  7. High order magnetic optics for high dynamic range proton radiography at a kinetic energy 800 MeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sjue, Sky K. L.; Morris, Christopher L.; Merrill, Frank Edward; Mariam, Fesseha Gebre; Saunders, Alexander

    2016-01-14

    Flash radiography with 800 MeV kinetic energy protons at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an important experimental tool for investigations of dynamic material behavior driven by high explosives or pulsed power. The extraction of quantitative information about density fields in a dynamic experiment from proton generated images requires a high fidelity model of the protonimaging process. It is shown that accurate calculations of the transmission through the magnetic lens system require terms beyond second order for protons far from the tune energy. The approach used integrates the correlated multiple Coulomb scattering distribution simultaneously over the collimator and the image plane.more » Furthermore, comparison with a series of static calibrationimages demonstrates the model’s accurate reproduction of both the transmission and blur over a wide range of tune energies in an inverse identity lens that consists of four quadrupole electromagnets.« less

  8. Used MRI magnets get a second chance at life in high-energy physics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    high-energy and nuclear physics experiments. The two new magnets have a strength of 4 Tesla, not as strong as the newest generation of MRI magnets but ideal for benchmarking ...

  9. High Field Magnetization measurements of uranium dioxide single crystals (P08358- E003-PF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gofryk, K.; Harrison, N.; Jaime, M.

    2014-12-01

    Our preliminary high field magnetic measurements of UO2 are consistent with a complex nature of the magnetic ordering in this material, compatible with the previously proposed non-collinear 3-k magnetic structure. Further extensive magnetic studies on well-oriented (<100 > and <111>) UO2 crystals are planned to address the puzzling behavior of UO2 in both antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic states at high fields.

  10. High Temperature Superconducting Reciprocating Magnetic Separator Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James F. Maguire

    2008-06-05

    In 2001, under DOE's Superconductivity Partnership Initiative (SPI), E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. (Dupont) was awarded a cost-share contract to build a fully functional full-scale model high temperature superconducting reciprocating magnet unit specifically designed for the koalin clay industry. After competitive bidding, American Superconductor (AMSC) was selected to provide the coil for the magnet. Dupont performed the statement of work until September 2004, when it stopped work, with the concurrence of DOE, due to lack of federal funds. DOE had paid all invoices to that point, and Dupont had provided all cost share. At this same time, Dupont determined that this program did not fit with its corporate strategies and notified DOE that it was not interesting in resuming the program when funding became available. AMSC expressed interest in assuming performance of the Agreement to Dupont and DOE, and in March 2005, this project was transferred to AMSC by DOE amendment to the original contract and Novation Agreement between AMSC and Dupont. Design drawings and some hardware components and subassemblies were transferred to AMSC. However, no funding was obligated by DOE and AMSC never performed work on the project. This report contains a summary of the work performed by Dupont up to the September 04 timeframe.

  11. A small-bore high-field superconducting quadrupole magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlow, D.B.; Kraus, R.H.; Lobb, C.T.; Menzel, M.T. ); Walstrom, P.L. )

    1990-01-01

    A prototype superconducting quadrupole magnet was designed and built for use in superconducting coupled-cavity linacs where the use of permanent magnets is ruled out by consideration of trapped flux losses. The magnet has a clear bore diameter of 1.8 cm and outside diameter of 11 cm and length of 11 cm. The magnet was operated at a temperature of 4.2 K and obtained a peak quadrupole field gradient of 320 T/m.

  12. Characterization of High Current RRP(R) Wires as a Function of Magnetic Field, Temperature and Strain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godeke, A.; Mentink, M.G.T.; Dietderich, D. R.; den Ouden, A.

    2009-08-16

    A new instrument for the characterization of superconducting materials as a function of Magnetic Field, Temperature and Strain, was designed, constructed and tested at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). A U-shaped bending spring was selected, since that design has proven to enable accurate characterizations of a multitude of superconducting materials for more than a decade. The new device is validated though measurements on very high current Rod Restack Processed (RRP) Internal-Tin (IT) wires, for which we will present initial results, including parameterizations of the superconducting phase boundaries and comparisons with other wire types. Accurate parametrization of modern high magnetic field conductors is important for the analysis of the performance of magnet systems.

  13. Strongest non-destructive magnetic field: world record set at...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Strongest non-destructive magnetic field: world record set at 100-tesla level Strongest non-destructive magnetic field: world record set at 100-tesla level National High Magnetic ...

  14. High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    selected embody the breadth of research in HEDLP science, ranging from the study of magnetized astrophysical jets to large-scale simulation of kinetic laser plasma interactions.

  15. Method of making fully dense anisotropic high energy magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, D.K.

    1990-01-09

    This patent describes a method of making anisotropic permanent magnets. It comprises extruding a rare earth, transition metal, magnetic alloy together with an oxygen-getter material at a temperature of from about 600{degrees} C to about 1000{degrees} C at an extrusion ratio of from about 10:1 to about 26:1 the rare earth, transition metal, magnetic alloy and the oxygen-getter material being disposed within an extrusion zone in Separate and discrete locations.

  16. High-Energy Composite Permanent Magnets: High-Energy Permanent Magnets for Hybrid Vehicles and Alternative Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-02-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: The University of Delaware is developing permanent magnets that contain less rare earth material and produce twice the energy of the strongest rare earth magnets currently available. The University of Delaware is creating these magnets by mixing existing permanent magnet materials with those that are more abundant, like iron. Both materials are first prepared in the form of nanoparticles via techniques ranging from wet chemistry to ball milling. After that, the nanoparticles must be assembled in a 3-D array and consolidated at low temperatures to form a magnet. With small size particles and good contact between these two materials, the best qualities of each allow for the development of exceptionally strong composite magnets.

  17. Highly sensitive magnetic field sensor based on microfiber coupler with magnetic fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Longfeng; Pu, Shengli Tang, Jiali; Zeng, Xianglong; Lahoubi, Mahieddine

    2015-05-11

    A kind of magnetic field sensor using a microfiber coupler (MFC) surrounded with magnetic fluid (MF) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. As the MFC is strongly sensitive to the surrounding refractive index (RI) and MF's RI is sensitive to magnetic field, the magnetic field sensing function of the proposed structure is realized. Interrogation of magnetic field strength is achieved by measuring the dip wavelength shift and transmission loss change of the transmission spectrum. The experimental results show that the sensitivity of the sensor is wavelength-dependent. The maximum sensitivity of 191.8 pm/Oe is achieved at wavelength of around 1537 nm in this work. In addition, a sensitivity of −0.037 dB/Oe is achieved by monitoring variation of the fringe visibility. These suggest the potential applications of the proposed structure in tunable all-in-fiber photonic devices such as magneto-optical modulator, filter, and sensing.

  18. Atomic magnetic gradiometer for room temperature high sensitivity magnetic field detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu,Shoujun; Lowery, Thomas L.; Budker, Dmitry; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander

    2009-08-11

    A laser-based atomic magnetometer (LBAM) apparatus measures magnetic fields, comprising: a plurality of polarization detector cells to detect magnetic fields; a laser source optically coupled to the polarization detector cells; and a signal detector that measures the laser source after being coupled to the polarization detector cells, which may be alkali cells. A single polarization cell may be used for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by prepolarizing the nuclear spins of an analyte, encoding spectroscopic and/or spatial information, and detecting NMR signals from the analyte with a laser-based atomic magnetometer to form NMR spectra and/or magnetic resonance images (MRI). There is no need of a magnetic field or cryogenics in the detection step, as it is detected through the LBAM.

  19. Past High School National Science Bowl Winners (1991 - 2014) | U.S. DOE

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Office of Science (SC) High School National Science Bowl Winners (1991 - 2015) National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Science Bowl Coordinators Alumni Historical Information - National Finals National Science Bowl Logos Regional Competitions National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585

  20. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonanos, P.

    1992-01-07

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity. 4 figs.

  1. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonanos, Peter (East Brunswick, NJ)

    1992-01-01

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity.

  2. The suppression effect of external magnetic field on the high-power microwave window multipactor phenomenon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xue Wang, Yong; Fan, Junjie

    2015-02-15

    To suppress the surface multipactor phenomenon and improve the transmitting power of the high-power microwave window, the application of external magnetic fields is theoretically analyzed and simulated. A Monte Carlo algorithm is used to track the secondary electron trajectories and study the multipactor scenario on the surface of a cylinder window. It is confirmed that over-resonant magnetic fields (an external magnetic field whose magnitude is slightly greater than that of a resonant magnetic field) will generate a compensating trajectory and collision, which can suppress the secondary electron avalanche. The optimal value of this external magnetic field that will avoid the multipactor phenomenon on cylinder windows is discussed.

  3. High School football | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High School football High School football Fancy footwork at High School football practice

  4. High-field magnetization processes in actinide intermetallics (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franse, J.J.M.; de Boer, F.R.; de Chatel, P.F.; Frings, P.H.; Menovsky, A.A. )

    1991-04-15

    In magnetically ordered intermetallics of uranium with {ital d} transition elements, the magnetic moment on the uranium site is often limited to values below 0.1{mu}{sub {ital B}}, with, in some cases, extremely large magnetic anisotropies. Several approaches are followed for explaining these small uranium moments: opposite directions and almost compensation of the spin and orbital moments, reduction of the uranium 5{ital f} moment by strong hybridization effects between the 5{ital f} and conduction electrons, and very weak itinerant magnetism of the 5{ital f} electrons. In the Laves-phase compounds UFe{sub 2} and UNi{sub 2}, the magnetic data have been explained in terms of opposite spin and orbital moments on the uranium sites. In the heavy-fermion compounds UPt{sub 3} and URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}, on the contrary, a Kondo approach is followed, although coherence effects largely complicate a proper description. The experimental evidence for these different approaches will be reviewed.

  5. Note: Experimental platform for magnetized high-energy-density plasma studies at the omega laser facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiksel, G.; Agliata, A.; Barnak, D.; Brent, G.; Chang, P. -Y.; Folnsbee, L.; Gates, G.; Hasset, D.; Lonobile, D.; Magoon, J.; Mastrosimone, D.; Shoup, III, M. J.; Betti, R.

    2015-01-12

    Here, an upgrade of the pulsed magnetic field generator magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system [O. Gotchev et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 043504 (2009)] is described. The device is used to study magnetized high-energy-density plasma and is capable of producing a pulsed magnetic field of tens of tesla in a volume of a few cubic centimeters. The magnetic field is created by discharging a high-voltage capacitor through a small wire-wound coil. The coil current pulse has a duration of about 1 μs and a peak value of 40 kA. Compared to the original, the updated version has a larger energy storage and improved switching system. In addition, magnetic coils are fabricated using 3-D printing technology which allows for a greater variety of the magnetic field topology.

  6. Comparative Study of Magnetic Properties of Nanoparticles by High-Frequency Heat Dissipation and Conventional Magnetometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Malik, V.; Goodwill, J.; Mallapragada, S.; Prozorov, T.; Prozorov, R.

    2014-11-13

    The rate of heating of a water-based colloid of uniformly sized 15 nm magnetic nanoparticles by high-amplitude and high-frequency ac magnetic field induced by the resonating LC circuit (nanoTherics Magnetherm) was measured. The results are analyzed in terms of specific energy absorption rate (SAR). Fitting field amplitude and frequency dependences of SAR to the linear response theory, magnetic moment per particles was extracted. The value of magnetic moment was independently evaluated from dc magnetization measurements (Quantum Design MPMS) of a frozen colloid by fitting field-dependent magnetization to Langevin function. The two methods produced similar results, which are compared to themore » theoretical expectation for this particle size. Additionally, analysis of SAR curves yielded effective relaxation time.« less

  7. Comparative Study of Magnetic Properties of Nanoparticles by High-Frequency Heat Dissipation and Conventional Magnetometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malik, V.; Goodwill, J.; Mallapragada, S.; Prozorov, T.; Prozorov, R.

    2014-11-13

    The rate of heating of a water-based colloid of uniformly sized 15 nm magnetic nanoparticles by high-amplitude and high-frequency ac magnetic field induced by the resonating LC circuit (nanoTherics Magnetherm) was measured. The results are analyzed in terms of specific energy absorption rate (SAR). Fitting field amplitude and frequency dependences of SAR to the linear response theory, magnetic moment per particles was extracted. The value of magnetic moment was independently evaluated from dc magnetization measurements (Quantum Design MPMS) of a frozen colloid by fitting field-dependent magnetization to Langevin function. The two methods produced similar results, which are compared to the theoretical expectation for this particle size. Additionally, analysis of SAR curves yielded effective relaxation time.

  8. Note: Experimental platform for magnetized high-energy-density plasma studies at the omega laser facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fiksel, G.; Agliata, A.; Barnak, D.; Brent, G.; Chang, P. -Y.; Folnsbee, L.; Gates, G.; Hasset, D.; Lonobile, D.; Magoon, J.; et al

    2015-01-12

    Here, an upgrade of the pulsed magnetic field generator magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system [O. Gotchev et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 80, 043504 (2009)] is described. The device is used to study magnetized high-energy-density plasma and is capable of producing a pulsed magnetic field of tens of tesla in a volume of a few cubic centimeters. The magnetic field is created by discharging a high-voltage capacitor through a small wire-wound coil. The coil current pulse has a duration of about 1 μs and a peak value of 40 kA. Compared to the original, the updated version has a larger energymore » storage and improved switching system. In addition, magnetic coils are fabricated using 3-D printing technology which allows for a greater variety of the magnetic field topology.« less

  9. High energy product permanent magnet having improved intrinsic coercivity and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Thomas, Gareth

    1990-01-01

    A high energy rare earth-ferromagnetic metal permanent magnet is disclosed which is characterized by improved intrinsic coercivity and is made by forming a particulate mixture of a permanent magnet alloy comprising one or more rare earth elements and one or more ferromagnetic metals and forming a second particulate mixture of a sintering alloy consisting essentially of 92-98 wt. % of one or more rare earth elements selected from the class consisting of Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, and mixtures of two or more of such rare earth elements, and 2-8 wt. % of one or more alloying metals selected from the class consisting of Al, Nb, Zr, V, Ta, Mo, and mixtures of two or more of such metals. The permanent magnet alloy particles and sintering aid alloy are mixed together and magnetically oriented by immersing the mixture in an axially aligned magnetic field while cold pressing the mixture. The compressed mixture is then sintered at a temperature above the melting point of the sintering aid and below the melting point of the permanent magnet alloy to thereby coat the particle surfaces of the permanent magnetic alloy particles with the sintering aid while inhibiting migration of the rare earth element in the sintering aid into the permanent magnet alloy particles to thereby raise the intrinsic coercivity of the permanent magnet alloy without substantially lowering the high energy of the permanent magnet alloy.

  10. Magnet Technology for Power Converters: Nanocomposite Magnet Technology for High Frequency MW-Scale Power Converters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-02-27

    Solar ADEPT Project: CMU is developing a new nanoscale magnetic material that will reduce the size, weight, and cost of utility-scale PV solar power conversion systems that connect directly to the grid. Power converters are required to turn the energy that solar power systems create into useable energy for the grid. The power conversion systems made with CMUs nanoscale magnetic material have the potential to be 150 times lighter and significantly smaller than conventional power conversion systems that produce similar amounts of power.

  11. Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology National...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The team also won a research trip to Alaska, three Computer Based Laboratories and 1,000 for their school's science department. The team has won the national championship for four ...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: High Consequence, Automation, &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robotics: EOD Decision Support Tools Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Decision Support Tools X-ray Toolkit X-ray Toolkit (XTK) X-ray Toolkit (XTK) is a software program developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the United States Government under funding from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Technical Support Working Group. XTK is a radiography planning, acquisition, processing, and analysis program designed specifically for explosive ordnance disposal (EOD)

  13. A field-reversed magnetic configuration and applications of high-temperature FRC plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryzhkov, S. V.

    2011-12-15

    As applied to a tokomak, a magnetic trap for confinement of a plasma with an inverted field or a magnetic field reversed configuration (FRC) is one of the most promising alternatives of the systems with high {beta}. A brief review of the latest data on FRC and potential directions of using such configurations in addition to energy generation in thermonuclear reactors (TNRs) is proposed.

  14. A reactor for high-throughput high-pressure nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beach, N. J.; Knapp, S. M. M.; Landis, C. R.

    2015-10-15

    The design of a reactor for operando nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of high-pressure gas-liquid reactions is described. The Wisconsin High Pressure NMR Reactor (WiHP-NMRR) design comprises four modules: a sapphire NMR tube with titanium tube holder rated for pressures as high as 1000 psig (68 atm) and temperatures ranging from −90 to 90 °C, a gas circulation system that maintains equilibrium concentrations of dissolved gases during gas-consuming or gas-releasing reactions, a liquid injection apparatus that is capable of adding measured amounts of solutions to the reactor under high pressure conditions, and a rapid wash system that enables the reactor to be cleaned without removal from the NMR instrument. The WiHP-NMRR is compatible with commercial 10 mm NMR probes. Reactions performed in the WiHP-NMRR yield high quality, information-rich, and multinuclear NMR data over the entire reaction time course with rapid experimental turnaround.

  15. Hybrid magnet devices for molecule manipulation and small scale high gradient-field applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Humphries, David E.; Hong, Seok-Cheol; Cozzarelli, legal representative, Linda A.; Pollard, Martin J.; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R.

    2009-01-06

    The present disclosure provides a high performance hybrid magnetic structure made from a combination of permanent magnets and ferromagnetic pole materials which are assembled in a predetermined array. The hybrid magnetic structure provides means for separation and other biotechnology applications involving holding, manipulation, or separation of magnetizable molecular structures and targets. Also disclosed are hybrid magnetic tweezers able to exert approximately 1 nN of force to 4.5 .mu.m magnetic bead. The maximum force was experimentally measured to be .about.900 pN which is in good agreement with theoretical estimations and other measurements. In addition, a new analysis scheme that permits fast real-time position measurement in typical geometry of magnetic tweezers has been developed and described in detail.

  16. Rotating magnetic field current drive of high-temperature field reversed configurations with high {zeta} scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, H. Y.; Hoffman, A. L.; Milroy, R. D.

    2007-11-15

    Greatly reduced recycling and impurity ingestion in the Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment--Upgrade (TCSU) device has allowed much higher plasma temperatures to be achieved in the field reversed configurations (FRC) under rotating magnetic field (RMF) formation and sustainment. The hotter plasmas have higher magnetic fields and much higher diamagnetic electron rotation rates so that the important ratio of average electron rotation frequency to RMF frequency, called {zeta}, approaches unity, for the first time, in TCSU. A large fraction of the RMF power is absorbed by an as yet unexplained (anomalous) mechanism directly proportional to the square of the RMF magnitude. It becomes of relatively lesser significance as the FRC current increases, and simple resistive heating begins to dominate, but the anomalous absorption is useful for initial plasma heating. Measurements of total absorbed power, and comparisons of applied RMF torque to torque on the electrons due to electron-ion friction under high-{zeta} operation, over a range of temperatures and fields, have allowed the separation of the classical Ohmic and anomalous heating to be inferred, and cross-field plasma resistivities to be calculated.

  17. Method for producing through extrusion an anisotropic magnet with high energy product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandhok, Vijay K.

    2004-09-07

    A method for producing an anisotropic magnet with high energy product through extrusion and, more specifically, by placing a particle charge of a composition from the which magnet is to be produced in a noncircular container, heating the container and particle charge and extruding the container and particle charge through a noncircular extrusion die in such a manner that one of the cross-sectional axes or dimension of the container and particle charge is held substantially constant during the extrusion to compact the particle charge to substantially full density by mechanical deformation produced during the extrusion to achieve a magnet with anisotropic magnetic properties along the axes or dimension thereof and, more specifically, a high energy product along the transverse of the smallest cross-sectional dimension of the extruded magnet.

  18. High-resolution dichroic imaging of magnetic flux distributions in superconductors with scanning x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruoß, S. Stahl, C.; Weigand, M.; Schütz, G.; Albrecht, J.

    2015-01-12

    The penetration of magnetic flux into high-temperature superconductors has been observed using a high-resolution technique based on x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Superconductors coated with thin soft-magnetic layers are observed in a scanning x-ray microscope under the influence of external magnetic fields. Resulting electric currents in the superconductor create an inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution above the superconductor and lead to a local reorientation of the ferromagnetic layer. Measuring the local magnetization of the ferromagnet by x-ray absorption microscopy with circular-polarized radiation allows the analysis of the magnetic flux distribution in the superconductor with a spatial resolution on the nanoscale.

  19. High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program NNSA invests in next ...

  20. Chosen Solutions to the Engineering Challenges of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Neumeyer; H.M. Fan; J. Chrzanowski; P. Heitzenroeder; and the NSTX Team

    1999-10-01

    NSTX is one of the largest of a new class of magnetic plasma research devices known as spherical toroids (STs). The plasma in a ST is characterized by its almost spherical shape with a slender cylindrical region through its vertical axis. The so-called ''center stack'' is located in this region. It contains magnetic windings for confining the plasma, induce the plasma current, and shape the plasma. This paper will describe the engineering challenges of designing the center stack magnets to meet their operational requirements within this constrained space.

  1. Ultra-high speed permanent magnet axial gap alternator with multiple stators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawsey, Robert A.; Bailey, J. Milton

    1991-01-01

    An ultra-high speed, axial gap alternator that can provide an output to a plurality of loads, the alternator providing magnetic isolation such that operating conditions in one load will not affect operating conditions of another load. This improved alternator uses a rotor member disposed between a pair of stator members, with magnets disposed in each of the rotor member surfaces facing the stator members. The magnets in one surface of the rotor member, which alternate in polarity, are isolated from the magnets in the other surface of the rotor member by a disk of magnetic material disposed between the two sets of magents. In the preferred embodiment, this disk of magnetic material is laminated between two layers of non-magnetic material that support the magnets, and the magnetic material has a peripheral rim that extends to both surfaces of the rotor member to enhance the structural integrity. The stator members are substantially conventional in construction in that equally-spaced and radially-oriented slots are provided, and winding members are laid in these slots. A unit with multiple rotor members and stator members is also described.

  2. Rube Goldberg 2013 - Hoffman Estates High School | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Rube Goldberg 2013 - Hoffman Estates High School Share Topic Community Education Rube Goldberg Machine Contest

  3. High frequency transformers and high Q factor inductors formed using epoxy-based magnetic polymer materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Robert O.; Gunewardena, Shelton; Masi, James V.

    2007-11-27

    An electrical component in the form of an inductor or transformer is disclosed which includes one or more coils and a magnetic polymer material located near the coils or supporting the coils to provide an electromagnetic interaction therewith. The magnetic polymer material is preferably a cured magnetic epoxy which includes a mercaptan derivative having a ferromagnetic atom chemically bonded therein. The ferromagnetic atom can be either a transition metal or rare-earth atom.

  4. High frequency transformers and high Q factor inductors formed using epoxy-based magnetic polymer materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Robert O.; Gunewardena, Shelton; Masi, James V.

    2005-03-29

    An electrical component in the form of an inductor or transformer is disclosed which includes one or more coils and a magnetic polymer material located near the coils or supporting the coils to provide an electromagnetic interaction therewith. The magnetic polymer material is preferably a cured magnetic epoxy which includes a mercaptan derivative having a ferromagnetic atom chemically bonded therein. The ferromagnetic atom can be either a transition metal or rare-earth atom.

  5. Rotation magnet sputtering: Damage-free novel magnetron sputtering using rotating helical magnet with very high target utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goto, Tetsuya; Matsuoka, Takaaki; Ohmi, Tadahiro

    2009-07-15

    Novel magnetron-sputtering equipment, called rotation magnet sputtering (ROT-MS), was developed to overcome various disadvantages of current magnetron-sputtering equipment. Disadvantages include (1) very low target utilization of less than 20%, (2) difficulty in obtaining uniform deposition on the substrate, and (3) charge-up damages and ion-bombardment-induced damages resulting from very high electron temperature (>3 eV) and that the substrate is set at the plasma excitation region. In ROT-MS, a number of moving high-density plasma loops are excited on the target surface by rotating helical magnets, resulting in very high target utilization with uniform target erosion and uniform deposition on the substrate. This excellent performance can be principally maintained even if equipment size increases for very large-substrate deposition. Because strong horizontal magnetic fields (>0.05 T) are produced within a very limited region just at the target surface, very low electron-temperature plasmas (<2.5 eV for Ar plasma and <1 eV for direct-current-excited Xe plasma) are excited at the very limited region adjacent to the target surface with a combination of grounded plate closely mounted on the strong magnetic field region. Consequently, the authors can establish charge-up damage-free and ion-bombardment-induced damage-free processes. ROT-MS has been applied for thin-film formation of LaB{sub 6}, which is well known as a stable, low-work-function bulk-crystal material for electron emissions. The work function of the LaB{sub 6} film decreased to 2.8 eV due to enhanced (100)-orientation crystallinity and reduced resistivity realized by adjusting the flux of low-energy bombarding ions impinging on the depositing surface, which work very efficiently, improving the performance of the electron emission devices.

  6. National Science Bowl Update: Teams from North Carolina and California to Compete for High School Championship

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The field of high school finalists in the Department of Energy (DOE) National Science Bowl has narrowed once more, and now only two high school teams remain in the competition.

  7. Influence of high magnetic field on the luminescence of Eu{sup 3+}-doped glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Wei; Chen, Weibo; Chen, Ping; Xu, Beibei; Zheng, Shuhong; Guo, Qiangbing; Liu, Xiaofeng E-mail: qjr@zju.edu.cn; Zhang, Junpei; Han, Junbo; Qiu, Jianrong E-mail: qjr@zju.edu.cn

    2014-09-28

    Rare earth (RE) doped materials have been widely exploited as the intriguing electronic configuration of RE ions offers diverse functionalities from optics to magnetism. However, the coupling of magnetism with photoluminescence (PL) in such materials has been rarely reported in spite of its fundamental significance. In the present paper, the effect of high pulsed magnetic field on the photoluminescence intensity of Eu{sup 3+}-doped nano-glass-ceramics has been investigated. In our experiment, Eu-doped oxyfluoride glass and glass ceramic were prepared by the conventional melt-quenching process and controlled heat treatment. The results demonstrate that the integrated PL intensity of Eu{sup 3+} decreases with the enhancement of magnetic field, which can be interpreted in terms of cooperation effect of Zeeman splitting and magnetic field induced change in site symmetry. Furthermore, as a result of Zeeman splitting, both blue and red shift in the emission peaks of Eu{sup 3+} can be observed, and this effect becomes more prominent with the increase of magnetic field. Possible mechanisms associated with the observed magneto-optical behaviors are suggested. The results of the present paper may open a new gate for modulation of luminescence by magnetic field and remote optical detection of magnetic field.

  8. NNSA Awards Contract for High-Performance Computers | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Awards Contract for High-Performance Computers October 02, 2007 Contract Highlights Efforts to Integrate Nuclear Weapons Complex WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The Department of Energy's ...

  9. Belgium Highly Enriched Uranium and Plutonium Removals | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Uranium and Plutonium Removals March 24, 2014 Belgium has been a global leader in nonproliferation, working with the United States since 2006 to minimize highly enriched uranium ...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: High Consequence, Automation, &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robotics: About Robotics High Consequence, Automation, & Robotics Robotics Homepage About Robotics Research & Development Advanced Controls Advanced Manipulation Cybernetics High-Consequence Automation Perception and Decision Tools Unique Mobility Facilities Publications and Factsheets Robotics Image Gallery Robotics Videos Contact Robotics Research About Robotics Robotic arm With more than 25 years of experience and hundreds of successful projects in the research, design,

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: High Consequence, Automation, &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robotics: Advanced Controls Controls Robotics Homepage About Robotics Research & Development Advanced Controls One-Control Many Swarm Control Technology Multi-Robot Cooperative Behavior Advanced Manipulation Cybernetics High-Consequence Automation Perception and Decision Tools Unique Mobility Facilities Publications and Factsheets Robotics Image Gallery Robotics Videos Contact Robotics Research Advanced Controls Swarm Sandia's High Consequence, Automation, & Robotics (HCAR) team

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: High Consequence, Automation, &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robotics: Facilities High Consequence, Automation, & Robotics Robotics Homepage About Robotics Research & Development Advanced Controls Advanced Manipulation Cybernetics High-Consequence Automation Perception and Decision Tools Unique Mobility Facilities Publications and Factsheets Robotics Image Gallery Robotics Videos Contact Robotics Research Facilities Advancing the evolution of robotic & intelligent system technologies Robot Vehicle Range A cutting-edge outdoor test &

  13. Synthesizing High-Quality Calcium Boride at Nanoscale | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory High-Quality Calcium Boride at Nanoscale Technology available for licensing: An innovative method for synthesizing compositionally pure calcium boride at the nanoscale by using two different precursors. Process increases stability, hardness and conductivity of high-melting-point calcium boride Makes calcium boride readily available for manufacturing processes in many industries PDF icon calcium_chloride

  14. Using magnetic fields to understand high-temperature superconductivity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (high-Tc) superconductivity has been the issue as to whether a quantum critical point-a special doping value where quantum fluctuations lead to strong...

  15. Magnetic and high frequency properties of nanogranular CoFe-yttrium-doped zirconia films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Guijie Tang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Huaiwu; Zhang, Dainan

    2014-05-07

    Soft magnetic nanogranular FeCo-Yttrium-doped Zirconia thin films were fabricated using RF magnetron sputtering at different sputtering power. It was found that film electrical resistivity (?) decreased steeply with the increase of sputtering power, while both saturation magnetization (4?M{sub s}) and natural ferromagnetic resonant frequency ({sub r}) increased with the sputtering power ascending from 100?W to 200?W, but decreased when sputtering power exceeded 200?W. X-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy confirmed that the films were nanocrystalline/amorphous composites. A saturation magnetization as high as 15.4 kGs and a ferromagnetic resonance frequency above 3?GHz were obtained.

  16. Design of pulsed guiding magnetic field for high power microwave generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, J.-C. Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Shu, T.; Zhong, H.-H.

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, we present a comprehensive study on designing solenoid together with the corresponding power supply system to excite pulsed magnetic field required for high power microwave generators. Particularly, a solenoid is designed and the excited magnetic field is applied to a Ku-band overmoded Cerenkov generator. It is found in experiment that the electron beam is properly guided by the magnetic field and a 1.1 GW high power microwave is achieved at a central frequency of 13.76 GHz. Pulsed solenoid system has the advantages of compactness and low energy consumption, which are of great interest for repetitive operation. The reported studies and results can be generalized to other applications which require magnetic fields.

  17. MAGNETS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  18. Panhandle Junior High takes second at National Science Bowl Car Race |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Panhandle Junior High takes second at National Science Bowl Car Race Wednesday, April 30, 2014 - 5:09pm A team of five competitors from Panhandle Junior High School capped off an eventful visit last week to the nation's capital with a second-place finish in the electric car race competition at the National Science Bowl. Coach Kevin Meyer said the team competed hard, but was barely edged out at the finish line of the final race. The academic

  19. Can Magnetism Explain High Temperature Superconductivity? | U.S. DOE Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Science (SC) Can Magnetism Explain High Temperature Superconductivity? Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » 05.01.12 Can Magnetism

  20. Magnetization studies of oxides related to the high temperature cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Z.

    1995-06-19

    The magnetic properties related to the following high temperature superconductors were measured utilizing a Faraday magnetometer: BaCuO{sub 2+x}, La{sub 2} CuO{sub 4}, Sr{sub 2} RhO{sub 4}, Sr{sub 2} VO{sub 4}, and Sr{sub 2} CuO{sub 3}. Neutron diffraction, magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity measurements are discussed.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: High Consequence, Automation, &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robotics: One-Control Many One-Control Many One Control Many Diagram As unmanned systems (UMS) are increasingly used in the battlefield, advantages provided by strategy, tactics, and training must be translated into UMS control systems. It's a challenge to effectively control large numbers of UMS. The human operator must focus on high-level perception, tactics, and strategy while the system automates lower-level functions. High Consequence, Automation, & Robotics (HCAR) is working to

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: High Consequence, Automation, &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robotics: Sandia Hand Sandia Hand Sandia Hand with Flowers Robots are used to perform more and more complex task and missions, and there is a need for a highly dexterous manipulation capability to support a wide variety of applications including, counter-improvised explosive device (IED), countermine, explosive ordnance disposal, search and rescue, casualty care, and operating in extreme environments. Need Current robot hands are highly dexterous and able to perform very complex manipulation

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: High Consequence, Automation, & Robotics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research High Consequence, Automation, & Robotics High-Consequence Automation Developing cost-effective, reliable systems to handle materials used in conventional and nuclear weapons Unique Mobility Specializing in advanced mobility technologies to support a broad range of challenging missions Advanced Manipulation Automating robots for difficult manipulation tasks for more than 25 years Cybernetics Specializing in the development of advanced man-machine interface technology Neural Control

  4. High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program Steady advances in increasing the energy, power, and brightness of lasers and particle beams and advances in pulsed power systems have made possible the exploration of matter at extremely high energy density in the laboratory. Exciting new experimental regimes are being realized by exploiting the scientific capabilities of existing ICF Office facilities, as well as the relevant Department of Defense (DoD) and university

  5. High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas NNSA's Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion and DOE's Office of Science established a joint program in HEDLP in 2008. Initially, this program was a combination of work that was funded as part of the NNSA's Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program in the research area of high energy density physics and the DOE Office of Science's HEDLP Program and Innovative Confinement Concepts Program. Steady advances in increasing the

  6. Italy Highly Enriched Uranium and Plutonium Removals | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Highly Enriched Uranium and Plutonium Removals March 24, 2014 Italy has been a global leader in nuclear nonproliferation, working with the United States since 1997 to eliminate more than 100 kilograms of highly enriched uranium (HEU) and separated plutonium. At the 2014 Nuclear Security Summit, the United States and Italy announced the successful removal of all eligible fresh HEU and plutonium from Italy. These shipments were completed via a joint effort

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: High Consequence, Automation, &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robotics: Research & Development Research & Development Gemini Scout Sandia's High Consequence, Automation, & Robotics (HCAR) group has the capabilities, expertise, and experience to develop advanced automation solutions for a variety of complex and high-consequence tasks and missions. HCAR has expertise in six core research areas that are the foundations for robotic and intelligent systems research and development. Bringing these core research areas together and leveraging the

  8. Amorphous RE–Fe–B–Na colloidal nanoparticles: High temperature solution synthesis and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Li-Ping; Yan, Bing

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: RE–Fe–B–Na (RE = Nd–Er) colloidal nanoparticles by high-temperature solution synthesis are ultra-small monodisperse and air-stable amorphous, whose size and magnetic dependence are studied. - Highlights: • RE–Fe–B–Na nanoparticles are obtained by high-temperature solution synthesis. • These colloidal nanoparticles are monodisperse and size controlled. • The magnetism dependence and possible magnetic coupling mechanism are studied. - Abstract: RE–Fe–B–Na (RE = Nd–Er) colloidal nanoparticles are prepared by high-temperature solution synthesis. These nanoparticles are ultra-small monodisperse, air-stable and amorphous, whose particle size and magnetic property are characterized by transmission electron microscope and superconducting quantum interference device. Taking Nd–Fe–B–Na nanoparticle as an example, it is found that the particle size can be controlled in less than 7 nm. Besides, the magnetic properties of RE–Fe–B–Na colloidal nanoparticles can be compared for different rare earth elements. Based on the bulk ferromagnetic coupling, other possible magnetic coupling mechanism is discussed.

  9. High temperature efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peachey, N.; Dye, R.

    1995-12-01

    With the potential for significant payoffs in chemical processing, separation science, and ``green technology``, inorganic membranes merit the increased attention they are currently receiving. Application of thin film deposition and characterization expertise at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to the fabrication of membranes has led to the development of two new membranes. The first is a zeolitic film formed by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The material deposited is largely amorphous but yields an interesting microporous structure. The pores, roughly 10 to 15 A in diameter, run perpendicular to the substrate and, since the film is typically only a half micron thick, provide excellent flow rates. The PLD material has been deposited on quartz crystal microbalances (QCMS) to investigate its potential as a sensor. As such, it has shown discrimination of simple alcohol isomers. The second membrane, consisting of a composite metal structure, passes hydrogen exclusively. Currently, we are studying the possibility of incorporating the membrane in a hydrogen fuel cell using a methanol reformer.

  10. High schools compete for Nevada Science Bowl title | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) High schools compete for Nevada Science Bowl title Monday, February 15, 2016 - 3:37pm NNSA Blog The winner of the 2016 Nevada Science Bowl was the team from Reno's Davidson Academy of Nevada. From left: Matthew Bauer, Rinik Kumar, Haydn Bradstreet, Paolo Adajar, Eric Liu, and Coach Brett Guisti. While sports fans across the U.S. prepared for last weekend's game day, 160 Nevada high school students went head-to-head in a different kind of competition.

  11. Recent Test Results of the High Field Nb3Sn Dipole Magnet HD2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferracin, P.; Bingham, B.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D. W.; Dietderich, D. R.; Felice, H.; Hafalia, A. R.; Hannaford, C. R.; Joseph, J.; Lietzke, A. F.; Lizarazo, J.; Sabbi, G.; Wang, X.

    2009-10-19

    The 1 m long Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole magnet HD2, fabricated and tested at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, represents a step towards the development of block-type accelerator quality magnets operating in the range of 13-15 T. The magnet design features two coil modules composed of two layers wound around a titanium-alloy pole. The layer 1 pole includes a round cutout to provide room for a bore tube with a clear aperture of 36 mm. After a first series of tests where HD2 reached a maximum bore field of 13.8 T, corresponding to an estimated peak field on the conductor of 14.5 T, the magnet was disassembled and reloaded without the bore tube and with a clear aperture increased to 43 mm. We describe in this paper the magnet training observed in two consecutive tests after the removal of the bore tube, with a comparison of the quench performance with respect to the previous tests. An analysis of the voltage signals recorded before and after training quenches is then presented and discussed, and the results of coil visual inspections reported.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: High Consequence, Automation, &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robotics: Precision Micro Assembly Precision Micro Assembly In optoelectronics and optomechanics manufacturing, precision assembly of increasingly small devices has become a critical capability. Microscopic machines are the focus of the High Consequence, Automation, & Robotics (HCAR) Precision Micro Assembly Lab. Created to investigate the automated assembly of microelectromechanical (MEMS) components, the laboratory is developing technologies for a robotic workcell that can assemble

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: High Consequence, Automation, &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robotics: Advanced Manipulation Manipulation Robotics Homepage About Robotics Research & Development Advanced Controls Advanced Manipulation Mighty Mouse (M2) Sandia Hand Cybernetics High-Consequence Automation Perception and Decision Tools Unique Mobility Facilities Publications and Factsheets Robotics Image Gallery Robotics Videos Contact Robotics Research Advanced Manipulation Addressing robotics challenges The Sandia Hand has overcome issues that have prevented widespread adoption of

  14. State College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE's National

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science Bowl® | Department of Energy College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE's National Science Bowl® State College Area High School From State College, PA Wins DOE's National Science Bowl® May 1, 2006 - 10:34am Addthis WASHINGTON , DC - State College Area High School from State College, Pennsylvania, today won the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Science Bowl®. Teams representing 65 schools from across the United States competed in this "Science Jeopardy"

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: High Consequence, Automation, &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robotics: Guided Bullet Technology Guided Bullet Technology Robotics Facility Leveraging the capabilities of the High Consequence, Automation, & Robotics Precision Micro Assembly Lab, we have designed a self-guided .50 caliber projectile that utilizes a laser designated target and is configured to be fired from a small caliber, smooth bore gun barrel. Self-guided projectiles increase the probability of hit at targets at long range. Design The self-guided projectile utilizes a laser

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: High Consequence, Automation, &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robotics: Volant Volant Land multi-modal vehicle Sea swimming multi-modal vehicle Air Volant mulit-modal vehicle Imagine a mission where you have to covertly fly into an area, traverse through water, across land, and overcome obstacles along the way. That might seem impossible with a single unmanned vehicle. How could one vehicle overcome so many terrains and obstacles? That would take a team of unmanned aerial, undersea, and ground vehicles, right? Not according to High Consequence,

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: High Consequence, Automation, &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robotics: Neural Control of Prosthetics Neural Control of Prosthetics Advanced prosthetics Researchers in High Consequence, Automation, & Robotics are working on ways to improve amputees' control over prosthetics with direct help from their own nervous systems. Neural interfaces operate where the nervous system and an artificial device intersect. Interfaces can monitor nerve signals or provide inputs that let amputees control prosthetic devices by direct neural signals, the same way they

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: High Consequence, Automation, &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robotics: Unique Mobility Unique Mobility Robotics Homepage About Robotics Research & Development Advanced Controls Advanced Manipulation Cybernetics High-Consequence Automation Perception and Decision Tools Unique Mobility Urban Hopper Gemini-Scout Mine Rescue Vehicle Volant Facilities Publications and Factsheets Robotics Image Gallery Robotics Videos Contact Robotics Research Unique Mobility Urban Hopper We specialize in developing advanced mobility technologies to support a broad

  19. Method for preparing high cure temperature rare earth iron compound magnetic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Yuhong; Wei, Qiang; Zheng, Haixing

    2002-01-01

    Insertion of light elements such as H,C, or N in the R.sub.2 Fe.sub.17 (R=rare earth metal) series has been found to modify the magnetic properties of these compounds, which thus become prospective candidates for high performance permanent magnets. The most spectacular changes are increases of the Curie temperature, T.sub.c, of the magnetization, M.sub.s, and of coercivity, H.sub.c, upon interstitial insertion. A preliminary product having a component R--Fe--C,N phase is produced by a chemical route. Rare earth metal and iron amides are synthesized followed by pyrolysis and sintering in an inert or reduced atmosphere, as a result of which, the R--Fe--C,N phases are formed. Fabrication of sintered rare earth iron nitride and carbonitride bulk magnet is impossible via conventional process due to the limitation of nitridation method.

  20. Gravity and magnetic anomalies associated with Tertiary volcanism and a Proterozoic crustal boundary, Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Navajo Nation (Arizona)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan-Ealy, P.F. . Geology Dept.); Hendricks, J.D. )

    1992-01-01

    The Hopi Buttes volcanic field is located in the Navajo Nation of northeastern Arizona, near the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau. Explosive phreatomagmatic eruptions from late Miocene to mid-Pliocene time produced more than 300 maar-diatremes and deposited limburgite tuffs and tuff breccia and monchiquite dikes, necks and flows within a roughly circular 2,500 km[sup 2] area. The volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks make up the middle member of the Bidahochi Formation, whose lower and upper members are lacustrine and fluvial, respectively. The Bidahochi Formation overlies gently dipping Mesozoic sedimentary rocks exposed in the southwestern portion of the volcanic field. Two significant gravity and magnetic anomalies appear within the Hopi Buttes volcanic field that are unlike the signatures of other Tertiary volcanic fields on the Colorado Plateau. A circular 20 mGal negative gravity anomaly is centered over exposed sedimentary rocks in the southwestern portion of the field. The anomaly may be due to the large volume of low density pyroclastic rocks in the volcanic field and/or extensive brecciation of the underlying strata from the violent maar eruptions. The second significant anomaly is the northeast-trending Holbrook lineament, a 5 km-wide gravity and magnetic lineament that crosses the southeastern part of the volcanic field. The lineament reflects substantial gravity and magnetic decreases of 1.67 mGals/km and 100 gammas/km respectively, to the southeast. Preliminary two-dimensional gravity and magnetic modeling suggests the lineament represents a major Proterozoic crustal boundary and may correlate with one of several Proterozoic faults exposed in the transition zone of central Arizona. Gravity modeling shows a 3--5 km step'' in the Moho near the crustal boundary. The decrease in depth of the Moho to the northwest indicates either movement along the fault or magmatic upwelling beneath the volcanic field.

  1. A novel platform to study magnetized high-velocity collisionless shocks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Higginson, D. P.; Korneev, Ph; Béard, J.; Chen, S. N.; d'Humières, E.; Pépin, H.; Pikuz, S.; Pollock, B.; Riquier, R.; Tikhonchuk, V.; et al

    2014-12-13

    An experimental platform to study the interaction of two colliding high-velocity (0.01–0.2c; 0.05–20 MeV) proton plasmas in a high strength (20 T) magnetic field is introduced. This platform aims to study the collision of magnetized plasmas accelerated via the Target-Normal-Sheath-Acceleration mechanism and initially separated by distances of a few hundred microns. The plasmas are accelerated from solid targets positioned inside a few cubic millimeter cavity located within a Helmholtz coil that provides up to 20 T magnetic fields. Various parameters of the plasmas at their interaction location are estimated. These show an interaction that is highly non-collisional, and that becomesmore » more and more dominated by the magnetic fields as time progresses (from 5 to 60 ps). Particle-in-cell simulations are used to reproduce the initial acceleration of the plasma both via simulations including the laser interaction and via simulations that start with preheated electrons (to save dramatically on computational expense). The benchmarking of such simulations with the experiment and with each other will be used to understand the physical interaction when a magnetic field is applied. In conclusion, the experimental density profile of the interacting plasmas is shown in the case without an applied magnetic magnetic field, so to show that without an applied field that the development of high-velocity shocks, as a result of particle-to-particle collisions, is not achievable in the configuration considered.« less

  2. High-Energy Permanent Magnets for Hybrid Vehicles and Alternative Energy Uses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjipanayis, George C.; McCallum, William R.; Sellmyer, David J.; Harris, Vincent; Carpenter, Everett E.; Liu, Jinfang

    2013-12-17

    The report summarizes research undertaken by a multidisciplinary team aimed at the development of the next generation high-energy permanent magnets. The principal approach was relied on bottom-up fabrication of anisotropic nanocomposite magnets. Our efforts resulted in further development of the theoretical concept and fabrication principles for the nanocomposites and in synthesis of a range of rare-earth-based hard magnetic nanoparticles. Even though we did not make a breakthrough in the assembly of these hard magnetic particles with separately prepared Fe(Co) nanoparticles and did not obtain a compact nanocomposite magnet, our performed research will help to direct the future efforts, in particular, towards nano-assembly via coating, when the two phases which made the nanocomposite are first organized in core-shell-structured particles. Two other approaches were to synthesize (discover) new materials for the traditional singe-material magnets and the nanocomposite magnets. Integrated theoretical and experimental efforts lead to a significant advance in nanocluster synthesis technique and yielded novel rare-earth-free nanostructured and nanocomposite materials. Examination of fifteen R-Fe-X alloy systems (R = rare earth), which have not been explored earlier due to various synthesis difficulties reveal several new ferromagnetic compounds. The research has made major progress in bottom-up manufacturing of rare-earth-containing nanocomposite magnets with superior energy density and open new directions in development of higher-energy-density magnets that do not contain rare earths. The advance in the scientific knowledge and technology made in the course of the project has been reported in 50 peer-reviewed journal articles and numerous presentations at scientific meetings.

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory i Table of Contents Letter from the Division Director 1 Innovation Prize Nominations 2 Innovation Prize Winner 5 About the Feynman Center for Innovation 6 Innovation Assets 7 Strategic Sponsored Work 8 National High Magnetic Field Laboratory 9 Licensing 10 SOLVE 11 Economic Development 12 STAR Cryoelectronics 13 Partnership 14 Verdesian Life Sciences 15 R&D 100 Awards 16 Federal Laboratory Consortium Awards 17 Los Alamos National Laboratory 1 As scientists and

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: High Consequence, Automation, &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robotics: Mighty Mouse (M2) Mighty Mouse (M2) Mighty Mouse Mighty Mouse, or M2, earned its heroic name by saving the day at the White Sands Missile Range in southern New Mexico when a radioactive cylinder became jammed inside a metal sleeve. Its radiation field was far too dangerous for a human, even in a protective suit, to get near enough to free it. The White Sands team knew they needed a robot for the job and called Sandia's High Consequence, Automation, & Robotics (HCAR) team.

  5. MAGNETIC METHOD FOR PRODUCING HIGH VELOCITY SHOCK WAVES IN GASES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Josephson, V.

    1960-01-26

    A device is described for producing high-energy plasmas comprising a tapered shock tube of dielectric material and having a closed small end, an exceedingly low-inductance coll supported about and axially aligned with the small end of the tapered tube. an elongated multiturn coil supported upon the remninder of the exterior wall of the shock tube. a potential source and switch connected in series with the low-inductance coil, a potential source and switch connected in series with the elongated coil, means for hermetically sealing the large end of the tube, means for purging the tube of gases, and means for admitting a selected gas into the shock tube.

  6. A Permanent-Magnet Microwave Ion Source for a Compact High-Yield Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waldmann, Ole; Ludewigt, Bernhard

    2010-10-11

    We present recent work on the development of a microwave ion source that will be used in a high-yield compact neutron generator for active interrogation applications. The sealed tube generator will be capable of producing high neutron yields, 5x1011 n/s for D-T and ~;;1x1010 n/s for D-D reactions, while remaining transportable. We constructed a microwave ion source (2.45 GHz) with permanent magnets to provide the magnetic field strength of 87.5 mT necessary for satisfying the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) condition. Microwave ion sources can produce high extracted beam currents at the low gas pressures required for sealed tube operation and at lower power levels than previously used RF-driven ion sources. A 100 mA deuterium/tritium beam will be extracted through a large slit (60x6 mm2) to spread the beam power over a larger target area. This paper describes the design of the permanent-magnet microwave ion source and discusses the impact of the magnetic field design on the source performance. The required equivalent proton beam current density of 40 mA/cm2 was extracted at a moderate microwave power of 400 W with an optimized magnetic field.

  7. Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on Bad Sugars

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Nano-High, a program of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is a series of free Saturday morning talks by internationally recognized leaders in scientific research. The talks are designed...

  8. Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on Good Sugars

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Nano-High, a program of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is a series of free Saturday morning talks by internationally recognized leaders in scientific research. The talks are designed...

  9. Nano-High: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lecture on the "compassionate instinct"

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Nano-High, a program of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, is a series of free Saturday morning talks by internationally recognized leaders in scientific research. The talks are designed...

  10. Note: A sample holder design for sensitive magnetic measurements at high temperatures in a magnetic properties measurement system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arauzo, A.; Guerrero, E.; Urtizberea, A.; Stankiewicz, J.; Rillo, C.

    2012-06-15

    A sample holder design for high temperature measurements in a commercial MPMS SQUID magnetometer from Quantum Design is presented. It fulfills the requirements for the simultaneous use of the oven and reciprocating sample option (RSO) options, thus allowing sensitive magnetic measurements up to 800 K. Alternating current susceptibility can also be measured, since the holder does not induce any phase shift relative to the ac driven field. It is easily fabricated by twisting Constantan Copyright-Sign wires into a braid nesting the sample inside. This design ensures that the sample be placed tightly into a tough holder with its orientation fixed, and prevents any sample displacement during the fast movements of the RSO transport, up to high temperatures.

  11. Realizing High-Performance Buildings; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-03-02

    High-performance buildings (HPBs) are exceptional examples of both design and practice. Their energy footprints are small, and these are buildings that people want to work in because of their intelligent structure, operations, and coincident comfort. However, the operation of most buildings, even ones that are properly constructed and commissioned at the start, can deviate significantly from the original design intent over time, particularly due to control system overrides and growing plug and data center loads. With early planning for systems such as submetering and occupant engagement tools, operators can identify and remedy the problems. This guide is a primer for owners and owners’ representatives who are pursuing HPBs. It describes processes that have been successful in the planning, procurement, and operation of HPBs with exceptional energy efficiency. Much of the guidance offered results from a series of semi-structured conference calls with a technical advisory group of 15 owners and operators of prominent HPBs in the United States. The guide provides a prescription for planning, achieving, and maintaining an HPB. Although the guide focuses on the operations stage of buildings, many of the operations practices are specified during the planning stage.

  12. A High-Order Finite-Volume Algorithm for Fokker-Planck Collisions in Magnetized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Z; Cohen, R H; Rognlien, T D; Xu, X Q

    2007-04-18

    A high-order finite volume algorithm is developed for the Fokker-Planck Operator (FPO) describing Coulomb collisions in strongly magnetized plasmas. The algorithm is based on a general fourth-order reconstruction scheme for an unstructured grid in the velocity space spanned by parallel velocity and magnetic moment. The method provides density conservation and high-order-accurate evaluation of the FPO independent of the choice of the velocity coordinates. As an example, a linearized FPO in constant-of-motion coordinates, i.e. the total energy and the magnetic moment, is developed using the present algorithm combined with a cut-cell merging procedure. Numerical tests include the Spitzer thermalization problem and the return to isotropy for distributions initialized with velocity space loss cones. Utilization of the method for a nonlinear FPO is straightforward but requires evaluation of the Rosenbluth potentials.

  13. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Frenje, J. A.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Wink, C. W.; Bell, P.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; et al

    2016-08-02

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (Ti), yield (Yn), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with amore » time resolution of ~20 ps and energy resolution of ~100 keV for total neutron yields above ~1016. Lastly, at lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ~20 ps.« less

  14. Improvement of magnetic shielding effects: The superposition of a double-magnetic cylinder over a high-Tc superconducting cylinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohyama, Takashi; Minemoto, Takumi ); Itoh, Mineo ); Hoshino, Kazutomo )

    1993-11-01

    Improvement of magnetic shielding was achieved by superimposing a double-magnetic cylinder over a YBCO (Y-Ba-Cu-0) cylinder. The value of the magnetic shielded field for the superimposed cylinder was 47 times larger than that of the YBCO cylinder. The magnetic shielded field obtained when superimposing a soft iron single-cylinder over a YBCO cylinder was analyzed using the Bean, Wills, and Mager models, with an important criterion being derived for designing an effective shield of the chamber.

  15. Raman spectroscopy of graphite in high magnetic fields: Electron-phonon coupling and magnetophonon resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Younghee; Smirnov, Dmitry; Kalugin, Nikolai G.; Lombardo, Antonio; Ferrari, Andrea C.

    2013-12-04

    The magneto-Raman measurements of graphite were performed in a back-scattering Faraday geometry at temperature 10 K in magnetic fields up to 45 T. The experimental data reveal the rich structure of Raman-active excitations dominated by K-point massive electrons. At high magnetic fields the graphite E{sub 2g} Raman line shows complex multi- component behavior interpreted as magnetophonon resonance coupled electron-phonon modes at graphite’s K-point. Also we found the clear signature of the fundamental, strongly dumped, n=0 magnetophonon resonance associated with H point massless holes.

  16. Magnetic lens apparatus for a low-voltage high-resolution electron microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crewe, Albert V.

    1996-01-01

    A lens apparatus in which a beam of charged particles of low accelerating voltage is brought to a focus by a magnetic field, the lens being situated behind the target position. The lens comprises an electrically-conducting coil arranged around the axis of the beam and a magnetic pole piece extending along the axis of the beam at least within the space surrounded by the coil. The lens apparatus comprises the sole focusing lens for high-resolution imaging in a low-voltage scanning electron microscope.

  17. A design for a high voltage magnet coil ringer test set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koska, W. ); Sims, R.E. )

    1992-04-01

    By discharging a bank of charged capacitors through a high power SCR switch into an SSC dipole magnet assembly, it is possible to ring'' the coil and develop a voltage stress of greater than 50 volts turn-to-turn, thereby verifying the insulation integrity. We will present an overview of the test set design for a 2 kV isolated SCR firing circuit, including safety features, selectable capacitor banks, and digital waveform storage system. Results from testing typical coils and magnets will be included. Possible upgrades are also discussed.

  18. A design for a high voltage magnet coil ringer test set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koska, W.; Sims, R.E.

    1992-04-01

    By discharging a bank of charged capacitors through a high power SCR switch into an SSC dipole magnet assembly, it is possible to ``ring`` the coil and develop a voltage stress of greater than 50 volts turn-to-turn, thereby verifying the insulation integrity. We will present an overview of the test set design for a 2 kV isolated SCR firing circuit, including safety features, selectable capacitor banks, and digital waveform storage system. Results from testing typical coils and magnets will be included. Possible upgrades are also discussed.

  19. Lightweight Superconducting Cables for use with High-Field Magnets and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Military Applications - Energy Innovation Portal Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Electricity Transmission Electricity Transmission Find More Like This Return to Search Lightweight Superconducting Cables for use with High-Field Magnets and Military Applications University of Colorado Contact CU About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryThe development of YBCO coated conductors has resulted in high critical current densities, but have been limited by the upper critical

  20. Cosmic magnetism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, P.

    1986-01-01

    This book deals with the cosmic magnetism in a non-mathematical way. It uses Faraday's very powerful and highly pictorial concept of lines of magnetic force and their associated physical properties to explain the structure and behavior of magnetic fields in extraterrestrial objects. Contents include: forces of nature; magnetic field of earth; solar and interplanetary magnetic fields; magnetic fields in the solar system; stars and pulsars; and magnetic fields of the milky way and other galaxies.

  1. Structural and magnetic phase transitions in gadolinium under high pressures and low temperatures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2014-11-07

    High pressure structural transition studies have been carried out on rare earth metal gadolinium in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature to 169 GPa. Gadolinium has been compressed to 38% of its initial volume at this pressure. With increasing pressure, a crystal structure sequence of hcp → Smtype→ dhcp → fcc → dfcc → monoclinic has been observed in our studies on gadolinium. The measured equation of state of gadolinium is presented to 169 GPa at ambient temperature. Magnetic ordering temperature of gadolinium has been studied using designer diamond anvils to a pressure of 25 GP and a temperaturemore » of 10 K. The magnetic ordering temperature has been determined from the four-point electrical resistivity measurements carried out on gadolinium. Furthermore, our experiments show that the magnetic transition temperature decreases with increasing pressure to 19 GPa and then increases when gadolinium is subjected to higher pressures.« less

  2. Structural and magnetic phase transitions in gadolinium under high pressures and low temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2014-11-07

    High pressure structural transition studies have been carried out on rare earth metal gadolinium in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature to 169 GPa. Gadolinium has been compressed to 38% of its initial volume at this pressure. With increasing pressure, a crystal structure sequence of hcp → Smtype→ dhcp → fcc → dfcc → monoclinic has been observed in our studies on gadolinium. The measured equation of state of gadolinium is presented to 169 GPa at ambient temperature. Magnetic ordering temperature of gadolinium has been studied using designer diamond anvils to a pressure of 25 GP and a temperature of 10 K. The magnetic ordering temperature has been determined from the four-point electrical resistivity measurements carried out on gadolinium. Furthermore, our experiments show that the magnetic transition temperature decreases with increasing pressure to 19 GPa and then increases when gadolinium is subjected to higher pressures.

  3. Magnetic lens apparatus for use in high-resolution scanning electron microscopes and lithographic processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crewe, Albert V. (Dune Acres, IN)

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are lens apparatus in which a beam of charged particlesis brought to a focus by means of a magnetic field, the lens being situated behind the target position. In illustrative embodiments, a lens apparatus is employed in a scanning electron microscopeas the sole lens for high-resolution focusing of an electron beam, and in particular, an electron beam having an accelerating voltage of from about 10 to about 30,000 V. In one embodiment, the lens apparatus comprises an electrically-conducting coil arranged around the axis of the beam and a magnetic pole piece extending along the axis of the beam at least within the space surrounded by the coil. In other embodiments, the lens apparatus comprises a magnetic dipole or virtual magnetic monopole fabricated from a variety of materials, including permanent magnets, superconducting coils, and magnetizable spheres and needles contained within an energy-conducting coil. Multiple-array lens apparatus are also disclosed for simultaneous and/or consecutive imaging of multiple images on single or multiple specimens. The invention further provides apparatus, methods, and devices useful in focusing charged particle beams for lithographic processes.

  4. The formation of reverse shocks in magnetized high energy density supersonic plasma flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, S. V. E-mail: l.suttle10@imperial.ac.uk; Suttle, L.; Swadling, G. F.; Bennett, M.; Bland, S. N.; Burdiak, G. C.; Chittenden, J. P.; Grouchy, P. de; Hall, G. N.; Hare, J. D.; Kalmoni, N.; Niasse, N.; Patankar, S.; Smith, R. A.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Burgess, D.; Clemens, A.; Ciardi, A.; Sheng, L.; Yuan, J.; and others

    2014-05-15

    A new experimental platform was developed, based on the use of supersonic plasma flow from the ablation stage of an inverse wire array z-pinch, for studies of shocks in magnetized high energy density physics plasmas in a well-defined and diagnosable 1-D interaction geometry. The mechanism of flow generation ensures that the plasma flow (Re{sub M} ∼ 50, M{sub S} ∼ 5, M{sub A} ∼ 8, V{sub flow} ≈ 100 km/s) has a frozen-in magnetic field at a level sufficient to affect shocks formed by its interaction with obstacles. It is found that in addition to the expected accumulation of stagnated plasma in a thin layer at the surface of a planar obstacle, the presence of the magnetic field leads to the formation of an additional detached density jump in the upstream plasma, at a distance of ∼c/ω{sub pi} from the obstacle. Analysis of the data obtained with Thomson scattering, interferometry, and local magnetic probes suggests that the sub-shock develops due to the pile-up of the magnetic flux advected by the plasma flow.

  5. Commissioning of horizontal-bend superconducting magnet for Jefferson Lab's 11-GeV super high momentum spectrometer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Eric; Brindza, Paul D.; Lassiter, Steven R.; Fowler, Mike J.; Fenker, Howard C.; DeKamp, Jon C.

    2016-03-02

    Commissioning characteristics of the Superconducting High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) Horizontal Bend (HB) magnet was presented. Pre-commissioning peer review of the magnet uncovered issues with eddy currents in the thermal shield, resulting in additional testing and modeling of the magnet. A three-stage test plan was discussed. A solution of using a small dump resistor and a warm thermal shield was presented. Analyses illustrated that it was safe to run the magnet to full test current. As a result, the HB magnet was successfully cooled to 4 K and reached its maximum test current of 4000 A.

  6. Magnetic field effect on the terahertz emission from nanometer InGaAs/AlInAs high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyakonova, N.; Teppe, F.; Lusakowski, J.; Knap, W.; Levinshtein, M.; Dmitriev, A.P.; Shur, M.S.; Bollaert, S.; Cappy, A.

    2005-06-01

    The influence of the magnetic field on the excitation of plasma waves in InGaAs/AlInAs lattice matched high electron mobility transistors is reported. The threshold source-drain voltage of the excitation of the terahertz emission shifts to higher values under a magnetic field increasing from 0 to 6 T. We show that the main change of the emission threshold in relatively low magnetic fields (smaller than approximately 4 T) is due to the magnetoresistance of the ungated parts of the channel. In higher magnetic fields, the effect of the magnetic field on the gated region of the device becomes important.

  7. NREL and Partners to Compare High-Efficiency Solar Cells from Three Nations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Sites in Colorado and Yokohama, Japan - News Releases | NREL and Partners to Compare High-Efficiency Solar Cells from Three Nations at Sites in Colorado and Yokohama, Japan April 4, 2011 Golden, Colo., April 4, 2011 - The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is partnering with major international industrial technology and solar research organizations to test how solar cells from three manufacturers perform in two geographic locations with different

  8. Proceedings from the conference on high speed computing: High speed computing and national security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirons, K.P.; Vigil, M.; Carlson, R.

    1997-07-01

    This meeting covered the following topics: technologies/national needs/policies: past, present and future; information warfare; crisis management/massive data systems; risk assessment/vulnerabilities; Internet law/privacy and rights of society; challenges to effective ASCI programmatic use of 100 TFLOPs systems; and new computing technologies.

  9. High Penetration PV: How High Can We Go? (Brochure), Energy Systems Integration (ESI), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Penetration PV: How High Can We Go? ENERGY SYSTEMS INTEGRATION ESI optimizes the design and performance of electrical, thermal, fuel, and water pathways at all scales. "We know how important the option of solar is for our customers. Solving these issues requires that everyone-utilities, the solar industry, and other leading technical experts like NREL-work together. That's what this work is all about. With the highest amount of solar in the nation, our utilities are facing potential

  10. Maximum mass of stable magnetized highly super-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs: stable solutions with varying magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Upasana; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata E-mail: bm@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2014-06-01

    We address the issue of stability of recently proposed significantly super-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs. We present stable solutions of magnetostatic equilibrium models for super-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs pertaining to various magnetic field profiles. This has been obtained by self-consistently including the effects of the magnetic pressure gradient and total magnetic density in a general relativistic framework. We estimate that the maximum stable mass of magnetized white dwarfs could be more than 3 solar mass. This is very useful to explain peculiar, overluminous type Ia supernovae which do not conform to the traditional Chandrasekhar mass-limit.

  11. Heavy medium recovery in coal washing by continuous high gradient magnetic separation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelland, D.R.

    1983-09-01

    We have adapted high grade magnetic separation (HGMS) for magnetite recovery because of its insensitivity to coal/magnetite ratio and slurry density and its ability to capture fine magnetite at high velocity. An open vertical matrix able to capture 10 ..mu..m (avg. size) magnetite without entraining 2 mm coal has been incorporated in a 1.85 m diameter continuous high gradient magnetic separator. Three-quarter ton samples of magnetite (in 1000 gallons of water) have been recovered with the matrix ring turning at 40 cm/s through a field of 6 kOe. A laminated core demagnetizing coil followed by water sprays removes the recovered magnetite. The recovery is high, particularly for two passes which could be accomplished by two magnet heads on a single carousel ring. Coal entrainment is low for a wide range of operating conditions. A 4.8 m diameter separator, the largest currently available, with multiple heads, should be able to treat 350 tons of magnetite and coal per hour. 29 references, 52 figures, 13 tables.

  12. Highly polarized light emission by isotropic quantum dots integrated with magnetically aligned segmented nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uran, Can; Erdem, Talha; Guzelturk, Burak; Perkgz, Nihan Kosku; Jun, Shinae; Jang, Eunjoo; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2014-10-06

    In this work, we demonstrate a proof-of-concept system for generating highly polarized light from colloidal quantum dots (QDs) coupled with magnetically aligned segmented Au/Ni/Au nanowires (NWs). Optical characterizations reveal that the optimized QD-NW coupled structures emit highly polarized light with an s-to p-polarization (s/p) contrast as high as 15:1 corresponding to a degree of polarization of 0.88. These experimental results are supported by the finite-difference time-domain simulations, which demonstrate the interplay between the inter-NW distance and the degree of polarization.

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory ships last of high-activity drums to WIPP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ships last ff high-activity drums to WIPP Los Alamos National Laboratory ships last of high-activity drums to WIPP The November shipment was the final delivery this year to the Carlsbad plant, which is scheduled to undergo facility maintenance through mid-January. November 25, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

  14. A highly stable DC power supply for precision magnetic field measurements and other purposes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ino, Takashi

    2012-04-15

    A homogeneous magnetic field is essential for the {sup 3}He neutron spin filter used to polarize neutron beams and analyze neutron spins in neutron scattering. The required spatial uniformity of the magnetic field is on the order of 10{sup -4}/cm or less. To measure such uniformity, one needs a DC current source with a current stability much better than 10{sup -4}. However, laboratory DC power supplies, which are commonly used in many {sup 3}He neutron spin filters, do not have such stabilities. To attain a highly stable current with a common laboratory DC power supply for every {sup 3}He neutron spin filter, a simple feedback circuit has been developed to keep the output current stable up to 10{sup -6}. Such a highly stable current or voltage from a common laboratory DC power supply can also be used for various other research applications.

  15. The effects of high magnetic field on the morphology and microwave electromagnetic properties of MnO{sub 2} powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia Zhang [Department of Materials Processing Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road 2, Ganjingzi District, Dalian 116085, Liaoning Province (China); Duan Yuping, E-mail: duanyp@dlut.edu.c [Department of Materials Processing Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road 2, Ganjingzi District, Dalian 116085, Liaoning Province (China); Li Shuqing, E-mail: lsq6668@126.co [Beijing Aeronautical Manufacturing Technology Research Institute, 1 Jun Zhuang east Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100024 (China); Li Xiaogang, E-mail: lixiaogang99@263.ne [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu Shunhua [Department of Materials Processing Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road 2, Ganjingzi District, Dalian 116085, Liaoning Province (China)

    2010-07-15

    MnO{sub 2} with a sea urchin-like ball chain shape was first synthesized in a high magnetic field via a simple chemical process, and a mechanism for the formation of this grain shape was discussed. The as-synthesized samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, and vector network analysis. The dielectric constant and the loss tangent clearly decreased under a magnetic field. The magnetic loss tangent and the imaginary part of the magnetic permeability increased substantially. Furthermore, the theoretically calculated values of reflection loss showed that the absorption peaks shifted to a higher frequency with increases in the magnetic field strength. - Graphical abstract: MnO{sub 2} with a sea urchin-like ball chain shape is first synthesized in a high magnetic field via a simple hydrothermal route.

  16. Magnetic reconnection in high-energy-density laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K.

    2012-05-15

    Recently, novel experiments on magnetic reconnection have been conducted in laser-produced plasmas in a high-energy-density regime. Individual plasma bubbles self-generate toroidal, mega-gauss-scale magnetic fields through the Biermann battery effect. When multiple bubbles are created at small separation, they expand into one another, driving reconnection of this field. Reconnection in the experiments was reported to be much faster than allowed by both Sweet-Parker, and even Hall-MHD theories, when normalized to the nominal magnetic fields self-generated by single bubbles. Through particle-in-cell simulations (both with and without a binary collision operator), we model the bubble interaction at parameters and geometry relevant to the experiments. This paper discusses in detail the reconnection regime of the laser-driven experiments and reports the qualitative features of simulations. We find substantial flux-pileup effects, which boost the relevant magnetic field for reconnection in the current sheet. When this is accounted for, the normalized reconnection rates are much more in line with standard two-fluid theory of reconnection. At the largest system sizes, we additionally find that the current sheet is prone to breakup into plasmoids.

  17. OBSERVATIONS OF ENERGETIC HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD PULSARS WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parent, D.; Abdo, A. A.; Kerr, M.; Den Hartog, P. R.; Romani, R. W.; Watters, K.; Craig, H. A.; Baring, M. G.; DeCesar, M. E.; Harding, A. K.; Espinoza, C. M.; Stappers, B. W.; Weltevrede, P.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Camilo, F.; Johnston, S.; Kaspi, V. M.; Livingstone, M.; Burgay, M.; Freire, P. C. C. E-mail: kerrm@stanford.edu; and others

    2011-12-20

    We report the detection of {gamma}-ray pulsations from the high-magnetic-field rotation-powered pulsar PSR J1119-6127 using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The {gamma}-ray light curve of PSR J1119-6127 shows a single, wide peak offset from the radio peak by 0.43 {+-} 0.02 in phase. Spectral analysis suggests a power law of index 1.0 {+-} 0.3{sup +0.4}{sub -0.2} with an energy cutoff at 0.8 {+-} 0.2{sup +2.0}{sub -0.5} GeV. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We discuss the emission models of PSR J1119-6127 and demonstrate that despite the object's high surface magnetic field-near that of magnetars-the field strength and structure in the {gamma}-ray emitting zone are apparently similar to those of typical young pulsars. Additionally, we present upper limits on the {gamma}-ray pulsed emission for the magnetically active PSR J1846-0258 in the supernova remnant Kesteven 75 and two other energetic high-B pulsars, PSRs J1718-3718 and J1734-3333. We explore possible explanations for the non-detection of these three objects, including peculiarities in their emission geometry.

  18. CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2007 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  19. CRAD, Configuration Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Configuration Management Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  20. CRAD, Emergency Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Emergency Management Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  1. CRAD, Engineering- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Engineering Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  2. CRAD, Safety Basis- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Safety Basis in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  3. CRAD, Safety Basis- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Safety Basis portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  4. CRAD, Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Management portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  5. CRAD, Quality Assurance- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Quality Assurance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  6. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Occupational Safety and Health Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  7. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Industrial Safety and Hygiene Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  8. CRAD, Maintenance- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Maintenance Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  9. CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2007 assessment of the Conduct of Operations Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  10. CRAD, Radiological Controls- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  11. CRAD, Nuclear Safety- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Nuclear Safety Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  12. CRAD, Training- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Training Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  13. CRAD, Configuration Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Configuration Management Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  14. CRAD, Emergency Management- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Emergency Management Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  15. CRAD, Environmental Protection- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Environmental Compliance Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  16. Pulsed high-magnetic-field experiments: New insights into the magnetocaloric effect in Ni-Mn-In Heusler alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar Mejía, C. Nayak, A. K.; Felser, C.; Nicklas, M.; Ghorbani Zavareh, M.; Wosnitza, J.; Skourski, Y.

    2015-05-07

    The present pulsed high-magnetic-field study on Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} gives an extra insight into the thermodynamics of the martensitic transformation in Heusler shape-memory alloys. The transformation-entropy change, ΔS, was estimated from field-dependent magnetization experiments in pulsed high magnetic fields and by heat-capacity measurements in static fields. We found a decrease of ΔS with decreasing temperature. This behavior can be understood by considering the different signs of the lattice and magnetic contributions to the total entropy. Our results further imply that the magnetocaloric effect will decrease with decreasing temperature and, furthermore, the martensitic transition is not induced anymore by changing the temperature in high magnetic fields.

  17. High School Students Begin Battle for Trip to the National Science Bowl -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Releases | NREL High School Students Begin Battle for Trip to the National Science Bowl January 29, 2009 Proving that they know more about science than some adults will be a cinch for approximately 160 Colorado high school students who will showcase their science and math knowledge at the Colorado Science Bowl on Saturday, January 31, at Dakota Ridge High School. The U.S. Department of Energy began the science bowl tradition nearly 20 years ago as a way to encourage high school students

  18. High-sensitivity cooled coil system for nuclear magnetic resonance in kHz range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Tingting; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Lee, Yong-Ho; Lin, Jun

    2014-11-15

    In several low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (LF-NMR) and surface nuclear magnetic resonance applications, i.e., in the frequency range of kHz, high sensitivity magnetic field detectors are needed. Usually, low-T{sub c} superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with a high field sensitivity of about 1 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} are employed as detectors. Considering the flux trapping and operational difficulties associated with low-T{sub c} SQUIDs, we designed and fabricated liquid-nitrogen-cooled Cu coils for NMR detection in the kHz range. A cooled coil system consisting of a 9-cm diameter Cu coil and a low noise preamplifier was systematically investigated and reached a sensitivity of 2 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} at 77 K, which is 3 times better compared to the sensitivity at 300 K. A Q-switch circuit as an essential element for damping the ringing effects of the pickup coil was developed to acquire free induction decay signals of a water sample with minimum loss of signal. Our studies demonstrate that cooled Cu coils, if designed properly, can provide a comparable sensitivity to low-T{sub c} SQUIDs.

  19. AC transport in p-Ge/GeSi quantum well in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drichko, I. L.; Malysh, V. A.; Smirnov, I. Yu.; Golub, L. E.; Tarasenko, S. A.; Suslov, A. V.; Mironov, O. A.; Kummer, M.; Känel, H. von

    2014-08-20

    The contactless surface acoustic wave technique is implemented to probe the high-frequency conductivity of a high-mobility p-Ge/GeSi quantum well structure in the regime of integer quantum Hall effect (IQHE) at temperatures 0.3–5.8 K and magnetic fields up to 18 T. It is shown that, in the IQHE regime at the minima of conductivity, holes are localized and ac conductivity is of hopping nature and can be described within the “two-site” model. The analysis of the temperature and magnetic-field-orientation dependence of the ac conductivity at odd filing factors enables us to determine the effective hole g-factor, |g{sub zz}|≈4.5. It is shown that the in-plane component of the magnetic field leads to a decrease in the g-factor as well as increase in the cyclotron mass, which is explained by orbital effects in the complex valence band of germanium.

  20. Extended magnetic exchange interactions in the high-temperature ferromagnet MnBi

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Christianson, Andrew D.; Hahn, Steven E.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Parker, David S.; McGuire, Michael A.; Sales, Brian C.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Williams, T. J.; Taylor, A. E.

    2016-05-09

    Here, the high-temperature ferromagnet MnBi continues to receive attention as a candidate to replace rare-earth-containing permanent magnets in applications above room temperature. This is due to a high Curie temperature, large magnetic moments, and a coercivity that increases with temperature. The synthesis of MnBi also allows for crystals that are free of interstitial Mn, enabling more direct access to the key interactions underlying the physical properties of binary Mn-based ferromagnets. In this work, we use inelastic neutron scattering to measure the spin waves of MnBi in order to characterize the magnetic exchange at low temperature. Consistent with the spin reorientationmore » that occurs below 140~K, we do not observe a spin gap in this system above our experimental resolution. A Heisenberg model was fit to the spin wave data in order to characterize the long-range nature of the exchange. It was found that interactions up to sixth nearest neighbor are required to fully parameterize the spin waves. Surprisingly, the nearest-neighbor term is antiferromagnetic, and the realization of a ferromagnetic ground state relies on the more numerous ferromagnetic terms beyond nearest neighbor, suggesting that the ferromagnetic ground state arises as a consequence of the long-ranged interactions in the system.« less

  1. Thin Shell, High Velocity Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, T.; Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Barrios, M. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Doppner, T.; Haan, S. W.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Park, H. S.; Patel, P. K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Celliers, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Church, J. A.; Dixit, S.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Field, J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hsing, W. W.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Knauer, J.; Kohut, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Kritcher, A.; Kyrala, G.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J. D.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Ralph, J. E.; Rosen, M. D.; Rygg, J. R.; Sater, J.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M. B.; Shaughnessy, D.; Spears, B. K.; Town, R.P. J.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-04-06

    Experiments have recently been conducted at the National Ignition Facility utilizing inertial confinement fusion capsule ablators that are 175 and 165 μm in thickness, 10% and 15% thinner, respectively, than the nominal thickness capsule used throughout the high foot and most of the National Ignition Campaign. These three-shock, high-adiabat, high-foot implosions have demonstrated good performance, with higher velocity and better symmetry control at lower laser powers and energies than their nominal thickness ablator counterparts. Little to no hydrodynamic mix into the DT hot spot has been observed despite the higher velocities and reduced depth for possible instability feedthrough. Earlier results have shown good repeatability, with up to 1/2 the neutron yield coming from α-particle self-heating.

  2. Characterization of a high-temperature superconducting conductor on round core cables in magnetic fields up to 20 T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Laan, D. C.; Noyes, P. D.; Miller, G. E.; Weijers, H. W.; Willering, G. P.

    2013-02-13

    The next generation of high-ï¬eld magnets that will operate at magnetic ï¬elds substantially above 20 T, or at temperatures substantially above 4.2 K, requires high-temperature superconductors (HTS). Conductor on round core (CORC) cables, in which RE-Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (RE = rare earth) (REBCO) coated conductors are wound in a helical fashion on a flexible core, are a practical and versatile HTS cable option for low-inductance, high-field magnets. We performed the first tests of CORC magnet cables in liquid helium in magnetic fields of up to 20 T. A record critical current I{sub c} of 5021 A was measured at 4.2 K and 19 T. In a cable with an outer diameter of 7.5 mm, this value corresponds to an engineering current density J{sub e} of 114 A mm{sup -2} , the highest J{sub e} ever reported for a superconducting cable at such high magnetic fields. Additionally, the first magnet wound from an HTS cable was constructed from a 6 m-long CORC cable. The 12-turn, double-layer magnet had an inner diameter of 9 cm and was tested in a magnetic field of 20 T, at which it had an I{sub c} of 1966 A. The cables were quenched repetitively without degradation during the measurements, demonstrating the feasibility of HTS CORC cables for use in high-field magnet applications.

  3. Lightning Protection Certification for High Explosives Facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clancy, T J; Brown, C G; Ong, M M; Clark, G A

    2006-01-11

    Presented here is an innovation in lighting safety certification, and a description of its implementation for high explosives processing and storage facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Lightning rods have proven useful in the protection of wooden structures; however, modern structures made of rebar, concrete, and the like, require fresh thinking. Our process involves a rigorous and unique approach to lightning safety for modern buildings, where the internal voltages and currents are quantified and the risk assessed. To follow are the main technical aspects of lightning protection for modern structures and these methods comply with the requirements of the National Fire Protection Association, the National Electrical Code, and the Department of Energy [1][2]. At the date of this release, we have certified over 70 HE processing and storage cells at our Site 300 facility.

  4. Highly tunable magnetism in silicene doped with Cr and Fe atoms under isotropic and uniaxial tensile strain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Rui; Ni, Jun; Chen, Ying

    2015-12-28

    We have investigated the magnetic properties of silicene doped with Cr and Fe atoms under isotropic and uniaxial tensile strain by the first-principles calculations. We find that Cr and Fe doped silicenes show strain-tunable magnetism. (1) The magnetism of Cr and Fe doped silicenes exhibits sharp transitions from low spin states to high spin states by a small isotropic tensile strain. Specially for Fe doped silicene, a nearly nonmagnetic state changes to a high magnetic state by a small isotropic tensile strain. (2) The magnetic moments of Fe doped silicene also show a sharp jump to ∼2 μ{sub B} at a small threshold of the uniaxial strain, and the magnetic moments of Cr doped silicene increase gradually to ∼4 μ{sub B} with the increase of uniaxial strain. (3) The electronic and magnetic properties of Cr and Fe doped silicenes are sensitive to the magnitude and direction of the external strain. The highly tunable magnetism may be applied in the spintronic devices.

  5. EIS-0291: High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Transition Project at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The EIS evaluates the range of reasonable alternatives and their impacts regarding the future management of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL).

  6. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2010-12-15

    5098-SR-03-0 FINAL REPORT- INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  7. High performance Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets without critical elements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pathak, Arjun K.; Gschneidner, Jr., K. A.; Khan, M.; McCallum, R. W.; Pecharsky, V. K.

    2016-01-28

    Scanning electron microscopy, and magnetization measurements reveal that as cast (Nd1–xCex)2Fe14B alloys contain significant amounts of α-Fe that can be dramatically reduced by annealing the alloys at 1000 °C for 3 days. The room temperature intrinsic coercivity, Hci, of (Nd0.8Ce0.2)2.2Fe14B melt spun ribbons was found to be 11 kOe, which is ~32 to ~10% higher in comparison to that of Nd2Fe14B (Hci = 8.3 kOe), and (Nd0.8Ce0.2)2.0Fe14B (Hci = 10 kOe), respectively. The substitution of Co for Fe in (Nd0.8Ce0.2)2Fe14–zCozB significantly increases both TC and the maximum energy product, (BH)max. Our study shows that both Co-containing and Co-free Ce-substituted Nd2Fe14Bmore » alloys have excellent magnetic properties at room temperature and above. As a result, the experimental results also demonstrate the potential of Nd-Ce-Fe-TM-B based alloys as alternative to expensive Dy-containing high performance rare earth magnets.« less

  8. High-magnetic-field MHD-generator program. Quarterly report, January 1, 1981-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-04-01

    Progress in an experimental and theoretical program designed to investigate MHD channel phenomena which are important at high magnetic fields is reported. The areas of research include nonuniformity effects, boundary layers, Hall field breakdown, the effects of electrode configuration and current concentrations, and studies of steady-state combustion disk and linear channels in an existing 6 Tesla magnet of small dimensions. In the study of the effects of nonuniformities, experiments have been performed to test a multi-channel, fiber optics diagnostic system that yields time-resolved temperature profiles in an MHD channel. For the study of magneto-acoustic fluctuation phenomena, a one-dimensional model has been developed to describe the performance of a non-ideal MHD generator with a generalized electrical configuration. The installation of the hardware for the data acquisition and reduction of the laser Doppler velocimeter data, to be used in the study of turbulence suppression in a magnetic field, has been nearly completed. A two-dimensional MHD computer code has been developed which predicts the dependence on electrode and insulator dimensions of the onset of interelectrode Hall field breakdown. Calculations have been performed of the effects of nonuniformities on the flow and electrical behavior of baseload-sized disk generators.

  9. Relativistic electron motion in cylindrical waveguide with strong guiding magnetic field and high power microwave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Ping; Sun, Jun; Cao, Yibing

    2015-06-15

    In O-type high power microwave (HPM) devices, the annular relativistic electron beam is constrained by a strong guiding magnetic field and propagates through an interaction region to generate HPM. Some papers believe that the E × B drift of electrons may lead to beam breakup. This paper simplifies the interaction region with a smooth cylindrical waveguide to research the radial motion of electrons under conditions of strong guiding magnetic field and TM{sub 01} mode HPM. The single-particle trajectory shows that the radial electron motion presents the characteristic of radial guiding-center drift carrying cyclotron motion. The radial guiding-center drift is spatially periodic and is dominated by the polarization drift, not the E × B drift. Furthermore, the self fields of the beam space charge can provide a radial force which may pull electrons outward to some extent but will not affect the radial polarization drift. Despite the radial drift, the strong guiding magnetic field limits the drift amplitude to a small value and prevents beam breakup from happening due to this cause.

  10. National cyber defense high performance computing and analysis : concepts, planning and roadmap.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamlet, Jason R.; Keliiaa, Curtis M.

    2010-09-01

    There is a national cyber dilemma that threatens the very fabric of government, commercial and private use operations worldwide. Much is written about 'what' the problem is, and though the basis for this paper is an assessment of the problem space, we target the 'how' solution space of the wide-area national information infrastructure through the advancement of science, technology, evaluation and analysis with actionable results intended to produce a more secure national information infrastructure and a comprehensive national cyber defense capability. This cybersecurity High Performance Computing (HPC) analysis concepts, planning and roadmap activity was conducted as an assessment of cybersecurity analysis as a fertile area of research and investment for high value cybersecurity wide-area solutions. This report and a related SAND2010-4765 Assessment of Current Cybersecurity Practices in the Public Domain: Cyber Indications and Warnings Domain report are intended to provoke discussion throughout a broad audience about developing a cohesive HPC centric solution to wide-area cybersecurity problems.

  11. Diffuse magnetic neutron scattering in the highly frustrated double perovskite Ba2YRuO6

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nilsen, Gøran. J.; Thompson, Corey M.; Ehlers, Georg; Marjerrison, Casey A.; Greedan, John E.

    2015-02-23

    Here we investigated diffuse magnetic scattering in the highly frustrated double perovskite Ba2YRuO6 using polarized neutrons. Consistent with previous reports, the material shows two apparent transitions at 47 and 36 K to an eventual type I face-centered-cubic magnetic ground state. The (100) magnetic reflection shows different behavior from the five other observed reflections upon heating from 1.8 K, with the former broadening well beyond the resolution limit near 36 K. Closer examination of the latter group reveals a small, but clear, increase in peak widths between 36 and 47 K, indicating that this regime is dominated by short-range spin correlations.more » Diffuse magnetic scattering persists above 47 K near the position of (100) to at least 200 K, consistent with strong frustration. Reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modeling of the diffuse scattering from 45 to 200 K finds that the spin-spin correlations between nearest and next-nearest neighbors are antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic, respectively, at temperatures near the upper ordering temperature, but both become antiferromagnetic and of similar magnitude above 100 K. The significance of this unusual crossover is discussed in light of the super-superexchange interactions between nearest and next-nearest neighbors in this material and the demands of type I order. The dimensionality of the correlations is addressed by reconstructing the scattering in the (hk0) plane using the RMC spin configurations. This indicates that one-dimensional spin correlations dominate at temperatures close to the first transition. In addition, a comparison between mean-field calculations and (hk0) scattering implies that further neighbor couplings play a significant role in the selection of the ground state. Finally, the results and interpretation are compared with those recently published for monoclinic Sr2YRuO6, and similarities and differences are emphasized.« less

  12. High performance electrical, magnetic, electromagnetic and electrooptical devices enabled by three dimensionally ordered nanodots and nanorods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, Amit , Kang; Sukill

    2012-02-21

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate same with self-assembled nanodots and/or nanorods of a single or multicomponent material within another single or multicomponent material for use in electrical, electronic, magnetic, electromagnetic and electrooptical devices is disclosed. Self-assembled nanodots and/or nanorods are ordered arrays wherein ordering occurs due to strain minimization during growth of the materials. A simple method to accomplish this when depositing in-situ films is also disclosed. Device applications of resulting materials are in areas of superconductivity, photovoltaics, ferroelectrics, magnetoresistance, high density storage, solid state lighting, non-volatile memory, photoluminescence, thermoelectrics and in quantum dot lasers.

  13. IEFIT - An Interactive Approach to High Temperature Fusion Plasma Magnetic Equilibrium Fitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Q.; Schachter, J.; Schissel, D.P.; Lao, L.L.

    1999-06-01

    An interactive IDL based wrapper, IEFIT, has been created for the magnetic equilibrium reconstruction code EFIT written in FORTRAN. It allows high temperature fusion physicists to rapidly optimize a plasma equilibrium reconstruction by eliminating the unnecessarily repeated initialization in the conventional approach along with the immediate display of the fitting results of each input variation. It uses a new IDL based graphics package, GaPlotObj, developed in cooperation with Fanning Software Consulting, that provides a unified interface with great flexibility in presenting and analyzing scientific data. The overall interactivity reduces the process to minutes from the usual hours.

  14. The impact of Hall physics on magnetized high energy density plasma jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gourdain, P.-A.; Seyler, C. E.; Atoyan, L.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.; Pikuz, S. A.; Potter, W. M.; Schrafel, P. C.; Shelkovenko, T. A.

    2014-05-15

    Hall physics is often neglected in high energy density plasma jets due to the relatively high electron density of such jets (n{sub e} ∼ 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}). However, the vacuum region surrounding the jet has much lower densities and is dominated by Hall electric field. This electric field redirects plasma flows towards or away from the axis, depending on the radial current direction. A resulting change in the jet density has been observed experimentally. Furthermore, if an axial field is applied on the jet, the Hall effect is enhanced and ignoring it leads to serious discrepancies between experimental results and numerical simulations. By combining high currents (∼1 MA) and magnetic field helicity (15° angle) in a pulsed power generator such as COBRA, plasma jets can be magnetized with a 10 T axial field. The resulting field enhances the impact of the Hall effect by altering the density profile of current-free plasma jets and the stability of current-carrying plasma jets (e.g., Z-pinches)

  15. Couples Magnetic and Structural Transitions in High-Purity Dy and Gd5SbxGe4-x

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander S. Chernyshov

    2006-08-09

    Magnetic materials exhibiting magnetic phase transitions simultaneously with structural rearrangements of their crystal lattices hold a promise for numerous applications including magnetic refrigeration, magnetomechanical devices and sensors. We undertook a detailed study of a single crystal of dysprosium metal, which is a classical example of a system where magnetic and crystallographic sublattices can be either coupled or decoupled from one another. Magnetocaloric effect, magnetization, ac magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity of high purity single crystals of dysprosium have been investigated over broad temperature and magnetic field intervals with the magnetic field vector parallel to either the a- or c-axes of the crystal. Notable differences in the behavior of the physical properties when compared to Dy samples studied in the past have been observed between 110 K and 125 K, and between 178 K and {approx}210 K. A plausible mechanism based on the formation of antiferromagnetic clusters in the impure Dy has been suggested in order to explain the reduction of the magnetocaloric effect in the vicinity of the Neel point. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the influence of commensurability effects on the magnetic phase diagram and the value of the magnetocaloric effect have been conducted. The presence of newly found anomalies in the physical properties has been considered as evidence of previously unreported states of Dy. The refined magnetic phase diagram of dysprosium with the magnetic field vector parallel to the a-axis of a crystal has been constructed and discussed. The magnetic and crystallographic properties of Gd{sub 5}Sb{sub x}Ge{sub 4-x} pseudo-binary system were studied by x-ray diffraction (at room temperature), heat capacity, ac-magnetic susceptibility, and magnetization in the temperature interval 5-320 K in magnetic fields up to 100 kOe. The magnetic properties of three composition (x = 0.5, 1,2) were examined in detail. The Gd{sub 5

  16. Bose-Einstein condensation of trapped polaritons in two-dimensional electron-hole systems in a high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, Oleg L.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.; Lozovik, Yurii E.

    2009-09-15

    The Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of magnetoexcitonic polaritons (magnetopolaritons) in two-dimensional (2D) electron-hole system embedded in a semiconductor microcavity in a high magnetic field B is predicted. There are two physical realizations of 2D electron-hole system under consideration: a graphene layer and quantum well (QW). A 2D gas of magnetopolaritons is considered in a planar harmonic potential trap. Two possible physical realizations of this trapping potential are assumed: inhomogeneous local stress or harmonic electric field potential applied to excitons and a parabolic shape of the semiconductor cavity causing the trapping of microcavity photons. The effective Hamiltonian of the ideal gas of cavity polaritons in a QW and graphene in a high magnetic field and the BEC temperature as functions of magnetic field are obtained. It is shown that the effective polariton mass M{sub eff} increases with magnetic field as B{sup 1/2}. The BEC critical temperature T{sub c}{sup (0)} decreases as B{sup -1/4} and increases with the spring constant of the parabolic trap. The Rabi splitting related to the creation of a magnetoexciton in a high magnetic field in graphene and QW is obtained. It is shown that Rabi splitting in graphene can be controlled by the external magnetic field since it is proportional to B{sup -1/4} while in a QW the Rabi splitting does not depend on the magnetic field when it is strong.

  17. Thermal effect on magnetic parameters of high-coercivity cobalt ferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chagas, E. F. Ponce, A. S.; Prado, R. J.; Silva, G. M.; Bettini, J.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.

    2014-07-21

    We prepared very high-coercivity cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by a combustion method and using short-time high-energy mechanical milling to increase strain and the structural defects density. The coercivity (H{sub C}) of the milled sample reached 3.75 kOea value almost five times higher than that obtained for the non-milled material (0.76 kOe). To investigate the effect of the temperature on the magnetic behavior of the milled sample, we performed a thermal treatment on the milled sample at 300, 400, and 600?C for 30 and 180?min. We analyzed the changes in the magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles due to the thermal treatment using the hysteresis curves, Williamson-Hall analysis, and transmission electron microscopy. The thermal treatment at 600?C causes decreases in the microstructural strain and density of structural defects resulting in a significant decrease in H{sub C}. Furthermore, this thermal treatment increases the size of the nanoparticles and, as a consequence, there is a substantial increase in the saturation magnetization (M{sub S}). The H{sub C} of the samples treated at 600?C for 30 and 180?min were 2.24 and 1.93 kOe, respectively, and the M{sub S} of these same samples increased from 57?emu/g to 66 and 70?emu/g, respectively. The H{sub C} and the M{sub S} are less affected by the thermal treatment at 300 and 400?C.

  18. Santa Monica High School From Santa Monica, Calif. Wins U.S. Department of Energy National Science Bowl®

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that Santa Monica High School from Santa Monica, Calif. is the winner of the 2008 DOE National Science Bowl®.  Santa Monica High...

  19. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories Perspective on Code Development and High Performance Computing Resources in Support of the National HED/ICF Effort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clouse, C. J.; Edwards, M. J.; McCoy, M. G.; Marinak, M. M.; Verdon, C. P.

    2015-07-07

    Through its Advanced Scientific Computing (ASC) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) code development efforts, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides a world leading numerical simulation capability for the National HED/ICF program in support of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP). In addition the ASC effort provides high performance computing platform capabilities upon which these codes are run. LLNL remains committed to, and will work with, the national HED/ICF program community to help insure numerical simulation needs are met and to make those capabilities available, consistent with programmatic priorities and available resources.

  20. Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory 15kW High Temperature Electrolysis Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl M. Stoots; Keith G. Condie; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

    2009-07-01

    A 15kW high temperature electrolysis test facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This facility is intended to study the technology readiness of using high temperature solid oxide cells for large scale nuclear powered hydrogen production. It is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high temperature gas handling, heat recuperation), multiple-stack hot zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, etc. Heat recuperation and hydrogen recycle are incorporated into the design. The facility was operated for 1080 hours and successfully demonstrated the largest scale high temperature solid-oxide-based production of hydrogen to date.

  1. Mode conversion and absorption of fast waves at high ion cyclotron harmonics in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Suwon; Kwak, Jong-Gu

    2014-04-15

    The propagation and absorption of high harmonic fast waves is of interest for non-inductive current drives in fusion experiments. The fast wave can be coupled with the ion Bernstein wave that propagates in the high magnetic field side of an ion cyclotron harmonic resonance layer. This coupling and the absorption are analyzed using the hot plasma dispersion relation and a wave equation that was converted from an approximate dispersion relation for the case where λ{sub i}=k{sub ⊥}{sup 2}ρ{sub i}{sup 2}/2≳1 (where k{sub ⊥} is the perpendicular wave number and ρ{sub i} is the ion Larmor radius). It is found that both reflection and conversion may occur near the harmonic resonance layer but that they decrease rapidly, giving rise to a sharp increase in the absorption as the parallel wave number increases.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Magnetic Superconducting, and other Phase Transitions in Novel f-Electron Materials at Ultra-high Pressures Using Designer Diamond Anvils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maple, M. Brian

    2005-09-13

    Pressure is a powerful control parameter, owing to its ability to affect crystal and electronic structure without introducing defects, for the investigation of condensed matter systems. Some f-electron, heavy-fermion materials display interesting and novel behavior when exposed to pressures achievable with conventional experimental techniques; however, a growing number of condensed matter systems require extreme conditions such as ultrahigh pressures, high magnetic fields, and ultralow temperatures to sufficiently explore the important properties. To that end, we have been funded to develop an ultrahigh pressure facility at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) in order to investigate superconductivity, magnetism, non-Fermi liquid behavior, and other phenomena under extreme conditions. Our goals for the second year of this grant were as follows: (a) perform electrical resistivity measurements on novel samples at a myriad of pressures using conventional piston-cylinder techniques, Bridgman anvil techniques, and diamond anvil cell technology; (b) install, commission, and operate an Oxford Kelvinox MX-100 dilution refrigerator for access to ultralow temperatures and high magnetic fields. (c) continue the development of diamond anvil cell (DAC) technology. During the past year, we have successfully installed the Oxford Kelvinox MX-100 dilution refrigerator and verified its operability down to 12 mK. We have begun an experimental program to systematically investigate the f-electron compound URu2Si2 under pressure and in the presence of magnetic fields. We have also continued our collaborative work with Sam Weir at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) on Au4V and implemented a new corollary study on Au1-xVx using ultrahigh pressures. We have continued developing our DAC facility by designing and constructing an apparatus for in situ pressure measurement as well as designing high pressure cells. This report serves to highlight the progress we have made

  3. Prospects for high-gain, high yield National Ignition Facility targets driven by 2(omega) (green) light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter, L J; Glenzer, S; Haan, S; Hammel, B; Manes, K; Meezan, N; Moody, J; Spaeth, M; Divol, L; Oades, K; Stevenson, M

    2003-12-16

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), operating at green (2{omega}) light, has the potential to drive ignition targets with significantly more energy than the 1.8 MJ it will produce with its baseline, blue (3{omega}) operations. This results in a greatly increased 'target design space', providing a number of exciting opportunities for fusion research. These include the prospect of ignition experiments with capsules absorbing energies in the vicinity of 1 MJ. This significant increase in capsule absorbed energy over the original designs at {approx}150 kJ could allow high-gain, high yield experiments on NIF. This paper reports the progress made exploring 2{omega} for NIF ignition, including potential 2{omega} laser performance, 2{omega} ignition target designs and 2{omega} Laser Plasma Interaction (LPI) studies.

  4. Dynamics and structure of self-generated magnetics fields on solids following high contrast, high intensity laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albertazzi, B.; Chen, S. N.; Fuchs, J.; Antici, P.; Böker, J.; Swantusch, M.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.; Breil, J.; Feugeas, J. L.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; D'Humières, E.; Dervieux, V.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Romagnagni, L.; Lancia, L.; Shepherd, R.; Sentoku, Y.; Starodubtsev, M.; and others

    2015-12-15

    The dynamics of self-generated magnetic B-fields produced following the interaction of a high contrast, high intensity (I > 10{sup 19 }W cm{sup −2}) laser beam with thin (3 μm thick) solid (Al or Au) targets is investigated experimentally and numerically. Two main sources drive the growth of B-fields on the target surfaces. B-fields are first driven by laser-generated hot electron currents that relax over ∼10–20 ps. Over longer timescales, the hydrodynamic expansion of the bulk of the target into vacuum also generates B-field induced by non-collinear gradients of density and temperature. The laser irradiation of the target front side strongly localizes the energy deposition at the target front, in contrast to the target rear side, which is heated by fast electrons over a much larger area. This induces an asymmetry in the hydrodynamic expansion between the front and rear target surfaces, and consequently the associated B-fields are found strongly asymmetric. The sole long-lasting (>30 ps) B-fields are the ones growing on the target front surface, where they remain of extremely high strength (∼8–10 MG). These B-fields have been recently put by us in practical use for focusing laser-accelerated protons [B. Albertazzi et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 043502 (2015)]; here we analyze in detail their dynamics and structure.

  5. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lord, J. S.; McKenzie, I.; Baker, P. J.; Cottrell, S. P.; Giblin, S. R.; Hillier, A. D.; Holsman, B. H.; King, P. J. C.; Nightingale, J. B.; Pratt, F. L.; Rhodes, N. J.; Blundell, S. J.; Lancaster, T.; Good, J.; Mitchell, R.; Owczarkowski, M.; Poli, S.; Scheuermann, R.; Salman, Z.

    2011-07-15

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument.

  6. DISCOVERY OF EXTENDED X-RAY EMISSION AROUND THE HIGHLY MAGNETIC RRAT J1819-1458

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rea, N.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Gaensler, B. M.; Slane, P. O.; Stella, L.; Israel, G. L.; Reynolds, S. P.; Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; Chatterjee, S.

    2009-09-20

    We report on the discovery of extended X-ray emission around the high magnetic field rotating radio transient J1819-1458. Using a 30 ks Chandra ACIS-S observation, we found significant evidence for extended X-ray emission with a peculiar shape: a compact region out to {approx}5.''5, and more diffuse emission extending out to {approx}13'' from the source. The most plausible interpretation is a nebula somehow powered by the pulsar, although the small number of counts prevents a conclusive answer on the nature of this emission. RRAT J1819-1458's spin-down energy loss rate (E-dot{sub rot}{approx}3 x 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1}) is much lower than that of other pulsars with observed spin-down-powered pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe), and implies a rather high X-ray efficiency of eta{sub X}ident toL{sub pwn:0.5-8keV}/E-dot{sub rot}{approx}0.2 at converting spin-down power into the PWN X-ray emission. This suggests the need of an additional source of energy rather than the spin-down power alone, such as the high magnetic energy of this source. Furthermore, this Chandra observation allowed us to refine the positional accuracy of RRAT J1819-1458 to a radius of {approx}0.''3, and confirms the presence of X-ray pulsations and the {approx}1 keV absorption line, previously observed in the X-ray emission of this source.

  7. Feasibility study of Nb3Al Rutherford cable for high field accelerator magnet application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, R.; Kikuchi, A.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Cooper, C.; Feher, S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.; Novitski, I.; Takeuchi, T.; Tartaglia, M.; Turrioni, D.; Verweij, A.P.; Wake, M.; Willering, G; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    Feasibility study of Cu stabilized Nb{sub 3}Al strand and Rutherford cable for the application to high field accelerator magnets are being done at Fermilab in collaboration with NIMS. The Nb{sub 3}Al strand, which was developed and manufactured at NIMS in Japan, has a non-copper Jc of about 844 A/mm{sup 2} at 15 Tesla at 4.2 K, a copper content of 50%, and filament size of about 50 microns. Rutherford cables with 27 Nb{sub 3}Al strands of 1.03 mm diameter were fabricated and tested. Quench tests on a short cable were done to study its stability with only its self field, utilizing a high current transformer. A pair of 2 meter long Nb{sub 3}Al cables was tested extensively at CERN at 4.3 and 1.9 K up to 11 Tesla including its self field with a high transport current of 20.2 kA. In the low field test we observed instability near splices and in the central region. This is related to the flux-jump like behavior, because of excessive amount of Nb in the Nb{sub 3}Al strand. There is possibility that the Nb in Nb{sub 3}Al can cause instability below 2 Tesla field regions. We need further investigation on this problem. Above 8 Tesla, we observed quenches near the critical surface at fast ramp rate from 1000 to 3000 A/sec, with quench velocity over 100 m/sec. A small racetrack magnet was made using a 14 m of Rutherford cable and successfully tested up to 21.8 kA, corresponding to 8.7 T.

  8. Achievement of high coercivity in sintered R-Fe-B magnets based on misch-metal by dual alloy method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, E Wang, Zhen-Xi; Chen, Zhi-An; Rao, Xiao-Lei; Hu, Bo-Ping; Chen, Guo-An; Zhao, Yu-Gang; Zhang, Jin

    2014-03-21

    The R-Fe-B (R, rare earth) sintered magnets prepared with different ratio of alloys of MM-Fe-B (MM, misch-metal) and Nd-Fe-B by dual alloy method were investigated. As expected, the high ratio of MM-Fe-B alloy degrades the hard magnetic properties heavily with intrinsic coercivity lower than 5 kOe. When the atomic ratio MM/R???21.5% the magnetic properties can reach a practical level of B{sub r}???12.1 kGs, H{sub cj}???10.7 kOe, and (BH){sub max}???34.0 MGOe. And the effect of H{sub cj} enhancement by the grain boundary diffusion process is obvious when MM/R???21.5%. It is revealed that the decrement of intrinsic magnetic properties of R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B matrix phase is not the main reason of the degradation of the magnets with high MM ratio. The change of deteriorated microstructure together with phase component plays fundamental roles in low H{sub cj}. In high MM ratio magnets, (a) after annealing, Ce atoms inside main phase are inclined to be segregated in the outer layer of the main phase grains; (b) there is no thin layer of Ce-rich phase as an analogue of Nd-rich phase to separate main phase grains; (c) excessive Ce tends to form CeFe{sub 2} grains.

  9. Thermal and high magnetic field treatment of materials and associated apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kisner, Roger A.; Wilgen, John B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.; Jaramillo, Roger A.; Mackiewicz-Ludtka, Gail

    2010-06-29

    An apparatus and method for altering characteristics, such as can include structural, magnetic, electrical, optical or acoustical characteristics, of an electrically-conductive workpiece utilizes a magnetic field within which the workpiece is positionable and schemes for thermally treating the workpiece by heating or cooling techniques in conjunction with the generated magnetic field so that the characteristics of the workpiece are effected by both the generated magnetic field and the thermal treatment of the workpiece.

  10. Thermal and high magnetic field treatment of materials and associated apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kisner, Roger A.; Wilgen, John B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.; Jaramillo, Roger A.; Mackiewicz-Ludtka, Gail

    2007-01-09

    An apparatus and method for altering characteristics, such as can include structural, magnetic, electrical, optical or acoustical characteristics, of an electrically-conductive workpiece utilizes a magnetic field within which the workpiece is positionable and schemes for thermally treating the workpiece by heating or cooling techniques in conjunction with the generated magnetic field so that the characteristics of the workpiece are effected by both the generated magnetic field and the thermal treatment of the workpiece.

  11. Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nellis, William J.; Geballe, Theodore H.; Maple, M. Brian

    1988-01-01

    Shock wave formation of thin layers of materials with improved superconducting and permanent magnetic properties and improved microstructures.

  12. Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nellis, William J.; Maple, M. Brian; Geballe, Theodore H.

    1988-01-01

    Shock wave formation of superconductive ceramic oxide electric and magnetic circuit elements with improved microstructures and mechanical properties.

  13. Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nellis, W.J.; Maple, M.B.; Geballe, T.H.

    1987-10-23

    Shock wave formation of superconductive ceramic oxide electric and magnetic circuit elements with improved microstructures and mechanical properties. 10 figs.

  14. Characterization of the magnetic moment distribution in low-concentration solutions of iron oxide nanoparticles by a high-T{sub c} superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saari, M. M. Sakai, K.; Kiwa, T.; Tsukada, K.; Sasayama, T.; Yoshida, T.

    2015-05-07

    We developed a highly sensitive AC/DC magnetometer using a high-temperature superconductor superconducting quantum interference device for the evaluation of magnetic nanoparticles in solutions. Using the developed system, we investigated the distribution of magnetic moments of iron oxide multi-core particles of 100 nm at various iron concentrations that are lower than 96 μg/ml by analyzing the measured magnetization curves. Singular value decomposition and non-regularized non-negative least-squares methods were used during the reconstruction of the distribution. Similar distributions were obtained for all concentrations, and the iron concentration could be determined from the measured magnetization curves. The measured harmonics upon the excitation of AC and DC magnetic fields curves agreed well with the harmonics simulated based on the reconstructed magnetization curves, implying that the magnetization curves of magnetic nanoparticles were successfully obtained as we will show in the article. We compared the magnetization curves between multi-core particles of 100 nm and 130 nm, composed of 12-nm iron oxide nanoparticles. A distinctive magnetic property between the 100 nm and 130 nm particles in low-concentration solutions was successfully characterized. The distribution characteristic of magnetic moments suggests that the net magnetic moment in a multi-core particle is affected by the size of the magnetic cores and their degree of aggregation. Exploration of magnetic properties with high sensitivity can be expected using the developed system.

  15. Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction for high-resolution bioimepedance imaging through vector source reconstruction under the static field of MRI magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mariappan, Leo; Hu, Gang; He, Bin

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging modality to reconstruct the electrical conductivity of biological tissue based on the acoustic measurements of Lorentz force induced tissue vibration. This study presents the feasibility of the authors' new MAT-MI system and vector source imaging algorithm to perform a complete reconstruction of the conductivity distribution of real biological tissues with ultrasound spatial resolution. Methods: In the present study, using ultrasound beamformation, imaging point spread functions are designed to reconstruct the induced vector source in the object which is used to estimate the object conductivity distribution. Both numerical studies and phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate the merits of the proposed method. Also, through the numerical simulations, the full width half maximum of the imaging point spread function is calculated to estimate of the spatial resolution. The tissue phantom experiments are performed with a MAT-MI imaging system in the static field of a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging magnet. Results: The image reconstruction through vector beamformation in the numerical and experimental studies gives a reliable estimate of the conductivity distribution in the object with a ∼1.5 mm spatial resolution corresponding to the imaging system frequency of 500 kHz ultrasound. In addition, the experiment results suggest that MAT-MI under high static magnetic field environment is able to reconstruct images of tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and real tissue samples with reliable conductivity contrast. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that MAT-MI is able to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues with better than 2 mm spatial resolution at 500 kHz, and the imaging with MAT-MI under a high static magnetic field environment is able to provide improved imaging contrast for biological tissue conductivity reconstruction.

  16. PPPL to design a high-resolution diagnostic system for the National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ignition Facility | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab to design a high-resolution diagnostic system for the National Ignition Facility By Johm Greenwald November 16, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Kenneth Hill and Manfred Bitter inspect an X-ray crystal spectrometer to be used to study OMEGA EP laser-produced plasmas. (Photo by Elle Starkman/Office of Communications) Kenneth Hill and Manfred Bitter inspect an X-ray crystal spectrometer to be used to study OMEGA EP

  17. design a high-resolution diagnostic system for the National Ignition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab design a high-resolution diagnostic system for the National Ignition Facility By John Greenwald November 16, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Kenneth Hill and Manfred Bitter inspect an X-ray crystal spectrometer to be used to study OMEGA EP laser-produced plasmas. (Photo by Elle Starkman/Office of Communications) Kenneth Hill and Manfred Bitter inspect an X-ray crystal spectrometer to be used to study OMEGA EP laser-produced plasmas.

  18. High-Tech Garage Showcases Strategies for Reducing Energy (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Tech Garage Showcases Strategies for Reducing Energy Even from a distance, the parking structure on the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus doesn't look like an ordinary parking garage. And it doesn't act like one either. NREL's parking structure, which opened in 2012, proves that large garages can be designed and built sustainably-at no additional cost. In addition to meeting staff needs with up to 1,800 parking spaces, this 578,320 square-foot,

  19. Investigation of a high impedance magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator with hollow load

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou Heng; Shu Ting; Li Zhiqiang

    2012-09-15

    A novel high-impedance magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) with greatly restrained power deposition on the anode has been investigated. Methods to increase the MILO impedance and decrease the anode current are discussed. A MILO with impedance of 30 {Omega} and power conversion efficiency of 25% is presented by particle-in-cell simulations. Compared with the previous MILO in our lab, the anode current of the proposed MILO is reduced about 50%, the power conversion efficiency doubles, and the power deposition on anode is reduced nearly one half. Furthermore, considerations for reducing the power deposition on load have also been carried out in MILO design, and the load current is reduced to 4.6 kA, only 17% of the total anode current. Finally, a hollow load was introduced to reduce the power deposition density on the load, without decreasing the power conversion efficiency.

  20. CoxC nanorod magnets: Highly magnetocrystalline anisotropy with lower Curie temperature for potential applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Gendy, AA; Almugaiteeb, T; Carpenter, EE

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic CoxC nanorods with larger magnetocrystalline anisotropy of 5 x 10(5) J/m(3) as well as larger coercivity and lower Curie temperature are introduced. The particles have an average diameter of 8 nm and shows three different magnetic behaviors. The sample shows ferromagnetism up to 400 K, superparamagnetism at temperature > 400 K and magnets, magnetic sensors and contract agent for magnetic resonance imaging. (c) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The high-foot implosion campaign on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurricane, O. A. Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Dppner, T.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Kervin, P.; Pape, S. Le; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P. K.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; and others

    2014-05-15

    The High-Foot platform manipulates the laser pulse-shape coming from the National Ignition Facility laser to create an indirect drive 3-shock implosion that is significantly more robust against instability growth involving the ablator and also modestly reduces implosion convergence ratio. This strategy gives up on theoretical high-gain in an inertial confinement fusion implosion in order to obtain better control of the implosion and bring experimental performance in-line with calculated performance, yet keeps the absolute capsule performance relatively high. In this paper, we will cover the various experimental and theoretical motivations for the high-foot drive as well as cover the experimental results that have come out of the high-foot experimental campaign. At the time of this writing, the high-foot implosion has demonstrated record total deuterium-tritium yields (9.310{sup 15}) with low levels of inferred mix, excellent agreement with implosion simulations, fuel energy gains exceeding unity, and evidence for the bootstrapping associated with alpha-particle self-heating.

  2. High-Performance Ducts in Hot-Dry Climates Hoeschele, Marc [National

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Performance Ducts in Hot-Dry Climates Hoeschele, Marc National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chitwood, Rick National Renewable Energy...

  3. MAINTAINING HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY CAPABILITIES FOR NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyrick, S.; Cordaro, J.; Reeves, G.; Mcintosh, J.; Mauldin, C.; Tietze, K.; Varble, D.

    2011-06-06

    The Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has a specialized need for analyzing low mass gas species at very high resolutions. The currently preferred analytical method is electromagnetic sector mass spectrometry. This method allows the NNSA Nuclear Security Enterprise (NSE) to resolve species of similar masses down to acceptable minimum detection limits (MDLs). Some examples of these similar masses are helium-4/deuterium and carbon monoxide/nitrogen. Through the 1980s and 1990s, there were two vendors who supplied and supported these instruments. However, with declining procurements and down turns in the economy, the supply of instruments, service and spare parts from these vendors has become less available, and in some cases, nonexistent. The largest NSE user of this capability is the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. The Research and Development Engineering (R&DE) Group in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) investigated the areas of instrument support that were needed to extend the life cycle of these aging instruments. Their conclusions, as to the focus areas of electromagnetic sector mass spectrometers to address, in order of priority, were electronics, software and hardware. Over the past 3-5 years, the R&DE Group has designed state of the art electronics and software that will allow high resolution legacy mass spectrometers, critical to the NNSA mission, to be operated for the foreseeable future. The funding support for this effort has been from several sources, including the SRS Defense Programs, NNSA Readiness Campaign, Pantex Plant and Sandia National Laboratory. To date, electronics systems have been upgraded on one development system at SRNL, two production systems at Pantex and one production system at Sandia National Laboratory. An NSE working group meets periodically to review strategies going forward. The R&DE Group has also applied their work to the electronics for a

  4. New 100 mm Gun Assembly Installation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory High Explosives Applications Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandersall, K S; Lee, R A; Chiao, P I; Garcia, F; Travis, J O; Forbes, J W

    2003-10-28

    A new 100mm gun assembly was recently installed and tested at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories located in the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF). Thiot Ingenierie performed the design of the replacement barrel, based on improvements to the initial design. This design incorporated barrel and breech sections forged from CLARM series high-strength alloys obtained from Tecphy Corporation and machined by Manufacture de Forage. Part of the improvement of the design was implementing a laser alignment system for quick and accurate barrel alignment checks. This laser is also used to align the target assembly. This paper will detail the design changes incorporated into the installation, the testing process, and future direction of research for the new gun.

  5. Studies of $${\\rm Nb}_{3}{\\rm Sn}$$ Strands Based on the Restacked-Rod Process for High Field Accelerator Magnets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barzi, E.; Bossert, M.; Gallo, G.; Lombardo, V.; Turrioni, D.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2011-12-21

    A major thrust in Fermilab's accelerator magnet R&D program is the development of Nb3Sn wires which meet target requirements for high field magnets, such as high critical current density, low effective filament size, and the capability to withstand the cabling process. The performance of a number of strands with 150/169 restack design produced by Oxford Superconducting Technology was studied for round and deformed wires. To optimize the maximum plastic strain, finite element modeling was also used as an aid in the design. Results of mechanical, transport and metallographic analyses are presented for round and deformed wires.

  6. High magnetic shear gain in a liquid sodium stable couette flow experiment A prelude to an alpha - omega dynamo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colgate, Stirling; Li, Jui; Finn, John; Pariev, Vladimir; Beckley, Howard; Si, Jiahe; Martinic, Joe; Westpfahl, David; Slutz, James; Westrom, Zeb; Klein, Brianna

    2010-11-08

    The {Omega}-phase of the liquid sodium {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo experiment at NMIMT in cooperation with LANL has successfully demonstrated the production of a high toroidal field, B{sub {phi}} {approx_equal} 8 x B{sub r} from the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field, B{sub r}. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by rotational shear in stable Couette Row within liquid sodium at Rm {approx_equal} 120. The small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette Row is caused by Ekman Row where ({delta}v/v){sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -3}. This high {Omega}-gain in low turbulence flow contrasts with a smaller {Omega}-gain in higher turbulence, Helmholtz-unstable shear flows. This result supports the ansatz that large scale astrophysical magnetic fields are created within semi-coherent large scale motions in which turbulence plays a diffusive role that enables magnetic flux linkage.

  7. Ru/FeCoB double layered film with high in-plane magnetic anisotropy field of 500 Oe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirata, Ken-ichiro; Hashimoto, Atsuto; Matsuu, Toshimitsu; Nakagawa, Shigeki

    2009-04-01

    FeCoB layers prepared on Ru underlayer possess a high saturation magnetization M{sub s} and a high in-plane magnetic anisotropy filed H{sub k}. Effects of preparation conditions were investigated. Low Ar gas pressure condition and thicker film thickness were effective to attain distortion of FeCo crystallite. As the crystallinity of Ru underlayer became higher, higher H{sub k} was induced. The accumulation of anisotropic stress in the film caused by the oblique incidences of depositing atoms with high energy seems to be one of the important effects to attain high anisotropy field. It was succeeded to prepare the Ru/FeCoB film with high H{sub k} of 500 Oe.

  8. Remedial investigation of the High-Explosives (HE) Process Area, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crow, N.B.; Lamarre, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents the results of a Remedial Investigation (RI) to define the extent of high explosives (HE) compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in the soil, rocks, and ground water of the HE Process Area of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300 Facility. The report evaluates potential public health environmental risks associated with these compounds. Hydrogeologic information available before February 15, 1990, is included; however, chemical analyses and water-level data are reported through March 1990. This report is intended to assist the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB)--Central Valley Region and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in evaluating the extent of environmental contamination of the LLNL HE Process Area and ultimately in designing remedial actions. 90 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. The National Ignition Facility: Ushering in a new age for high energy density science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E. I.; Boyd, R. N.; Remington, B. A.; Keane, C. J.; Al-Ayat, R.

    2009-04-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses, J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 112, 012003 (2008); https://lasers.llnl.gov/], completed in March 2009, is the highest energy laser ever constructed. The high temperatures and densities achievable at NIF will enable a number of experiments in inertial confinement fusion and stockpile stewardship, as well as access to new regimes in a variety of experiments relevant to x-ray astronomy, laser-plasma interactions, hydrodynamic instabilities, nuclear astrophysics, and planetary science. The experiments will impact research on black holes and other accreting objects, the understanding of stellar evolution and explosions, nuclear reactions in dense plasmas relevant to stellar nucleosynthesis, properties of warm dense matter in planetary interiors, molecular cloud dynamics and star formation, and fusion energy generation.

  10. High Magnetic Field Processing - A Heat-Free Heat Treating Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz-; Wilgen, John B; Kenik, Edward A; Parish, Chad M; Rios, Orlando; Rogers, Hiram; Manuel, Michele; Kisner, Roger A; Watkins, Thomas R; Murphy, Bart L

    2012-08-01

    The High and Thermal Magnetic Processing/Electro-magnetic Acoustic Transducer (HTMP/EMAT) technology has been shown to be an enabling disruptive materials processing technology, that can achieve significant improvements in microstructure and consequently material performance beyond that achievable through conventional processing, and will lead to the next generation of advanced performance structural and functional materials. HTMP exposure increased the reaction kinetics enabling refinement of microstructural features such as finer martensite lath size, and finer, more copious, homogeneous dispersions of strengthening carbides leading to combined strength and toughness improvements in bainitic steels. When induction heating is applied in a high magnetic field environment, the induction heating coil is configured so that high intensity acoustic/ultrasonic treatment occurs naturally. The configuration results in a highly effective electromagnetic acoustical transducer (EMAT). HTMP combined with applying high-field EMAT, produce a non-contact ultrasonic treatment that can be used to process metal alloys in either the liquid state resulting in significant microstructural changes over conventional processing. Proof-of-principle experiments on cast irons resulted in homogeneous microstructures in small castings along with improved casting surface appearance. The experiment showed that by exposing liquid metal to the non-contact acoustic/ultrasonic processing technology developed using HMFP/EMAT wrought-like microstructures were developed in cast components. This Energy Intensive Processes (EIP) project sponsored by the DOE EERE Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) demonstrated the following: (1) The reduction of retained austenite in high carbon/high alloy steels with an ambient temperature HTMP process, replacing either a cryogenic or double tempering thermal process normally employed to accomplish retained austenite transformation. HTMP can be described as a 'heat

  11. RECENT ADVANCES IN HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY: STACK TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X, Zhang; J. E. O'Brien; R. C. O'Brien; J. J. Hartvigsen; G. Tao; N. Petigny

    2012-07-01

    High temperature steam electrolysis is a promising technology for efficient sustainable large-scale hydrogen production. Solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) are able to utilize high temperature heat and electric power from advanced high-temperature nuclear reactors or renewable sources to generate carbon-free hydrogen at large scale. However, long term durability of SOECs needs to be improved significantly before commercialization of this technology. A degradation rate of 1%/khr or lower is proposed as a threshold value for commercialization of this technology. Solid oxide electrolysis stack tests have been conducted at Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate recent improvements in long-term durability of SOECs. Electrolytesupported and electrode-supported SOEC stacks were provided by Ceramatec Inc., Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI), and Saint Gobain Advanced Materials (St. Gobain), respectively for these tests. Long-term durability tests were generally operated for a duration of 1000 hours or more. Stack tests based on technology developed at Ceramatec and MSRI have shown significant improvement in durability in the electrolysis mode. Long-term degradation rates of 3.2%/khr and 4.6%/khr were observed for MSRI and Ceramatec stacks, respectively. One recent Ceramatec stack even showed negative degradation (performance improvement) over 1900 hours of operation. A three-cell short stack provided by St. Gobain, however, showed rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode. Improvements on electrode materials, interconnect coatings, and electrolyteelectrode interface microstructures contribute to better durability of SOEC stacks.

  12. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2004-12-28

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  13. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-12-30

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  14. High-efficiency graphene nanomesh magnets realized by controlling mono-hydrogenation of pore edges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, T.; Kamijyo, J.; Kobayashi, T.; Yagi, Y.; Haruyama, J.; Nakamura, T.

    2014-06-23

    We demonstrate a drastic improvement in the efficiency of rare-element-free graphene nanomesh (GNM) magnets with saturation magnetization values as large as ∼10{sup −4 }emu/mm{sup 2}, which are 10–100 times greater than those in previous GNM magnets hydrogenated by only annealing under a hydrogen molecule (H{sub 2}) atmosphere, even at room temperature. This improvement is realized by a significant increase in the area of the mono-H-terminated pore edges by using hydrogen silsesquioxane resist treatment with electron beam irradiation, which can produce mono-H by detaching H-silicon (Si) bonds. This result must open the door for industrial applications of graphene magnets to rare-element-free magnetic and spintronic systems.

  15. A high performance inverter-fed drive system of an interior permanent magnet synchronous machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bose, B.K.

    1987-01-01

    A high performance fully operational four-quadrant control scheme of an interior permanent magnet synchronous machine is described. The machine operates smoothly with full performance in constant-torque region as well as in flux-weakening constant-power region in both the directions of motion. The transition between constant-torque region and constant-power region is very smooth at all conditions of operation. The control in constant-torque region is based on vector or field-oriented technique with the direct-axis aligned to the total stator flux, whereas the constant-power region control is implemented by orientation of torque angle of the impressed square-wave voltage through the feedforward vector rotator. The control system is implemented digitally using distributed microcomputer system and all the essential feedback signals, such as torque, flux, etc., are estimated with precision. The control has been described with an outer torque control loop primarily for traction type applications, but speed and position control loops can be easily added to extend its application to other industrial drives. A 70 hp drive system using a Neodymium-Iron-Boron PM machine and transistor PWM inverter has been designed and extensively tested in laboratory on a dynamometer, and performances are found to be excellent.

  16. High speed internal permanent magnet machine and method of manufacturing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, James Pellegrino; EL-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi; Lokhandwalla, Murtuza; Shah, Manoj Ramprasad; VanDam, Jeremy Daniel

    2011-09-13

    An internal permanent magnet (IPM) machine is provided. The IPM machine includes a stator assembly and a stator core. The stator core also includes multiple stator teeth. The stator assembly is further configured with stator windings to generate a magnetic field when excited with alternating currents and extends along a longitudinal axis with an inner surface defining a cavity. The IPM machine also includes a rotor assembly and a rotor core. The rotor core is disposed inside the cavity and configured to rotate about the longitudinal axis. The rotor assembly further includes a shaft. The shaft further includes multiple protrusions alternately arranged relative to multiple bottom structures provided on the shaft. The rotor assembly also includes multiple stacks of laminations disposed on the protrusions and dovetailed circumferentially around the shaft. The rotor assembly further includes multiple permanent magnets for generating a magnetic field, which interacts with the stator magnetic field to produce torque. The permanent magnets are disposed between the stacks. The rotor assembly also includes multiple bottom wedges disposed on the bottom structures of the shaft and configured to hold the multiple stacks and the multiple permanent magnets.

  17. Power and magnetic field-induced microwave absorption in Tl-based high T sub c superconducting films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Portis, A.M. ); Cooke, D.W.; Gray, E.R.; Arendt, P.N. ); Bohn, C.L.; Delayen, J.R.; Roche, C.T. ); Hein, M.; Klein, N.; Mueller, G.; Orbach, S.; Piel, H. )

    1991-01-21

    The increase in the microwave surface resistance {ital R}{sub {ital s}} of high {ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors at elevated microwave power levels is reported for both oriented and unoriented Tl-based films as a function of rf magnetic field at 820 MHz and 18 GHz. The application of dc magnetic fields produces qualitatively similar increases in {ital R}{sub {ital s}} and in the surface reactance {ital X}{sub {ital s}}. The increase in {ital R}{sub {ital s}} with dc field is shown to arise from simple decoupling of grains by intergranular magnetic flux. The increase in {ital R}{sub {ital s}} with microwave power, on the other hand, is a consequence of hysteretic intergranular processes.

  18. Status of high current R&D Energy Recovery LINAC at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayran, D.; Altinbas Z.; Beavis D.; Ben-Zvi I.; Calaga R.; Gassner D.M.; Hahn H.; Hammons L.; Jain A.; Jamilkowski J.; Lambiase R.; Lederle D.; Litvinenko V.N.; Laloudakis N.; Mahler G.; McIntyre G.; Meng W.; Oerter B.; Pate D.; Phillips D.; Reich J.; Roser T.; Schultheiss C.; Seda T.; Sheehy B.; Srinivasan-Rao T.; Than R.; Tuozzolo J.; Weiss D.; Xu W.; Zaltsman A.

    2011-03-28

    An ampere class 20 MeV superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for testing of concepts relevant for high-energy coherent electron cooling and electron-ion colliders. One of the goals is to demonstrate an electron beam with high charge per bunch ({approx} 5 nC) and low normalized emittance ({approx} 5 mm-mrad) at an energy of 20 MeV. Flexible lattice of ERL loop provides a test-bed for investigating issues of transverse and longitudinal instabilities, and diagnostics for intense CW e-beam. The superconducting 703 MHz RF photoinjector is considered as an electron source for such a facility. We will start with a straight pass (gun - 5 cell cavity - beam stop) test for the SRF Gun performance studies. Later, we will install and test a novel injection line concept for emittance preservation in a lower energy merger. In this paper we present the status and our plans for construction and commissioning of this facility.

  19. Direct X-B mode conversion for high-? national spherical torus experiment in nonlinear regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali Asgarian, M. E-mail: maa@msu.edu; Parvazian, A.; Abbasi, M.; Verboncoeur, J. P.

    2014-09-15

    Electron Bernstein wave (EBW) can be effective for heating and driving currents in spherical tokamak plasmas. Power can be coupled to EBW via mode conversion of the extraordinary (X) mode wave. The most common and successful approach to study the conditions for optimized mode conversion to EBW was evaluated analytically and numerically using a cold plasma model and an approximate kinetic model. The major drawback in using radio frequency waves was the lack of continuous wave sources at very high frequencies (above the electron plasma frequency), which has been addressed. A future milestone is to approach high power regime, where the nonlinear effects become significant, exceeding the limits of validity for present linear theory. Therefore, one appropriate tool would be particle in cell (PIC) simulation. The PIC method retains most of the nonlinear physics without approximations. In this work, we study the direct X-B mode conversion process stages using PIC method for incident wave frequency f{sub 0}?=?15?GHz, and maximum amplitude E{sub 0}?=?10{sup 5?}V/m in the national spherical torus experiment (NSTX). The modelling shows a considerable reduction in X-B mode conversion efficiency, C{sub modelling}?=?0.43, due to the presence of nonlinearities. Comparison of system properties to the linear state reveals predominant nonlinear effects; EBW wavelength and group velocity in comparison with linear regime exhibit an increment around ?36% and 17%, respectively.

  20. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-11-25

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the biological object in a main magnetic field and in a radio frequency field, the main magnetic field having a static field direction; rotating the biological object at a rotational frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. According to another embodiment, the radio frequency is pulsed to provide a sequence capable of producing a spectrum that is substantially free of spinning sideband peaks.

  1. Use of High Magnetic Fields to Improve Material Properties for Hydraulics, Automotive and Truck Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz-; Wilgen, John B; Kisner, Roger A; Ahmad, Aquil

    2010-08-01

    In this CRADA, research and development activities were successfully conducted on magnetic processing effects for the purpose of manipulating microstructure and the application specific performance of three alloys provided by Eaton (alloys provided were: carburized steel, plain low carbon steel and medium carbon spring steel). Three specific industrial/commercial application areas were considered where HMFP can be used to provide significant energy savings and improve materials performance include using HMFP to: 1.) Produce higher material strengths enabling higher torque bearing capability for drive shafts and other motor components; 2.) Increase the magnetic response in an iron-based material, thereby improving its magnetic permeability resulting in improved magnetic coupling and power density, and 3.) Improve wear resistance. The very promising results achieved in this endeavor include: 1.) a significant increase in tensile strength and a major reduction in volume percent retained austenite for the carburized alloy, and 2.) a substantial improvement in magnetic perm respect to a no-field processed sample (which also represents a significant improvement over the nominal conventional automotive condition of no heat treatment). The successful completion of these activities has resulted in the current 3-year CRADA No. NFE-09-02522 Prototyping Energy Efficient ThermoMagnetic and Induction Hardening for Heat Treat and Net Shape Forming Applications .

  2. THE MAGNETIZATION DEGREE OF THE OUTFLOW POWERING THE HIGHLY POLARIZED REVERSE-SHOCK EMISSION OF GRB 120308A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shuai; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Da-Ming, E-mail: jin@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, 210008 (China)

    2015-01-01

    GRB 120308A, a long duration ?-ray burst (GRB) detected by Swift, was distinguished by a highly polarized early optical afterglow emission that strongly suggests an ordered magnetic field component in the emitting region. In this work, we model the optical and X-ray emission in the reverse and forward shock scenario and show that the strength of the magnetic field in the reverse-shock region is ?10 times stronger than that in the forward shock region. Consequently, the outflow powering the highly polarized reverse-shock optical emission was mildly magnetized at a degree of ? ? a few percent. Considering the plausible magnetic energy dissipation in both the acceleration and prompt emission phases of the GRB outflow, the afterglow data of GRB 120308A provides us with compelling evidence that, at least for some GRBs, a nonignorable fraction of the energy was released in the form of Poynting flux, confirming the finding first made in the reverse-forward shock emission modeling of the optical afterglow of GRB 990123 by Fan etal. in 2002 and Zhang etal. in 2003.

  3. BIG KARL and COSY: Examples for high performance magnet design taught by {open_quotes}Papa Klaus{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtstedt, U.; Hacker, U.; Maier, R.; Martin, S.; Berg, G.P.A.; Hardt, A.; Huerlimann, W.; Meissburger, J.; Roemer, J.G.M.

    1995-02-01

    The past decades have seen a tremendous development in nuclear, middle, and high energy physics. This advance was in a great part promoted by the availability of newer and more powerful instruments. Over time, these instruments grew in size as well as in sophistication and precision. Nearly all these devices had one fundamental thing in common - magnetic fields produced with currents and iron. The precision demanded by the new experiments and machines did bring the magnet technology to new frontiers requiring the utmost in the accuracy of magnetic fields. The complex properties of the iron challenged innumerable physicists in the attempt to force the magnetic fields into the desired shape. Experience and analytical insight were the pillars for coping with those problems and only few mastered the skills and were in addition able to communicate their intricate knowledge. It was a fortuitous situation that the authors got to know Klaus Halbach who belonged to those few and who shared his knowledge contributing thus largely to the successful completion of two large instruments that were built at the Forschungszentrum Juelich, KFA, for nuclear and middle energy physics. In one case the efforts went to the large spectrometer named BIG KARL whose design phase started in the early 70`s. In the second case the work started in the early 80`s with the task to build a high precision 2.5 GeV proton accelerator for cooled stored and extracted beams known as COSY-Juelich.

  4. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Döppner, T.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; et al

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in “high foot” implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), andmore » the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1e15 neutrons, the total yield ~ v⁹˙⁴. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating ( ~v⁵˙⁹) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.« less

  5. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Döppner, T.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J. P.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P. K.; Rygg, J. R.; Ralph, J. E.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J. A.; Field, J. E.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hatarik, R.; Merrill, F. E.; Nagel, S. R.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Town, R. P. J.; Sayre, D. B.; Volegov, P.; Wilde, C. H.

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in “high foot” implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), and the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1e15 neutrons, the total yield ~ v⁹˙⁴. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating ( ~v⁵˙⁹) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.

  6. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Dppner, T.; Ma, T.; Park, H.-S.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; and others

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in high foot implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), and the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1 10{sup 15} neutrons, the total yield ??v{sup 9.4}. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating (?v{sup 5.9}) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.

  7. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Dppner, T.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J. P.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P. K.; Rygg, J. R.; Ralph, J. E.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J. A.; Field, J. E.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hatarik, R.; Merrill, F. E.; Nagel, S. R.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Town, R. P. J.; Sayre, D. B.; Volegov, P.; Wilde, C. H.

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in high foot implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), and the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1e15 neutrons, the total yield ~ v???. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating ( ~v???) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.

  8. RECENT ADVANCES IN HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY: SINGLE CELL TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X. Zhang; J. E. O'Brien; R. C. O'Brien

    2012-07-01

    An experimental investigation on the performance and durability of single solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory. In order to understand and mitigate the degradation issues in high temperature electrolysis, single SOECs with different configurations from several manufacturers have been evaluated for initial performance and long-term durability. A new test apparatus has been developed for single cell and small stack tests from different vendors. Single cells from Ceramatec Inc. show improved durability compared to our previous stack tests. Single cells from Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI) demonstrate low degradation both in fuel cell and electrolysis modes. Single cells from Saint Gobain Advanced Materials (St. Gobain) show stable performance in fuel cell mode, but rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode. Electrolyte-electrode delamination is found to have significant impact on degradation in some cases. Enhanced bonding between electrolyte and electrode and modification of the microstructure help to mitigate degradation. Polarization scans and AC impedance measurements are performed during the tests to characterize the cell performance and degradation.

  9. Utilization of the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selby, Douglas L; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Meilleur, Flora; Jones, Amy; Bailey, William Barton; Vandergriff, David H

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses several aspects of the scientific utilization of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Topics to be covered will include: 1) HFIR neutron scattering instruments and the formal instrument user program; 2) Recent upgrades to the neutron scattering instrument stations at the reactor, and 3) eMod a new tool for addressing instrument modifications and providing configuration control and design process for scientific instruments at HFIR and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). There are 15 operating neutron instrument stations at HFIR with 12 of them organized into a formal user program. Since the last presentation on HFIR instruments at IGORR we have installed a Single Crystal Quasi-Laue Diffractometer instrument called IMAGINE; and we have made significant upgrades to HFIR neutron scattering instruments including the Cold Triple Axis Instrument, the Wide Angle Neutron Diffractometer, the Powder Diffractometer, and the Neutron Imaging station. In addition, we have initiated upgrades to the Thermal Triple Axis Instrument and the Bio-SANS cold neutron instrument detector system. All of these upgrades are tied to a continuous effort to maintain a high level neutron scattering user program at the HFIR. For the purpose of tracking modifications such as those mentioned and configuration control we have been developing an electronic system for entering instrument modification requests that follows a modification or instrument project through concept development, design, fabrication, installation, and commissioning. This system, which we call eMod, electronically leads the task leader through a series of questions and checklists that then identifies such things as ES&H and radiological issues and then automatically designates specific individuals for the activity review process. The system has been in use for less than a year and we are still working out some of the inefficiencies, but we believe that this will become a very

  10. DECOMMISSIONING THE HIGH PRESSURE TRITIUM LABORATORY AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peifer, M.J.; Rendell, K.; Hearnsberger, D.W.

    2003-02-27

    In May 0f 2000, the Cerro Grande wild land fire burned approximately 48,000 acres in and around Los Alamos. In addition to the many buildings that were destroyed in the town site, many structures were also damaged and destroyed within the 43 square miles that comprise the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A special Act of Congress provided funding to remove Laboratory structures that were damaged by the fire, or that could be threatened by subsequent catastrophic wild land fires. The High Pressure Tritium Laboratory (HPTL) is located at Technical Area (TA) 33, building 86 in the far southeast corner of the Laboratory property. It is immediately adjacent to Bandelier National Park. Because it was threatened by both the Cerro Grande fire in 2000, and the 16,000- acre Dome fire in 1996, the former tritium processing facility was placed on the list of facilities scheduled for Decontamination and Decommissioning under the Cerro Grande Rehabilitation Project. The work was performed through the Facilities and Waste Operations (FWO) Division and is integrated with other Laboratory D&D efforts. The primary demolition contractor was Clauss Construction of San Diego, California. Earth Tech Global Environmental Services of San Antonio, Texas was sub-contracted to Clauss Construction, and provided radiological decontamination support to the project. Although the forty-seven year old facility had been in a state of safe-shutdown since operations ceased in 1990, a significant amount of tritium remained in the rooms where process systems were located. Tritium was the only radiological contaminant associated with this facility. Since no specific regulatory standards have been set for the release of volumetrically contaminated materials, concentration guidelines were derived in order to meet other established regulatory criteria. A tritium removal system was developed for this project with the goal of reducing the volume of tritium concentrated in the concrete of the building

  11. Three-dimensional charge density wave order in YBa2Cu3O6.67 at high magnetic fields

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gerber, S.; Jang, H.; Nojiri, H.; Matsuzawa, S.; Yasumura, H.; Bonn, D. A.; Liang, R.; Hardy, W. N.; Islam, Z.; Mehta, A.; et al

    2015-11-20

    In this study, charge density wave (CDW) correlations have recently been shown to universally exist in cuprate superconductors. However, their nature at high fields inferred from nuclear magnetic resonance is distinct from that measured by x-ray scattering at zero and low fields. Here we combine a pulsed magnet with an x-ray free electron laser to characterize the CDW in YBa2Cu3O6.67 via x-ray scattering in fields up to 28 Tesla. While the zero-field CDW order, which develops below T ~ 150 K, is essentially two-dimensional, at lower temperature and beyond 15 Tesla, another three-dimensionally ordered CDW emerges. The field-induced CDW onsetsmore » around the zero-field superconducting transition temperature, yet the incommensurate in-plane ordering vector is field-independent. This implies that the two forms of CDW and high-temperature superconductivity are intimately linked.« less

  12. Observations of imposed ordered structures in a dusty plasma at high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Edward Lynch, Brian; Konopka, Uwe; Merlino, Robert L.; Rosenberg, Marlene

    2015-03-15

    Dusty plasmas have been studied in argon, rf glow discharge plasmas at magnetic fields up to 2 T, where the electrons and ions are strongly magnetized. In this experiment, plasmas are generated between two parallel plate electrodes where the lower, powered electrode is solid and the upper, electrically floating electrode supports a semi-transparent, titanium mesh. We report on the formation of an ordered dusty plasma, where the dust particles form a spatial structure that is aligned to the mesh. We discuss possible mechanisms that may lead to the formation of the “dust grid” and point out potential implications and applications of these observations.

  13. A Study to Develop an Industrial-Scale, Computer-Controlled High Magnetic Field Processing (HMFP) System to Assist in Commercializing the Novel, Enabling HMFP Manufacturing Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz-; Chourey, Aashish

    2010-08-01

    As the original magnet designer and manufacturer of ORNL s 9T, 5-inch ID bore magnet, American Magnetics Inc. (AMI) has collaborated with ORNL s Materials Processing Group s and this partnership has been instrumental in the development of our unique thermo-magnetic facilities and expertise. Consequently, AMI and ORNL have realized that the commercial implementation of the High Magnetic Field Processing (HMFP) technology will require the evolution of robust, automated superconducting (SC) magnet systems that will be cost-effective and easy to operate in an industrial environment. The goal of this project and CRADA is to significantly expedite the timeline for implementing this revolutionary and pervasive cross-cutting technology for future US produced industrial components. The successful completion of this project is anticipated to significantly assist in the timely commercialization and licensing of our HMFP intellectual property for a broad spectrum of industries; and to open up a new market for AMI. One notable outcome of this project is that the ThermoMagnetic Processing Technology WON a prestigious 2009 R&D 100 Awards. This award acknowledges and recognizes our TMP Technology as one of the top 100 innovative US technologies in 2009. By successfully establishing the design requirements for a commercial scale magnetic processing system, this project effort has accomplished a key first step in facilitating the building and demonstration of a superconducting magnetic processing coil, enabling the transition of the High Magnetic Field Processing Technology beyond a laboratory novelty into a commercially viable and industrially scalable Manufacturing Technology.

  14. Magnetic Correlations: A (Momentum) Space-Time Odyssey | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Magnetic Correlations: A (Momentum) Space-Time Odyssey Wednesday, July 6, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Yue Cao, Brookhaven National Laboratory Program Description Magnetic correlations are the fundamental building blocks of magnetism, and are suspected by many to be the driving force behind such exotic phenomenon as high Tc superconductivity. The marriage between the Free Electron Laser (FEL) and inelastic X-ray spectroscopy

  15. Determination of the Average Aromatic Cluster Size of Fossil Fuels by Solid-State NMR at High Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Kanmi; Kennedy, Gordon J.; Althaus, Stacey M.; Pruski, Marek

    2013-01-07

    We show that the average aromatic cluster size in complex carbonaceous materials can be accurately determined using fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR at a high magnetic field. To accurately quantify the nonprotonated aromatic carbon, we edited the 13C spectra using the recently reported MAS-synchronized spinecho, which alleviated the problem of rotational recoupling of 1H-13C dipolar interactions associated with traditional dipolar dephasing experiments. The dependability of this approach was demonstrated on selected Argonne Premium coal standards, for which full sets of basic structural parameters were determined with high accuracy.

  16. Three-Dimensional Charge Density Wave Order in YBa2Cu3O6.67 at High Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, S.; Jang, H.; Nojiri, H.; Matsuzawa, S.; Yasumura, H.; Bonn, D. A.; Liang, R.; Hardy, W.; Islam, Z.; Lee, W. -S.; Zhu, D.; Lee, J. -S.

    2015-11-20

    Charge density wave (CDW) correlations have been shown to universally exist in cuprate superconductors. However, their nature at high fields inferred from nuclear magnetic resonance is distinct from that measured by x-ray scattering at zero and low fields. Here we combine a pulsed magnet with an x-ray free electron laser to characterize the CDW in YBa2Cu3O6.67 via x-ray scattering in fields up to 28 Tesla. While the zero-field CDW order, which develops below T ~ 150 K, is essentially two-dimensional, at lower temperature and beyond 15 Tesla, another three-dimensionally ordered CDW emerges. The field-induced CDW onsets around the zero-field superconducting transition temperature, yet the incommensurate inplane ordering vector is field-independent. This implies that the two forms of CDW and hightemperature superconductivity are intimately linked.

  17. Effect of Triplet Magnet Vibrations on RHIC Performance with High Energy Protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minty, M.

    2010-05-23

    In this report we present recent experimental data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) illustrating effects resulting from {approx}10 Hz vibrations of the triplet quadrupole magnets in the interactions regions and evaluate the impact of these vibrations on RHIC collider performance. Measurements revealed modulation of the betatron tunes of appreciable magnitude relative to the total beam-beam parameter. Comparison of the discrete frequencies in the spectra of the measured beam positions and betatron tunes confirmed a common source. The tune modulations were shown to result from feed-down in the sextupole magnets in the interaction regions. In addition we show that the distortions to the closed orbit of the two counter-rotating beams produced a modulated crossing angle at the interaction point(s).

  18. A high power Ka band millimeter wave generator with low guiding magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu Jun; Shu Ting; Zhang Jun; Li Guolin; Zhang Zehai

    2010-08-15

    A slow wave type gigawatt millimeter wave generator is proposed in this paper. In order to increase power capacity, overmoded slow wave structures (SWSs) with larger diameter have been used. Taking advantage of the ''surface wave'' property of overmoded SWSs, the TM{sub 01} mode can be selected to be the operating mode. Calculations have also been carried out to choose a proper low operating magnetic field strength, and it agrees with particle in cell (PIC) simulations. Main structure parameters of the device are optimized by PIC simulations. A typical simulation result is that, at the beam parameters of 600 keV and 5.05 kA, and guiding magnetic field of 0.85 T, a Ka band millimeter wave with an output power of 1.05 GW is generated, yielding a conversion efficiency of about 35%.

  19. Magnetically operated beam dump for dumping high power beams in a neutral beamline

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-01-27

    It is an object of this invention to provide a beam dump system for a neutral beam generator which lowers the time-averaged power density of the beam dump impingement surface. Another object of this invention is to provide a beam dump system for a neutral particle beam based on reionization and subsequent magnetic beam position modulation of the beam onto a beam dump surface to lower the time-averaged power density of the beam dump ion impingement surface.

  20. Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nellis, William J.; Geballe, Theodore H.; Maple, M. Brian

    1990-01-01

    Shock wave formation of thin layers of materials with improved superconducting and permanent magnetic properties and improved microstructures. The material fabrication system includes a sandwiched structure including a powder material placed between two solid members to enable explosive shock consolidation. The two solid members are precooled to about 80.degree.-100.degree. K. to reduce the residual temperatures attained as a result of the shock wave treatment, and thereby increase the quench rate of the consolidated powder.

  1. Dynamic high pressure process for fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nellis, W.J.; Geballe, T.H.; Maple, M.B.

    1990-03-13

    Shock wave formation of thin layers of materials with improved superconducting and permanent magnetic properties and improved microstructures is disclosed. The material fabrication system includes a sandwiched structure including a powder material placed between two solid members to enable explosive shock consolidation. The two solid members are precooled to about 80--100 K to reduce the residual temperatures attained as a result of the shock wave treatment, and thereby increase the quench rate of the consolidated powder. 9 figs.

  2. A novel permanently magnetised high gradient magnetic filter using assisted capture for fine particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, J.H.P.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes the structure and properties of a novel permanently magnetised magnetic filter for fine friable radioactive material. Previously a filter was described and tested. This filter was designed so that the holes in the filter are left open as capture proceeds which means the pressure drop builds up only slowly. This filter is not suitable for friable composite particles which can be broken by mechanical forces. The structure of magnetic part of the second filter has been changed so as to strongly capture particles composed of fine particles weakly bound together which tend to break when captured. This uses a principle of assisted-capture in which coarse particles aid the capture of the fine fragments. The technique has the unfortunate consequence that the pressure drop across the filter rises faster as capture capture proceeds than the filter described previously. These filters have the following characteristics: (1) No external magnet is required. (2) No external power is required. (3) Small is size and portable. (4) Easily interchangeable. (5) Can be cleaned without demagnetising.

  3. Skin explosion of double-layer conductors in fast-rising high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaikovsky, S. A. Datsko, I. M.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Ratakhin, N. A.

    2014-04-15

    An experiment has been performed to study the electrical explosion of thick cylindrical conductors using the MIG pulsed power generator capable of producing a peak current of 2.5 MA within 100?ns rise time. The experimental goal was to compare the skin explosion of a solid conductor with that of a double-layer conductor whose outer layer had a lower conductivity than the inner one. It has been shown that in magnetic fields of peak induction up to 300?T and average induction rise rate 3??10{sup 9}?T/s, the double-layer structure of a conductor makes it possible to achieve higher magnetic induction at the conductor surface before it explodes. This can be accounted for, in particular, by the reduction of the ratio of the Joule heat density to the energy density of the magnetic field at the surface of a double-layer conductor due to redistribution of the current density over the conductor cross section.

  4. A high-current electron gun for the electron beam ion trap at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, S. Baumann, T. M.; Kittimanapun, K.; Lapierre, A.; Snyder, A.

    2014-02-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) in NSCL’s reaccelerator ReA uses continuous ion injection and accumulation. In order to maximize capture efficiency and minimize breeding time into high charge states, the EBIT requires a high-current/high current-density electron beam. A new electron gun insert based on a concave Ba-dispenser cathode has been designed and built to increase the current transmitted through the EBIT’s superconducting magnet. With the new insert, stable EBIT operating conditions with 0.8 A of electron beam have been established. The design of the electron gun is presented together with calculated and measured perveance data. In order to assess the experimental compression of the electron beam, a pinhole CCD camera has been set up to measure the electron beam radius. The camera observes X-rays emitted from highly charged ions, excited by the electron beam. Initial tests with this camera setup will be presented. They indicate that a current density of 640 A/cm{sup 2} has been reached when the EBIT magnet was operated at 4 T.

  5. High-pressure, high-temperature magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance devices and processes for making and using same

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Hu, Mary Y.; Townsend, Mark R.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2015-10-06

    Re-usable ceramic magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR rotors constructed of high-mechanic strength ceramics are detailed that include a sample compartment that maintains high pressures up to at least about 200 atmospheres (atm) and high temperatures up to about least about 300.degree. C. during operation. The rotor designs minimize pressure losses stemming from penetration over an extended period of time. The present invention makes possible a variety of in-situ high pressure, high temperature MAS NMR experiments not previously achieved in the prior art.

  6. CRAD, DOE Oversight- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a DOE independent oversight assessment of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory programs for oversight of its contractors.

  7. New Osage Nation Facilities Deliver High Energy Performance, Comfort, and Cost Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Osage Nation (OK) celebrated the opening of two state-of-the-art tribal government buildings designed with energy efficiency, comfort, and cost savings in mind. The buildings incorporate daylighting, geothermal heat pumps, fans, and other environmentally friendly design features that optimize the use of natural light, moderate heating and cooling, and reduce electricity consumption and costs.

  8. Calloway Middle School Honored at DOE National Science Bowl, Lone Oak Competes Among High Schools

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PADUCAH, KY – Calloway County Middle School won the Civility Award and was named one of the top six battery-powered model car design teams at the Department of Energy’s National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C.

  9. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.M. Harpenau

    2010-12-15

    5098-SR-05-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  10. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2010-11-03

    5098-SR-04-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  11. Preparation and characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with nickelphosphorous layers of high magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yi; Qi, Shuhua; Zhang, Fan

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? Impurities in crude MWNTs were effectively removed after purification treatment. ? Many Ni nanoparticles were homogenously coated on the purified MWNTs. ? The saturation magnetization (Ms) of the MWNTs with NiP layers is 91.5 emu/g. -- Abstract: The multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with nickelphosphorous (NiP) layers were prepared by electroless plating method. To obtain the MWNTs with NiP layers of high magnetic properties, an effective purification treatment and a pre-treatment procedure were developed. The crude MWNTs, the purified MWNTs and the MWNTs with NiP layers were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). SEM results, TEM images and XRD results indicate that impurities in the crude MWNTs were effectively removed after the purification treatment and a large number of Ni nanoparticles were homogenously coated on the surface of the purified MWNTs. According to the VSM test, the saturation magnetization (Ms) of the MWNTs with NiP layers is 91.5 emu/g which is higher than results of other researchers.

  12. High field nuclear magnetic resonance in transition metal substituted BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garitezi, T. M. Lesseux, G. G.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Adriano, C.; Pagliuso, P. G.; Urbano, R. R.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P. L.

    2014-05-07

    We report high field {sup 75}As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on Co and Cu substituted BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} single crystals displaying same structural/magnetic transition T{sub 0}≃128  K. From our anisotropy studies in the paramagnetic state, we strikingly found virtually identical quadrupolar splitting and consequently the quadrupole frequency ν{sub Q}≃2.57(1)  MHz for both compounds, despite the claim that each Cu delivers 2 extra 3d electrons in BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} compared to Co substitution. These results allow us to conclude that a subtle change in the crystallographic structure, particularly in the Fe–As tetrahedra, must be the most probable tuning parameter to determine T{sub 0} in this class of superconductors rather than electronic doping. Furthermore, our NMR data around T{sub 0} suggest coexistence of tetragonal/paramagnetic and orthorhombic/antiferromagnetic phases between the structural and the spin density wave magnetic phase transitions, similarly to what was reported for K-doped BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} [Urbano et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 107001 (2010)].

  13. Oriented nanometric aggregates of partially inverted zinc ferrite: One-step processing and tunable high-frequency magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sai, Ranajit; Endo, Yasushi; Shimada, Yutaka; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Shivashankar, S. A.

    2015-05-07

    In this work, it is demonstrated that the in situ growth of oriented nanometric aggregates of partially inverted zinc ferrite can potentially pave a way to alter and tune magnetocrystalline anisotropy that, in turn, dictates ferromagnetic resonance frequency (f{sub FMR}) by inducing strain due to aggregation. Furthermore, the influence of interparticle interaction on magnetic properties of the aggregates is investigated. Mono-dispersed zinc ferrite nanoparticles (<5 nm) with various degrees of aggregation were prepared through decomposition of metal-organic compounds of zinc (II) and iron (III) in an alcoholic solution under controlled microwave irradiation, below 200 °C. The nanocrystallites were found to possess high degree of inversion (>0.5). With increasing order of aggregation in the samples, saturation magnetization (at 5 K) is found to decrease from 38 emu/g to 24 emu/g, while coercivity is found to increase gradually by up to 100% (525 Oe to 1040 Oe). Anisotropy-mediated shift of f{sub FMR} has also been measured and discussed. In essence, the result exhibits an easy way to control the magnetic characteristics of nanocrystalline zinc ferrite, boosted with significant degree of inversion, at GHz frequencies.

  14. Design and Fabrication of the Superconducting Horizontal Bend Magnet for the Super High Momentum Spectrometer at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chouhan, Shailendra S.; DeKamp, Jon; Burkhart, E. E,; Bierwagen, J.; Song, H.; Zeller, Albert F.; Brindza, Paul D.; Lassiter, Steven R.; Fowler, Michael J.; Sun, Qiuli

    2015-06-01

    A collaboration exists between NSCL and JLab to design and build JLab's Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) horizontal bend magnet that allows the bending of the 12 GeV/c particles horizontally by 3 to allow SHMS to reach angles as low as 5.5. Two full size coils have been wound and are cold tested for both magnetic and structural properties. Each coil is built from 90 layers of single-turn SSC outer conductor cable. An initial test coil with one third the turns was fabricated to demonstrate that the unique saddle shape with fully contoured ends could be wound with Rutherford superconducting cable. Learned lessons during the trial winding were integrated into the two complete full-scale coils that are now installed in the helium vessel. The fabrication of the iron yoke, cold mass, and thermal shield is complete, and assembly of the vacuum vessel is in progress. This paper presents the process and progress along with the modified magnet design to reduce the fringe field in the primary beam region and also includes the impact of the changes on coil forces and coil restraint system.

  15. Method for improving performance of high temperature superconductors within a magnetic field

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Haiyan; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Maiorov, Boris A.; Civale, Leonardo

    2010-01-05

    The present invention provides articles including a base substrate including a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure layer thereon; and, a buffer layer upon the oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure layer, the buffer layer having an outwardly facing surface with a surface morphology including particulate outgrowths of from 10 nm to 500 run in size at the surface, such particulate outgrowths serving as flux pinning centers whereby the article maintains higher performance within magnetic fields than similar articles without the necessary density of such outgrowths.

  16. Characterization of the self magnetic pinch diode at high voltages for flash radiography.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordova, Steve Ray; Portillo, Salvador; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Threadgold, James R.; Crotch, Ian; Ziska, Derek Raymond

    2008-10-01

    The Sandia Laboratories Advanced Radiographic Technologies Department, in collaboration with the United Kingdom Atomic Weapons Establishment, has been conducting research into the development of the Self-Magnetic-Pinched diode as an x-ray source suitable for flash radiographic experiments. We have demonstrated that this source is capable of meeting and exceeding the initial requirements of 250 rads (measured at one meter) with a 2.75 mm source spot-size. Recent experiments conducted on the RITS-6 accelerator have demonstrated the ability of this diode to meet intermediate requirements with a sub 3 mm source spot size and a dose in excess of 400 rads at one meter.

  17. Simulation of High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Images on the IBM Blue Gene/L Supercomputer Using SIMRI

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baum, K. G.; Menezes, G.; Helguera, M.

    2011-01-01

    Medical imaging system simulators are tools that provide a means to evaluate system architecture and create artificial image sets that are appropriate for specific applications. We have modified SIMRI, a Bloch equation-based magnetic resonance image simulator, in order to successfully generate high-resolution 3D MR images of the Montreal brain phantom using Blue Gene/L systems. Results show that redistribution of the workload allows an anatomically accurate 256 3 voxel spin-echo simulation in less than 5 hours when executed on an 8192-node partition of a Blue Gene/L system.

  18. Experimental study of magnetically confined hollow electron beams in the Tevatron as collimators for intense high-energy hadron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stancari, G.; Annala, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Still, D.; Valishev, A.; Vorobiev, L.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable losses. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and tested at Fermilab for this purpose. It was installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses in the summer of 2010. We present the results of the first experimental tests of the hollow-beam collimation concept on 980-GeV antiproton bunches in the Tevatron.

  19. Experimental investigation of a Ka band high power millimeter wave generator operated at low guiding magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu Jun; Shu Ting; Zhang Jun; Li Guolin; Zhang Zehai; Fan Yuwei

    2011-05-15

    An overmoded slow wave type Ka band generator is investigated experimentally to produce high power millimeter waves in this paper. The experiments were carried out at the TORCH-01 accelerator. The produced microwave frequency was measured by dispersive line method, and the power was estimated by integrating over the radiation pattern at far field. With relatively low guiding magnetic field of 0.8 T and diode voltage and beam current of 590 kV and 5.2 kA, respectively, a 33.56 GHz millimeter wave with an output power of 320 MW was generated, and the microwave mode was quasi-TM{sub 01} mode.

  20. Mitigation of rotational instability of high-beta field-reversed configuration by double-sided magnetized plasmoid injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itagaki, H.; Inomoto, M.; Asai, T.; Takahashi, Ts.

    2014-03-15

    Active control of destructive rotational instability in a high-beta field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma was demonstrated by using double-sided plasmoid injection technique. The elliptical deformation of the FRC's cross section was mitigated as a result of substantial suppression of spontaneous spin-up by the plasmoid injection. It was found that the injected plasmoid provided better stability against the rotational mode, suggesting that the compensation of the FRC's decaying magnetic flux might help to suppress its spin-up.

  1. The high-efficiency jets magnetically accelerated from a thin disk in powerful lobe-dominated FRII radio galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Shuang-Liang

    2014-06-10

    A maximum jet efficiency line R ? 25 (R = L {sub jet}/L {sub bol}), found in FRII radio galaxies by Fernandes et al., was extended to cover the full range of jet power by Punsly. Recent general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of jet formation have mainly focused on the enhancement of jet power. In this work, we suggest that the jet efficiency could be very high even for conventional jet power if the radiative efficiency of disks was much smaller. We adopt the model of a thin disk with magnetically driven winds to investigate the observational high-efficiency jets in FRII radio galaxies. It is found that the structure of a thin disk can be significantly altered by the feedback of winds. The temperature of a disk gradually decreases with increasing magnetic field; the disk density, surface density, and pressure also change enormously. The lower temperature and higher surface density in the inner disk result in the rapid decrease of radiative efficiency. Thus, the jet efficiency is greatly improved even if the jet power is conventional. Our results can explain the observations quite well. The theoretical maximum jet efficiency of R ? 1000 suggested by our calculations is large enough to explain all of the high jet efficiency in observations, even considering the episodic activity of jets.

  2. High Energy, Short Pulse Fiber Injection Lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Crane, J K; Beach, R J; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2008-09-10

    A short pulse fiber injection laser for the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This system produces 100 {micro}J pulses with 5 nm of bandwidth centered at 1053 nm. The pulses are stretched to 2.5 ns and have been recompressed to sub-ps pulse widths. A key feature of the system is that the pre-pulse power contrast ratio exceeds 80 dB. The system can also precisely adjust the final recompressed pulse width and timing and has been designed for reliable, hands free operation. The key challenges in constructing this system were control of the signal to noise ratio, dispersion management and managing the impact of self phase modulation on the chirped pulse.

  3. Competition between cotunneling, Kondo effect, and direct tunneling in discontinuous high-anisotropy magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciudad D.; Arena D.; We, Z.-C.; Hindmarch, A.T.; Negusse, E.; Han, X.-F.Han; Marrows, C.H.

    2012-06-07

    The transition between Kondo and Coulomb blockade effects in discontinuous double magnetic tunnel junctions is explored as a function of the size of the CoPt magnetic clusters embedded between AlO{sub x} tunnel barriers. A gradual competition between cotunneling enhancement of the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) and the TMR suppression due to the Kondo effect has been found in these junctions, with both effects having been found to coexist even in the same sample. It is possible to tune between these two states with temperature (at a temperature far below the cluster blocking temperature). In addition, when further decreasing the size of the CoPt clusters, another gradual transition between the Kondo effect and direct tunneling between the electrodes takes place. This second transition shows that the spin-flip processes found in junctions with impurities in the barrier are in fact due to the Kondo effect. A simple theoretical model able to account for these experimental results is proposed.

  4. Modeling of ground magnetic signatures associated with high latitude ionospheric current systems. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gifford, P.G.

    1995-09-10

    Due to their location, ionospheric currents are difficult to study directly. To gather information indirectly, magnetometers have been placed throughout the polar regions to measure perturbations in the geomagnetic field caused by the currents. Understanding the abilities and limitations of the magnetometer networks to resolve details about changes in the magnetic field provides insight into the accuracy of the data. Discovering these abilities and limitations is the focus of this research. For use with ionospheric current system models, a simulation was made of a ground magnetometer. After validation of this simulation, it was used to verify Fukushima`s theory on the cancellation of the ground magnetic signatures caused by the field aligned currents and Pedersen current. A distribution of the simulated magnetometers, patterned after the Scandinavian Magnetometer Array, proved successful in gathering information about traveling convection twin vortices. A global distribution of the magnetometers was tested with an ionospheric substorm model to find out what effects gaps in magnetometer coverage would have on the accuracy of data collected.

  5. SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE FORMATION AT HIGH REDSHIFTS THROUGH A PRIMORDIAL MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sethi, Shiv; Pandey, Kanhaiya; Haiman, Zoltan E-mail: kanhaiya@rri.res.i

    2010-09-20

    It has been proposed that primordial gas in early dark matter halos, with virial temperatures T{sub vir} {approx}> 10{sup 4} K, can avoid fragmentation and undergo rapid collapse, possibly resulting in a supermassive black hole. This requires the gas to avoid cooling and to remain at temperatures near T {approx} 10{sup 4} K. We show that this condition can be satisfied in the presence of a sufficiently strong primordial magnetic field, which heats the collapsing gas via ambipolar diffusion. If the field has a strength above |B | {approx}>3.6 (comoving) nG, the collapsing gas is kept warm (T {approx} 10{sup 4} K) until it reaches the critical density n{sub crit} {approx} 10{sup 3} cm{sup -3} at which the rotovibrational states of H{sub 2} approach local thermodynamic equilibrium. H{sub 2} cooling then remains inefficient and the gas temperature stays near {approx}10{sup 4} K, even as it continues to collapse at higher densities. The critical magnetic field strength required to permanently suppress H{sub 2} cooling is somewhat higher than the upper limit of {approx}2 nG from the cosmic microwave background. However, it can be realized in the rare {approx}>(2-3){sigma} regions of the spatially fluctuating B field; these regions contain a sufficient number of halos to account for z {approx} 6 quasar black holes.

  6. High Solids Enzymatic Hydrolysis Reactors (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biorefinery Research Facility | NREL, Golden, Colorado | December 2011 | NREL/PO-5100-50150 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. * Designed for operation at total solids loadings greater than 20% (w/w) * Reactors are operated in a batch mode with a 36-hour turnaround time * Two reactors are staged to accept a continuous stream of pretreated biomass to achieve semi-

  7. Design status of the US 100 tesla non-destructive magnet system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider-Muntau, H.; Eyssa, Y.; Pernambuco-Wise, P.; Boenig, H.; Campbell, L.J.; Eberl, K.R.; Parkin, D.M.; Schillig, J.; Sims, J.

    1996-09-01

    A collaborative effort is now underway in the US between the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation to design, build, and use a 100 T non-destructive magnet for studying the properties of materials at high fields. The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) at Tallahassee, Florida, and Los Alamos, New Mexico, where the magnet will be sited, is carrying out this task. This magnet will join other pulsed magnets at NHMFL, to provide magnetic fields at strengths, time durations, and volumes that are longer (in combination) than any now available. In particular, the goal for the 100 T magnet is a time duration above 80 T of about 15 ms in a cold bore of 24 mm. The present status of the design effort and various design issues are presented here.

  8. The magnetic ordering in high magnetoresistance Mn-doped ZnO thin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Venkatesh, S.; Baras, A.; Lee, J. -S.; Roqan, I. S.

    2016-03-24

    Here, we studied the nature of magnetic ordering in Mn-doped ZnO thin films that exhibited ferromagnetism at 300 K and superparamagnetism at 5 K. We directly inter-related the magnetisation and magnetoresistance by invoking the polaronpercolation theory and variable range of hopping conduction below the metal-to-insulator transition. By obtaining a qualitative agreement between these two models, we attribute the ferromagnetism to the s-d exchange-induced spin splitting that was indicated by large positive magnetoresistance (~40 %). Low temperature superparamagnetism was attributed to the localization of carriers and non-interacting polaron clusters. This analysis can assist in understanding the presence or absence of ferromagnetismmore » in doped/un-doped ZnO.« less

  9. Superconducting magnet development in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasukochi, K.

    1983-05-01

    The present state of R and D works on the superconducting magnet and its applications in Japan are presented. On electrical rotating machines, 30 MVA superconducting synchronous rotary condenser (Mitsubishi and Fuji) and 50 MVA generator are under construction. Two ways of ship propulsion by superconducting magnets are developing. A superconducting magnetically levitated and linear motor propelled train ''MAGLEV'' was developed by the Japan National Railways (JNR). The superconducting magnet development for fusion is the most active field in Japan. The Cluster Test program has been demonstrated on a 10 T Nb/sub 3/Sn coil and the first coil of Large Coil Task in IEA collaboration has been constructed and the domestic test was completed in JAERI. These works are for the development of toroidal coils of the next generation tokamak machine. R and D works on superconducting ohmic heating coil are in progress in JAERI and ETL. The latter group has constructed 3.8 MJ pulsed coil. A high ramp rate of changing field in pulsed magnet, 200 T/s, has been tested successfully. High Energy Physics Laboratory (KEK) are conducting active works. The superconducting ..mu.. meson channel and ..pi.. meson channel have been constructed and are operating successfully. KEK has also a project of big accelerator named ''TRISTAN'', which is similar to ISABELLE project of BNL. Superconducting synchrotron magnets are developed for this project. The development of superconducting three thin wall solenoid has been started. One of them, CDF, is progressing under USA-Japan collaboration.

  10. Devices and process for high-pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoyt, David W; Sears, Jr., Jesse A; Turcu, Romulus V.F.; Rosso, Kevin M; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2014-04-08

    A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) rotor is detailed that includes a high-pressure sample cell that maintains high pressures exceeding 150 bar. The sample cell design minimizes pressure losses due to penetration over an extended period of time.

  11. A Study to Develop an Industrial-Scale, Computer-Controlled High Magnetic Field Processing (HMFP) System to Assist in Commercializing the Novel, Enabling HMFP Manufacturing Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutdka, G. M.; Chourey, A.

    2010-05-12

    As the original magnet designer and manufacturer of ORNLs 9T, 5-inch ID bore magnet, American Magnetics Inc. (AMI) has collaborated with ORNLs Materials Processing Groups and this partnership has been instrumental in the development of our unique thermo-magnetic facilities and expertise. Consequently, AMI and ORNL have realized that the commercial implementation of the High Magnetic Field Processing (HMFP) technology will require the evolution of robust, automated superconducting (SC) magnet systems that will be cost-effective and easy to operate in an industrial environment. The goal of this project and CRADA is to significantly expedite the timeline for implementing this revolutionary and pervasive cross-cutting technology for future US produced industrial components. The successful completion of this project is anticipated to significantly assist in the timely commercialization and licensing of our HMFP intellectual property for a broad spectrum of industries; and to open up a new market for AMI. One notable outcome of this project is that the ThermoMagnetic Processing Technology WON a prestigious 2009 R&D 100 Awards. This award acknowledges and recognizes our TMP Technology as one of the top 100 innovative US technologies in 2009. By successfully establishing the design requirements for a commercial scale magnetic processing system, this project effort has accomplished a key first step in facilitating the building and demonstration of a superconducting magnetic processing coil, enabling the transition of the High Magnetic Field Processing Technology beyond a laboratory novelty into a commercially viable and industrially scalable Manufacturing Technology.

  12. Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: technology development - annotated bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, D.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report provides a collection of annotated bibliographies for documents prepared under the Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification (Plant) Program. The bibliographies are for documents from Fiscal Year 1983 through Fiscal Year 1995, and include work conducted at or under the direction of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The bibliographies included focus on the technology developed over the specified time period for vitrifying Hanford pretreated high-level waste. The following subject areas are included: General Documentation; Program Documentation; High-Level Waste Characterization; Glass Formulation and Characterization; Feed Preparation; Radioactive Feed Preparation and Glass Properties Testing; Full-Scale Feed Preparation Testing; Equipment Materials Testing; Melter Performance Assessment and Evaluations; Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter; Cold Crucible Melter; Stirred Melter; High-Temperature Melter; Melter Off-Gas Treatment; Vitrification Waste Treatment; Process, Product Control and Modeling; Analytical; and Canister Closure, Decontamination, and Handling

  13. High-pressure science gets super-sized | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-pressure science gets super-sized By Tona Kunz * October 23, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - The study of materials at extreme conditions took a giant leap forward with the discovery of a way to generate super high pressures without using shock waves whose accompanying heat turns solids to liquid. This discovery will allow scientists for the first time to reach static pressure levels exceeding four million atmospheres, a high-pressure environment where new unique compounds could be

  14. Magnetic shield of high-T sub c Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductors at 77 K for SQUID measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoshino, K.; Sudoh, E.; Katoh, K.; Yamazaki, S.; Takayama, H.; Takahara, H. ); Ohta, H.; Aono, M. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on the development of a relatively large high-Tc Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconducting magnetic shield vessel of 150 mm in inner diameter, 320 mm in depth and 10 mm in thickness, which is applicable to biomagnetic measurements with a SQUID. Magnetic fields inside the vessel were measured by using an RF SQUID magnetometer or measuring induced voltages in a pickup coil. The shielding factors, defined as the ratio of the magnetic field at 290 K to that at 77 K, were around 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6}.

  15. A High-Resolution Integrated Model of the National Ignition Campaign Cryogenic Layered Experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jones, O. S.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D. S.; Dixit, S. M.; Dopppner, T.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Dzentitis, E. G.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S. M.; et al

    2012-05-29

    A detailed simulation-based model of the June 2011 National Ignition Campaign (NIC) cryogenic DT experiments is presented. The model is based on integrated hohlraum-capsule simulations that utilize the best available models for the hohlraum wall, ablator, and DT equations of state and opacities. The calculated radiation drive was adjusted by changing the input laser power to match the experimentally measured shock speeds, shock merger times, peak implosion velocity, and bangtime. The crossbeam energy transfer model was tuned to match the measured time-dependent symmetry. Mid-mode mix was included by directly modeling the ablator and ice surface perturbations up to mode 60.more » Simulated experimental values were extracted from the simulation and compared against the experiment. The model adjustments brought much of the simulated data into closer agreement with the experiment, with the notable exception of the measured yields, which were 15-40% of the calculated yields.« less

  16. NOx/O2 Sensors for High-Temperature Applications | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory NOx/O2 Sensors for High-Temperature Applications Technology available for licensing: Low-cost bifunctional high-temperature NOx/oxygen sensor that provides real-time sensing inside a combustion chamber without the requirement of a reference air supply. Placement in combustion chamber provide accurate oxygen-sensing, extremely low drift 2-10% energy saving from sensor optimization of air-flow ratio and fuel oil viscosity PDF icon high-temp_NOx-O2_sensor

  17. High School Girls Honored for Math, Science Achievements at Sandia National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Now in its 23rd year, the Math and Science Awards program is sponsored by the Sandia Women’s Connection. This year’s event honored more students, with the addition of four high schools in Oakland, Calif., and included recognition of the students by federal and state officials. Teachers from 15 high schools in Livermore, Dublin, Pleasanton, Tracy, Manteca and Oakland nominated high school juniors whom they deemed outstanding in math and science, so the students can include the award on college and scholarship applications.

  18. PPPL to design a high-resolution diagnostic system for the National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NIF, by contrast, is developing a technique called inertial confinement fusion that is quite different. NIF fires 192 high-power lasers at tiny pellets of fuel to compress the ...

  19. design a high-resolution diagnostic system for the National Ignition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NIF, by contrast, is developing a technique called inertial confinement fusion that is quite different. NIF fires 192 high-power lasers at tiny pellets of fuel to compress the ...

  20. Characterization of Alloys with Potential for Application in Cable-in-Conduit Conductors for High-Field Superconducting Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, R.P.; Miller, J.R.; Toplosky, V.J.

    2004-06-28

    Since the introduction of the cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) concept, a variety of alloys have been proposed for fabricating the jacket. The jacket provides primary containment of the supercritical helium coolant and is typically also the primary structural component for the magnet. These functions create requirements for strength, toughness, weldability, and fabricability in tubular form. When the CICC uses Nb3Sn, there are additional requirements to accommodate the manufacturing and heat-treatment processes for the superconductor as well as its strain-sensitive performance during operation. Both of the present favorite jacket alloys, Incoloy 908 and modified (ultra-low carbon) 316LN, have both demonstrated acceptable functionality as well as a few undesirable features. In this paper, we present data from cryogenic mechanical tests on a group of heat-resistant, high-strength superalloys that appear to offer equal or better mechanical performance (e.g. strength, toughness, and modulus) while mitigating the undesirable aspects (e.g. SAGBO in the case of I908 and thermal-expansion mismatch with Nb3Sn in the case of 316LN). Data are presented for each alloy in the as-received and aged conditions. These alloys are presently being considered as candidates for use in the next-generation hybrid magnet for the NHMFL but may also be of interest to the fusion and energy storage communities.

  1. Hydrodynamic Effects on Modeling and Control of a High Temperature Active Magnetic Bearing Pump with a Canned Rotor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melin, Alexander M; Kisner, Roger A; Fugate, David L; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Embedding instrumentation and control Embedding instrumentation and control (I\\&C) at the component level in nuclear power plants can improve component performance, lifetime, and resilience by optimizing operation, reducing the constraints on physical design, and providing on-board prognostics and diagnostics. However, the extreme environments that many nuclear power plant components operate in makes embedding instrumentation and control at the component level difficult. Successfully utilizing embedded I\\&C requires developing a deep understanding of the system's dynamics and using that knowledge to overcome material and physical limitations imposed by the environment. In this paper, we will develop a coupled dynamic model of a high temperature (700 $^\\circ$C) canned rotor pump that incorporates rotordynamics, hydrodynamics, and active magnetic bearing dynamics. Then we will compare two control design methods, one that uses a simplified decoupled model of the system and another that utilizes the full coupled system model. It will be seen that utilizing all the available knowledge of the system dynamics in the controller design yield an order of magnitude improvement in the magnitude of the magnetic bearing response to disturbances at the same level of control effort, a large reduction in the settling time of the system, and a smoother control action.

  2. Characterization of microstructure, texture and magnetic properties in twin-roll casting high silicon non-oriented electrical steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hao-Ze; Liu, Hai-Tao Liu, Zhen-Yu Lu, Hui-Hu; Song, Hong-Yu; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2014-02-15

    An Fe-6.5 wt.% Si-0.3 wt.% Al as-cast sheet was produced by twin-roll strip casting process, then treated with hot rolling, warm rolling and annealing. A detailed study of the microstructure and texture evolution at different processing stages was carried out by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron backscattered diffraction analysis. The initial as-cast strip showed strong columnar grains and pronounced < 001 >//ND texture. The hot rolled and warm rolled sheets were characterized by large amounts of shear bands distributed through the thickness together with strong < 110 >//RD texture and weak < 111 >//ND texture. After annealing, detrimental < 111 >//ND texture almost disappeared while beneficial (001)<210 >, (001)<010 >, (115)<5 − 10 1 > and (410) < 001 > recrystallization textures were formed, thus the magnetic induction of the annealed sheet was significantly improved. The recrystallization texture in the present study could be explained by preferred nucleation and grain growth mechanism. - Highlights: • A high silicon as-cast strip with columnar structure was produced. • A thin warm rolled sheet without large edge cracks was obtained. • Microstructure and texture evolution at each stage were investigated. • Beneficial (001)<210 >, (001)<010 >, (410)<001 > recrystallization textures were formed. • The magnetic induction of annealed sheet was significantly improved.

  3. Western Grid Can Handle High Renewables in Challenging Conditions (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Western Grid Can Handle High Renewables in Challenging Conditions NREL and GE fnd that with good system planning, sound engineering practices, and commercially available technologies, the Western grid can maintain reliability and stability during the crucial frst minute after grid disturbances with high penetrations of wind and solar power. Phase 3 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-3) investigated the dynamic performance of the Western Interconnection in the fractions of a

  4. Magnetic coherence in cuprate superconductors (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; HIGH-TC SUPERCONDUCTORS; LANTHANUM OXIDES; STRONTIUM OXIDES; COPPER OXIDES; COHERENCE LENGTH; NEUTRON DIFFRACTION; MAGNETIZATION; MAGNETIC ...

  5. The National Ignition Facility: The Path to Ignition, High Energy Density Science and Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2011-03-25

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is a Nd:Glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. This world's most energetic laser system is now operational with the goals of achieving thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and exploring the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in the interiors of planetary and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, NIF performed the first integrated ignition experiment which demonstrated the successful coordination of the laser, the cryogenic target system, the array of diagnostics and the infrastructure required for ignition. Many more experiments have been completed since. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and the international communities are examining the implication of achieving ignition on NIF for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a 10% electrical-optical efficiency laser, as well as further advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection and tracking, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in 10- to 15-years. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) baseline design and examining various technology choices for LIFE power plant This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF, the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the start of fundamental science experiments and plans to transition NIF to an international user facility

  6. Work plan for the High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    The High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project (HRFDP), commissioned by the US Department of Energy Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program, is to place four primary high-risk surplus facilities with 28 associated ancillary facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition as rapidly and economically as possible. The facilities will be deactivated and left in a condition suitable for an extended period of minimized surveillance and maintenance (S and M) prior to decontaminating and decommissioning (D and D). These four facilities include two reactor facilities containing spent fuel. One of these reactor facilities also contains 55 tons of sodium with approximately 34 tons containing activated sodium-22, 2.5 tons of lithium hydride, approximately 100 tons of potentially contaminated lead, and several other hazardous materials as well as bulk quantities of contaminated scrap metals. The other two facilities to be transferred include a facility with a bank of hot cells containing high levels of transferable contamination and also a facility containing significant quantities of uranyl nitrate and quantities of transferable contamination. This work plan documents the objectives, technical requirements, and detailed work plans--including preliminary schedules, milestones, and conceptual FY 1996 cost estimates--for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This plan has been developed by the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Energy Systems) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO).

  7. High-energy x-ray microscopy of laser-fusion plasmas at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J.A.; Landen, O.L.; Hammel, B.A.

    1997-08-26

    Multi-keV x-ray microscopy will be an important laser-produced plasma diagnostic at future megajoule facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF).In preparation for the construction of this facility, we have investigated several instrumentation options in detail, and we conclude that near normal incidence single spherical or toroidal crystals may offer the best general solution for high-energy x-raymicroscopy at NIF and at similar large facilities. Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes using multi-layer mirrors may also be good secondary options, particularly if apertures are used to increase the band-width limited field of view.

  8. A facility for X-ray diffraction in magnetic fields up to 25 T and temperatures between 15 and 295 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.; Kovalev, A. E. Suslov, A. V.; Siegrist, T.

    2015-12-15

    A facility for X-ray diffraction has been developed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. It brings diffraction capability to the 25 T Florida split coil magnet and implements temperature control in a range of 15–295 K using a cold finger helium cryostat. This instrument represents an alternative to pulsed magnetic field systems, and it exceeds the static magnetic fields currently available at synchrotron facilities. Magnetic field compatibility of an X-ray source and detectors with the sizable magnetic fringe fields emanating from the magnet constrained the design of the diffractometer.

  9. Process for selecting NEAMS applications for access to Idaho National Laboratory high performance computing resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Pernice

    2010-09-01

    INL has agreed to provide participants in the Nuclear Energy Advanced Mod- eling and Simulation (NEAMS) program with access to its high performance computing (HPC) resources under sponsorship of the Enabling Computational Technologies (ECT) program element. This report documents the process used to select applications and the software stack in place at INL.

  10. Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces for High-Temperature Packaging; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVoto, Douglas

    2015-06-10

    This is a technical review of the DOE VTO EDT project EDT063, Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces for High-Temperature Packaging. A procedure for analyzing the reliability of sintered-silver through experimental thermal cycling and crack propagation modeling has been outlined and results have been presented.

  11. Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping during magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation of bone marrow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waspe, Adam C.; Looi, Thomas; Mougenot, Charles; Amaral, Joao; Temple, Michael; Sivaloganathan, Siv; Drake, James M.

    2012-11-28

    Focal bone tumor treatments include amputation, limb-sparing surgical excision with bone reconstruction, and high-dose external-beam radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is an effective non-invasive thermotherapy for palliative management of bone metastases pain. MR thermometry (MRT) measures the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) of water molecules and produces accurate (<1 Degree-Sign C) and dynamic (<5s) thermal maps in soft tissues. PRFS-MRT is ineffective in fatty tissues such as yellow bone marrow and, since accurate temperature measurements are required in the bone to ensure adequate thermal dose, MR-HIFU is not indicated for primary bone tumor treatments. Magnetic relaxation times are sensitive to lipid temperature and we hypothesize that bone marrow temperature can be determined accurately by measuring changes in T{sub 2}, since T{sub 2} increases linearly in fat during heating. T{sub 2}-mapping using dual echo times during a dynamic turbo spin-echo pulse sequence enabled rapid measurement of T{sub 2}. Calibration of T{sub 2}-based thermal maps involved heating the marrow in a bovine femur and simultaneously measuring T{sub 2} and temperature with a thermocouple. A positive T{sub 2} temperature dependence in bone marrow of 20 ms/ Degree-Sign C was observed. Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping should enable accurate temperature monitoring during MR-HIFU treatment of bone marrow and shows promise for improving the safety and reducing the invasiveness of pediatric bone tumor treatments.

  12. Partial Spin Ordering and Complex Magnetic Structure in BaYFeO4: A Neutron Diffraction and High Temperature Susceptibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Corey; Greedan, John; Garlea, Vasile O; Flacau, Roxana; Tan, Malinda; Derakhshan, Shahab

    2014-01-01

    The novel iron-based compound, BaYFeO4, crystallizes in the Pnma space group with two distinct Fe3+ sites, that are alternately corner-shared [FeO5]7 square pyramids and [FeO6]9 octahedra, forming into [Fe4O18]24 rings, which propagate as columns along the b-axis. A recent report shows two discernible antiferromagnetic (AFM) transitions at 36 and 48 K in the susceptibility, yet heat capacity measurements reveal no magnetic phase transitions at these temperatures. An upturn in the magnetic susceptibility measurements up to 400 K suggests the presence of shortrange magnetic behavior at higher temperatures. In this Article, variable-temperature neutron powder diffraction and hightemperature magnetic susceptibility measurements were performed to clarify the magnetic behavior. Neutron powder diffraction confirmed that the two magnetic transitions observed at 36 and 48 K are due to long-range magnetic order. Below 48 K, the magnetic structure was determined as a spin-density wave (SDW) with a propagation vector, k = (0, 0, 1/3), and the moments along the b-axis, whereas the structure becomes an incommensurate cycloid [k = (0, 0, 0.35)] below 36 K with the moments within the bc-plane. However, for both cases the ordered moments on Fe3+ are only of the order 3.0 B, smaller than the expected values near 4.5 B, indicating that significant components of the Fe moments remain paramagnetic to the lowest temperature studied, 6 K. Moreover, new high-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed a peak maximum at 550 K indicative of short-range spin correlations. It is postulated that most of the magnetic entropy is thus removed at high temperatures which could explain the absence of heat capacity anomalies at the long-range ordering temperatures. Published spin dimer calculations, which appear to suggest a k = (0, 0, 0) magnetic structure, and allow for neither low dimensionality nor geometric frustration, are inadequate to explain the observed complex magnetic

  13. A high-resolution field-emission-gun, scanning electron microscope investigation of anisotropic hydrogen decrepitation in Nd-Fe-B-based sintered magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soderznik, Marko; McGuiness, Paul; Zuzek-Rozman, Kristina; Kobe, Spomenka; Skulj, Irena; Yan Gaolin

    2010-05-15

    In this investigation commercial magnets based on (Nd,Dy){sub 14}(Fe,Co){sub 79}B{sub 7} were prepared by a conventional powder-metallurgy route with a degree of alignment equal to {approx}90% and then exposed to hydrogen at a pressure of 1 bar. The magnets, in the form of cylinders, were observed to decrepitate exclusively from the ends. High-resolution electron microscopy was able to identify the presence of crack formation within the Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B grains, with the cracks running parallel to the c axis of these grains. Based on the concentration profile for hydrogen in a rare-earth transition-metal material, it is clear that the presence of hydrogen-induced cracks running perpendicular to the ends of the magnet provides for a much more rapidly progressing hydrogen front in this direction than from the sides of the magnet. This results in the magnet exhibiting a macroscopic tendency to decrepitate from the poles of the magnet toward the center. This combination of microstructural modification via particle alignment as part of the sintering process and direct observation via high-resolution electron microscopy has led to a satisfying explanation for the anisotropic hydrogen-decrepitation effect.

  14. The High Temperature Materials Laboratory: A research and user facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    HTML is a modern facility for high-temperature ceramic research; it is also a major user facility, providing industry and university communities access to special research equipment for studying microstructure and microchemistry of materials. User research equipment is divided among six User Centers: Materials Analysis, X-ray Diffraction, Physical Properties, Mechanical Properties, Ceramic Specimen Preparation, and Residual Stress. This brochure provides brief descriptions of each of the major research instruments in the User Centers: scanning Auger microprobe, field emission SEMs, electron microprobe, multitechnique surface analyzer, analytical electron microscope, HRTEM, optical microscopy image analysis, goniometer, scanning calorimetry, simultaneous thermal analysis, thermal properties (expansion, diffusivity, conductivity), high-temperature tensile test facilities, flexure, electromechanical test facilities (flexure, compression creep, environmental), microhardness microprobe, ceramic machining. Hands-on operation by qualified users is encouraged; staff is available. Both proprietary and nonproprietary research may be performed; the former on full cost recovery basis.

  15. The High Temperature Materials Laboratory: A research and user facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    HTML is a modern facility for high-temperature ceramic research; it is also a major user facility, providing industry and university communities access to special research equipment for studying microstructure and microchemistry of materials. User research equipment is divided among six User Centers: Materials Analysis, X-ray Diffraction, Physical Properties, Mechanical Properties, Ceramic Specimen Preparation, and Residual Stress. This brochure provides brief descriptions of each of the major research instruments in the User Centers: scanning Auger microprobe, field emission SEMs, electron microprobe, multitechnique surface analyzer, analytical electron microscope, HRTEM, optical microscopy & image analysis, goniometer, scanning calorimetry, simultaneous thermal analysis, thermal properties (expansion, diffusivity, conductivity), high-temperature tensile test facilities, flexure, electromechanical test facilities (flexure, compression creep, environmental), microhardness microprobe, ceramic machining. Hands-on operation by qualified users is encouraged; staff is available. Both proprietary and nonproprietary research may be performed; the former on full cost recovery basis.

  16. Preliminary Physics Motivation and Engineering Design Assessment of the National High Power Torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert D. Woolley

    2009-06-11

    In April 2006, Dr. Ray Orbach, Director of the DOE Office of Science, challenged the fusion community to "propose a new facility... which will put the U.S. at the lead in world fusion science." Analysis of the gaps between expected ITER performance and the requirements of a demonstration power plant (Demo) pointed to the critical and urgent need to develop fusion-relvant plasma-material interface (PMI) solutions consistent with sustained high plasma performance. A survey of world fusion program indicated that present and planned experimental devices do not advance the PMI issue beyond ITER, and a major dedicated experimental facility is warranted. Such a facility should provide the flexibility and access needed to solve plasma boundary challenges related to divertor heat flux and particle exhaust while also developing methods to minimize hydrogenic isotope retention and remaining compatible with high plasma performance.

  17. Axel Hoffmann | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Axel Hoffmann Senior Group Leader, Magnetic Films & Senior Materials Scientist Dr. Axel Hoffmann is currently the Group Leader of the Magnetic Films Group within the Materials Science Division of the Argonne National Laboratory, which he joined in 2001 as a staff member. His research interests encompass a variety of magnetism related subjects, including basic properties of magnetic heterostructures, spin-transport and magnetization dynamics in novel geometries, and biomedical applications of

  18. National survey of crystalline rocks and recommendations of regions to be explored for high-level radioactive waste repository sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smedes, H.W.

    1983-04-01

    A reconnaissance of the geological literature on large regions of exposed crystalline rocks in the United States provides the basis for evaluating if any of those regions warrant further exploration toward identifying potential sites for development of a high-level radioactive waste repository. The reconnaissance does not serve as a detailed evaluation of regions or of any smaller subunits within the regions. Site performance criteria were selected and applied insofar as a national data base exists, and guidelines were adopted that relate the data to those criteria. The criteria include consideration of size, vertical movements, faulting, earthquakes, seismically induced ground motion, Quaternary volcanic rocks, mineral deposits, high-temperature convective ground-water systems, hydraulic gradients, and erosion. Brief summaries of each major region of exposed crystalline rock, and national maps of relevant data provided the means for applying the guidelines and for recommending regions for further study. It is concluded that there is a reasonable likelihood that geologically suitable repository sites exist in each of the major regions of crystalline rocks. The recommendation is made that further studies first be conducted of the Lake Superior, Northern Appalachian and Adirondack, and the Southern Appalachian Regions. It is believed that those regions could be explored more effectively and suitable sites probably could be found, characterized, verified, and licensed more readily there than in the other regions.

  19. Magnetic Microcalorimeter Gamma Detectors for High-Precision Non-Destructive Analysis, FY14 Extended Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrich, S.

    2015-02-06

    Cryogenic gamma (γ) detectors with operating temperatures of ~0.1 K or below offer 10× better energy resolution than conventional high-purity germanium detectors that are currently used for non-destructive analysis (NDA) of nuclear materials. This can greatly increase the accuracy of NDA, especially at low-energies where gamma rays often have similar energies and cannot be resolved by Ge detectors. We are developing cryogenic γ–detectors based on metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs), which have the potential of higher resolution, faster count rates and better linearity than other cryogenic detector technologies. High linearity is essential to add spectra from different pixels in detector arrays that are needed for high sensitivity. Here we discuss the fabrication of a new generation of MMC γ–detectors in FY2014, and the resulting improvements in energy resolution and linearity of the new design. As an example of the type of NDA that cryogenic detectors enable, we demonstrate the direct detection of Pu-242 emissions with our MMC γ–detectors in the presence of Pu-240, and show that a quantitative NDA analysis agrees with the mass spectrometry

  20. A BEAMLINE FOR HIGH PRESSURE STUDIES AT THE ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE WITH A SUPERCONDUCTING BENDING MAGNET AS THE SOURCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunz, M; MacDowell, A A; Caldwell, W A; Cambie, D; Celestre, R S; Domning, E E; Duarte, R M; Gleason, A; Glossinger, J; Kelez, N; Plate, D W; Yu, T; Zaug, J M; Padmore, H A; Jeanloz, R; Alivisatos, A P; Clark, S M

    2005-04-19

    A new facility for high-pressure diffraction and spectroscopy using diamond anvil high-pressure cells has been built at the Advanced Light Source on Beamline 12.2.2. This beamline benefits from the hard X-radiation generated by a 6 Tesla superconducting bending magnet (superbend). Useful x-ray flux is available between 5 keV and 35 keV. The radiation is transferred from the superbend to the experimental enclosure by the brightness preserving optics of the beamline. These optics are comprised of: a plane parabola collimating mirror (M1), followed by a Kohzu monochromator vessel with a Si(111) crystals (E/{Delta}E {approx} 7000) and a W/B{sub 4}C multilayer (E/{Delta}E {approx} 100), and then a toroidal focusing mirror (M2) with variable focusing distance. The experimental enclosure contains an automated beam positioning system, a set of slits, ion chambers, the sample positioning goniometry and area detectors (CCD or image-plate detector). Future developments aim at the installation of a second end station dedicated for in situ laser-heating on one hand and a dedicated high-pressure single-crystal station, applying both monochromatic as well as polychromatic techniques.

  1. A Beamline for High-Pressure Studies at the Advanced Light Sourcewith a Superconducting Bending Magnet as the Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunz, Martin; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Caldwell, Wendel A.; Cambie, Daniella; Celestre, Richard S.; Domning, Edward E.; Duarte,Robert M.; Gleason, Arianna E.; Glossinger, James M.; Kelez, Nicholas; Plate, David W.; Yu, Tony; Zaug, Joeseph M.; Padmore, Howard A.; Jeanloz,Raymond; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Clark, Simon M.

    2005-06-30

    A new facility for high-pressure diffraction and spectroscopy using diamond anvil high-pressure cells has been built at the Advanced Light Source on Beamline 12.2.2. This beamline benefits from the hard X-radiation generated by a 6 Tesla superconducting bending magnet (superbend). Useful x-ray flux is available between 5 keV and 35 keV. The radiation is transferred from the superbend to the experimental enclosure by the brightness preserving optics of the beamline. These optics are comprised of: a plane parabola collimating mirror (M1), followed by a Kohzu monochromator vessel with a Si(111) crystals (E/DE {approx}7000) and a W/B4C multilayers (E/DE {approx} 100), and then a toroidal focusing mirror (M2) with variable focusing distance. The experimental enclosure contains an automated beam positioning system, a set of slits, ion chambers, the sample positioning goniometry and area detectors (CCD or image-plate detector). Future developments aim at the installation of a second end station dedicated for in situ laser-heating on one hand and a dedicated high-pressure single-crystal station, applying both monochromatic as well as polychromatic techniques.

  2. Magnetic frustration in the three-band Anderson lattice model for high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ihle, D.; Kasner, M. )

    1990-09-01

    The three-band Anderson lattice model for the CuO{sub 2} planes in high-{Tc} superconductors is established. Treating this model by perturbation theory, the effective spin interactions are derived. The antiferromagnetic superexchange integrals are calculated as functions of the direct oxygen transfer and the hole concentration. It is found that frustration in the superexchange occurs, even in the undoped case, which increases with oxygen trnasfer and decreases with hole concentration.

  3. Neutron scattering at the high flux isotope reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yethiraj, M.; Fernandez-Baca, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    Since its beginnings in Oak Ridge and Argonne in the late 1940`s, neutron scattering has been established as the premier tool to study matter in its various states. Since the thermal neutron wavelength is of the same order of magnitude as typical atomic spacings and because they have comparable energies to those of atomic excitations in solids, both structure and dynamics of matter can be studied via neutron scattering. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) provides an intense source of neutrons with which to carry out these measurements. This paper summarizes the available neutron scattering facilities at the HFIR.

  4. Leadership development study :success profile competencies and high-performing leaders at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, Katherine M.; Mulligan, Deborah Rae; Szenasi, Gail L.; Crowder, Stephen Vernon

    2005-04-01

    Sandia is undergoing tremendous change. Sandia's executive management recognized the need for leadership development. About ten years ago the Business, Leadership, and Management Development department in partnership with executive management developed and implemented the organizational leadership Success Profile Competencies to help address some of the changes on the horizon such as workforce losses and lack of a skill set in the area of interpersonal skills. This study addresses the need for the Business, Leadership, and Management Development department to provide statistically sound data in two areas. One is to demonstrate that the organizational 360-degree success profile assessment tool has made a difference for leaders. A second area is to demonstrate the presence of high performing leaders at the Labs. The study utilized two tools to address these two areas. Study participants were made up of individuals who have solid data on Sandia's 360-degree success profile assessment tool. The second assessment tool was comprised of those leaders who participated in the Lockheed Martin Corporation Employee Preferences Survey. Statistical data supports the connection between leader indicators and the 360-degree assessment tool. The study also indicates the presence of high performing leaders at Sandia.

  5. Studies of Nb3Sn Strands Based on the Restacked-Rod Process for High-Field Accelerator Magnets Nb3Sn

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barzi, E; Bossert, M; Gallo, G; Lombardo, V; Turrioni, D; Yamada, R; Zlobin, A V

    2012-06-01

    A major thrust in Fermilab's accelerator magnet R&D program is the development of Nb3Sn wires which meet target requirements for high field magnets, such as high critical current density, low effective filament size, and the capability to withstand the cabling process. The performance of a number of strands with 150/169 restack design produced by Oxford Superconducting Technology was studied for round and deformed wires. To optimize the maximum plastic strain, finite element modeling was also used as an aid in the design. Results of mechanical, transport and metallographic analyses are presented for round and deformed wires.

  6. Ablation of high-Z material dust grains in edge plasmas of magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marenkov, E. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-12-15

    The model, including shielding effects of high-Z dust grain ablation in tokamak edge plasma, is presented. In a contrast to shielding models developed for pellets ablation in a hot plasma core, this model deals with the dust grain ablation in relatively cold edge plasma. Using some simplifications, a closed set of equations determining the grain ablation rate Γ is derived and analyzed both analytically and numerically. The scaling law for Γ versus grain radius and ambient plasma parameters is obtained and confirmed by the results of numerical solutions. The results obtained are compared with both dust grain models containing no shielding effects and the pellet ablation models.

  7. Bottom-Up Cost Analysis of a High Concentration PV Module; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horowitz, K.; Woodhouse, M.; Lee, H.; Smestad, G.

    2015-04-13

    We present a bottom-up model of III-V multi-junction cells, as well as a high concentration PV (HCPV) module. We calculate $0.65/Wp(DC) manufacturing costs for our model HCPV module design with today’s capabilities, and find that reducing cell costs and increasing module efficiency offer the promising pathways for future cost reductions. Cell costs could be significantly reduced via an increase in manufacturing scale, substrate reuse, and improved manufacturing yields. We also identify several other significant drivers of HCPV module costs, including the Fresnel lens primary optic, module housing, thermal management, and the receiver board. These costs could potentially be lowered by employing innovative module designs.

  8. Propagation and neutrino oscillations in the base of a highly magnetized gamma-ray burst fireball flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraija, N. [Instituto de Astronoma, Universidad Nacional Autnoma de Mxico, Circuito Exterior, C.U., A. Postal 70-264, 04510 Mxico D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-06-01

    Neutrons play an important role in the dynamics of gamma-ray bursts. The presence of neutrons in the baryon-loaded fireball is expected. If the neutron abundance is comparable to that of protons, important features may be observed, such as quasi-thermal multi-GeV neutrinos in coincidence with a subphotospheric ?-ray emission, nucleosynthesis at later times, and rebrightening of the afterglow emission. Additionally, thermal MeV neutrinos are created by electron-positron annihilation, electron (positron) capture on protons (neutrons), and nucleonic bremsstrahlung. Although MeV neutrinos are difficult to detect, quasi-thermal GeV neutrinos are expected in cubic kilometer detectors and/or DeepCore and IceCube. In this paper, we show that neutrino oscillations have outstanding implications for the dynamics of the fireball evolution and also that they can be detected through their flavor ratio on Earth. For that, we derive the resonance and charged-neutrality conditions as well as the neutrino self-energy and effective potential up to the order of m{sub W}{sup ?4} at strong, moderate, and weak magnetic field approximations to constrain the dynamics of the fireball. We found important implications: (1) resonant oscillations are suppressed for high baryon densities as well as neutron abundance larger than that of protons, and (2) the effect of magnetic field is to decrease the proton-to-neutron ratio aside from the number of multi-GeV neutrinos expected in the DeepCore detector. Also, we estimate the GeV neutrino flavor ratios along the jet and on Earth.

  9. High-density carbon ablator experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacKinnon, A. J. Meezan, N. B.; Ross, J. S.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Divol, L.; Ho, D.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J.; Döppner, T.; Patel, P. K.; Thomas, C.; Tommasini, R.; Haan, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J.; Caggiano, J.; Hatarik, R.; Bionta, R.; and others

    2014-05-15

    High Density Carbon (HDC) is a leading candidate as an ablator material for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules in x-ray (indirect) drive implosions. HDC has a higher density (3.5 g/cc) than plastic (CH, 1 g/cc), which results in a thinner ablator with a larger inner radius for a given capsule scale. This leads to higher x-ray absorption and shorter laser pulses compared to equivalent CH designs. This paper will describe a series of experiments carried out to examine the feasibility of using HDC as an ablator using both gas filled hohlraums and lower density, near vacuum hohlraums. These experiments have shown that deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium gas filled HDC capsules driven by a hohlraum filled with 1.2 mg/cc He gas, produce neutron yields a factor of 2× higher than equivalent CH implosions, representing better than 50% Yield-over-Clean (YoC). In a near vacuum hohlraum (He = 0.03 mg/cc) with 98% laser-to-hohlraum coupling, such a DD gas-filled capsule performed near 1D expectations. A cryogenic layered implosion version was consistent with a fuel velocity = 410 ± 20 km/s with no observed ablator mixing into the hot spot.

  10. High-density carbon ablator experiments on the National Ignition Facilitya)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Ross, J. S.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Divol, L.; Ho, D.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J.; Döppner, T.; Patel, P. K.; Thomas, C.; Tommasini, R.; Haan, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J.; Caggiano, J.; Hatarik, R.; Bionta, R.; Ma, T.; Spears, B.; Rygg, J. R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Dewald, E. L.; Fittinghoff, D.; Jones, O. S.; Robey, H. R.; Moody, J. D.; Khan, S.; Callahan, D. A.; Hamza, A.; Biener, J.; Celliers, P. M.; Braun, D. G.; Erskine, D. J.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Wallace, R. J.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Sater, J.; Collins, G.; Storm, E.; Hsing, W.; Landen, O.; Atherton, J. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Edwards, M. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Rinderknecht, H.; Rosenberg, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Zylstra, A.; Knauer, J. P.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F.; Olson, R.; Kyrala, G. A.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.; Moreno, K.; Hoover, D. E.; Wild, C.; Werner, E.

    2014-05-01

    High Density Carbon (HDC) is a leading candidate as an ablator material for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules in x-ray (indirect) drive implosions. HDC has a higher density (3.5 g/cc) than plastic (CH, 1 g/cc), which results in a thinner ablator with a larger inner radius for a given capsule scale. This leads to higher x-ray absorption and shorter laser pulses compared to equivalent CH designs. This paper will describe a series of experiments carried out to examine the feasibility of using HDC as an ablator using both gas filled hohlraums and lower density, near vacuum hohlraums. These experiments have shown that deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium gas filled HDC capsules driven by a hohlraum filled with 1.2 mg/cc He gas, produce neutron yields a factor of 2× higher than equivalent CH implosions, representing better than 50% Yield-over-Clean (YoC). In a near vacuum hohlraum (He = 0.03 mg/cc) with 98% laser-to-hohlraum coupling, such a DD gas-filled capsule performed near 1D expectations. A cryogenic layered implosion version was consistent with a fuel velocity = 410 ± 20 km/s with no observed ablator mixing into the hot spot.

  11. The effect of external magnetic field on the bremsstrahlung nonlinear absorption mechanism in the interaction of high intensity short laser pulse with collisional underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedaghat, M.; Ettehadi-Abari, M.; Shokri, B. Ghorbanalilu, M.

    2015-03-15

    Laser absorption in the interaction between ultra-intense femtosecond laser and solid density plasma is studied theoretically here in the intensity range I?{sup 2}?10{sup 14}?10{sup 16}Wcm{sup ?2}?m{sup 2}. The collisional effect is found to be significant when the incident laser intensity is less than 10{sup 16}Wcm{sup ?2}?m{sup 2}. In the current work, the propagation of a high frequency electromagnetic wave, for underdense collisional plasma in the presence of an external magnetic field is investigated. It is shown that, by considering the effect of the ponderomotive force in collisional magnetized plasmas, the increase of laser pulse intensity leads to steepening of the electron density profile and the electron bunches of plasma makes narrower. Moreover, it is found that the wavelength of electric and magnetic fields oscillations increases by increasing the external magnetic field and the density distribution of electrons also grows in comparison with the unmagnetized collisional plasma. Furthermore, the spatial damping rate of laser energy and the nonlinear bremsstrahlung absorption coefficient are obtained in the collisional regime of magnetized plasma. The other remarkable result is that by increasing the external magnetic field in this case, the absorption coefficient increases strongly.

  12. New 30 kA power system at Fermilab and its use for measuring the effects of ripple current on the performance of superconducting high field magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Garvey, J.; Jaskierny, W.; Lamm, M.; Makulski, A.; Orris, D.F.; Pfeffer, H.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; Wolff, D.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    A new 30 kA, 30 V dc Power System was designed, built, and commissioned at Fermilab for testing Superconducting High Field Magnets. This system has been successfully supporting operations at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility since April 2002. It is based on six commercial 150 kW Power Energy Industries power supply modules and the following in-house modules: six 720 Hz filters, two 15 kA/1kV dc solid-state dump switch, and a 3 MJ/30 kA/1 kV dc dump resistor. Additional inhouse electronic components were designed and built to provide precise current regulation and distribution of current and current rate of change. An industrial-type Programmable Logic Controller system was used to provide equipment interlocks and monitoring. This paper summarizes studies on the influence of characteristics of this new power system--such as ripple current--on the performance of High Field Superconducting magnets.

  13. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Döppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. P.; Dewald, E. L.; et al

    2015-07-28

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a “highfoot” laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shapemore » closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.« less

  14. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Döppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. P.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Haan, S.; Kritcher, A. L.; MacPhee, A.; Le Pape, S.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Springer, P. T.; Salmonson, J. D.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Church, J.; Dixit, S.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Hatarik, R.; Havre, M.; Herrmann, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J.; Moore, A. S.; Nikroo, A.; Ralph, J. E.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Streckert, H.; Town, R.; Turnbull, D.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-07-28

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a “highfoot” laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.

  15. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. P.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Haan, S.; Kritcher, A. L.; MacPhee, A.; Le Pape, S.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Springer, P. T.; Salmonson, J. D.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Church, J.; Dixit, S.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Hatarik, R.; Havre, M.; Herrmann, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J.; Moore, A. S.; Nikroo, A.; Ralph, J. E.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Streckert, H.; Town, R.; Turnbull, D.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-07-28

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a highfoot laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.

  16. Current-carrying element based on second-generation high-temperature superconductor for the magnet system of a fusion neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novikov, M. S. Ivanov, D. P. E-mail: denis.ivanov30@mail.ru; Novikov, S. I. Shuvaev, S. A. E-mail: sergey.shuvaev@phystech.edu

    2015-12-15

    Application of current-carrying elements (CCEs) made of second-generation high-temperature superconductor (2G HTS) in magnet systems of a fusion neutron source (FNS) and other fusion devices will allow their magnetic field and thermodynamic stability to be increased substantially in comparison with those of low-temperature superconductor (LTS) magnets. For a toroidal magnet of the FNS, a design of a helical (partially transposed) CCE made of 2G HTS is under development with forced-flow cooling by helium gas, a current of 20–30 kA, an operating temperature of 10–20 K, and a magnetic field on the winding of 12–15 T (prospectively ∼20 T). Short-sized samples of the helical flexible heavy-current CCE are being fabricated and investigated; a pilot-line unit for production of long-sized CCE pieces is under construction. The applied fabrication technique allows the CCE to be produced which combines a high operating current, thermal and mechanical stability, manufacturability, and low losses in the alternating modes. The possibility of fabricating the CCE with the outer dimensions and values of the operating parameter required for the FNS (and with a significant margin) using already available serial 2G HTS tapes is substantiated. The maximum field of toroidal magnets with CCEs made of 2G HTS will be limited only by mechanical properties of the magnet’s casing and structure, while the thermal stability will be approximately two orders of magnitude higher than that of toroidal magnets with LTS-based CCEs. The helical CCE made of 2G HTS is very promising for fusion and hybrid electric power plants, and its design and technologies of production, as well as the prototype coils made of it for the FNS and other tokamaks, are worth developing now.

  17. Multi-wavelength high-resolution observations of a small-scale emerging magnetic flux event and the chromospheric and coronal response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargas Domínguez, Santiago; Kosovichev, Alexander; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2014-10-20

    State-of-the-art solar instrumentation is now revealing magnetic activity of the Sun with unprecedented temporal and spatial resolutions. Observations with the 1.6 m aperture New Solar Telescope (NST) of the Big Bear Solar Observatory are making next steps in our understanding of the solar surface structure. Granular-scale magnetic flux emergence and the response of the solar atmosphere are among the key research topics of high-resolution solar physics. As part of a joint observing program with NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission on 2013 August 7, the NST observed active region NOAA 11,810 in the photospheric TiO 7057 Å band with a resolution of pixel size of 0.''034 and chromospheric He I 10830 Å and Hα 6563 Å wavelengths. Complementary data are provided by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Hinode space-based telescopes. The region displayed a group of solar pores, in the vicinity of which we detect a small-scale buoyant horizontal magnetic flux tube causing granular alignments and interacting with the preexisting ambient field in the upper atmospheric layers. Following the expansion of distorted granules at the emergence site, we observed a sudden appearance of an extended surge in the He I 10830 Å data (bandpass of 0.05 Å). The IRIS transition region imaging caught ejection of a hot plasma jet associated with the He I surge. The SDO/HMI data used to study the evolution of the magnetic and Doppler velocity fields reveal emerging magnetic loop-like structures. Hinode/Ca II H and IRIS filtergrams detail the connectivities of the newly emerged magnetic field in the lower solar chromosphere. From these data, we find that the orientation of the emerging magnetic field lines from a twisted flux tube formed an angle of ∼45° with the overlying ambient field. Nevertheless, the interaction of emerging magnetic field lines with the pre-existing overlying field generates high-temperature emission regions and boosts the surge

  18. Spin-lattice coupling in uranium dioxide probed by magnetostriction measurements at high magnetic fields (P08358-E001-PF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gofryk, K.; Jaime, M.

    2014-12-01

    Our preliminary magnetostriction measurements have already shown a strong interplay of lattice dynamic and magnetism in both antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic states, and give unambiguous evidence of strong spin- phonon coupling in uranium dioxide. Further studies are planned to address the puzzling behavior of UO2 in magnetic and paramagnetic states and details of the spin-phonon coupling.

  19. On the Fielding of a High Gain, Shock-Ignited Target on the National Ignitiion Facility in the Near Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, L J; Betti, R; Schurtz, G P; Craxton, R S; Dunne, A M; LaFortune, K N; Schmitt, A J; McKenty, P W; Bailey, D S; Lambert, M A; Ribeyre, X; Theobald, W R; Strozzi, D J; Harding, D R; Casner, A; Atzemi, S; Erbert, G V; Andersen, K S; Murakami, M; Comley, A J; Cook, R C; Stephens, R B

    2010-04-12

    Shock ignition, a new concept for igniting thermonuclear fuel, offers the possibility for a near-term ({approx}3-4 years) test of high gain inertial confinement fusion on the National Ignition Facility at less than 1MJ drive energy and without the need for new laser hardware. In shock ignition, compressed fusion fuel is separately ignited by a strong spherically converging shock and, because capsule implosion velocities are significantly lower than those required for conventional hotpot ignition, fusion energy gains of {approx}60 may be achievable on NIF at laser drive energies around {approx}0.5MJ. Because of the simple all-DT target design, its in-flight robustness, the potential need for only 1D SSD beam smoothing, minimal early time LPI preheat, and use of present (indirect drive) laser hardware, this target may be easier to field on NIF than a conventional (polar) direct drive hotspot ignition target. Like fast ignition, shock ignition has the potential for high fusion yields at low drive energy, but requires only a single laser with less demanding timing and spatial focusing requirements. Of course, conventional symmetry and stability constraints still apply. In this paper we present initial target performance simulations, delineate the critical issues and describe the immediate-term R&D program that must be performed in order to test the potential of a high gain shock ignition target on NIF in the near term.

  20. Magnetic liquefier for hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-12-31

    This document summarizes work done at the Astronautics Technology Center of the Astronautics Corporation of America (ACA) in Phase 1 of a four phase program leading to the development of a magnetic liquefier for hydrogen. The project involves the design, fabrication, installation, and operation of a hydrogen liquefier providing significantly reduced capital and operating costs, compared to present liquefiers. To achieve this goal, magnetic refrigeration, a recently developed, highly efficient refrigeration technology, will be used for the liquefaction process. Phase 1 project tasks included liquefier conceptual design and analysis, preliminary design of promising configurations, design selection, and detailed design of the selected design. Fabrication drawings and vendor specifications for the selected design were completed during detailed design. The design of a subscale, demonstration magnetic hydrogen liquefier represents a significant advance in liquefaction technology. The cost reductions that can be realized in hydrogen liquefaction in both the subscale and, more importantly, in the full-scale device are expected to have considerable impact on the use of liquid hydrogen in transportation, chemical, and electronic industries. The benefits to the nation from this technological advance will continue to have importance well into the 21st century.

  1. World Record Magnetic Field 100T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, Ross; Mielke, Chuck; Rickel, Dwight

    2012-03-22

    Scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory campus of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory have successfully produced the world's first 100 Tesla non-destructive magnetic field. The achievement was decades in the making, involving a diverse team of scientists and engineers. The 100 Tesla mark was reached at approximately 3:30 p.m. on March 22, 2012. A note about the sound you'll hear when the magnet is energized: The sound that the 100 T multi-shot magnet makes is due to the electrical current modulation from the 3 phase power converters (known as 12 pulse converters) and the harmonics associated with the chopping of the sinusoidal input power. The magnet vibrates at the electrical current frequencies multiplied by 12 (i.e. ~ 55 Hz x 12 = 660 Hz) hence making an audible sound. The generator is not run at full speed (1650 RPM instead of 1800 RPM) so the frequency is slightly lower than US Line frequency (i.e. 55 Hz instead of 60 Hz). A spectrograph of the sound from the magnet pulse shows the multiple harmonics as reddish horizontal bands as a function of time.

  2. Cryostat design and analysis of the superconducting magnets for Jefferson Lab's 11-GEV/C super high momentum spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Brindza, E. Sun, S. Lassiter, M. Fowler

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design and analysis of the cryostats for the two cos(2theta) quadrupoles and the cos(theta) dipole. All the magnets are currently being bid for commercial fabrication. The results of finite element analysis for the magnet cryostat helium vessels and outer vacuum chambers which investigate the mechanical integrity under maximum allowable internal working pressure, maximum allowable external working pressure, and cryogenic temperature are discussed. The allowable stress criterion is determined based on the allowable stress philosophy of the ASME codes. The computed cryogenic heat load of the magnets is compared with the allowable cryogenic consumption budget. The presented cool-down time of the magnets was studied under the conditions of a limited supply rate and a controlled temperature differential of 50 K in the magnets.

  3. FIRST 100 T NON-DESTRUCTIVE MAGNET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. R. SIMS; ET AL

    1999-10-01

    The first 100 T non-destructive (100 T ND) magnet and power supplies as currently designed are described. This magnet will be installed as part of the user facility research equipment at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 100 T ND magnet will provide a 100 T pulsed field of 5 ms duration (above 90% of full field) in a 15 mm diameter bore once per hour. Magnet operation will be non-destructive. The magnet will consist of a controlled power outer coil set which produces a 47 T platform field in a 225 mm diameter bore. Located within the outer coil set will be a 220 mm outer diameter capacitor powered insert coil. Using inertial energy storage a synchronous motor/generator will provide ac power to a set of seven ac-dc converters rated at 64 MW/80 MVA each. These converters will energize three independent coil circuits to create 170 MJ of field energy in the outer coil set at the platform field of 47 T. The insert will then be energized to produce the balance of the 100 T peak field using a 2.3 MJ, 18 kV (charged to 15 kV), 14.4 mF capacitor bank controlled with solid-state switches. The magnet will be the first of its kind and the first non-destructive, reusable 100 T pulsed magnet. The operation of the magnet will be described along with special features of its design and construction.

  4. Perpendicular spin transfer torque magnetic random access memories with high spin torque efficiency and thermal stability for embedded applications (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Luc Jan, Guenole; Zhu, Jian; Liu, Huanlong; Lee, Yuan-Jen; Le, Son; Tong, Ru-Ying; Pi, Keyu; Wang, Yu-Jen; Shen, Dongna; He, Renren; Haq, Jesmin; Teng, Jeffrey; Lam, Vinh; Huang, Kenlin; Zhong, Tom; Torng, Terry; Wang, Po-Kang

    2014-05-07

    Magnetic random access memories based on the spin transfer torque phenomenon (STT-MRAMs) have become one of the leading candidates for next generation memory applications. Among the many attractive features of this technology are its potential for high speed and endurance, read signal margin, low power consumption, scalability, and non-volatility. In this paper, we discuss our recent results on perpendicular STT-MRAM stack designs that show STT efficiency higher than 5?k{sub B}T/?A, energy barriers higher than 100?k{sub B}T at room temperature for sub-40?nm diameter devices, and tunnel magnetoresistance higher than 150%. We use both single device data and results from 8?Mb array to demonstrate data retention sufficient for automotive applications. Moreover, we also demonstrate for the first time thermal stability up to 400?C exceeding the requirement of Si CMOS back-end processing, thus opening the realm of non-volatile embedded memory to STT-MRAM technology.

  5. Fundamental Scientific Problems in Magnetic Recording

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulthess, T.C.; Miller, M.K.

    2007-06-27

    Magnetic data storage technology is presently leading the high tech industry in advancing device integration--doubling the storage density every 12 months. To continue these advancements and to achieve terra bit per inch squared recording densities, new approaches to store and access data will be needed in about 3-5 years. In this project, collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Center for Materials for Information Technology (MINT) at University of Alabama (UA), Imago Scientific Instruments, and Seagate Technologies, was undertaken to address the fundamental scientific problems confronted by the industry in meeting the upcoming challenges. The areas that were the focus of this study were to: (1) develop atom probe tomography for atomic scale imaging of magnetic heterostructures used in magnetic data storage technology; (2) develop a first principles based tools for the study of exchange bias aimed at finding new anti-ferromagnetic materials to reduce the thickness of the pinning layer in the read head; (3) develop high moment magnetic materials and tools to study magnetic switching in nanostructures aimed at developing improved writers of high anisotropy magnetic storage media.

  6. NREL Particle Receiver Will Enable High-Temperature CSP (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Near-blackbody enclosed particle receiver can support high-temperature thermal energy storage and high- efficiency power cycles. National Renewable Energy Labora- tory (NREL) scientists are designing and developing an innovative high-temper- ature particle receiver and integrated heat-exchanger system to be used in high-efficiency concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. This configuration is addressing the temperature, efficiency, and cost barriers associated with current molten-salt CSP

  7. High-pressure synthesis, crystal structure and magnetic properties of double perovskite oxide Ba{sub 2}CuOsO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Hai L.; Arai, Masao; Matsushita, Yoshitaka; Tsujimoto, Yoshihiro; Yuan, Yahua; Sathish, Clastin I.; He, Jianfeng; Tanaka, Masahiko; Yamaura, Kazunari

    2014-09-15

    A new compositional double perovskite oxide Ba{sub 2}CuOsO{sub 6} was synthesized under high-pressure (6 GPa) and high-temperature (1500 °C) conditions. The polycrystalline Ba{sub 2}CuOsO{sub 6} was characterized by synchrotron X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and magnetic susceptibility, isothermal magnetization, and specific heat measurements. The oxide crystallizes in a double-perovskite structure with an I4/m space group, in which Os(VI) and Cu(II) are ordered in the perovskite B-site. Ba{sub 2}CuOsO{sub 6} is electrically insulating with an activation energy of 0.813(2) eV and shows antiferromagnetic-like characteristics at temperatures of ∼55 K and ∼70 K. The results of the first-principle calculation suggested that the spin–orbit interaction of Os(VI) plays a substantial role in the insulating state. The Jahn–Teller distortion of CuO{sub 6} octahedra influences the magnetic characteristics with regard to possible two-dimensional magnetic correlations. - Graphical abstract: A new compositional double perovskite oxide Ba{sub 2}CuOsO{sub 6} synthesized by a high-pressure (6 GPa) and high-temperature (1500 °C) method. - Highlights: • A new compositional double perovskite oxide Ba{sub 2}CuOsO{sub 6} was synthesized. • Ba{sub 2}CuOsO{sub 6} is electrically insulating and antiferromagnetic below ∼70 K. • The Jahn–Teller distortion of CuO{sub 6} has relevance to possible magnetic anisotropy.

  8. EIS-0074: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive Wastes Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Idaho National Engineering Lab, Idaho

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this statement to analyze the environmental implications of the proposed selection of a strategy for long-term management of the high-level radioactive wastes generated as part of the national defense effort at the Department's Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The project was cancelled after the Draft Environmental Impact Statement was produced.

  9. Magnetic Filtration Process, Magnetic Filtering Material, and Method of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forming Magnetic Filtering Material - Energy Innovation Portal Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Find More Like This Return to Search Magnetic Filtration Process, Magnetic Filtering Material, and Method of Forming Magnetic Filtering Material Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryORNL researchers developed a new method for filtering materials and managing wastewater. This invention offers an integrated, intensified process

  10. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Wednesday, 28 March 2012 00:00 Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the

  11. Combustion of reels of magnetic tapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipska, A.; Priante, S.; Beason, D.; Ford, H.; Stover, S.

    1981-02-06

    The flammability of magnetic tape assemblies used at the National Fusion Energy Computer Center was investigated. Experimental and large-scale tests showed that the magnetic computer tape, reels and cases decompose at fairly low temperatures; do not release detectable amounts of corrosive products at low heating rates; release small amounts of detectable corrosive products at high heating rates; form a wide variety of chemicals upon thermal degradation; ignite readily, produce copious amount of smoke, and are extremely hard to extinguish with water once the assemblies are fully involved. Reignition is probably due to the high heat capacity of the metal oxide in the magnetic tapes. This finding suggests that a re-examination of the NFPA sprinkler standard for computer tapes storage facilities would be in order. 7 figures, 5 tables. (RWR)

  12. Transportation properties of a high-current magnetically insulated transmission line and dynamics of the electrode plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anan'ev, S. S.; Bakshaev, Yu. L.; Bartov, A. V.; Blinov, P. I.; Dan'ko, S. A.; Zhuzhunashvili, A. I.; Kazakov, E. D.; Kalinin, Yu. G.; Kingsep, A. S.; Korolev, V. D.; Mizhiritskii, V. I.; Smirnov, V. P.; Tkachenko, S. I.; Chernenko, A. S.

    2008-07-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies of a section of a magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) with a current density of up to 500 MA/cm{sup 2} and linear current density of up to 7 MA/cm (the parameters close to those in a fast-Z-pinch-driven fusion reactor projected at Sandia Laboratories). The experiments were performed in the S-300 facility (3 MA, 0.15 {Omega}, 100 ns). At high linear current densities, the surface of the ohmically heated MITL electrode can explode and a plasma layer can form near the electrode surface. As a result, the MITL can lose its transmission properties due to the shunting of the vacuum gap by the plasma produced. In this series of experiments, the dynamics of the electrode plasma and the dependence of the transmission properties of the MITL on the material and cleanness of the electrode surface were studied. It is shown experimentally that, when the current with a linear density of up to 7 MA/cm begins to flow along a model MITL, the input and output currents differ by less than 10% over a time interval of up to 230 ns for nickel electrodes and up to 350 ns for a line with a gold central electrode. No effect of the oil film present on the electrode surface on the loss of the transmission properties of the line was observed. It is also shown that electron losses insignificantly contribute to the total current balance. The experimental results are compared with calculations of the electrode explosion and the subsequent expansion of the plasma layer. A conclusion is made that the life-time of the model MITL satisfies the requirements imposed on the transmission lines intended for use in the projected thermonuclear reactor.

  13. Test results of a Nb3Al/Nb3Sn subscale magnet for accelerator application

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Iio, Masami; Xu, Qingjin; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Sasaki, Ken -ichi; Ogitsu, Toru; Yamamoto, Akira; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Tsuchiya, Kiyosumi; Sugano, Michinaka; Enomoto, Shun; et al

    2015-01-28

    The High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) has been developing a Nb3Al and Nb3Sn subscale magnet to establish the technology for a high-field accelerator magnet. The development goals are a feasibility demonstration for a Nb3Al cable and the technology acquisition of magnet fabrication with Nb3Al superconductors. KEK developed two double-pancake racetrack coils with Rutherford-type cables composed of 28 Nb3Al wires processed by rapid heating, quenching, and transformation in collaboration with the National Institute for Materials Science and the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The magnet was fabricated to efficiently generate a high magnetic field in a minimum-gap common-coil configuration with twomore » Nb3Al coils sandwiched between two Nb3Sn coils produced by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. A shell-based structure and a “bladder and key” technique have been used for adjusting coil prestress during both the magnet assembly and the cool down. In the first excitation test of the magnet at 4.5 K performed in June 2014, the highest quench current of the Nb3Sn coil, i.e., 9667 A, was reached at 40 A/s corresponding to 9.0 T in the Nb3Sn coil and 8.2 T in the Nb3Al coil. The quench characteristics of the magnet were studied.« less

  14. National Security Facility (NSF) | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Security Facility (NSF) National Security Facility (NSF) Argonne National Laboratory's National Security Facility (NSF) is a flexible, state-of-the-art secure user facility that contains multiple national security networks, video teleconference capability, high-resolution graphics support, a fully powered and cooled data center, multi-level training facilities, and conferencing facilities. The NSF provides tools and resources to enable and strengthen connections between government

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Novel Manufacturing Technologies for High Power Induction and Permanent Magnet Electric Motors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Novel Manufacturing Technologies for High Power Induction and Permanent Magnet Electric Motors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about novel...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Novel Manufacturing Technologies for High Power Induction and Permanent Magnet Electric Motors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about novel...

  18. Avian community composition in response to high explosive testing operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory in Northern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, David C.; Fresquez, Philip R.; Hansen, Leslie A.; Kaschube, Danielle R.

    2015-12-28

    Breeding bird abundance, species richness, evenness, diversity, composition, productivity, and survivorship were determined near a high-explosive detonation site at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, USA, during pre-operation (1997-1999) and operation (2000-2014) periods. The operation periods consisted of detonations (<23 kg in yield and <3 per breeding season) in open air (2000-2002), within foam containment (2003-2006) and within steel vessel containment (2007-2014) systems; the latter two were employed to reduce noise and dispersal of high-explosives residues. A total of 2952 bird captures, representing 80 species, was recorded during 18 years of mist net operations using the Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship protocol. Individuals captured were identified to species, aged, sexed, and banded during May through August of each year. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in mean avian abundance and species evenness in any of the operation periods as compared with the pre-operation period. Species richness and diversity were significantly higher (p < 0.05) during the vessel containment period (2007-2014) than the pre-operation period. The time period of this study coincided with a wildfire (2000), a bark beetle infestation (2002), and two periods of drought (Nov 1999-Mar 2004 and Dec 2005-Dec 2014) that affected the study area. Furthermore, analysis of aerial photos determined that the average percent canopy cover of mature ponderosa pines (Pinus ponderosa) within 100 feet of mist net sites declined from 12% to 3% between 1991 and 2014 and the percent cover of shrubs slightly increased.

  19. Environmental Assessment for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-03

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has identified a need to improve the management of wastewater resulting from high explosives (HE) research and development work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LANL`s current methods off managing HE-contaminated wastewater cannot ensure that discharged HE wastewater would consistently meet the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE needs to enhance He wastewater management to e able to meet both present and future regulatory standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE also proposes to incorporate major pollution prevention and waste reduction features into LANL`s existing HE production facilities. Currently, wastewater from HE processing buildings at four Technical Areas (TAs) accumulates in sumps where particulate HE settles out and barium is precipitated. Wastewater is then released from the sumps to the environment at 15 permitted outfalls without treatment. The released water may contain suspended and dissolved contaminants, such as HE and solvents. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes two alternatives, the Proposed Action and the Alternative Action, that would meet the purpose and need for agency action. Both alternatives would treat all HE process wastewater using sand filters to remove HE particulates and activated carbon to adsorb organic solvents and dissolved HE. Under either alternative, LANL would burn solvents and flash dried HE particulates and spent carbon following well-established procedures. Burning would produce secondary waste that would be stored, treated, and disposed of at TA-54, Area J. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact and Floodplain Statement of Findings for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility.

  20. Avian community composition in response to high explosive testing operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory in Northern New Mexico

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Keller, David C.; Fresquez, Philip R.; Hansen, Leslie A.; Kaschube, Danielle R.

    2015-12-28

    Breeding bird abundance, species richness, evenness, diversity, composition, productivity, and survivorship were determined near a high-explosive detonation site at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, USA, during pre-operation (1997-1999) and operation (2000-2014) periods. The operation periods consisted of detonations (<23 kg in yield and <3 per breeding season) in open air (2000-2002), within foam containment (2003-2006) and within steel vessel containment (2007-2014) systems; the latter two were employed to reduce noise and dispersal of high-explosives residues. A total of 2952 bird captures, representing 80 species, was recorded during 18 years of mist net operations using the Monitoring Avian Productivity andmore » Survivorship protocol. Individuals captured were identified to species, aged, sexed, and banded during May through August of each year. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in mean avian abundance and species evenness in any of the operation periods as compared with the pre-operation period. Species richness and diversity were significantly higher (p < 0.05) during the vessel containment period (2007-2014) than the pre-operation period. The time period of this study coincided with a wildfire (2000), a bark beetle infestation (2002), and two periods of drought (Nov 1999-Mar 2004 and Dec 2005-Dec 2014) that affected the study area. Furthermore, analysis of aerial photos determined that the average percent canopy cover of mature ponderosa pines (Pinus ponderosa) within 100 feet of mist net sites declined from 12% to 3% between 1991 and 2014 and the percent cover of shrubs slightly increased.« less

  1. Study of hydrogen in coals, polymers, oxides, and muscle water by nuclear magnetic resonance; extension of solid-state high-resolution techniques. [Hydrogen molybdenum bronze

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, L.M.

    1981-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been an important analytical and physical research tool for several decades. One area of NMR which has undergone considerable development in recent years is high resolution NMR of solids. In particular, high resolution solid state /sup 13/C NMR spectra exhibiting features similar to those observed in liquids are currently achievable using sophisticated pulse techniques. The work described in this thesis develops analogous methods for high resolution /sup 1/H NMR of rigid solids. Applications include characterization of hydrogen aromaticities in fossil fuels, and studies of hydrogen in oxides and bound water in muscle.

  2. National Hydropower Map

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High-resolution map produced by Oak Ridge National Laboratory showing hydropower resources throughout the United States.

  3. National SCADA Testbed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Photovoltaic Systems Evaluation Laboratory PV Regional ... Facility Geomechanics and Drilling Labs National ... Health Monitoring Offshore Wind High-Resolution ...

  4. Quasi-discrete particle motion in an externally imposed, ordered structure in a dusty plasma at high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Edward Konopka, Uwe; Lynch, Brian; Adams, Stephen; LeBlanc, Spencer; Merlino, Robert L.; Rosenberg, Marlene

    2015-11-15

    Dusty plasmas have been studied in argon, radio frequency (rf) glow discharge plasmas at magnetic fields up to 2.5 T where the electrons and ions are strongly magnetized. Plasmas are generated between two parallel plate electrodes where the lower, powered electrode is solid and the upper electrode supports a dual mesh consisting of #24 brass and #30 aluminum wire cloth. In this experiment, we study the formation of imposed ordered structures and particle dynamics as a function of magnetic field. Through observations of trapped particles and the quasi-discrete (i.e., “hopping”) motion of particles between the trapping locations, it is possible to make a preliminary estimate of the potential structure that confines the particles to a grid structure in the plasma. This information is used to gain insight into the formation of the imposed grid pattern of the dust particles in the plasma.

  5. Radio-frequency measurements of UNiX compounds (X= Al, Ga, Ge) in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mielke, Charles H; Mcdonald, David R; Zapf, Vivien; Altarawneh, Moaz M; Lacerda, Alex H; Adak, Sourav; Karunakar, Kothapalli; Nakotte, Heinrich; Chang, S; Alsmadi, A M; Alyones, S

    2009-01-01

    We performed radio-frequency (RF) skin-depth measurements of antiferromagnetic UNiX compounds (X=Al, Ga, Ge) in magnetic fields up to 60 T and at temperatures between 1.4 to {approx}60 K. Magnetic fields are applied along different crystallographic directions and RF penetration-depth was measured using a tunnel-diode oscillator (TDO) circuit. The sample is coupled to the inductive element of a TDO resonant tank circuit, and the shift in the resonant frequency {Delta}f of the circuit is measured. The UNiX compounds exhibit field-induced magnetic transitions at low temperatures, and those transitions are accompanied by a drastic change in {Delta}f. The results of our skin-depth measurements were compared with previously published B-T phase diagrams for these three compounds.

  6. John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling Machines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling Machines and Switched Reluctance Motors to Replace Permanent Magnets in Electric Vehicles John Hsu, Oak Ridge National...

  7. First Magnet Girder Installed in NSLS-II Storage Ring

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Frank Lincoln

    2013-07-19

    Supervisor Frank Lincoln explains how the first magnet girder is installed in the storage ring of Brookhaven National Laboratory's National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II).

  8. Experimental Investigation of Magnetic, Superconducting, and other Phase Transitions in novel F-Electron Materials at Ultra-high Pressures - Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maple, Brian; Jeffires, Jason

    2006-07-28

    This grant, entitled “Experimental investigation of magnetic, superconducting and other phase transitions in novel f-electron materials at ultrahigh pressures,” spanned the funding period from May 1st, 2003 until April 30th, 2006. The major goal of this grant was to develop and utilize an ultrahigh pressure facility—capable of achieving very low temperatures, high magnetic fields, and extreme pressures as well as providing electrical resistivity, ac susceptibility, and magnetization measurement capabilities under pressure—for the exploration of magnetic, electronic, and structural phases and any corresponding interactions between these states in novel f-electron materials. Realizing this goal required the acquisition, development, fabrication, and implementation of essential equipment, apparatuses, and techniques. The following sections of this report detail the establishment of an ultrahigh pressure facility (Section 1) and measurements performed during the funding period (Section 2), as well as summarize the research project (Section 3), project participants and their levels of support (Section 4), and publications and presentations (Section 5).

  9. Facilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities Argonne maintains two state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy physics research. The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility is home to technology that produces high accelerating gradients that could form the basis of the next generation of particle accelerators. Additionally, the 4 Tesla Magnet Facility reuses hospital MRI magnets to provide benchmarking for new muon experiments that will be performed at Fermilab. 4 Tesla Magnet Facility Learn More » Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

  10. High resolution NMR study of T{sub 1} magnetic relaxation dispersion. IV. Proton relaxation in amino acids and Met-enkephalin pentapeptide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N.; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V.; Ivanov, Konstantin L.; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2014-10-21

    Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) of protons was studied in the pentapeptide Met-enkephalin and the amino acids, which constitute it. Experiments were run by using high-resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in combination with fast field-cycling, thus enabling measuring NMRD curves for all individual protons. As in earlier works, Papers I–III, pronounced effects of intramolecular scalar spin-spin interactions, J-couplings, on spin relaxation were found. Notably, at low fields J-couplings tend to equalize the apparent relaxation rates within networks of coupled protons. In Met-enkephalin, in contrast to the free amino acids, there is a sharp increase in the proton T{sub 1}-relaxation times at high fields due to the changes in the regime of molecular motion. The experimental data are in good agreement with theory. From modelling the relaxation experiments we were able to determine motional correlation times of different residues in Met-enkephalin with atomic resolution. This allows us to draw conclusions about preferential conformation of the pentapeptide in solution, which is also in agreement with data from two-dimensional NMR experiments (rotating frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy). Altogether, our study demonstrates that high-resolution NMR studies of magnetic field-dependent relaxation allow one to probe molecular mobility in biomolecules with atomic resolution.

  11. Not All Nanodisk Magnetic Vortices Are Created Equally

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Not All Nanodisk Magnetic Vortices Are Created Equally Print Magnetic vortices - hurricanes of magnetism only a few atoms across - have generated intense interest in the high-tech...

  12. Making permanent magnets more powerful and less expensive | The...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Making permanent magnets more powerful and less expensive Today's high-tech and clean energy capabilities are extremely reliant on powerful permanent magnets. Permanent magnets...

  13. Nanodomain induced anomalous magnetic and electronic transport properties of LaBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+?} highly epitaxial thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz-Zepeda, F.; Ma, C.; Bahena Uribe, D.; Cantu-Valle, J.; Wang, H.; Xu, Xing; Yacaman, M. J.; Ponce, A.; Chen, C.; Lorenz, B.; Jacobson, A. J.; Chu, P. C. W.

    2014-01-14

    A giant magnetoresistance effect (?46% at 20?K under 7?T) and anomalous magnetic properties were found in a highly epitaxial double perovskite LaBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+?} (LBCO) thin film on (001) MgO. Aberration-corrected Electron Microscopy and related analytical techniques were employed to understand the nature of these unusual physical properties. The as-grown film is epitaxial with the c-axis of the LBCO structure lying in the film plane and with an interface relationship given by (100){sub LBCO} || (001){sub MgO} and [001]{sub LBCO} || [100]{sub MgO} or [010]{sub MgO}. Orderly oxygen vacancies were observed by line profile electron energy loss spectroscopy and by atomic resolution imaging. Especially, oxygen vacancy and nanodomain structures were found to have a crucial effect on the electronic transport and magnetic properties.

  14. materials science | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    materials science NNSA-lab-created new magnets will power renewable technology The Ion Beam Materials Laboratory at NNSA's Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) works to ...

  15. Improved Performance of High Areal Density Indirect Drive Implosions at the National Ignition Facility using a Four-Shock Adiabat Shaped Drive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, D. T.; Milovich, J. L.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Clark, D. S.; Robey, H. F.; Pak, A.; MacPhee, A. G.; Baker, K. L.; Weber, C. R.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Döppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Haan, S. W.; Patel, P. K.; Peterson, J. L.; Hoover, D.; Nikroo, A.; Yeamans, C. B.; Merrill, F. E.; Volegov, P. L.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Grim, G. P.; Edwards, M. J.; Landen, O. L.; Lafortune, K. N.; MacGowan, B. J.; Widmayer, C. C.; Sayre, D. B.; Hatarik, R.; Bond, E. J.; Nagel, S. R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.; Bachmann, B.; Spears, B. K.; Cerjan, C. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities can cause capsule defects and other perturbations to grow and degrade implosion performance in ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Here, we show the first experimental demonstration that a strong unsupported first shock in indirect drive implosions at the NIF reduces ablation front instability growth leading to a 3 to 10 times higher yield with fuel ρR > 1 g=cm2. This work shows the importance of ablation front instability growth during the National Ignition Campaign and may provide a path to improved performance at the high compression necessary for ignition.

  16. Improved Performance of High Areal Density Indirect Drive Implosions at the National Ignition Facility using a Four-Shock Adiabat Shaped Drive

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Casey, D. T.; Milovich, J. L.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Clark, D. S.; Robey, H. F.; Pak, A.; MacPhee, A. G.; Baker, K. L.; Weber, C. R.; Ma, T.; et al

    2015-09-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities can cause capsule defects and other perturbations to grow and degrade implosion performance in ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Here, we show the first experimental demonstration that a strong unsupported first shock in indirect drive implosions at the NIF reduces ablation front instability growth leading to a 3 to 10 times higher yield with fuel ρR > 1 g=cm2. This work shows the importance of ablation front instability growth during the National Ignition Campaign and may provide a path to improved performance at the high compression necessary for ignition.

  17. High-efficiency cross-beam magnetic electron-impact source for improved miniature Mattauch-Herzog mass spectrometer performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjar, O.; Fowler, W. K.

    2012-06-15

    We describe a newly designed cross-beam magnetic electron-impact ion source (CBM-EI). We demonstrate its superiority in comparison with a conventional source (CB-EI) when used with a commercial miniature sector-field-type, non-scanning mass spectrometer featuring Mattauch-Herzog geometry (MH-MS) and a permanent sector-field magnet. This paper clearly shows the value of the CBM-EI for enhancing MH-MS sensitivity. Unlike secondary electron-multiplier type detectors, the pixelated detector (IonCCD Trade-Mark-Sign ) used in the commercial MH-MS has no gain. The MH-MS/IonCCD system is therefore challenged to compete with time-of-flight and quadrupole MS systems due to their higher ion transmissions and detector gains. Using the new CBM-EI, we demonstrate an instrument sensitivity increase of 20-fold to 100-fold relative to the CB-EI-equipped instrument. This remarkable signal increase by the simple addition of the magnet assembly arises from the magnet-induced gyromotion of the thermionic electrons, which vastly increases the effective path length of the electrons through the ionization region, and the collimated nature of the electron flux, which optimizes the ion transmission through the 100-{mu}m object slit of the MH-MS. Some or all of the realized sensitivity increase may be exchanged for an increase in resolution and/or mass range through the use of a narrower object slit, or for a reduction in ion-source pressure to limit quenching. The CBM-EI should facilitate development of a differentially pumped ion source to extend the lifetime of the filament, especially in otherwise intractable applications associated with oxidizing and corrosive samples.

  18. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging

  19. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging

  20. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging

  1. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging

  2. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging for the

  3. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging for the

  4. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging

  5. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging

  6. Successful Characterization and Remedial Contour of Highly Contaminated Mercury Soil at the Y-12 National Security Complex - 13593

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Aaron; Rigas, Michael; Birchfield, Joseph W. III

    2013-07-01

    An area known as the 81-10 pad within the footprint of the Y-12 National Security Complex, suspected to be heavily contaminated with mercury, was slated for characterization in support of a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) milestone to be accomplished by September 30, 2012. A full remedial design report (RDR) required the soil in Exposure Unit -9 (EU-9) to be fully characterized for a number of contaminates of concern including mercury. The goal of this characterization effort was to determine what soil, if any, would need to be removed for the protection of industrial workers and impacts to the surface and ground water. Funding for this project was made available using buy-back scope under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The EU-9 soil unit involved 3 different classifications which were determined as follows: Class 1: Known to have been impacted, contamination is likely; Class 2: Suspected to have been impacted, contamination is unknown; Class 3: Area not known to have been impacted, contamination unlikely. Due to various sampling and analysis events since the 1980's, significant mercury contamination was expected under the concrete pad of an area known as 81-10. Mercury contamination outside of the boundary of this pad within the EU-9 footprint was not known and therefore an original planned estimate of 1,461 cubic meters of material were expected to be heavily contaminated with mercury requiring removal, treatment and disposal. Through the use of a highly effective nature and extent sampling and analysis design that involved a hybrid of statistically-based and judgmental sampling, the actual remedial contour requiring removal was approximately 717 cubic meters, roughly 12% of the original estimate. This characterization approach was executed in full compliance with the Record of Decision (ROD) [1] documents that were agreed upon by the U.S. Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency and Tennessee Department of Environment and

  7. A POSSIBLE EVOLUTIONARY SCENARIO OF HIGHLY MAGNETIZED SUPER-CHANDRASEKHAR WHITE DWARFS: PROGENITORS OF PECULIAR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Upasana; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata; Rao, A. R. E-mail: bm@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2013-04-10

    Several recently discovered peculiar Type Ia supernovae seem to demand an altogether new formation theory that might help explain the puzzling dissimilarities between them and the standard Type Ia supernovae. The most striking aspect of the observational analysis is the necessity of invoking super-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs having masses {approx}2.1-2.8 M{sub Sun }, M{sub Sun} being the mass of Sun, as their most probable progenitors. Strongly magnetized white dwarfs having super-Chandrasekhar masses have already been established as potential candidates for the progenitors of peculiar Type Ia supernovae. Owing to the Landau quantization of the underlying electron degenerate gas, theoretical results yielded the observationally inferred mass range. Here, we sketch a possible evolutionary scenario by which super-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs could be formed by accretion on to a commonly observed magnetized white dwarf, invoking the phenomenon of flux freezing. This opens multiple possible evolution scenarios ending in supernova explosions of super-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs having masses within the range stated above. We point out that our proposal has observational support, such as the recent discovery of a large number of magnetized white dwarfs by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  8. PROJECT PROFILE: Combined PV/Battery Grid Integration with High Frequency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Magnetics Enabled Power Electronics (SuNLaMP) | Department of Energy PROJECT PROFILE: Combined PV/Battery Grid Integration with High Frequency Magnetics Enabled Power Electronics (SuNLaMP) PROJECT PROFILE: Combined PV/Battery Grid Integration with High Frequency Magnetics Enabled Power Electronics (SuNLaMP) Funding Program: SuNLaMP SunShot Subprogram: Systems Integration Location: National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA SunShot Award Amount: $4,238,040 Awardee Cost Share:

  9. Design Principles for Materials with Magnetic Functionality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Joe David

    2015-11-05

    This report describes the processes involved with refining and testing design principles of high density, magnetic materials and while observing their magnetic functionality.

  10. FIRST 100 T NON-DESTRUCTIVE MAGNET OUTER COIL SET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. BACON; A. BACA; ET AL

    1999-09-01

    The controlled power outer coil set of the first 100 T non-destructive (100 T ND) magnet is described. This magnet will be installed as part of the user facility research equipment at the National High Magnetic Field laboratory (NHMFL) Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 100 T ND controlled power outer coil set consists of seven nested, mechanically independent externally reinforced coils. These coils, in combination, will produce a 47 T platform field in a 225-mm diameter bore. Using inertial energy storage a synchronous motor/generator provides ac power to a set of seven ac-dc converters rated at 64 MW/80 MVA each. These converters energize three independent coil circuits to create 170 MJ of field energy in the outer coil set at the platform field of 47 T. Each coil consists of a multi-layer winding of high strength conductor supported by an external high strength stainless steel shell. Coils with the highest magnetic loads will utilize a reinforcing shell fabricated from highly cold worked 301 stainless steel strip. The autofrettage conditioning method will be used to pre-stress the coils and thereby limit conductor and reinforcement strains to the elastic range. The purpose of pre-stressing the coils is to attain a design life of 10,000 full field pulses. The operation and conditioning of the coil set will be described along with special features of its design, magnetic and structural analyses and construction.

  11. A novel magnetically separable TiO{sub 2}/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanofiber with high photocatalytic activity under UV-vis light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Cong-Ju; Wang, Jiao-Na; Wang, Bin; Gong, Jian Ru; Lin, Zhang

    2012-02-15

    Graphical abstract: A novel magnetically separable composite photocatalyst TiO{sub 2}/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanofiber was prepared by sol-gel method and electrospinning technique, which can be reclaimed with a magnet, and the decolorizing efficiency of MB solution reached 95.87%. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composite TiO{sub 2}/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanofibers with diameter of 110 {+-} 28 nm have been successfully synthesized by the combination of sol-gel method and electrospinning technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The presence of Co{sup 2+} or/and Fe{sup 3+} ions may occupy some of the lattice sites of TiO{sub 2} to form an iron-titanium solid solution and narrow the band gap, which broadens the response region of visible light. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The resultant nanofibers not only have high decomposition efficiency with methylene blue (MB) under the UV irradiation, which is close to that of Degussa P25, but also can be separated with a magnet and avoid the secondary pollution of the treated water. -- Abstract: A novel magnetically separable heterogeneous photocatalyst TiO{sub 2}/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanofiber was prepared by sol-gel method and electrospinning technology, followed by heat treatment at 550 Degree-Sign C for 2 h. The phase structure, morphology and magnetic property of the composite nanofibers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscope and vibrating sample magnetometer analysis. The photocatalytic studies of TiO{sub 2}/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} fibers suggested that the presence of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} not only enhanced the absorbance of UV light, but also broadened the response region to visible light. The decolorizing efficiency of methylene blue (MB) solution reaches 95.87% over TiO{sub 2}/CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanofibers under 300 W Hg lamp after 5 h, which is close to that of Degussa P25. Furthermore, these fibers can be collected with a magnet for reuse and

  12. Household magnets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Household magnets Chances are very good that you have experimented with magnets. People have been fascinated with magnetism for thousands of years. As familiar to us as they may be, magnets still have some surprises for us. Here is a small collection of some of our favorite magnet experiments. What happens when we break a magnet in half? Radio Shack sells cheap ceramic magnets in several shapes. Get a ring shaped magnet and break it with pliers or a tap with a hammer. Try to put it back

  13. Magnet Girder Assembly and Installation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-17

    It takes teamwork to assemble and install magnet girders for the storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source II. NSLS-II is now under construction at Brookhaven Lab.

  14. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-03-06

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  15. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-08-06

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  16. High-energy magnetic excitations in overdoped La 2 - x Sr x CuO 4 studied by neutron and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wakimoto, S.; Ishii, K.; Kimura, H.; Fujita, M.; Dellea, G.; Kummer, K.; Braicovich, L.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Debeer-Schmitt, L. M.; Granroth, G. E.

    2015-05-21

    We have performed neutron inelastic scattering and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Cu-L₃ edge to study high-energy magnetic excitations at energy transfers of more than 100 meV for overdoped La2-xSrxCuO₄ with x=0.25 (Tc=15 K) and x=0.30 (nonsuperconducting) using identical single-crystal samples for the two techniques. From constant-energy slices of neutron-scattering cross sections, we have identified magnetic excitations up to ~250 meV for x=0.25. Although the width in the momentum direction is large, the peak positions along the (π,π) direction agree with the dispersion relation of the spin wave in the nondoped La₂CuO₄ (LCO), which is consistent with themore » previous RIXS results of cuprate superconductors. Using RIXS at the Cu-L₃ edge, we have measured the dispersion relations of the so-called paramagnon mode along both (π,π) and (π,0) directions. Although in both directions the neutron and RIXS data connect with each other and the paramagnon along (π,0) agrees well with the LCO spin-wave dispersion, the paramagnon in the (π,π) direction probed by RIXS appears to be less dispersive and the excitation energy is lower than the spin wave of LCO near (π/2,π/2). Thus, our results indicate consistency between neutron inelastic scattering and RIXS, and elucidate the entire magnetic excitation in the (π,π) direction by the complementary use of two probes. The polarization dependence of the RIXS profiles indicates that appreciable charge excitations exist in the same energy range of magnetic excitations, reflecting the itinerant character of the overdoped sample. A possible anisotropy in the charge excitation intensity might explain the apparent differences in the paramagnon dispersion in the (π,π) direction as detected by the x-ray scattering.« less

  17. Measuring the strong electrostatic and magnetic fields with proton radiography for ultra-high intensity laser channeling on fast ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uematsu, Y.; Iwawaki, T.; Habara, H. Tanaka, K. A.; Ivancic, S.; Theobald, W.; Lei, A. L.

    2014-11-15

    In order to investigate the intense laser propagation and channel formation in dense plasma, we conducted an experiment with proton deflectometry on the OMEGA EP Laser facility. The proton image was analyzed by tracing the trajectory of mono-energetic protons, which provides understanding the electric and magnetic fields that were generated around the channel. The estimated field strengths (E ∼ 10{sup 11} V/m and B ∼ 10{sup 8} G) agree with the predictions from 2D-Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, indicating the feasibility of the proton deflectometry technique for over-critical density plasma.

  18. Magnetically applied pressure-shear : a new technique for direct strength measurement at high pressure (final report for LDRD project 117856).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamppa, Derek C.; Haill, Thomas A.; Alexander, C. Scott; Asay, James Russell

    2010-09-01

    A new experimental technique to measure material shear strength at high pressures has been developed for use on magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) drive pulsed power platforms. By applying an external static magnetic field to the sample region, the MHD drive directly induces a shear stress wave in addition to the usual longitudinal stress wave. Strength is probed by passing this shear wave through a sample material where the transmissible shear stress is limited to the sample strength. The magnitude of the transmitted shear wave is measured via a transverse VISAR system from which the sample strength is determined.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Magnetic Resonance Facility capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers as well as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

  20. National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Solar Thermal Test Facility HomeNational Solar Thermal Test Facility Permalink High-Efficiency Solar Thermochemical Reactor for Hydrogen Production Center for ...

  1. Type A verification report for the high flux beam reactor stack and grounds, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harpenau, Evan M.

    2012-01-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 requires independent verification (IV) of DOE cleanup projects (DOE 2011). The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has been designated as the responsible organization for IV of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Stack and Grounds area at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The IV evaluation may consist of an in-process inspection with document and data reviews (Type A Verification) or a confirmatory survey of the site (Type B Verification). DOE and ORISE determined that a Type A verification of the documents and data for the HFBR Stack and Grounds: Survey Units (SU) 6, 7, and 8 was appropriate based on the initial survey unit classification, the walkover surveys, and the final analytical results provided by the Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA). The HFBR Stack and Grounds surveys began in June 2011 and were completed in September 2011. Survey activities by BSA included gamma walkover scans and sampling of the as-left soils in accordance with the BSA Work Procedure (BNL 2010a). The Field Sampling Plan - Stack and Remaining HFBR Outside Areas (FSP) stated that gamma walk-over surveys would be conducted with a bare sodium iodide (NaI) detector, and a collimated detector would be used to check areas with elevated count rates to locate the source of the high readings (BNL 2010b). BSA used the Mult- Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) principles for determining the classifications of each survey unit. Therefore, SUs 6 and 7 were identified as Class 1 and SU 8 was deemed Class 2 (BNL 2010b). Gamma walkover surveys of SUs 6, 7, and 8 were completed using a 2?2 NaI detector coupled to a data-logger with a global positioning system (GPS). The 100% scan surveys conducted prior to the final status survey (FSS) sampling identified two general soil areas and two isolated soil locations with elevated radioactivity. The general areas of elevated activity identified

  2. Independent Oversight Review, Oak Ridge National Laboratory ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    National Laboratory - January 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Oak Ridge National Laboratory - January 2013 January 2013 Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...

  3. EXOTIC MAGNETS FOR ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WANDERER, P.

    2005-09-18

    Over the last few years, several novel magnet designs have been introduced to meet the requirements of new, high performance accelerators and beam lines. For example, the FAIR project at GSI requires superconducting magnets ramped at high rates ({approx} 4 T/s) in order to achieve the design intensity. Magnets for the RIA and FAIR projects and for the next generation of LHC interaction regions will need to withstand high doses of radiation. Helical magnets are required to maintain and control the polarization of high energy protons at RHIC. In other cases, novel magnets have been designed in response to limited budgets and space. For example, it is planned to use combined function superconducting magnets for the 50 GeV proton transport line at J-PARC to satisfy both budget and performance requirements. Novel coil winding methods have been developed for short, large aperture magnets such as those used in the insertion region upgrade at BEPC. This paper will highlight the novel features of these exotic magnets.

  4. Effect of magnetic fields on the Kondo insulator CeRhSb: Magnetoresistance and high-field heat capacity measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malik, S.K.; Menon, L.; Pecharsky, V.K.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    The compound CeRhSb is a mixed valent Ce-based compound which shows a gap in the electronic density of states at low temperatures. The gap manifests by a rise in electrical resistivity{emdash}below about 8 K from which the gap energy is estimated to be about 4 K. We have carried out heat capacity measurements on this compound in various applied fields up to 9.85 T. The magnetic contribution to the heat capacity, {Delta}C, is found to have a maximum in {Delta}C/T vs T at 10 K, below which {Delta}C/T is linear with T. This is attributed to the fact that below this temperature, in the gapped state, the electronic density of states decreases linearly with decreasing temperature. On application of a magnetic field, the electronic specific heat coefficient {gamma} in the gapped state increases by {approximately}4mJ/molK{sup 2}. The maximum in {Delta}C/T vs T is observed in all fields, which shifts to lower temperatures {approximately}1K at 5.32 T and raises again at 9.85 T to about the same values as at H=0T. This suggests that the gap exists for all fields up to 9.85 T. Above 10 K, in the mixed-valent state, {Delta}C/T vs T decreases with increasing temperature in zero field. There is hardly any effect of application of field in the mixed-valent state. We have also carried out magnetoresistance measurements on CeRhSb up to fields of 5.5 T at 2, 4.5, 10, 20, and 30 K. The magnetoresistance in CeRhSb is positive at temperatures of 4.5 K and above, in applied fields up to 5.5 T. At 5.5 T, the magnetoresistance is maximum at 4.5 K (6{percent}) and decreases with increasing temperature. The observation of the maximum is consistent with the observation of a maximum in {Delta}C/T vs T and is due to a change in the density of states. At a temperature of 2 K, a negative magnetoresistance is observed for magnetic fields greater than {approximately}3.5T which suggests reduction in the gap. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Magnetic switches and circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nunnally, W.C.

    1982-05-01

    This report outlines the use of saturable inductors as switches in lumped-element, magnetic-pulse compression circuits is discussed and the characteristic use of each is defined. In addition, the geometric constraints and magnetic pulse compression circuits used in short-pulse, low-inductance systems are considered. The scaling of presaturation leakage currents, magnetic energy losses, and switching times with geometrical and material parameters are developed to aid in evaluating magnetic pulse compression systems in a particular application. Finally, a scheme for increasing the couping coefficient in saturable stripline transformers is proposed to enable their use in the short-pulse, high-voltage regime.

  6. Passive magnetic bearing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F.

    2014-09-02

    An axial stabilizer for the rotor of a magnetic bearing provides external control of stiffness through switching in external inductances. External control also allows the stabilizer to become a part of a passive/active magnetic bearing system that requires no external source of power and no position sensor. Stabilizers for displacements transverse to the axis of rotation are provided that require only a single cylindrical Halbach array in its operation, and thus are especially suited for use in high rotation speed applications, such as flywheel energy storage systems. The elimination of the need of an inner cylindrical array solves the difficult mechanical problem of supplying support against centrifugal forces for the magnets of that array. Compensation is provided for the temperature variation of the strength of the magnetic fields of the permanent magnets in the levitating magnet arrays.

  7. Synthesis and magnetization studies of nanopowder Fe₇₀Ni₂₀Cr₁₀ alloys prepared by high energy milling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chater, R.; Bououdina, M.; Chaanbi, D.; Abbas, H.

    2013-05-01

    Nanocrystalline Fe{sub 1–x–y}NixCry (x=20, y=10% in Wt)) alloy samples were prepared by mechanical alloying process. Fe, Ni and Cr elemental powders have been ball milled in a planetary mill for various periods of time, up to 27 h. XRD analysis allowed the determination of the structure of the mixture, the average crystallite size and the lattice parameter as a function of milling time. The complete formation of FeNiCr is observed after 27 h milling. With increasing milling time from 0 to 27 h, it is observed that the lattice parameter increases from 0.3515 to 0.3593 nm as well as an increase of microstrain from 0.15 to 0.40%, whereas the grain size decreases from 48 to 13 nm. Grain morphology of the powders at different formation stages was examined using SEM. Saturation magnetization and coercive fields derived from the hysteresis curves are discussed as a function of milling time. - Graphical abstract: Fe₇₀Ni₂₀Cr₁₀ nanopowders were prepared using a planetary ball mill. The structure and microstructure vary with milling time; thereby important modifications of the magnetic properties were observed and discussed. Highlights: • Nanocrystalline Fe₇₀Ni₂₀Cr₁₀ alloy were prepared by the mechanical alloying process. • The complete formation of Fe₇₀Ni₂₀Cr₁₀ is observed after 24 h milling. • With increasing milling time, the grain size decreases, while the strain increases. • The SEM images allowed following the morphology of the materials at different stages. • Ms and HC derived from the hysteresis are discussed as a function of milling time.

  8. sandia national labs | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    sandia national labs

  9. Brookhaven National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

  10. Highly (001) oriented L1{sub 0}-CoPt/TiN multilayer films on glass substrates with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    An, Hongyu; Sannomiya, Takumi; Muraishi, Shinji; Nakamura, Yoshio; Shi, Ji; Xie, Qian; Zhang, Zhengjun; Wang, Jian

    2015-03-15

    To obtain strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) based on L1{sub 0} structure for magnetic storage devices, costly single crystalline substrates are generally required to achieve (001) texture. Recently, various studies also have focused on depositing different kinds of seed layers on glass or other amorphous substrates to promote (001) preferred orientation of L1{sub 0} CoPt and FePt. TiN is a very promising seed layer material because of its cubic crystalline structure (similar to MgO) and excellent diffusion barring property even at high temperatures. In the present work, highly (001) oriented L1{sub 0}-CoPt/TiN multilayer films have been successfully deposited on glass substrates. After annealing at 700 °C, the film exhibits PMA, and a strong (001) peak is detected from the x-ray diffraction profiles, indicating the ordering transformation of CoPt layers from fcc (A1) to L1{sub 0} structure. It also is found that alternate deposition of cubic TiN and CoPt effectively improves the crystallinity and (001) preferred orientation of CoPt layers. This effect is verified by the substantial enhancement of (001) reflection and PMA with increasing the period number of the multilayer films.

  11. Secondary lift for magnetically levitated vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, Richard K.

    1976-01-01

    A high-speed terrestrial vehicle that is magnetically levitated by means of magnets which are used to induce eddy currents in a continuous electrically conductive nonferromagnetic track to produce magnetic images that repel the inducing magnet to provide primary lift for the vehicle. The magnets are arranged so that adjacent ones have their fields in opposite directions and the magnets are spaced apart a distance that provides a secondary lift between each magnet and the adjacent magnet's image, the secondary lift being maximized by optimal spacing of the magnets.

  12. Missing Money--Will the Current Electricity Market Structure Support High (~50%) Wind/Solar?; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, Michael

    2015-05-15

    This presentation summarizes the missing money problem and whether the current electricity market structure will support high penetration levels of wind and solar.

  13. Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    short-pulse laser, scientists from Los Alamos, the Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany, and Sandia National Laboratories focus high-intensity light on an ultra-thin...

  14. Performance of High-Convergence, Layered DT Implosions on Power-Scaling Experiments at National Ignition Facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Atherton, L. J.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bleuel, D.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; et al

    2013-10-19

    The radiation-driven, low-adiabat, cryogenic DT layered plastic capsule implosions were carried out on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to study the sensitivity of performance to peak power and drive duration. An implosion with extended drive and at reduced peak power of 350 TW achieved the highest compression with fuel areal density of ~1.3±0.1 g/cm 2, representing a significant step from previously measured ~1.0 g/cm2 toward a goal of 1.5 g/cm 2. Moreover, for future experiments will focus on understanding and mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities and mix, and improving symmetry required to reach the threshold for thermonuclear ignition on NIF.

  15. Performance of High-Convergence, Layered DT Implosions on Power-Scaling Experiments at National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Atherton, L. J.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bleuel, D.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D.; Dewald, E. L.; Dixit, S. N.; Doeppner, T.; Edgell, D. H.; Edwards, M. J.; Frenje, J.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Y.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Grim, G.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hartouni, E.; Hatarik, R.; Hatchett, S.; Hicks, D.; Hsing, W. W.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Key, M. H.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Pape, S. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Ma, T.; MacGowan, B. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A.; Moran, M.; Moses, E. I.; Pak, A.; Parham, T; Park, H. -S.; Patel, P. K.; Petrasso, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Regan, S. P.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Suter, L J; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P.; Weber, S. V.; Widmann, K.

    2013-10-19

    The radiation-driven, low-adiabat, cryogenic DT layered plastic capsule implosions were carried out on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to study the sensitivity of performance to peak power and drive duration. An implosion with extended drive and at reduced peak power of 350 TW achieved the highest compression with fuel areal density of ~1.3±0.1 g/cm 2, representing a significant step from previously measured ~1.0 g/cm2 toward a goal of 1.5 g/cm 2. Moreover, for future experiments will focus on understanding and mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities and mix, and improving symmetry required to reach the threshold for thermonuclear ignition on NIF.

  16. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a design laboratory that is responsible for the safety and reliability of the nuclear explosives package in nuclear weapons. It supports surveillance, assessment, and refurbishment of the nuclear weapons stockpile. LLNL also possesses unique high-energy-density physics capabilities and scientific computing assets. The lab is managed by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC and

  17. National Science Bowl | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Science Bowl Texas students win regional National Science Bowl competition, secure spot in finals in nation's capital More than 200 students from 37 from High schools across the Texas Panhandle gathered together with a few hundred volunteers for a meeting and competition of the minds: The Pantex Science Bowl 2016. Set up like a game show with buzzers, toss up and bonus questions, these groups of four students... Amarillo Students Win Regional National Science Bowl Competition, Secure Spot in

  18. Apparatus and method for magnetically processing a specimen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Kisner, Roger A; Jaramillo, Roger A

    2013-09-03

    An apparatus for magnetically processing a specimen that couples high field strength magnetic fields with the magnetocaloric effect includes a high field strength magnet capable of generating a magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla and a magnetocaloric insert disposed within a bore of the high field strength magnet. A method for magnetically processing a specimen includes positioning a specimen adjacent to a magnetocaloric insert within a bore of a magnet and applying a high field strength magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla to the specimen and to the magnetocaloric insert. The temperature of the specimen changes during the application of the high field strength magnetic field due to the magnetocaloric effect.

  19. Moment free toroidal magnet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonanos, Peter

    1983-01-01

    A toroidal magnet for confining a high magnetic field for use in fusion reactor research and nuclear particle detection. The magnet includes a series of conductor elements arranged about and fixed at its small major radius portion to the outer surface of a central cylindrical support each conductor element having a geometry such as to maintain the conductor elements in pure tension when a high current flows therein, and a support assembly which redistributes all or part of the tension which would otherwise arise in the small major radius portion of each coil element to the large major radius portion thereof.

  20. Graphene oxide-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle composite with high transverse proton relaxivity value for magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatesha, N.; Srivastava, Chandan; Poojar, Pavan; Geethanath, Sairam; Qurishi, Yasrib

    2015-04-21

    The potential of graphene oxideFe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle (GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) composite as an image contrast enhancing material in magnetic resonance imaging has been investigated. Proton relaxivity values were obtained in three different homogeneous dispersions of GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites synthesized by precipitating Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in three different reaction mixtures containing 0.01?g, 0.1?g, and 0.2?g of graphene oxide. A noticeable difference in proton relaxivity values was observed between the three cases. A comprehensive structural and magnetic characterization revealed discrete differences in the extent of reduction of the graphene oxide and spacing between the graphene oxide sheets in the three composites. The GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite framework that contained graphene oxide with least extent of reduction of the carboxyl groups and largest spacing between the graphene oxide sheets provided the optimum structure for yielding a very high transverse proton relaxivity value. It was found that the GO-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composites possessed good biocompatibility with normal cell lines, whereas they exhibited considerable toxicity towards breast cancer cells.