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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Amtrak fuel consumption study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a study of fuel consumption on National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) trains and is part of an effort to determine effective ways of conserving fuel on the Amtrak system. The study was performed by the Transportation Systems Center (TSC). A series of 26 test runs were conducted on Amtrak trains operating between Boston, Massachusetts, and New Haven, Connecticut, to measure fuel consumption, trip time and other fuel-use-related parameters. The test data were analyzed and compared with results of the TSC Train Performance Simulator replicating the same operations.

Hitz, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Fuel Consumption - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration, Residential Energy Consumption Survey(RTECS), 1994 Fuel Consumption

3

Fuel Consumption | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Consumption, CO2 Emissions, And A Simple Connection To the Vehicle Fuel Consumption, CO2 Emissions, And A Simple Connection To the Vehicle Road Load Equation Jan 15 2014 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM Glen E. Johnson Tennessee Tech University, Cookeville Energy and Transportation Science Division Seminar National Transportation Research Center, Room C-04 CONTACT : Email: Andreas Malikopoulos Phone:865.382.7827 Add to Calendar SHARE Ambitious goals have been set to reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions over the next generation. Starting from first principles, we will derive relations to connect fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions to a vehicle's road load equation. The model suggests approaches to facilitate achievement of future fuel and emissions targets. About the speaker: Dr. Johnson is a 1973 Mechanical Engineering graduate of Worcester

4

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

5

Table E7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit:...

6

Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Emissions and Fuel Consumption Impacts of IntelligentTravel Time, Fuel Consumption and Weigh Station Efficiency.EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION - Sustainable Approaches for

Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991--Combined Consumption and Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

< < Welcome to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Manufacturing Web Site. If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Home > Energy Users > Manufacturing > Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Overview Full Report Tables & Spreadsheets This report presents national-level estimates about energy use and consumption in the manufacturing sector as well as manufacturers' fuel-switching capability. Contact: Stephanie.battle@eia.doe.gov Stephanie Battle Director, Energy Consumption Division Phone: (202) 586-7237 Fax: (202) 586-0018 URL: http://www.eia.gov/emeu/mecs/mecs91/consumption/mecs1a.html File Last Modified: May 25, 1996

8

Table 6.2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

9

Railroad fuel-oil consumption in 1928  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented, by districts, covering the consumption of fuel oil for various uses by railroads.

Redfield, A.H.

1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Argonne TTRDC - TransForum v10n1 - Fuel Consumption vs. Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Great Debate: Fuel Consumption versus Fuel Economy Graphs for Fuel Consumption vs. Fuel Economy What is the difference between fuel consumption and fuel economy? In Europe,...

11

Table 3.1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 16,479 * * 118 * 6 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 1,218 * * 15 * 2 * 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 9,203

12

Table E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

13

Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

14

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke","Waste","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

15

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Agency/Company /Organization: Natural Resources Canada Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Analysis Tools Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/transportation/tools/fuel-consumption-guide/fuel-consu Natural Resources Canada has compiled fuel consumption ratings for passenger cars and light-duty pickup trucks, vans, and special purpose vehicles sold in Canada. The website links to the Fuel Consumption Guide and allows users to search for vehicles from current and past model years. It also provides information about vehicle maintenance and other practices to reduce fuel consumption. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies:

16

Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption and Expenditures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures This chapter analyzes trends in fuel economy, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures, using data unique to the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, as well as selected data from other sources. Analysis topics include the following: Following the oil supply and price disruptions caused by the Arab oil embargo of 1973-1974, motor gasoline price increases, the introduction of corporate average fuel economy standards, and environmental quality initiatives helped to spur major changes in vehicle technology. But have the many advances in vehicle technology resulted in measurable gains in the fuel economy of the residential vehicle fleet?

17

Amtrak fuel consumption study. Final report May-Sep 80  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a study of fuel consumption on National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) trains and is part of an effort to determine effective ways of conserving fuel on the Amtrak system. The study was performed by the Transportation Systems Center (TSC) under the sponsorship of the Federal Railroad Administration and in cooperation with Amtrak. A series of 26 test runs were conducted on Amtrak trains operating between Boston, Massachusetts, and New Haven, Connecticut, to measure fuel consumption, trip time and other fuel-use-related parameters. The test data were analyzed and compared with results of the TSC Train Performance Simulator replicating the same operations. Results of the tests showed that the average fuel consumption for the 157.7 mile trip was 368 gallons and that the average fuel use efficiency was 277 ton-miles per gallon. Fuel consumption and fuel use efficiency were found to increase consistently with increasing train tonnage. One locomotive was also found to consume about 12 percent more fuel than the other locomotive tested. The fuel consumption and trip time results for individual runs varied between +8.0 to -9.5 and +5.4 and -10.7 percent, respectively, of the Train Performance Simulator results. However, when averaged over the ten test runs analyzed, the fuel consumption and trip time results were within 1.04 and 0.03 percent, respectively, of the simulator. Throttle notch settings and train speed profiles also agreed well with simulated results.

Hitz, J.S.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 3 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Economic Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and Characteristic(a) Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,148 314 6 53 446 14 25 Q 291 20-49 1,018 297 13 22 381 18 97 5 185 50-99 1,095 305 7 13 440 6 130 9 186 100-249 1,728 411 16 11 793 7 131 7 353 250-499 1,916 391 16 11 583 3 185 5 722 500 and Over 7,323 720 21 21 2,569 21 300 348 3,323 Total 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 376 5,059 Employment Size Under 50 1,149 305 12 45 565 21 31

19

Table 3.2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. NAICS Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 257 12 22 579 6 182 2 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 56 * 1 121 * 126 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 25 * * 53 * 110 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 4 1 1 15 * 49 2 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 31 1 Q 100 1 2 0 4 3115 Dairy Products 105 33 2 2 66 1 * 0 2 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 212 69 5 3 125 2 Q 0 8 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 86 29 1 1 38 1 10 0 7 3121 Beverages

20

,"Utah Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","52013" ,"Release Date:","7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

,"Ohio Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release Date:","9...

22

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release...

23

,"Michigan Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release...

24

,"California Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

25

,"Vermont Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Vermont Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release...

26

,"Texas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

27

,"Texas Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

28

,"Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","52013" ,"Release Date:","7...

29

Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 845,727 13 22 5,064 18 39 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 12,979 7 3 2,074 3 26 Conventional Boiler Use 12,979 3 1 712 1 3 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 4 3 1,362 2 23 Direct Uses-Total Process 675,152 4 9 2,549 7 13 Process Heating

30

Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 4 3 1,362 2 23 -- Direct Uses-Total Process

31

Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 182 * Q 25

32

Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 2,886 79 130 5,211 69 868 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 44 46 19 2,134 10 572 Conventional Boiler Use 44 20 4 733 3 72 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 26 15 1,401 7 500 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,304 26 54 2,623 29 289 Process Heating 318 25 14 2,362 24 280 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

33

Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280

34

Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

35

Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

36

Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

37

South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption...

38

South Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

39

,"Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:31:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570STX2" "Date","Texas...

40

Table 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,113 75,673 2 4 563 1 8 * 54 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 346 16,620 * * 118 * 6 0 41 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,481 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 72 1,264 * * 15 * 2 * * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 142 9,258 * Q 97

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Video game console usage and national energy consumption: Results from a field-metering study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

console usage and national energy consumption: Results fromNational Energy Consumption .Discussion National Energy Consumption Under the assumption

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Table N5.1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

43

South Dakota Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel...

44

Utah Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

45

Utah Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

46

California Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

47

California Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

48

California Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

49

Ohio Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

50

Ohio Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

51

Michigan Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

52

Michigan Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

53

Idaho Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

54

Vermont Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Vermont Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

55

Colorado Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

56

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

57

The individual contribution of automotive components to vehicle fuel consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel consumption has grown to become a major point of interest as oil reserves are depleted. The purpose of this study is to determine the key components that cause variation in the instantaneous fuel consumption of vehicles ...

Napier, Parhys L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Illinois Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2010 25 23 25...

59

New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

60

New Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Texas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

62

Chapter 2. Consumption of Fossil Fuels - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

48 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Monthly June 2012 Chapter 2. Consumption of Fossil Fuels

63

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and expenditures, April 1984 through March 1985: Part 1, National data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data collected in the 1984 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The 1984 RECS was the sixth national survey of US households and their energy suppliers. The purpose of these surveys is to provide baseline information on how households use energy. Households in all types of housing units - single family homes (including townhouses), apartments, and mobile homes - were chosen to participate. Data from the surveys are available to the public in published reports such as this one and on public-use data tapes. The report presents data on the US consumption and expenditures for residential use of these ''major fuels'' - natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, kerosene, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) - from April 1984 through March 1985. These data are presented in tables in the Detailed Statistics section of this report. Except for kerosene and wood fuel, the consumption and expenditures data are based on actual household bills obtained, with the permission of the household, from the companies supplying energy to the household. Purchases of kerosene are based on respondent reports because records of ''cash and carry'' purchases of kerosene for individual households are usually unavailable. Data on the consumption of wood fuel (Table 27) covers the 12-month period ending November 1984 and are based on respondent recall of the amount of wood burned during the 12-month period. Both the kerosene and wood consumption data are subject to memory errors and other reporting errors. This report does not cover household use of motor fuel, which is reported separately.

Not Available

1987-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

64

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Plan to Reduce State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption

65

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: August 9, 5: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on

66

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Blast Pulping Liquor NAICS Furnace/Coke Petroleum or Wood Chips, Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Oven Gases Waste Gas Coke Black Liquor Bark Total United States 311 Food 11 0 7 0 0 1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 5 0 2 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 * 0 0 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1 0 1 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Products 1 0 1 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 4 0 4 0 0 * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 3 0 2 0 0 1 3121 Beverages 3 0 2 0 0 1 3122 Tobacco 0 0 0 0 0 0 313 Textile Mills 0 0 0 0 0 0 314 Textile Product Mills

67

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website Focus Area: Fuel Efficiency Topics: Market Analysis Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/transportation/tools/fuelratings/ratings-search.cfm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/canadas-fuel-consumption-guide-websit Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Fuel Efficiency Standards This website provides a compilation of fuel consumption ratings for passenger cars and light-duty pickup trucks, vans and special purpose vehicles sold in Canada. The website links to the Fuel Consumption Guide and allows users to search for vehicles from current and past model years. It also provides information about vehicle maintenance and other practices

68

Modeling the Impact of Summer Temperatures on National Electricity Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National population-weighted weekly degree day totals, which have been used to model and assess temperature-related natural gas consumption, are compared with summertime electricity consumption. A very close relationship between national cooling ...

Douglas M. Le Comte; Henry E. Warren

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The impact of residential density on vehicle usage and fuel consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on vehicle usage and energy consumption. Journal of Urbanon vehicle usage and fuel consumption Jinwon Kim and Davidon vehicle usage and fuel consumption* Jinwon Kim and David

Kim, Jinwon; Brownstone, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: December 12, 5: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705:

71

UK Availability and Consumption of Primary and Secondary Fuels...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Availability and Consumption of Primary and Secondary Fuels (1974) The then UK Department of Energy, in conjunction with the UK Government Statistical Service published statistics...

72

Consumption of alternative transportation fuels held steady in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The consumption of propane in heavy duty vehicles has ... Many fleets have replaced their light duty vehicles with flexible fueled and gasoline hybrid vehicles ...

73

Figure 64. Industrial energy consumption by fuel, 2011, 2025, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 64. Industrial energy consumption by fuel, 2011, 2025, and 2040 (quadrillion Btu) Natural Gas Petroleum and other liquids

74

,"U.S. Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","10312013"...

75

,"U.S. Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

76

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

77

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

78

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1998 ,"Release...

79

Figure 6. Transportation energy consumption by fuel, 1990-2040 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 6. Transportation energy consumption by fuel, 1990-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Motor Gasoline, no E85 Pipeline Other E85 Jet Fuel

80

Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. ... Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel Economy, 1949-2010:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

National Fuel Cell Bus National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) The goal of the NFCBP is to facilitate the development of commercially

82

Development of a Heavy-Duty Diesel Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model 2. Brown, S. ,Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model Clark, N. N. andModal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model 4.6. E XHAUST A

Barth, Matthew; Younglove, Theodore; Scora, George

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

New Zealand Energy Data: Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to oil and other...

84

Michigan Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2010: 22: 20: 22: 21: 22: 21: 22: 22: 21: 22 ...

85

,"U.S. Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:27:42 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3025US2" "Date","U.S....

86

,"U.S. Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:27:42 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3025US2" "Date","U.S. Natural...

87

South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul...

88

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:31:16 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570SNM2" "Date","New...

89

Biomass fuels: a national plan  

SciTech Connect

The options and potentials of biomass fuel production for the U.S. are reviewed. The following options are discussed: plant or vegetable oils, direct combustion of wood, production of biogas, and alcohol fuels. It is considered essential that a national planning model is developed to integrate the biofuel requirements for arable land and commercial forests with those for food and other traditional uses. (Refs. 32)

Mitchell, T.E.; Schroer, B.J.; Ziemke, M.C.; Peters, J.F.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 29,750 31,237 31,121 29,705 35,751 40,508 38,392 1990's 39,249 42,166 39,700 39,211 35,432 34,900 35,236 30,370 26,034 25,055 2000's 25,934 28,266 25,525 26,276 27,818 27,380 28,435 28,213 27,161 24,089 2010's 23,238 24,938 27,809 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

91

Alaska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,225 1,736 1,807 1,582 4,278 2,390 2,537 1990's 27,720 36,088 36,741 35,503 37,347 39,116 40,334 40,706 39,601 41,149 2000's 42,519 42,243 44,008 44,762 44,016 43,386 38,938 41,197 40,286 39,447 2010's 37,316 35,339 37,397 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

92

Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 121,848 123,993 104,292 102,185 123,008 121,936 134,132 1990's 82,828 83,733 86,623 74,925 66,600 75,845 69,235 71,155 63,368 68,393 2000's 69,174 63,137 63,031 56,018 55,970 45,837 46,205 51,499 42,957 39,002 2010's 40,814 42,633 42,123 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Louisiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

93

Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 12,572 16,185 17,090 13,633 16,249 17,446 19,820 1990's 12,182 14,154 13,217 13,051 13,939 14,896 15,409 15,597 16,524 19,272 2000's 20,602 20,991 25,767 28,829 24,053 24,408 23,868 25,276 23,574 25,282 2010's 27,104 28,582 29,157 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

94

Vehicle Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated ... Gas volumes delivered for use as vehicle fuel are included in the State annual totals through 2010 but not in ...

95

Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated electric ... Gas volumes delivered for vehicle fuel are included in the State monthly totals from January 2011 ...

96

National Clean Fuels Inc National Wind Solutions Inc | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Fuels Inc National Wind Solutions Inc Clean Fuels Inc National Wind Solutions Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name National Clean Fuels Inc (National Wind Solutions Inc) Place San Antonio, Texas Zip 78230 Product Texas-based consultancy that works with clean technology developers, or with public utilities in their strategic and procurement plans for alternative energy contracts. References National Clean Fuels Inc (National Wind Solutions Inc)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. National Clean Fuels Inc (National Wind Solutions Inc) is a company located in San Antonio, Texas . References ↑ "National Clean Fuels Inc (National Wind Solutions Inc)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=National_Clean_Fuels_Inc_National_Wind_Solutions_Inc&oldid=349061"

97

Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel Economy, 1949-2010: Year: Light-Duty Vehicles, Short Wheelbase 1: Light-Duty Vehicles, Long Wheelbase 2:

98

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

99

Table N5.2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

100

Microsoft Word - EVS25_Primary Factors Impact Fuel Consumption of PHEV_FINAL.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EVS-25 Shenzhen, China, Nov. 5-9, 2010 EVS-25 Shenzhen, China, Nov. 5-9, 2010 The 25th World Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium & Exhibition Factors Affecting the Fuel Consumption of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Richard 'Barney' Carlson, Matthew G. Shirk, and Benjamin M. Geller Energy Storage and Transportation Systems Department, Idaho National Laboratory 2525 N. Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83401, USA E-mail: richard.carlson@inl.gov Abstract- Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have proven to significantly reduce petroleum consumption when compared to conventional internal combustion engine vehicles by utilizing onboard electrical energy storage for propulsion. Through extensive testing of PHEVs, analysis has shown that fuel consumption of PHEVs is more

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020 Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020 Source: EIA, International Energy Outlook 2000 Previous slide Next slide Back to first slide View graphic version Notes: Natural gas is projected to be the fastest-growing component of primary world energy consumption, more than doubling between 1997 and 2020. Gas accounts for the largest increment in electricity generation (41 percent of the total increment of energy used for electricity generation). Combined-cycle gas turbine power plants offer some of the highest commercially available plant efficiencies, and natural gas is environmentally attractive because it emits less sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter than does oil or coal. In the IEO2000 projection, world natural gas consumption reaches the level of coal by

102

Comparing Pathways Projected fuel consumption and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(all-electric 10-20 miles, 40-60 miles) · Fuel cells (hybrid with batteries) #12;Mid-size passenger car Vehicles by UC Davis, DOE, and MIT #12;Mid-size Passenger car Year Electric range mi Charge depleting mpg capability #12;Vehicle types and advanced technologies considered Vehicle types · Mid-size passenger cars

California at Davis, University of

103

California National Guard Sustainability Planning, Hydrogen Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Army National Guard, Environmental Programs Directorate California National Guard Sustainability Planning, Hydrogen Fuel Goals 27 Oct 08 Lt Col Reuben Sendejas Lt Col Reuben...

104

Alaska Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 96,603 109,333 62,341 71,104 112,404 151,280 189,702 1990's 166,155 187,106 197,975 202,199 200,809 253,695 255,500 230,578 242,271 224,355 2000's 226,659 229,206 241,469 255,701 237,530 259,829 218,153 227,374 211,878 219,161 2010's 211,918 208,531 214,335 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease

105

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,270 1,530 1,924 1970's 2,251 2,419 2,847 2,725 1,649 1,760 3,043 3,210 2,134 2,889 1980's 1,320 1,580 3,278 3,543 5,236 4,575 4,715 5,799 4,983 4,767 1990's 6,031 3,502 3,381 4,145 3,252 3,069 3,299 2,275 1,706 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pennsylvania Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

106

Texas Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 183,870 204,390 193,822 189,173 229,053 200,239 163,218 1990's 228,485 125,198 123,111 130,916 139,427 178,827 177,508 144,787 176,262 136,708 2000's 141,785 135,786 114,919 123,585 129,825 134,434 138,558 154,323 166,500 169,631 2010's 157,751 147,268 163,325 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease

107

Mississippi Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 8,582 9,158 8,521 1970's 7,893 5,840 9,153 6,152 5,357 7,894 4,836 4,979 5,421 8,645 1980's 4,428 4,028 7,236 6,632 7,202 6,296 6,562 8,091 7,100 5,021 1990's 7,257 4,585 4,945 4,829 3,632 3,507 3,584 3,652 3,710 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

108

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next MECS will be fielded in 2015 Table 6.1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios; Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 Food 871.7 4.3 1.8 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6,239.5 10.5 3.6 311221 Wet Corn Milling 28,965.0 27.1 12.6 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 7,755.9 32.6 13.4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 861.3 4.8 2.2 3115 Dairy Products 854.8 3.5 1.1 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 442.9 3.5 1.2 312

109

Nonresidential buildings energy consumption survey: 1979 consumption and expenditures. Part 2. Steam, fuel oil, LPG, and all fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data on square footage and on total energy consumption and expenditures for commercial buildings in the contiguous United States. Also included are detailed consumption and expenditures tables for fuel oil or kerosene, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and purchased steam. Commercial buildings include all nonresidential buildings with the exception of those where industrial activities occupy more of the total square footage than any other type of activity. 7 figures, 23 tables.

Patinkin, L.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

National emissions data system (NEDS) fuel use report (1977). Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes annual estimates of total consumption of major fuels such as coal, fuel oil, natural gas, gasoline, and diesel fuel. Estimates of the consumption of a number of other comparatively minor fuels are also included. The data are distributed according to major categories of air pollutant emissions sources and are reported for the nation as a whole and for individual states, territories, and the District of Columbia.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Table 2. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expeditures in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Oil Consumption and Expeditures in U.S. Households ... Space Heating - Main or Secondary ... Forms EIA-457 A-G of the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption

112

Vermont Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0...

113

Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Battery control strategy Diesel generator Fuel consumption Hybrid system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standalone diesel generators (DGs) are widely utilized in remote areas in Indonesia. Some areas use microhydro (MH) systems with DGs backup. However, highly diesel fuel price makes such systems become uneconomical. This paper introduces hybrid photovoltaic (PV)/MH/DG/battery systems with a battery control strategy to minimize the diesel fuel consumption. The method is applied to control the state of charge (SOC) level of the battery based on its previous level and the demand load condition to optimize the DG operation. Simulation results show that operations of the hybrid PV/MH/DG/battery with the battery control strategy needs less fuel consumption than PV/MH/DG and MH/DG systems.

Ayong Hiendro; Yohannes M. Simanjuntak

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

"Table A10. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" 0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" " Oil for Selected Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Barrels per Day)" ,,,," Inputs for Heat",,," Primary Consumption" " "," Primary Consumption for all Purposes",,," Power, and Generation of Electricity",,," for Nonfuel Purposes",,,"RSE" ," ------------------------------------",,," ------------------------------------",,," -------------------------------",,,"Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","Factors"

116

Table WH3. Total Consumption for Water Heating by Major Fuels Used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table WH3. Total Consumption for Water Heating by Major Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units Electricity (billion kWh) Natural Gas (billion cf) Fuel Oil

117

Table WH10. Consumption Intensity by Main Water Heating Fuel Used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Main Water Heating Fuel Used (physical units/number of household members) Electricity Table WH10. Consumption Intensity by Main Water Heating Fuel Used, 2005

118

Table SH3. Total Consumption for Space Heating by Major Fuels Used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas (billion cf) Major Fuels Used 4 (physical units) Table SH3. Total Consumption for Space Heating by Major Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units

119

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

120

Table WH6. Average Consumption for Water Heating by Major Fuels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Major Fuels Used 5 (physical units of consumption per household using the fuel as a water heating source) Electricity (kWh) Table WH6. Average Consumption for Water ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Utilization of Fuel Consumption Data in an Ecodriving Incentive System for Heavy-Duty Vehicle Drivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Driver behavior is one of the greatest factors determining fuel consumption and, thus, carbon dioxide emissions from a heavy-duty vehicle. The difference in fuel consumption can be up to 30%, depending on the driver. Education, monitoring, and feedback ...

Heikki Liimatainen

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

OE/EIA-0272 The National Interim Energy Consumption Survey:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

272 272 The National Interim Energy Consumption Survey: Exploring the Variability in Energy Consumption July 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Assistant Administrator for Program Development Office of the Consumption Data System Industrial Data Systems Division This publication is available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, at the following address: Superintendent of Documents U.S. Government Printing Office Washington, D.C. 20402 Order Desk: (202) 783-3238 Stock Number: 061-003-00205-6 Price: $4.25 For questions on energy statistics or information on availability of other EIA publications, contact: National Energy Information Center, El-20 Forrestal Building U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585

123

Energy Department Launches National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Launches National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center to Advance Fuel Cell Technologies Energy Department Launches National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center to Advance...

124

Development of a predictive system for car fuel consumption using an artificial neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A predictive system for car fuel consumption using a back-propagation neural network is proposed in this paper. The proposed system is constituted of three parts: information acquisition system, fuel consumption forecasting algorithm and performance ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Back-propagation algorithm, Fuel consumption

Jian-Da Wu; Jun-Ching Liu

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A forecasting system for car fuel consumption using a radial basis function neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A predictive system for car fuel consumption using a radial basis function (RBF) neural network is proposed in this paper. The proposed work consists of three parts: information acquisition, fuel consumption forecasting algorithm and performance evaluation. ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Car fuel consumption, Radial basis function algorithm

Jian-Da Wu; Jun-Ching Liu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Fuel consumption: Industrial, residential, and general studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning fuel consumption in industrial and residential sectors. General studies of fuel supply, demand, policy, forecasts, and consumption models are presented. Citations examine fuel information and forecasting systems, fuel production, international economic and energy activities, heating oils, and pollution control. Fuel consumption in the transportation sector is covered in a separate bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

128

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States Coal (thousand st/d) .................... 2,361 2,207 2,586 2,287 2,421 2,237 2,720 2,365 2,391 2,174 2,622 2,286 2,361 2,437 2,369 Natural Gas (million cf/d) ............. 20,952 21,902 28,751 21,535 20,291 22,193 28,174 20,227 20,829 22,857 29,506 21,248 23,302 22,736 23,627 Petroleum (thousand b/d) ........... 128 127 144 127 135 128 135 119 131 124 134 117 131 129 127 Residual Fuel Oil ...................... 38 28 36 29 30 31 33 29 31 30 34 27 33 31 30 Distillate Fuel Oil ....................... 26 24 27 28 35 30 30 26 31 26 28 25 26 30 28 Petroleum Coke (a) .................. 59 72 78 66 63 63 66 59 62 63 67 60 69 63 63 Other Petroleum Liquids (b) ..... 5 3 4 4 7 5 5 5 7 5 5 5 4 6 6 Northeast Census Region Coal (thousand st/d) ....................

129

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and Industry Black Liquor Total(b) Waste(c) from Trees(d) Processing(e) Refuse(f) Total United States 311 Food 0 44 43 * * 1 311221 Wet Corn Milling 0 1 1 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 0 1 0 0 1 0 321 Wood Products 0 218 * 13 199 6 321113 Sawmills 0 100 * 5 94 1 3212 Veneer, Plywood, and Engineered Woods 0 95 * 6 87 2 321219 Reconstituted Wood Products 0 52 0 6 46 1 3219 Other Wood Products

130

RECENT TRENDS IN EMERGING TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND ENERGY CONSUMPTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abundance of energy can be improved both by developing new sources of fuel and by improving efficiency of energy utilization, although we really need to pursue both paths to improve energy accessibility in the future. Currently, 2.7 billion people or 38% of the world s population do not have access to modern cooking fuel and depend on wood or dung and 1.4 billion people or 20% do not have access to electricity. It is estimated that correcting these deficiencies will require an investment of $36 billion dollars annually through 2030. In growing economies, energy use and economic growth are strongly linked, but energy use generally grows at a lower rate due to increased access to modern fuels and adaptation of modern, more efficient technology. Reducing environmental impacts of increased energy consumption such as global warming or regional emissions will require improved technology, renewable fuels, and CO2 reuse or sequestration. The increase in energy utilization will probably result in increased transportation fuel diversity as fuels are shaped by availability of local resources, world trade, and governmental, environmental, and economic policies. The purpose of this paper is to outline some of the recently emerging trends, but not to suggest winners. This paper will focus on liquid transportation fuels, which provide the highest energy density and best match with existing vehicles and infrastructure. Data is taken from a variety of US, European, and other sources without an attempt to normalize or combine the various data sources. Liquid transportation fuels can be derived from conventional hydrocarbon resources (crude oil), unconventional hydrocarbon resources (oil sands or oil shale), and biological feedstocks through a variety of biochemical or thermo chemical processes, or by converting natural gas or coal to liquids.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Energy Information Administration - Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total 2 1,672 1,455 1,147 Net Electricity 3 158 184 175 Natural Gas 456 388 326 Coal 48 36 14 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 8 W 1 Residual Fuel Oil 10 * 4 Natural Gas 52 39 27 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 74 79 76 Residual Fuel Oil 19 * 11 Natural Gas 369 329 272 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 68 86 77 Notes 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. 'Total' is the sum of all energy sources listed below, including net steam (the sum of purchases, generation from renewable resources, and net transfers), and other energy that respondents indicated was used to produce heat and power. It is the fuel quantities across all end-uses.

132

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - National Fuel Cell Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center The National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC) at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) plays a crucial role in NREL's independent, third-party analysis of hydrogen fuel cell technologies in real-world operation. The NFCTEC is designed for secure management, storage, and processing of proprietary data from industry. Access to the off-network NFCTEC is limited to NREL's Technology Validation Team, which analyzes detailed data and reports on fuel cell technology status, progress, and technical challenges. Graphic representing NREL's Hydrogen Secure Data Center and the variety of applications from which it gathers data, including fuel cell (FC) stacks, FC backup power, FC forklifts, FC cars, FC buses, and FC prime power, and hydrogen infrastructure.

133

Factors Affecting the Fuel Consumption of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Primary Factors that Impact the Fuel Consumption of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles RICHARD BARNEY CARLSON, MATTHEW G. SHIRK Idaho National Laboratory 2525 N. Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA richard.carlson@inl.gov Abstract Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV) have proven to significantly reduce petroleum consumption as compared to conventional internal combustion engine vehicles (ICE) by utilizing electrical energy for propulsion. Through extensive testing of PHEVs, analysis has shown that the fuel consumption of PHEVs is more significantly affected than conventional vehicles by either the drivers input or by the environmental inputs around the vehicle. Six primary factors have been identified that significantly affect the fuel consumption of PHEVs. In this paper, these primary factors are analyzed from on-road driving and charging data from over 200 PHEVs throughout North America that include Hymotion Prius conversions and Hybrids Plus Escape conversions. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) tests plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV) vehicles as part of its conduct of DOEs Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). In collaboration with its 75 testing partners located in 23 states and Canada, INL has collected data on 191 PHEVs, comprised of 12 different PHEV models (by battery manufacturer). With more than 1 million PHEV test miles accumulated to date, the PHEVs are fleet, track, and dynamometer tested. Six Primary Factors The six primary factors that significantly impact PHEV fuel consumption are listed below. Some of the factors are unique to plug-in vehicles while others are common for all types of vehicles. 1. Usable Electrical Energy is dictated by battery capacity, rate of depletion as well as when the vehicle was last plugged-in. With less electrical energy available the powertrain must use more petroleum to generate the required power output. 2. Driver Aggressiveness impacts the fuel consumption of nearly all vehicles but this impact is greater for high efficiency powertrains. 3. Accessory Utilization like air conditioner systems or defroster systems can use a significant amount of additional energy that is not contributing to the propulsion of the vehicle. 4. Route Type such as city, highway or mountainous driving can affect the fuel consumption since it can involve stop and go driving or ascending a step grade. 5. Cold Start / Key On includes control strategies to improve cold start emissions as well as control routines to quickly supply cabin heat. These control strategies are necessary for consumer acceptance even though fuel consumption is negatively impacted. 6. Ambient Temperature can reduce the efficiency of many powertrain components by significantly increasing fluid viscosity. For vehicles that utilize battery energy storage systems, the temperature of the battery system can greatly affect the power output capability therefore reducing its system effectiveness. The analysis of the six primary factors that impact fuel economy of PHEVs helped to identify areas of potential further development as well as may assist in informing drivers of these effects in an effort to modify driving behavior to reduce petroleum consumption.

Richard "Barney" Carlson; Matthew G. Shirk; Benjamin M. Geller

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview Total Energy USA Houston, Texas Dr. Sunita Satyapal Director, Office of Fuel Cell Technologies Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy 11/27/2012 National Support for Clean Energy "We've got to invest in a serious, sustained, all-of- - President Barack Obama "Advancing hydrogen and fuel cell technology is an important part of the Energy Department's efforts to support the President's all-of-the-above energy strategy, helping to diversify America's energy sector and reduce our dependence on foreign oil." - Energy Secretary Steven Chu "Fuel cells are an important part of our energy portfolio...deployments in early markets are helping to drive innovations in fuel cell technologies

135

Table US8. Average Consumption by Fuels Used, 2005 Physical ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wood (cords) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables. Table US8.

136

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone National Park Commits to  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Yellowstone National Yellowstone National Park Commits to Alternative Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone National Park Commits to Alternative Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone National Park Commits to Alternative Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone National Park Commits to Alternative Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone National Park Commits to Alternative Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone National Park Commits to Alternative Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone National Park Commits to Alternative Fuels on AddThis.com... Oct. 16, 2010 Yellowstone National Park Commits to Alternative Fuels

137

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Research Council Reviews...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Research Council Reviews FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership Research Program to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Research Council Reviews...

138

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 6.1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios Unit: Varies. Consumption Consumption per Dollar Consumption per Dollar of Value NAICS per Employee of Value Added of Shipments Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (thousand Btu) Total United States 311 Food 879.8 5.0 2.2 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6,416.6 17.5 5.7 311221 Wet Corn Milling 21,552.1 43.6 18.2 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 6,629.2 31.3 12.2 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1,075.3 5.5 2.8 3115 Dairy Products 956.3 4.3 1.3 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 493.8 4.4 1.6 312

139

Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and ...

140

Table 8.7c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Table 8.7a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of ...

142

Table 8.7c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 ...

143

Table 8.7b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table ...

144

Table 8.6a Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.6a Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 ...

145

Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.5b)

146

Figure 102. U.S. motor gasoline and diesel fuel consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 102. U.S. motor gasoline and diesel fuel consumption, 2000-2040 (million barrels per day) Motor Gasoline Petroleum Portion ...

147

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Linked Data Search Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Dataset Summary...

148

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Mammoth Cave National Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only Alternative Fuel Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mammoth Cave National Park Uses Only Alternative Fuel Vehicles on AddThis.com...

149

National Interim Energy-Consumption Survey. Part VI. Energy assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of energy assessment of the housing unit is to obtain physical information which can be combined with other survey results to give a more complete picture of the residential environment. A limited pretest of an energy assessment procedure was carried out in April-June 1979 with a subsample of 44 households that had been originally interviewed in the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey. In order to gain experience under a variety of environmental conditions, the pretest sites included locations in the Northeast, North Central, and South regions. As developed for the pretest, the energy assessment was a 90-minute inspection of the housing unit by a trained technician. Data collected during the inspection included square footage of the unit; age, make, and characteristics of appliances; insulation characteristics, characteristics of siting and apertures; and detailed information on the heating and cooling systems in the unit. The report describes the data collection procedures for the pretest.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Hydrogen National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration Status Webinar (Text Version) on

151

New Zealand Energy Data: Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to oil and other petroleum products. Included here are two oil consumption datasets: quarterly petrol consumption by sector (agriculture, forestry and fishing; industrial; commercial; residential; transport industry; and international transport), from 1974 to 2010; and oil consumption by fuel type (petrol, diesel, fuel oil, aviation fuels, LPG, and other), also for the years 1974 through 2010. The full 2010 Energy Data File is available: http://www.med.govt.nz/upload/73585/EDF%202010.pdf. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 02nd, 2010 (4 years ago)

152

DOE/EIA-0193/P PRELIMINARY CONSERVATION TABLES FROM THE NATIONAL INTERIM ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

193/P 193/P PRELIMINARY CONSERVATION TABLES FROM THE NATIONAL INTERIM ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY OFFICE OF THE CONSUMPTION DATA SYSTEM OFFICE OF PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION AUGUST 1, 1979 PRELIMINARY CONSERVATION TABLES FROM THE NATIONAL INTERIM ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY Attached is the first report of the Office of the Consumption Data System, Office of Program Development, Energy Information Administration, presenting preliminary data from the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS). The focus of this report is the conservation activities performed by households since January 1977, and the status of households with respect to insulation, storm windows, and other energy conserving characteristics. These tables are from preliminary data files.

153

Video game console usage and national energy consumption: Results from a field-metering study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and energy savings potential of video game consoles in thethe energy efficiency of video game consoles. NaturalVideo game console usage and national energy consumption:

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Biomass fuels: a national plan  

SciTech Connect

This article advocates the development of a national plan to integrate the biofuel requirements for arable land and commercial forests with those for food and other traditional uses. Attempts to provide an idea of the anticipated magnitude of the US biofuel industry by the turn of the century. Notes that 78 billion gallons of ethanol can be produced annually from cellulose. Argues that some arable land and forests can be committed to the growth of ''energy crops'' without undue impact on traditional products.

Mitchell, T.E.; Peters, J.F.; Schroer, B.J.; Ziemke, M.C.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC) (Revised...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen and fuel cell organizations Contact Us If you are interested in working with the National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center, please contact: NREL's Technology...

156

National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications News Release Release Date: July 23, 2013 National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Studies SOFC Solid oxide fuel cells are among the...

157

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development (R&D) Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of...

158

Nuclear Fuels and Materials: Jon Carmack, Idaho National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 28, 2012 ... w w w .in. l.g o v. Nuclear Fuels and Materials. Jon Carmack. Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division. Idaho National Laboratory. February 28...

159

EA-1887: Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado (DOEEA-1573-S1) EA-1887: Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the...

160

,"Alaska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sak_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sak_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:46 PM"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1840_sky_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1840_sky_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:39 PM"

162

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sar_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sar_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:47 PM"

163

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sne_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sne_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:51 PM"

164

,"California Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sca_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sca_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:47 PM"

165

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sok_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sok_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:52 PM"

166

,"Michigan Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_smi_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_smi_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:49 PM"

167

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sms_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sms_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:50 PM"

168

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sla_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sla_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:49 PM"

169

,"Florida Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sfl_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sfl_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:48 PM"

170

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_swy_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_swy_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:54 PM"

171

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_spa_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_spa_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:52 PM"

172

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sky_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sky_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:49 PM"

173

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1840_ssd_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1840_ssd_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:44 PM"

174

,"Illinois Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Illinois Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sil_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sil_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:21 PM"

175

,"Colorado Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sco_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sco_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:48 PM"

176

,"Utah Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sut_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sut_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:53 PM"

177

,"Kansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sks_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sks_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:49 PM"

178

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_stn_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_stn_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:52 PM"

179

,"Montana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_smt_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_smt_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:50 PM"

180

Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Reducing the energy consumption of the nation's buildings is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/21/2011 Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Reducing the energy consumption of the nation's buildings is essential for achieving a sustainable clean energy future and will be an enormous challenge. Buildings account for 40% of the nation's carbon emissions and the consumption of 40% of our

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA-846, '2010 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey,' and Office of Petroleum and Biofuels Statistics, Form EIA-810, 'Monthly Refinery Report' for 2010, and the Bureau of the...

182

National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Studies National Energy...

183

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent...

184

Toyota Prius Fuel Use in Yellowstone National Park - October...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Use in Yellowstone National Park - October 2006 Four 2004 Toyota Prius hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) were introduced into the Yellowstone National Park motor pool during the...

185

Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measures on national energy consumption that take regionalnational estimates of the building loads and energy consumption,national electricity and fuel consumption, as well as the combined primary energy consumption. (

Hopkins, Asa S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Table 8.6b Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.6b Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of ...

187

Table 8.6a Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.6a Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of ...

188

Table 8.7b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.7a) ...

189

U.S. Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1990's: 8,328: 9,341 ...

190

SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORYREGENERATIVE FUEL CELL PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A team comprised of governmental, academic and industrial partners led by the Savannah River National Laboratory developed and demonstrated a regenerative fuel cell system for backup power applications. Recent market assessments have identified emergency response and telecommunication applications as promising near-term markets for fuel cell backup power systems. The Regenerative Fuel Cell System (RFC) consisted of a 2 kg-per-day electrolyzer, metal-hydride based hydrogen storage units and a 5 kW fuel cell. Coupling these components together created a system that can produce and store its own energy from the power grid much like a rechargeable battery. A series of test were conducted to evaluate the performance of the RFC system under both steady-state and transit conditions that might be encountered in typical backup power applications. In almost all cases the RFC functioned effectively. Test results from the demonstration project will be used to support recommendations for future fuel cell and hydrogen component and system designs and support potential commercialization activities. In addition to the work presented in this report, further testing of the RFC system at the Center for Hydrogen Research in Aiken County, SC is planned including evaluating the system as a renewable system coupled with a 20kW-peak solar photovoltaic array.

Motyka, T

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

191

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Mowers Help National Park Cut  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Propane Mowers Help Propane Mowers Help National Park Cut Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Mowers Help National Park Cut Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Mowers Help National Park Cut Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Mowers Help National Park Cut Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Mowers Help National Park Cut Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Mowers Help National Park Cut Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Mowers Help National Park Cut Emissions on AddThis.com... Aug. 8, 2013 Propane Mowers Help National Park Cut Emissions " We're very proud to be an example of what the National Park Service can

192

National Parks Clean Up with Alternative Fuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Parks Clean Up with Alternative Fuels National Parks Clean Up with Alternative Fuels National Parks Clean Up with Alternative Fuels March 1, 2011 - 11:38am Addthis Alternative fuel vehicles and advanced vehicle technologies are helping to keep National treasures like Yellowstone National Park in Cody, Wyoming pristine. | Photo by Jeff Gunn Alternative fuel vehicles and advanced vehicle technologies are helping to keep National treasures like Yellowstone National Park in Cody, Wyoming pristine. | Photo by Jeff Gunn Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities What does this mean for me? Pristine National Parks Less of your tax dollars spent on fuel Blue skies, pristine mountain vistas, endless open space and ... choking fumes from motor vehicles? Even though the latter clearly doesn't belong

193

Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Clean Diesel Campaign (NCDC)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

National Clean Diesel National Clean Diesel Campaign (NCDC) to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Clean Diesel Campaign (NCDC) on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Clean Diesel Campaign (NCDC) on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Clean Diesel Campaign (NCDC) on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Clean Diesel Campaign (NCDC) on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Clean Diesel Campaign (NCDC) on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Clean Diesel Campaign (NCDC) on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type National Clean Diesel Campaign (NCDC) The NCDC was established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to

194

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 383,077 389,525 367,572 348,731 408,115 398,180 429,269 1990's 428,657 456,954 460,571 448,822 423,878 427,853 450,033 426,873 401,314 399,509 2000's 404,059 371,141 382,503 363,903 366,341 355,193 358,985 365,323 355,590 362,009 2010's 368,830 384,248 408,316 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

195

Table 8.5d Consumption of Combustible Fuels for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

biomass. Through 2000, also includes non-renewable waste ... (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 4 Jet fuel, kerosene, other petroleum ...

196

Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated electric ... Gas volumes delivered for vehicle fuel are included in the State monthly totals from January 2011 ...

197

Table 4.2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) 327993 Mineral Wool 39 12 0 * 24 * 0 3 * 331 Primary Metals 1,328 412 1 9 537 3 23 291 53 331111 Iron and...

198

World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: Natural gas is projected to be the fastest-growing component of primary world energy consumption, more than doubling between 1997 and 2020. Gas accounts for the largest increment in electricity generation (41 percent of the total increment of energy used for electricity generation). Combined-cycle gas turbine power plants offer some of the highest commercially available plant efficiencies, and natural gas is environmentally attractive because it emits less sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter than does oil or coal. In the IEO2000 projection, world natural gas consumption reaches the level of coal by 2005, and by 2020 gas use exceeds coal by 29 percent. Oil currently provides a larger share of world energy consumption than any other energy source and is expected to remain in that position

199

National Parks Clean Up with Alternative Fuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Up with Alternative Fuels Clean Up with Alternative Fuels National Parks Clean Up with Alternative Fuels March 1, 2011 - 11:38am Addthis Alternative fuel vehicles and advanced vehicle technologies are helping to keep National treasures like Yellowstone National Park in Cody, Wyoming pristine. | Photo by Jeff Gunn Alternative fuel vehicles and advanced vehicle technologies are helping to keep National treasures like Yellowstone National Park in Cody, Wyoming pristine. | Photo by Jeff Gunn Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities What does this mean for me? Pristine National Parks Less of your tax dollars spent on fuel Blue skies, pristine mountain vistas, endless open space and ... choking fumes from motor vehicles? Even though the latter clearly doesn't belong in our National Parks, maintaining their air quality has become a real

200

Evaluation of fuel consumption potential of medium and heavy duty vehicles through modeling and simulation.  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this report is to provide quantitative data to support the Committee in its task of establishing a report to support rulemaking on medium- and heavy-duty fuel efficiency improvement. In particular, it is of paramount importance for the Committee to base or illustrate their conclusions on established models and actual state-of-the art data. The simulations studies presented in the report have been defined and requested by the members of the National Academy committee to provide quantitative inputs to support their recommendations. As such, various technologies and usage scenarios were considered for several applications. One of the objective is to provide the results along with their associated assumptions (both vehicle and drive cycles), information generally missing from public discussions on literature search. Finally, the advantages and limitations of using simulation will be summarized. The study addresses several of the committee tasks, including: (1) Discussion of the implication of metric selection; (2) Assessing the impact of existing technologies on fuel consumption through energy balance analysis (both steady-state and standard cycles) as well as real world drive cycles; and (3) Impact of future technologies, both individually and collectively.

Delorme, A.; Karbowski, D.; Sharer, P.; Energy Systems

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel Cell  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Studies National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Studies July 23, 2013 - 1:07pm Addthis National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Studies What does this project do? For more information on DOE's efforts to make solid oxide fuel cells an efficient and economically compelling option, please visit: The NETL Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Program Webpage Solid oxide fuel cells are among the cleanest, most efficient power-generating technologies now being developed. They provide excellent electrical efficiencies and are capable of operating on a wide variety of fuels, from coal and natural gas to landfill waste and hydrogen. And with continued advancements, solid oxide fuel cells can provide clean

202

Energy Department Launches National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Launches National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Launches National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center to Advance Fuel Cell Technologies Energy Department Launches National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center to Advance Fuel Cell Technologies September 12, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Following Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz's visit to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the Energy Department today announced the unveiling of a one-of-its-kind national secure data center dedicated to the independent analysis of advanced hydrogen and fuel cell technologies at the Energy Department's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) located at NREL in Golden, Colorado. The National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC) allows industry, academia, and government organizations to submit and review data

203

Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and...

204

Evaluations of 1997 Fuel Consumption Patterns of Heavy Duty Trucks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed 21st Century Truck program selected three truck classes for focused analysis. On the basis of gross vehicle weight (GVW) classification, these were Class 8 (representing heavy), Class 6 (representing medium), and Class 2b (representing light). To develop and verify these selections, an evaluation of fuel use of commercial trucks was conducted, using data from the 1997 Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (VIUS). Truck fuel use was analyzed by registered GVW class, and by body type.

Santini, Danilo

2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

205

Advanced Nuclear Fuel | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium-based Technologies Advanced Nuclear Fuel Advanced Nuclear Fuel Y-12 developers co-roll zirconium clad LEU-Mo. The Y-12 National Security Complex has over 60 years of...

206

Recent world fossil-fuel and primary energy production and consumption trends  

SciTech Connect

Worldwide fossil fuel and primary electric power production figures since 1973 show a recent drop in oil production similar to the 1975 decline after recession. Crude oil consumption has declined since 1978, while production has increased. Natural gas production and consumption continue to increase as does power generation from all energy sources. Differences are noted between data sources and comparisons made of the validity of the data. 13 references, 7 figures, 12 tables. (DCK)

Parent, J.D.

1982-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

207

Michigan Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,798 2,012 2,074 1970's 3,440 2,145 2,143 2,551 3,194 8,420 7,647 8,022 11,076 14,695 1980's 6,494 3,461 9,699 8,130 8,710 8,195 7,609 9,616 8,250 8,003 1990's 9,094 9,595 7,274 8,171 9,766 9,535 8,489 12,060 9,233 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

208

Kansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 7,842 15,867 17,587 1970's 20,841 27,972 28,183 32,663 35,350 27,212 31,044 29,142 30,491 48,663 1980's 24,521 19,665 41,392 37,901 40,105 42,457 38,885 44,505 45,928 43,630 1990's 40,914 44,614 43,736 56,657 44,611 47,282 49,196 46,846 33,989 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

209

Oklahoma Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 65,167 84,259 103,361 1970's 98,417 101,126 98,784 80,233 80,780 79,728 84,025 77,631 82,046 128,475 1980's 59,934 56,785 91,465 79,230 91,707 88,185 84,200 104,415 100,926 90,225 1990's 111,567 88,366 92,978 99,869 91,039 80,846 73,039 81,412 61,543 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

210

Alaska Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,659 2,240 6,864 1970's 4,748 8,459 16,056 15,217 14,402 17,842 15,972 17,336 15,895 12,153 1980's 30,250 15,249 94,232 97,828 111,069 64,148 72,686 116,682 153,670 192,239 1990's 193,875 223,194 234,716 237,702 238,156 292,811 295,834 271,284 281,872 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

211

Arkansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 10,267 4,027 6,268 1970's 9,184 6,433 4,740 3,000 4,246 4,200 4,049 4,032 3,760 7,661 1980's 1,949 2,549 5,096 5,384 5,922 12,439 9,062 11,990 12,115 11,586 1990's 7,101 1,406 5,838 6,405 4,750 5,551 5,575 6,857 8,385 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

212

New Mexico Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 46,793 46,331 45,309 1970's 47,998 46,114 48,803 52,553 43,452 38,604 49,160 43,751 37,880 50,798 1980's 36,859 22,685 55,722 47,630 50,662 46,709 35,615 48,138 41,706 42,224 1990's 65,889 44,766 53,697 49,658 54,786 52,589 81,751 64,458 59,654 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

213

Utah Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,956 1,503 2,113 1970's 633 2,115 1,978 2,435 4,193 7,240 9,150 7,585 8,325 14,123 1980's 7,594 511 5,965 4,538 8,375 9,001 13,289 17,671 16,889 16,211 1990's 19,719 13,738 12,611 12,526 13,273 27,012 27,119 24,619 27,466 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

214

West Virginia Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,052 2,276 0 1970's 2,551 3,043 3,808 2,160 1,909 1,791 1,490 1,527 1,233 1,218 1980's 2,482 2,515 6,426 5,826 7,232 7,190 6,658 8,835 8,343 7,882 1990's 9,631 7,744 8,097 7,065 8,087 8,045 6,554 7,210 6,893 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

215

Colorado Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,668 2,361 2,604 1970's 2,726 3,231 4,676 7,202 5,822 7,673 7,739 9,124 10,619 21,610 1980's 7,041 7,093 13,673 10,000 10,560 10,829 9,397 12,095 11,622 12,221 1990's 17,343 23,883 21,169 24,832 24,347 25,130 27,492 29,585 31,074 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

216

Kentucky Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,828 1,992 2,277 1970's 2,317 2,212 1,509 1,238 1,206 1,218 1,040 1,107 1,160 1,214 1980's 989 1,040 9,772 8,361 9,038 9,095 6,335 3,254 2,942 2,345 1990's 3,149 2,432 2,812 3,262 2,773 2,647 2,426 2,457 2,325 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

217

North Dakota Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 17,133 16,163 14,691 1970's 14,067 13,990 12,773 12,462 11,483 12,008 15,998 13,697 12,218 3,950 1980's 1,017 13,759 3,514 4,100 4,563 4,710 3,974 5,194 4,014 3,388 1990's 6,939 11,583 8,462 8,256 11,306 11,342 11,603 8,572 8,309 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

218

U.S. Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 595,172 687,356 598,475 573,793 741,268 697,703 640,633 1990's 807,735 672,314 710,250 723,118 699,842 792,315 799,629 776,306 771,366 679,480 2000's 746,889 747,411 730,579 758,380 731,563 756,324 782,992 861,063 864,113 913,229 2010's 916,797 938,340 987,957 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

219

Montana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 5,904 5,188 6,183 1970's 5,091 6,148 5,924 4,281 3,683 2,315 2,754 2,972 2,792 4,796 1980's 3,425 1,832 2,012 1,970 2,069 2,138 1,808 2,088 1,994 1,766 1990's 2,262 1,680 1,871 2,379 2,243 2,238 2,401 2,277 2,000 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

220

Ohio Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,656 3,505 2,879 1970's 3,140 4,302 3,397 3,548 2,957 2,925 2,742 2,814 3,477 22,094 1980's 1,941 1,776 3,671 4,377 5,741 5,442 5,243 5,802 4,869 3,876 1990's 5,129 1,476 1,450 1,366 1,332 1,283 1,230 1,201 1,125 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

President Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility The Reagan Administration announces a nuclear energy policy that anticipates the establishment of a facility for the storage of...

222

National Rural Electric Cooperative Association: Residential Fuel Cell Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summarizes the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association's work, under contract to DOE's Distribution and Interconnection R&D, to create a residential fuel cell demonstration program.

Not Available

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Roadmap for Development of Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructructure and Analysis of Vehicular Natural Gas Consumption by Niche Sector  

SciTech Connect

Vehicular natural gas consumption is on the rise, totaling nearly 200 million GGEs in 2005, despite declines in total NGV inventory in recent years. This may be attributed to greater deployment of higher fuel use medium- and heavy-duty NGVs as compared to the low fuel use of the natural gas-powered LDVs that exited the market through attrition, many of which were bi-fuel. Natural gas station counts are down to about 1100 from their peak of about 1300. Many of the stations that closed were under-utilized or not used at all while most new stations were developed with greater attention to critical business fundamentals such as site selection, projected customer counts, peak and off-peak fueling capacity needs and total station throughput. Essentially, the nation's NGV fueling infrastructure has been--and will continue--going through a 'market correction'. While current economic fundamentals have shortened payback and improved life-cycle savings for investment in NGVs and fueling infrastructure, a combination of grants and other financial incentives will still be needed to overcome general fleet market inertia to maintain status quo. Also imperative to the market's adoption of NGVs and other alternative fueled vehicle and fueling technologies is a clear statement of long-term federal government commitment to diversifying our nation's transportation fuel use portfolio and, more specifically, the role of natural gas in that policy. Based on the current NGV market there, and the continued promulgation of clean air and transportation policies, the Western Region is--and will continue to be--the dominant region for vehicular natural gas use and growth. In other regions, especially the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic states and Texas, increased awareness and attention to air quality and energy security concerns by the public and - more important, elected officials--are spurring policies and programs that facilitate deployment of NGVs and fueling infrastructure. Because of their high per-vehicle fuel use, central fueling and sensitivity to fuel costs, fleets will continue to be the primary target for NGV deployment and station development efforts. The transit sector is projected to continue to account for the greatest vehicular natural gas use and for new volume growth. New tax incentives and improved life-cycle economics also create opportunities to deploy additional vehicles and install related vehicular natural gas fueling infrastructure in the refuse, airport and short-haul sectors. Focusing on fleets generates the highest vehicular natural gas throughout but it doesn't necessarily facilitate public fueling infrastructure because, generally, fleet operators prefer not to allow public access due to liability concerns and revenue and tax administrative burdens. While there are ways to overcome this reluctance, including ''outside the fence'' retail dispensers and/or co-location of public and ''anchor'' fleet dispensing capability at a mutually convenient existing or new retail location, each has challenges that complicate an already complex business transaction. Partnering with independent retail fuel station companies, especially operators of large ''truck stops'' on the major interstates, to include natural gas at their facilities may build public fueling infrastructure and demand enough to entice the major oil companies to once again engage. Garnering national mass media coverage of success in California and Utah where vehicular natural gas fueling infrastructure is more established will help pave the way for similar consumer market growth and inclusion of public accessibility at stations in other regions. There isn't one ''right'' business model for growing the nation's NGV inventory and fueling infrastructure. Different types of station development and ownership-operation strategies will continue to be warranted for different customers in different markets. Factors affecting NGV deployment and station development include: regional air quality compliance status and the state and/or local political climate regarding mandates and/or in

Stephen C. Yborra

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Monthly, global emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines available data, develops a strategy and presents a monthly, global time series of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions for the years 1950 2006. This monthly time series was constructed from detailed study of monthly data from the 21 countries that account for approximately 80% of global total emissions. These data were then used in a Monte Carlo approach to proxy for all remaining countries. The proportional-proxy methodology estimates by fuel group the fraction of annual emissions emitted in each country and month. Emissions from solid, liquid and gas fuels are explicitly modelled by the proportional-proxy method. The primary conclusion from this study is the global monthly time series is statistically significantly different from a uniform distribution throughout the year. Uncertainty analysis of the data presented show that the proportional-proxy method used faithfully reproduces monthly patterns in the data and the global monthly pattern of emissions is relatively insensitive to the exact proxy assignments used. The data and results presented here should lead to a better understanding of global and regional carbon cycles, especially when the mass data are combined with the stable carbon isotope data in atmospheric transport models.

Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Gregg, JS [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Losey, London M [ORNL; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs EIS-0203: Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs SUMMARY This EIS considers programmatic (DOE-wide) alternative approaches to safely, efficiently, and responsibly manage existing and projected quantities of spent nuclear fuel until the year 2035. This amount of time may be required to make and implement a decision on the ultimate disposition of spent nuclear fuel. DOE's spent nuclear fuel responsibilities include fuel generated by DOE production, research, and development reactors; naval reactors; university and foreign research reactors; domestic non-DOE reactors such as those at the National Institute

226

US National Institute of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Commercialization | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Institute of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Commercialization Institute of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Commercialization Jump to: navigation, search Name US National Institute of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Commercialization Place Columbia, South Carolina Zip 29250-0768 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product The National Institute of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Commercialization, a nonprofit organization, will work to find commercial opportunities for USC and other state research institutions doing fuel cell research. References US National Institute of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Commercialization[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. US National Institute of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Commercialization is a company located in Columbia, South Carolina . References

227

Texas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 645,058 711,720 741,902 1970's 769,500 784,773 802,112 828,139 817,194 763,107 729,946 732,428 757,853 717,462 1980's 536,766 505,322 347,846 307,717 326,662 307,759 302,266 355,765 318,922 291,977 1990's 394,605 297,233 293,845 296,423 298,253 333,548 330,547 301,800 330,228 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption

228

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Supplemental Table 47 of EIA AEO 2011 Early Release
2011-02-23T16:04:28Z 2011-03-31T19:33:44Z...

229

Louisiana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 195,990 212,134 273,213 1970's 287,222 292,589 312,145 336,832 347,098 301,816 556,772 591,292 558,877 305,181 1980's 196,033 180,687 337,398 275,698 303,284 258,069 243,283 301,279 272,455 256,123 1990's 258,267 195,526 220,711 222,813 207,171 209,670 213,721 227,542 194,963 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption

230

Table 4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per 4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Fuel Oil (thousand) Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu) Fuel Oil Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 10 14 13 13 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 10 16 11 11 5,001 to 10,000 15 22 18 18 10,001 to 25,000 15 24 19 19 25,001 to 50,000 13 25 29 29 50,001 to 100,000 14 27 21 22 100,001 to 200,000 13 36 34 34 200,001 to 500,000 13 37 33 33 Over 500,000 17 51 50 50 Principal Building Activity Education 17 17 16 17 Food Sales and Service 25 36 16 16 Health Care 29 48 47 47 Lodging 27 37 32 32 Mercantile and Service 14 25 26 26 Office 14 19 21 21 Public Assembly 23 46 35 34 Public Order and Safety 28 48 46 46 Religious Worship

231

US National Fuel Cell Research Center NFCRC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Research Center NFCRC Research Center NFCRC Jump to: navigation, search Name US National Fuel Cell Research Center (NFCRC) Place Irvine, California Zip 92697-3550 Product Academic research center active as a component of the Advanced Power&Energy Program (APEP) which also oversees the UC Irvine Combustion Labaratory (UCICL). References US National Fuel Cell Research Center (NFCRC)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. US National Fuel Cell Research Center (NFCRC) is a company located in Irvine, California . References ↑ "US National Fuel Cell Research Center (NFCRC)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=US_National_Fuel_Cell_Research_Center_NFCRC&oldid=352615

232

" Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES"

233

" Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

234

FUEL CONSUMPTION AND COST SAVINGS OF CLASS 8 HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS POWERED BY NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compare the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas and diesel heavy-duty (HD) class 8 trucks under consistent simulated drive cycle conditions. Our study included both conventional and hybrid HD trucks operating with either natural gas or diesel engines, and we compare the resulting simulated fuel efficiencies, fuel costs, and payback periods. While trucks powered by natural gas engines have lower fuel economy, their CO2 emissions and costs are lower than comparable diesel trucks. Both diesel and natural gas powered hybrid trucks have significantly improved fuel economy, reasonable cost savings and payback time, and lower CO2 emissions under city driving conditions. However, under freeway-dominant driving conditions, the overall benefits of hybridization are considerably less. Based on payback period alone, non-hybrid natural gas trucks appear to be the most economic option for both urban and freeway driving environments.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Table 5.1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption . U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 1994 1993 Household and 1994 Vehicle Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Number of Vehicles Vehicle-Miles Traveled Motor Fuel Consumption Motor Fuel Expenditures RSE Row Factor: (million) (percent) (billion) (percent) (billion gallons) (gallon percent) (quadril- lion Btu) (billion dollars) (percent) 0.9 0.8 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.0 Household Characteristics Total .................................................... 156.8 100.0 1,793 100.0 90.6 100.0 11.2 104.7 100.0 2.8 Census Region and Division Northeast ........................................... 26.6 17.0 299 16.7 14.5 16.0 1.8 17.2 16.4 5.7 New England ................................... 7.6 4.8 84 4.7 4.1 4.5 0.5 4.8 4.6 13.8 Middle Atlantic

236

Modelling road and rail freight energy consumption: A comparative study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??After reviewing land based freight growth trends nationally and internationally, this thesis discusses the main parameters governing fuel consumption, as well as past approaches in (more)

Parajuli, Ashis

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Pantex installs new meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex installs new meters to help to ... Pantex installs new meters to help to reduce energy consumption Posted By Office of Public Affairs Project Manager Janice Clark gives a safety briefing.

238

Pantex installs new meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National meters to help to reduce energy consumption | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex installs new meters to help to ... Pantex installs new meters to help to reduce energy consumption Posted By Office of Public Affairs Project Manager Janice Clark gives a safety briefing.

239

National Fuel - Large Non-Residential Conservation Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Fuel - Large Non-Residential Conservation Program National Fuel - Large Non-Residential Conservation Program National Fuel - Large Non-Residential Conservation Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Commercial Custom Rebates: $200,000 Industrial Custom Rebates: $5,000,000 Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom Rebates: $15/Mcf x the gas savings or 50% of the total project cost Unit Heater: $1000 Hot Air Furnace: $500 Low Intensity Infrared Heating: $500 Programmable Thermostat: $25

240

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_ssd_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_ssd_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:58 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SSD_2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,0 40224,0 40252,0 40283,0 40313,0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

,"Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sid_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sid_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SID_2" "Date","Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,10 34880,19

242

,"Indiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sin_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sin_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SIN_2" "Date","Indiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,4 40224,4 40252,4 40283,4 40313,4 40344,4

243

,"Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_shi_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_shi_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SHI_2" "Date","Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,0 40224,0 40252,0 40283,0 40313,0 40344,0

244

,"Colorado Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sco_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sco_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SCO_2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,21 40224,19 40252,21 40283,20 40313,21

245

,"Arizona Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_saz_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_saz_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arizona Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAZ_2" "Date","Arizona Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,37 33785,46 34150,44 34515,61 34880,118

246

,"Georgia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sga_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sga_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:16 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Georgia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SGA_2" "Date","Georgia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,78 40224,70 40252,78 40283,75 40313,78

247

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sar_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sar_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAR_2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,3 34880,2

248

,"Delaware Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sde_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sde_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Delaware Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SDE_2" "Date","Delaware Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,1 34880,1

249

,"Alaska Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sak_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sak_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:04 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAK_2" "Date","Alaska Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,2 40224,2 40252,2 40283,2 40313,2 40344,2

250

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sla_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sla_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SLA_2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,34 33419,9 33785,9 34150,8 34515,22

251

,"Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sfl_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sfl_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SFL_2" "Date","Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,7 33785,9 34150,27 34515,68 34880,75

252

,"Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sid_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sid_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:20 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SID_2" "Date","Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,6 40224,5 40252,6 40283,6 40313,6 40344,6 40374,6

253

,"Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sal_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sal_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:04 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAL_2" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,3 33419,0 33785,3 34150,4 34515,3 34880,4

254

,"California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sca_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sca_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SCA_2" "Date","California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,4 33419,9 33785,27 34150,255 34515,550

255

,"California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sca_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sca_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SCA_2" "Date","California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1153 40224,1041 40252,1153 40283,1116

256

,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sma_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sma_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:28 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Massachusetts Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SMA_2" "Date","Massachusetts Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,1 33785,2 34150,2

257

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sar_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sar_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAR_2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1 40224,1 40252,1 40283,1 40313,1 40344,1

258

,"Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sal_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sal_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:05 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAL_2" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,9 40224,8 40252,9 40283,9 40313,9 40344,9

259

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sct_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sct_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Connecticut Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SCT_2" "Date","Connecticut Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,2

260

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_ssd_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_ssd_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:57 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SSD_2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,2 33785,5 34150,7 34515,5

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

,"Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sks_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sks_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SKS_2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,10 34880,2

262

,"Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sfl_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sfl_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SFL_2" "Date","Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,5 40224,5 40252,5 40283,5 40313,5 40344,5

263

,"Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_shi_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_shi_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SHI_2" "Date","Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 35611,284 35976,0 36341,380 36707,0 37072,0 37437,0 37802,0 38168,0

264

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sla_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sla_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SLA_2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1 40224,1 40252,1 40283,1 40313,1

265

,"South Carolina Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_ssc_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_ssc_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:56 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Carolina Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SSC_2" "Date","South Carolina Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1 40224,1 40252,1 40283,1

266

,"Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sks_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sks_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SKS_2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1 40224,1 40252,1 40283,1 40313,1 40344,1

267

Hearing on the Use of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technology in the National Park Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Parks hydrogen and fuel cell initiative must be education and research.and fuel cell projects in the National Parks Service must be education and research.

Eggert, Anthony

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

National Fuel (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Fuel (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates National Fuel (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates National Fuel (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Rebate amount cannot exceed the purchase price Program Info Start Date 1/1/2013 Expiration Date 3/31/2014 State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $250 Forced Air Furnace with ECM: $350 Hot Water Boiler: $350 Steam Boiler: $200 Programmable Thermostat: $25 Indirect Water Heater: $250 Provider Energy Federation Incorporated (EFI) National Fuel offers pre-qualified equipment rebates for the installation of certain energy efficiency measures to residential customers in Western

269

Trends in the size distribution, highway use, and consumption of gasoline and diesel fuels of the U.S. Commercial Truck Fleet, 1977-2002.  

SciTech Connect

This paper focuses on various major long-range (1977-2002, 1982-2002) U.S. commercial trucking trends by using U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census Vehicle/Truck Inventory and Use Survey (VIUS/TIUS) data from this period, as well as selected 1977-2002 data from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA) and the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) Highway Statistics. Analyses are made of (1) overall passenger vehicle versus truck consumption patterns of gasoline and diesel fuel and (2) the population growth and fuels used by all commercial truck classes and selected truck types (single unit and combination). Selected vehicle miles traveled, gallons per vehicle miles traveled, and gallons per cargo ton-miles traveled trends, as well as the effect of cargo tons per truck on fuel consumption, are also assessed. In addition, long-range trends of related factors (such as long-haul mileages driven by heavy trucks) and their impacts on both reducing fuel consumption per cargo-ton-mile and the relative shares of total commercial fuel use among truck classes were examined. Results of these trends on U.S. petroleum consumption are identified. The effects of basic engineering design and performance, national Interstate highway construction legislation, national demographic trends (such as suburbanization), and changes in U.S. corporate operational requirements are discussed. Their impacts on both the long-distance hauling and shorter-distance urban and suburban delivery markets of the commercial trucking industry are highlighted.

Bertram, K. M.; Santini, D. J.; Anderson, J. L.; Vyas, A. D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Fuel Cell Electric National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration Final Report K. Wipke, S. Sprik, J. Kurtz, T. Ramsden, C. Ainscough, and G. Saur Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-54860 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration Final Report K. Wipke, S. Sprik, J. Kurtz, T. Ramsden, C. Ainscough, and G. Saur Prepared under Task No. HT12.8110 Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-54860 July 2012 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

271

President Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility | Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > President Reagan Calls for a National Spent ... President Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility October 08, 1981

272

A Study of the Discrepancy Between Federal and State Measurements of On-Highway Motor Fuel Consumption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TM TM -2003/171 A Study of the Discrepancy Between Federal and State Measurements of On-Highway Motor Fuel Consumption July 2003 Ho-Ling Hwang Lorena F. Truett Stacy C. Davis DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the followi ng source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD 703-487-4639 Fax 703-605-6900 E-mail info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm Reports are available to DOE employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange

273

Impact of Solar Control PVB Glass on Vehicle Interior Temperatures, Air-Conditioning Capacity, Fuel Consumption, and Vehicle Range  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the study was to assess the impact of Saflex1 S-series Solar Control PVB (polyvinyl butyral) configurations on conventional vehicle fuel economy and electric vehicle (EV) range. The approach included outdoor vehicle thermal soak testing, RadTherm cool-down analysis, and vehicle simulations. Thermal soak tests were conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility in Golden, Colorado. The test results quantified interior temperature reductions and were used to generate initial conditions for the RadTherm cool-down analysis. The RadTherm model determined the potential reduction in air-conditioning (A/C) capacity, which was used to calculate the A/C load for the vehicle simulations. The vehicle simulation tool identified the potential reduction in fuel consumption or improvement in EV range between a baseline and modified configurations for the city and highway drive cycles. The thermal analysis determined a potential 4.0% reduction in A/C power for the Saflex Solar PVB solar control configuration. The reduction in A/C power improved the vehicle range of EVs and fuel economy of conventional vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

Rugh, J.; Chaney, L.; Venson, T.; Ramroth, L.; Rose, M.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Fuel consumption: industrial, residential, and general studies. Volume 2. 1977-October, 1979 (a bibliography with abstracts). Report for 1977-October 1979  

SciTech Connect

Citations of research on fuel supply, demand, shortages, and conservation through effective utilization are presented. A few abstracts pertain to energy consumption in the agricultural sector, fuel substitution, economic studies, and environmental concerns relating to energy consumption. Bibliographies on electric power consumption and fuel consumption by transportation also are available. (This updated bibliography contains 159 abstracts, 29 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Hundemann, A.S.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

NETL: Hydrogen and Clean Fuels - National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To augment its own capabilities as the only national laboratory dedicated to fossil energy R&D, NETL has access to these other specialized resources for expertise in...

276

DOE/EIA-0272/S The National Interim Energy Consumption Survey:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

272/S 272/S The National Interim Energy Consumption Survey: Exploring the Variability in Energy Consumption - A Supplement October 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use This publication is available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Superintendent of Documents U.S. Government Printing Office Washington, D.C. 20402 Order Desk: (202) 783-3238 Stock Number: 061-003-00217-0 Price: $3.25 For questions on energy statistics or information on availability of other EIA publications, contact. National Energy Information Center, El-20 Forrestal Building U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 (202) 252-8800 For those living and working in the Mountain and Pacific time zones, you may call:

277

Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption Report to Congress  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Pub. L. No. 109-58; EPAct 2005) amended the Uniform Time Act of 1966 (Pub. L. No. 89-387) to increase the portion of the year that is subject to Daylight Saving Time. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) EPAct 2005 extended the duration of Daylight Saving Time in the spring by changing its start date from the first Sunday in April to the second Sunday in March, and in the fall by changing its end date from the last Sunday in October to the first Sunday in November. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) EPAct 2005 also called for the Department of Energy to evaluate the impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on energy consumption in the United States and to submit a report to Congress. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) This report presents the results of impacts of Extended Daylight Saving Time on the national energy consumption in the United States. The key findings are: (1) The total electricity savings of Extended Daylight Saving Time were about 1.3 Tera Watt-hour (TWh). This corresponds to 0.5 percent per each day of Extended Daylight Saving Time, or 0.03 percent of electricity consumption over the year. In reference, the total 2007 electricity consumption in the United States was 3,900 TWh. (2) In terms of national primary energy consumption, the electricity savings translate to a reduction of 17 Trillion Btu (TBtu) over the spring and fall Extended Daylight Saving Time periods, or roughly 0.02 percent of total U.S. energy consumption during 2007 of 101,000 TBtu. (3) During Extended Daylight Saving Time, electricity savings generally occurred over a three- to five-hour period in the evening with small increases in usage during the early-morning hours. On a daily percentage basis, electricity savings were slightly greater during the March (spring) extension of Extended Daylight Saving Time than the November (fall) extension. On a regional basis, some southern portions of the United States exhibited slightly smaller impacts of Extended Daylight Saving Time on energy savings compared to the northern regions, a result possibly due to a small, offsetting increase in household air conditioning usage. (4) Changes in national traffic volume and motor gasoline consumption for passenger vehicles in 2007 were determined to be statistically insignificant and therefore, could not be attributed to Extended Daylight Saving Time.

Belzer, D. B.; Hadley, S. W.; Chin, S-M.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Great Smoky Mountains Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Great Smoky Mountains National Park Turns to Alternative Fuels on AddThis.com...

279

Industrial sector end use. Energy Consumption Data Base (ECDB) for 1975 and 1976. Volume I. Summary of 1976 results. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is the summary document of a three-volume report. It contains an introduction followed by tables of data containing the following information: 1976 national energy consumption by industry fuel type, and end use; 1976 regional energy consumption by industry fuel type, and census division; 1976 regional energy consumption by industry fuel type, and federal regions; 1976 regional energy consumption by industry fuel type, and PAD district; 1976 state energy consumption by industry fuel type, and by state. (PLG)

1980-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

EIA Average Energy Consumption 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table US8. Average Consumption by Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units per Household Fuels Used (physical units of consumption per household using the fuel)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Cost and energy consumption estimates for the aluminum-air battery anode fuel cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the request of DOE's Office of Energy Storage and Distribution (OESD), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a study to generate estimates of the energy use and costs associated with the aluminum anode fuel cycle of the aluminum-air (Al-air) battery. The results of this analysis indicate that the cost and energy consumption characteristics of the mechanically rechargeable Al-air battery system are not as attractive as some other electrically rechargeable electric vehicle battery systems being developed by OESD. However, there are distinct advantages to mechanically rechargeable batteries, which may make the Al-air battery (or other mechanically rechargeable batteries) attractive for other uses, such as stand-alone applications. Fuel cells, such as the proton exchange membrane (PEM), and advanced secondary batteries may be better suited to electric vehicle applications. 26 refs., 3 figs., 25 tabs.

Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet Mar 26, 2012 For nearly two decades, the United States and Ukraine have cooperated on a

283

Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet Mar 26, 2012 For nearly two decades, the United States and Ukraine have cooperated on a

284

Video game console usage and national energy consumption: Results from a field-metering study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Azevedo. 2012, Electricity consumption and energy savingsMcKenney. 2007. Energy consumption by consumer electronicsK. Roth. 2011. Energy Consumption of Consumer Electronics in

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

How El Nino affects energy consumption: a study at national and regional levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

El Nio is typically viewed as an episode of destructive weather anomalies that can last from a few months to several years. The majority of research looks at the negative impacts of this event. However, not all impacts of El Nio are necessarily bad. This study outlines areas of the United States that are most highly impacted by anomalous temperature and rainfall during El Nio years and determines whether these anomalies affect energy consumption. These effects will be examined on both a national and regional scale. Areas of the northwestern and southeastern United States exhibit anomalous temperatures during El Nio years. The southern US and Great Plains area receives positive anomalous precipitation during El Nio years while an area of the east central US experiences negative anomalous precipitation. Natural gas consumption in the northwestern US is reduced by the El Nio/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). During an ENSO event consumers actually save money because less is spent on natural gas for home heating purposes. Hydroelectricity may also be affected by ENSO in the southeastern US but the results at this time are inconclusive. At the national level, ENSO influences the consumption of nuclear electricity.

Collins, Kathleen Jo

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" N7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

287

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

288

The effects of driving style and vehicle performance on the real-world fuel consumption of U.S. light-duty vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Even with advances in vehicle technology, both conservation and methods for reducing the fuel consumption of existing vehicles are needed to decrease the petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of the U.S. ...

Berry, Irene Michelle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Preliminary concepts for detecting national diversion of LWR spent fuel  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary concepts for detecting national diversion of LWR spent fuel during storage, handling and transportation are presented. Principal emphasis is placed on means to achieve timely detection by an international authority. This work was sponsored by the Department of Energy/Office of Safeguards and Security (DOE/OSS) as part of the overall Sandia Fixed Facility Physical Protection Program.

Sonnier, C.S.; Cravens, M.N.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. The Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to

291

A plot study of the potential for Navy utilization of solid waste derived fuels to offset fossil fuels consumption. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A brief study was made to define problems that would be encountered in estimating potential Navy markets for various forms of waste derived fuels. Fossil fuel consumption estimates for boiler plants at several Navy activities were converted to waste derived fuel (WDF) estimates using a set of assumed rules judged technically feasible regarding boiler conversions and confirming fossil fuels and WDF. The results of this first study are presented indicating Navy boilers might represent a significant market for all the WDF a region could produce if the WDF were available in liquid as well as solid forms. The economic feasibility of conversions and WDF production are not addressed in this brief paper.

Capps, A.G.; Duffey-Armstrong, M.; Freeman, R.E.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption of a PHEV School Bus: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected and analyzed real-world school bus drive cycle data and selected similar standard drive cycles for testing on a chassis dynamometer. NREL tested a first-generation plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) school bus equipped with a 6.4L engine and an Enova PHEV drive system comprising a 25-kW/80 kW (continuous/peak) motor and a 370-volt lithium ion battery pack. A Bluebird 7.2L conventional school bus was also tested. Both vehicles were tested over three different drive cycles to capture a range of driving activity. PHEV fuel savings in charge-depleting (CD) mode ranged from slightly more than 30% to a little over 50%. However, the larger fuel savings lasted over a shorter driving distance, as the fully charged PHEV school bus would initially operate in CD mode for some distance, then in a transitional mode, and finally in a charge-sustaining (CS) mode for continued driving. The test results indicate that a PHEV school bus can achieve significant fuel savings during CD operation relative to a conventional bus. In CS mode, the tested bus showed small fuel savings and somewhat higher nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions than the baseline comparison bus.

Barnitt, R.; Gonder, J.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses key analysis results based on data from early 2005 through September 2011 from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration Project, also referred to as the National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) Learning Demonstration. This report serves as one of many mechanisms to help transfer knowledge and lessons learned within various parts of DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Program, as well as externally to other stakeholders. It is the fifth and final such report in a series, with previous reports being published in July 2007, November 2007, April 2008, and September 2010.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Safety analysis of IFR fuel processing in the Argonne National Laboratory Fuel Cycle Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) includes on-site processing and recycling of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process is being demonstrated in the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) at ANL`s Idaho site. This paper describes the safety analyses that were performed in support of the FCF program; the resulting safety analysis report was the vehicle used to secure authorization to operate the facility and carry out the program, which is now under way. This work also provided some insights into safety-related issues of a commercial IFR fuel processing facility. These are also discussed.

Charak, I; Pedersen, D.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Forrester, R.J.; Phipps, R.D. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Overview of Idaho National Laboratory's Hot Fuels Examination Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) of the Idaho National Laboratory was constructed in the 1960s and opened for operation in the 1975 in support of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor research. Specifically the facility was designed to handle spent fuel and irradiated experiments from the Experimental Breeder Reactor EBRII, the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT). HFEF is a large alpha-gamma facility designed to remotely characterize highly radioactive materials. In the late 1980s the facility also began support of the US DOE waste characterization including characterizing contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste. A description of the hot cell as well as some of its primary capabilities are discussed herein.

Adam B. Robinson; R. Paul Lind; Daniel M. Wachs

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

UK Sub-National Energy Consumption The UK Department of Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electricity, gas, road transport fuels, other fuels (includes: coal, industrial petroleum, renewables, manufactured solid fuels), and total energy. Annual data available for...

297

Managing Spent Nuclear Fuel at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a large inventory of diverse types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This legacy derives from the history of the INL as the National Reactor Testing Station, and from its mission to recover HEU from SNF and to test and examine SNF after irradiation. The INL also has a large diversity of SNF storage facilities, some 50 years old. SNF at INL has many formsfrom intact assemblies down to metallurgical mounts, and some fuel has been wet stored for over 40 years. SNF is stored bare or in metal cans under water, or dry in vaults, caissons or casks. Inspection shows varying corrosion and degradation of the SNF and its storage cans. SNF has been stored in 10 different facilities: 5 pools, one cask storage pad, one vault, two generations of caisson facilities, and one modular Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). The pools range in age from 40 years old to the most modern in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The near-term objective is to move SNF from older pools to interim dry storage, allowing shutdown and decommissioning of the older facilities. This move involves drying methods that are dependent on fuel type. The long-term objective is to have INL SNF in safe dry storage and ready to be shipped to the National Repository. The unique features of the INL SNF requires special treatments and packaging to meet the proposed repository acceptance criteria and SNF will be repackaged in standardized canisters for shipment and disposal in the National Repository. Disposal will use the standardized canisters that can be co-disposed with High Level Waste glass logs to limit the total fissile material in a repository waste package. The DOE standardized canister also simplifies the repository handling of the multitude of DOE SNF sizes and shapes.

Thomas Hill; Denzel L. Fillmore

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

National Program Plan Fuel Cells in Transportation. Executive Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells are being developed for application in the transportation sector because they will convert hydrogen to electric power at high efficiencies with virtually no detrimental environmental impact. To realize these energy, environmental, and economic benefits, developers of FCVs need to (1) reduce the size and weight of current designs, (2) develop fuel cell propulsion systems with rapid start-up and greater load-following capability, (3) reduce system cost and/or improve performance, and (4) utilize alternative fuels to a large extent. This Plan addresses the FCV-related requirements of the Energy Act, describing a development program for light- and heavy-duty propulsion systems, a basic R&D program on fuel cell technology that is separate from, but feeds into, the system development activities, and supporting analyses. Implementation of the Program Plan by means of industry/government alliances will accelerate the commercialization of FCVs. In the long term, the successful deployment of large numbers of FCVs promises to eliminate the transportation sector as a major contributor to the nation`s environmental problems.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Plumbing System Upgrade ... Building Newer than 1980 ... 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: ...

300

Nuclear fuel recycling in 4 minutes | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel recycling in 4 minutes Share Topic Energy Energy sources Nuclear energy Nuclear fuel cycle Reactors...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 2b. Primary Fuel Consumption for Selected  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 2b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Primary 1 Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,468 1,572 1,665 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 156 156 166 313 Textile Mills 457 375 304 314 Textile Product Mills 85 94 110 315 Apparel 84 54 27 316 Leather and Allied Products 14 11 5 321 Wood Products 647 518 619 322 Paper 3,221 2,803 2,833 323 Printing and Related Support 199 197 171 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,873 3,454 3,657 325 Chemicals 4,851 4,803 4,181 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 691 707 683 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 1,235 1,331 1,385 331 Primary Metals 3,660 3,100 2,617 332 Fabricated Metal Products 791 706 670 333 Machinery 404 341 416 334 Computer and Electronic Products

302

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 1b. Fuel Consumption for Selected Industries,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Site Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,044 1,116 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 108 104 109 313 Textile Mills 254 205 178 314 Textile Product Mills 49 60 72 315 Apparel 48 30 14 316 Leather and Allied Products 8 7 3 321 Wood Products 504 375 445 322 Paper 2,744 2,361 2,354 323 Printing and Related Support 98 98 85 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,622 3,202 3,396 325 Chemicals 3,704 3,769 3,195 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 327 348 336 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 969 1,052 1,105 331 Primary Metals 2,576 2,123 1,744 332 Fabricated Metal Products 441 387 397

303

Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be Fueled by Biomass | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be Fueled by Biomass Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be Fueled by Biomass Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be Fueled by Biomass May 27, 2010 - 12:59pm Addthis When construction is complete in 2011, Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s biomass steam plant will be fueled by roughly 50,000 tons of waste wood per year. | Illustration Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory When construction is complete in 2011, Oak Ridge National Laboratory's biomass steam plant will be fueled by roughly 50,000 tons of waste wood per year. | Illustration Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Lindsay Gsell Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be saving nearly $4 million a year by switching a portion of their current natural gas-fueled steam plant for one powered by biofuel. The move is part of an Energy Savings

304

Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be Fueled by Biomass | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ridge National Laboratory to be Fueled by Biomass Ridge National Laboratory to be Fueled by Biomass Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be Fueled by Biomass May 27, 2010 - 12:59pm Addthis When construction is complete in 2011, Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s biomass steam plant will be fueled by roughly 50,000 tons of waste wood per year. | Illustration Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory When construction is complete in 2011, Oak Ridge National Laboratory's biomass steam plant will be fueled by roughly 50,000 tons of waste wood per year. | Illustration Courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Lindsay Gsell Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be saving nearly $4 million a year by switching a portion of their current natural gas-fueled steam plant for one powered by biofuel. The move is part of an Energy Savings

305

Water consumption footprint and land requirements of alternative diesel and jet fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Renewable Fuels Standard 2 (RFS2) is an important component of alternative transportation fuels policy in the United States (US). By mandating the production of alternative fuels, RFS2 attempts to address a number of ...

Staples, Mark Douglas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

MANAGING SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL WASTES AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INL) has a large inventory of diverse types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This legacy is in part due to the history of the INL as the National Reactor Testing Station, in part to its mission to recover highly enriched uranium from SNF and in part to its mission to test and examine SNF after irradiation. The INL also has a large diversity of SNF storage facility, some dating back 50 years in the site history. The success of the INL SNF program is measured by its ability to: 1) achieve safe existing storage, 2) continue to receive SNF from other locations, both foreign and domestic, 3) repackage SNF from wet storage to interim dry storage, and 4) prepare the SNF for dispositioning in a federal repository. Because of the diversity in the SNF and the facilities at the INL, the INL is addressing almost very condition that may exist in the SNF world. Many of solutions developed by the INL are applicable to other SNF storage sites as they develop their management strategy. The SNF being managed by the INL are in a variety of conditions, from intact assemblies to individual rods or plates to powders, rubble, and metallurgical mounts. Some of the fuel has been in wet storage for over forty years. The fuel is stored bare, or in metal cans and either wet under water or dry in vaults, caissons or casks. Inspections have shown varying degrees of corrosion and degradation of the fuel and the storage cans. Some of the fuel has been recanned under water, and the conditions of the fuel inside the second or third can are unknown. The fuel has been stored in one of 10 different facilities: five wet pools and one casks storage pad, one vault, two generations of caisson facilities, and one modular Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). The wet pools range from forty years old to the most modern pool in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The near-term objective is moving the fuel in the older wet storage facilities to interim dry storage facilities, thus permitting the shutdown and decommission of the older facilities. Two wet pool facilities, one at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center and the other at Test Area North, were targeted for initial SNF movements since these were some of the oldest at the INL. Because of the difference in the SNF materials different types of drying processes had to be developed. Passive drying, as is done with typical commercial SNF was not an option because on the condition of some of the fuel, the materials to be dried, and the low heat generation of some of the SNF. There were also size limitations in the existing facility. Active dry stations were designed to address the specific needs of the SNF and the facilities.

Hill, Thomas J

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, 1751-1991; and an estimate of their isotopic composition and latitudinal distribution  

SciTech Connect

This work briefly discusses four of the current research emphases at Oak Ridge National Laboratory regarding the emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from fossil fuel consumption, natural gas flaring and cement manufacture. These emphases include: (1) updating the 1950 to present time series of CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, (2) extending this time series back to 1751, (3) gridding the data at 1{sup 0} by 1{sup 0} resolution, and (4) estimating the isotopic signature of these emissions. In 1991, global emissions of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel and cement increased 1.5% over 1990 levels to 6188 {times} 10{sup 6} metric tonnes C. The Kuwaiti oil fires can account for all of the increase. Recently published energy data (Etemad et al., 1991) allow extension of the CO emissions time series back to 1751. Preliminary examination shows good agreement with two other, but shorter, energy time series. A latitudinal distribution of carbon emissions is being completed. A southward shift in the major mass of CO{sub 2} emissions is occurring from European-North American latitudes towards central-southeast Asian latitudes, reflecting the growth of population and industrialization at these lower latitudes. The carbon isotopic signature of these emissions has been re-examined. The emissions of the last two decades are approximately 1{per_thousand} lighter than previously reported (Tans, 1981). This lightening of the emissions signature is due to fossil fuel gases and liquids, including a revision of their {delta}{sup 13}C isotopic signature and an increased production rate.

Andres, R.J.; Marland, G.; Boden, T.; Bischof, S.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Table 7.4b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector (Subset of Table 7.4a) Coala Petroleum Natural Gasf Other Gasesg Biomass Otherj Distillate Fuel Oilb Residual Fuel Oilc

309

Table 2. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 A small amount of fuel oil used for appliances is included in "Fuel Oil" under "All Uses." NF = No applicable RSE row factor.

310

National briefing summaries: Nuclear fuel cycle and waste management  

SciTech Connect

The National Briefing Summaries is a compilation of publicly available information concerning the nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management strategies and programs of 21 nations, including the United States and three international agencies that have publicized their activities in this field. It presents available highlight information with references that may be used by the reader for additional information. The information in this document is compiled primarily for use by the US Department of Energy and other US federal agencies and their contractors to provide summary information on radioactive waste management activities in other countries. This document provides an awareness to managers and technical staff of what is occurring in other countries with regard to strategies, activities, and facilities. The information may be useful in program planning to improve and benefit United States' programs through foreign information exchange. Benefits to foreign exchange may be derived through a number of exchange activities.

Schneider, K.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Silviera, D.J.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

National briefing summaries: Nuclear fuel cycle and waste management  

SciTech Connect

Since 1976, the International Program Support Office (IPSO) at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has collected and compiled publicly available information concerning foreign and international radioactive waste management programs. This National Briefing Summaries is a printout of an electronic database that has been compiled and is maintained by the IPSO staff. The database contains current information concerning the radioactive waste management programs (with supporting information on nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle) of most of the nations (except eastern European countries) that now have or are contemplating nuclear power, and of the multinational agencies that are active in radioactive waste management. Information in this document is included for three additional countries (China, Mexico, and USSR) compared to the prior issue. The database and this document were developed in response to needs of the US Department of Energy.

Schneider, K.J.; Bradley, D.J.; Fletcher, J.F.; Konzek, G.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Mitchell, S.J.; Molton, P.M.; Nightingale, R.E.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Emissions of CO/sub 2/ to the atmosphere due to U. S. A. fossil fuel consumption  

SciTech Connect

Analysis and projection of carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere are estimated based on the Brookhaven reference energy system. Some new results are given on carbon dioxide contribution to the atmosphere from US fossil fuel consumption by different sectors including residential, commercial, industrial and transportation. The total weight of carbon as carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere and the additional CO/sub 2/ concentration over background by different subsectors in the years 1977, 1980, 1985, 1990, 2000 and 2020 are presented.

Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, M.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments with equimolar deuterium-tritium thermonuclear fuel have been performed on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments use 0.17 mg of fuel with the potential for ignition and significant fusion yield conditions. The thermonuclear fuel has been fielded as a cryogenic layer on the inside of a spherical plastic capsule that is mounted in the center of a cylindrical gold hohlraum. Heating the hohlraum with 192 laser beams for a total laser energy of 1.6 MJ produces a soft x-ray field with 300 eV temperature. The ablation pressure produced by the radiation field compresses the initially 2.2-mm diameter capsule by a factor of 30 to a spherical dense fuel shell that surrounds a central hot-spot plasma of 50 {mu}m diameter. While an extensive set of x-ray and neutron diagnostics has been applied to characterize hot spot formation from the x-ray emission and 14.1 MeV deuterium-tritium primary fusion neutrons, thermonuclear fuel assembly is studied by measuring the down-scattered neutrons with energies in the range of 10 to 12 MeV. X-ray and neutron imaging of the compressed core and fuel indicate a fuel thickness of (14 {+-} 3) {mu}m, which combined with magnetic recoil spectrometer measurements of the fuel areal density of (1 {+-} 0.09) g cm{sup -2} result in fuel densities approaching 600 g cm{sup -3}. The fuel surrounds a hot-spot plasma with average ion temperatures of (3.5 {+-} 0.1) keV that is measured with neutron time of flight spectra. The hot-spot plasma produces a total fusion neutron yield of 10{sup 15} that is measured with the magnetic recoil spectrometer and nuclear activation diagnostics that indicate a 14.1 MeV yield of (7.5{+-}0.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} which is 70% to 75% of the total fusion yield due to the high areal density. Gamma ray measurements provide the duration of nuclear activity of (170 {+-} 30) ps. These indirect-drive implosions result in the highest areal densities and neutron yields achieved on laser facilities to date. This achievement is the result of the first hohlraum and capsule tuning experiments where the stagnation pressures have been systematically increased by more than a factor of 10 by fielding low-entropy implosions through the control of radiation symmetry, small hot electron production, and proper shock timing. The stagnation pressure is above 100 Gbars resulting in high Lawson-type confinement parameters of P{tau} Asymptotically-Equal-To 10 atm s. Comparisons with radiation-hydrodynamic simulations indicate that the pressure is within a factor of three required for reaching ignition and high yield. This will be the focus of future higher-velocity implosions that will employ additional optimizations of hohlraum, capsule and laser pulse shape conditions.

Glenzer, S. H.; Callahan, D. A.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Alger, E. T.; Berger, R. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bradley, D. K.; Burkhart, S. C.; Burr, R.; Caggiano, J. A.; Castro, C.; Choate, C.; Clark, D. S.; Celliers, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; DiNicola, P.; DiNicola, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Cities Helps the National Mall Cut  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cities Helps the Cities Helps the National Mall Cut Petroleum Use With Propane Mowers to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Cities Helps the National Mall Cut Petroleum Use With Propane Mowers on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Cities Helps the National Mall Cut Petroleum Use With Propane Mowers on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Cities Helps the National Mall Cut Petroleum Use With Propane Mowers on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Cities Helps the National Mall Cut Petroleum Use With Propane Mowers on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Cities Helps the National Mall Cut Petroleum Use With Propane Mowers on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean

315

Household energy and consumption and expenditures, 1990. Supplement, Regional  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this supplement to the Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990 report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential housing units, specifically at the four Census regions and nine Census division levels. This report includes household energy consumption, expenditures, and prices for natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and kerosene as well as household wood consumption. For national-level data, see the main report, Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990.

Not Available

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

316

Case Study: Fuel Cells Increase Reliability at First National Bank of Omaha  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

A case study of the First National Bank of Omaha fuel cell system, covering 1999 through October 2009. The system reduced heating bills by more than $1 million.

317

Argonne National Laboratory puts alternative-fuel vehicles to the test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the participation in the alternative-fueled vehicles (AFV) program at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne maintains a fleet of 300 vehicles, including AFV`s.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Heavy Duty Diesel Particulate Matter and Fuel Consumption Modeling for Transportation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel use. Mesoscale Modeling Data Set and Mesoscale Modelobserved, quantified in the data set, and modeled to improveerrors for the validation data set are less than 2% for fuel

Scora, George Alexander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

RSEs for Table C1A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Number of Buildings Floorspace Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings ..... 3.8 1 4.5 4. 5.0 16.4 32

320

Residual fuel consumption in the U.S. continues to decline - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil , gasoline, heating ... in the late 1970s, demand for residual fuel oil in the United ... Changes on both the residual fuel supply and demand side of the ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercial). National Energy Consumption Estimates We usedsection entitled National Energy Consumption Estimates).section entitled National Energy Consumption Estimates).

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

National Fuel (Gas) - Small Commercial Conservation Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Gas) - Small Commercial Conservation Program (Gas) - Small Commercial Conservation Program National Fuel (Gas) - Small Commercial Conservation Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Custom Rebates: $25,000 Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom Rebates: $15/Mcf x the gas savings Unit Heater: $1000 Hot Air Furnace: $500 Low Intensity Infrared Heating: $500 Programmable Thermostat: $25 Hot Water Boiler: $600-$3500 Steam Boiler: $600-$2000 + $2/kBtuh Tankless Water Heaters: $350 Storage Tank Water Heater: $150 Fryer: $750 Convection Oven: $500 Combination Oven: $750 Broiler: $500 Steamer: $750 Griddle: $500 Provider New York State Energy Research and Development Authority

323

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This is the first National Report prepared under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Managementi hereafter referred to as the "Joint Convention". This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within the United States of America (U.S.). National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management - May 2003

324

Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is that the spatial changes observed over time are solely due to changes in national energy consumption and nation-based fuel mix. Increases in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions over...

325

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This second National Report updates the first National Report published on May 3, 2003, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention). This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel (SF) and radioactive waste management facilities within the United States of America (U.S.). Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel

326

Liquid Fuels Market Model of the National Energy Modeling ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The outside battery-limit (OSBL) costs include the cost of cooling water, steam and electric power generation and distribution, fuel oil and fuel gas ...

327

Fuel cells for transportation program: FY1997 national laboratory annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cells for Transportation Program is structured to effectively implement the research and development (R and D) required for highly efficient, low or zero emission fuel cell power systems to be a viable replacement for the internal combustion engine in automobiles. The Program is part of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), a government-industry initiative aimed at development of an 80 mile-per-gallon vehicle. This Annual Report summarizes the technical accomplishments of the laboratories during 1997. Participants include: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). During 1997, the laboratory R and D included one project on solid oxide fuel cells; this project has since been terminated to focus Department resources on PEM fuel cells. The technical component of this report is divided into five key areas: fuel cell stack research and development; fuel processing; fuel cell modeling, testing, and evaluation; direct methanol PEM fuel cells; and solid oxide fuel cells.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

A STUDY OF THE DISCREPANCY BETWEEN FEDERAL AND STATE MEASUREMENTS OF ON-HIGHWAY FUEL CONSUMPTION  

SciTech Connect

Annual highway fuel taxes are collected by the Treasury Department and placed in the Highway Trust Fund (HTF). There is, however, no direct connection between the taxes collected by the Treasury Department and the gallons of on-highway fuel use, which can lead to a discrepancy between these totals. This study was conducted to determine how much of a discrepancy exists between the total fuel usages estimated based on highway revenue funds as reported by the Treasury Department and the total fuel usages used in the apportionment of the HTF to the States. The analysis was conducted using data from Highway Statistics Tables MF-27 and FE-9 for the years 1991-2001. It was found that the overall discrepancy is relatively small, mostly within 5% difference. The amount of the discrepancy varies from year to year and varies among the three fuel types (gasoline, gasohol, special fuels). Several potential explanations for these discrepancies were identified, including issues on data, tax measurement, gallon measurement, HTF receipts, and timing. Data anomalies caused by outside forces, such as deferment of tax payments from one fiscal year to the next, can skew fuel tax data. Fuel tax evasion can lead to differences between actual fuel use and fuel taxes collected. Furthermore, differences in data collection and reporting among States can impact fuel use data. Refunds, credits, and transfers from the HTF can impact the total fuel tax receipt data. Timing issues, such as calendar year vs. fiscal year, can also cause some discrepancy between the two data sources.

Hwang, HL

2003-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

329

Table 8.5a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

For 19491979, data are for gas turbine and internal combustion plant use of petroleum. For 19802000, ... 8 Wood and wood-derived fuels.

330

Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

11 Commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants. 4 Jet fuel, kerosene, other petroleum liquids, and waste oil. 12 Industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants.

331

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: National Research Council  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Council Printable Version National Research Council The National Research Council (NRC) was established in 1916 and operates as a part of the National Academies, a private,...

332

Independent Oversight Review of the Idaho National Laboratory Fuel Conditioning Facility Safety Basis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT REVIEW OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY FUEL CONDITIONING FACILITY SAFETY BASIS April 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Independent Oversight i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT REVIEW OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY FUEL CONDITIONING FACILITY SAFETY BASIS Table of Contents Acronyms ............................................................................................................................ ii Executive Summary ........................................................................................................... iii 1.0 Introduction ..................................................................................................................1

333

TAX EXPENDITURES RELATED TO THE PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION OF MOTOR FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-miles of travel RECS = Residential Energy Consumption Survey SIC = standard industrial classification SOx = sulfur industries, or oil over other energy industries: virtually all major energy sources require large investments.......................24 18.5.1 Corporate income-tax expenditures for the oil industry

Delucchi, Mark

334

Modelling domestic energy consumption at district scale: A tool to support national and local energy policies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the development, evaluation and application of the Domestic Energy and Carbon Model (DECM) for predicting the energy consumptions and carbon dioxide emissions of the existing English housing stock. A novel feature of DECM is the adoption ... Keywords: Domestic energy model, Dwelling carbon emission, Housing stock model, Local energy policy

Vicky Cheng; Koen Steemers

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Table 8.7a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total 5: Wood 8: Waste 9: Thousand ... electric utility data also include a small amount of fuel oil no. 4. 10 ... and other manufactured and waste gases derived from ...

336

Fossil fuel potential of Turkey: A statistical evaluation of reserves, production, and consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since Turkey is a developing country with tremendous economic growth, its energy demand is also getting increased. Of this energy, about 70% is supplied from fossil fuels and the remaining 30% is from renewable sources. Among the fossil fuels, 90% of oil, natural gas, and coal are imported, and only 10% is from domestic sources. All the lignite is supplied from domestic sources. The total share of renewable sources and lignite in the total energy production is 45%. In order for Turkey to have sufficient and reliable energy sources, first the renewable energy sources must be developed, and energy production from fossil fuels, except for lignite, must be minimized. Particularly, scarcity of fossil fuels and increasing oil prices have a strong effect on economic growth of the country.

Korkmaz, S.; Kara-Gulbay, R.; Turan, M. [Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 1 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",879.8,5,2.2 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",6416.6,17.5,5.7

338

EA-1573-S1: Proposed Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

573-S1: Proposed Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the 573-S1: Proposed Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory South Table Mountain Site, Golden, CO EA-1573-S1: Proposed Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory South Table Mountain Site, Golden, CO DOE's Golden Field Office has prepared a draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) for proposed improvements to the Renewable Fuel Heat Plant (RFHP) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain site. The SEA analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed improvements tot he RFHP consisting of construction and operation of an onsite woodchip fuel storage silo and an expansion of woodchip fuel sources to a regional scale.

339

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This Third United States National Report updates the second National Report published in October 2005, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management 1(Joint Convention). This report reflects developments in the United States through September 2008. This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within

340

Evaluating Thermoelectric, Agricultural, and Municipal Water Consumption in a National Water Resources Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than a decade ago, EPRI identified water availability constraints as a major issue facing current operations and future development of the electric power sector in the United States and internationally. As a result, EPRI initiated research to assess and reduce both current and future vulnerabilities to water shortages. This report derives and applies algorithms for calculating water consumption by the U.S. electric power, municipal, and agricultural sectors. Using the most recent available ...

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A fuzzy diagnosis and advice system for optimization of emissions and fuel consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a fuzzy expert system has been developed, which is used for defining possible fuel system faults, ignition system faults, intake valve and exhaust valve faults and refers solution advice for these faults, which uses measurements of CO, ... Keywords: Diagnosis software, Emissions, Fuzzy expert systems, Spark ignition engine

Yavuz Kilagiz; Ahmet Baran; Zerrin Yildiz; Murat etin

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Factor of two : halving the fuel consumption of new U.S. Automobiles by 2035  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the vehicle design and sales mix changes necessary to double the average fuel economy of new U.S. cars and light-trucks by model year 2035. To achieve this factor of two target, three technology options ...

Cheah, Lynette W

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Analysis of Technology Options to Reduce the Fuel Consumption of Idling Trucks  

SciTech Connect

Long-haul trucks idling overnight consume more than 838 million gallons (20 million barrels) of fuel annually. Idling also emits pollutants. Truck drivers idle their engines primarily to (1) heat or cool the cab and/or sleeper, (2) keep the fuel warm in winter, and (3) keep the engine warm in the winter so that the engine is easier to start. Alternatives to overnight idling could save much of this fuel, reduce emissions, and cut operating costs. Several fuel-efficient alternatives to idling are available to provide heating and cooling: (1) direct-fired heater for cab/sleeper heating, with or without storage cooling; (2) auxiliary power units; and (3) truck stop electrification. Many of these technologies have drawbacks that limit market acceptance. Options that supply electricity are economically viable for trucks that are idled for 1,000-3,000 or more hours a year, while heater units could be used across the board. Payback times for fleets, which would receive quantity discounts on the prices, would be somewhat shorter.

F. Stodolsky; L. Gaines; A. Vyas

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Fuel cells for transportation R and D at Argonne National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the transportation fuel cell systems research at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Two areas of research are discussed: the development of a catalytic partial-oxidation reformer for conventional and alternative transportation fuels, and a novel approach for the removal of carbon monoxide from reformate for use in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The objective of the first study is to develop reformers for converting liquid fuels (gasoline, ethanol, or methanol) to hydrogen gas for use with fuel cell systems in light-duty vehicles. The second study is investigating the use of acidic cuprous chloride (or other suitable sorbent) to chemically bind and thus remove the CO from the reformate.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Bloom, I.; Carter, J.D.; Doshi, R.; Kramarz, K.; Lee, S.H.D.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Energy Department Launches National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moniz Dedicates Clean Energy Research Center, New Supercomputer A hydrogen-powered Toyota Prius pulls up to Humboldt State University's student designed hydrogen fueling...

346

EA-1887: Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

improvements to the Renewable Fuel Heat Plant including construction and operation of a wood chip storage silo and the associated material handling conveyances and utilization of...

347

Improving the performance and fuel consumption of dual chamber stratified charge spark ignition engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the nature of the combustion processes in a dual chamber stratified charge spark ignition engine is described. This work concentrated on understanding the mixing process in the main chamber gases. A specially constructed single cylinder engine was used to both conduct experiments to study mixing effects and to obtain experimental data for the validation of the computer model which was constructed in the theoretical portion of the study. The test procedures are described. Studies were conducted on the effect of fuel injection timing on performance and emissions using the combination of orifice size and prechamber to main chamber flow rate ratio which gave the best overall compromise between emissions and performance. In general, fuel injection gave slightly higher oxides of nitrogen, but considerably lower hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions than the carbureted form of the engine. Experiments with engine intake port redesign to promote swirl mixing indicated a substantial increase in the power output from the engine and, that an equivalent power levels, the nitric oxide emissions are approximately 30% lower with swirl in the main chamber than without swirl. The development of a computer simulation of the combustion process showed that a one-dimensional combustion model can be used to accurately predict trends in engine operation conditions and nitric oxide emissions even though the actual flame in the engine is not completely one-dimensional, and that a simple model for mixing of the main chamber and prechamber intake gases at the start of compression proved adequate to explain the effects of swirl, ignition timing, overall fuel air ratio, volumetric efficiency, and variations in prechamber air fuel ratio and fuel rate percentage on engine power and nitric oxide emissions. (LCL)

Sorenson, S.C.; Pan, S.S.; Bruckbauer, J.J.; Gehrke, G.R.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Effects of Village Power Quality on Fuel Consumption and Operating Expenses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alaska's rural village electric utilities are isolated from the Alaska railbelt electrical grid intertie and from each other. Different strategies have been developed for providing power to meet demand in each of these rural communities. Many of these communities rely on diesel electric generators (DEGs) for power. Some villages have also installed renewable power sources and automated generation systems for controlling the DEGs and other sources of power. For example, Lime Village has installed a diesel battery photovoltaic hybrid system, Kotzebue and Wales have wind-diesel hybrid systems, and McGrath has installed a highly automated system for controlling diesel generators. Poor power quality and diesel engine efficiency in village power systems increases the cost of meeting the load. Power quality problems may consist of poor power factor (PF) or waveform disturbances, while diesel engine efficiency depends primarily on loading, the fuel type, the engine temperature, and the use of waste heat for nearby buildings. These costs take the form of increased fuel use, increased generator maintenance, and decreased reliability. With the cost of bulk fuel in some villages approaching $1.32/liter ($5.00/gallon) a modest 5% decrease in fuel use can result in substantial savings with short payback periods depending on the village's load profile and the cost of corrective measures. This project over its five year history has investigated approaches to improving power quality and implementing fuel savings measures through the use of performance assessment software tools developed in MATLAB{reg_sign} Simulink{reg_sign} and the implementation of remote monitoring, automated generation control, and the addition of renewable energy sources in select villages. The results have shown how many of these communities would benefit from the use of automated generation control by implementing a simple economic dispatch scheme and the integration of renewable energy sources such as wind generation.

Richard Wies; Ron Johnson

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

Video game console usage and national energy consumption: Results from a field-metering study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of usage nationwide, we can estimate total national energythe total combined energy use. 3. Average usage over alltotal game console usage, this suggests that an appreciable fraction of console energy

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Residential wood burning: Energy modeling and conventional fuel displacement in a national sample  

SciTech Connect

This research studied the natural, built, and behavioral factors predictive of energy consumption for residential space heating with wood or conventional fuels. This study was a secondary analysis of survey data from a nationwide representative sample of 5,682 households collected DOE in the 1984-1985 REC survey. Included were: weather, census division and utility data, interviewer-supplied dwelling measurements and respondent-reported energy-related family behaviors. Linear-regression procedures were used to develop a model that identified key determinants accounting for the variability in wood consumption. A nonlinear-regression model was employed to estimate the amount of conventional fuels used for space heating. The model was also used to estimate the amount of conventional fuels being displaced by wood-heating systems. There was a significant (p {le} .05) linear relationship between the dependent variable, square root of cords burned, various independent variables.

Warsco, K.S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development (R&D)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development (R&D) Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development (R&D) Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development (R&D) Programs Focus Area: Hydrogen Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.iea.org/Textbase/npsum/hydrogenSUM.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/hydrogen-fuel-cells-review-national-r Language: English Policies: "Regulations,Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Public-Private Partnerships Regulations: Safety Standards This book maps the various governmental research activities and policies

352

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This Fourth United States of America (U.S.) National Report updates the Third Report published in October 2008, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention). This report reflects developments in the U.S. through June 2011. This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within the U.S.

353

What Has the Federal Renewable Fuels Standard Accomplished - A National Perspective (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation provides an overview of the nation's biofuels industry accomplishments and a perspective on the challenges and implications of reaching goals set in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

Schwab, A.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Second-Generation Fuel Cell Stack Durability and Freeze Capability from National FCV Learning Demonstration (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation provides information about the objectives and partners of the National Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration, the status of vehicle and station deployment, and results of vehicle and infrastructure analysis.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Garbak, J.

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

355

What Has the Federal Renewable Fuels Standard Accomplished - A National Perspective (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation provides an overview of the nation's biofuels industry accomplishments and a perspective on the challenges and implications of reaching goals set in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

Schwab, A.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

State of California BOARD OF EQUALIZATION USE FUEL TAX REGULATIONS Regulation 1322. CONSUMPTION OF LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS IN VEHICLES FUELED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Users who operate motor vehicles powered by liquefied petroleum gas supplied directly to the engine from the cargo tank of the motor vehicle are authorized for the purpose of making tax returns to compute the gallons used on a mileper-gallon basis. The mile-per-gallon basis will be determined by tests. The tests will be made by the user and will be subject to review by the Board. All detail and test data should be retained for inspection by the Board. This method of computing use is authorized only for the purpose of making tax returns. Determinations may be imposed or refunds granted, if the Board upon audit of the users accounts and records, or upon the basis of tests made or other information determines that the return did not disclose the proper amount of tax due. See Regulation 1332 with respect to records on those motor vehicles powered by fuel not supplied directly to the

unknown authors

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

NONE

1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

358

Enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuels National Metrics Workshop Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), in collaboration with the nuclear industry, has been conducting research and development (R&D) activities on advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels for the last few years. The emphasis for these activities was on improving the fuel performance in terms of increased burnup for waste minimization and increased power density for power upgrades, as well as collaborating with industry on fuel reliability. After the events at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan in March 2011, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. In the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, Conference Report 112-75, the U.S. Congress directed DOE-NE to: Give priority to developing enhanced fuels and cladding for light water reactors to improve safety in the event of accidents in the reactor or spent fuel pools. Give special technical emphasis and funding priorityto activities aimed at the development and near-term qualification of meltdown-resistant, accident-tolerant nuclear fuels that would enhance the safety of present and future generations of light water reactors. Report to the Committee, within 90 days of enactment of this act, on its plan for development of meltdown-resistant fuels leading to reactor testing and utilization by 2020. Fuels with enhanced accident tolerance are those that, in comparison with the standard UO2-zirconium alloy system currently used by the nuclear industry, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, and operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. The overall draft strategy for development and demonstration is comprised of three phases: Feasibility Assessment and Down-selection; Development and Qualification; and Commercialization. The activities performed during the feasibility assessment phase include laboratory scale experiments; fuel performance code updates; and analytical assessment of economic, operational, safety, fuel cycle, and environmental impacts of the new concepts. The development and qualification stage will consist of fuel fabrication and large scale irradiation and safety basis testing, leading to qualification and ultimate NRC licensing of the new fuel. The commercialization phase initiates technology transfer to industry for implementation. Attributes for fuels with enhanced accident tolerance include improved reaction kinetics with steam and slower hydrogen generation rate, while maintaining acceptable cladding thermo-mechanical properties; fuel thermo-mechanical properties; fuel-clad interactions; and fission-product behavior. These attributes provide a qualitative guidance for parameters that must be considered in the development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. However, quantitative metrics must be developed for these attributes. To initiate the quantitative metrics development, a Light Water Reactor Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels Metrics Development Workshop was held October 10-11, 2012, in Germantown, Maryland. This document summarizes the structure and outcome of the two-day workshop. Questions regarding the content can be directed to Lori Braase, 208-526-7763, lori.braase@inl.gov.

Lori Braase

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Technology adoption and content consumption in Chinese television: Local city, national city, and global city  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in media technologies allow people to restructure their relations across a broad range of time and space. As a result, modern communities are organized on local, national, and global bases. These communities are sustained and developed by media ... Keywords: China, Community, New media technology, Programming, Space, Television, Time

Jia Lu, Ian Weber

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Development of an energy consumption and cost data base for fuel cell total energy systems and conventional building energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the procedures and data sources used to develop an energy-consumption and system-cost data base for use in predicting the market penetration of phosphoric acid fuel cell total-energy systems in the nonindustrial building market. A computer program was used to simulate the hourly energy requirements of six types of buildings - office buildings, retail stores, hotels and motels, schools, hospitals, and multifamily residences. The simulations were done by using hourly weather tapes for one city in each of the ten Department of Energy administrative regions. Two types of building construction were considered, one for existing buildings and one for new buildings. A fuel cell system combined with electrically driven heat pumps and one combined with a gas boiler and an electrically driven chiller were compared with similar conventional systems. The methods of system simulation, component sizing, and system cost estimation are described for each system. The systems were simulated for a single building size for each building type. Methods were developed to extrapolate the system cost and performance data to other building sizes.

Pine, G.D.; Christian, J.E.; Mixon, W.R.; Jackson, W.L.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Composite Nuclear Fuel Pellet - Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

ORNL 2010-G0613-jcn UT-B ID 200902238 Composite Nuclear Fuel Pellet Technology Summary To improve rates of nuclear power generation, ORNL has patented a way to increase

362

Case Study: Fuel Cells Increase Reliability at First National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

13, 2009). 8. Personal communication with Dennis Hughes, FNBO, 2010. 9. U.S. EPA, eGrid 2007 Version 1.1, Year 2005 Summary Tables, Region MRO West (fossil fuel output)....

363

Reliable fuel source | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report | Volume 9, Issue 2 | 2013 Y-12 provides the U.S. Navy with feedstock from retired weapons systems to fuel nuclear-powered vessels. Y-12 provides the U.S. Navy with...

364

Ris National Laboratory Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Doped ceria has 1 #12;2 advantages over conventional zirconia oxide, temperature and oxygen activty. High leak current densities may be deduced from reports on SOFCs with ceria

365

Adapting state and national electricity consumption forecasting methods to utility service areas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the experiences of six utilities (Florida Power and Light Co., Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia, Philadelphia Electric Co., Public Service Co. of Colorado, Sacramento Municipal Utility District, and TVA) in adapting to their service territories models that were developed for forecasting loads on a national or regional basis. The models examined were of both end-use and econometric design and included the three major customer classes: residential, commercial, and industrial.

Swift, M.A.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

United States National Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle and Infrastructure Learning Demonstration - Status and Results (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides status and results for the United States National Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration, including project objectives, partners, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's role in the project and methodology, how to access complete results, and results of vehicle and infrastructure analysis.

Wipke,K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Garbak, J.

2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

367

EA-1887: Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado (DOE/EA-1573-S1) EA-1887: Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado (DOE/EA-1573-S1) Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to make improvements to the Renewable Fuel Heat Plant including construction and operation of a wood chip storage silo and the associated material handling conveyances and utilization of regional wood sources. DOE/EA-1887 supplements a prior EA (DOE/EA-1573, July 2007) and is also referred to as DOE/EA-1573-S1. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download April 9, 2012 EA-1887: Finding of No Significant Impact

368

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Renewable Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuelsl Module Renewable Fuelsl Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Renewable Fuels Module Figure 11. Renewable Fuels Module Structure. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Renewable Fuels Module Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The renewable fuels module (RFM) represents renewable energy resoures and large–scale technologies used for grid-connected U.S. electricity supply (Figure 11). Since most renewables (biomass, conventional hydroelectricity, geothermal, landfill gas, solar photovoltaics, solar thermal, and wind) are used to generate electricity, the RFM primarily interacts with the electricity market module (EMM). New renewable energy generating capacity is either model–determined or

369

Global, Regional, and National Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

al. (1991) published a summary compilation that tabulates coal, brown coal, peat, and crude oil production by nation and year. Footnotes in the Etemad et al.(1991) publication...

370

National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration Final...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

national daily average miles traveled. An effective 40-mile electric range would allow electrification of more than two-thirds of the Learning Demonstration vehicle miles and...

371

Household energy and consumption and expenditures, 1990. [Contains Division, Census Region, and Climate Zone maps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this supplement to the Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990 report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential housing units, specifically at the four Census regions and nine Census division levels. This report includes household energy consumption, expenditures, and prices for natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and kerosene as well as household wood consumption. For national-level data, see the main report, Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990.

Not Available

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

372

National Renewable Energy Laboratory DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cold start analysis: 2001 ­ Fuel cell hybrid electric vehicles: 1999 (in collaboration with VATech) ­ H funding from the DOE Hydrogen Program (now HFCIT), with some funding coming from PBA and OFCVT #12;History analysis, electric grid/hydrogen interaction ­ Johanna Ivy: Electrolysis, H2A, programming ­ Maggie Mann

373

Global, Regional, and National Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

et al. (1991) published a summary compilation that tabulates coal, brown coal, peat, and crude oil production by nation and year. Footnotes in the Etemad et al.(1991) publication...

374

Residential energy consumption and expenditure patterns of black and nonblack households in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential energy consumption and expenditures by black and nonblack households are presented by Census region and for the nation based on the Energy Information Administration's 1982-83 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Black households were found to have significantly lower levels of electricity consumption at both the national and regional level. Natural gas is the dominant space heating fuel used by black households. Natural gas consumption was typically higher for black households. However, when considering natural gas consumption conditional on natural gas space heating no significant differences were found. 10 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

Vyas, A.D.; Poyer, D.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption April 1, 2011 - 1:07pm Addthis President Obama announces the National Clean Fleets Partnership to help companies reduce fuel usage by incorporating electric vehicles, alternative fuels, and conservation techniques. Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities What does this project do? Cuts oil imports and consumption Helps businesses save money Increases the efficiency of large-scale fleets Reduces emissions Surrounded by cutting-edge vehicles, from all-electric trucks to hydraulic hybrids, President Obama today announced the National Clean Fleets Partnership, an initiative of the Department's Clean Cities program, at a UPS fleet facility in Landover, Maryland. This public-private partnership

376

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption April 1, 2011 - 1:07pm Addthis President Obama announces the National Clean Fleets Partnership to help companies reduce fuel usage by incorporating electric vehicles, alternative fuels, and conservation techniques. Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities What does this project do? Cuts oil imports and consumption Helps businesses save money Increases the efficiency of large-scale fleets Reduces emissions Surrounded by cutting-edge vehicles, from all-electric trucks to hydraulic hybrids, President Obama today announced the National Clean Fleets Partnership, an initiative of the Department's Clean Cities program, at a UPS fleet facility in Landover, Maryland. This public-private partnership

377

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Renewable Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

renewable fuels module (RFM) consists of five submodules that represent the various types of renewable energy technologies used for grid-connected U.S. electricity supply (Figure 11). Since most renewables (wind, solar, and geothermal) are used to generate electricity, the interaction with the electricity market module (EMM) is important for modeling grid-connected renewable-electric applications. The penetration of grid-connected generation technologies, with the exception of municipal solid waste, is determined by EMM. Hydropower is included in EMM directly. renewable fuels module (RFM) consists of five submodules that represent the various types of renewable energy technologies used for grid-connected U.S. electricity supply (Figure 11). Since most renewables (wind, solar, and geothermal) are used to generate electricity, the interaction with the electricity market module (EMM) is important for modeling grid-connected renewable-electric applications. The penetration of grid-connected generation technologies, with the exception of municipal solid waste, is determined by EMM. Hydropower is included in EMM directly. Figure 11. Renewable Fuels Module Structure Each submodule of RFM is solved independently of the rest. Because variable operation and maintenance costs for renewable technologies are lower than for any other major generating technology and they produce almost no air pollution, all available renewable generating capacity is dispatched first by EMM.

378

Storage of spent fuel from the nation`s nuclear reactors: Status, technology, and policy options  

SciTech Connect

Since the beginning of the commercial nuclear electric power industry, it has been recognized that spent nuclear reactor fuel must be able to be readily removed from the reactor vessel in the plant and safely stored on-site. The need for adjacent ready storage is first for safety. In the event of an emergency, or necessary maintenance that requires the removal of irradiated fuel from the reactor vessel, cooled reserve storage capacity for the full amount of fuel from the reactor core must be available. Also, the uranium fuel in the reactor eventually reaches the point where its heat generation is below the planned efficiency for steam production which drives the turbines and generators. It then must be replaced by fresh uranium fuel, with the ``spent fuel`` elements being removed to a safe and convenient storage location near the reactor vessel. The federal nuclear waste repository program, even without delays in the current schedule of disposal becoming available in 2003, will result in a large percentage of the 111 existing operable commercial reactors requiring expansion of their spent fuel storage capacity. How that need can and will be met raises issues of both technology and policy that will be reviewed in this report.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Model documentation Renewable Fuels Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analaytical approach and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the 1996 Annual Energy Outlook forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs, and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Developments of Spent Nuclear Fuel Pyroprocessing Technology at Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes research in used fuel pyroprocessing that has been published by Idaho National Laboratory over the last decade. It includes work done both on treatment of Experimental Breeder Reactor-II and development of advanced technology for potential scale-up and commercialization. Collaborations with universities and other laboratories is included in the cited work.

Michael F. Simpson

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Stationary and Portable Fuel Cell Systems Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Stationary and Portable Fuel Cell Systems Codes and Standards Citations This document lists codes and standards typically used for Stationary and Portable Fuel Cell Systems projects. To determine which codes and standards apply to a specific project, you need to identify the codes and standards currently in effect within the jurisdiction where the project will be located. Some jurisdictions also have unique applicable ordinances or regulations. Learn about codes and standards basics at www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/codes_standards_basics.html. Find Stationary and Portable Fuel Cell Systems codes and standards in these categories:

382

Estimates of global, regional, and national annual CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring: 1950--1992  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the compilation, content, and format of the most comprehensive C0{sub 2}-emissions database currently available. The database includes global, regional, and national annual estimates of C0{sub 2} emissions resulting from fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing, and gas flaring in oil fields for 1950--92 as well as the energy production, consumption, and trade data used for these estimates. The methods of Marland and Rotty (1983) are used to calculate these emission estimates. For the first time, the methods and data used to calculate CO, emissions from gas flaring are presented. This C0{sub 2}-emissions database is useful for carbon-cycle research, provides estimates of the rate at which fossil-fuel combustion has released C0{sub 2} to the atmosphere, and offers baseline estimates for those countries compiling 1990 C0{sub 2}-emissions inventories.

Boden, T.A.; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Andres, R.J. [University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Inst. of Northern Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen & Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Meet Brian Larsen, a materials scientist who is helping lower fuel cell costs by developing the next generation of fuel cell catalysts. Meet Brian Larsen, a materials scientist who is helping lower fuel cell costs by developing the next generation of fuel cell catalysts. Fuel cells produce electricity from a number of domestic fuels, including hydrogen and renewables, and can provide power for virtually any application -- from cars and buses to commercial buildings. This technology, which is similar to a battery, has the potential to revolutionize the way we power the nation while reducing carbon pollution and oil consumption.

384

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Development at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in collaboration with government agencies and industries, is actively engaged in the development, testing, and characterization of high efficiency, low cost modular solid oxide fuel cell power generation systems for stationary, automotive and military applications. Advanced SOFC systems are being developed which will offer ease of operation on a variety of gaseous liquid hydrocarbon and coal-derived fuels as well as "zero emissions" capability. SOFC R&D activities at PNNL continue in the areas of cell component materials, electrochemistry, cell design and modeling, high temperature corrosion, and fuel processing. Specific activities include development of optimized materials and cost effective fabrication techniques for high power density anode-supported cells operating at temperatures below 800 degrees C, characterization of processes responsible for high electrical performance and long term performance degradation, optimization and cell and stack designs using computational engineering models, and hydrocarbon fuel processing using micro technology.

Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Baskaran, Suresh; Chick, Lawrence A.; Chou, Y. S.; Deibler, John E.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Marina, Olga A.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Paxton, Dean M.; Pederson, Larry R.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Simner, Steve P.; Sprenkle, Vince L.; Weil, K. Scott; Yang, Z Gary; Singh, Prabhakar; McVay, Gary L.

2003-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

385

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Energy Consumption by End-Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by End Use Sector Energy Consumption by End Use Sector International Energy Outlook 2007 Figure 25. OECD and Non-OECD Transportation Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 25 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 26. OECD and Non-OECD Residential Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 26 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 27. Growth in OECD and Non-OECD Residential Sector Delivered Energy Consumption by Fuel, 2004 and 2030 Figure 27 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 28. OECD and Non-OECD Commercial Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 28 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

386

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

parking garages. Web Page: For related information, ... "Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey." 6 Distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, ...

387

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Expenditures > Executive Summary & Expenditures > Executive Summary 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 presents statistics about the amount of energy consumed in commercial buildings and the corresponding expenditures for that energy. These data are based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national energy survey of buildings in the commercial sector, conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Figure ES1. Energy Consumption is Commercial Buidings by Energy Source, 1992 Energy Consumption: In 1992, the 4.8 million commercial buildings in the United States consumed 5.5 quadrillion Btu of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat. Of those 5.5 quadrillion Btu, consumption of site electricity accounted for 2.6 quadrillion Btu, or 48.0 percent, and consumption of natural gas accounted for 2.2 quadrillion Btu, or 39.6 percent. Fuel oil consumption made up 0.3 quadrillion Btu, or 4.0 percent of the total, while consumption of district heat made up 0.4 quadrillion Btu, or 7.9 percent of energy consumption in that sector. When the energy losses that occur at the electricity generating plants are included, the overall energy consumed by commercial buildings increases to about 10.8 quadrillion Btu (Figure ES1).

388

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . Vehicle Fuel Efficiency and Consumption Fuel consumption is estimated from RTECS data on the vehicle stock (Chapter 2) and miles traveled (Chapter 3), in combination with vehicle fuel efficiency ratings, adjusted to account for individual driving circumstances. The first two sections of this chapter present estimates of household vehicle fuel efficiency and household fuel consumption calculated from these fuel efficiency estimates. These sections also discuss variations in fuel efficiency and consumption based on differences in household and vehicle characteristics. The third section presents EIA estimates of the potential savings from replacing the oldest (and least fuel-efficient) household vehicles with new (and more fuel-efficient) vehicles. The final section of this chapter focuses on households receiving (or eligible to receive) supplemental income under

389

US SoAtl VA Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SoAtl VA SoAtl VA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl VA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Virginia households consume an average of 86 million Btu per year, about 4% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption and costs are higher for Virginia households than the national average, but similar to those in neighboring states where electricity is the most common heating fuel. * Virginia homes are typically newer and larger than homes in other parts of the country. CONSUMPTION BY END USE

390

US SoAtl VA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

SoAtl VA SoAtl VA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl VA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Virginia households consume an average of 86 million Btu per year, about 4% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption and costs are higher for Virginia households than the national average, but similar to those in neighboring states where electricity is the most common heating fuel. * Virginia homes are typically newer and larger than homes in other parts of the country. CONSUMPTION BY END USE

391

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 - PDF Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1 U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 1994 Table 2 U.S. per Household Vehicle Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel ...

392

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C35A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption...

393

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a regular basis at the time of the 1990 RECS personal interviews. Electricity: See Main Heating Fuel. Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991...

394

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 110 Electricity: See Main Heating Fuel. Energy Used in the Home: For electricity or natural gas, the quantity is the...

395

Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Natural Phenomena Hazards Flood Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of flood hazards analyses performed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the adjacent Transient Reactor Experiment and Test Facility (TREAT) located at Idaho National Laboratory. The requirements of these analyses are provided in the U.S. Department of Energy Order 420.1B and supporting Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomenon Hazard standards. The flood hazards analyses were performed by Battelle Energy Alliance and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The analyses addressed the following: Determination of the design basis flood (DBFL) Evaluation of the DBFL versus the Critical Flood Elevations (CFEs) for critical existing structures, systems, and components (SSCs).

Gerald Sehlke; Paul Wichlacz

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Environmental Statements, Availability, Etc., Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8679 8679 Thursday June 1, 1995 Part III Department of Energy Environmental Statements, Availability, Etc.; Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs: Notice 28680 Federal Register / Vol. 60, No. 105 / Thursday, June 1, 1995 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Record of decision. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy has issued a Record of Decision on Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs. The Record of Decision includes a Department-wide decision to

397

Standardized DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister and Transportation System for Shipping to the National Repository  

SciTech Connect

The U.S.Department of Energys (DOE) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), has been chartered with the responsibility for developing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) standardized canisters and a transportation cask system for shipping DOE SNF to the national repository. The mandate for this development is outlined in the Memorandum of Agreement for Acceptance of Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste that states, EM shall design and fabricate DOE SNF canisters for shipment to RW. (1) It also states, EM shall be responsible for the design, NRC certification, and fabrication of the transportation cask system for DOE SNF canisters or bare DOE SNF in accordance with 10 CFR Part 71. (2) In fulfillment of these requirements, the NSNFP has developed four SNF standardized canister configurations and has conceptually designed a versatile transportation cask system for shipping the canisters to the national repository.1 The standardized canister sizes were derived from the national repository waste package design for co-disposal of SNF with high-level waste (HLW). One SNF canister can be placed in the center of the waste package or one can be placed in one of five radial positions, replacing a HLW canister. The internal cavity of the transportation cask was derived using the same logic, matching the size of the internal cavity of the waste package. The size of the internal cavity for the transportation cask allows the shipment of multiple canister configurations with the application of a removable basket design. The standardized canisters have been designed to be loaded with DOE SNF, placed into interim storage, shipped to the national repository, and placed in a waste package without having to be reopened. Significant testing has been completed that clearly demonstrates that the standardized canisters can safely achieve their intended design goals. The transportation cask system will include all of the standard design features, with the addition of dual containment for the shipment of failed fuel. The transportation cask system will also meet the rigorous licensing requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to ensure that the design and the methods of fabrication employed will result in a shipping cask that will safely contain the radioactive materials under all credible accident scenarios. The standardization of the SNF canisters and the versatile design of the transportation cask system will eliminate a proliferation of designs and simplify the operations at the user sites and the national repository.

Pincock, David Lynn; Morton, Dana Keith; Lengyel, Arpad Leslie

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Fuel Cell Demonstration Project - 200 kW - Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Power Plant Located at the National Transportation Research Center: FINAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researches and develops distributed generation technology for the Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Distributed Energy Program. This report describes installation and operation of one such distributed generation system, a United Technology Corporation fuel cell located at the National Transportation Research Center in Knoxville, Tennessee. Data collected from June 2003 to June of 2004, provides valuable insight regarding fuel cell-grid compatibility and the cost-benefit of the fuel cell operation. The NTRC fuel cell included a high-heat recovery option so that use of thermal energy improves project economics and improves system efficiency to 59% year round. During the year the fuel cell supplied a total of 834MWh to the NTRC and provided 300MBtu of hot water. Installation of the NTRC fuel cell was funded by the Distributed Energy Program with partial funding from the Department of Defense's Climate Change Fuel Cell Buy Down Program, administered by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. On-going operational expenses are funded by ORNL's utility budget and are paid from operational cost savings. Technical information and the benefit-cost of the fuel cell are both evaluated in this report and sister reports.

Berry, JB

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

399

Plutonium Consumption Program, CANDU Reactor Project: Feasibility of BNFP Site as MOX Fuel Supply Facility. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation was made of the technical feasibility, cost, and schedule for converting the existing unused Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Facility (BNFP) into a Mixed Oxide (MOX) CANDU fuel fabrication plant for disposition of excess weapons plutonium. This MOX fuel would be transported to Ontario where it would generate electricity in the Bruce CANDU reactors. Because CANDU MOX fuel operates at lower thermal load than natural uranium fuel, the MOX program can be licensed by AECB within 4.5 years, and actual Pu disposition in the Bruce reactors can begin in 2001. Ontario Hydro will have to be involved in the entire program. Cost is compared between BNFP and FMEF at Hanford for converting to a CANDU MOX facility.

1995-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

Oak Ridge partners: Global security and fuel development | Y-12 National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge partners: Global ... Oak Ridge partners: Global ... Oak Ridge partners: Global security and fuel development Posted: July 18, 2012 - 10:00am | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 1 | 2012 Additive manufacturing builds metal parts, layer by layer, such as this titanium piece ORNL fabricated for Y-12. Y-12 is evaluating the technology for tooling and manufacturing applications. In 2011 the two DOE facilities shared 178 projects worth $12.5 million. In the 1940s Bear Creek and Bethel valleys cradled newly constructed facilities filled with people on a common mission that ended World War II. Today, the Y-12 National Security Complex and Oak Ridge National Laboratory thrive in those transformed valleys and collaborate daily. In 2011 they shared 178 projects worth $12.5 million. "With just a few miles separating our nationally renowned institutions,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nations around the world pursue a variety of sustainable nations around the world pursue a variety of sustainable transportation solutions, the hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) presents a promising opportunity for American consumers and automakers. FCEVs are important to our nation's future because they can: * Play an important role in our portfolio of sustainable transportation options * Provide a cost-competitive, appealing alternative for drivers * Reduce dependence on imported oil and diversify energy sources for transportation * Enable global economic leadership and job growth. Offering a Sustainable Transportation Option Americans have tremendous freedom to travel wherever and whenever they want. Ninety percent of travel in the United States is achieved by automobiles that refuel quickly

402

Energy Information Administration - Transportation Energy Consumption by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Transportation Energy Consumption Surveys energy used by vehicles EIA conducts numerous energy-related surveys and other information programs. In general, the surveys can be divided into two broad groups: supply surveys, directed to the suppliers and marketers of specific energy sources, that measure the quantities of specific fuels produced for and/or supplied to the market; and consumption surveys, which gather information on the types of energy used by consumer groups along with the consumer characteristics that are associated with energy use. In the transportation sector, EIA's core consumption survey was the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. RTECS belongs to the consumption group because it collects information directly from the consumer, the household. For roughly a decade, EIA fielded the RTECS--data were first collected in 1983. This survey, fielded for the last time in 1994, was a triennial survey of energy use and expenditures, vehicle miles-traveled (VMT), and vehicle characteristics for household vehicles. For the 1994 survey, a national sample of more than 3,000 households that own or use some 5,500 vehicles provided data.

403

Electricity Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consumption Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates (million kWh) National Petroleum Council Assumption: The definition of electricity con- sumption and sales used in the NPC 1999 study is the equivalent ofwhat EIA calls "sales by utilities" plus "retail wheeling by power marketers." This A nn u al Gro wth total could also be called "sales through the distribution grid," 2o 99 99 to Sales by Utilities -012% #N/A Two other categories of electricity consumption tracked by EIA cover on site Retail Wheeling Sales by generation for host use. The first, "nonutility onsite direct use," covers the Power Marketen 212.25% #N/A traditional generation/cogeneration facilities owned by industrial or large All Sales Through Distribution

404

StreetSmart : modeling vehicle fuel consumption with mobile phone sensor data through a participatory sensing framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicle energy efficiency has become a priority of governments, researchers, and consumers in the wake of rising fuels costs over the last decade. Traditional Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) vehicles are particularly ...

Oehlerking, Austin Louis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Consumption | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NREL. National Clean Fleets partners are investing in hybrid vehicles to reduce their oil use, vehicle emissions and fuel costs. Detecting Air Leaks For a thorough and accurate...

406

Criticality safety strategy for the Fuel Cycle Facility electrorefiner at Argonne National Laboratory, West  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Integral Fast Reactor being developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) combines the advantages of metal-fueled, liquid-metal-cooled reactors and a closed fuel cycle. Presently, the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) at ANL-West in Idaho Falls, Idaho is being modified to recycle spent metallic fuel from Experimental Breeder Reactor II as part of a demonstration project sponsored by the Department of Energy. A key component of the FCF is the electrorefiner (ER) in which the actinides are separated from the fission products. In the electrorefining process, the metal fuel is anodically dissolved into a high-temperature molten salt and refined uranium or uranium/plutonium products are deposited at cathodes. In this report, the criticality safety strategy for the FCF ER is summarized. FCF ER operations and processes formed the basis for evaluating criticality safety and control during actinide metal fuel refining. In order to show criticality safety for the FCF ER, the reference operating conditions for the ER had to be defined. Normal operating envelopes (NOES) were then defined to bracket the important operating conditions. To keep the operating conditions within their NOES, process controls were identified that can be used to regulate the actinide forms and content within the ER. A series of operational checks were developed for each operation that wig verify the extent or success of an operation. The criticality analysis considered the ER operating conditions at their NOE values as the point of departure for credible and incredible failure modes. As a result of the analysis, FCF ER operations were found to be safe with respect to criticality.

Mariani, R.D.; Benedict, R.W. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lell, R.M.; Turski, R.B.; Fujita, E.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Residential energy consumption survey. Consumption patterns of household vehicles, supplement: January 1981-September 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information on the fuel consumption characteristics on household vehicles in the 48 contiguous States and the District of Columbia is presented by monthly statistics of fuel consumption, expenditures, miles per gallon, and miles driven.

Not Available

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

More Than 1,000 Fuel Cell Units Deployed Through DOE ARRA Funding (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

359 * July 2012 359 * July 2012 More Than 1,000 Fuel Cell Units Deployed Through DOE ARRA Funding Team: Jennifer Kurtz, Keith Wipke, Sam Sprik, Todd Ramsden, Chris Ainscough Accomplishment: Early market end users are operating 1,111 fuel cell units at 301 sites in 20 states funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program and with analysis by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Context: The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funded the deployment of approximately 1,000 fuel cell systems in key early markets to accelerate the commercialization and deployment of fuel cells and fuel cell manufacturing, installation, maintenance, and support services. In support of the ARRA fuel cell deployment objectives, NREL analyzes and

409

National Codes and Standards Coordination - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Carl Rivkin, (Primary Contact), Chad Blake, Robert Burgess, William Buttner, and Matthew Post National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3839 Email: carl.rivkin@nrel.gov DOE Manager Antonio Ruiz Phone: (202) 586-0729 Email: Antonio.Ruiz@ee.doe.gov Subcontractors: * CSA, Standards, Cleveland, OH * FP2 Fire Protection Engineering, Golden, CO * GWS Solutions, Tolland, CT * Kelvin Hecht, Avon, CT * MorEvents, Englewood, CO * SAE International (SAE), Warrendale, PA

410

Summary of national and international fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs, 1984  

SciTech Connect

Worldwide activities related to nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs are summarized. Several trends have developed in waste management strategy: All countries having to dispose of reprocessing wastes plan on conversion of the high-level waste (HLW) stream to a borosilicate glass and eventual emplacement of the glass logs, suitably packaged, in a deep geologic repository. Countries that must deal with plutonium-contaminated waste emphasize pluonium recovery, volume reduction and fixation in cement or bitumen in their treatment plans and expect to use deep geologic repositories for final disposal. Commercially available, classical engineering processing are being used worldwide to treat and immobilize low- and intermediate-level wastes (LLW, ILW); disposal to surface structures, shallow-land burial and deep-underground repositories, such as played-out mines, is being done widely with no obvious technical problems. Many countries have established extensive programs to prepare for construction and operation of geologic repositories. Geologic media being studied fall into three main classes: argillites (clay or shale); crystalline rock (granite, basalt, gneiss or gabbro); and evaporates (salt formations). Most nations plan to allow 30 years or longer between discharge of fuel from the reactor and emplacement of HLW or spent fuel is a repository to permit thermal and radioactive decay. Most repository designs are based on the mined-gallery concept, placing waste or spent fuel packages into shallow holes in the floor of the gallery. Many countries have established extensive and costly programs of site evaluation, repository development and safety assessment. Two other waste management problems are the subject of major R and D programs in several countries: stabilization of uranium mill tailing piles; and immobilization or disposal of contaminated nuclear facilities, namely reactors, fuel cycle plants and R and D laboratories.

Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

The Use of Staff Augmentation Subcontracts at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility, IG-0887  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Use of Staff Augmentation The Use of Staff Augmentation Subcontracts at National Nuclear Security Administration's Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility DOE/IG-0887 May 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 May 15, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Use of Staff Augmentation Subcontracts at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility" BACKGROUND Shaw AREVA MOX Services, LLC (MOX Services) is responsible for the design and construction of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) nearly $5 billion Mixed

412

Characterization of degraded EBR-II fuel from the ICPP-603 basin: National spent nuclear fuel program, FY 1999 final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Characterization data is reported for sodium bonded Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) fuel which had been stored underwater in containers since the late 1970's. Sixteen stainless steel storage containers were retrieved from the ICPP-603 storage pool at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in Idaho. Ten of the containers had leaked water due to improper sealing. In the container chosen for detailed destructive analysis, the stainless steel cladding on the uranium alloy fuel had ruptured and fuel oxide particulate formed and filled the bottom of the container. Headspace gas analysis determined that greater than 99% hydrogen was present. Cesium-137, which had leached out of the fuel during the aqueous corrosion process, dominated the radionuclide source term of the water. The metallic sodium from the fuel element bond had reacted with the water, forming a caustic solution of NaOH.

Pahl, R. G.

2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

413

Table SH8. Average Consumption for Space Heating by Main Space ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Oil Main Space Heating Fuel Used (million Btu of consumption per household using the fuel as a main heating source) Any Major Fuel 4 Table SH8.

414

Natural Gas Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 23,103,793 23,277,008 22,910,078 24,086,797 24,477,425 25,533,448 1949-2012 Alabama 418,512 404,157 454,456 534,779 598,514 666,738 1997-2012 Alaska 369,967 341,888 342,261 333,312 335,458 343,110 1997-2012

415

Model documentation renewable fuels module of the National Energy Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the 1995 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO95) forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs, and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. The RFM consists of six analytical submodules that represent each of the major renewable energy resources--wood, municipal solid waste (MSW), solar energy, wind energy, geothermal energy, and alcohol fuels. The RFM also reads in hydroelectric facility capacities and capacity factors from a data file for use by the NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM). The purpose of the RFM is to define the technological, cost and resource size characteristics of renewable energy technologies. These characteristics are used to compute a levelized cost to be competed against other similarly derived costs from other energy sources and technologies. The competition of these energy sources over the NEMS time horizon determines the market penetration of these renewable energy technologies. The characteristics include available energy capacity, capital costs, fixed operating costs, variable operating costs, capacity factor, heat rate, construction lead time, and fuel product price.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Hydrogen and Fuel Cells - Refining the Message Initiating a National Dialogue and Educational Agenda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Refining the Message Initiating aApril 1, 2005 Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Refining the Message2002, "Fuel Choices for Fuel Cell Vehicles: Well-to-Wheels

Eggert, Anthony; Kurani, Kenneth S; Turrentine, Tom; Ogden, Joan M; Sperling, Dan; Winston, Emily

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Recent Advances in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is collaborating with government agencies, industries, and academic institutions to develop the technology and knowledge base for SOFC power generation systems capable of near term applications in small distributed generation, mobile auxiliary power and man portable units as well as long term applications in large centralized SOFC/turbine hybrid and reversible power plants operating on coal. R&D activities at PNNL include materials development, analysis of cell and stack performance degradation processes, cell/stack/system modeling and design optimization, and liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon fuel processing. Our technical activities address a wide range of challenges, such as long-term performance stability, cell/stack structural reliability, and low cost fabrication processes. Recent materials work has focused on the development of improved electrode materials and understanding of electrode poisoning processes in the presence of gas phase Cr, interconnect materials and electronically conductive corrosion-tolerant coatings capable of blocking Cr diffusion, and glass seal materials with improved structural properties. Modeling activities have emphasized improving the understanding of cell/stack degradation/failure mechanisms to assist development of larger active area cells and associated thermal management issues. Fuel processing activities include evaluation and optimization of on-cell reforming and related thermal management strategies in smaller and larger foot print stacks, and development of fuel desulphurization technology. In addition to performing R&D in a number of SOFC-related areas, PNNL is a co-leader (along with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)) of the U.S. Department of Energys Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) initiative. This paper will summarize the status of current R&D activities at PNNL.

Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; King, David L.; Pederson, Larry R.; McVay, Gary L.; Singh, Prabhakar

2006-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

418

Consumption & Efficiency - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Find statistics on energy consumption and efficiency across all fuel sources. + EXPAND ALL Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Household characteristics Release Date: March 28, 2011 Survey data for occupied primary housing units. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

419

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

420

Fuel.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F23: Nuclear Energy Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2011 State Nuclear Electric Power Nuclear Fuel Consumption Prices Expenditures Million Kilowatthours Trillion Btu...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

National energy use of consumer electronics in 1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comparison purposes. Estimating National Energy ConsumptionNational energy consumption values for all product typesestimates and national energy consumption estimates, by mode

Rosen, Karen; Meier, Alan; Zandelin, Stefan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

consumption consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 32.3 KiB)

423

Table 37. Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Technology ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 37. Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Technology Type and Fuel Type (trillion Btu) Light-Duty Consumption by Technology Type Conventional Vehicles 1/

424

Alternative Fuels - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration, Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey(RTECS), Transporation Channel of Alternative Fuels

425

Monthly 2008 Utility and Nonutility Fuel Receipts and Fuel Quality...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tags fossil fuel receipts, coal receipts, oil receipts, gas receipts, fossil fuel consumption, electricity generating fuel Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data...

426

Fuel Cell Backup Power Geographical Visualization Map (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6740 * December 2012 6740 * December 2012 Fuel Cell Backup Power Geographical Visualization Map Team: Genevieve Saur, Jennifer Kurtz, Sam Sprik, Todd Ramsden Accomplishment: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a time-lapse geographical visualization map of early market use of fuel cells for telecommunications backup power. This map synthesizes data being analyzed by NREL's Technology Validation team for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Program with DOE's publically available annual summaries of electric disturbance events. 1 Context: Correlating fuel cell operation with grid outages enhances knowledge of backup system requirements and backup power operation strategies that may advance how systems are designed and how best to utilize their capabilities. NREL's

427

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Reports Increase in Durability and Reliability for Current Generation Fuel Cell Buses (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

869 * November 2010 869 * November 2010 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Reports Increase in Durability and Reliability for Current Generation Fuel Cell Buses NREL Team: Hydrogen Technology Validation, Leslie Eudy Accomplishment: NREL recently reported an increase in durability and reliability for fuel cell systems demonstrated in transit service (first reported in July 2010). Context: The transit industry provides an excellent test-bed for developing and optimizing advanced transportation technologies, such as fuel cells. In coordination with the Federal Transit Administration, the Department of Energy (DOE) funds the evaluation of fuel cell buses (FCBs) in real-world service. Under this funding, NREL has collected and analyzed data on nine early generation FCBs operated by four transit agencies in the United States.

428

Model documentation renewable fuels module of the National Energy Modeling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the 1997 Annual Energy Outlook forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs. and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. This documentation report serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document for model analysts, model users, and the public interested in the construction and application of the RFM. Second, it meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. Finally, such documentation facilitates continuity in EIA model development by providing information sufficient to perform model enhancements and data updates as part of EIA`s ongoing mission to provide analytical and forecasting information systems.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory, Ann Arbor, Michigan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This case study was prepared as one in a series for the Laboratories for the 21st Century program, a joint endeavor of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program. The goal of this program is to foster greater energy efficiency in new and retrofit laboratory buildings in both the public and the private sectors. The energy-efficient elements of the laboratory featured in this case study-EPA's National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory, Ann Arbor, Michigan-include the addition of digital controls for heating and cooling equipment, variable-air-volume supply and exhaust systems, energy recovery systems, water conservation equipment, and the use of a fuel cell to supplement grid-supplied electricity with a nonpolluting source of power. These features and upgrades were installed as part of an Energy Savings Performance Contract; the result has been a 60% drop in energy costs and a 50% reduction in domestic water use at the laboratory.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Model documentation: Renewable Fuels Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it related to the production of the 1994 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO94) forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs, and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. This documentation report serves two purposes. First, it is a reference document for model analysts, model users, and the public interested in the construction and application of the RFM. Second, it meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. The RFM consists of six analytical submodules that represent each of the major renewable energy resources -- wood, municipal solid waste (MSW), solar energy, wind energy, geothermal energy, and alcohol fuels. Of these six, four are documented in the following chapters: municipal solid waste, wind, solar and biofuels. Geothermal and wood are not currently working components of NEMS. The purpose of the RFM is to define the technological and cost characteristics of renewable energy technologies, and to pass these characteristics to other NEMS modules for the determination of mid-term forecasted renewable energy demand.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C10A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption...

432

Hearing on the Use of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technology in the National Park Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON THE USE OF HYDROGEN FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGY IN THE NATIONALON THE USE OF HYDROGEN FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGY IN THE NATIONALon hydrogen and hydrogen fuel cell vehicle technologies and

Eggert, Anthony

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive 8 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Values SIC RSE Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Establishment Counts XLS XLS XLS First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Trillion Btu XLS XLS XLS First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Physical Units or Btu XLS XLS

434

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report is the third in the series of reports presenting data from the 1987 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The 1987 RECS, seventh in a series of national surveys of households and their energy suppliers, provides baseline information on household energy use in the United States. Data from the seven RECS and its companion survey, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS), are made available to the public in published reports such as this one, and on public use data files. This report presents data for the four Census regions and nine Census divisions on the consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil and kerosene (as a single category), and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Data are also presented on consumption of wood at the Census region level. The emphasis in this report is on graphic depiction of the data. Data from previous RECS surveys are provided in the graphics, which indicate the regional trends in consumption, expenditures, and uses of energy. These graphs present data for the United States and each Census division. 12 figs., 71 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

435

Model documentation, Renewable Fuels Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98) forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs, and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. For AEO98, the RFM was modified in three principal ways, introducing capital cost elasticities of supply for new renewable energy technologies, modifying biomass supply curves, and revising assumptions for use of landfill gas from municipal solid waste (MSW). In addition, the RFM was modified in general to accommodate projections beyond 2015 through 2020. Two supply elasticities were introduced, the first reflecting short-term (annual) cost increases from manufacturing, siting, and installation bottlenecks incurred under conditions of rapid growth, and the second reflecting longer term natural resource, transmission and distribution upgrade, and market limitations increasing costs as more and more of the overall resource is used. Biomass supply curves were also modified, basing forest products supplies on production rather than on inventory, and expanding energy crop estimates to include states west of the Mississippi River using information developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Finally, for MSW, several assumptions for the use of landfill gas were revised and extended.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

CRITICAL NATIONAL NEED IDEA:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... power generation 0.8-1.1MW per ton of MSW), high internal power consumption (about 500 ... of traditional fossil fuels like coal and fuel oil when ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

437

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(MECS) > MECS 1994 Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching (MECS) > MECS 1994 Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey 1994 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Logo Full Report - (file size 5.4 MB) pages:531 Selected Sections (PDF format) Contents (file size 56 kilobytes, 10 pages). Overview (file size 597 kilobytes, 11 pages). Chapters 1-3 (file size 265 kilobytes, 9 pages). Chapter 4 (file size 1,070 kilobytes, 15 pages). Appendix A - Detailed Tables Tables A1 - A8 (file size 1,031 kilobytes, 139 pages). Tables A9 - A23 (file size 746 kilobytes, 119 pages). Tables A24 - A29 (file size 485 kilobytes, 84 pages). Tables A30 - A44 (file size 338 kilobytes, 39 pages). Appendix B (file size 194 kilobytes, 24 pages). Appendix C (file size 116 kilobytes, 16 pages).

438

The Czech National R&D Program of Nuclear Incineration of PWR Spent Fuel in a Transmuter with Liquid Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The principle drawbacks of any kind of solid nuclear fuel are listed and briefly analysed in the first part of the paper. On the basis of this analysis, the liquid fuel concept and its benefits are introduced and briefly described in the following parts of the paper allowing to develop new reactor systems for nuclear incineration of spent fuel from conventional reactors and a new clean source of energy. As one of the first realistic attempts to utilise the advantages of liquid fuel, the reactor/blanket system with molten fluoride salts in the role of fuel and coolant simultaneously, as incorporated in the accelerator-driven transmutation technology (ADTT) being proposed in [1], has been proposed for a deeper, both theoretical and experimental studies in [2]. There will be a preliminary design concept of an experimental assembly LA-0 briefly introduced in the paper which is under preparation in the Czech Republic for such a project [3]. 1

M. Hron

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Table 2.10 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditure ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

parking garages. Note: Data are estimates. Statistics for individual fuels are for all buildings using each fuel. ... "Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption

440

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C2. Energy Consumption Estimates for Major Energy Sources in Physical Units, 2011 State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Power f Fuel Ethanol g...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

ZIP (all tables) Release Date: January 11, 2013 : CE4.1 End-Use Consumption by Fuel Totals, U.S. Homes: XLS: CE4.2 End-Use Consumption by Fuel Totals, Northeast Homes ...

442

Fuel.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Table F7: Distillate Fuel Oil Consumption Estimates, 2011 State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric Power Total Residential Commercial Industrial...

443

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The gross output for the petroleum and coal products subsector grew by about 3 percent, ... Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey, MECS Definition of Fuel Use, ...

444

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Energy-Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Energy Consumption Total primary energy consumption in the AEO2008 reference case increases at an average rate of 0.9 percent per year, from 100.0 quadrillion Btu in 2006 to 123.8 quadrillion Btu in 2030—7.4 quadrillion Btu less than in the AEO2007 reference case. In 2030, the levels of consumption projected for liquid fuels, natural gas, and coal are all lower in the AEO2008 reference case than in the AEO2007 reference case. Among the most important factors resulting in lower total energy demand in the AEO2008 reference case are lower economic growth, higher energy prices, greater use of more efficient appliances, and slower growth in energy-intensive industries. Figure 2. Delivered energy consumption by sector, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

445

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. energy-related carbon-dioxide emissions, including both direct fuel consumption (primarily natural gas)

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Fuel Cell Technologies Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel Cell Technologies Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E Security, LLC for NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Fuel Cell Technologies Objectives Develop a ceramic National Security, LLC for NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Fuel Cell Technologies Technical Targets

447

1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption and Expenditures Tables Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel ............................................... 124 Table C2. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel................................................ 130 Table C3. Consumption for Sum of Major Fuels ...................................................... 135 Table C4. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels....................................................... 140 Table C5. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels................................................................................................... 145 Table C6. Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels......................... 150 Table C7. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of

448

Commerce study looks at cost of pollution control for fossil-fuel power industry  

SciTech Connect

Environmental controls for fossil-fuel power plants consumed 1.3 percent of the national fuel used in 1974, with the largest demand going for sulfur dioxide emission control. Projections for power plant consumption to meet environmental standards range as high as eight percent in the 1980s. Less-energy-consuming systems include coal blending, tall stacks, and supplementary control systems; while high consumers are using coal washing operations in place of scrubbers, fuel transportation, conversion to acceptable fuels, waste heat disposal, and particulate controls. A summary table presents sulfur dioxide regulations in terms of their goals and their anticipated minimum and maximum fuel consumption. (DCK)

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Table SH7. Average Consumption for Space Heating by Main Space ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Oil (gallons) Main Space Heating Fuel Used (physical units of consumption per household using the fuel as a main heating source) Table SH7.

450

Alternative fuel transit buses: Interim results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Vehicle Evaluation Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transit bus program is designed to provide a comprehensive study of the alternative fuels currently used by the transit bus industry. The study focuses on the reliability, fuel economy, operating costs, and emissions of vehicles running on the various fuels and alternative fuel engines. The alternative fuels being tested are methanol, ethanol, biodiesel and natural gas. The alternative fuel buses in this program use the most common alternative fuel engines from the heavy-duty engine manufacturers. Data are collected in four categories: Bus and route descriptions; Bus operating data; Emissions data; and, Capital costs. The goal is to collect 18 months of data on each test bus. This report summarizes the interim results from the project to date. The report addresses performance and reliability, fuel economy, costs, and emissions of the busses in the program.

Motta, R.; Norton, P.; Kelly, K.J.; Chandler, K.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Survey Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

452

The effects of energy policies in China on energy consumption and GDP1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of biogas, stalks and firewood by rural residents by region, and fossil fuel energy consumption refers variable is: Biogas consumption per capita Stalks consumption per capita Firewood consumption per capita FE

Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

453

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Liquid Fuels Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquid Fuels Liquid Fuels International Energy Outlook 2008 Figure 26. World Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1990-2030 Figure 26 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 27. World Production of Unconventional Liquid Fuels, 2005-2030 Figure 27 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 28. World Liquids Consumption by Sector, 2005-2030 Figure 28 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 29. World Liquids Consumption by Region and Country Group, 2005 and 2030 Figure 29 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 30. Nominal World Oil Prices in three Cases, 1980-2030 Figure 30 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

455

& CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12% of the nation's electricity. Hydropower produces more than 90,000 megawatts of electricity, which is enough to meet the needs of 28.3 million consumers. Hydropower accounts for over 90% of all electricity the NAO. ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND PRODUCTION IN NORWAY AND THE NAO The demand for heating oil in Norway

456

Benefits vs. risks of fish consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits of fish consumption outweigh the risks, according to a joint expert consultation released in October 2011 by two United Nations agencies. Benefits vs. risks of fish consumption News Inform Magazine Inform Archives Health Nutrition Omega

457

Historic American Engineering Record, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex  

SciTech Connect

Just as automobiles need fuel to operate, so do nuclear reactors. When fossil fuels such as gasoline are burned to power an automobile, they are consumed immediately and nearly completely in the process. When the fuel is gone, energy production stops. Nuclear reactors are incapable of achieving this near complete burn-up because as the fuel (uranium) that powers them is burned through the process of nuclear fission, a variety of other elements are also created and become intimately associated with the uranium. Because they absorb neutrons, which energize the fission process, these accumulating fission products eventually poison the fuel by stopping the production of energy from it. The fission products may also damage the structural integrity of the fuel elements. Even though the uranium fuel is still present, sometimes in significant quantities, it is unburnable and will not power a reactor unless it is separated from the neutron-absorbing fission products by a method called fuel reprocessing. Construction of the Fuel Reprocessing Complex at the Chem Plant started in 1950 with the Bechtel Corporation serving as construction contractor and American Cyanamid Company as operating contractor. Although the Foster Wheeler Corporation assumed responsibility for the detailed working design of the overall plant, scientists at Oak Ridge designed all of the equipment that would be employed in the uranium separations process. After three years of construction activity and extensive testing, the plant was ready to handle its first load of irradiated fuel.

Susan Stacy; Julie Braun

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 View...

459

Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

861,063 864,113 913,229 916,797 938,340 987,957 1983-2012 861,063 864,113 913,229 916,797 938,340 987,957 1983-2012 Alabama 11,345 11,136 10,460 10,163 10,367 12,389 1983-2012 Alaska 227,374 211,878 219,161 211,918 208,531 214,335 1983-2012 Arizona 20 20 17 19 17 12 1983-2012 Arkansas 1,502 2,521 4,091 5,340 6,173 6,599 1983-2012 California 56,936 64,689 63,127 64,931 44,379 51,154 1983-2012 Colorado 39,347 44,231 64,873 66,083 78,800 76,462 1983-2012 Florida 654 897 94 4,512 4,896 6,080 1983-2012 Gulf of Mexico 115,528 102,389 103,976 108,490 101,217 93,985 1999-2012 Illinois 39 41 62 50 101 122 1983-2012 Indiana 101 161 211 283 433 506 1983-2012 Kansas 10,232 12,803 15,169 13,461 12,781 17,017 1983-2012 Kentucky 2,676 3,914 4,862 5,626 5,925 6,095 1983-2012

460

The Analysis and Assessment on Heating Energy Consumption of SAT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The article introduced the fuel-energy consumption and outdoor temperatures of three heating terms from year 1999 to 2002 of SAT's fuel-boiler heating system. It demonstrated the relationship between the consumption and the temperatures by using the regression analysis method. It also calculated the economization of the fuel, introduced the methods of economizing fuel and, made an assessment on it.

Zhang, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "national fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

462

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

463

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

464

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

465

Margins up; consumption down  

SciTech Connect

The results of a survey of dealers in the domestic fuel oil industry are reported. Wholesale prices, reacting to oversupply, decreased as did retail prices; retail prices decreased at a slower rate so profit margins were larger. This trend produced competitive markets as price-cutting became the method for increasing a dealer's share of the profits. Losses to other fuels decreased, when the figures were compared to earlier y; and cash flow was very good for most dealers. In summary, profits per gallon of oil delivered increased, while the consumption of gasoline per customer decreased. 22 tables.

Mantho, M.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports An Assessment of EIA's Building Consumption Data Background image of CNSTAT logo The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) routinely uses feedback from customers and outside experts to help improve its programs and products. As part of an assessment of its consumption

467

Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

468

Summary of non-US national and international fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs 1982  

SciTech Connect

Brief program overviews of fuel cycle, spent fuel, and waste management activities in the following countries are provided: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, Finland, France, German Federal Republic, India, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Mexico, Netherlands, Pakistan, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, USSR, and the United Kingdom. International nonproliferation activities, multilateral agreements and projects, and the international agencies specifically involved in the nuclear fuel cycle are also described.

Harmon, K.M.; Kelman, J.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Hearing on the Use of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technology in the National Park Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuels like wind and solar power may have even greateron energy loads and solar power availability using aEducation Campaign for Solar Power This project involves

Eggert, Anthony

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

101. Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Natural Gas Consumption 1. Natural Gas Consumption in the United States, 1930-1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table Year Lease and Plant Fuel Pipeline Fuel Delivered to Consumers Total Consumption Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Total 1930 ....................... 648,025 NA 295,700 80,707 721,782 NA 120,290 1,218,479 1,866,504 1931 ....................... 509,077 NA 294,406 86,491 593,644 NA 138,343 1,112,884 1,621,961 1932 ....................... 477,562 NA 298,520 87,367 531,831 NA 107,239 1,024,957 1,502,519 1933 ....................... 442,879 NA 283,197 85,577 590,865 NA 102,601 1,062,240 1,505,119 1934 ....................... 502,352 NA 288,236 91,261 703,053 NA 127,896 1,210,446 1,712,798 1935 ....................... 524,926 NA 313,498 100,187 790,563 NA 125,239 1,329,487 1,854,413 1936 ....................... 557,404 NA 343,346

471

Residential energy consumption survey: housing characteristics 1984  

SciTech Connect

Data collected in the 1984 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the sixth national survey of households and their fuel suppliers, provides baseline information on how households use energy. Households living in all types of housing units - single-family homes (including townhouses), apartments, and mobile homes - were chosen to participate. Data from the surveys are available to the public. The housing characteristics this report describes include fuels and the uses they are put to in the home; appliances; square footage of floorspace; heating (and cooling) equipment; thermal characteristics of housing structures; conservation features and measures taken; the consumption of wood; temperatures indoors; and regional weather. These data are tabulated in sets, first showing counts of households and then showing percentages. Results showed: Fewer households are changing their main heating fuel. More households are air conditioned than before. Some 50% of air-conditioned homes now use central systems. The three appliances considered essential are the refrigerator, the range, and the television set. At least 98% of US homes have at least one television set; but automatic dishwashers are still not prevalent. Few households use the budget plans tht are available from their utility companies to ease the payment burden of seasonal surges in fuel bills. The most common type of heating equipment in the United States is the natural-gas forced-air furnace. About 40% ofthose furnaces are at least 15 years old. The oldest water heaters are those that use fuel oil. The most common conservation feature in 1984 is ceiling or attic insulation - 80% of homes report having this item. Relatively few households claimed tax credits in 1984 for energy-conservation improvements.

Not Available

1986-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

472

Cultural Resource Investigation for the Materials and Fuels Complex Wastewater System Upgrade at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) located in Bingham County at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho is considering several alternatives to upgrade wastewater systems to meet future needs at the facility. In April and May of 2010, the INL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, archaeological field surveys, and coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify cultural resources that may be adversely affected by the proposed construction and to provide recommendations to protect any resources listed or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. These investigations showed that one National Register-eligible archaeological site is located on the boundary of the area of potential effects for the wastewater upgrade. This report outlines protective measures to help ensure that this resource is not adversely affected by construction.

Brenda R. Pace; Julie B raun Williams; Hollie Gilbert; Dino Lowrey; Julie Brizzee

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Clean Cities National Partner Awards (Clean Cities alternative fuel information series fact sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet summarizes the accomplishments of the programs of the Clean Cities that won National Partner awards for 1999.

Thomas, J.; Coulter, J.

2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

474

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005) Dataset Summary Description The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The 2005 survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the U.S. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the Consumption & Expenditures data. The Consumption & Expenditures and Intensities data is divided into two parts: Part 1 provides energy consumption and expenditures by census region, population density, climate zone, type of housing unit, year of construction and ownership status; Part 2 provides the same data according to household size, income category, race and age. The next update to the RECS survey (2009 data) will be available in 2011.

475

Residential energy consumption and expenditures by end use for 1978, 1980, and 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The end-use estimates of the average household consumption and expenditures are statistical estimates based on the 1978, 1980, and 1981 Residential Enery Consumption Surveys (RECS) conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) rather than on metered observations. The end-use estimates were obtained by developing a set of equations that predict the percentage of energy used for each broad end-use category. The equations were applied separately to each household and to each fuel. The resulting household end-use estimates were averaged to produce estimates of the average end-use consumption and expenditures on a national and regional basis. The accuracy and potential biases of these end-use estimates vary depending on the fuel type, on the year of the survey, and on the type of end use. The figures and tables presented show the amount and the type of energy cosumed, plus the cost of this energy. National averages are given as well as averages for various categories including region, size and age of dwelling, number of heating degree-days, and income. Some of the significant findings; energy trends by end use for all fuels used in the home for 1978, 1980, and 1981; and electricity consumption and expenditures and natural gas consumption and expenditures are discussed.

Johnson, M.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Performance of Thorium-Based Mixed Oxide Fuels for the Consumption of Plutonium and Minor Actinides in Current and Advanced Reactors  

SciTech Connect

A renewed interest in thorium-based fuels has arisen lately based on the need for proliferation resistance, longer fuel cycles, higher burnup and improved wasteform characteristics. Recent studies have been directed toward homogeneously mixed, heterogeneously mixed, and seed-and-blanket thorium-uranium fuel cycles that rely on "in situ" use of the bred-in U-233. However, due to the higher initial enrichment required to achieve acceptable burnups, these fuels are encountering economic constraints. Thorium can nevertheless play a large role in the nuclear fuel cycle; particularly in the reduction of plutonium. While uranium-based mixedoxide (MOX) fuel will decrease the amount of plutonium, the reduction is limited due to the breeding of more plutonium (and higher actinides) from the U-238. Here we present calculational results and a comparison of the potential burnup of a thorium-based and uranium-based mixed oxide fuel in a light water reactor (LWR). Although the uranium-based fuels outperformed the thorium-based fuels in achievable burnup, a depletion comparison of the initially charged plutonium (both reactor and weapons grade) showed that the thorium-based fuels outperformed the uranium-based fuels by more that a factor of 2; where more than 70% of the total plutonium in the thorium-based fuel is consumed during the cycle. This is significant considering that the achievable burnup of the thorium-based fuels were 1.4 to 4.6 times less than the uranium-based fuels. Furthermore, use of a thorium-based fuel could also be used as a strategy for reducing the amount of long-lived nuclides (including the minor actinides), and thus the radiotoxicity in spent nuclear fuel. Although the breeding of U-233 is a concern, the presence of U-232 and its daughter products can aid in making this fuel self-protecting, and/or enough U-238 can be added to denature the fissile uranium. From these calculations, it appears that thorium-based fuel for plutonium incineration is superior as compared to uranium-based fuel, and should be considered as an alternative to traditional MOX in both current and future reactor designs.

Weaver, Kevan Dean; Herring, James Stephen

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe » Italy Western Europe » Italy (including San Marino) Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends As occurred in many industrialized nations, CO2 emissions from Italy rose steeply since the late 1940's until the growth was abruptly terminated in 1974. Since 1974, emissions from liquid fuels have vacillated, dropping from 76% to 46% of a static but varying total. Significant increases in natural gas consumption have compensated for the drop in oil consumption. In 2008, 35.8% of Italy's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions were due to natural gas consumption. Coal usage grew steadily until 1985 when CO2 emissions from coal consumption reached 16 million metric tons of carbon. Not until 2004 did coal usage exceed 1985 levels and now accounts for 13.9% of Italy's

478

Alternatives to traditional transportation fuels 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, gasoline and diesel fuel have accounted for about 80 percent of total transportation fuel and nearly all of the fuel used in on-road vehicles. Growing concerns about the environmental effects of fossil fuel use and the Nation`s high level of dependence on foreign oil are providing impetus for the development of replacements or alternatives for these traditional transportation fuels. (The Energy Policy Act of 1992 definitions of {open_quotes}replacement{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}alternative{close_quotes} fuels are presented in the following box.) The Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) and the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) are significant legislative forces behind the growth of replacement fuel use. Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels 1993 provides the number of on-road alternative fueled vehicles in use in the United States, alternative and replacement fuel consumption, and information on greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the production, delivery, and use of replacement fuels for 1992, 1993, and 1995.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Jet Fuel from Microalgal Lipids; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probably our most pressing energy need is Probably our most pressing energy need is to develop domestic, renewable substitutes for imported transportation fuel. Ethanol made from starch or sugar such as corn grain already displaces about 2% of gasoline and making it from cellulosic biomass will allow much greater displacement. Biodiesel made from oil crops such as soybeans can displace some of our diesel use. Unfortunately, neither of these biofuels can help supply jet fuel, for which energy density and low-temperature fuel properties are critical. Ethanol is not dense enough having only about half the energy per volume of jet fuel. Biodiesel has about 80% the energy density of kerosene, but can solidify at the low temperatures of high altitude flight. In

480

Ignition Capsules with Aerogel-Supported Liquid DT Fuel For The National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

For high repetition-rate fusion power plant applications, capsules with aerogel-supported liquid DT fuel can have much reduced fill time compared to {beta}-layering a solid DT fuel layer. The melting point of liquid DT can be lowered once liquid DT is embedded in an aerogel matrix, and the DT vapor density is consequently closer to the desired density for optimal capsule design requirement. We present design for NIF-scale aerogel-filled capsules based on 1-D and 2-D simulations. An optimal configuration is obtained when the outer radius is increased until the clean fuel fraction is within 65-75% at peak velocity. A scan (in ablator and fuel thickness parameter space) is used to optimize the capsule configurations. The optimized aerogel-filled capsule has good low-mode robustness and acceptable high-mode mix.

Ho, D D; Salmonson, J D; Clark, D S; Lindl, J D; Haan, S W; Amendt, P; Wu, K J

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Hydrogen and Fuel Cells - Refining the Message Initiating a National Dialogue and Educational Agenda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

we talk about our future transportation and energy options,about realizing our future transportation energy goals.transportation energy technology (not just fuel cells) if we are to successfully produce the future

Eggert, Anthony; Kurani, Kenneth S; Turrentine, Tom; Ogden, Joan M; Sperling, Dan; Winston, Emily

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Monitoring of Olympic National Park Beaches to determine fate and effects of spilled bunker C fuel oil  

SciTech Connect

On December 23, 1988, the barge Nestucca was accidentally struck by its tow, a Souse Brothers Towing Company tug, releasing approximately 230,000 gallons of Bunker C fuel oil and fouling beaches from Grays Harbor north to Vancouver Island. Affected beaches in Washington included a 40-mile-long strip that has been recently added to Olympic National Park. The purpose of the monitoring program documented in this report was to determine the fate of spilled Bunker C fuel oil on selected Washington coastal beaches. We sought to determine (1) how much oil remained in intertidal and shallow subtidal habitats following clean-up and weathering, (2) to what extent intertidal and/or shallow subtidal biotic assemblages have been contaminated, and (3) how rapidly the oil has left the ecosystem. 45 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs.

Strand, J.A.; Cullinan, V.I.; Crecelius, E.A.; Fortman, T.J.; Citterman, R.J.; Fleischmann, M.L.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D, Part B: Naval spent nuclear fuel management  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the following attachments: transportation of Naval spent nuclear fuel; description of Naval spent nuclear receipt and handling at the Expended Core Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; comparison of storage in new water pools versus dry container storage; description of storage of Naval spent nuclear fuel at servicing locations; description of receipt, handling, and examination of Naval spent nuclear fuel at alternate DOE facilities; analysis of normal operations and accident conditions; and comparison of the Naval spent nuclear fuel storage environmental assessment and this environmental impact statement.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Table 2.1f Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption, 1949-2011 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.1f Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year: Primary Consumption 1: Fossil Fuels: Nuclear

485

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding total residential transportation energy usageon Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption total annual fuelUsage and Energy Consumption Gasoline-equivalent gallons per year total

Golob, Thomas F; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fue -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487 32 345 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 206 * 1 32 * * -- Machine Drive

487

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

488

EIA Renewable Energy- The Role of Renewable Energy Consumption in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pie graph and bar graph showing the percentage of renewable energy consumption in the Nation's overall energy supply

489

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 C3. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Fossil Fuels Fossil Fuels (as commingled) Coal Natural Gas excluding Supplemental Gaseous Fuels a Petroleum Total Natural Gas including Supplemental Gaseous Fuels a Motor Gasoline including Fuel Ethanol a Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline excluding Fuel Ethanol a Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Alabama ........... 651.0 614.8 156.5 13.4 12.8 304.5 13.4 49.1 549.5 1,815.4 614.8 319.8 Alaska ............... 15.5 337.0 85.1 118.2 1.3 31.9 1.9 28.6 267.1 619.6 337.0 34.6 Arizona ............. 459.9 293.7 151.8 21.5 9.1 297.3 (s) 21.1 500.9 1,254.5 293.7 323.4 Arkansas ........... 306.1 288.6 134.9 5.9 9.4 165.4 0.2 19.8 335.7 930.5 288.6 175.6 California .......... 55.3 2,196.6 567.0 549.7 67.2 1,695.4 186.9 339.6 3,405.8 5,657.6 2,196.6

490

US MidAtl NY Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MidAtl NY MidAtl NY Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US MidAtl NY Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl NY Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US MidAtl NY Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * New York households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Electricity consumption in New York homes is much lower than the U.S. average, because many households use other fuels for major energy end uses like space heating, water heating, and cooking. Electricity costs are closer to the national average due to higher than average electricity prices in the state.

491

US MidAtl NY Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MidAtl NY MidAtl NY Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US MidAtl NY Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl NY Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US MidAtl NY Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * New York households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Electricity consumption in New York homes is much lower than the U.S. average, because many households use other fuels for major energy end uses like space heating, water heating, and cooking. Electricity costs are closer to the national average due to higher than average electricity prices in the state.

492

Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heavy-water-moderated, light-water-moderated and liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors fueled with natural or low-enriched uranium and containing thorium mixed with the uranium or in separate target channels. U-232 decays with a 69-year half-life through 1.9-year half-life Th-228 to Tl-208, which emits a 2.6 MeV gamma ray upon decay. We find that pressurized light-water-reactors fueled with LEU-thorium fuel at high burnup (70 MWd/kg) produce U-233 with U-232 contamination levels of about 0.4 percent. At this contamination level, a 5 kg sphere of U-233 would produce a gammaray dose rate of 13 and 38 rem/hr at 1 meter one and ten years after chemical purification respectively. The associated plutonium contains 7.5 percent of the undesirable heat-generating 88-year half-life isotope Pu-238. However, just as it is possible to produce weapon-grade plutonium in low-burnup fuel, it is also practical to use heavy-water reactors to produce U-233 containing only a few ppm of U-232 if the thorium is segregated in target channels and discharged a few times more frequently than the natural-uranium driver fuel. The dose rate from a 5-kg solid sphere of U-233 containing 5 ppm U-232 could be reduced by a further factor of 30, to about 2 mrem/hr, with a close-fitting lead sphere weighing about 100 kg. Thus the proliferation resistance of thorium fuel cycles depends very much upon how they are implemented. The original version of this manuscript was received by Science & Global Security on

Jungmin Kang A

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z