National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for national ecological observation

  1. EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) prepared an EA that evaluated potential environmental impacts of the proposed National Ecological Observation Network (NEON), a continental-scale network of...

  2. Baseline ecological footprint of Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coplen, Amy K.; Mizner, Jack Harry,; Ubechel, Norion M.

    2009-01-01

    The Ecological Footprint Model is a mechanism for measuring the environmental effects of operations at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM). This analysis quantifies environmental impact associated with energy use, transportation, waste, land use, and water consumption at SNL/NM for fiscal year 2005 (FY05). Since SNL/NM's total ecological footprint (96,434 gha) is greater than the waste absorption capacity of its landholdings (338 gha), it created an ecological deficit of 96,096 gha. This deficit is equal to 886,470lha, or about 3,423 square miles of Pinyon-Juniper woodlands and desert grassland. 89% of the ecological footprint can be attributed to energy use, indicating that in order to mitigate environmental impact, efforts should be focused on energy efficiency, energy reduction, and the incorporation of additional renewable energy alternatives at SNL/NM.

  3. Preliminary systems engineering evaluations for the National Ecological Observatory Network.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Perry J.; Kottenstette, Richard Joseph; Crouch, Shannon M.; Brocato, Robert Wesley; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Osborn, Thor D.; Ivey, Mark D.; Gass, Karl Leslie; Heller, Edwin J.; Dishman, James Larry; Schubert, William Kent; Zirzow, Jeffrey A.

    2008-11-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is an ambitious National Science Foundation sponsored project intended to accumulate and disseminate ecologically informative sensor data from sites among 20 distinct biomes found within the United States and Puerto Rico over a period of at least 30 years. These data are expected to provide valuable insights into the ecological impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species in these various biomes, and thereby provide a scientific foundation for the decisions of future national, regional, and local policy makers. NEON's objectives are of substantial national and international importance, yet they must be achieved with limited resources. Sandia National Laboratories was therefore contracted to examine four areas of significant systems engineering concern; specifically, alternatives to commercial electrical utility power for remote operations, approaches to data acquisition and local data handling, protocols for secure long-distance data transmission, and processes and procedures for the introduction of new instruments and continuous improvement of the sensor network. The results of these preliminary systems engineering evaluations are presented, with a series of recommendations intended to optimize the efficiency and probability of long-term success for the NEON enterprise.

  4. Industrial ecology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory summary statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmartin, T.J.

    1996-06-04

    At Livermore our hope and our intention is to make important contributions to global sustainability by basing both our scientific and technological research and our business practices on the principles of industrial ecology. Current efforts in the following fields are documented: global security, global ecology, energy for transportation, fusion energy, materials sciences, environmental technology, and bioscience.

  5. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory radioecology and ecology programs. 1983 progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markham, O. D.

    1983-06-01

    Progress is reported in research on: the baseline ecology of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the effects of disturbance on animal and plant communities, and the behavior of radionuclides in the environment surrounding radioactive waste sites. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual reports. (ACR)

  6. Aspen Ecology in Rocky Mountain National Park: Age Distribution, Genetics, and the Effects of Elk Herbivory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    , its natural and living resources, natural hazards, and the environment: World Wide Web: httpAspen Ecology in Rocky Mountain National Park: Age Distribution, Genetics, and the Effects of Elk distribution, genetics, and the effects of elk herbivory: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2008­1337, 52

  7. Industrial ecology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory summary statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmartin, T.J.

    1996-05-21

    This statement summarizes Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s committment to making important scientific, technological, and business contributions to global sustainability. The quest has many aspects, some socio-political or economic and some technological, and some in which the soft and hard sciences become indistinguishable, as in visionary national strategies, like Holland`s, and futuristic regional and city development plans, like those of Kagoshima and Chattanooga.

  8. Effectiveness and Impacts of Ecological Fiscal Transfers and Payments for Environmental Services: A Case Study of Shengnongjia National Nature Reserve 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mingmei

    2012-11-29

    .e. Ecological Fiscal Transfers (EFT) and Payments for Environmental Services (PES), in achieving conservation effectiveness and their economic and social impacts, through a case study on the Shengnongjia National Nature Reserve in China. It is found...

  9. Quantifying landscape pattern in the Ouachita National Forest: an ecological application of GIS-based spatial analysis and modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Delayne Marie

    1998-01-01

    Human induced land use changes are contributing to raphics. serious ecological impacts in National Forests. Although these types of human activities are being looked upon with great concern, the contribution of human development and disturbance...

  10. 2010 Ecological Survey of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, Michele A.; Perry, Christopher; Downs, Janelle L.; Powell, Sylvia D.

    2011-02-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL Site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL Site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL Site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL Site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), and the recently completed Physical Sciences Facility (PSF). This report describes the results of the annual survey of the biological resources found on the undeveloped portions of the PNNL Site in 2010. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the surveys and the results of the surveys are presented. Actions taken to fully delineate noxious weed populations discovered in 2009 and efforts in 2010 to control those weeds also are described. Appendix A provides a list of plant and animal species identified on the PNNL Site.

  11. 2011 Annual Ecological Survey: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, James M.; Chamness, Michele A.

    2012-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE Orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory and the Physical Sciences Facility. This report describes the annual survey of biological resources found on the undeveloped upland portions of the PNNL site. The annual survey is comprised of a series of individual field surveys conducted on various days in late May and throughout June 2011. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the baseline surveys and a summary of the results of the surveys are presented. Appendix A provides a list of plant and animal species identified in the upland areas of the PNNL site in 2011. Efforts in 2011 to control noxious weed populations (comprising plant species designated as Class B noxious weeds by the Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board) discovered in 2009 and initially treated with herbicides in 2010 are described in Appendix B.

  12. Ecological risk assessment of elemental pollution in sediment from Tunku Abdul Rahman National Park, Sabah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elias, Md Suhaimi; Hamzah, Mohd Suhaimi; Rahman, Shamsiah Ab; Salim, Nazaratul Ashifa Abdullah; Siong, Wee Boon; Sanuri, Ezwiza

    2014-02-12

    Eleven (11) surface sediment samples were collected from Tunku Abdul Rahman National Park, Sabah. The neutron activation analysis (NAA) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) techniques were applied for the determinations metal contents and their distributions in sediment samples. The results shown that Arsenic (As) concentrations are enriched at all sampling stations except for station TAR 09, with enrichment factor (EF) values ranged from 1.1 to 7.2. The elements such as Cd, Cr, Sb and U showed enrichment at a few stations and other elements (Cr, Cu, Pb, Th, Zn) shown as background levels in all stations. Degrees of contamination in this study were calculated base on concentrations of six elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn). TAR 11 station can be categorized as very high degree of contamination with degree of contamination value of 43.2. TAR 07 station can be categorized as a considerable degree of contamination (contamination value of 16.9). Six stations (TAR 01, 03, 04, 05, 06, 08, 10) showed moderate degree of contamination, with contamination values ranging from 8.0 to 16.0. TAR 02 and TAR 09 stations showed low degree of contaminations (< 8.0). TAR 11 showed very high ecological risk index (R{sub I}) with RI value is 916. TAR 07 and TAR 10 showed moderate ecological risk index with R{sub I} value 263 and 213, respectively. Other stations showed low ecological risk with RI values ranging from 42.3 to 117 (< 150). Very high ecological risk index could give an adverse effect to the benthic organism. The data obtained from the enrichment factor, degree of contamination and ecological risk index provided vital information, which can be used for future comparison. Information from the present study will be useful to the relevant government agencies and authorities in preparing preventive action to control direct discharge of heavy metals from industries, agro-base activities and domestic waste to the rivers and the sea.

  13. Dr. Jon Copley is a Lecturer in Marine Ecology in the National Oceanography Centre at the University of Southampton, UK. His research investigates the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    Dr. Jon Copley is a Lecturer in Marine Ecology in the National Oceanography Centre's and Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of Southampton. He received the British Association with Jonathan Copley, Ph.D. Lecturer in Marine Ecology, School of Ocean & Earth Science National Oceanography

  14. Spatial heterogeneity and ecology of algal communities in an ephemeral sandstone stream in the Bohemian Switzerland National Park, Czech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Spatial heterogeneity and ecology of algal communities in an ephemeral sandstone stream Switzerland National Park was established to protect the sandstone landscape formed by the erosion of the sandstone bedrock. These ephemeral streams are unique biotopes on the boundary of aquatic and aerial

  15. Giving Back: Collaborations with Others in Ecological Studies on the Nevada National Security Site - 13058

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, Scott A.; Knapp, Kathryn S. [U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Agency, Nevada Site Office, P.O. Box 98518, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8518 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Agency, Nevada Site Office, P.O. Box 98518, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8518 (United States); Wills, Cathy A. [National Nuclear Security Technologies, LLC, P.O. Box 98521, M/S 260, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8521 (United States)] [National Nuclear Security Technologies, LLC, P.O. Box 98521, M/S 260, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8521 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Formerly named the Nevada Test Site, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) was the historical site for nuclear weapons testing from the 1950's to the early 1990's. The site was renamed in 2010 to reflect the diversity of nuclear, energy, and homeland security activities now conducted at the site. Biological and ecological programs and research have been conducted on the site for decades to address the impacts of radiation and to take advantage of the relatively undisturbed and isolated lands for gathering basic information on the occurrence and distribution of native plants and animals. Currently, the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) oversees the radiological biota monitoring and ecological compliance programs on the NNSS. The top priority of these programs are compliance with federal and state regulations. They focus on performing radiological dose assessments for the public who reside near the NNSS and for populations of plants and animals on the NNSS and in protecting important species and habitat from direct impacts of mission activities. The NNSS serves as an invaluable outdoor laboratory. The geographic and ecological diversity of the site offers researchers many opportunities to study human influences on ecosystems. NNSA/NSO has pursued collaborations with outside agencies and organizations to be able to conduct programs and studies that enhance radiological biota monitoring and ecosystem preservation when budgets are restrictive, as well as to provide valuable scientific information to the human health and natural resource communities at large. NNSA/NSO is using one current collaborative study to better assess the potential dose to the off-site public from the ingestion of game animals, the most realistic pathway for off-site public exposure at this time from radionuclide contamination on the NNSS. A second collaborative study is furthering desert tortoise conservation measures onsite. It is the goal of NNSA/NSO to continue to develop such collaborations in the sharing of resources, such as personnel, equipment, expertise, and NNSS land access, with outside entities to meet mutually beneficial goals cost effectively. (authors)

  16. Giving Back: Collaborations with Others in Ecological Studies on the Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott A. Wade; Kathryn S. Knapp; Cathy A. Wills

    2013-02-24

    Formerly named the Nevada Test Site, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) was the historical site for nuclear weapons testing from the 1950s to the early 1990s. The site was renamed in 2010 to reflect the diversity of nuclear, energy, and homeland security activities now conducted at the site. Biological and ecological programs and research have been conducted on the site for decades to address the impacts of radiation and to take advantage of the relatively undisturbed and isolated lands for gathering basic information on the occurrence and distribution of native plants and animals. Currently, the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) oversees the radiological biota monitoring and ecological compliance programs on the NNSS. The top priority of these programs are compliance with federal and state regulations. They focus on performing radiological dose assessments for the public who reside near the NNSS and for populations of plants and animals on the NNSS and in protecting important species and habitat from direct impacts of mission activities. The NNSS serves as an invaluable outdoor laboratory. The geographic and ecological diversity of the site offers researchers many opportunities to study human influences on ecosystems. NNSA/NSO has pursued collaborations with outside agencies and organizations to be able to conduct programs and studies that enhance radiological biota monitoring and ecosystem preservation when budgets are restrictive, as well as to provide valuable scientific information to the human health and natural resource communities at large. NNSA/NSO is using one current collaborative study to better assess the potential dose to the off-site public from the ingestion of game animals, the most realistic pathway for off-site public exposure at this time from radionuclide contamination on the NNSS. A second collaborative study is furthering desert tortoise conservation measures onsite. It is the goal of NNSA/NSO to continue to develop such collaborations in the sharing of resources, such as personnel, equipment, expertise, and NNSS land access, with outside entities to meet mutually beneficial goals cost effectively.

  17. Aspen Ecology in Rocky Mountain National Park: Age Distribution, Genetics, and the Effects of Elk Herbivory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Yin, Tongming [ORNL

    2008-10-01

    Lack of aspen (Populus tremuloides) recruitment and canopy replacement of aspen stands that grow on the edges of grasslands on the low-elevation elk (Cervus elaphus) winter range of Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) in Colorado has been a cause of concern for more than 70 years (Packard, 1942; Olmsted, 1979; Stevens, 1980; Hess, 1993; R.J. Monello, T.L. Johnson, and R.G. Wright, Rocky Mountain National Park, 2006, written commun.). These aspen stands are a significant resource since they are located close to the park's road system and thus are highly visible to park visitors. Aspen communities are integral to the ecological structure of montane and subalpine landscapes because they contain high native species richness of plants, birds, and butterflies (Chong and others, 2001; Simonson and others, 2001; Chong and Stohlgren, 2007). These low-elevation, winter range stands also represent a unique component of the park's plant community diversity since most (more than 95 percent) of the park's aspen stands grow in coniferous forest, often on sheltered slopes and at higher elevations, while these winter range stands are situated on the low-elevation ecotone between the winter range grasslands and some of the park's drier coniferous forests.

  18. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory interests and capabilities for research on the ecological effects of global climatic and atmospheric change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amthor, J.S.; Houpis, J.L.; Kercher, J.R.; Ledebuhr, A.; Miller, N.L.; Penner, J.E.; Robison, W.L.; Taylor, K.E.

    1994-09-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has interests and capabilities in all three types of research that must be conducted in order to understand and predict effects of global atmospheric and climatic (i.e., environmental) changes on ecological systems and their functions (ecosystem function is perhaps most conveniently defined as mass and energy exchange and storage). These three types of research are: (1) manipulative experiments with plants and ecosystems; (2) monitoring of present ecosystem, landscape, and global exchanges and pools of energy, elements, and compounds that play important roles in ecosystem function or the physical climate system, and (3) mechanistic (i.e., hierarchic and explanatory) modeling of plant and ecosystem responses to global environmental change. Specific experimental programs, monitoring plans, and modeling activities related to evaluation of ecological effects of global environmental change that are of interest to, and that can be carried out by LLNL scientists are outlined. Several projects have the distinction of integrating modeling with empirical studies resulting in an Integrated Product (a model or set of models) that DOE or any federal policy maker could use to assess ecological effects. The authors note that any scheme for evaluating ecological effects of atmospheric and climatic change should take into account exceptional or sensitive species, in particular, rare, threatened, or endangered species.

  19. he Cooperative Observer Program is a unique partnership between the National Weather Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T he Cooperative Observer Program is a unique partnership between the National Weather Service the nation with a cost-effective way to collect weather data for immediate forecasting needs and longer with Congressional passage of the National Weather Service Organic Act, which set up a system to recruit and train

  20. Big data and the future of ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Ecological Archives, iPlant, NatureServe, Dryad, the National Oceanographic Data Center). Some of these repositories house

  1. Defocused Observations of Selected Exoplanet Transits with T100 in TUBITAK National Observatory of Turkey (TUG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basturk, Ozgur; Ozavci, Ibrahim; Yorukoglu, Onur; Selam, Selim O

    2015-01-01

    It is crucial to determine masses and radii of extrasolar planets with high precision to have constraints on their chemical composition, internal structure and thereby their formation and evolution. In order to achieve this goal, we apply the defocus technique in the observations of selected planetary systems with the 1 m Turkish telescope T100 in TUBITAK National Observatory (TUG). With this contribution, we aim to present preliminary analyses of transit light curves of the selected exoplanets KELT-3b, HAT-P-10b/WASP-11b, HAT-P-20b, and HAT-P-22b, observed with this technique using T100.

  2. A Strategy for a Global Observing System for Verification of National Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    With the risks of climate change becoming increasingly evident, there is growing discussion regarding international treaties and national regulations to lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Enforcement of such agreements ...

  3. Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access to scienceSpeedingLightweight MaterialsGasObservation of aof

  4. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation Into Culturally Appropriate Building Designs for First Nations at UBC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and Ecological) assessment was conducted for the Plank House, Pit-House, and Wigam. Special considerationUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation different styles of Aboriginal housing design, with focus placed on designs that could be considered

  5. Ecological Risk Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological Risk Assessments Ecological risk assessment is the appraisal of potential adverse effects of exposure to contaminants on plants and animals....

  6. Designing for ecology : the ecological park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power, Andres M

    2006-01-01

    This thesis aims to define a) what an ecological park is, and b) whether it is a new model in park design. Reference to the literature on landscape ecology is used to analyze the natural ecological merit of these parks, ...

  7. Proximate and Underlying Causes of Tropical Deforestation: The Event Ecology of Migration and Forest Conversion in the Sierra de Lacandn National Park, Guatemala1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    1 Proximate and Underlying Causes of Tropical Deforestation: The Event Ecology of Migration-farm") resource use, while population researchers have largely ignored rural-to-rural migration. The way in which in another place has been inadequately explored. This paper investigates the primary proximate and underlying

  8. Ecology, Microbial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan

    2009-05-15

    Microbial ecology is a relatively young discipline within the field of microbiology. Its modern history spans just the past 60 years, and the field is defined by its emphasis on understanding the interactions of microbes with their environment, rather than their behavior under artificial laboratory conditions. Because microbes are ubiquitous, microbial ecologists study a broad diversity of habitats that range from aquatic to terrestrial to plant- or animal-associated. This has made it a challenge to identify unifying principles within the field. One approach is to recognize that although the activity of microbes in nature have effects at the macroscale, they interact with their physical, chemical and biological milieu at a scale of micrometers. At this scale, several different microbial ecosystems can be defined, based upon association with particles, the presence of environmental gradients and the continuous availability of water. Principles applicable to microbial ecology reflect not only their population ecology and physiological ecology, but also their broad versatility and quantitative importance in the biosphere as biogeochemical catalysts and capacity for rapid physiological and evolutionary responses.

  9. Ecology, Microbial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan

    2009-03-19

    Microbial ecology is a relatively young discipline within the field of microbiology. Its modern history spans just the past 60 years, and the field is defined by its emphasis on understanding the interactions of microbes with their environment, rather than their behavior under artificial laboratory conditions. Because microbes are ubiquitous, microbial ecologists study a broad diversity of habitats that range from aquatic to terrestrial to plant- or animal-associated. This has made it a challenge to identify unifying principles within the field. One approach is to recognize that although the activity of microbes in nature have effects at the macroscale, they interact with their physical, chemical and biological milieu at a scale of micrometers. At this scale, several different microbial ecosystems can be defined, based upon association with particles, the presence of environmental gradients and the continuous availability of water. Principles applicable to microbial ecology reflect not only their population ecology and physiological ecology, but also their broad versatility and quantitative importance in the biosphere as biogeochemical catalysts and capacity for rapid physiological and evolutionary responses.

  10. Review: Manufacturing National Park Nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Fred

    2012-01-01

    tourist industry photos of Jasper National Park maintainedwilderness industry, how recreational activities in the parkPark Nature: Photography, Ecology and the Wilderness Industry

  11. Description of three ecology studies on brown shrimp Penaeus aztecus and white shrimp P. setiferus conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service, Galveston, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diego, Maria Eugenia de

    1984-01-01

    Description of three ecology studies on brown shrimp Penaeus aztecus and white shrimp'P; setiferus conducted by the Mational Marine Fisheries Service, Galveston, Texas. A professional paper by Maria Eugenia de Diego Submitted to the College... shrimp Penaeus aztecus and white shrimp P, set1ferus conducted by the Nat1onal Marine F1sheries Ser- v1ce, Galveston, Texas. (December, 19843 Maria Eugenia de Diego, B. S. , Universidad de Panama Chairman of Adv1sory Committee: Dr. Addison L...

  12. Complexity, Ecology, Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Systemic risk in consumer finance Uncertain about risk HowComplexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-History of ResilienceRisk Complexity, Ecology, Finance Andrew Haldane, Senior

  13. December 2003 3403DATA PAPERS Ecology, 84(12), 2003, p. 3403

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James H.

    . BROWN, AND JOHN P. HASKELL 1 Working Group on Body Size in Ecology and Paleoecology, National Center taxa (NCEAS Working Group on Body Size in Ecology and Paleoecology: linking pattern and process across

  14. Industrial ecology Prosperity Game{trademark}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, D.; Boyack, K.; Berman, M.

    1998-03-01

    Industrial ecology (IE) is an emerging scientific field that views industrial activities and the environment as an interactive whole. The IE approach simultaneously optimizes activities with respect to cost, performance, and environmental impact. Industrial Ecology provides a dynamic systems-based framework that enables management of human activity on a sustainable basis by: minimizing energy and materials usage; insuring acceptable quality of life for people; minimizing the ecological impact of human activity to levels that natural systems can sustain; and maintaining the economic viability of systems for industry, trade and commerce. Industrial ecology applies systems science to industrial systems, defining the system boundary to incorporate the natural world. Its overall goal is to optimize industrial activities within the constraints imposed by ecological viability, globally and locally. In this context, Industrial systems applies not just to private sector manufacturing and services but also to government operations, including provision of infrastructure. Sandia conducted its seventeenth Prosperity Game{trademark} on May 23--25, 1997, at the Hyatt Dulles Hotel in Herndon, Virginia. The primary sponsors of the event were Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory, who were interested in using the format of a Prosperity Game to address some of the issues surrounding Industrial Ecology. Honorary game sponsors were: The National Science Foundation; the Committee on Environmental Improvement, American Chemical Society; the Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Division, American Chemical Society; the US EPA--The Smart Growth Network, Office of Policy Development; and the US DOE-Center of Excellence for Sustainable Development.

  15. Microfluidics Expanding the Frontiers of Microbial Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusconi, Roberto

    Microfluidics has significantly contributed to the expansion of the frontiers of microbial ecology over the past decade by allowing researchers to observe the behaviors of microbes in highly controlled microenvironments, ...

  16. Observations and Modeling of Debris and Shrapnel Impacts on Optics and Diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eder, D; Bailey, D; Chamgers, F; Darnell, I; Nicola, P D; Dixit, S; Fisher, A; Gururangan, G; Kalantar, D; Koniges, A; Liu, W; Marinak, M; Masters, N; Mlaker, V; Prasad, R; Sepke, S; Whitman, P

    2011-11-04

    A wide range of targets with laser energies spanning two orders of magnitude have been shot at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) targets are cryogenic with Si supports and cooling rings attached to an Al thermo-mechanical package (TMP) with a thin (30 micron) Au hohlraum inside. Particular attention is placed on the low-energy shots where the TMP is not completely vaporized. In addition to NIC targets, a range of other targets has also been fielded on NIF. For all targets, simulations play a critical role in determining if the risks associated with debris and shrapnel are acceptable. In a number of cases, experiments were redesigned, based on simulations, to reduce risks or to obtain data. The majority of these simulations were done using the ALE-AMR code, which provides efficient late-time (100-1000X the pulse duration) 3D calculations of complex NIF targets.

  17. 173Bailey: Design ofEcologicalNetworksfor Monitoring Global Change Designof Ecological Networks for Monitoring Global Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environment Monitoring System (GEMS) of the United Nations Environment Programme, and the US Global Change173Bailey: Design ofEcologicalNetworksfor Monitoring Global Change Designof Ecological Networks for Monitoring Global Change World-wide monitoring of agricultural and other natural-resource ecosystems

  18. Ecological risks of DOE`s programmatic environmental restoration alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report assesses the ecological risks of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration Program. The assessment is programmatic in that it is directed at evaluation of the broad programmatic alternatives outlined in the DOE Implementation Plan. It attempts to (1) characterize the ecological resources present on DOE facilities, (2) describe the occurrence and importance of ecologically significant contamination at major DOE facilities, (3) evaluate the adverse ecological impacts of habitat disturbance caused by remedial activities, and (4) determine whether one or another of the programmatic alternatives is clearly ecologically superior to the others. The assessment focuses on six representative facilities: the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP); the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), including the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Y-12 plant, and K-25 plant; the Rocky Flats Plant; the Hanford Reservation; and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

  19. SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Eric Nelson, E; Nancy Halverson, N; John Mayer, J; Michael Paller, M; Rodney Riley, R; Michael Serrato, M

    2006-03-01

    The SRS Ecology Environmental Information Document (EEID) provides a source of information on the ecology of Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--owned property on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina, centered approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) southeast of Augusta, Georgia. The entire site was designated a National Environmental Research Park in 1972 by the Atomic Energy Commission, the predecessor of DOE. This document summarizes and synthesizes ecological research and monitoring conducted on the three main types of ecosystems found at SRS: terrestrial, wetland and aquatic. It also summarizes the available information on the threatened and endangered species found on the Savannah River Site. SRS is located along the Savannah River and encompasses an area of 80,267 hectares (310 square miles) in three South Carolina counties. It contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, wetlands, streams, reservoirs, and the adjacent Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a variety of plants and animals, including many commercially or recreationally valuable species and several rare, threatened, or endangered species. Soils are the basic terrestrial resource, influencing the development of terrestrial biological communities. Many different soils exist on the SRS, from hydric to well-drained, and from sand to clay. In general, SRS soils are predominantly well-drained loamy sands.

  20. Journal of Animal Ecology 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laaksonen, Toni

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2004 73, 342­352 © 2004 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing, reproductive value, sex allocation, sex-dependent mortality, varia- ble environment. Journal of Animal Ecology manipulation in kestrels © 2004 British Ecological Society, Journal of Animal Ecology, 73, 342­352 van

  1. Journal of Applied Ecology 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holl, Karen

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2004 41, 922­933 © 2004 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing-scale, Sacramento River, succession, vegetation Journal of Applied Ecology (2004) 41, 922­933 Introduction More than@ucsc.edu). #12;923 Riparian forest restoration © 2004 British Ecological Society, Journal of Applied Ecology, 41

  2. Journal of Applied Ecology 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holl, Karen

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2002 39, 960­970 © 2002 British Ecological Society Blackwell Science- tion, succession. Journal of Applied Ecology (2002) 39, 960­970 Introduction Efforts to reclaim@ucsc.edu). #12;961 Vegetation on reclaimed mines © 2002 British Ecological Society, Journal of Applied Ecology

  3. Journal of Animal Ecology 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trexler, Joel C.

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2005 © 2005 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing, Ltd Everglades, Moran effect, spatial synchrony. Journal of Animal Ecology (2005) doi: 10.1111/j.1365-mail: cruetz@sigmaxi.org #12;2 C. R. Ruetz et al. © 2005 British Ecological Society, Journal of Animal Ecology

  4. Master programme in Ecology & Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    of Ecology and Evolution, Baltzerstrasse 6, CH-3012 Bern save form print form #12;Master programme in Ecology of Ecology and Evolution, Baltzerstrasse 6, CH-3012 Bern #12;Master programme in Ecology & Evolution Jointly, Baltzerstrasse 6, CH-3012 Bern #12;Master programme in Ecology & Evolution Jointly organized by the Institute

  5. Ecological Resources and Systems | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES Science Network Requirements ReportEES

  6. 245Copyright ECOLOGICAL BULLETINS, 2013 Ecological Bulletins 54: 245250, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willig, Michael

    245Copyright © ECOLOGICAL BULLETINS, 2013 Ecological Bulletins 54: 245­250, 2013 Background, An- drewartha and Birch 1954, Odum 1959). Indeed, the relation between environmental gradients

  7. Marine Ecological Processes Online section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Marine Ecological Processes Online section FAS 6272 (3 credits) Fall 2014 Course Description, behavior, population dynamics, and community structure in marine and estuarine ecosystems. Prerequisite will have: · Examined how ecological processes operate in the marine environment · Compared how ecological

  8. NATIONAL CENTRE FOR EARTH OBSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    Realising long-term datasets of land surface temperature 4 The challenges of estimating biomass and carbon stores in sub-tropical woodlands 5 Operational deployment of SEVIRI Fire radiative power product 6 into an Arctic sea ice model Data assimilation 18 Data assimilation for modelling the carbon cycle 19 Deployment

  9. Ecology 2003 91, 240252

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chave, Jérôme

    Journal of Ecology 2003 91, 240­252 © 2003 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Center for Tropical Forest Science, Smithsonian Institution, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute-words: above-ground biomass change, carbon cycle, dry living above-ground bio- mass, tropical rain forest

  10. Ecology 2004 18, 212222

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehleringer, Jim

    Functional Ecology 2004 18, 212­222 © 2004 British Ecological Society 212 Blackwell Publishing, Ltd of California, Berkeley 94720-3140, CA, and Stable Isotope Ratio Facility for Environmental Research (SIRFER) examine if cultural conditions have an effect on instantaneous gas exchange and time-integrated carbon

  11. Ecology 2005 93, 10851093

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gehring, Catherine "Kitty"

    Journal of Ecology 2005 93, 1085­1093 © 2005 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing, Ltd G. WHITHAM Department of Biological Sciences and Merriam Powell Center for Environmental Research on ecosystems and ecosystem processes. Projected changes include increased levels of carbon dioxide, elevated

  12. Ecology 2006 20, 678688

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGraw, Kevin J.

    Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Carotenoid accumulation strategies for becoming a colourful HouseFunctional Ecology 2006 20, 678­688 678 © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 British. CRINO School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287­4501, USA Summary 1. Male House

  13. Ecology 2006 20, 491499

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    Functional Ecology 2006 20, 491­499 491 © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Physiological and behavioural correlates of life-history variation: a comparison between tropical and temperate zone House Wrens B. I. TIELEMAN,* T. H. DIJKSTRA,§ J

  14. Baltimore Harbor's Ecological and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilderbrand, Robert H.

    1 State of Baltimore Harbor's Ecological and Human Health 2010 E. Caroline Wicks, R. Heath Kelsey of Baltimore Harbor's ecological and human health, 2011. IAN Press, Cambridge, Maryland. Science communication to thank all the data providers: Baltimore City, Baltimore County, Maryland Department of Natural Resources

  15. Ecology 2004 92, 168173

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvertown, Jonathan

    in these islands. Key-words: Canary Islands, colonization, endemism, interspecific competition, Macaronesia, niche et al. 1994) and the Canary Islands (e.g. Francisco-Ortega et al. 1996), and these show that most.Oxford, UKJECJournal of Ecology0022-04772004 British Ecological SocietyFebruary 2004921ForumPhylogeny of island

  16. National Environmental Research Parks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The National Environmental Research Parks are outdoor laboratories that provide opportunities for environmental studies on protected lands that act as buffers around Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The research parks are used to evaluate the environmental consequences of energy use and development as well as the strategies to mitigate these effects. They are also used to demonstrate possible environmental and land-use options. The seven parks are: Fermilab National Environmental Research Park; Hanford National Environmental Research Park; Idaho National Environmental Research Park; Los Alamos National Environmental Research Park; Nevada National Environmental Research Park; Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park; and Savannah River National Environmental Research Park. This document gives an overview of the events that led to the creation of the research parks. Its main purpose is to summarize key points about each park, including ecological research, geological characteristics, facilities, and available databases.

  17. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2007 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Dennis; Anderson, David; Derek, Hall; Greger, Paul; Ostler, W. Kent

    2008-03-01

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) requires ecological monitoring and biological compliance support for activities and programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Ecological Services has implemented the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program to provide this support. EMAC is designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, delineate and define NTS ecosystems, and provide ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and programs on those ecosystems. This report summarizes the EMAC activities conducted by NSTec during calendar year 2007. Monitoring tasks during 2007 included eight program areas: (a) biological surveys, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) biological monitoring at the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). The following sections of this report describe work performed under these eight areas.

  18. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA) that is managed in conjunction with the University`s Institute of Ecology. The laboratory`s overall mission is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under an M&O contract with the US Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. Significant accomplishments were made during the year ending July 31, 1994 in the areas of research, education and service. Reviewed in this document are research projects in the following areas: Environmental Operations Support (impacted wetlands, streams, trace organics, radioecology, database synthesis, wild life studies, zooplankton, safety and quality assurance); wood stork foraging and breeding ecology; defence waste processing facility; environmental risk assessment (endangered species, fish, ash basin studies); ecosystem alteration by chemical pollutants; wetlands systems; biodiversity on the SRS; Environmental toxicology; environmental outreach and education; Par Pond drawdown studies in wildlife and fish and metals; theoretical ecology; DOE-SR National Environmental Research Park; wildlife studies. Summaries of educational programs and publications are also give.

  19. Journal of Animal Ecology 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laaksonen, Toni

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2002 71, 23­31 © 2002 British Ecological Society Blackwell Science Ltd, cyclic variation in food abundance, differential mortality, reproductive effort, senescence. Journal@utu.fi #12;© 2002 British Ecological Society, Journal of Animal Ecology, 71, 23­31 24 T. Laaksonen, E

  20. Journal of Animal Ecology 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotelli, Nicholas J.

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2003 72, 1015­1026 © 2003 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing, positive interactions, rarefaction. Journal of Animal Ecology (2003) 72, 1015­1026 Introduction After Society, Journal of Animal Ecology, 72, 1015­1026 available to other colonizing species (Gallagher et al

  1. Ecology, 82(4), 2001, pp. 10231039 2001 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    , CHRISTER BRO¨ NMARK, AND WILHELM GRANE´ LI Department of Ecology, Ecology Building, Lund University, S-223

  2. Environmental Impacts of Tourism in Khao Yai National Park, Thailand 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phumsathan, Sangsan

    2011-10-21

    Knowledge of visitor impacts is critical for sustainable tourism management in national parks. The focus of past tourism impact research on national parks is either on bio-physical impacts (conducted as recreation ecology research) or on social...

  3. PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL PAPER Tracking plant physiological properties from multi-angular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gitelson, Anatoly

    PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL PAPER Tracking plant physiological properties from multi surface and the atmosphere. However, spectral observations are subject to the sun­ observer geometry, the sun­observer geometry influences the spectral brightness measured by the sensor. Likewise, when

  4. Guidance Manual for Conducting Screening Level Ecological Risk Assessments at the INEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. L. VanHorn; N. L. Hampton; R. C. Morris

    1995-06-01

    This document presents reference material for conducting screening level ecological risk assessments (SLERAs)for the waste area groups (WAGs) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included in this document are discussions of the objectives of and processes for conducting SLERAs. The Environmental Protection Agency ecological risk assessment framework is closely followed. Guidance for site characterization, stressor characterization, ecological effects, pathways of contaminant migration, the conceptual site model, assessment endpoints, measurement endpoints, analysis guidance, and risk characterization are included.

  5. NATIONAL CENTER FOR GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION AND ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    sciences; and to provide a central clearing house and conduit for disseminating information regarding of the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis at Santa Barbara. The University Consortium

  6. Assessing the ecological and economic benefits of a no-take marine reserve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Leah R.

    National Park (LBNP, Fig. 1), established in 1996 to protect the biologically-rich area from industrialMETHODS Assessing the ecological and economic benefits of a no-take marine reserve Jeffrey Wielgusa The management of marine resources is often impeded by a lack of models to integrate ecological and economic

  7. 44 WEB ECOLOGY 9, 2009 Web Ecology 9: 4453.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Benayas, José María

    44 WEB ECOLOGY 9, 2009 Web Ecology 9: 44­53. Accepted 13 May 2009 Copyright © EEF ISSN 1399 agricultural landscape on local bird communities. ­ Web Ecol. 9: 44­53. This study assesses whether Alcalá de Henares, Spain. #12;45WEB ECOLOGY 9, 2009 multifunctional systems are common in southern Europe

  8. 74 WEB ECOLOGY 8, 2008 Web Ecology 8: 7483.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Benayas, José María

    74 WEB ECOLOGY 8, 2008 Web Ecology 8: 74­83. Accepted 2 June 2008 Copyright © EEF ISSN 1399 experimental environments. ­ Web Ecol. 8: 74­83. Living organisms respond both to current and previous;75WEB ECOLOGY 8, 2008 previous environments on the future performance. This type of experiments

  9. 120 WEB ECOLOGY 7, 2007 Web Ecology 7: 120131.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Benayas, José María

    120 WEB ECOLOGY 7, 2007 Web Ecology 7: 120­131. Accepted 27 December 2007 Copyright © EEF ISSN 1399 improves early performance of planted seedlings of the Mediterranean shrub Quer- cus coccifera. ­ Web, Spain. #12;121WEB ECOLOGY 7, 2007 have important economic consequences because large amounts of public

  10. Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Field Sampling Plan for 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Haney R. VanHorn

    2007-07-31

    This field sampling plan describes the field investigations planned for the Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Project at the Idaho National Laboratory Site in 2007. This plan and the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions constitute the sampling and analysis plan supporting long-term ecological monitoring sampling in 2007. The data collected under this plan will become part of the long-term ecological monitoring data set that is being collected annually. The data will be used t determine the requirements for the subsequent long-term ecological monitoring. This plan guides the 2007 investigations, including sampling, quality assurance, quality control, analytical procedures, and data management. As such, this plan will help to ensure that the resulting monitoring data will be scientifically valid, defensible, and of known and acceptable quality.

  11. The Marine Ecology of Juvenile Columbia River Basin Salmonids: A Synthesis of Research 1998-2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Marine Ecology of Juvenile Columbia River Basin Salmonids: A Synthesis of Research 1998 Wainwright, Laurie Weitkamp, Jeannette Zamon and Kurt Fresh Report of the U.S. National Marine Fisheries by the National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA), which began in 1998

  12. Ecological Engineering Undergraduate Advising Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Ecological Engineering Undergraduate Advising Guide 2014-2015 #12;2 #12;Student Responsibilities in Ecological Engineering as administered by Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering (BEE carefully review the College of Engineering and the BEE Department policies for admission, student

  13. Ecological Engineering Undergraduate Advising Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Ecological Engineering Undergraduate Advising Guide 2013-2014 #12;2 #12;Student Responsibilities in Ecological Engineering as administered by Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering (BEE carefully review the College of Engineering and the BEE Department policies for admission, student

  14. Journal of Applied Ecology 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2007 44, 748­759 © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British, distribution, edge, marbled murrelets, model transferability, old-growth Journal of Applied Ecology (2007) 44-nesting Alcid © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British Ecological Society, Journal of Applied

  15. Marine Ecological Processes Online section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Marine Ecological Processes Online section FAS 4270 (3 credits) Fall 2012 Course Description The course covers the ecology of marine organisms and habitats with focus on how general ecological principles and those unique to the marine environment drive patterns and processes. Prerequisite: Two

  16. Foraging Ecology of Lactating Steller Sea Lions (Eumetopias jubatus) at Lovushki Island, Russia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier, Paul

    2015-04-29

    A key objective of the National Marine Fisheries Service recovery plan for Steller sea lions (SSL – Eumetopias jubatus) is to protect critical habitats. Doing so relies in part on knowledge of SSL ecology based on time-depth ...

  17. Ecology 2006 94, 276284

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gehring, Catherine "Kitty"

    Journal of Ecology 2006 94, 276­284 © 2006 The Authors Journal compilation © 2006 British of Biological Sciences and Merriam Powell Center for Environmental Research, Northern Arizona University and Cupressaceae that are dependent on the host plant for water and mineral nutrients and a portion of their carbon

  18. Ecology 2007 95, 13941403

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traveset, Anna

    EvolutionResearchGroup(CSIC-IPNA),C/AstrofísicoFranciscoSánchez3,38206LaLaguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain, Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Conservation (Canary Islands). 2. Seeds from all three plant species studied (Lycium intricatum, Rubia fruticosa probably in the colonization of other subtropical islands. Key-words: Badlands, Canary Islands, diplochory

  19. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2013 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.

    2014-06-05

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2013. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed activity sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, and (f) habitat restoration monitoring. During 2013, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  20. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2011 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, D. J.; Anderson, D. C.; Hall, D. B.; Greger, P. D.; Ostler, W. K.

    2012-06-13

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2011. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2011, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  1. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2012 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent; Hansen, Dennis J.

    2013-07-03

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2012. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2012, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  2. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2010 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, D.J.; Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.; Greger, P.D.; Ostler, W.K.

    2011-07-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2010. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2010, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  3. Valuation of ecological resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, M.J.; Bilyard, G.R.; Link, S.O.; Ricci, P.F.; Seely, H.E.; Ulibarri, C.A.; Westerdahl, H.E.

    1995-04-01

    Ecological resources are resources that have functional value to ecosystems. Frequently, these functions are overlooked in terms of the value they provide to humans. Environmental economics is in search of an appropriate analysis framework for such resources. In such a framework, it is essential to distinguish between two related subsets of information: (1) ecological processes that have intrinsic value to natural ecosystems; and (2) ecological functions that are values by humans. The present study addresses these concerns by identifying a habitat that is being displaced by development, and by measuring the human and ecological values associated with the ecological resources in that habitat. It is also essential to determine which functions are mutually exclusive and which are, in effect, complementary or products of joint production. The authors apply several resource valuation tools, including contingent valuation methodology (CVM), travel cost methodology (TCM), and hedonic damage-pricing (HDP). One way to derive upper-limit values for more difficult-to-value functions is through the use of human analogs, because human-engineered systems are relatively inefficient at supplying the desired services when compared with natural systems. Where data on the relative efficiencies of natural systems and human analogs exist, it is possible to adjust the costs of providing the human analog by the relative efficiency of the natural system to obtain a more realistic value of the function under consideration. The authors demonstrate this approach in an environmental economic case study of the environmental services rendered by shrub-steppe habitats of Benton County, Washington State.

  4. National Day of Remembrance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01

    Ames Laboratory observed the National Day of Remembrance for weapons workers from the Cold War era with a ceremony held Oct. 27, 2009 at the Ames Public Library.

  5. National Day of Remembrance

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-03-01

    Ames Laboratory observed the National Day of Remembrance for weapons workers from the Cold War era with a ceremony held Oct. 27, 2009 at the Ames Public Library.

  6. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS ABSTRACT

  7. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2008 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Dennis J.; Anderson, David C.; Hall, Derek B.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent

    2009-04-30

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2008. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

  8. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2009 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, J. Dennis; Anderson, David C.; Hall, Derek B.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent

    2010-07-13

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2009. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2009, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

  9. The ecology of mutualism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucher, D. H.; James, Samuel W.; Keeler, K. H.

    1982-11-01

    , Quebec, Canada H3C 3P8 Sam James Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA 48109 Kathleen H. Keeler School of Life Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska, USA 68588 INTRODUCTION....annualreviews.org/aronline Annu. Rev. Ecol. Syst. 1982.13:315-347. Downloaded from arjournals.annualreviews.org by University of Kanas-Lawrence & Edwards on 09/26/05. For personal use only. 316 BOUCHER, JAMES & KEELER species" without evoking group selection. Two definitions have...

  10. Rocky Mountain Futures: An Ecological Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguero, Tania

    2003-01-01

    changes in the Rocky Mountains, global warming, and severalReview: Rocky Mountain Futures: An Ecological Perspective ByJill S. Baron (Ed. ). Rocky Mountain Futures: An Ecological

  11. SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT -1997 UPDATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, N.V.; Wike, L.D.; Patterson, K.K.; Bowers, J.A.; Bryan, A.L.; Chen, K.F.; Cummins, C.L.; deCarmen, B.R.; Dixon, K.L.; Dunn, D.L.

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of the SRS Ecology: Environmental Information Document is to provide a source of information on the ecology of the Savannah River Site.

  12. Big data and the future of ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Bonter DN. 2010. Citizen science as an ecological researchand ecology Panel 2. Citizen science – crowd-sourcing bigspecies (NABCI 2011). Citizen science is a form of data

  13. Journal of Applied Ecology 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Len

    Journal of Applied Ecology 2006 43, 377­384 © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd METHODOLOGICAL INSIGHTS Point transect sampling with traps, Etive House, Beechwood Park, Inverness IV2 3BW, UK Summary 1. The ability to monitor abundance of animal

  14. ISSUES IN ECOLOGY TECHNICAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    ISSUES IN ECOLOGY TECHNICAL REPORT Ecological Applications, 21(6), 2011, pp. 1902­1924 Ó 2011 for carbon benefits, environmental and monetary costs, risks and trade-offs for a variety of activities co-benefits such as biodiversity, water, and economic opportunities. Each strategy also has trade

  15. Journal of Animal Ecology 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laaksonen, Toni

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2007 76, 1045­1052 © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British-words: density effect, Ficedula hypoleuca, long-term trend, Parus major, timing of breeding. Journal of Animal@utu.fi #12;1046 M. P. Ahola et al. © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British Ecological Society

  16. SRS ecology: Environmental information document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L.D.; Shipley, R.W.; Bowers, J.A.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this Document is to provide a source of ecological information based on the exiting knowledge gained from research conducted at the Savannah River Site. This document provides a summary and synthesis of ecological research in the three main ecosystem types found at SRS and information on the threatened and endangered species residing there.

  17. The Ecological Impact of Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    The Ecological Impact of Biofuels Joseph E. Fargione,1 Richard J. Plevin,2 and Jason D. Hill3 1 land-use change Abstract The ecological impact of biofuels is mediated through their effects on land, air, and water. In 2008, about 33.3 million ha were used to produce food- based biofuels

  18. Journal of Animal Ecology 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aberdeen, University of

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2006 75, 456­465 © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 British-words: correlated random walk, first-passage time, search paths, spatial scale. Journal of Animal Ecology (2006) 75-mail: h.bailey@abdn.ac.uk #12;457 Movementpatterns and foraging © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation

  19. ORGANIZING INFORMATION FOR ECOLOGICAL SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in a way that preserves the greatest possible knowledge base, while making the most efficient and effectiveORGANIZING INFORMATION FOR ECOLOGICAL SITES Society for Range Management Annual Meeting Ecological effectively for planning, restoration, and management. Arranging the various elements within the ecosystem

  20. Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future TOPICAL LUNCH Title: EPA's National Environmental Education Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    's National Environmental Education Program Marianne Krasny, Professor, Civic Ecology Lab, Natural Resources, Cornell University Judy Braus, Executive Director, North American Association for Environmental Education EECapacity, EPA's national environmental education training program, applies social innovation theory

  1. Argonne Director Eric Isaacs addresses the National Press Club

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Eric Isaccs

    2010-01-08

    Argonne Director Eric Isaacs addresses the National Press Club on 9/15/2009. To build a national economy based on sustainable energy, the nation must first "reignite its innovation ecology," he said. Issacs makes the case for investing in science to secure America's future.

  2. New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and associated facilities to house its new Department of Global Ecology. The buildings, located on the campus1 New Laboratory Complex Department of Global Ecology Carnegie Institution of Washington Stanford Ecology will conduct basic research and training on large-scale interactions between ecological systems

  3. BIOL 303, Ecology Study guide for Exam1, Spring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creel, Scott

    BIOL 303, Ecology Study guide for Exam1, Spring 2011 1. The sun is so far from the earth this produce the observed global distribution of wet and dry climates along the NorthSouth axis? 3. Given global temperature responds to the addition of CO2. Understand this figure thoroughly, because

  4. Basalt features observed in outcrops, cores, borehole video imagery and geophysical logs, and basalt hydrogeologic study at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Eastern Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennecke, W.M.

    1996-10-01

    A study was undertaken to examine permeable zones identified in boreholes open to the underlying basalt and to describe the vertical cross flows present in the boreholes. To understand the permeable zones in the boreholes detailed descriptions and measurements of three outcrops in the Snake River Plain, three cores at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the INEL, and over fifty borehole TV logs from the INEL were carried out. Based on the observations made on the three outcrops an idealized basalt lava flow model was generated that used a set of nomenclature that would be standard for the basalt lava flows studied. An upper vesicular zone, a sometimes absent columnar zone, central zone, and lower vesicular zone make up the basalt lava flow model. The overall distinction between the different zones are based on the vesicle shape size, vesicularity, and fractures present. The results of the studies also indicated that the basalt lava flows at the INEL are distal to medial facies pahoehoe lava flows with close fitting contacts. The most permeable zones identified in these basalts are fractured vesiculated portions of the top of the lava flow, the columnar areas, and basalt-flow contacts in order of importance. This was determined from impeller flowmeter logging at the INEL. Having this information a detailed stratigraphy of individual basalt lava flows and the corresponding permeable units were generated. From this it was concluded that groundwater flow at the ICPP prefers to travel along thin basalt lava flows or flow-units. Flow direction and velocity of intrawell flows detected by flowmeter is controlled by a nearby pumping well.

  5. Journal of Animal Ecology 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willson. J.D.

    energy reserves during the drought, S. pygaea reproduced with the same frequency and fecundity during to rebound rapidly from the stresses of prolonged drought is due in part to their reproductive ecology

  6. Journal of Animal Ecology 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    * *Evolutionary Ecology Group, Zoological Institute, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland; Behavioural, Zoological Institute, University of Bern, 3012 Bern, Switzerland; Tel: +41 31 631 30 21, Fax: +41 31 631 30

  7. Arid Lands Ecology Facility management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1993-02-01

    The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) facility is a 312-sq-km tract of land that lies on the western side of the Hanford Site in southcentral Washington. The US Atomic Energy Commission officially set aside this land area in 1967 to preserve shrub-steppe habitat and vegetation. The ALE facility is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for ecological research and education purposes. In 1971, the ALE facility was designated the Rattlesnake Hills Research Natural Area (RNA) as a result of an interagency federal cooperative agreement, and remains the largest RNA in Washington. it is also one of the few remaining large tracts of shrub-steppe vegetation in the state retaining a predominant preeuropean settlement character. This management plan provides policy and implementation methods for management of the ALE facilities consistent with both US Department of Energy Headquarters and the Richland Field Office decision (US Congress 1977) to designate and manage ALE lands as an RNA and as a component of the DOE National Environmental Research Park System.

  8. ECOLOGY & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Programs of Study The graduate program in Ecology & Environmental Science capitalizes on University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    Science capitalizes on University strengths in ecology, environmental science, and environmental policy programs in ecology, environmental science, and environmental policy. The EES Graduate Program includes studying a wide range of challenging problems in ecology, environmental science, and environmental policy

  9. Survey of ecological resources at selected US Department of Energy sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAllister, C.; Beckert, H.; Abrams, C.

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns and manages a wide range of ecological resources. During the next 30 years, DOE Headquarters and Field Offices will make land-use planning decisions and conduct environmental remediation and restoration activities in response to federal and state statutes. This document fulfills, in part, DOE`s need to know what types of ecological resources it currently owns and manages by synthesizing information on the types and locations of ecological resources at 10 DOE sites: Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Plant, Los Alamos National Laboratory, savannah River Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Fernald Environmental Management Project. This report summarizes information on ecosystems, habitats, and federally listed threatened, endangered, and candidate species that could be stressed by contaminants or physical activity during the restoration process, or by the natural or anthropogenic transport of contaminants from presently contaminated areas into presently uncontaminated areas. This report also provides summary information on the ecosystems, habitats, and threatened and endangered species that exist on each of the 10 sites. Each site chapter contains a general description of the site, including information on size, location, history, geology, hydrology, and climate. Descriptions of the major vegetation and animal communities and of aquatic resources are also provided, with discussions of the treatened or endangered plant or animal species present. Site-specific ecological issues are also discussed in each site chapter. 106 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  10. OBSERVATIONS ON THE DISTRIBUTION AND ECOLOGY OF SIDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spooner, David

    potential as a soil stabilizer, fodder crop, honey plant, and fiber plant for the pulp and paper industry

  11. Physical influences on phytoplankton ecology : models and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Sophie A

    2013-01-01

    The physical environment in the oceans dictates not only how phytoplankton cells are dispersed and their populations intermingled, but also mediates the supply of nutrients to the surface mixed layer. In this thesis I ...

  12. Ecologic and geographic distribution of filovirus disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Bauer, John T.; Mills, James N.

    2004-01-01

    We used ecologic niche modeling of outbreaks and sporadic cases of filovirus-associated hemorrhagic fever (HF) to provide a large-scale perspective on the geographic and ecologic distributions of Ebola and Marburg viruses. We predicted...

  13. Opportunistic, collaborative and synchronized, proximal device ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toledano, Eyal

    2013-01-01

    CoSync is an on-device software framework for coordinating proximal consumer electronic devices in order to create a synchronized, opportunistic and collaborative device ecology. The CoSync device ecology combines multiple ...

  14. 2578 Ecology, Vol. 79, No. 7BOOK REVIEWS Ecology, 79(7), 1998, p. 2578

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    2578 Ecology, Vol. 79, No. 7BOOK REVIEWS Ecology, 79(7), 1998, p. 2578 1998 by the Ecological and challenging ecological issues associated with human expansion and global change. This issue has led, muskrat, house finch, gypsy moth, cheatgrass, rinderpest, etc. But this book does not pinpoint specific

  15. Rebecca A. Efroymson Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    seed money fund · Investigator for "Developing Metrics for Assessment of Ecological Benefits of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy R&D Programs," DOE (2007) · Advisor to DOE and National Wind Coordinating for biomass energy, including development of sustainability indicators and targets, consideration

  16. SHORT REVIEW Ecological genomics: understanding gene and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herman, Mike

    SHORT REVIEW Ecological genomics: understanding gene and genome function in the natural environment MC Ungerer, LC Johnson and MA Herman Division of Biology, Ecological Genomics Institute, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA The field of ecological genomics seeks to understand the genetic mechanisms

  17. Ecologically Significant Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agreement 280016 © 1999 Montana Natural Heritage Program State Library Building · P.O. Box 201800 · 1515 on vegeta- tion, documenting the types of wetland communities present, their quality and condition, and rare integrity. Our observations indicate that some types of wetlands, like wet meadows and valley bottom

  18. Mexico National Institute of Ecology and Climate Change (INECC) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation,Mereg GmbH Jump to: navigation,Energy Information

  19. Journal of Animal Ecology 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Fangliang

    and Macroecology Group, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK between species of different colonization status. Indeed, virtually all variation about the bivariate distribution, spatial variance, Taylor's power law. Journal of Animal Ecology (2006) 75, 646­656 doi: 10.1111/j

  20. Zoology 4413 TROPICA L ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fincke, Ola M.

    2/22/2013 1 Zoology 4413 TROPICA L ECOLOGY FIELD COURSE In Veracruz and Chiapas, Mexico At Los rainforest left in Mexico Mahogany tree The forest provided a sense of history . . . Casa de Cortez, La to Chajul Solar panels power Chajul Clinics provide free family planning but also saw some solutions #12

  1. Journal of Animal Ecology 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, John D.

    of distribution due to thermal stratification during the summer. However, plaice from the northern North Sea did, spatial dynamics, thermal stratification. Journal of Animal Ecology (2004) 73, 377­385 Introduction Long non-breeding season. Two clusters were in warm, thermally mixed water in the eastern and western North

  2. Journal of Animal Ecology 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engen, Steinar

    on the dynamics of central European great and blue tit popula- tions. This generates synchronous fluctuations Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd The extended Moran effect and large-scale synchronous, Bauernstrasse 14, D-38162 Cremlingen, Germany Summary 1. Synchronous fluctuations of geographically separated

  3. Cheatgrass Biology, Ecology, and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Cheatgrass Biology, Ecology, and Management Fabián Menalled menalled@montana.edu 406-994-4783 Montana State #12;http://ipm.montana.edu/cropweeds #12;#12;· Biology and identification of brome species secalinus Not found in MT #12;Cheatgrass Japanese brome #12;Pictures from Interactive Encyclopedia of North

  4. Population Ecology Philip M. Dixon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of populations include the mallard ducks in the Central flyway of the United States, the Daphnia laevis(t) - e(t), (2) where b(t), d(t), i(t), and e(t) are the instantaneous rates of birth, death, immigrationPopulation Ecology Philip M. Dixon Department of Statistics Iowa State University 20 December 2001

  5. Industrial Ecology Master of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Cycles · Resource Scarcity · Agent Based Modelling of Complex Adaptive Systems · Renewable energy systems. An interdisciplinary approach, integrating technical, environmental and social frames of reference, is essential and profit Industrial Ecology is inspired by nature. The analogy between natural and technical systems

  6. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Ecological resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R.; Jones, A.T.; Smith, C.R.; Kalmijn, A.J.

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information that were obtained from review of the (1) scientific literature, (2) government and private sector reports, (3) studies done under DOE interagency agreements with the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and with the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), and (4) observations made during site visits are being made available for future research in these areas.

  7. Predicting ecological roles in the rhizosphere using metabolome and transportome modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Peter E.; Collart, Frank R.; Dai, Yang; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2015-09-02

    The ability to obtain complete genome sequences from bacteria in environmental samples, such as soil samples from the rhizosphere, has highlighted the microbial diversity and complexity of environmental communities. New algorithms to analyze genome sequence information in the context of community structure are needed to enhance our understanding of the specific ecological roles of these organisms in soil environments. We present a machine learning approach using sequenced Pseudomonad genomes coupled with outputs of metabolic and transportomic computational models for identifying the most predictive molecular mechanisms indicative of a Pseudomonad’s ecological role in the rhizosphere: a biofilm, biocontrol agent, promoter of plant growth, or plant pathogen. Computational predictions of ecological niche were highly accurate overall with models trained on transportomic model output being the most accurate (Leave One Out Validation F-scores between 0.82 and 0.89). The strongest predictive molecular mechanism features for rhizosphere ecological niche overlap with many previously reported analyses of Pseudomonad interactions in the rhizosphere, suggesting that this approach successfully informs a system-scale level understanding of how Pseudomonads sense and interact with their environments. The observation that an organism’s transportome is highly predictive of its ecological niche is a novel discovery and may have implications in our understanding microbial ecology. The framework developed here can be generalized to the analysis of any bacteria across a wide range of environments and ecological niches making this approach a powerful tool for providing insights into functional predictions from bacterial genomic data.

  8. Predicting ecological roles in the rhizosphere using metabolome and transportome modeling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Larsen, Peter E.; Collart, Frank R.; Dai, Yang; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2015-09-02

    The ability to obtain complete genome sequences from bacteria in environmental samples, such as soil samples from the rhizosphere, has highlighted the microbial diversity and complexity of environmental communities. New algorithms to analyze genome sequence information in the context of community structure are needed to enhance our understanding of the specific ecological roles of these organisms in soil environments. We present a machine learning approach using sequenced Pseudomonad genomes coupled with outputs of metabolic and transportomic computational models for identifying the most predictive molecular mechanisms indicative of a Pseudomonad’s ecological role in the rhizosphere: a biofilm, biocontrol agent, promoter ofmore »plant growth, or plant pathogen. Computational predictions of ecological niche were highly accurate overall with models trained on transportomic model output being the most accurate (Leave One Out Validation F-scores between 0.82 and 0.89). The strongest predictive molecular mechanism features for rhizosphere ecological niche overlap with many previously reported analyses of Pseudomonad interactions in the rhizosphere, suggesting that this approach successfully informs a system-scale level understanding of how Pseudomonads sense and interact with their environments. The observation that an organism’s transportome is highly predictive of its ecological niche is a novel discovery and may have implications in our understanding microbial ecology. The framework developed here can be generalized to the analysis of any bacteria across a wide range of environments and ecological niches making this approach a powerful tool for providing insights into functional predictions from bacterial genomic data.« less

  9. ECOLOGICAL MONITORING AND COMPLIANCE PROGRAM CALENDAR YEAR 2005 REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA ECOLOGICAL SERVICES

    2006-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during the Calendar Year 2005. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive and protected/regulated species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

  10. Radioactivity in Precipitation: Methods and Observations from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radioactivity in Precipitation: Methods & Observations from Savannah River Site Dennis Jackson P.E. & Timothy Jannik - Savannah River National Laboratory Teresa Eddy - Savannah...

  11. Ecological investigation of a hazardous waste site, Warner Robins, Georgia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Billig, P. [Camp Dresser and McKee, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Landfill No. 4 and the sludge lagoon at Robins Air Force Base, Warner Robins, Georgia, were added to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Priorities List in 1987 because of highpotential for contaminant migration. Warner Robins is located approximately 90 miles southeast of Atlanta. In 1990 CH2M HILL conducted a Remedial Investigation at the base that recommended that further ecological assessment investigations be conducted (CH2M HILL 1990). The subject paper is the result of this recommendation. The ecological study was carried out by the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP)Division of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., working jointly with its subcontractor CDM (CDM 1992a). The primary area of investigation (Zone 1) included the sludge lagoon, Landfill No. 4, the wetland area east of the landfill and west of Hannah Road (including two sewage treatment ponds), and the area between Hannah Road and Horse Creek (Fig. 1). The bottomland forest wetlands of Zone 1 extend from the landfill east to Horse Creek. Surface water and groundwater flow across Zone 1 is generally in an easterly direction toward Horse Creek. Horse Creek is a south-flowing tributary of the Ocmulgee River Floodplain. The objective of the study was to perform a quantitative analysis of ecological risk associated with the ecosystems present in Zone 1. This investigation was unique because the assessment was to be based upon many measurement endpoints resulting in both location-specific data and data that would assess the condition of the overall ecosystem. The study was segregated into five distinct field investigations: hydrology, surface water and sediment, aquatic biology, wetlands ecology, and wildlife biology.

  12. Exciting careers blending engineering, science, and ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Exciting careers blending engineering, science, and ecology New Opportunities Making the world incorporate a broad range of biological systems as components, and emphasize mutual improvement of both human

  13. Globalisation and sustainable development: a political ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    ...................................................................................64 Free trade versus fair trade ........................................................................63 Globalisation and trade ecological justice into practice: guidelines for policy.............................68 A role for "fair trade

  14. ADVANCING A POLITICAL ECOLOGY OF GLOBAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    environmental issues: deforestation, desertification, biodiversity use and climate change. These discourses ecology, global environmental change, deforestation, desertification, biodiversity, climate change #12;1 1

  15. National Centre for Earth Observation, Publications 2008 National Centre for Earth Observation Publications 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :213, British Geological Survey Report no. CR/08/179, 48pp. Aiken, J., Hardman-Mountford, N.J., Barlow remote sensing. Journal of Plankton Research 30: 165-182. Allan, R.P. and Soden, B.J. (2008) Atmospheric. Bösch, S.C. Doney, and D.S. Schimel, (2008) Carbon source/sink information provided by column CO2

  16. Consent Order, Lawrence Livermore National National Security...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lawrence Livermore National National Security, LLC - WCO-2010-01 Consent Order, Lawrence Livermore National National Security, LLC - WCO-2010-01 October 29, 2010 Issued to Lawrence...

  17. Ecologic Analytics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH Jump to:Providence, RhodeEchols County,EU (SmartEcofysEcoleEcologic

  18. Partial Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Marlow

    2006-10-20

    We attempt to dissolve the measurement problem using an anthropic principle which allows us to invoke rational observers. We argue that the key feature of such observers is that they are rational (we need not care whether they are `classical' or `macroscopic' for example) and thus, since quantum theory can be expressed as a rational theory of probabilistic inference, the measurement problem is not a problem.

  19. Metapopulation Ecology Saskya van Nouhuys, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Nouhuys, Saskya

    of natural and experimental systems. Metapopulation ecology is used in conservation biology and in population Nouhuys, Saskya (December 2009) Metapopulation Ecology. In: Encyclopedia of

  20. Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil Friday, G. P. 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SOILS; SURFACE WATERS; SEDIMENTS; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; ENVIRONMENTAL...

  1. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #18 Pedro Quintana 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report #16 Covering

  2. MOWII Webinar: The ECO TLP, an Economical and Ecologically Sound...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MOWII Webinar: The ECO TLP, an Economical and Ecologically Sound Tension Leg Platform for Deep Water Wind Farms MOWII Webinar: The ECO TLP, an Economical and Ecologically Sound...

  3. UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology Bioinformatics training Roche 454 GS-FLX Registration, Microbiomes, Variant Analysis, Whole Genomes, Transcriptomes Data Analysis and Statistics CAGE database and employer. University of Nebraska-Lincoln*Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology* 323 Filley Hall *Lincoln

  4. Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, Anne

    Meetings Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology 6th New Phytologist of easily cultured saprotrophic fungi (among the first three published genomes were the models Saccharomyces or biotechnological interest, genomics is now poised to rapidly permeate the fields of fungal ecology and evolution

  5. Integrating Soil Ecological Knowledge into Restoration Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitchell

    Integrating Soil Ecological Knowledge into Restoration Management Liam Heneghan,1,2 Susan P. Miller that lead to restoration success. The discipline of soil ecology, which emphasizes both soil organisms the outcomes of restoration despite this variability. Here, we propose that the usefulness of this soil

  6. FrontiersinEcology and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    , Diorhabda elongata (Chrysomelidae; Dudley 2005), as a biocontrol agent for tamarisk. Beetle releasesFrontiersinEcology and the Environment Tamarisk biocontrol in the western United States: ecological are reported to result in up to REVIEWS REVIEWS REVIEWS Tamarisk biocontrol in the western United States

  7. Nordic Society Oikos Phylogenetic Approaches in Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nylin, Sören

    Nordic Society Oikos Phylogenetic Approaches in Ecology Author(s): Hans-Erik Wanntorp, Daniel R. Brooks, Thomas Nilsson, Soren Nylin, Fredrik Ronquist, Stephen C. Stearns, Nina Wedell Source: Oikos, Vol cited.A summaryis required. Phylogeneticapproachesin ecology Hans-Erik Wanntorp, Daniel R. Brooks

  8. National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the Pajarito Plateau topic of inaugural lecture at Los Alamos National Laboratory January 4, 2013 Lecture series begins yearlong commemoration of 70th anniversary LOS...

  9. Ecological

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R E H E N S I551 - g 7 sEZrZ, -

  10. What is microbial community ecology?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan

    2009-11-11

    The activities of complex communities of microbes affect biogeochemical transformations in natural, managed and engineered ecosystems. Meaningfully defining what constitutes a community of interacting microbial populations is not trivial, but is important for rigorous progress in the field. Important elements of research in microbial community ecology include the analysis of functional pathways for nutrient resource and energy flows, mechanistic understanding of interactions between microbial populations and their environment, and the emergent properties of the complex community. Some emergent properties mirror those analyzed by community ecologists who study plants and animals: biological diversity, functional redundancy and system stability. However, because microbes possess mechanisms for the horizontal transfer of genetic information, the metagenome may also be considered a community property.

  11. Multimodel inference in ecology and evolution: challenges and solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Ian

    landscape ecol- ogy, behavioural ecology, life history evolution, phylog- enetics and population genetics

  12. Waste area grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Ecological risk assessment and White Oak Creek watershed screening ecological risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroymson, R.A.; Jackson, B.L.; Jones, D.S. [and others] [and others

    1996-05-01

    This report presents an ecological risk assessment for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 based on the data collected in the Phase I remedial investigation (RI). It serves as an update to the WAG 2 screening ecological risk assessment that was performed using historic data. In addition to identifying potential ecological risks in WAG 2 that may require additional data collection, this report serves to determine whether there are ecological risks of sufficient magnitude to require a removal action or some other expedited remedial process. WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, associated flood plains, and the associated groundwater. The WOC system drains the WOC watershed, an area of approximately 16.8 km{sup 2} that includes ORNL and associated WAGs. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminants released from ORNL and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent WAGs.

  13. NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    a modified United Nations Test for Oxidizing Solids protocol. * 2010 burn-rate tests at New Mexico Tech performed on two types of surrogates of the buried Rocky Flats salt...

  14. Globalization Nationalized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazlish, Bruce

    Globalism and globalization have been seen as competitors to other allegiances, namely regionalism and nationalism. A look at recent efforts at reconceptualizing global history in China, Korea and the U.S., however, suggests ...

  15. Ungulate Carcasses Perforate Ecological Filters and Create

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007). Forest biodiversity, energy flow, nutrient cycling, and regeneration are significantly affectedUngulate Carcasses Perforate Ecological Filters and Create Biogeochemical Hotspots in Forest. Vucetich, Rolf O. Peterson, Joshua M. Shields, and Matthew D. Powers School of Forest Resources

  16. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansell, Dennis

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 30: 19­36, 2002 Published November 27 INTRODUCTION consent of the publisher #12;Aquat Microb Ecol 30: 19­36, 2002 Hodson 1977, Azam et al. 1983). Net DOC

  17. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Bess

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 38: 295­307, 2005 Published March 18 INTRODUCTION Resale or republication not permitted without written consent of the publisher #12;Aquat Microb Ecol 38

  18. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morel, François M. M.

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 51: 183­193, 2008 doi: 10.3354/ame01192 Published Microb Ecol 51: 183­193, 2008 ous study, we found that cdca-like genes are com- mon in diatoms

  19. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Bess

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 31: 33­47, 2003 Published February 13 INTRODUCTION@princeton.edu #12;Aquat Microb Ecol 31: 33­47, 2003 tions. There is evidence that the geologic history of the East

  20. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 54: 35­44, 2009 doi: 10.3354/ame01253 Published be taken up. It also applies to some phagotrophic particle feeders, such as radiolari- ans

  1. A PUBLICATION OF DOE'S SAVANNAH RIVER SITE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PARK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    #12;A PUBLICATION OF DOE'S SAVANNAH RIVER SITE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PARK April 1990 COMMUNITY TYPES Sarah W. Workman Kenneth W. McLeod Savannah River Ecology Laboratory A Publication of the Savannah River Site National Environmental Research Park Program 1990 #12;ABSTRACT The eight major plant

  2. National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  3. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific re-vegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat re-vegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Re-vegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS. Copies of the PDF documents were sent to DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information website in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Public Reading Facility.

  4. Ecology, 89(6), 2008, pp. 17231732 2008 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarnelle, Orlando

    on Daphnia clearance rate at low food levels, i.e., evidence of an overall Type III functional responseEcology, 89(6), 2008, pp. 1723­1732 Ó 2008 by the Ecological Society of America TYPE III FUNCTIONAL Aquacultures, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 USA Abstract. The functional response of Daphnia

  5. Water in a Changing World IssuesinEcologyPublishedbytheEcologicalSocietyofAmericaNumber9,Spring2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    , recreation, and waste disposal. In many regions of the world, the amount and quality of water available-based ecosystems that influence water quality. · At least 90 percent of river flows in the United StatesWater in a Changing World IssuesinEcologyPublishedbytheEcologicalSocietyofAmericaNumber9,Spring2001

  6. Ecology, 92(5), 2011, pp. 11151125 2011 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    Ecology, 92(5), 2011, pp. 1115­1125 Ó 2011 by the Ecological Society of America Terrestrial understanding of basal resource use by consumers is limited, because describing trophic pathways in complex food evident. Zooplankton relied on terrestrial and pelagic primary production, while zoobenthos and fishes

  7. Ecology, 92(11), 2011, pp. 21082116 2011 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    succession with climax communities being relatively uncommon. The effects of disturbance frequency mayEcology, 92(11), 2011, pp. 2108­2116 Ó 2011 by the Ecological Society of America Wave disturbance pressure (top-down), and storm waves (disturbance) in determining the standing biomass and net primary

  8. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  9. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  10. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note

  11. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology and imple- #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  12. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Extension Note EN-007

  13. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Relationships between Elevation and Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

  14. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS

  15. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Combined Snowpack and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  16. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific revegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat revegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Revegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS.

  17. New Ecology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation,National MarineUSAIDCanaan, Connecticut:New Earth

  18. FAS4932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    FAS4932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips Main Office: Program algae, including evolution, classification, structure, photosynthesis, growth, and reproduction. Emphasis on the ecological role of algae in different aquatic ecosystems (e.g. open ocean, estuaries, coral

  19. Hierarchical Bayesian Models for Predicting The Spread of Ecological Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hierarchical Bayesian Models for Predicting The Spread of Ecological Processes Christopher K. Wikle Department of Statistics, University of Missouri To appear: Ecology June 10, 2002 Key Words: Bayesian, Diffusion, Forecast, Hierarchical, House Finch, Invasive, Malthu- sian, State Space, Uncertainty Abstract

  20. DOE Cites Safety and Ecology Corp. for Violating Nuclear Safety...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Cites Safety and Ecology Corp. for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules DOE Cites Safety and Ecology Corp. for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules June 14, 2005 - 4:53pm Addthis...

  1. Ecological Engineering and Sustainability: A New Opportunity for Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stouffer, Daniel B.

    Ecological Engineering and Sustainability: A New Opportunity for Chemical Engineering Daniel B Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, and Northwestern Institute on Complex Systems InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). Keywords: ecological engineering, food webs, contaminant

  2. Ecologic niche modeling and spatial patterns of disease transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend

    2006-12-01

    Ecologic niche modeling (ENM) is a growing field with many potential applications to questions regarding the geography and ecology of disease transmission. Specifically, ENM has the potential to inform investigations concerned ...

  3. START HERE 2013 Annual Ecology Report DVD 1.htm

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3 Annual Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site Ecology DVD 1 Click on the links below to access different portions of the electronic annual report. 2013 Annual Report Sections...

  4. START HERE 2014 Annual Ecology Report DVD 1.htm

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 Annual Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site Ecology DVD 1 Click on the links below to access different portions of the electronic annual report. 2014 Annual Report Sections...

  5. Applicability of 10 CFR 851 to Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Letter from Bruce Diamond, Assistant General Counsel for Environment, DOE, dated November 24, 2007 to Mr. Bertsch, Director and Professor, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, regarding Savannah Riber Ecology Laboratory's Request for Interpretive Ruling under 10 CFR 851.

  6. Amigo Bob Cantisano: Organic Farming Advisor, Founder, Ecological Farming Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabkin, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    the Ecological Farming Conference at that point? Cantisano:the speakers at that conference? Cantisano: Miguel Altieri.it the Ecological Farming Conference. I can’t remember if it

  7. Behavioral Ecology doi:10.1093/beheco/arn084

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendry, Andrew

    stud- ies of ecologically based divergence in mating signals have focused on nonbehavioral traits own size'' rule (Wood and Foote 1996; McKinnon et al. 2004). Another possibility is that ecologically

  8. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #14 A willow island 19 April 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report #14

  9. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #6 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 July 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  10. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #2 Drs. Pedro Quintana, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 March 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly

  11. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #11 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 January 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  12. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #15 Pedro Quintana, Orlando, Florida 32816 26 May 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status

  13. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #12 Willow sapling 15 February 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report #9

  14. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #17 Pedro Quintana;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report #16 Covering the time period from

  15. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #5 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 June 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  16. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #19

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #19 Pedro Quintana, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 September 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly

  17. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #4 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 May 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  18. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #9 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 11 November 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  19. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #3 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 April 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  20. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #10 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 December 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  1. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #16

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #16 Pedro Quintana, Florida 32816 15 June 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report

  2. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #1 Drs. Pedro Quintana, Orlando, Florida 32816 14 February 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly

  3. Ecology and Geography of Plague Transmission Areas in Northeastern Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, John R.; Peterson, A. Townsend; Ameida, Alzira

    2011-01-04

    Plague in Brazil is poorly known and now rarely seen, so studies of its ecology are difficult. We used ecological niche models of historical (1966-present) records of human plague cases across northeastern Brazil to assess hypotheses regarding...

  4. National Institutes of Health Current National Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    Library of Medicine John E. Fogarty International Center for Advanced Study in National Center National Institute of Nursing Research National Library of Medicine John E. Fogarty International CenterNational Institutes of Health Current National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin

  5. FAS6176 ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    FAS6176 ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips 7922 NW 71st Street the biology and ecology of aquatic algae, including evolution, classification, structure, photosynthesis, growth, and reproduction. Emphasis on the ecological role of algae in different aquatic ecosystems (e

  6. FAS6932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FAS6932: ALGAE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY Instructor: Professor Edward Phlips Main Office: Program-mail: phlips@ufl.edu Office Hours: Mondays 4pm-5pm Course Description: The biology and ecology of aquatic algae on the ecological role of algae in different aquatic ecosystems (e.g. open ocean, estuaries, coral reefs, rocky

  7. Bird diversity indicates ecological value in urban home prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    have been proven to benefit housing values with little need for nuanced ecological assessmentBird diversity indicates ecological value in urban home prices Michael C. Farmer & Mark C. Wallace are equally valuable. Also some ecologically valuable space appears on private residences, not only public

  8. Advanced Mathematical Ecology -Fall 2013 Math/EEB 681

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Louis J.

    of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Mathematics Dr. Chris Remien, NIMBioS Postdoctoral Fellow Meeting Methods for Ecology and Evolutionary Biology by Marc Mangel, Cambridge University Press 2006 We the mathematical aspects of the text, and by a few essays from the recent Encyclopedia of Theoretical Ecology (Alan

  9. CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giron, David - Institut de Recherche sur la Biologie de l'Insecte, Université François Rabelais

    545 CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY Ecology, 86 could be achieved in that model by assuming that the large amounts of ingested proteins and car to all organisms with implications ranging from energy metabolism, behav- ioral ecology, senescence

  10. Marine Chemical Ecology: A Science Born of Scuba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlik, Joseph

    Marine Chemical Ecology: A Science Born of Scuba Joseph R. Pawlik, Charles D.Amsler, Raphael Ritson chemists have been interested in the novel chemical structures and biological activities of marine natural by diverse marine organisms. Chemi- cal ecology, the study of the natural ecological functions

  11. National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolar Photovoltaic Solar PhotovoltaicBWXT Y-12 is preserving Y-12'sNational

  12. National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolar Photovoltaic Solar PhotovoltaicBWXT Y-12 is preserving Y-12'sNational

  13. National Laboratory

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report: AchievementsTemperatures Year 6 -FINALEnergy,Pacific Mort hwest National

  14. Master of Science in Ecology (Plan A) Graduate Degree Interdisciplinary Program in Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    section of the catalog or http://catalog.colostate.edu/front/courses-of-instruction.aspx to see the course Advanced Physiological Ecology of Fishes 4 FW662 Wildlife Population Dynamics 3 HORT571 Soil Plant Water

  15. PhD in Ecology Graduate Degree Interdisciplinary Program in Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Charles W.

    of the catalog or http://catalog.colostate.edu/front/courses-of-instruction.aspx to see the course prerequisites Physiological Ecology of Fishes 4 FW662 Wildlife Population Dynamics 3 #12;HORT571 Soil Plant Water Relations 3

  16. Ecology, 83(8), 2002, pp. 20912096 2002 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCabe, Declan

    1989), species nestedness (Patterson and At- mar 1986), and trait­environment associations (Keddy colonization and were competition-free. These ex- changes touched off a debate in community ecology that has

  17. Ecology, 91(11), 2010, pp. 31893200 2010 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Ana

    of a grassland ecosystem to an experimental manipulation of a keystone rodent and domestic livestock ANA D (Cynomys spp.), a keystone burrowing rodent. Understanding the ecological relationships between cattle; grasshoppers; grassland; grazing; herbivores; keystone species; prairie dogs; vegetation. INTRODUCTION

  18. National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory Management Systems AgencyCompany Organization: United...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administratio...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    nuclear weapons Bay Area national labs team to tackle long-standing automotive hydrogen storage challenge Sandia National Laboratories chemist Mark Allendorf, shown here at...

  20. Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Los Alamos National Laboratory, along with colleagues at institutions in Switzerland and Canada, have observed, for the first time in a single exotic phase, a situation...

  1. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Group 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives.

  2. Montana State University 1 Department of Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    leading to Master of Science degrees in biological sciences. The Master's degree generally requires the Master's and Doctoral level the following areas of study are available: terrestrial and aquatic ecologyBT is required for admission. All qualified students must secure an agreement from a faculty member who

  3. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Stéphan

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 22: 301­313, 2000 Published October 26 of the phytoplankton community. This community was dominated by cells, which averaged 77% (range 41 to 98, and might contribute to fueling planktonic communities with the limiting nutrient through regeneration. KEY

  4. Restoring Ecological Function with Invasive Species Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanna, Cause

    2012-01-01

    Journal of Ecology 22:55-63. Beggs, J. R. , J. S. Rees, R.and Systematics 38:567-593. Beggs, J. R. , R. J. Toft, J. P.Control 44:399-407. Beggs, J. R. , E. G. Brockerhoff, J. C.

  5. Predicting species invasions using ecological niche modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Vieglais, David A.

    2001-05-01

    ) and commission (including niche space not ,lctually occupied by the 'pecies). Each algorithm for modeling specIes' ecological niches involves a specific com binatiol1 of errors of omission ,md commission. A rel.ltively new approach, called the (;enetic...

  6. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochem, Frank J.

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 51: 117­128, 2008 doi: 10.3354/ame01180 Published and mortality rates of microbes in Lake Erie during thermal stratification and determined how they varied consent of the publisher #12;Aquat Microb Ecol 51: 117­128, 2008 1999, DeBruyn et al. 2004), autotrophic

  7. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Stéphan

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 51: 195­208, 2008 doi: 10.3354/ame01190 Published May 19 INTRODUCTION Over the last 20 yr, extensive studies have revealed the crucial roles of microbes of the publisher #12;Aquat Microb Ecol 51: 195­208, 2008 phylogenetic diversity of microbes (Breitbart et al. 2002

  8. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Laura

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 64: 51­67, 2011 doi: 10.3354/ame01509 Published to the historic view that microbes are not dispersal-limited (reviewed in Finlay 2002, Foissner 2006). Molecular closely related microbes and such studies do indicate that dispersal of microbial forms can be global (e

  9. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Laura

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 41: 55­65, 2005 Published November 11 INTRODUCTION on the phylogeography of eukaryotic microbes (protists). The first maintains that all microbes, including ciliates, have or republication not permitted without written consent of the publisher #12;Aquat Microb Ecol 41: 55­65, 2005 ing

  10. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 41: 49­54, 2005 Published November 11 INTRODUCTION Microbial species appear to have cosmopolitan distribution. With respect to eukaryotic microbes of the Earth provided that particular habitat requirements are met. The distribution of microbes does

  11. Ecology & Earth Systems Dynamics for Educators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Ecosystem Science Reserve; East Bethel, MN (approx. 35 miles north of the Twin Cities). For more information ecology and environmental issues. Topics include a survey of general ecosystem and community level Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve located approximately 35 miles north of the Twin Cities in East Bethel

  12. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yahel, Gitai

    AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY Aquat Microb Ecol Vol. 45: 181­194, 2006 Published November 24.g. by maximizing their energy gain or avoiding harmful food. It is well documented that selective predation in pelagic habi- tats structures the microbial community (Pernthaler 2005). Less is known of interactions

  13. Introduction to Theme "Genomics in Ecology,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaffer, H. Bradley

    Introduction to Theme "Genomics in Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics" H. Bradley Shaffer1, Los Angeles, California 90095; email: brad.shaffer@ucla.edu 2 Center for Genomics and Systems Biology.1146/annurev-ecolsys-081913-123118 Copyright c 2013 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved Keywords genome

  14. INTRODUCTION Aquatic food-webs' ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTRODUCTION Aquatic food-webs' ecology: old and new challenges Andrea Belgrano Looking up ``aquatic food web'' on Google provides a dizzying array of eclectic sites and information (and disinformation!) to choose from. However, even within this morass it is clear that aquatic food-web research has

  15. NRES 725 PLANT PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    1 NRES 725 ­ PLANT PHYSIOLOGICAL ECOLOGY Spring 2006 Reading List ­ Water Balance of Plants I) Water Balance of Plants A) Water potential B) Soil, plant, air continuum C) Physiological control 1 Kramer & Boyer (95) pp 16-41 & 42-83 Kramer & Boyer (95) pp 201-256 *Steudle (01) Ann Rev Plant Phy Mol

  16. Five Differences Between Ecological and Economic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald D. Smith

    2011-08-29

    Ecological and economic networks have many similarities and are often compared. However, the comparison is often more apt as metaphor than a direct equivalence. In this paper, five key differences are explained which should inform any analysis which compares the two.

  17. Elsevier Oceanography Series, 52 GLOBAL ECOLOGICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, David Cameron

    Elsevier Oceanography Series, 52 GLOBAL ECOLOGICAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE 1982-83 EL NINO 30602 ABSTRACT Duffy, D.C., 1989. Seabirds and the 1982-1984 El Nino-Southern Oscillation The 1982-1984 El Nino and associated events affected seabirds in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Effects ranged

  18. Environmental science and ecology involve studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Dan

    Environmental science and ecology involve studies of the biosphere, hydro- sphere, and lithosphere in environmental science is conducted on spatial scales varying from a single algal cell to the Earth as a whole's environmental scientists require investigation by an interdisciplinary team, including members from several

  19. Marine Bird Ecology & Conservation: The Farallon Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    11/19/2014 1 Marine Bird Ecology & Conservation: The Farallon Islands Example Some Historical;11/19/2014 2 Charadriformes: gulls, terns Anseriformes: marine ducks, geese and swans Other birds Location of island Distant photo of island #12;11/19/2014 3 Western Gull The gull colony on the marine terrace

  20. 2011 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism, & Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keneth Stedman

    2011-08-05

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  1. 2009 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism & Molecular Biology GRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Julie Maupin- Furlow

    2009-07-26

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses; and industrial applications. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  2. Science and technology for industrial ecology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmartin, T.J.; Allenby, B.R.

    1996-07-10

    Scientific and technological communities have a significant role to play and responsibility for the evolution of global sustainability (continuously improving quality of life into the indefinite future). Sustainability is not possible without a substantially improved science and technology basis for industrial ecology. Society needs data and understanding of complex ecological issues to govern itself in a sustainable manner. We should: support and develop multi-disciplinary programs which create the scientific basis for understanding natural and anthropogenic complex systems and for developing environmentally and economically efficient technology; demonstrate a systems-based approach to science and technology issues which is life-cycle comprehensive, integrates environmental considerations, and promotes conservation of natural resources; and encourage development of responsible, technically and scientifically valid, cost-effective environmental laws and practices.

  3. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.H.

    1996-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. The Laboratory`s research mission was fulfilled with the publication of two books and 143 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical and students, and visiting scientists. An additional three books and about 80 journal articles currently are in press. Faculty, technician and students presented 193 lectures, scientific presentations, and posters to colleges and universities, including minority institutions. Dr. J Vaun McArthur organized and conducted the Third Annual SREL Symposium on the Environment: New Concepts in Strewn Ecology: An Integrative Approach. Dr. Michael Newman conducted a 5-day course titled Quantitative Methods in Ecotoxicology, and Dr. Brian Teppen of The Advanced Analytical Center for Environmental Sciences (AACES) taught a 3-day short course titled Introduction to Molecular Modeling of Environmental Systems. Dr. I. Lehr Brisbin co-hosted a meeting of the Crocodile Special Interest Group. Dr. Rebecca Sharitz attended four symposia in Japan during May and June 1996 and conducted meetings of the Executive Committee and Board of the International Association for Ecology (ENTECOL).

  4. Aspects of Key Largo woodrat ecology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCleery, Robert Alan; Lopez, Roel R.

    2004-09-30

    population has declined even within protected areas (Frank et al. 1997, USFWS 1999). Still, little is known about KLWR ecology and what may be causing its decline. Feral cats (Felix domestica, Humphrey 1992, Frank et al. 1997, USFWS 1999 ), fire ants... of 26, 42, and 30 also suggest the original estimate of 106 was likely an overestimation of the population. MANAGEMENT IMPLICATIONS No clear evidence has been found to explain the decline of the KLWR. Feral cats (Felix domestica, Humphrey 1992...

  5. Priorities for ecological research on energy crops in the north central states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ugoretz, S.M. [Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (United States); Rineer, K.C. [Public Service Commission of Wisconsin (United States); Downing, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-07-26

    Following the principles set by the National Biofuels Roundtable, a workshop was held in March 1995 which brought together a group of stakeholders and experts in the field of biomass energy and ecology. The mission of the workshop was to identify and set priorities for ecological research to ensure that large-scale biomass energy development in the North Central states occurs in an ecologically sound, sustainable manner. The workshop found that questions about the landscape-scale deployment of biomass plantations were most pressing. The workshop recommended that adaptive resource management principles be applied in a phased development of increasingly larger plantations. Each phase of development would help to answer questions about landscape-scale development; improving the design of subsequent phases. Principles of sustainable agriculture should also be applied to biomass plantations to minimize impact on soils and water quality, maintain productivity and benefit the rural economy. Results of the workshop will be helpful to natural resource and research agencies, as well as utilities and biomass energy developers.

  6. GIS Framework for Large River Geomorphic Classification to Aid in the Evaluation of Flow-Ecology Relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vernon, Christopher R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Richmond, Marshall C.; McManamay, R. A.; Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

    2013-02-01

    Assessing the environmental benefits of proposed flow modification to large rivers provides invaluable insight into future hydropower project operations and relicensing activities. Providing a means to quantitatively define flow-ecology relationships is integral in establishing flow regimes that are mutually beneficial to power production and ecological needs. To compliment this effort an opportunity to create versatile tools that can be applied to broad geographic areas has been presented. In particular, integration with efforts standardized within the ecological limits of hydrologic alteration (ELOHA) is highly advantageous (Poff et al. 2010). This paper presents a geographic information system (GIS) framework for large river classification that houses a base geomorphic classification that is both flexible and accurate, allowing for full integration with other hydrologic models focused on addressing ELOHA efforts. A case study is also provided that integrates publically available National Hydrography Dataset Plus Version 2 (NHDPlusV2) data, Modular Aquatic Simulation System two-dimensional (MASS2) hydraulic data, and field collected data into the framework to produce a suite of flow-ecology related outputs. The case study objective was to establish areas of optimal juvenile salmonid rearing habitat under varying flow regimes throughout an impounded portion of the lower Snake River, USA (Figure 1) as an indicator to determine sites where the potential exists to create additional shallow water habitat. Additionally, an alternative hydrologic classification useable throughout the contiguous United States which can be coupled with the geomorphic aspect of this framework is also presented. This framework provides the user with the ability to integrate hydrologic and ecologic data into the base geomorphic aspect of this framework within a geographic information system (GIS) to output spatiotemporally variable flow-ecology relationship scenarios.

  7. The Gut Microbiota: Ecology and Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willing, B.P.; Jansson, J.K.

    2010-06-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is teeming with an extremely abundant and diverse microbial community. The members of this community have coevolved along with their hosts over millennia. Until recently, the gut ecosystem was viewed as black box with little knowledge of who or what was there or their specific functions. Over the past decade, however, this ecosystem has become one of fastest growing research areas of focus in microbial ecology and human and animal physiology. This increased interest is largely in response to studies tying microbes in the gut to important diseases afflicting modern society, including obesity, allergies, inflammatory bowel diseases, and diabetes. Although the importance of a resident community of microorganisms in health was first hypothesized by Pasteur over a century ago (Sears, 2005), the multiplicity of physiological changes induced by commensal bacteria has only recently been recognized (Hooper et al., 2001). The term 'ecological development' was recently coined to support the idea that development of the GI tract is a product of the genetics of the host and the host's interactions with resident microbes (Hooper, 2004). The search for new therapeutic targets and disease biomarkers has escalated the need to understand the identities and functions of the microorganisms inhabiting the gut. Recent studies have revealed new insights into the membership of the gut microbial community, interactions within that community, as well as mechanisms of interaction with the host. This chapter focuses on the microbial ecology of the gut, with an emphasis on information gleaned from recent molecular studies.

  8. United Nations Programme on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    United Nations Programme on Space Applications UNITED NATIONS UNITED NATIONS OFFICE FOR OUTER SPACE, Sputnik 1. Soon after that event, the Member States of the United Nations declared that space should and natural resources management. At the first United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses

  9. Observing Emissions of Air Pollutants from Space | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access to scienceSpeedingLightweightand Simulated Cirrus Cloud

  10. National Laboratory]; Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Michael Los Alamos National Laboratory Construction and Facility Engineering; Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization(32); Energy Planning, Policy, &...

  11. ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE UPPER THREE RUNS INTEGRATOR...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    English Subject: 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ECOLOGY; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; CONTAMINATION Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File size NAView Full Text View...

  12. 2006 Annual Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site Click on the links below to access different portions of the electronic annual report. 2006 Annual Report Sections Diffuse Knapweed...

  13. Functional Ecological Gene Networks to Reveal the Changes Among...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    network structure among different microbial speciespopulations. Here, a novel random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework for identifying functional ecological gene...

  14. Ecology-basics and applications Planned activities 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Ecological Ideas January 2013 Jan.Bengtsson@slu.se Statistical programming in R 22-26th April 2013 Matt

  15. Mojave National Preserve Joshua Tree National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Forest (SBNF) Angeles National Forest (ANF) Cleveland National Forest (CNF) CNF CNF SBNF ANF CACA 049111°0'0"N 34°0'0"N 34°0'0"N 33°0'0"N 33°0'0"N California Desert Conservation Area BLM Solar Energy Project Contingent Corridor Deleted Corridor Land Status BLM National Park Service Forest Service Military USFWS

  16. Oak Ridge National Laboratory National Security Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Security Challenges #12;3 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY How Will Our Enemies and Homeland Security #12;OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Nuclear Nonproliferation $27,050 Cleanup $7,481 Science $359M National Security $278M Energy $170M Cleanup $0.8M Total $1.08B

  17. URBAN CHANGE -INTEGTRATED MODELING ENVIRONMENT (UCIME) Annual Report for the National Science Foundation (NSF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Keith

    of Mexico (UNAM) in Mexico City that has sent a research to Santa Barbara to work on the Mexico City Institute of Ecology at the National University of Mexico to establish research collaboration. #12;§ Have: Web/Internet Sites: § http://www.geog.ucsb.edu/~kclarke/ucime/index.html Other Specific Products

  18. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Environmental Baseline update--Revision 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    This report provides a baseline update to provide the background information necessary for personnel to prepare clear and consise NEPA documentation. The environment of the Sandia National Laboratories is described in this document, including the ecology, meteorology, climatology, seismology, emissions, cultural resources and land use, visual resources, noise pollution, transportation, and socioeconomics.

  19. National Environmental Information Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    National Environmental Information Infrastructure: Reference Architecture Contributing to the Australian Government National Plan for Environmental Information initiative #12;National Environmental Information Infrastructure: Reference Architecture v1.1 Environmental Information Programme Publication Series

  20. Ecological Consequences of Artificial Night Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piselli, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    s editors, the idea that light pollution might pose a broadpublic opinion against light pollution. But consider thatlight in the night sky in national parks, finding pollution

  1. Hazard/Risk Assessment A REFINED AQUATIC ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT FOR A PYRETHROID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Robert K. D.

    Hazard/Risk Assessment A REFINED AQUATIC ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT FOR A PYRETHROID INSECTICIDE risk assessments, the authors performed a probabilistic aquatic ecological risk assessment. The present study is the first ecological risk assessment for pyrethroids to quantitatively integrate

  2. National Science Bowl Finals

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01

    National Science Bowl finals and awards at the National Building Museum in Washington D.C. Monday 5/3/2010

  3. CEMI 2015 National Summit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    At the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative's (CEMI) 2015 National Summit, stakeholders are invited to share input on national priorities for clean energy manufacturing and explore models for...

  4. 2012 National Electricity Forum

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Workshop - December 6, 2011 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study...

  5. Integrating Empirical-Modeling Approaches to Improve Understanding of Terrestrial Ecology Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, Heather [University of Oklahoma; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Recent decades have seen tremendous increases in the quantity of empirical ecological data collected by individual investigators, as well as through research networks such as FLUXNET (Baldocchi et al., 2001). At the same time, advances in computer technology have facilitated the development and implementation of large and complex land surface and ecological process models. Separately, each of these information streams provides useful, but imperfect information about ecosystems. To develop the best scientific understanding of ecological processes, and most accurately predict how ecosystems may cope with global change, integration of empirical and modeling approaches is necessary. However, true integration - in which models inform empirical research, which in turn informs models (Fig. 1) - is not yet common in ecological research (Luo et al., 2011). The goal of this workshop, sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER) program, was to bring together members of the empirical and modeling communities to exchange ideas and discuss scientific practices for increasing empirical - model integration, and to explore infrastructure and/or virtual network needs for institutionalizing empirical - model integration (Yiqi Luo, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA). The workshop included presentations and small group discussions that covered topics ranging from model-assisted experimental design to data driven modeling (e.g. benchmarking and data assimilation) to infrastructure needs for empirical - model integration. Ultimately, three central questions emerged. How can models be used to inform experiments and observations? How can experimental and observational results be used to inform models? What are effective strategies to promote empirical - model integration?

  6. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaitkus, M.R.; Wein, G.R. [eds.; Johnson, G.

    1993-11-01

    This progress report gives an overview of research programs at the Savannah River Site. Topics include; environmental operations support, wood stork foraging and breeding, defense waste processing, environmental stresses, alterations in the environment due to pollutants, wetland ecology, biodiversity, pond drawdown studies, and environmental toxicology.

  7. Ecology, 89(2), 2008, pp. 306312 2008 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; ecosystem-based management; eggs; fisheries; food web; foraging; functional extinction; grayling; marine in subsidies to stream food webs. Thus, the ecological consequences of population declines of keystone species et al. 2004), there is concern that nonlinearities may lead to functional extinction prior to species

  8. Ecology, 93(8), 2012, pp. 18671879 2012 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    of soil bacteria and fungi along a soil moisture gradient. On average, soil microorganisms had relatively with metabolism restricted to less-negative water potentials. These contrasting ecological strategies had microorganisms is highly conserved. In addition, variation in microbial responses along the moisture gradient

  9. Ecology, 91(2), 2010, pp. 422430 2010 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Carlos M.

    (Barrowclough and Rockwell 1993, Dodd and Silvertown 2000); and (3) from an ecological viewpoint, it may, demographic structure, and persis- tence of populations (Harper 1977, Clutton-Brock 1988, Newton 1989). Our groups and life styles (Clutton-Brock 1988, Newton 1989), similar information is scarce for natural plant

  10. Ecological Applications, 23(4), 2013, pp. 726741 2013 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leslie, Heather

    the Pacific red snapper (Lutjanus peru) fishery around La Paz, Mexico, where medium or ``plate-sized'' fish words: coupled natural and human systems model; coupled social-ecological systems; ecosystem services et al. 2010, Buckley 2011). Nonetheless, investigations of human impacts in marine systems, and even

  11. Ecological Monographs, 74(3), 2004, pp. 513532 2004 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denny, Mark

    QUANTIFYING SCALE IN ECOLOGY: LESSONS FROM A WAVE-SWEPT SHORE MARK W. DENNY,1,4 BRIAN HELMUTH,1,2 GEORGE H physical and biological processes in the wave-swept intertidal zone at Mussel Point, near Hopkins Marine Station in California. We analyze temporal variability in wave height, ocean temperature, upwelling

  12. Ecology, 93(6), 2012, pp. 14391450 2012 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    feedback mediates effects of invasive grasses on coastal dune shape PHOEBE L. ZARNETSKE,1,6 SALLY D. HACKER-specific ecological mechanisms influencing the geomorphology of U.S. Pacific Northwest coastal dunes. Over the last century, this system changed from open, shifting sand dunes with sparse vegetation (including native beach

  13. Traditional ecological knowledge: the third alternative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierotti, Raymond; Wildcat, Daniel R.

    2000-10-01

    , Lakota (Marshall 1995, McIntyre 1995), and Northwest coastal tribes (Anderson 1996). This was wolf, Canis lupus, who was found throughout North America, lived in family groups, and was not strong or swift enough to kill large prey alone. Wolves working... with the exact time when events happened, since they happened so long ago that they exist ‘‘on the other side of memory’’ (Marshall 1995:207). The worldviews and cultures of Native American peoples evolved in 1336 INVITED FEATURE Ecological ApplicationsVol. 10...

  14. Ecological effects of an invasive social wasp on Hawaiian arthropod communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Erin Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    M (eds) Food exploitation by social insects: ecological,M (eds) Food exploitation by social insects: ecological,insect species represent an important and underappreciated food

  15. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology-748-1331. mdeact@shaw.ca #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  16. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology Rd., Black Creek, BC, V9J 1G4 #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology

  17. Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology.for.gov.bc.ca/vancouvr/research/research_index.htm #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture

  18. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Airphotos to Interpret

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture March 2004 Research Section, Coast Forest Region, BCMOF 1 Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology

  19. Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology, BC, V9J 1G4 #12;Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology

  20. National estuary program guidance: Technical characterization in the National Estuary Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    Estuaries are waterways, such as bays and sounds, where fresh water drained from the surrounding watershed mixes with salt water from the ocean. Section 320 of the Clean Water Act established the National Estuary Program (NEP) to identify nationally significant estuaries threatened by pollution, development, or overuse and to promote the preparation of comprehensive management plans to ensure their ecological integrity. The program's goals are protection and improvement of water quality and enhancement of living resources. To reach these goals, the Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) convenes management conferences for each estuary in the NEP to provide a forum for consensus building and problem solving among interested agencies and user groups.

  1. SpecialFeature Ecology, 86(8), 2005, pp. 19671974

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    , see footnote 1, p. 1965. 1 E-mail: turnermg@wisc.edu dresses landscape and urban planning (e and fluxes of organisms, material, and energy; and potential applications of landscape ecology in natural.g., Nassauer 1997). Landscape ecology has been defined variously (Ris- ser et al. 1984, Urban et al. 1987

  2. Vol. 59: 195-201. 1990 MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morel, François M. M.

    Vol. 59: 195-201. 1990 MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. Published January 11, lithium dodecyl sulfate. INTRODUCTION nitrogen. To begin to understand the ecological signifi- cance of L Biological Supply House (USA) and main- tained according to accompanying instructions. Present address: Dept

  3. Evaluating biodiversity in fragmented landscapes: applications of landscape ecology tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Evaluating biodiversity in fragmented landscapes: applications of landscape ecology tools Kevin landscapes: applications of landscape ecology tools" will soon be published. It will expand on the basic Networks (FHNs) are an important tool for directing the improvement of woodland landscapes using a series

  4. TOOLS AND METHODS FOR STUDIES IN COASTAL ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sealey, Kathleen Sullivan

    TOOLS AND METHODS FOR STUDIES IN COASTAL ECOLOGY OF THE BAHAMAS Version 1.2. April 2006 #12;TOOLS Sealey, K, K. Semon, N. Cushion, E.Wright, C. Kaplan, and B. Carpenter. 2006. Tools and Methods for Coastal Ecological Studies of The Bahamas. University of Miami, Coral Gables, Fl. 33124. 111 pp. #12;TOOLS

  5. Hydraulic "Fracking": Are Surface Water Impacts An Ecological Concern?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydraulic "Fracking": Are Surface Water Impacts An Ecological Concern? G. Allen Burton Jr; Fracking; Water-quality stressor; Ecological risk assessment Introduction The world's energy marketplace industrial processes, the higher the risk of that ecosystem being impacted by the operation. The associated

  6. Elsevier Editorial System(tm) for Ecological Informatics Manuscript Draft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    : Special Issue: Ecol. Data Management Keywords: Analytic web; Little-JIL; metadata; process; sensor network. Nowhere is this change more evident than in the advent of sensor networks able to collect and process (in and synthesis, including a new standard for descriptive metadata for ecological datasets (Ecological Metadata

  7. MEETING REVIEW Ecological genomics--changing perspectives on Darwin's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renn, Susan C.P.

    MEETING REVIEW Ecological genomics--changing perspectives on Darwin's basic concerns SUZY C. P Genomics Program, Department of Biology, Black Hills State University, Spearfish, SD 57799, USA Abstract Ecological Genomics is an interdisciplinary field that seeks to understand the genetic and physiological

  8. Communications Ecological Applications, 23(3), 2013, pp. 515522

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Communications Ecological Applications, 23(3), 2013, pp. 515­522 Ó 2013 by the Ecological Society to develop statistical models to quantify three different aspects of aggregate regional forest harvest agents of tree mortality. Disturbance theory provides a useful framework for integrating the impacts

  9. Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    ......................................................................................................7 The Technology: Wave Energy Development on the West Coast Mirko Previsic, re vision consultingEcological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest A Scientific Workshop Technical Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-92 #12;#12;Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific

  10. CULTURE, ECONOMIC STRUCTURE, AND THE DYNAMICS OF ECOLOGICAL ECONOMIC SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fournier, John J.F.

    CULTURE, ECONOMIC STRUCTURE, AND THE DYNAMICS OF ECOLOGICAL ECONOMIC SYSTEMS By John M. Anderies B are developed and analyzed in an attempt to better un- derstand the interaction of culture, economic structure, and the dynamics of human ecological economic systems. Speci cally, how does the ability of humans to change

  11. Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest A Scientific Workshop Technical Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-92 #12;#12;Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Service; Justin Klure, Oregon Wave Energy Trust; Greg McMurray, Oregon Department of Land Conservation

  12. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 253: 25­38, 2003 Published May 15 INTRODUCTION Marine protected areas are riding the wave of ocean governance reform (Kelleher 1997, Allison et component for the ecologically sustainable use of marine resources. Where such reform processes are grounded

  13. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future ponsorship Format Reversed Color:White rtical Format Reversed-A ertical Format Reversed-B National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  14. HOLARCTIC ECOLOGY 12: 137-143. Copenhagen 1989 Thermal ecology and spatio-temporal distribution of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    at 24.5"C (air temperature) and 31.4"C (body temperature). The spatial distribution pattern of Pvariationsof air (Ta) and ground (Ts: areas exposed to sun; Tsh: areas in the shade) temperatures (bottomHOLARCTIC ECOLOGY 12: 137-143. Copenhagen 1989 Thermal ecology and spatio-temporal distribution

  15. FOR 4934/6934 Longleaf Pine: Ecology, Management and Restoration Course Title: Forestry 6934/4934 Longleaf Pine: Ecology,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    and ecology. Methods of Instruction: 1) Lectures Major source of theory and technical information Discussion assigned papers #12;2 2) Laboratory Major source of practical and applied information; 3) Textbook). Univ. Georgia Press. 211 p. Purpose and Objectives: 1) Knowledge of fundamental ecological

  16. Wave Energy Ecological Effects Workshop page 1 of 4 Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development in the Pacific Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Wave Energy Ecological Effects Workshop page 1 of 4 Ecological Effects of Wave Energy Development the capacity to harvest wave energy off its coast as a clean, renewable resource. An important part of moving this agenda forward must include understanding the potential effects of wave energy technology

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: National Security Missions: Internationa...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Unified Combatant Commands, National Nuclear Security Administration, and U.S. industry. Related Links Robotics Weapons-Force Center...

  18. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Life Extension Program Bay Area national labs team to tackle long-standing automotive hydrogen storage challenge SOLAR POWER PURCHASE FOR DOE LABORATORIES More about LLNL...

  19. Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, D.A. [ed.] [ed.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Fosmire, C.J. [and others] [and others

    1997-08-01

    This ninth revision of the Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization presents current environmental data regarding the hanford Site and its immediate environs. This information is intended for use in preparing Chapters 4 and 6 in Hanford Site-related NEPA documents. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological and historical resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) provides the preparer with the federal and state regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site. Not all of the sections have been updated for this revision. The following lists the updated sections: climate and meteorology; ecology (threatened and endangered species section only); culture, archaeological, and historical resources; socioeconomics; all of Chapter 6.

  20. A Strategic Project Appraisal framework for ecologically sustainable urban infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrissey, John; Iyer-Raniga, Usha; McLaughlin, Patricia; Mills, Anthony

    2012-02-15

    Actors in the built environment are progressively considering environmental and social issues alongside functional and economic aspects of development projects. Infrastructure projects represent major investment and construction initiatives with attendant environmental, economic and societal impacts across multiple scales. To date, while sustainability strategies and frameworks have focused on wider national aspirations and strategic objectives, they are noticeably weak in addressing micro-level integrated decision making in the built environment, particularly for infrastructure projects. The proposed approach of this paper is based on the principal that early intervention is the most cost-effective and efficient means of mitigating the environmental effects of development projects, particularly macro infrastructure developments. A strategic overview of the various project alternatives, taking account for stakeholder and expert input, could effectively reduce project impacts/risks at low cost to the project developers but provide significant benefit to wider communities, including communities of future stakeholders. This paper is the first exploratory step in developing a more systematic framework for evaluating strategic alternatives for major metropolitan infrastructure projects, based on key sustainability principles. The developed Strategic Project Appraisal (SPA) framework, grounded in the theory of Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA), provides a means of practically appraising project impacts and alternatives in terms of quantified ecological limits; addresses the neglected topic of metropolitan infrastructure as a means of delivering sustainability outcomes in the urban context and more broadly, seeks to open a debate on the potential for SEA methodology to be more extensively applied to address sustainability challenges in the built environment. Practically applied and timed appropriately, the SPA framework can enable better decision-making and more efficient resource allocation ensuring low impact infrastructure development.

  1. Discordance between living and death assemblages as evidence for anthropogenic ecological change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . ecological baseline eutrophication marine communities paleoecology Human activities affect living systems

  2. National Energy Education Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Education Summit is organized by the Council of Energy Research and Education Leaders (CEREL) and will serve as a first-of-its-kind national forum for energy educators, subject...

  3. National Geothermal Summit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) will be holding it’s fifth annual National Geothermal Summit on June 3-4 at the Grand Sierra Resort and Casino in Reno, NV. The National Geothermal Summit is...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    feet underground.

    Bay Area national labs team to tackle long-standing automotive hydrogen storage challenge http:www.nnsa.energy.govblogbay-area-national-labs-team-tackle-...

  5. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    next webinar is scheduled to occur in June 2013 TRIBAL NATIONS CAUCUS UPDATE WIKI AND NTSF WEB SITES ntsf.wikidot.com www.em.doe.govPagesNationalTransportationForum.aspx...

  6. nevada national security site

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7%2A en Nevada National Security Site operator recognized for green fleet http:www.nnsa.energy.govblognevada-national-security-site-operator-recognized-green-fleet

    The...

  7. Literature Review on the Effects of Prescription Fire on theEcology of Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, R

    2011-03-14

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has historically conducted prescription burns across approximately 2,000 acres of Site 300 on an annual basis to safeguard test facilities and operations from the risk of wildfire encroachment. Prescription burns began in 1960, and although fire frequency varies among the designated burn areas, all have been burned at least once. A patchwork of native perennial grassland communities and associated special-status plant and animal populations occur onsite in many areas that have been receiving these treatments. Because the size and locations of prescription burns may shift in coming years, an evaluation is warranted to determine how these shifts may affect listed biota, including rare plants, and the distinct ecological conditions present on the site. This report presents the results of a literature review conducted by ICF International (ICF) to collect basic information on native perennial grasslands in California, the influence of fire on these grasslands, and management tools for restoring and maintaining them. The objective of this study was to review the scientific literature on California native grasslands and summarize the current state of knowledge pertaining to the possible effects -- both beneficial and detrimental -- of prescribed fire on the ecology of Site 300. The results of this review are intended to inform future management practices that may be carried out at Site 300 to maintain the plant and wildlife communities and to ensure that the ecological conditions benefit the special-status species that inhabit the Site. This review is also intended to identify a study approach to investigate changes over the next 10 years in the burned areas and in areas where burning will be discontinued.

  8. Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Assessment Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Voluntary...

  9. National Geothermal Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Geothermal Energy Association hosts its annual National Geothermal Summit in Reno, Nevada, June 3-4, 2015.

  10. National Hydropower Map

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High-resolution map produced by Oak Ridge National Laboratory showing hydropower resources throughout the United States.

  11. Real time observations of the nucleation and growth of nanowires...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Real time observations of the nucleation and growth of nanowires and nanotubes December 1, 2011 at 3pm36-428 Eric Stach Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National...

  12. NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP . . Toward a More Secure and Cleaner Energy Future for America Based on the results of the National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap Workshop to make it a reality. This Roadmap provides a framework that can make a hydrogen economy a reality

  13. National Center Standardsfor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    texts of standards Indexes to millions of industry, national, regional, and international standards U for Standards and Certification Information (NCSCI) National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 100.975.4040 for an appointment, Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.­5:00 p.m. (except Federal holidays). National Institute of Standards

  14. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory 2004 Annual Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul M. Bertsch

    2004-07-29

    2004 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of The University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina

  15. thesis abstract: Ecology and biogeography of island parasitoid faunas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Ana M. C.

    2012-01-01

    ISSN 1948-6596 news and update thesis abstract Ecology andM. C. Santos 1,2,3 PhD Thesis, Silwood Park Campus, Divisionmainland counterparts. In this thesis I investigated whether

  16. Acid ecologies : or the secret lives of Spanish tomatoes/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Curtis (Curtis A.)

    2012-01-01

    This thesis seeks to unpack the nature of ecology within architecture, not as a neutral science, but a legitimizing construct, building a future and transforming the ethics of the present towards very deliberate ideological ...

  17. The ultimate rendezvous: microbial ecology meets industrial biotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    The ultimate rendezvous: microbial ecology meets industrial biotechnology Editorial overview about by the plethora of emissions associated with industrial growth. At the same time, economic, synthesis and degradation reactions that have been so far the near exclusive realm of industrial

  18. Postgraduate Overview MSc Aquatic Ecology by Research (AER)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittka, Lars

    Postgraduate Overview MSc Aquatic Ecology by Research (AER) Established programme to strengthen theatre. In essence then, AER melds both UK and European models of MSc. The key element is the extended

  19. 1.020 Ecology II: Engineering for Sustainability, Spring 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, Dennis B.

    This course covers the use of ecological and thermodynamic principles to examine interactions between humans and the natural environment.. Topics include conservation and constitutive laws, box models, feedback, thermodynamic ...

  20. Land Snail Ecology and Biogeography of Eastern Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nekola, Jeffrey C.

    Land Snail Ecology and Biogeography of Eastern Maine Vertigo bollesiana Vertigo nylanderi Vertigo & Invertebrate Group Maine Department of Inland Fisheries & Wildlife and the Aroostook Hills and Lowlands ......................................................................................................... 75 Appendix I: Taxonomic Key for Maine Land Snails ............................................... 78

  1. Applications of industrial ecology : manufacturing, recycling, and efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahmus, Jeffrey B. (Jeffrey Brian), 1974-

    2007-01-01

    This work applies concepts from industrial ecology to analyses of manufacturing, recycling, and efficiency. The first part focuses on an environmental analysis of machining, with a specific emphasis on energy consumption. ...

  2. Ecological Economy (2008)4: 24-34 Empirical Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    of organic, ecological and Fairtrade certification schemes in the context of smallholder farmers and trees outside forests [1] ; they include products used as food and food additives (edible nuts

  3. Organic agriculture and ecological justice: Ethics and practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    : Danish Research Centre for Organic Food and Farming, Research Centre Foulum, Blichers Allé 20. P.O. Box3 Organic agriculture and ecological justice: Ethics and practice Hugo F. Alrøe*, John Byrne.......................................................................79 Sustainability, globalisation and organic agriculture ..........................................79

  4. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Safety and Ecology Corporation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June 14, 2005 Issued to Safety and Ecology Corporation related to a 10 CFR Part 708 Violation at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Project On June 14, 2005, the U.S. Department of...

  5. Application of Wearable Inertial Sensors in Ecological Rehabilitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    Application of Wearable Inertial Sensors in Ecological Rehabilitation Environments Abstract Rehabilitation after injury or stroke is a long process towards regaining functionality, mobility capture movements during inpatient rehabilitation. We utilized wearable inertial sensors to collect data

  6. Trait-based approaches to marine microbial ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barton, Andrew David

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to understand how the functional traits of species, biotic interactions, and the environment jointly regulate the community ecology of phytoplankton. In Chapter 2, I examined Continuous Plankton ...

  7. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory FY2006 Annual Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul M. Bertsch

    2006-10-23

    FY2006 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of the University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site in Aiken, County, SC.

  8. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory 2005 Annual Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul M. Bertsch

    2005-07-19

    2005 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of The University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

  9. POPULATION ECOLOGY Dispersal of the Eucalyptus Longhorned Borer (Coleoptera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanks, Lawrence M.

    POPULATION ECOLOGY Dispersal of the Eucalyptus Longhorned Borer (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Urban behavior of the eucalyptus longhorned borer, Phoracantha semipunctata (F.), a crepuscular beetle whose distributed in time and space. KEY WORDS Phoracantha semipunctata, Cerambycidae, eucalyptus, wood boring

  10. Data Papers Ecology, 94(6), 2013, p. 1433

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffis-Kyle, Kerry

    that transmit numerous diseases and are an integral part of the food web in many terrestrial and aquatic. This resource is invaluable to researchers studying mosquito ecology, disease vectors and pathways, and insect

  11. Host nutrition and infectious disease: an ecological view

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Val H.; Jones II, Tyrees P.; Smith, Marilyn S.

    2005-06-01

    Nutrition is typically discussed in terms of maintaining a proper diet and avoiding nutrient deficiency diseases. However, nutrition can also be viewed from an ecological standpoint: mammalian hosts and their pathogens ...

  12. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.

    in 1976. Fish abundance surveys via active acoustics are presently a standard stock assessment tool (Mac consent of the publisher Contribution to the Theme Section `Acoustics in marine ecology' OPENPEN

  13. Ecological Assesment of Executive Function in Healthy Aging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Lorne

    2008-03-12

    Objectives: Recent literature has highlighted the requirement for ecologically valid and broad measures of executive function. In the current study, a relatively new virtual reality measure of executive function designed ...

  14. Washington State Department of Ecology: Replacement Wells Requiring...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington State Department of Ecology: Replacement Wells Requiring a Water Right Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther:...

  15. Data Archive of the Harvard Forest, a Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Since 1907 research and education have been the mission of the Harvard Forest is one of the oldest and most intensively studied forests in North America. Located in Petersham, Massachusetts, its 3000 acres of land have been a center of research and education since 1907. The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, established in 1988 and funded by the National Science Foundation, provides a framework for much of this activity. An understanding of forest responses to natural and human disturbance and environmental change over broad spatial and temporal scales pulls together research topics including biodiversity studies, the effects of invasive organisms, large experiments and permanent plot studies, historical and retrospective studies, soil nutrient dynamics, and plant population and community ecological interactions. Major research in forest-atmosphere exchange, hydrology, and regional studies places the work in regional and global context, aided by modeling tools. Conservation and management research and linkages to policy have been part of the Forest since its beginning, and the approaches used in New England can often apply to international studies. [Copied from http://harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu/research.html] In addition to more than 150 datasets, the Visual Information Access system at Harvard University Library makes nearly 900 images pertaining to Harvard Forest research available online to the public.

  16. Oneida Nation | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Oneida Nation Oneida Nation Oneida Nation More Documents & Publications Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Pueblo de San Ildefonso...

  17. Program Areas | National Security | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organizations National Security Home | Science & Discovery | National Security | Program Areas SHARE Program Areas image Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a robust...

  18. Climate Change and National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    for Environment and National Security Scripps Institution ofMultiplying Threats to National Security Higher temperaturesefforts to protect national security. Page 2 The U.S. Armed

  19. Review: Manufacturing National Park Nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Review: Manufacturing National Park Nature: Photography,Canada Cronin, J. Keri. Manufacturing National Park Nature:J. Keri Cronin’s book Manufacturing National Park Nature

  20. Journal of Animal Ecology 2008, 77, 275284 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2007.01336.x 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation 2007 British Ecological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2008, 77, 275­284 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2007.01336.x © 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2007 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Biotic disturbance

  1. Estimating and mapping ecological processes influencing microbial community assembly

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stegen, James C.; Lin, Xueju; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan

    2015-05-01

    Ecological community assembly is governed by a combination of (i) selection resulting from among-taxa differences in performance; (ii) dispersal resulting from organismal movement; and (iii) ecological drift resulting from stochastic changes in population sizes. The relative importance and nature of these processes can vary across environments. Selection can be homogeneous or variable, and while dispersal is a rate, we conceptualize extreme dispersal rates as two categories; dispersal limitation results from limited exchange of organisms among communities, and homogenizing dispersal results from high levels of organism exchange. To estimate the influence and spatial variation of each process we extend a recentlymore »developed statistical framework, use a simulation model to evaluate the accuracy of the extended framework, and use the framework to examine subsurface microbial communities over two geologic formations. For each subsurface community we estimate the degree to which it is influenced by homogeneous selection, variable selection, dispersal limitation, and homogenizing dispersal. Our analyses revealed that the relative influences of these ecological processes vary substantially across communities even within a geologic formation. We further identify environmental and spatial features associated with each ecological process, which allowed mapping of spatial variation in ecological-process-influences. The resulting maps provide a new lens through which ecological systems can be understood; in the subsurface system investigated here they revealed that the influence of variable selection was associated with the rate at which redox conditions change with subsurface depth.« less

  2. Estimating and mapping ecological processes influencing microbial community assembly

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stegen, James; Lin, Xueju; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan E.

    2015-05-01

    Ecological community assembly is governed by a combination of (i) selection resulting from among-taxa differences in performance; (ii) dispersal resulting from organismal movement; and (iii) ecological drift resulting from stochastic changes in population sizes. The relative importance and nature of these processes can vary across environments. Selection can be homogeneous or variable, and while dispersal is a rate, we conceptualize extreme dispersal rates as two categories; dispersal limitation results from limited exchange of organisms among communities, and homogenizing dispersal results from high levels of organism exchange. To estimate the influence and spatial variation of each process we extend a recently developed statistical framework, use a simulation model to evaluate the accuracy of the extended framework, and use the framework to examine subsurface microbial communities over two geologic formations. For each subsurface community we estimate the degree to which it is influenced by homogeneous selection, variable selection, dispersal limitation, and homogenizing dispersal. Our analyses revealed that the relative influences of these ecological processes vary substantially across communities even within a geologic formation. We further identify environmental and spatial features associated with each ecological process, which allowed mapping of spatial variation in ecological-process-influences. The resulting maps provide a new lens through which ecological systems can be understood; in the subsurface system investigated here they revealed that the influence of variable selection was associated with the rate at which redox conditions change with subsurface depth.

  3. FrontiersinEcology and theEnvironment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    agricultural use to the production of bioenergy crops. One persistent argument against the use of biofuel for biofuel production is limited by the Renewable Fuel Standard (a mandate for national biofuel production- mental consequences of biofuel production (Dale et al. 2010; Plevin et al. 2010; Davis et al. 2011

  4. Ecological niche modeling and differentiation of populations of *Triatoma brasiliensis* Neiva, 1911, the most important Chagas disease vector in northeastern Brazil (Hemiptera, Reduviidae, Triatominae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, Jane; Peterson, A. Townsend; Beard, C. Ben

    2002-11-01

    Ecologic niche modeling has allowed numerous advances in understanding the geographic ecology of species, including distributionalpredictions, distributionalchange and invasion, and assessment of ecologic differences. We ...

  5. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into UBC Farm Sustainability College: What Are the Social, Ecological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Are the Social, Ecological and Economic Factors to Consider When Planning Sustainable Housing Options? RaymondUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into UBC Farm Sustainability College: What Are the Social, Ecological and Economic Factors to Consider When

  6. Journal of Animal Ecology 2008 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2008.01426.x 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation 2008 British Ecological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is a fundamental ecological process and the ultimate fate of all populations. A reliable, quantitative theory and associated principles that govern population dynamics may inform multiple applied ecological problems 30602­2202 USA Summary 1. Population extinction is a fundamental ecological process. Recent experimental

  7. Ecological sustainability of energy cane as a biofuel feedstock Assess the ecological sustainability of deploying energy cane on land previously used for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Ecological sustainability of energy cane as a biofuel feedstock Objective Assess the ecological to the ecological sustainability of the wide-scale deployment of biofuel feedstocks. Key among these issues are how replacing current land use with biofuel feedstocks will affect the fluxes of greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N20

  8. Journal of Animal Ecology 2008, 77, 558564 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2007.01353.x 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation 2008 British Ecological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Dale H.

    Journal of Animal Ecology 2008, 77, 558­564 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2007.01353.x © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Host defence. Journal of Animal Ecology (2007) doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2007.0@@@@.x Introduction Interspecific

  9. Ecological Applications, 14(3), 2004, pp. 942953 2004 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Marine Mammal Laboratory, Alaska Fisheries and the foraging range of constituent species, will require a similar energy balance, and independent assessments should yield similar results. In this study, we compared the area of maximum energy balance, estimated

  10. Ecology, 92(6), 2011, pp. 12921302 2011 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohr, Jason

    of dispersal and thermal environment for mycorrhizal communities: lessons from Yellowstone National Park YLVA of the root-symbiont arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) by sampling roots from geothermal and nonthermal grasslands in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), followed by sequencing and RFLP of AMF ribosomal DNA

  11. Twenty-Five Years of Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Review of Environmental Problems and Remedial Actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, John G; Loar, James M; Stewart, Arthur J

    2011-01-01

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy s Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated oncethrough cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody s biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

  12. Geo-neutrino Observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dye, S. T.; Alderman, M.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Mahoney, J. M.; Pakvasa, S.; Rosen, M.; Smith, S.; Varner, G.; McDonough, W. F.

    2009-12-17

    Observations of geo-neutrinos measure radiogenic heat production within the earth, providing information on the thermal history and dynamic processes of the mantle. Two detectors currently observe geo-neutrinos from underground locations. Other detection projects in various stages of development include a deep ocean observatory. This paper presents the current status of geo-neutrino observation and describes the scientific capabilities of the deep ocean observatory, with emphasis on geology and neutrino physics.

  13. Optical Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts: Connections to GeV...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts: Connections to GeVTeV Jets Vestrand, W. Thomas Los Alamos National Laboratory Astronomy & Astrophysics(79) Astronomy and Astrophysics Astronomy...

  14. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  15. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  16. Atomic Collapse Observed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 | Tags: Hopper, Materials Science Contact: Linda...

  17. Sandia Energy - National SCADA Testbed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National SCADA Testbed Home Stationary Power Safety, Security & Resilience of Energy Infrastructure Grid Modernization Cyber Security for Electric Infrastructure National...

  18. Ecological perspectives of land use history: The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinds, N R; Rogers, L E

    1991-07-01

    The objective of this study was to gather information on the land use history of the Arid Land Ecology (ALE) Reserve so that current ecological research could be placed within a historical perspective. The data were gathered in the early 1980s by interviewing former users of the land and from previously published research (where available). Interviews with former land users of the ALE Reserve in Benton County, Washington, revealed that major land uses from 1880 to 1940 were homesteading, grazing, oil/gas production, and road building. Land use practices associated with grazing and homesteading have left the greatest impact on the landscape. Disturbed sites where succession is characterized by non-native species, plots where sagebrush was railed away, and sheep trails are major indications today of past land uses. Recent estimates of annual bunchgrass production do ALE do not support the widespread belief that bunchgrass were more productive during the homesteading era, though the invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissium), and other European alien plant species has altered pre-settlement succession patterns. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesofPublications TheScience (SC) National2015 | National Nuclear

  20. Physical observability of horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matt Visser

    2014-11-25

    Event horizons are (generically) not physically observable. In contrast, apparent horizons (and the closely related trapping horizons) are generically physically observable --- in the sense that they can be detected by observers working in finite-size regions of spacetime. Consequently event horizons are inappropriate tools for defining astrophysical black holes, or indeed for defining any notion of evolving}black hole, (evolving either due to accretion or Hawking radiation). The only situation in which an event horizon becomes physically observable is for the very highly idealized stationary or static black holes, when the event horizon is a Killing horizon which is degenerate with the apparent and trapping horizons; and then it is the physical observability of the apparent/trapping horizons that is fundamental --- the event horizon merely comes along for the ride.

  1. Physical observability of horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Event horizons are (generically) not physically observable. In contrast, apparent horizons (and the closely related trapping horizons) are generically physically observable --- in the sense that they can be detected by observers working in finite-size regions of spacetime. Consequently event horizons are inappropriate tools for defining astrophysical black holes, or indeed for defining any notion of evolving}black hole, (evolving either due to accretion or Hawking radiation). The only situation in which an event horizon becomes physically observable is for the very highly idealized stationary or static black holes, when the event horizon is a Killing horizon which is degenerate with the apparent and trapping horizons; and then it is the physical observability of the apparent/trapping horizons that is fundamental --- the event horizon merely comes along for the ride.

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    guy" and "a very hard worker." Fanelli began his college education in his native Argentina. By 2005, he was stationed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory...

  3. National Laboratory Geothermal Publications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    You can find publications, including technical papers and reports, about geothermal technologies, research, and development at the following U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories.

  4. National Women's History Month

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    NATIONAL WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH is an annual declared month that highlights the contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society.

  5. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Fuel Grand BC and High-Level Radioactive Waste - Jeff Williams, Director, Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project, DOEOffice of Nuclear Energy National...

  6. Seneca Nation- 2014 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seneca Nation of Indians (SNI) will install one 1.8-megawatt (MW) wind turbine on tribal common lands near Lake Erie in New York.

  7. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's weapon-physicist Greg Spriggs, leader of the Film Scanning and Reanalysis Project, the work has become a search-and-rescue mission. He...

  8. National VPPPA Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    VPPPA Conference August 19, 2012 Subcontractor Selection & Alignment Mark Manderbach, Steve Maki, J. Manuel Aguirre National VPPPA Conference August 19, 2012 Mark Manderbach, Steve...

  9. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, 2015 Projects save taxpayer dollars, promote environmental stewardship, sustainability LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 22, 2015-Nearly 400 Los Alamos National Laboratory employees on 32...

  10. National RES Las Vegas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    RES Las Vegas is another multifaceted event from The National Center which will feature unparalleled access to respected tribal leaders, members of congress, federal agency representatives, state...

  11. 2015 APPA National Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The American Public Power Association (APPA) is hosting their national conference that covers the political, economic, and technological trends shaping the electric utility industry.

  12. National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    the Earth's Surface. The second virtual classroom to the student was presented by Tommy Smith from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on various sources of energy, its use and...

  13. National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington, DC 20585 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ADMINISTRATOR FROM: THEODORE D. SHERRY II 4 flA. * -. SUBJECT: REFERENCE: NATIONAL SECURITY ENTI's'E FIELD COUNCIL CHAIR ACTION:...

  14. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and page number - 2 - Mission is to remove excess, unwanted, abandoned, or orphan radioactive sealed sources that pose a potential risk to health, safety, and national security...

  15. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    rate. Reserve a room at Embassy Suites Albuquerque About the NTSF The NTSF is the mechanism through which the DOE communicates with states and tribal nations about DOE's...

  16. Alamos National Security, LLC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    30 nonprofit organizations to receive monetary donations from Los Alamos National Security, LLC June 25, 2012 Recognizing employee and retiree volunteer efforts LOS ALAMOS, NEW...

  17. National Laboratory Photovoltaics Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE supports photovoltaic (PV) research and development and facilities at its national laboratories to accelerate progress toward achieving the SunShot Initiative's technological and economic...

  18. 2012 National Electricity Forum

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    U.S. Department of Energy 2012 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study Eastern Regional Workshops December 6, 2011 - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Hilton Philadelphia Airport...

  19. Submitting Organization Sandia National ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    POC Technologies Center, funded by a National Institutes of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) U54 award, focuses on advancing critical-emergency-disaster care by...

  20. Environmental resource document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irving, J.S.

    1993-07-01

    This document contains information related to the environmental characterization of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is a major US Department of Energy facility in southeastern Idaho dedicated to nuclear research, waste management, environmental restoration, and other activities related to the development of technology. Environmental information covered in this document includes land, air, water, and ecological resources; socioeconomic characteristics and land use; and cultural, aesthetic, and scenic resources.

  1. Environmental resource document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irving, J.S.

    1993-07-01

    This document contains information related to the environmental characterization of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL is a major US Department of Energy facility in southeastern Idaho dedicated to nuclear research, waste management, environmental restoration, and other activities related to the development of technology. Environmental information covered in this document includes land, air, water, and ecological resources; socioeconomic characteristics and land use; and cultural, aesthetic, and scenic resources.

  2. Observables on Quantum Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatolij Dvure?enskij; Mária Kuková

    2012-04-29

    An observable on a quantum structure is any $\\sigma$-homomorphism of quantum structures from the Borel $\\sigma$-algebra into the quantum structure. We show that our partial information on an observable known only for all intervals of the form $(-\\infty,t)$ is sufficient to determine uniquely the whole observable defined on quantum structures like $\\sigma$-MV-algebras, $\\sigma$-effect algebras, Boolean $\\sigma$-algebras, monotone $\\sigma$-complete effect algebras with the Riesz Decomposition Property, the effect algebra of effect operators of a Hilbert space, and a system of functions, and an effect-tribe.

  3. Measuring the Non-Observed Economy: A Survey-Based Study of Demand in the Korean Prostitution Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KIM, WONSOON

    2013-01-01

    the Non- Observed Economy: A Handbook, with Development,Brigita, comp. Non-Observed Economy In National Accounts.Measuring the Non-observed Economy. Publication. 5th ed.

  4. National Tribal Energy Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is participating in a National Tribal Energy Summit September 23–25, 2015, in Washington, D.C. The National Summit supports the Obama Administration’s ongoing commitment to assist tribal efforts to enhance energy security, increase community resiliency, and cultivate a sustainable energy future.

  5. The National Cancer Institute,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The National Cancer Institute, International Cancer Information Center Bldg. 82, Rm 123 Bethesda, MD 20892 The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is part of the Federal Government. NCI coordinates the government's cancer research program. It is the largest of the 17 biomedical research institutes and centers

  6. MARS OBSERVER Mission Failure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    of Mars Observer Mission Failure.. ................... D-12 a. Most Probable Cause: Leakage of NT0 Through Check Valves .................................................................. D-14 b. Potential Cause: Pressure Regulator Failure....................... D-28 c. Potential Cause: Failure of a Pyro Valve Charge

  7. Seismo-geomagnetic anomalies and M P 5.0 earthquakes observed in Taiwan during 19882001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuh-Ing

    Seismo-geomagnetic anomalies and M P 5.0 earthquakes observed in Taiwan during 1988­2001 J.Y. Liu a, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054, Taiwan b Center for Space and Remote Sensing Research, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054, Taiwan c Institute of Geophysics, National Central University

  8. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11 Print3.30.2 Print1VacuumWelcome to the

  9. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11 Print3.30.2 Print1VacuumWelcome to

  10. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11 Print3.30.2 Print1VacuumWelcome

  11. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11 Print3.30.2 Print1VacuumWelcomeField

  12. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11 Print3.30.2

  13. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11 Print3.30.2

  14. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11 Print3.30.2Lab News Oct-Dec 2015 Tom

  15. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11 Print3.30.2Lab News Oct-Dec 2015

  16. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11 Print3.30.2Lab News Oct-Dec 2015Recent

  17. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11 Print3.30.2Lab News Oct-Dec

  18. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11 Print3.30.2Lab News Oct-DecScavenging

  19. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11 Print3.30.2Lab News

  20. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11 Print3.30.2Lab NewsVulture Spatial

  1. Beasley Lab | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11 Print3.30.2Lab NewsVulture SpatialGray

  2. Justin D. Congdon | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate student Subtask 4Photo4 | National Nuclear65 JuneCongdon

  3. Michael E. Dorcas | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillionStockpile Stewardship NationalMEMS:Mfg

  4. The Ecological Society of America wwwwww..ffrroonnttiieerrssiinneeccoollooggyy..oorrgg How do you study an ecosystem no ecologist has ever

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, John W. "Jack"

    patterns and processes to forecast ecological responses to future change. Thus, both paleoecology. PALEOECOLOGY PALEOECOLOGY PALEOECOLOGY Novel climates, no-analog communities, and ecological surprises JJoohhnn

  5. Version Date: December 22, 2014 National Weather Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Version Date: December 22, 2014 National Weather Service NWS Partners' and Family of Services, National Weather Service 9:00 ­ 9:15 Observation Systems John Murphy, Director, Office of Science Services Updates Andy Stern, Acting Director, Office of Climate, Water and Weather Services 9:45 ­ 10

  6. Ecological effects of an invasive social wasp on Hawaiian arthropod communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Erin Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    of Biogeography 29:789-808. Beggs, J. 2001. The ecologicalSociety 48:12-16. Beggs, J. 2001. The ecologicalBiological Conservation Beggs, J. R. and J. S. Rees. 1999.

  7. The Ecological Basis of Forest Ecosystem Management in the Oregon Coast Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    processes can contribute to reaching ecosystem goals. We draw primarily on information developed31 The Ecological Basis of Forest Ecosystem Management in the Oregon Coast Range Thomas A. Spies twelve major ecological themes (regional environment, ecosystem types and patterns, vegetation

  8. A new landscape ecology mapping scheme for coastal environments: Galveston Island, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Karen Marie

    1996-01-01

    of landscape ecology to understand the complete picture of the changing environment of a barrier island. Mapping is fundamental to detecting and monitoring change. Currently no mapping scheme can effectively integrate geomorphological and ecological mapping...

  9. Ecology in Africa: a view from the past for informing the future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martins, Dino J.

    2013-01-01

    ISSN 1948?6596  Ecology in Africa: a view from the past for http://www.springer.com/  “Africa’s  natural  habitats  are the  ecology  of  Africa…”.   These opening sentences from 

  10. ECOLOGICAL NICHE MODELING AS A PREDICTIVE TOOL: ASIATIC FRESHWATER FISHES IN NORTH AMERICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Pingfu

    2008-05-30

    appropriately. After introduction, the most effective way is to predict their spread, to discover populations early, and to adopt measures to eradicate or at least contain them. This dissertation uses ecological niches modeling to estimate the ecological...

  11. Ecological Indicators 11 (2011) 304310 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olden, Julian D.

    2011-01-01

    Ecological Indicators 11 (2011) 304­310 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Ecological.g., number of canals, dams), and human development (e.g., road and railroads density, pollution sites

  12. Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay. The consequences for both the hydrology and 41 #12;42 HYDRO-ECOLOGIC RESPONSES TO LAND USE IN SMALL URBANIZING

  13. COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT OF CONTAMINATED FLUVIAL SEDIMENTS EROSION RISK AND ECOLOGICAL HAZARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT OF CONTAMINATED FLUVIAL SEDIMENTS ­ EROSION RISK AND ECOLOGICAL HAZARD assessment of contaminated aquatic sediments has to consider both sediment hydraulics and ecology. Since layers of contaminated sediments are often buried under less polluted deposits, the risk of erosion

  14. A white paper on relevant aspects of Population Dynamics, Marine Community Ecology, and Oceanography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and Oceanography of Marine Microbes for the Department of Energy Genomes to Life project: CARBON SEQUESTRATIONA white paper on relevant aspects of Population Dynamics, Marine Community Ecology ........................................................................................................7 Introductory Marine Community Ecology

  15. Foraging ecology of North Pacific albacore in the California Current System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, Sarah M.

    2009-01-01

    composition and energy density. Marine Ecology ProgressMarine Ecology Progress Series Emlen JM (1966) The role of time and energyMarine Biology 115:469-480 Emlen JM (1966) The role of time and energy

  16. TED AND KARYN HUME CENTER FOR NATIONAL SECURITY AND TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Dong S.

    Networks, Crypto, Formal Methods, Cloud, IPv6, Hardware Security, Visualization, Policy/Law Applications Security IPv6 Security Cloud Security and Privacy Secure Virtualization Anonymous Computation VisualizationTED AND KARYN HUME CENTER FOR NATIONAL SECURITY AND TECHNOLOGY Cybersecurity: Observations

  17. Fourth report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M. [ed.] [ed.

    1994-04-01

    In response to a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC) and selected tributaries. BMAP currently consists of six major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota, (3) biological indicator studies, (4) instream ecological monitoring, (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment, and (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake. The ecological characterization of the WOC watershed will provide baseline data that can be used to document the ecological effects of the water pollution control program and the remedial action program. The long-term nature of BMAP ensures that the effectiveness of remedial measures will be properly evaluated.

  18. ECOLOGIC REGRESSION ANALYSIS AND THE STUDY OF THE INFLUENCE OF AIR QUALITY ON MORTALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selvin, S.

    2014-01-01

    Orcutt, An empirical analysis of air pollution dose-responseIf ecologic regression analysis of air quality and mortality

  19. Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Silvicultural Treatments for Enhancing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  20. Global Ecology and Conservation 3 (2015) 379388 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    of Conservation Biology, Institute of Ecology and Evolution, University of Bern, Bern 3012, Switzerland g r a p h

  1. Influence of foraging ecology and body condition on contaminant bioaccumulation in a top marine predator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Sarah Elendil Hardee

    2015-01-01

    52 CHAPTER 2: Marine foraging ecology influences mercuryfasting North Pacific marine Mammal . . . . . . . . .distribution and conservation of marine mammals. Proceedings

  2. The Gut Microbiota of Rural Papua New Guineans: Composition, Diversity Patterns, and Ecological Processes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    None

    2015-04-01

    Comparisons between the fecal microbiota of humans from industrialized and non-industrialized communities indicate a pronounced impact of westernization on the diversity and composition of the human gut microbiota. However, the exact consequences of westernization on community characteristics are still insufficiently understood, and the ecological processes that drive differences have not been elucidated. Here we have compared the fecal microbiota of adults from two non-industrialized regions in Papua New Guinea (PNG) with that of United States (US) residents. Papua New Guineans harbor communities with greater bacterial diversity but lower inter-individual variation. Although the fecal microbiota in PNG and US was largely dominated by shared bacterial lineages, the relative abundance of 25 families, 45 genera, and 230 species-level OTUs differed, and 47 core OTUs in PNG were undetectable in US residents. To gain insight into the ecological mechanisms that cause the observed differences, we quantified community assembly processes in PNG and US microbiomes using a null modeling approach. This analysis demonstrated a significant higher rate of bacterial dispersal in PNG and divergent selective environments in the US. Interestingly, equivalent findings were obtained for other datasets comparing industrialized and non-industrialized microbiomes. Overall, the findings demonstrate a dominant role for microbial dispersal in shaping the human gut microbiota in non-industrialized societies, and point to differential selection pressures across individuals as a major factor shaping microbiomes associated with modern lifestyle.

  3. Air Observe System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-10

    This manuscript contains a description and basic principles for observing inaccessible areas using low cost, easily deployed equipment. The basic premise is to suspend a tiny video camera at an altitude of 10 - 200 meters over the area to be surveyed. The TV camera supports at altitude by wind or balloon. The technical challenges regard the means by which the camera is suspended. Such a system may be used by military or police forces or by civil authorities for rescue missions or assessment of natural disasters. The method may be further developed for military applications by integrating the surveillance task with deployment of munitions. Key words: air observer, air suspended system, low altitude video observer.

  4. Industrial Ecology and LCA, Instructor Iddo Wernick Fall 2014 Syllabus (subject to refinement/updating)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    Industrial Ecology and LCA, Instructor Iddo Wernick Fall 2014 Syllabus (subject to refinement/updating) 1 SUS-7300C INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY AND LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS Description: Students will be introduced to the purpose, philosophy, and applications of Industrial Ecology as they affect environmental and urban

  5. Evolution in plant populations as a driver of ecological changes in arthropod communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellend, Mark

    Evolution in plant populations as a driver of ecological changes in arthropod communities Marc T. J of Ecology and Evolution, Centre for the Analysis of Genome Evolution and Function, University of Toronto, 25-ranging impacts on species interactions, but the effects that ongoing evolution has on the temporal ecological

  6. The Primate Life History Database: a unique shared ecological data resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bronikowski, Anne

    The Primate Life History Database: a unique shared ecological data resource Karen B. Strier1, University of North Carolina-Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, USA; 4 Department of Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA; 5 Department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental

  7. SYNTHESIS Disturbance-driven changes in the variability of ecological patterns and processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraterrigo, Jennifer

    by considering disturbance extent, frequency and intensity, as well as ecosystem recovery, and thereby capturesREVIEW AND SYNTHESIS Disturbance-driven changes in the variability of ecological patterns Understanding how disturbance shapes the dynamics of ecological systems is of fundamental importance in ecology

  8. Quantum Mechanics Without Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. H. Sulis

    2013-03-03

    The measurement problem and the role of observers have plagued quantum mechanics since its conception. Attempts to resolve these have introduced anthropomorphic or non-realist notions into physics. A shift of perspective based upon process theory and utilizing methods from combinatorial games, interpolation theory and complex systems theory results in a novel realist version of quantum mechanics incorporating quasi-local, nondeterministic hidden variables that are compatible with the no-hidden variable theorems and relativistic invariance, and reproduce the standard results of quantum mechanics to a high degree of accuracy without invoking observers.

  9. NNSA Celebrates National Nuclear Science Week | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Science Week | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

  10. National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    ,,/ NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center Houston by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration ii Hosted by the National Academy of Sclences for library, abstract service, educational, or research purposes; however, republication of any paper

  11. Biomass Feedstock National User Facility

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Breakout Session 1B—Integration of Supply Chains I: Breaking Down Barriers Biomass Feedstock National User Facility Kevin L. Kenney, Director, Biomass Feedstock National User Facility, Idaho National Laboratory

  12. BROADER National Security Missions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metal Chips (U) Uranium Trioxide (UO 3 ) UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 Ur anyl Nitrate Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate (NH 4 ) 2 UO 2 (CO 3 ) 4 DEVELOP NEW NATIONAL SECURITY MISSIONS Y-12 has...

  13. Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site OverviewThe Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was established in 1947 by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) (predecessor to U.S. Department of Energy [DOE]). Formerly Camp Upton, a U.S....

  14. Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measurement LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, July 10, 2012-Using a one-of-a-kind laser system at Los Alamos National Laboratory, scientists have created the largest neutron beam...

  15. Northwest National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is now a member of the National Academy of Sciences and France's Legion of Honor. He is Sterling Professor of Mathematics Emeritus, at Yale University and Fellow Emeritus of...

  16. Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazardous devices teams showcase skills at Robot Rodeo June 24-27 June 18, 2014 Bomb squads compete in timed scenarios at Los Alamos National Laboratory LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 19,...

  17. Los Alamos National Laboratory's

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    takes part in Blue Star Museums program May 16, 2012 Free admission for active duty military, their family members LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, May 16, 2012-Los Alamos National...

  18. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  19. SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    who require access must be United States citizens, or foreign nationals who are legal aliens or have the required authorization to perform work in the Unites States. CS31 -...

  20. AISES National Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The AISES National Conference is a one-of-a-kind, three day event convening graduate, undergraduate, and high school junior and senior students, teachers, workforce professionals, corporate and...

  1. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  2. Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

    2007-10-01

    He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

  3. CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    the dynamics, composition, and abundance of nutrients in glacial melt water. Consequently, we must now consider, 78(1), 2008, pp. 41­67 Ó 2008 by the Ecological Society of America GLACIAL ECOSYSTEMS ANDY HODSON,1. Two key glacial ecosystems emerge, one inhabiting the glacier surface (the supraglacial ecosystem

  4. Turing Machine as an ecological model for Task Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frénod, Emmanuel

    1 Turing Machine as an ecological model for Task Analysis Thierry Morineau, Emmanuel Frénod model is based on the Turing Machine formalism and takes into account the variety of situations that can opening a door. Keywords: Cognitive work analysis, task analysis, Turing machine, affordance #12;3 1

  5. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Ecological Resources (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R.; Jones, A.T.; Smith, C.R.; Kalmijn, A.J.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (COE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed. Regist. 5925638) withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed. Regst. 575433) of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County, including the southeastern coast, a potential development corridor along the Saddle Road between Hilo and the North Kohala District on the northwestern coast, and on the southeastern coast of Maui. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for future research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

  6. Information Analysis of a Spatial Database for Ecological Land classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Information Analysis of a Spatial Database for Ecological Land classification Frank W. Davis:An ecologicalland classification was developed for a complex region in southern California using geographic. The analysis was weakened by map errors, especially errors in the digital elevation data. Nevertheless

  7. Plant behavioural ecology: dynamic plasticity in secondary metabolites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aschehoug, Erik

    Plant behavioural ecology: dynamic plasticity in secondary metabolites KERRY L. METLEN, ERIK T induction and attenuation of plant secondary metabolites occur as chemically mediated root foraging, plant growth. Rapid and reversible secondary metabolite production and release is also a key mechanism by which

  8. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Eco-Friendly Office the current status of the subject matter of a project/report. #12;APSC 261 Final Report Eco-Friendly Office Supplies: Post-it Notes Andy Kwan Arjan Dhaliwal Emmanuel Augustine #12;i ABSTRACT The purpose of the Eco-Friendly

  9. Doing political ecology inside and outside the academy Simon Batterbury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batterbury, Simon

    . This interdisciplinary field makes a contribution to understanding environmental and social justice issues, that require world of environmental politics is debated, but embraced by some academics, numerous NGOs, and civil: social and politial issues Urban political ecology Overview and review articles Social construction

  10. Methods of Risk Analysis: Traditional and Ecological Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Methods of Risk Analysis: Traditional and Ecological Approaches John Buie Introduction of pesticides on human health, and oil spills. In recent years, a branch of risk analysis has formed that deals primarily with risks posed to the environment as a result of human activ- ity; this type of analysis

  11. Plant Ecology doi: 10.1093/jpe/rts010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    atmospheric carbon dioxide (Cleland et al. 2007), (iii) forest ecohydrology, e.g. evapotranspiration, preJournal of Plant Ecology PAGES 1­8 doi: 10.1093/jpe/rts010 Applicability of remote sensing- based and its ability of exchanging atmospheric carbon diox- ide, forest ecohydrology, risk of insect

  12. Marine Ecological Processes FAS 4270 (3 credits) Fall 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    modes for presentation of the subject matter with class discussion. Upon conclusion of each chapter (2005) Marine Biology: An Ecological Approach. Benjamin Cummings. Course Format, Policies on Attendance, and Make-up Exams Course format: This course is intended to provide upper division undergraduate students

  13. Food web structure and the evolution of ecological communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Alan

    Food web structure and the evolution of ecological communities Christopher Quince1 , Paul G. Higgs2 the population dynamics of the species for any structure of the food web. The equations account for competition of speciations and extinctions, and on the statistical properties of the food webs that are generated

  14. CHAPTER ELEVEN The microbial ecology of land and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    CHAPTER ELEVEN The microbial ecology of land and water contaminated with radioactive waste: towards the development of bioremediation options for the nuclear industry A N D R E A G E I S S L E R , S O N J A S E L E via a number of mechanisms which are potentially useful for scalable, cost-effective bioremediation

  15. Jonathan K. London, Ph.D. Department of Human Ecology &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    + Jonathan K. London, Ph.D. Department of Human Ecology & Eyes on the Prize: Sustainable and Jobs" (EEJ) alternative Sacramento: Formal integration into SCS Selection of TPAs Transportation just communities Focus on actual transportation and housing investments not only modeled land use

  16. Ecological economics of coastal disasters: Introduction to the special issue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    and magnitude--measured in terms of human lives lost, destroyed infrastructure, ecological damage and disrupted social networks. Hurricane Katrina and the Indian Ocean tsunami illustrate the severe and widespread on the coasts. The Asian Tsunami and Hurricane Katrina are just two recent examples. Part of the reason

  17. GEOSTATISTICS AND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN APPLIED INSECT ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebhold, Andrew

    GEOSTATISTICS AND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN APPLIED INSECT ECOLOGY Andrew M. Liebhold USDA INTRODUCTION GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS (GIS) Storage And Retrieval Data Input Spatial Manipulations Data: (a) geographical information systems (GIS) and (b) geostatistics. A GIS is a set of computer programs

  18. Biology BS, Ecology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Biology BS, Ecology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Completed DLN BIOL 191 General Biology I 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 DLV Visual Sciences course in a second field 3 BIOL 192 General Biology II 4 BIOL 301 Cell Biology 3 CID BIOL 323

  19. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE BIOLOGY ECOLOGY & EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY OPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Brian M.

    BACHELOR OF SCIENCE ­ BIOLOGY ECOLOGY & EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY OPTION A Bachelor of Science degree hours must be upper division coursework. A B.S. in Biology requires a minimum of 19 semester hours of core BIOLOGY courses (BIOLOGY 106, 107, 301, 372 and 405 or 403). An additional 21 semester hours

  20. The Emphasis on Ecological Design for High-rise Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, F.; Zhang, G.; Xie, M.

    2006-01-01

    Along with the rapid development of urbanization, there are more and more high-rise buildings in cities. Meanwhile, the negative impacts of high-rise buildings on the urban environment have become more and more serious. The ecological design of high...

  1. Lodgepole Pine Forest Ecology A foundation for future forest management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is Very large patches of even-aged forests varying in composition from Fire Regimes in Lodgepole Pine Forests The historic fire regime is dominated by severe, stand-replacing fires. These fires occur at longLodgepole Pine Forest Ecology A foundation for future forest management Claudia Regan ­ Regional

  2. forest ecology Using Fire to Increase the Scale, Benefits, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, Malcolm

    forest ecology Using Fire to Increase the Scale, Benefits, and Future Maintenance of Fuels limited to affect fire severity and the Forest Service has predominantly focused on suppression, and institutional barriers to increased fire use that we discuss. Keywords: fire policy, fire suppression, forest

  3. Appendix 30 Fire Effects on Key Ecological Processes in Forested

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix 30 Fire Effects on Key Ecological Processes in Forested Ecosystems The following paragraphs on fire effects on forest succession are from Stickney (1982) Forest Succession ...the severity of the pre-disturbance forest herb species also demonstrated the ability to survive fire, particularly those

  4. Book Reviews Ecology, 86(12), 2005, pp. 34203421

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    with their landscapes to achieve an ecolog- ically, economically, and socially sustainable world? More specifically, these are some of the questions that have motivated DeFries et al. to organize this book on impacts of land on ``Ecosystems interactions with land-use change,'' held in Santa Fe, New Mexico during June 14­18, 2003

  5. Ecological Setting of the Wind River Old-growth Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, Jerry

    , which act at the indi- vidual to small groups of trees scale, are wind, snow loads, and droughtEcological Setting of the Wind River Old-growth Forest David C. Shaw,1,2 * Jerry F. Franklin,1,2 Ken Bible,1,2 Jeffrey Klopatek,3 Elizabeth Freeman, Sarah Greene,4 and Geoffrey G. Parker5 1 Wind

  6. Phragmites australis: Ecology and Management in Dr. Kirk J. Havens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phragmites australis: Ecology and Management in Virginia Dr. Kirk J. Havens Assistant Director of Red Bow Cliff Dwellings in Arizona dated to 1300 A.D. Kirk J. Havens, VIMS #12;Seed head Seedy-head Phragmites australis Kirk J. Havens, VIMS #12;Leaves off #12;Seed head Spartina cynosuroides Big Cordgrass

  7. Ecological consequences of early Late Pleistocene megadroughts in tropical Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    Ecological consequences of early Late Pleistocene megadroughts in tropical Africa Andrew S. Cohen conditions in tropical Africa occurred in several discrete episodes between 135 and 90 ka, as demonstrated]. This resulted in extraordinarily low lake levels, even in Africa's deepest lakes. On the basis of well dated

  8. Building Resources for Refugee, Immigrant, Diaspora Groups and Ecological Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    Building Resources for Refugee, Immigrant, Diaspora Groups and Ecological Systems #12;BRIDGES Community and University Initiative To provide psychosocial skills to refugee youth in Winnipeg Assist of talking about "refugee issues" and a lack of action that directly supports the long-term adjustment

  9. 206 Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America Invasion Terminology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Mark A.

    traits of "high-im- pact" invaders. Daehler expresses concern regard- ing the subjectivity of the term206 Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America Invasion Terminology: Should Ecologists Define Their Terms Dif- ferently Than Others? No, Not if We Want to be of Any Help! Daehler (2001) recently argued

  10. Vol. 118: 51-58,1995 MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grutter, Alexandra "Lexa"

    Vol. 118: 51-58,1995 MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. Published March 9 load and mean surface area of the 11fish species. Surface area, however, explained slightly more surface area may be useful for predicting the cleaning rates of fish species. When the fre- quency

  11. Advanced Mathematical Ecology -Syllabus Fall 2013 Math/EEB 681

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Louis J.

    Advanced Mathematical Ecology - Syllabus Fall 2013 Math/EEB 681 Dr. Louis Gross (gross@nimbios.org) Dr. Chris Remien (cremien@nimbios.org) Home Page: http://www.tiem.utk.edu/~gross/math681.html Meeting presented in Math/EEB 581-2 by discussing, in particular, certain areas of research that were not included

  12. COMMUNITY ECOLOGY Joel C. Trexler William F. Loftus Sue Perry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trexler, Joel C.

    COMMUNITY ECOLOGY Joel C. Trexler Æ William F. Loftus Æ Sue Perry Disturbance frequency of the frequency of hydrological disturbance in an intervention analysis to examine its effects on small frequency or intensity of disturbance may affect both negatively. Field studies conducted over multigenera

  13. CONCEPTS & SYNTHESIS EMPHASIZING NEW IDEAS TO STIMULATE RESEARCH IN ECOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietze, Michael

    . DAVIDSON,2 AND MICHAEL C. DIETZE 1,2,4 1 Energy Biosciences Institute, University of Illinois, Urbana; ecological forecast; ecophysiology; Ecosystem Demography model; ecosystem model; meta-analysis; plant traits there is growing demand for predictions of ecosystem responses that provide actionable information for policy

  14. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

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    Grutter, Alexandra "Lexa"

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser 1 Published January 11 Parasite removal rates is dependent on the rates at which par- asites are removed by cleaner fish and added through colonization-Research 1996 Resale of full article not permitted #12;Mar Ecol Prog Ser 130:61-70, 1996 of daily consumption

  15. Vol. 81: 247-255, 1992 MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maldonado, Manuel

    Vol. 81: 247-255, 1992 MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. Published April 30 host and colonizer may be present. The high number of inhabitants of some of the sponges studied (upto to recover and lull the invader, in contrast to the situation described for other colonizers with limited

  16. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

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    Krug, Patrick J.

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 312: 149­159, 2006 Published April 24 therefore have limited time to locate and colonize a suitable adult habitat. Domi- nant spatial competitors consent of the publisher #12;Mar Ecol Prog Ser 312: 149­159, 2006 energy reserves, they became `desperate

  17. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

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    Denny, Mark

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 522: 127­143, 2015 doi: 10.3354/meps11117 on experimental plates colonized by natural microalgae. Limpet species found higher on the shore had lower peak without written consent of the publisher #12;Mar Ecol Prog Ser 522: 127­143, 2015 In the rocky intertidal

  18. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

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    Pawlik, Joseph

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 368: 137­143, 2008 doi: 10.3354/meps07615 and reproduction, thereby also enhancing their ability to colonize open space. As for some plant communities without written consent of the publisher #12;Mar Ecol Prog Ser 368: 137­143, 2008 primary limiting

  19. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

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    Koehl, Mimi

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 479: 47­62, 2013 doi: 10.3354/meps10193 larvae, which are trans- ported by ambient currents and colonize new sur- faces. The recruitment. 1994, Schiel 2004, Edwards & Stachowicz 2011). To colonize a surface, a larva must be transported

  20. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

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    Shima, Jeff

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 472: 239­248, 2013 doi: 10.3354/meps10015 in the system via a range of mechanisms, including competition-colonization tradeoffs (Levins & Culver 1971 holder(s). It may be distributed to interested individuals on request. #12;Mar Ecol Prog Ser 472: 239

  1. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

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    Stachowicz, Jay

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 398: 69­80, 2010 doi: 10.3354/meps08341 surfaces for colonization that adequately compensate for the primary substrate it exploits, its high consent of the publisher #12;Mar Ecol Prog Ser 398: 69­80, 2010 Rodriguez 2006, Heiman et al. 2008

  2. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 262: 19­25, 2003 Published November 7 blocked access to ice-free terrain for breeding. The first colonization of Ross Island in East Mc;Mar Ecol Prog Ser 262: 19­25, 2003 guins (Baroni &

  3. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

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    Pawlik, Joseph

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 465: 111­117, 2012 doi: 10.3354/meps09904. laevis neither affected the frequency of colonization of Montastraea annularis by boring sponges, nor individuals on request. #12;Mar Ecol Prog Ser 465: 111­117, 2012 tem are altered. These context

  4. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

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    Love, Milton

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 344: 245­256, 2007 doi: 10.3354/meps06929 findings suggest that trophic pathways on other types of artificial structures colonized by exotic species · Artificial reef Resale or republication not permitted without written consent of the publisher #12;Mar Ecol

  5. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

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    Pawlik, Joseph

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 224: 103­114, 2001 Published December 19 process: solitary larvae first colonize a suitable but previously uninhabited sub- stratum; gregarious the conditions under which larvae of a gregarious species colonize new habitats. We first confirmed

  6. Vol. 138: 71-82, 1996 MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES

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    Osenberg, Craig W.

    Vol. 138: 71-82, 1996 MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Published July 25 tested the effects of hydrocarbon seepage on the distnbution and abundance of macrofauna. Colon & Boyer 1983). O Inter-Research 1996 Resale of full article not permitted #12;72 Mar Ecol Prog Ser 138

  7. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

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    Pawlik, Joseph

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 224: 115­131, 2001 Published December 19 substrata. Previous investigations with barnacles and polychaetes have suggested that the colonization for the initiation of monospecific aggregations of fouling marine invertebrates. KEY WORDS: Colonization · Gregarious

  8. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

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    Pawlik, Joseph

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Published November 2 Defenses of Caribbean sponges.Pawlik* Biological Sciences and Center for Marine Science Research. University of North Carolina at Wilmington. Analyses of ash content, tensile strength, protein, carbohydrate, and lipid content, and total energy

  9. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 382: 211­219, 2009 doi: 10.3354/meps07997 Published April 30 INTRODUCTION Seabirds play critical roles in the transfer of energy and nutrients within marine ecosystems and also between marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Despite decades of intensive study

  10. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

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    Thomas, David D.

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 311: 273­283, 2006 Published April 13 scales in biodiversity-based research: challenges and solutions for marine systems Shahid Naeem York, New York 10027, USA ABSTRACT: As in terrestrial biodiversity, human influences over marine

  11. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

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    Queensland, University of

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 295: 201­213, 2005 Published June 23 INTRODUCTION Due to the ongoing direct depletion of the world's marine resources as well as the indirect effects of fish- ing, no-take marine reserves are being promoted as an ecosystem-level management tool. No

  12. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

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    Camassa, Roberto

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 487: 185­200, 2013 doi: 10.3354/meps10387 Published July 30 INTRODUCTION Marine snow plays a critical role in the marine car- bon cycle, as a dominant, Kiørboe 2011). Knowledge of the vertical distribution of marine aggregates in the water column, as well

  13. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

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    Morel, François M. M.

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 236: 37­43, 2002 Published July 3 the CO2 responses of marine phytoplankton despite the established importance of these organisms poten- tially limit the growth of large marine diatoms (Riebe- sell et al. 1993), while recent field

  14. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

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    Rolán-Alvarez, Emilio

    MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser Vol. 357: 175­184, 2008 doi: 10.3354/meps07278 will affect only some regions of the genome. An additional difficulty in the marine environment variation in the marine environment remains insufficiently understood (Avise 2004). Natural populations

  15. Key Title Marine Ecology www.wiley.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, Diana

    Key Title Marine Ecology www.wiley.com Antarctic Ecosystems: An Extreme Environment in a Changing their genomes. Chapters address both Antarctic terrestrial and marine ecosystems, and the scientific and evolution Part II: Marine habitats and regions Chapter 4. The impact of regional climate change

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    Sorin, Eric J.

    important ecological functions such as the transport of energy and nutrients (Irlandi & Crawford 1997 is important for maintaining community structure, but data on the degree to which animals efficiently move acoustic telemetry, measured their ability to home back to their estuary of capture. Individu- als from all

  17. National Lab Day Fact Sheets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These fact sheets highlight the important work of the 17 National Labs in five key mission areas: discovery science, energy & the environment, national security, manufacturing, and supercomputing.

  18. Mark Peters | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory, where he managed the science and engineering testing program at the Yucca Mountain Project. Before joining Los Alamos National Laboratory, Dr. Peters was a...

  19. Climate Change and National Security

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    Alyson, Fleming; Summer, Kelly; Summer, Martin; Lauren, Franck; Jonathan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    CLIMATE CHANGE Multiplying Threats to National Securityfor the impacts of climate change on national security. Pagea warming world. Page 11 “Climate change acts as a threat

  20. National Nuclear Security Administration Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    May 11, 2011 Ahmad Al-Daouk Manager, National Security Department (NSD) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Service Center - Albuquerque, NM May 11, 2011 - Page 2...