National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for national carbon capture

  1. The National Carbon Capture Center

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility Topical Report Budget Period Four Ja n u a r y 1, 2013 - D e c e m b e r 31, 2013 DOE C o o p e ra tiv e A g r e e m e n t DE-NT0000749 The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Developm ent Facility Topical Report Budget Period Four Ja n u a r y 1, 2013 - D e c e m b e r 31, 2013 DOE C o o p e ra tiv e A g r e e m e n t DE-NT0000749 P r e p a r e d by: S o u t h e r n C o m p a n y Services, Inc. P o w e r S

  2. Carbon Capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capture Fact Sheet Research Team Members Key Contacts Carbon Capture Research & Development Carbon capture and storage from fossil-based power generation is a critical component of realistic strategies for arresting the rise in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, but capturing substantial amounts of CO2 using current technology would result in a prohibitive rise in the cost of producing energy. The National Energy Technology Laboratory, in collaboration with researchers from regional

  3. National Carbon Capture Center Launches Post-Combustion Test Center |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Carbon Capture Center Launches Post-Combustion Test Center National Carbon Capture Center Launches Post-Combustion Test Center June 6, 2011 - 2:32pm Addthis Jenny Hakun What does this mean for me? Commercial deployment of the processes tested here could cut carbon pollution. Innovation is important to finding ways to make energy cleaner. And testing the ideas and processes that researchers come up with is critical to moving ideas from the lab to the marketplace. That's

  4. DOE Establishes National Carbon Capture Center to Speed Deployment of CO2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Capture Processes | Department of Energy Establishes National Carbon Capture Center to Speed Deployment of CO2 Capture Processes DOE Establishes National Carbon Capture Center to Speed Deployment of CO2 Capture Processes May 27, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy has announced the creation of a new National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to develop and test technologies to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-based power plants. Managed and operated by

  5. Carbon Capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Capture Carbon capture involves the separation of CO2 from coal-based power plant flue gas or syngas. Commercially available first-generation CO2 capture technologies are currently being used in various industrial applications. However, in their current state of development, these technologies are not ready for implementation on coal-based power plants because they have not been demonstrated at appropriate scale, require approximately one-third of the plant's steam and power to operate,

  6. Carbon Capture Research and Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Research Institute of Innovative Energy Carbon Capture Research and Development Carbon capture and storage from fossil-based power...

  7. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    States' energy security through reliable, clean, and affordable energy produced from coal. ... of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. ...

  8. Carbon Capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Integrated technology development takes materials from molecular design through fabrication to commercialization Project Overview The NETL capture program seeks to create ...

  9. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-09-01

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  10. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-07-12

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  11. THE NATIONAL CARBON CAPTURE CENTER AT THE POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2012-09-01

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of advanced coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to study CO2 capture from coal-derived syngas and flue gas. The NCCC includes multiple, adaptable test skids that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity. During the Budget Period Three reporting period, efforts at the NCCC/PSDF focused on testing of pre-combustion CO2 capture and related processes; commissioning and initial testing at the post-combustion CO2 capture facilities; and operating the gasification process to develop gasification related technologies and for syngas generation to test syngas conditioning technologies.

  12. THE NATIONAL CARBON CAPTURE CENTER AT THE POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2011-05-11

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of advanced coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to study CO2 capture from coal-derived syngas and flue gas. The NCCC includes multiple, adaptable test skids that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity. During the Budget Period Two reporting period, efforts at the PSDF/NCCC focused on new technology assessment and test planning; designing and constructing post-combustion CO2 capture facilities; testing of pre-combustion CO2 capture and related processes; and operating the gasification process to develop gasification related technologies and for syngas generation to test syngas conditioning technologies.

  13. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2014-12-30

    The National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) at the Power Systems Development Facility supports the Department of Energy (DOE) goal of promoting the United States’ energy security through reliable, clean, and affordable energy produced from coal. Work at the NCCC supports the development of new power technologies and the continued operation of conventional power plants under CO2 emission constraints. The NCCC includes adaptable slipstreams that allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity and accelerate their development path to commercialization. During its first contract period, from October 1, 2008, through December 30, 2014, the NCCC designed, constructed, and began operation of the Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Center (PC4). Testing of CO2 capture technologies commenced in 2011, and through the end of the contract period, more than 25,000 hours of testing had been achieved, supporting a variety of technology developers. Technologies tested included advanced solvents, enzymes, membranes, sorbents, and associated systems. The NCCC continued operation of the existing gasification facilities, which have been in operation since 1996, to support the advancement of technologies for next-generation gasification processes and pre-combustion CO2 capture. The gasification process operated for 13 test runs, supporting over 30,000 hours combined of both gasification and pre-combustion technology developer testing. Throughout the contract period, the NCCC incorporated numerous modifications to the facilities to accommodate technology developers and increase test capabilities. Preparations for further testing were ongoing to continue advancement of the most promising technologies for future power generation processes.

  14. THE NATIONAL CARBON CAPTURE CENTER AT THE POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2011-03-01

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of advanced coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to study CO2 capture from coal-derived syngas and flue gas. The newly established NCCC will include multiple, adaptable test skids that will allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity. During the Budget Period One reporting period, efforts at the PSDF/NCCC focused on developing a screening process for testing consideration of new technologies; designing and constructing pre- and post-combustion CO2 capture facilities; developing sampling and analytical methods; expanding fuel flexibility of the Transport Gasification process; and operating the gasification process for technology research and for syngas generation to test syngas conditioning technologies.

  15. How Carbon Capture Works

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carbon capture, utilization and storage is a process that captures carbon dioxide emissions from sources like coal-fired power plants and either reuses or stores it so it will not enter the atmosphere. We'll break down the process step by step so you can learn how this technology can help us lower our carbon pollution.

  16. IMPACCT: Carbon Capture Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    IMPACCT Project: IMPACCT’s 15 projects seek to develop technologies for existing coal-fired power plants that will lower the cost of carbon capture. Short for “Innovative Materials and Processes for Advanced Carbon Capture Technologies,” the IMPACCT Project is geared toward minimizing the cost of removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plant exhaust by developing materials and processes that have never before been considered for this application. Retrofitting coal-fired power plants to capture the CO2 they produce would enable greenhouse gas reductions without forcing these plants to close, shifting away from the inexpensive and abundant U.S. coal supply.

  17. ATK - Supersonic Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castrogiovanni, Anthony; Calayag, Bon

    2014-03-05

    ATK and ACEnt Laboratories, with the help of ARPA-E funding, have taken an aerospace problem, supersonic condensation, and turned it into a viable clean energy solution for carbon capture.

  18. ATK - Supersonic Carbon Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Castrogiovanni, Anthony (ACEnT Laboratories, President and CEO); Calayag, Bon (ATK, Program Manager)

    2014-04-11

    ATK and ACEnt Laboratories, with the help of ARPA-E funding, have taken an aerospace problem, supersonic condensation, and turned it into a viable clean energy solution for carbon capture.

  19. Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Capture Innovation: Making an IMPACCT on Coal Carbon Capture Innovation: Making an IMPACCT on Coal February 16, 2012 - 4:48pm Addthis The ICES team from Alliant Techsystems and ACENT Laboratories (L to R): Fred Gregory, Andy Robertson, Tony Castrogiovanni, Florin Girlea, Vincenzo Verrelli, Bon Calayag, Vladimir Balepin, Kirk Featherstone. | Courtesy of the ICES team. The ICES team from Alliant Techsystems and ACENT Laboratories (L to R): Fred Gregory, Andy Robertson, Tony Castrogiovanni,

  20. Carbon Capture and Storage, 2008

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy is researching the safe implementation of a technology called carbon sequestration, also known as carbon capture and storage, or CCS. Based on an oilfield practice, this approach stores carbon dioxide, or CO2 generated from human activities for millennia as a means to mitigate global climate change. In 2003, the Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory formed seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships to assess geologic formations suitable for storage and to determine the best approaches to implement carbon sequestration in each region. This video describes the work of these partnerships.

  1. Carbon Capture and Storage, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-03-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy is researching the safe implementation of a technology called carbon sequestration, also known as carbon capture and storage, or CCS. Based on an oilfield practice, this approach stores carbon dioxide, or CO2 generated from human activities for millennia as a means to mitigate global climate change. In 2003, the Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory formed seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships to assess geologic formations suitable for storage and to determine the best approaches to implement carbon sequestration in each region. This video describes the work of these partnerships.

  2. Carbon Capture and Storage Database (CCS) from DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    NETL's Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Database includes active, proposed, canceled, and terminated CCS projects worldwide. Information in the database regarding technologies being developed for capture, evaluation of sites for carbon dioxide (CO2) storage, estimation of project costs, and anticipated dates of completion is sourced from publically available information. The CCS Database provides the public with information regarding efforts by various industries, public groups, and governments towards development and eventual deployment of CCS technology. The database contains more than 260 CCS projects worldwide in more than 30 countries across 6 continents. Access to the database requires use of Google Earth, as the NETL CCS database is a layer in Google Earth. Or, users can download a copy of the database in MS-Excel directly from the NETL website.

  3. Carbon Capture and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedmann, S

    2007-10-03

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is the long-term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. This includes a range of approaches including soil carbon sequestration (e.g., through no-till farming), terrestrial biomass sequestration (e.g., through planting forests), direct ocean injection of CO{sub 2} either onto the deep seafloor or into the intermediate depths, injection into deep geological formations, or even direct conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonate minerals. Some of these approaches are considered geoengineering (see the appropriate chapter herein). All are considered in the 2005 special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005). Of the range of options available, geological carbon sequestration (GCS) appears to be the most actionable and economic option for major greenhouse gas reduction in the next 10-30 years. The basis for this interest includes several factors: (1) The potential capacities are large based on initial estimates. Formal estimates for global storage potential vary substantially, but are likely to be between 800 and 3300 Gt of C (3000 and 10,000 Gt of CO{sub 2}), with significant capacity located reasonably near large point sources of the CO{sub 2}. (2) GCS can begin operations with demonstrated technology. Carbon dioxide has been separated from large point sources for nearly 100 years, and has been injected underground for over 30 years (below). (3) Testing of GCS at intermediate scale is feasible. In the US, Canada, and many industrial countries, large CO{sub 2} sources like power plants and refineries lie near prospective storage sites. These plants could be retrofit today and injection begun (while bearing in mind scientific uncertainties and unknowns). Indeed, some have, and three projects described here provide a great deal of information on the operational needs and field implementation of CCS. Part of this interest comes from several key documents written in the last three years that provide information on the status, economics, technology, and impact of CCS. These are cited throughout this text and identified as key references at the end of this manuscript. When coupled with improvements in energy efficiency, renewable energy supplies, and nuclear power, CCS help dramatically reduce current and future emissions (US CCTP 2005, MIT 2007). If CCS is not available as a carbon management option, it will be much more difficult and much more expensive to stabilize atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions. Recent estimates put the cost of carbon abatement without CCS to be 30-80% higher that if CCS were to be available (Edmonds et al. 2004).

  4. Carbon Capture R&D | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Capture R&D Carbon Capture R&D DOE's Carbon Capture Program, administered by the Office of Fossil Energy and the National Energy Technology Laboratory, is conducting research and development activities on Second Generation and Transformational carbon capture technologies that have the potential to provide step-change reductions in both cost and energy penalty as compared to currently available First Generation technologies. The Carbon Capture Program consists of two core research

  5. Cryogenic Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-15

    IMPACCT Project: SES is developing a process to capture CO2 from the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants by desublimation - the conversion of a gas to a solid. Capturing CO2 as a solid and delivering it as a liquid avoids the large energy cost of CO2 gas compression. SES’ capture technology facilitates the prudent use of available energy resources. Coal is our most abundant energy resource and is an excellent fuel for baseline power production. SES capture technology can capture 99% of the CO2 emissions in addition to a wide range of other pollutants more efficiently and at lower costs than existing capture technologies. SES’ capture technology can be readily added to our existing energy infrastructure.

  6. New demands, new supplies : a national look at the water balance of carbon dioxide capture and sequestration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krumhansl, James Lee; McNemar, Andrea , Morgantown, WV); Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2010-12-01

    Concerns over rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have resulted in serious consideration of policies aimed at reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. If large scale abatement efforts are undertaken, one critical tool will be geologic sequestration of CO2 captured from large point sources, specifically coal and natural gas fired power plants. Current CO2 capture technologies exact a substantial energy penalty on the source power plant, which must be offset with make-up power. Water demands increase at the source plant due to added cooling loads. In addition, new water demand is created by water requirements associated with generation of the make-up power. At the sequestration site however, saline water may be extracted to manage CO2 plum migration and pressure build up in the geologic formation. Thus, while CO2 capture creates new water demands, CO2 sequestration has the potential to create new supplies. Some or all of the added demand may be offset by treatment and use of the saline waters extracted from geologic formations during CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories, with guidance and support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory, is creating a model to evaluate the potential for a combined approach to saline formations, as a sink for CO2 and a source for saline waters that can be treated and beneficially reused to serve power plant water demands. This presentation will focus on the magnitude of added U.S. power plant water demand under different CO2 emissions reduction scenarios, and the portion of added demand that might be offset by saline waters extracted during the CO2 sequestration process.

  7. Demonstrating carbon capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qader, A.; Hooper, B.; Stevens, G.

    2009-11-15

    Australia is at the forefront of advancing CCS technology. The CO2CRC's H3 (Post-combustion) and Mulgrave (pre-combustion) capture projects are outlined. The capture technologies for these 2 demonstration projects are described. 1 map., 2 photos.

  8. Carbon Capture FAQs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... such as depleted oil and gas fields, saline formations, and unmineable coal seams. ... As for commercial-scale CO2 capture in a coal-based power plant application, there is one ...

  9. Toward transformational carbon capture systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David C.; Litynski, John T.; Brickett, Lynn A.; Morreale, Bryan D.

    2015-10-28

    This paper will briefly review the history and current state of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) research and development and describe the technical barriers to carbon capture. it will argue forcefully for a new approach to R&D, which leverages both simulation and physical systems at the laboratory and pilot scales to more rapidly move the best technoogies forward, prune less advantageous approaches, and simultaneously develop materials and processes.

  10. FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engineer Earns Presidential Award for R&D That Could Help Meet DOE Carbon Capture Goals A Carnegie Mellon University professor who worked with the National Energy Technology...

  11. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory--Capture and Sequestration Support Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - Capture and Sequestration Support Services Background The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is helping to develop technologies to capture, separate, and store carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to reduce green-house gas (GHG) emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS)-the capture of CO 2 from large point sources and subsequent injection into deep

  12. Natural materials for carbon capture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myshakin, Evgeniy M.; Romanov, Vyacheslav N.; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2010-11-01

    Naturally occurring clay minerals provide a distinctive material for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. Swelling clay minerals, such as the smectite variety, possess an aluminosilicate structure that is controlled by low-charge layers that readily expand to accommodate water molecules and, potentially, carbon dioxide. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the efficacy of intercalating carbon dioxide in the interlayer of layered clays but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the process and the extent of carbon capture as a function of clay charge and structure. A series of molecular dynamics simulations and vibrational analyses have been completed to assess the molecular interactions associated with incorporation of CO2 in the interlayer of montmorillonite clay and to help validate the models with experimental observation.

  13. Carbon Capture | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Capture Carbon Capture This GIF shows how CO2 emissions vary across the United States. Each bar represents a 50x50 kilometer grid. Bar height is proportional to total CO2 emissions and bar color represents the type of CO2 emissions. Red bars represent proportionately more CO2 emissions from electricity generation (coal, gas and oil). Green bars represent CO2 emissions by other sources (such as ethanol production, iron-steel production and cement manufacture). Yellow/orange bars signify a

  14. Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30 September

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2012) (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect 2) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30 September 2012) The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and academic institutions that is developing and deploying state-of-the-art computational modeling and simulation tools to accelerate the commercialization of carbon capture technologies from discovery to development,

  15. Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30 September

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2013) (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect 3) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30 September 2013) The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and academic institutions that is developing and deploying state-of-the-art computational modeling and simulation tools to accelerate the commercialization of carbon capture technologies from discovery to development,

  16. Carbon Capture Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Carbon Capture Corporation Address: 7825 Fay Avenue Place: La Jolla, California Zip: 92037 Region: Southern CA Area Sector: Carbon...

  17. Carbon Capture, Utilization & Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Capture, Utilization & Storage Carbon Capture, Utilization & Storage Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory demonstrated coal gasification in large-scale field experiments at the Rocky Mountain Test Facility (above) near Hanna, Wyoming. Coal gasification and sequestration of the carbon dioxide produced are among the technologies being used in a Texas Clean Energy Project. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory demonstrated coal gasification in large-scale field experiments at the

  18. DOE Selects 16 Transformational Carbon Capture Technologies Projects for Funding

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has selected 16 projects to receive funding through NETL’s Carbon Capture Program. The program funds development and testing of transformational carbon dioxide (CO2) capture systems for new and existing coal-based power plants.

  19. Quarterly Report for LANL Activities: FY12-Q2 National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP): Industrial Carbon Capture Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawar, Rajesh J.

    2012-04-17

    This report summarizes progress of LANL activities related to the tasks performed under the LANL FWP FE102-002-FY10, National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP): Industrial Carbon Capture Program. This FWP is funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Overall, the NRAP activities are focused on understanding and evaluating risks associated with large-scale injection and long-term storage of CO{sub 2} in deep geological formations. One of the primary risks during large-scale injection is due to changes in geomechanical stresses to the storage reservoir, to the caprock/seals and to the wellbores. These changes may have the potential to cause CO{sub 2} and brine leakage and geochemical impacts to the groundwater systems. While the importance of these stresses is well recognized, there have been relatively few quantitative studies (laboratory, field or theoretical) of geomechanical processes in sequestration systems. In addition, there are no integrated studies that allow evaluation of risks to groundwater quality in the context of CO{sub 2} injection-induced stresses. The work performed under this project is focused on better understanding these effects. LANL approach will develop laboratory and computational tools to understand the impact of CO{sub 2}-induced mechanical stress by creating a geomechanical test bed using inputs from laboratory experiments, field data, and conceptual approaches. The Geomechanical Test Bed will be used for conducting sensitivity and scenario analyses of the impacts of CO{sub 2} injection. The specific types of questions will relate to fault stimulation and fracture inducing stress on caprock, changes in wellbore leakage due to evolution of stress in the reservoir and caprock, and the potential for induced seismicity. In addition, the Geomechanical Test Bed will be used to investigate the coupling of stress-induced leakage pathways with impacts on groundwater quality. LANL activities are performed under two tasks: (1) develop laboratory and computational tools to understand CO{sub 2}-induced mechanical impacts and (2) use natural analog sites to determine potential groundwater impacts. We are using the Springerville-St. John Dome as a field site for collecting field data on CO{sub 2} migration through faults and groundwater impacts as well as developing and validating computational models. During the FY12 second quarter we have been working with New England Research Company to construct a tri-axial core-holder. We have built fluid control system for the coreflood system that can be ported to perform in-situ imaging of core. We have performed numerical simulations for groundwater impacts of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage using the reservoir model for Springerville-St John's Dome site. We have analyzed groundwater samples collected from Springerville site for major ion chemistry and isotopic composition. We are currently analyzing subsurface core and chip samples acquired for mineralogical composition.

  20. Realistic costs of carbon capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al Juaied, Mohammed . Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam )

    2009-07-01

    There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding transport and storage costs appears to be US$100-150/tCO2 for first-of-a-kind plants and perhaps US$30-50/tCO2 for nth-of-a-kind plants.The estimates for FOAK and NOAK costs appear to be broadly consistent in the light of estimates of the potential for cost reductions with increased experience. Cost reductions are expected from increasing scale, learning on individual components, and technological innovation including improved plant integration. Innovation and integration can both lower costs and increase net output with a given cost base. These factors are expected to reduce abatement costs by approximately 65% by 2030. The range of estimated costs for NOAK plants is within the range of plausible future carbon prices, implying that mature technology would be competitive with conventional fossil fuel plants at prevailing carbon prices.

  1. Annual Report: Carbon Capture (30 September 2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luebke, David; Morreale, Bryan; Richards, George; Syamlal, Madhava

    2014-04-16

    Capture of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a critical component in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel-based processes. The Carbon Capture research to be performed is aimed at accelerating the development of efficient, cost-effective technologies which meet the post-combustion programmatic goal of capture of 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced from an existing coal-fired power plant with less than a 35% increase in the cost of electricity (COE), and the pre-combustion goal of 90% CO{sub 2} capture with less than a 10% increase in COE. The specific objective of this work is to develop innovative materials and approaches for the economic and efficient capture of CO{sub 2} from coal-based processes, and ultimately assess the performance of promising technologies at conditions representative of field application (i.e., slip stream evaluation). The Carbon Capture research includes seven core technical research areas: post-combustion solvents, sorbents, and membranes; pre-combustion solvents, sorbents, and membranes; and oxygen (O{sub 2}) production. The goal of each of these tasks is to develop advanced materials and processes that are able to reduce the energy penalty and cost of CO{sub 2} (or O{sub 2}) separation over conventional technologies. In the first year of development, materials will be examined by molecular modeling, and then synthesized and experimentally characterized at lab scale. In the second year, they will be tested further under ideal conditions. In the third year, they will be tested under realistic conditions. The most promising materials will be tested at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) using actual flue or fuel gas. Systems analyses will be used to determine whether or not materials developed are likely to meet the Department of Energy (DOE) COE targets. Materials which perform well and appear likely to improve in performance will be licensed for further development outside of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Office of Research and Development (ORD).

  2. A Novel System for Carbon Dioxide Capture Utilizing Electrochemical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Membrane Technology (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: A Novel System for Carbon Dioxide Capture Utilizing Electrochemical Membrane Technology Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Novel System for Carbon Dioxide Capture Utilizing Electrochemical Membrane Technology FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and URS Corporation, is developing a novel Combined Electric Power and Carbon-Dioxide Separation (CEPACS)

  3. Carbon Capture and Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storage Carbon Capture and Storage Through Office of Fossil Energy R&D the United States has become a world leader in carbon capture and storage science and technology. PDF icon Fossil Energy Research Benefits - Carbon Capture and Storage More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - PSRP Updates 6-25-10_v2 A Legacy of Benefit Fossil Energy FY 2013 Budget-in-Brief

  4. INFOGRAPHIC: Carbon Capture 101 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Capture 101 INFOGRAPHIC: Carbon Capture 101 January 7, 2016 - 11:34am Addthis Carbon capture is an important part of the Energy Department's Fossil Energy research and development efforts, but it can be hard to understand. This infographic breaks it down for you. | Infographic by <a href="/node/1332956">Carly Wilkins</a>, Energy Department. Carbon capture is an important part of the Energy Department's Fossil Energy research and development efforts, but it can be

  5. How Carbon Capture Works | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    How Carbon Capture Works Nearly 70 percent of America's electricity is generated from fossil fuels like coal, oil and natural gas. And fossil fuels also account for almost...

  6. DOE Pens New Agreement with Southern Company to Test Advanced Carbon-Capture & Gasification Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy has signed a new 5-year cooperative agreement with Southern Company to evaluate advanced carbon-capture and gasification technologies at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, Ala.

  7. Novel Carbon Capture Solvent Begins Pilot-Scale Testing for Emissions Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pilot-scale testing of an advanced technology for economically capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gas has begun at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, Ala.

  8. 2011 Department of Energy Investments in Carbon Capture Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Investments in Carbon Capture Technologies 2011 Department of Energy Investments in Carbon Capture Technologies 2011 Department of Energy Investments in Carbon...

  9. EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC Why it Matters: Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas is considered to be...

  10. FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Capture and Storage News FE Carbon Capture and Storage News RSS May 11, 2016 NETL Launches a University Coalition for Fossil Energy Research at Pennsylvania State University The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has selected Pennsylvania State University as the lead institution to establish the University Coalition for Fossil Energy Research. The Coalition will bring together a multi-disciplinary team of researchers from participating universities

  11. Breakthrough Industrial Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Project Begins Full-Scale Operations May 10, 2013 - 11:36am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy ...

  12. Discussion on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Statement of Dr. James Markowsky, Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation, S. 1856, S. 1134, and other Draft Legislative Text.

  13. How Carbon Capture Works | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    -- is a process that captures carbon dioxide emissions from sources like coal-fired power plants and either reuses or stores it so it will not enter the atmosphere. We'll...

  14. NUCLEAR HYDROGEN AND CAPTURED CARBON DIOXIDE FOR ALTERNATIVE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: NUCLEAR HYDROGEN AND CAPTURED CARBON DIOXIDE FOR ALTERNATIVE LIQUID FUELS. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NUCLEAR HYDROGEN AND CAPTURED CARBON DIOXIDE ...

  15. Nuclear Hydrogen and Captured Carbon Dioxide for Alternative...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Nuclear Hydrogen and Captured Carbon Dioxide for Alternative Liquid Fuels. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Hydrogen and Captured Carbon Dioxide for ...

  16. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE You are accessing a document ...

  17. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate You are accessing a document ...

  18. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate You are ...

  19. Thermodynamic assessment of microencapsulated sodium carbonate slurry for carbon capture

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stolaroff, Joshuah K.; Bourcier, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Micro-encapsulated Carbon Sorbents (MECS) are a new class of carbon capture materials consisting of a CO₂- absorbing liquid solvent contained within solid, CO₂-permeable, polymer shells. MECS enhance the rate of CO₂ absorption for solvents with slow kinetics and prevent solid precipitates from scaling and fouling equipment, two factors that have previously limited the use of sodium carbonate solution for carbon capture. Here, we examine the thermodynamics of sodium carbonate slurries for carbon capture. We model the vapour-liquid-solid equilibria of sodium carbonate and find several features that can contribute to an energy-efficient capture process: very high CO₂ pressures in stripping conditions,more » relatively low water vapour pressures in stripping conditions, and good swing capacity. The potential energy savings compared with an MEA system are discussed.« less

  20. Thermodynamic assessment of microencapsulated sodium carbonate slurry for carbon capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stolaroff, Joshuah K.; Bourcier, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Micro-encapsulated Carbon Sorbents (MECS) are a new class of carbon capture materials consisting of a CO?- absorbing liquid solvent contained within solid, CO?-permeable, polymer shells. MECS enhance the rate of CO? absorption for solvents with slow kinetics and prevent solid precipitates from scaling and fouling equipment, two factors that have previously limited the use of sodium carbonate solution for carbon capture. Here, we examine the thermodynamics of sodium carbonate slurries for carbon capture. We model the vapour-liquid-solid equilibria of sodium carbonate and find several features that can contribute to an energy-efficient capture process: very high CO? pressures in stripping conditions, relatively low water vapour pressures in stripping conditions, and good swing capacity. The potential energy savings compared with an MEA system are discussed.

  1. Carbon Capture (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Smit, Berend

    2011-06-08

    Berend Smit speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  2. Novel Carbon Capture Solvent Begins Pilot-Scale Testing for Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for economically capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gas has begun at the National ... nominal 1-megawatt-electric (MWe) pilot plant expected to capture 30 tons of CO2 per day. ...

  3. Subsurface capture of carbon dioxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blount, Gerald; Siddal, Alvin A.; Falta, Ronald W.

    2014-07-22

    A process and apparatus of separating CO.sub.2 gas from industrial off-gas source in which the CO.sub.2 containing off-gas is introduced deep within an injection well. The CO.sub.2 gases are dissolved in the, liquid within the injection well while non-CO.sub.2 gases, typically being insoluble in water or brine, are returned to the surface. Once the CO.sub.2 saturated liquid is present within the injection well, the injection well may be used for long-term geologic storage of CO.sub.2 or the CO.sub.2 saturated liquid can be returned to the surface for capturing a purified CO.sub.2 gas.

  4. Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Carbon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Capture and Storage Facility | Department of Energy Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Facility Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Facility August 24, 2011 - 6:23pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy issued the following statement in support of today's groundbreaking for construction of the nation's first large-scale industrial carbon capture and storage (ICCS) facility in Decatur,

  5. The National Carbon Capture Center

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... 11. MTR 500 lbhr Membrane System Skids in Fabrication. ... 29 Figure 26. Color Change of Solvent During 2012 MEA ... Project Mission and Approach Offering a world-class neutral ...

  6. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is hosting a Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (BECCS) Workshop on Monday, May 18, 2015 in Washington, DC.

  7. Synthesis of optimal adsorptive carbon capture processes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    chang, Y.; Cozad, A.; Kim, H.; Lee, A.; Vouzis, P.; Konda, M.; Simon, A.; Sahinidis, N.; Miller, D.

    2011-01-01

    Solid sorbent carbon capture systems have the potential to require significantly lower regeneration energy compared to aqueous monoethanol amine (MEA) systems. To date, the majority of work on solid sorbents has focused on developing the sorbent materials themselves. In order to advance these technologies, it is necessary to design systems that can exploit the full potential and unique characteristics of these materials. The Department of Energy (DOE) recently initiated the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) to develop computational tools to accelerate the commercialization of carbon capture technology. Solid sorbents is the first Industry Challenge Problem considered under this initiative. An early goal of the initiative is to demonstrate a superstructure-based framework to synthesize an optimal solid sorbent carbon capture process. For a given solid sorbent, there are a number of potential reactors and reactor configurations consisting of various fluidized bed reactors, moving bed reactors, and fixed bed reactors. Detailed process models for these reactors have been modeled using Aspen Custom Modeler; however, such models are computationally intractable for large optimization-based process synthesis. Thus, in order to facilitate the use of these models for process synthesis, we have developed an approach for generating simple algebraic surrogate models that can be used in an optimization formulation. This presentation will describe the superstructure formulation which uses these surrogate models to choose among various process alternatives and will describe the resulting optimal process configuration.

  8. Carbon Capture and Storage Initiative Aims to Bring Technologies to Market Faster

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory has begun research under the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative, partnering with other national laboratories, universities, and industry to develop state-of-the-art computational modeling and simulation tools to accelerate commercialization of carbon capture and storage technologies.

  9. Membrane-based systems for carbon capture and hydrogen purification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berchtold, Kathryn A

    2010-11-24

    This presentation describes the activities being conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory to develop carbon capture technologies for power systems. This work is aimed at continued development and demonstration of a membrane based pre- and post-combustion carbon capture technology and separation schemes. Our primary work entails the development and demonstration of an innovative membrane technology for pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide that operates over a broad range of conditions relevant to the power industry while meeting the US DOE's Carbon Sequestration Program goals of 90% CO{sub 2} capture at less than a 10% increase in the cost of energy services. Separating and capturing carbon dioxide from mixed gas streams is a first and critical step in carbon sequestration. To be technically and economically viable, a successful separation method must be applicable to industrially relevant gas streams at realistic temperatures and pressures as well as be compatible with large gas volumes. Our project team is developing polymer membranes based on polybenzimidazole (PBI) chemistries that can purify hydrogen and capture CO{sub 2} at industrially relevant temperatures. Our primary objectives are to develop and demonstrate polymer-based membrane chemistries, structures, deployment platforms, and sealing technologies that achieve the critical combination of high selectivity, high permeability, chemical stability, and mechanical stability all at elevated temperatures (> 150 C) and packaged in a scalable, economically viable, high area density system amenable to incorporation into an advanced Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) plant for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. Stability requirements are focused on tolerance to the primary synthesis gas components and impurities at various locations in the IGCC process. Since the process stream compositions and conditions (temperature and pressure) vary throughout the IGCC process, the project is focused on the optimization of a technology that could be positioned upstream or downstream of one or more of the water-gas-shift reactors (WGSRs) or integrated with a WGSR.

  10. Wyoming Carbon Capture and Storage Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nealon, Teresa

    2014-06-30

    This report outlines the accomplishments of the Wyoming Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Technology Institute (WCTI), including creating a website and online course catalog, sponsoring technology transfer workshops, reaching out to interested parties via news briefs and engaging in marketing activities, i.e., advertising and participating in tradeshows. We conclude that the success of WCTI was hampered by the lack of a market. Because there were no supporting financial incentives to store carbon, the private sector had no reason to incur the extra expense of training their staff to implement carbon storage. ii

  11. FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to maintain integrity of turbine components. May 10, 2013 Breakthrough Industrial Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Project Begins Full-Scale Operations Captured...

  12. Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory...

  13. Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2013-01-29

    Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

  14. Energy Department Investments in Innovative Carbon Capture Projects |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Energy Department Investments in Innovative Carbon Capture Projects Energy Department Investments in Innovative Carbon Capture Projects Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Technologies COMPANY CITY & STATE PROJECT TITLE DOE INVESTMENT PROJECT DESCRIPTION SRI International Menlo Park, CA CO2 Capture Using Advanced Carbon Sorbents at a Slipstream Scale Approx. $10.5 million The project team will test a CO2 sorbent capture process and conduct pilot-scale testing of the sorbent

  15. New Funding Boosts Carbon Capture, Solar Energy and High Gas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boosts Carbon Capture, Solar Energy and High Gas Mileage Cars and Trucks New Funding Boosts Carbon Capture, Solar Energy and High Gas Mileage Cars and Trucks June 11, 2009 - ...

  16. New Membrane Technology for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Begins...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Membrane Technology for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Begins Pilot-Scale Test New Membrane Technology for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Begins Pilot-Scale Test January 26, 2015 - ...

  17. A2BE Carbon Capture LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Logo: A2BE Carbon Capture LLC Name: A2BE Carbon Capture LLC Address: 2301 Panorama Ave Place: Boulder, Colorado Zip: 80304 Region: Rockies Area Sector: Biofuels Product:...

  18. Carbon Capture and Storage Research | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sequestration Overview Carbon Capture R&D Carbon Storage R&D Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Simulation and Risk Assessment CO2 Utilization Stay Connected Fossil Energy on ...

  19. Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction August 24, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Construction activities have begun at an Illinois ethanol plant that will demonstrate carbon capture and storage. The project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy, is the first large-scale integrated carbon capture and storage (CCS) demonstration

  20. Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utilization | Department of Energy Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture and Utilization Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture and Utilization January 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A breakthrough carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) project in Texas has begun capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) and piping it to an oilfield for use in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Read the project factsheet The project at Air Products

  1. Secretary Moniz Tours Kemper Carbon Capture and Storage Facility |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Secretary Moniz Tours Kemper Carbon Capture and Storage Facility Secretary Moniz Tours Kemper Carbon Capture and Storage Facility Addthis 1 of 5 A group including U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest J. Moniz and Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant tours the Kemper carbon capture and storage facility in Liberty, Mississippi, on Friday, Nov. 8. Kemper is the largest carbon capture and storage facility in the United States. | Photo Copyright 2013 Southern Company. 2 of 5 Southern

  2. In Silico Screening of Carbon Capture Materials | Center for Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome In Silico Screening of Carbon Capture Materials

  3. Layered solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Bingyun; Jiang, Bingbing; Gray, McMahan L; Fauth, Daniel J; Pennline, Henry W; Richards, George A

    2014-11-18

    A solid sorbent for the capture and the transport of carbon dioxide gas is provided having at least one first layer of a positively charged material that is polyethylenimine or poly(allylamine hydrochloride), that captures at least a portion of the gas, and at least one second layer of a negatively charged material that is polystyrenesulfonate or poly(acryclic acid), that transports the gas, wherein the second layer of material is in juxtaposition to, attached to, or crosslinked with the first layer for forming at least one bilayer, and a solid substrate support having a porous surface, wherein one or more of the bilayers is/are deposited on the surface of and/or within the solid substrate. A method of preparing and using the solid sorbent is provided.

  4. Capture of carbon dioxide by hybrid sorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srinivasachar, Srivats

    2014-09-23

    A composition, process and system for capturing carbon dioxide from a combustion gas stream. The composition has a particulate porous support medium that has a high volume of pores, an alkaline component distributed within the pores and on the surface of the support medium, and water adsorbed on the alkaline component, wherein the proportion of water in the composition is between about 5% and about 35% by weight of the composition. The process and system contemplates contacting the sorbent and the flowing gas stream together at a temperature and for a time such that some water remains adsorbed in the alkaline component when the contact of the sorbent with the flowing gas ceases.

  5. Carbon Capture and Storage Poster | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storage Poster Carbon Capture and Storage Poster Educational poster graphically displaying the key components of carbon capture and storage technology. Teachers: If you would like hard copies of this poster sent to you, please contact the FE Office of Communications. PDF icon Carbon Capture and Storage - In Depth (poster) More Documents & Publications Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Training Awards EA-1626: Final Environmental

  6. Risk-Based Comparison of Carbon Capture Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Dale, Crystal; Jones, Edward

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we describe an integrated probabilistic risk assessment methodological framework and a decision-support tool suite for implementing systematic comparisons of competing carbon capture technologies. Culminating from a collaborative effort among national laboratories under the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI), the risk assessment framework and the decision-support tool suite encapsulate three interconnected probabilistic modeling and simulation components. The technology readiness level (TRL) assessment component identifies specific scientific and engineering targets required by each readiness level and applies probabilistic estimation techniques to calculate the likelihood of graded as well as nonlinear advancement in technology maturity. The technical risk assessment component focuses on identifying and quantifying risk contributors, especially stochastic distributions for significant risk contributors, performing scenario-based risk analysis, and integrating with carbon capture process model simulations and optimization. The financial risk component estimates the long-term return on investment based on energy retail pricing, production cost, operating and power replacement cost, plan construction and retrofit expenses, and potential tax relief, expressed probabilistically as the net present value distributions over various forecast horizons.

  7. DOE Science Showcase - Carbon Capture research in DOE Databases | OSTI,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information DOE Science Showcase - Carbon Capture research in DOE Databases Information Bridge : Natural materials for carbon capture. ... Realistic costs of carbon capture ... Technology and international climate policy Energy Citations Database : What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions ... Effects of warming on the structure and function of a boreal black spruce forest ...

  8. Worldwide Carbon Capture and Storage Projects on the Increase | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Worldwide Carbon Capture and Storage Projects on the Increase Worldwide Carbon Capture and Storage Projects on the Increase November 13, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Worldwide efforts to fund and establish carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects have accelerated, according to a new Department of Energy (DOE) online database, indicating ongoing positive momentum toward achieving the G-8 goal for launching 20 CCS demonstrations by 2010. The database, a project of the

  9. New Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research and Development | Department of Energy Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Research and Development New Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Research and Development September 7, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the selection of 22 projects that will accelerate carbon capture and storage research and development for industrial sources. Funded with more than $575

  10. Secretary Chu Announces $3 Billion Investment for Carbon Capture and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sequestration | Department of Energy 3 Billion Investment for Carbon Capture and Sequestration Secretary Chu Announces $3 Billion Investment for Carbon Capture and Sequestration December 4, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the selection of three new projects with a value of $3.18 billion to accelerate the development of advanced coal technologies with carbon capture and storage at commercial-scale. Secretary Chu made today's

  11. Department of Energy Announces $67 Million Investment for Carbon Capture

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development | Department of Energy 7 Million Investment for Carbon Capture Development Department of Energy Announces $67 Million Investment for Carbon Capture Development July 7, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The US Department of Energy announced today the selection of ten projects aimed at developing advanced technologies for capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal combustion. The projects, valued at up to $67 million over three years, focus on reducing the energy and

  12. Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Research | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Research Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Research Pre-combustion capture refers to removing CO2 from fossil fuels before combustion is completed. For example, in gasification processes a feedstock (such as coal) is partially oxidized in steam and oxygen/air under high temperature and pressure to form synthesis gas. This synthesis gas, or syngas, is a mixture of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, CO2, and smaller amounts of other gaseous components, such as methane. The syngas

  13. Secretary Chu Announces $3 Billion Investment for Carbon Capture and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sequestration | Department of Energy Billion Investment for Carbon Capture and Sequestration Secretary Chu Announces $3 Billion Investment for Carbon Capture and Sequestration December 4, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - US Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the selection of three new projects with a value of $3.18 billion to accelerate the development of advanced coal technologies with carbon capture and storage at commercial-scale. Secretary Chu made today's announcement

  14. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration Workshop | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration Workshop Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) co-hosted the Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Sequestration (BECCS) Workshop on Monday, May 18, 2015, in Washington, D.C. BECCS brought together experts in bioenergy, power generation, and transmission and distribution infrastructure from industry, academia,

  15. Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30 September 2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David C.; Syamlal, Madhava; Cottrell, Roger; Kress, Joel D.; Sun, Xin; Sundaresan, S.; Sahinidis, Nikolaos V.; Zitney, Stephen E.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Agarwal, Deb; Tong, Charles; Lin, Guang; Dale, Crystal; Engel, Dave; Calafiura, Paolo; Beattie, Keith; Shinn, John

    2012-09-30

    The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and academic institutions that is developing and deploying state-of-the-art computational modeling and simulation tools to accelerate the commercialization of carbon capture technologies from discovery to development, demonstration, and ultimately the widespread deployment to hundreds of power plants. The CCSI Toolset will provide end users in industry with a comprehensive, integrated suite of scientifically validated models, with uncertainty quantification (UQ), optimization, risk analysis and decision making capabilities. The CCSI Toolset incorporates commercial and open-source software currently in use by industry and is also developing new software tools as necessary to fill technology gaps identified during execution of the project. Ultimately, the CCSI Toolset will (1) enable promising concepts to be more quickly identified through rapid computational screening of devices and processes; (2) reduce the time to design and troubleshoot new devices and processes; (3) quantify the technical risk in taking technology from laboratory-scale to commercial-scale; and (4) stabilize deployment costs more quickly by replacing some of the physical operational tests with virtual power plant simulations. CCSI is organized into 8 technical elements that fall under two focus areas. The first focus area (Physicochemical Models and Data) addresses the steps necessary to model and simulate the various technologies and processes needed to bring a new Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology into production. The second focus area (Analysis & Software) is developing the software infrastructure to integrate the various components and implement the tools that are needed to make quantifiable decisions regarding the viability of new CCS technologies. CCSI also has an Industry Advisory Board (IAB). By working closely with industry from the inception of the project to identify industrial challenge problems, CCSI ensures that the simulation tools are developed for the carbon capture technologies of most relevance to industry. CCSI is led by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and leverages the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories' core strengths in modeling and simulation, bringing together the best capabilities at NETL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The CCSI's industrial partners provide representation from the power generation industry, equipment manufacturers, technology providers and engineering and construction firms. The CCSI's academic participants (Carnegie Mellon University, Princeton University, West Virginia University, and Boston University) bring unparalleled expertise in multiphase flow reactors, combustion, process synthesis and optimization, planning and scheduling, and process control techniques for energy processes. During Fiscal Year (FY) 12, CCSI released its first set of computational tools and models. This pre-release, a year ahead of the originally planned first release, is the result of intense industry interest in getting early access to the tools and the phenomenal progress of the CCSI technical team. These initial components of the CCSI Toolset provide new models and computational capabilities that will accelerate the commercial development of carbon capture technologies as well as related technologies, such as those found in the power, refining, chemicals, and gas production industries. The release consists of new tools for process synthesis and optimization to help identify promising concepts more quickly, new physics-based models of potential capture equipment and processes that will reduce the time to design and troubleshoot new systems, a framework to quantify the uncertainty of model predictions, and various enabling tools that provide new capabilities such as creating reduced order models (ROMs) from reacting multiphase flow simul

  16. Ionic Liquid Sorbents for Carbon Capture - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that promise to improve efficiency and economics of the carbon capture process in ... Benefits * These materials and methods promise to improve efficiency and economics of the ...

  17. Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Federal Agencies establishing an Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage. ... The Task Force, co-chaired by the Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection ...

  18. Secretary Chu Announces Carbon Capture and Storage Simulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on advancing the science and research related to carbon capture and storage (CCS). ... of a defensible, science-based methodology for quantifying and minimizing ...

  19. Strategic Analysis of the Global Status of Carbon Capture and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Strategic Analysis of the Global Status of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS): Country Studies, United Arab Emirates Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy...

  20. Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing Countries: Analysis of Key Policy Issues and Barriers...

  1. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) and Community Engagement | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Engagement Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) and Community Engagement Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: Best...

  2. A Global Technology Roadmap on Carbon Capture and Storage in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    industry sectors, and complements ongoing technology road-mapping exercises for other key energy technologies." References "A Global Technology Roadmap on Carbon Capture and...

  3. FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    large-scale industrial carbon capture and storage demonstration project. The Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) marked the progress made on construction on the project's...

  4. Carbon Capture Turned Upside Down: High-Temperature Adsorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Capture Turned Upside Down: High-Temperature Adsorption & Low-Temperature Desorption (HALD) Previous Next List Joos, Lennart; Lejaeghere, Kurt; Huck, Johanna M.; Van...

  5. FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    September 7, 2010 New Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Research and Development U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the selection of...

  6. Evaluating different classes of porous materials for carbon capture |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Evaluating different classes of porous materials for carbon capture

  7. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Studies | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fossil Energy Studies for the next 6 months,December 2008-June 2009, Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Studies Expected From DOENETL from December 2008-June 2009....

  8. Carbon Dioxide Capture at a Reduced Cost - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that reduces the expense of capturing carbon dioxide generated by the combustion of fossil fuels. This technology would allow power plants and the chemical and cement...

  9. Better Enzymes for Carbon Capture: Low-Cost Biological Catalyst to Enable Efficient Carbon Dioxide Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    IMPACCT Project: Codexis is developing new and efficient forms of enzymes known as carbonic anhydrases to absorb CO2 more rapidly and under challenging conditions found in the gas exhaust of coal-fired power plants. Carbonic anhydrases are common and are among the fastest enzymes, but they are not robust enough to withstand the harsh environment found in the power plant exhaust steams. In this project, Codexis will be using proprietary technology to improve the enzymes’ ability to withstand high temperatures and large swings in chemical composition. The project aims to develop a carbon-capture process that uses less energy and less equipment than existing approaches. This would reduce the cost of retrofitting today’s coal-fired power plants.

  10. Secretary Chu Announces $2.4 Billion in Funding for Carbon Capture and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Storage Projects | Department of Energy $2.4 Billion in Funding for Carbon Capture and Storage Projects Secretary Chu Announces $2.4 Billion in Funding for Carbon Capture and Storage Projects May 15, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced at the National Coal Council that $2.4 billion from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act will be used to expand and accelerate the commercial deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS)

  11. World's Largest Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Project Begins

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Construction | Department of Energy World's Largest Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Project Begins Construction World's Largest Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Project Begins Construction July 15, 2014 - 9:55am Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 Department of Energy Supported Project Will Capture 1.4 Million Tons of CO2 Annually Washington, D.C. - Today, the Department of Energy - in partnership with NRG Energy Inc. and JX Nippon - announced that construction has begun on the first

  12. Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project U. S. Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project U. S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2014 1 INTRODUCTION The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) issued a final environmental impact statement (EIS; DOE/EIS-0464) for the Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project (Lake Charles CCS Project) in November 2013. DOE announced its decision to provide up to $261.4 million in cost-shared funding to Leucadia Energy, LLC (Leucadia) for the

  13. Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project U. S. Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project U. S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2014 1 INTRODUCTION The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) issued a final environmental impact statement (EIS; DOE/EIS-0464) for the Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project (Lake Charles CCS Project) in November 2013. DOE announced its decision to provide up to $261.4 million in cost-shared funding to Leucadia Energy, LLC (Leucadia) for the

  14. Ohio State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture, Utilization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Storage | Department of Energy State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Ohio State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage December 20, 2012 - 9:44am Addthis Researchers at The Ohio State University have developed a groundbreaking new hybrid membrane that could efficiently separate carbon dioxide (CO2) from the gas that comes from burning coal at power plants. | Photo courtesy of Office of Fossil Energy.

  15. New Computer Model Pinpoints Prime Materials for Carbon Capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Computer Model Pinpoints Prime Materials for Carbon Capture New Computer Model Pinpoints Prime Materials for Carbon Capture July 17, 2012 NERSC Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 UC Berkeley Contact: Robert Sanders, rsanders@berkeley.edu zeolite350.jpg One of the 50 best zeolite structures for capturing carbon dioxide. Zeolite is a porous solid made of silicon dioxide, or quartz. In the model, the red balls are oxygen, the tan balls are silicon. The blue-green area is where

  16. FE Carbon Capture and Storage News

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DC 20585202-586-6660 en NETL's 2015 Carbon Storage Atlas Shows Increase in U.S. CO2 Storage Potential http:energy.govfearticlesnetl-s-2015-carbon-storage-atlas-shows-...

  17. Carbon dioxide capture process with regenerable sorbents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pennline, Henry W.; Hoffman, James S.

    2002-05-14

    A process to remove carbon dioxide from a gas stream using a cross-flow, or a moving-bed reactor. In the reactor the gas contacts an active material that is an alkali-metal compound, such as an alkali-metal carbonate, alkali-metal oxide, or alkali-metal hydroxide; or in the alternative, an alkaline-earth metal compound, such as an alkaline-earth metal carbonate, alkaline-earth metal oxide, or alkaline-earth metal hydroxide. The active material can be used by itself or supported on a substrate of carbon, alumina, silica, titania or aluminosilicate. When the active material is an alkali-metal compound, the carbon-dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate bicarbonate. When the active material is an alkaline-earth metal, the carbon dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate carbonate. Spent sorbent containing the bicarbonate or carbonate is moved to a second reactor where it is heated or treated with a reducing agent such as, natural gas, methane, carbon monoxide hydrogen, or a synthesis gas comprising of a combination of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The heat or reducing agent releases carbon dioxide gas and regenerates the active material for use as the sorbent material in the first reactor. New sorbent may be added to the regenerated sorbent prior to subsequent passes in the carbon dioxide removal reactor.

  18. Readout of Secretary Chu Meetings on Carbon Capture and Sequestration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    carbon capture and sequestration project underway at the company's power plant in Tianjin. ... CCS could reduce CO2 emissions from a conventional power plant by as much as 95 percent. ...

  19. World's Largest Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Project Begins...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) annually from an existing coal-fired power plant in Texas. ... MW of generation at the Houston-area power plant, quadrupling the size of the capture ...

  20. Carbon dioxide capture-related gas adsorption and separation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon dioxide capture-related gas adsorption and separation in metal-organic frameworks Previous Next List Jian-Rong Li, Yuguang Ma, M. Colin McCarthy, Julian Sculley, Jiamei Yu,...

  1. In silico screening of carbon-capture materials | Center for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In silico screening of carbon-capture materials Previous Next List L.-C. Lin, A. H. Berger, R. L. Martin, J. Kim, J. A. Swisher, K. Jariwala, C. H. Rycroft, A. S. Bhown, M. W....

  2. Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Research | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Research Fossil fuel fired electric generating plants are ... In the meantime, the United States will continue to rely on existing plants to provide a ...

  3. Carbon Dioxide Capture: Prospects for New Materials | Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Dioxide Capture: Prospects for New Materials Previous Next List D. M. D'Alessandro, B. Smit, and J. R. Long, Angew. Chem.-Int. Edit. 49 (35), 6058 (2010) DOI: 10.1002...

  4. Thermodynamic Complexity of Carbon Capture in Alkylamine-Functionalize...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermodynamic Complexity of Carbon Capture in Alkylamine-Functionalized Metal-Organic Frameworks Previous Next List D. Wu, T. M. McDonald, Z. Quan, S. V. Ushakov, P. Zhang, J. R....

  5. FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    construct, and operate a system that will capture and store approximately 400,000 tons of carbon dioxide per year. June 16, 2010 Alabama Project Testing Potential for Combining CO2...

  6. Carbon Dioxide Capture in Metal-Organic Frameworks | Center for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Dioxide Capture in Metal-Organic Frameworks Previous Next List Kenji Sumida , David L. Rogow , Jarad A. Mason , Thomas M. McDonald , Eric D. Bloch , Zoey R. Herm , Tae-Hyun...

  7. DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon Capture Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy has signed a cooperative agreement with NRG Energy Inc. for the Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project to design, construct, and operate a system that will capture and store approximately 400,000 tons of carbon dioxide per year.

  8. Mountaineer Commerical Scale Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deanna Gilliland; Matthew Usher

    2011-12-31

    The Final Technical documents all work performed during the award period on the Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture & Storage project. This report presents the findings and conclusions produced as a consequence of this work. As identified in the Cooperative Agreement DE-FE0002673, AEP's objective of the Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture and Storage (MT CCS II) project is to design, build and operate a commercial scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) system capable of treating a nominal 235 MWe slip stream of flue gas from the outlet duct of the Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system at AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant (Mountaineer Plant), a 1300 MWe coal-fired generating station in New Haven, WV. The CCS system is designed to capture 90% of the CO{sub 2} from the incoming flue gas using the Alstom Chilled Ammonia Process (CAP) and compress, transport, inject and store 1.5 million tonnes per year of the captured CO{sub 2} in deep saline reservoirs. Specific Project Objectives include: (1) Achieve a minimum of 90% carbon capture efficiency during steady-state operations; (2) Demonstrate progress toward capture and storage at less than a 35% increase in cost of electricity (COE); (3) Store CO{sub 2} at a rate of 1.5 million tonnes per year in deep saline reservoirs; and (4) Demonstrate commercial technology readiness of the integrated CO{sub 2} capture and storage system.

  9. An early deployment strategy for carbon capture, utilisation, and storage

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: An early deployment strategy for carbon capture, utilisation, and storage Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An early deployment strategy for carbon capture, utilisation, and storage This report describes the current use of CO2 for EOR, and discusses potential expansion of EOR using CO2 from power plants. Analysis of potential EOR development in the USA, where most current CO2-based EOR production takes place, indicates that

  10. Making Carbon Capture and Storage Efficient and Cost Competitive |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Carbon Capture and Storage Efficient and Cost Competitive Making Carbon Capture and Storage Efficient and Cost Competitive July 26, 2012 - 6:32pm Addthis Ohio State University (OSU) Professor Liang-Shih Fan shows Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Charles McConnell OSU's coal direct chemical looping reactor. | Photo by Niranjani Deshpande Ohio State University (OSU) Professor Liang-Shih Fan shows Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Charles McConnell OSU's coal

  11. NUCLEAR HYDROGEN AND CAPTURED CARBON DIOXIDE FOR ALTERNATIVE LIQUID FUELS.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: NUCLEAR HYDROGEN AND CAPTURED CARBON DIOXIDE FOR ALTERNATIVE LIQUID FUELS. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NUCLEAR HYDROGEN AND CAPTURED CARBON DIOXIDE FOR ALTERNATIVE LIQUID FUELS. Abstract not provided. Authors: Middleton, Bobby ; Kazimi, Mujid ; Leung, MinWah Publication Date: 2008-03-01 OSTI Identifier: 1145909 Report Number(s): SAND2008-1979J 518805 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Journal Article

  12. Breakthrough Industrial Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Begins Full-Scale Operations | Department of Energy Industrial Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Project Begins Full-Scale Operations Breakthrough Industrial Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Project Begins Full-Scale Operations May 10, 2013 - 11:36am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department's Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Christopher Smith today attended a dedication ceremony at the Air Products and Chemicals hydrogen production

  13. Fossil Energy Research Efforts in Carbon Capture and Storage | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Fossil Energy Research Efforts in Carbon Capture and Storage Fossil Energy Research Efforts in Carbon Capture and Storage May 14, 2009 - 1:54pm Addthis Statement of Dr. Victor K. Der, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of Fossil Energy before the Energy and Natural Resources Committee, United States Senate. Thank you, Mr. Chairman and members of the Committee. I appreciate this opportunity to provide testimony on the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) research efforts in

  14. Nuclear Hydrogen and Captured Carbon Dioxide for Alternative Liquid Fuels.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Nuclear Hydrogen and Captured Carbon Dioxide for Alternative Liquid Fuels. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Hydrogen and Captured Carbon Dioxide for Alternative Liquid Fuels. Abstract not provided. Authors: Middleton, Bobby ; Kazimi, Mujid Publication Date: 2007-06-01 OSTI Identifier: 1147847 Report Number(s): SAND2007-3553C 522735 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: ANS

  15. Progress and new developments in carbon capture and storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plasynski, S.I.; Litynski, J.T.; McIlvried, H.G.; Srivastava, R.D.

    2009-07-01

    Growing concern over the impact on global climate change of the buildup of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere has resulted in proposals to capture carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) at large point sources and store it in geologic formations, such as oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal seams, and saline formations, referred to as carbon capture and storage (CCS). There are three options for capturing CO{sub 2} from point sources: post-combustion capture, pre-combustion capture, and oxy-combustion. Several processes are available to capture CO{sub 2}, and new or improved processes are under development. However, CO{sub 2} capture is the most expensive part of CCS, typically accounting for 75% of overall cost. CCS will benefit significantly from the development of a lower cost post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture process that can be retrofitted to existing power plants. Once captured, the CO{sub 2} is compressed to about 150 atm and pipelined at supercritical conditions to a suitable storage site. Oil and gas reservoirs, because they have assured seals and are well characterized, are promising early opportunity sites. Saline formations are much more extensive and have a huge potential storage capacity, but are much less characterized. Several commercial and a number of pilot CCS projects are underway around the world.

  16. Novel Application of Carbonate Fuel Cell for Capturing Carbon Dioxide from

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Flue Gas Streams (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Novel Application of Carbonate Fuel Cell for Capturing Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas Streams Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Novel Application of Carbonate Fuel Cell for Capturing Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas Streams To address concerns about climate change resulting from emission of CO2 by coal-fueled power plants, FuelCell Energy, Inc. has developed the Combined Electric Power and Carbon-dioxide Separation (CEPACS) system

  17. Speeding Up Zeolite Evaluation for Carbon Capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the center of this periodic structure is a cavity that might be a good candidate for adsorption of a gas such as carbon dioxide. The seven small red areas at the corners (plus the...

  18. Carbon Capture Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    power plants contains 10-12 percent CO2 by volume, while flue gas from natural gas combined cycle plants contains only 3-6 percent CO2. For effective carbon...

  19. Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In 2009, the industrial sector accounted for slightly more than one-quarter of total U.S. carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions of 5,405 million metric tons from energy consumption, according to data from...

  20. NETL Carbon Capture Technologies to Be Used in Commercial Biomass-to-Biofuel Conversion Process with Power Generation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has granted a license for two patented sorbent technologies that capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from streams of mixed gases and enable cleaner, more-efficient energy production from renewable fuels.

  1. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

    2004-07-01

    This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2004 and June 30, 2004 on the preparation and use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Support materials and supported sorbents were prepared by spray drying. Sorbents consisting of 20 to 50% sodium carbonate on a ceramic support were prepared by spray drying in batches of approximately 300 grams. The supported sorbents exhibited greater carbon dioxide capture rates than unsupported calcined sodium bicarbonate in laboratory tests. Preliminary process design and cost estimation for a retrofit application suggested that costs of a dry regenerable sodium carbonate-based process could be lower than those of a monoethanolamine absorption system. In both cases, the greatest part of the process costs come from power plant output reductions due to parasitic consumption of steam for recovery of carbon dioxide from the capture medium.

  2. New Funding from DOE Boosts Carbon Capture and Storage Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Investment of more than $62 million from Recovery Act reflects Administration's aggressive approach for carbon capture

  3. Secretary Chu Announces $2.4 billion in Funding for Carbon Capture and Storage Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Funds to Advance Research, Development and Deployment of Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies and Infrastructure

  4. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

    2007-06-30

    Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that includes a co-current downflow reactor system for adsorption of CO{sub 2} and a steam-heated, hollow-screw conveyor system for regeneration of the sorbent and release of a concentrated CO{sub 2} gas stream. An economic analysis of this process (based on the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory's [DOE/NETL's] 'Carbon Capture and Sequestration Systems Analysis Guidelines') was carried out. RTI's economic analyses indicate that installation of the Dry Carbonate Process in a 500 MW{sub e} (nominal) power plant could achieve 90% CO{sub 2} removal with an incremental capital cost of about $69 million and an increase in the cost of electricity (COE) of about 1.95 cents per kWh. This represents an increase of roughly 35.4% in the estimated COE - which compares very favorable versus MEA's COE increase of 58%. Both the incremental capital cost and the incremental COE were projected to be less than the comparable costs for an equally efficient CO{sub 2} removal system based on monoethanolamine (MEA).

  5. NETL-Developed Carbon Capture Technology Recognized with an R&D 100 Award

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A novel carbon capture technology developed by researchers at the Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory and ADA Environmental Solutions has been recognized by R&D Magazine as among the 100 most technologically significant products introduced into commercial marketplace within the past year.

  6. Plastic Bags Might Kickstart the Carbon Capture Industry | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Plastic Bags Might Kickstart the Carbon Capture Industry Plastic Bags Might Kickstart the Carbon Capture Industry May 6, 2016 - 5:46pm Addthis This GIF shows how CO2 emissions vary across the United States. Each bar represents a 50x50 kilometer grid. Bar height is proportional to total CO2 emissions and bar color represents the type of CO2 emissions. Red bars represent proportionately more CO2 emissions from electricity generation (coal, gas and oil). Green bars represent CO2

  7. New Technical Risk Management Development for Carbon Capture Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.; Letellier, Bruce; Edwards, Brian; Leclaire, Rene; Jones, Edward

    2012-04-30

    The basic CCSI objective of accelerating technology development and commercial deployment of carbon capture technologies through the extensive use of numerical simulation introduces a degree of unfamiliarity and novelty that potentially increases both of the traditional risk elements. In order to secure investor confidence and successfully accelerate the marketability of carbon capture technologies, it is critical that risk management decision tools be developed in parallel with numerical simulation capabilities and uncertainty quantification efforts. The focus of this paper is on the development of a technical risk model that incorporates the specific technology maturity development (level).

  8. Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novick, Scott; Alvizo, Oscar

    2013-01-15

    The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

  9. Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novick, Scott J; Alvizo, Oscar

    2013-10-29

    The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

  10. Head of UN Economic Commission for Europe: "Capture the Carbon"

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The increased urgency of global climate change has focused the attention of many leaders around the world. While the Department of Energy remains a global leader in carbon capture and storage (CCS) research and development, CCS has grown in prominence as one international solution to an "all-of-the-above" problem.

  11. Participatory Carbon Monitoring: Operational Guidance for National...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Participatory Carbon Monitoring: Operational Guidance for National REDD+ Carbon Accounting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Participatory Carbon...

  12. Los Alamos National Laboratory communicators capture numerous awards from

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Society for Technical Communication Society for Technical Communication Awards Los Alamos National Laboratory communicators capture numerous awards from Society for Technical Communication Three Los Alamos entries garnered Distinguished Technical Communication awards, the competition's highest award category. April 15, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering

  13. Guidelines for carbon dioxide capture, transport and storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, S.

    2008-07-01

    The goal of this effort was to develop a set of preliminary guidelines and recommendations for the deployment of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies in the United States. The CCS Guidelines are written for those who may be involved in decisions on a proposed project: the developers, regulators, financiers, insurers, project operators, and policymakers. Contents are: Part 1: introduction; Part 2: capture; Part 3: transport; Part 4; storage; Part. 5 supplementary information. Within these parts, eight recommended guidelines are given for: CO{sub 2} capture; ancillary environmental impacts from CO{sub 2}; pipeline design and operation; pipeline safety and integrity; siting CO{sub 2} pipelines; pipeline access and tariff regulation; guidelines for (MMV); risk assessment; financial responsibility; property rights and ownership; site selection and characterisation; injection operations; site closure; and post-closure. 18 figs., 9 tabs., 4 apps.

  14. Synthesis, Structure, and Carbon Dioxide Capture Properties of Zeolitic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imidazolate Frameworks | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Synthesis, Structure, and Carbon Dioxide Capture Properties of Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks Previous Next List Anh Phan, Christian J. Doonan, Fernando J. Uribe-Romo, Carolyn B. Knobler, Michael O'Keeffe and Omar M. Yaghi, Acc. Chem. Res., 2010, 43 (1), pp 58-67 DOI: 10.1021/ar900116g Abstract Zeolites are one of humanity's most important synthetic products. These

  15. Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30 September

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2012) (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect 2) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30 September 2012) × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document

  16. Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30 September

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2013) (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect 3) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30 September 2013) × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document

  17. Construction Begins on DOE-Sponsored Carbon-Capture Project at...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Construction Begins on DOE-Sponsored Carbon-Capture Project at Kentucky Power Plant Construction Begins on DOE-Sponsored Carbon-Capture Project at Kentucky Power Plant July 21, ...

  18. U.S. China Carbon Capture and Storage Development Project at...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    U.S. China Carbon Capture and Storage Development Project at West Virginia University Citation Details In-Document Search Title: U.S. China Carbon Capture and Storage Development ...

  19. Novel Application of Carbonate Fuel Cell for Capturing Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jolly, Stephen; Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein; Willman, Carl; Patel, Dilip; DiNitto, M.; Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Steen, William A.

    2015-09-30

    To address concerns about climate change resulting from emission of CO2 by coal-fueled power plants, FuelCell Energy, Inc. has developed the Combined Electric Power and Carbon-dioxide Separation (CEPACS) system concept. The CEPACS system utilizes Electrochemical Membrane (ECM) technology derived from the Company’s Direct FuelCell® products. The system separates the CO2 from the flue gas of other plants and produces electric power using a supplementary fuel. FCE is currently evaluating the use of ECM to cost effectively separate CO2 from the flue gas of Pulverized Coal (PC) power plants under a U.S. Department of Energy contract. The overarching objective of the project is to verify that the ECM can achieve at least 90% CO2 capture from the flue gas with no more than 35% increase in the cost of electricity. The project activities include: 1) laboratory scale operational and performance tests of a membrane assembly, 2) performance tests of the membrane to evaluate the effects of impurities present in the coal plant flue gas, in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 3) techno-economic analysis for an ECM-based CO2 capture system applied to a 550 MW existing PC plant, in partnership with URS Corporation, and 4) bench scale (11.7 m2 area) testing of an ECM-based CO2 separation and purification system.

  20. Reversible Acid Gas Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dave Heldebrant

    2012-12-31

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist David Heldebrant demonstrates how a new process called reversible acid gas capture works to pull carbon dioxide out of power plant emissions.

  1. Layered solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture (Patent) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Patent: Layered solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Layered solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture A solid sorbent for the capture and the transport of carbon dioxide gas is provided having at least one first layer of a positively charged material that is polyethylenimine or poly(allylamine hydrochloride), that captures at least a portion of the gas, and at least one second layer of a negatively charged material that is

  2. Final Scientific/Technical Report Carbon Capture and Storage Training Northwest - CCSTNW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Workman, James

    2013-09-30

    This report details the activities of the Carbon Capture and Storage Training Northwest (CCSTNW) program 2009 to 2013. The CCSTNW created, implemented, and provided Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) training over the period of the program. With the assistance of an expert advisory board, CCSTNW created curriculum and conducted three short courses, more than three lectures, two symposiums, and a final conference. The program was conducted in five phases; 1) organization, gap analysis, and form advisory board; 2) develop list serves, website, and tech alerts; 3) training needs survey; 4) conduct lectures, courses, symposiums, and a conference; 5) evaluation surveys and course evaluations. This program was conducted jointly by Environmental Outreach and Stewardship Alliance (dba. Northwest Environmental Training Center NWETC) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL).

  3. Advanced computational tools for optimization and uncertainty quantification of carbon capture processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David C.; Ng, Brenda; Eslick, John

    2014-01-01

    Advanced multi-scale modeling and simulation has the potential to dramatically reduce development time, resulting in considerable cost savings. The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and universities that is developing, demonstrating, and deploying a suite of multi-scale modeling and simulation tools. One significant computational tool is FOQUS, a Framework for Optimization and Quantification of Uncertainty and Sensitivity, which enables basic data submodels, including thermodynamics and kinetics, to be used within detailed process models to rapidly synthesize and optimize a process and determine the level of uncertainty associated with the resulting process. The overall approach of CCSI is described with a more detailed discussion of FOQUS and its application to carbon capture systems.

  4. Petra Nova Project Breaks Ground on World’s Largest Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Houston-area Petra Nova project is designed to capture 1.4 million tons of CO2 per year -- making it the world's largest post-combustion carbon capture facility.

  5. Carbon Dioxide Capture and Transportation Options in the Illinois Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Rostam-Abadi; S. S. Chen; Y. Lu

    2004-09-30

    This report describes carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture options from large stationary emission sources in the Illinois Basin, primarily focusing on coal-fired utility power plants. The CO{sub 2} emissions data were collected for utility power plants and industrial facilities over most of Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and western Kentucky. Coal-fired power plants are by far the largest CO{sub 2} emission sources in the Illinois Basin. The data revealed that sources within the Illinois Basin emit about 276 million tonnes of CO2 annually from 122 utility power plants and industrial facilities. Industrial facilities include 48 emission sources and contribute about 10% of total emissions. A process analysis study was conducted to review the suitability of various CO{sub 2} capture technologies for large stationary sources. The advantages and disadvantages of each class of technology were investigated. Based on these analyses, a suitable CO{sub 2} capture technology was assigned to each type of emission source in the Illinois Basin. Techno-economic studies were then conducted to evaluate the energy and economic performances of three coal-based power generation plants with CO{sub 2} capture facilities. The three plants considered were (1) pulverized coal (PC) + post combustion chemical absorption (monoethanolamine, or MEA), (2) integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) + pre-combustion physical absorption (Selexol), and (3) oxygen-enriched coal combustion plants. A conventional PC power plant without CO2 capture was also investigated as a baseline plant for comparison. Gross capacities of 266, 533, and 1,054 MW were investigated at each power plant. The economic study considered the burning of both Illinois No. 6 coal and Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. The cost estimation included the cost for compressing the CO{sub 2} stream to pipeline pressure. A process simulation software, CHEMCAD, was employed to perform steady-state simulations of power generation systems and CO{sub 2} capture processes. Financial models were developed to estimate the capital cost, operations and maintenance cost, cost of electricity, and CO{sub 2} avoidance cost. Results showed that, depending on the plant size and the type of coal burned, CO{sub 2} avoidance cost is between $47/t to $67/t for a PC +MEA plant, between $22.03/t to $32.05/t for an oxygen combustion plant, and between $13.58/t to $26.78/t for an IGCC + Selexol plant. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the impact on the CO2 avoidance cost of the heat of absorption of solvent in an MEA plant and energy consumption of the ASU in an oxy-coal combustion plant. An economic analysis of CO{sub 2} capture from an ethanol plant was also conducted. The cost of CO{sub 2} capture from an ethanol plant with a production capacity of 100 million gallons/year was estimated to be about $13.92/t.

  6. NETL-Developed Process for Capturing CO2 Emissions Wins National Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A process developed by researchers at the Office of Fossil Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory that improves the capture of carbon dioxide emissions from power plants while reducing the cost has been selected to receive a 2011 Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer.

  7. Computational Tools for Accelerating Carbon Capture Process Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David

    2013-01-01

    The goals of the work reported are: to develop new computational tools and models to enable industry to more rapidly develop and deploy new advanced energy technologies; to demonstrate the capabilities of the CCSI Toolset on non-proprietary case studies; and to deploy the CCSI Toolset to industry. Challenges of simulating carbon capture (and other) processes include: dealing with multiple scales (particle, device, and whole process scales); integration across scales; verification, validation, and uncertainty; and decision support. The tools cover: risk analysis and decision making; validated, high-fidelity CFD; high-resolution filtered sub-models; process design and optimization tools; advanced process control and dynamics; process models; basic data sub-models; and cross-cutting integration tools.

  8. LOW-PRESSURE MEMBRANE CONTACTORS FOR CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Richard; Kniep, Jay; Hao, Pingjiao; Chan, Chi Cheng; Nguyen, Vincent; Huang, Ivy; Amo, Karl; Freeman, Brice; Fulton, Don; Ly, Jennifer; Lipscomb, Glenn; Lou, Yuecun; Gogar, Ravikumar

    2014-09-30

    This final technical progress report describes work conducted by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) for the Department of Energy (DOE NETL) on development of low-pressure membrane contactors for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from power plant flue gas (award number DE-FE0007553). The work was conducted from October 1, 2011 through September 30, 2014. The overall goal of this three-year project was to build and operate a prototype 500 m2 low-pressure sweep membrane module specifically designed to separate CO2 from coal-fired power plant flue gas. MTR was assisted in this project by a research group at the University of Toledo, which contributed to the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of module design and process simulation. This report details the work conducted to develop a new type of membrane contactor specifically designed for the high-gas-flow, low-pressure, countercurrent sweep operation required for affordable membrane-based CO2 capture at coal power plants. Work for this project included module development and testing, design and assembly of a large membrane module test unit at MTR, CFD comparative analysis of cross-flow, countercurrent, and novel partial-countercurrent sweep membrane module designs, CFD analysis of membrane spacers, design and fabrication of a 500 m2 membrane module skid for field tests, a detailed performance and cost analysis of the MTR CO2 capture process with low-pressure sweep modules, and a process design analysis of a membrane-hybrid separation process for CO2 removal from coal-fired flue gas. Key results for each major task are discussed in the report.

  9. Licensing Agreement Moves Two NETL-Patented Carbon Capture Sorbents Closer

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Commercialization | Department of Energy Licensing Agreement Moves Two NETL-Patented Carbon Capture Sorbents Closer to Commercialization Licensing Agreement Moves Two NETL-Patented Carbon Capture Sorbents Closer to Commercialization March 23, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Two new patented sorbents used for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from coal-based power plants have moved closer to commercialization as a result of a licensing agreement between the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE)

  10. Today: Live from the Carbon Capture and Storage Forum | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Today: Live from the Carbon Capture and Storage Forum Today: Live from the Carbon Capture and Storage Forum September 8, 2010 - 10:10am Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Earlier this week Secretary Chu announced $575 Million dollars in funding for 22 projects across 15 states, projects that will accelerate carbon capture and storage research and development for industrial sources. The selections include projects from four

  11. U.S. and Italy Sign Agreement to Collaborate on Carbon Capture and Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies | Department of Energy Italy Sign Agreement to Collaborate on Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies U.S. and Italy Sign Agreement to Collaborate on Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies May 23, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis ROME, ITALY - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today joined with Italian Minister of Economic Development Claudio Scajola to sign a bilateral agreement to advance carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies in each country. Working together, the U.S. and Italy

  12. Projects Aimed at Advancing State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Coal Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plants Selected for Further Development | Department of Energy Aimed at Advancing State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Coal Power Plants Selected for Further Development Projects Aimed at Advancing State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Coal Power Plants Selected for Further Development August 15, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Four projects aimed at reducing the energy and cost penalties of advanced carbon capture systems applied to power plants have been selected for further

  13. NETL Carbon Capture Technologies to Be Used in CommercialBiomass...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of mixed gases and enable cleaner, more-efficient energy production from renewable fuels. ... This innovative process includes carbon capture and represents a sustainable solution ...

  14. A Strategy for Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in the United...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Strategy for Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in the United Kingdom and Beyond Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics:...

  15. Ab initio Carbon Capture in Open-Site Metal Organic Frameworks | Center for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Ab initio Carbon Capture in Open-Site Metal Organic Frameworks

  16. Carbon Capture and Sequestration: A Regulatory Gap Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lincoln Davies; Kirsten Uchitel; John Ruple; Heather Tanana

    2012-04-30

    Though a potentially significant climate change mitigation strategy, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) remains mired in demonstration and development rather than proceeding to full-scale commercialization. Prior studies have suggested numerous reasons for this stagnation. This Report seeks to empirically assess those claims. Using an anonymous opinion survey completed by over 200 individuals involved in CCS, it concludes that there are four primary barriers to CCS commercialization: (1) cost, (2) lack of a carbon price, (3) liability risks, and (4) lack of a comprehensive regulatory regime. These results largely confirm previous work. They also, however, expose a key barrier that prior studies have overlooked: the need for comprehensive, rather than piecemeal, CCS regulation. The survey data clearly show that the CCS community sees this as one of the most needed incentives for CCS deployment. The community also has a relatively clear idea of what that regulation should entail: a cooperative federalism approach that directly addresses liability concerns and that generally does not upset traditional lines of federal-state authority.

  17. DOE Program Offers Participants Unique Opportunity to Gain Carbon Capture and Storage Knowledge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Future leaders and innovators in the area of carbon capture and storage can gain a unique and intensive tutorial on the subject by participating in the U.S. Department of Energy’s Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration program.

  18. A Novel System for Carbon Dioxide Capture Utilizing Electrochemical Membrane Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein; Jolly, Stephen; Patel, Dilip; Hunt, Jennifer; Steen, William A.; Richardson, Carl F.; Marina, Olga A.

    2013-06-03

    FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and URS Corporation, is developing a novel Combined Electric Power and Carbon-Dioxide Separation (CEPACS) system, under a contract from the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FE0007634), to efficiently and cost effectively separate carbon dioxide from the emissions of existing coal fired power plants. The CEPACS system is based on FCEs electrochemical membrane (ECM) technology utilizing the Companys internal reforming carbonate fuel cell products carrying the trade name of Direct FuelCell (DFC). The unique chemistry of carbonate fuel cells offers an innovative approach for separation of CO2 from existing fossil-fuel power plant exhaust streams (flue gases). The ECM-based CEPACS system has the potential to become a transformational CO2-separation technology by working as two devices in one: it separates the CO2 from the exhaust of other plants such as an existing coal-fired plant and simultaneously produces clean and environmentally benign (green) electric power at high efficiency using a supplementary fuel. The overall objective of this project is to successfully demonstrate the ability of FCEs electrochemical membrane-based CEPACS system technology to separate ? 90% of the CO2 from a simulated Pulverized Coal (PC) power plant flue-gas stream and to compress the captured CO2 to a state that can be easily transported for sequestration or beneficial use. Also, a key project objective is to show, through a Technical and Economic Feasibility Study and bench scale testing (11.7 m2 area ECM), that the electrochemical membrane-based CEPACS system is an economical alternative for CO2 capture in PC power plants, and that it meets DOE objectives for the incremental cost of electricity (COE) for post-combustion CO2 capture.

  19. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CARBON DIOXIDE; ABSORPTION; SORPTIVE PROPERTIES; POTASSIUM CARBONATES; THERMODYNAMIC MODEL; VAPOR PRESSURE; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL Word Cloud ...

  20. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Subject: 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CARBON DIOXIDE; ABSORPTION; POTASSIUM CARBONATES; SORPTIVE PROPERTIES; AMINES; MATERIALS RECOVERY; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; MATHEMATICAL MODELS ...

  1. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ABSORPTION; HEAT EXCHANGERS; PILOT PLANTS; POTASSIUM CARBONATES; THERMODYNAMICS; VAPOR PRESSURE; CARBON DIOXIDE; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; SORPTIVE ...

  2. Valuation of carbon capture and sequestration under Greenhouse gas regulations: CCS as an offsetting activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lokey, Elizabeth

    2009-08-15

    When carbon capture and sequestration is conducted by entities that are not regulated, it could be counted as an offset that is fungible in the market or sold to a voluntary market. This paper addresses the complications that arise in accounting for carbon capture and sequestration as an offset, and methodologies that exist for accounting for CCS in voluntary and compliance markets. (author)

  3. DOE Awards Cooperative Agreement for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy has awarded a cooperative agreement to American Electric Power Service Corporation for the Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture and Storage Project to design, construct, and operate a system that will capture and store approximately 1.5 million tons per year of carbon dioxide.

  4. Construction Begins on DOE-Sponsored Carbon-Capture Project at Kentucky Power Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today, construction began on an innovative $19.5 million carbon-capture pilot, funded in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, at Kentucky Utilities’ E.W. Brown Generating Station near Harrodsburg, Kentucky. The 2 megawatt thermal system will be the first megawatt-scale carbon-capture pilot unit in the Commonwealth.

  5. Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Facility Energy Department Applauds Nation's First Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Facility ...

  6. Composite Membranes for CO2 Capture: High Performance Metal Organic Frameworks/Polymer Composite Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    IMPACCT Project: A team of six faculty members at Georgia Tech are developing an enhanced membrane by fitting metal organic frameworks, compounds that show great promise for improved carbon capture, into hollow fiber membranes. This new material would be highly efficient at removing CO2 from the flue gas produced at coal-fired power plants. The team is analyzing thousands of metal organic frameworks to identify those that are most suitable for carbon capture based both on their ability to allow coal exhaust to pass easily through them and their ability to select CO2 from that exhaust for capture and storage. The most suitable frameworks would be inserted into the walls of the hollow fiber membranes, making the technology readily scalable due to their high surface area. This composite membrane would be highly stable, withstanding the harsh gas environment found in coal exhaust.

  7. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; POTASSIUM CARBONATES; CARBON DIOXIDE; MATERIALS RECOVERY; AMINES; SOLVENTS; MATERIALS TESTING; ...

  8. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Language: English Subject: 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; POTASSIUM CARBONATES; CARBON DIOXIDE; MATERIALS RECOVERY; AMINES; SOLVENTS; MATERIALS TESTING; ...

  9. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CARBON DIOXIDE; ABSORPTION; ACID NEUTRALIZING CAPACITY; DESORPTION; POTASSIUM CARBONATES; AMINES; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; FLUE GAS Word Cloud ...

  10. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ABSORPTION; PERFORMANCE; POTASSIUM CARBONATES; CHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS; CARBON DIOXIDE; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; AMINES Word Cloud More Like ...

  11. Evaluating different classes of porous materials for carbon capture...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    emission from power plants. In particular, amongst several separation strategies, adsorption by nano-porous materials is regarded as a potential means to efficiently capture CO2...

  12. An early deployment strategy for carbon capture, utilisation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In the longer term, research and development may be sufficient to reduce CO2 capture costs ... IMPLEMENTATION; COST ESTIMATION; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; OPERATING COST; ENERGY SOURCES

  13. Carbon Capture and Storage in Southern Africa | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    assessment of the rationale, possibilities and capacity needs to enable CO2 capture and storage in Botswana, Mozambique and Namibia AgencyCompany Organization Energy Research...

  14. First-of-its-Kind Carbon Capture and Conversion Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nitric oxides, mercury, and other heavy metals from the flue gas. Addthis Related Articles Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from ...

  15. Development of Novel Carbon Sorbents for CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, Gopala; Hornbostel, Marc; Bao, Jianer; Perez, Jordi; Nagar, Anoop; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2013-11-30

    An innovative, low-cost, and low-energy-consuming carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture technology was developed, based on CO{sub 2}adsorption on a high-capacity and durable carbon sorbent. This report describes the (1) performance of the concept on a bench-scale system; (2) results of parametric tests to determine the optimum operating conditions; (3) results of the testing with a flue gas from coal-fired boilers; and (4) evaluation of the technical and economic viability of the technology. The process uses a falling bed of carbon sorbent microbeads to separate the flue gas into two streams: a CO{sub 2} -lean flue gas stream from which > 90% of the CP{sub 2} is removed and a pure stream of CO{sub 2} that is ready for compression and sequestration. The carbo sorbent microbeads have several unique properties such as high CO{sub 2} capacity, low heat of adsorption and desorption (25 to 28 kJ/mole), mechanically robust, and rapid adsorption and desorption rates. The capture of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas is performed at near ambient temperatures in whic the sorbent microbeads flow down by gravity counter-current with the up-flow of the flue gas. The adsorbed CO{sub 2} is stripped by heating the CO{sub 2}-loaded sorbent to - 100C, in contact with low-pressure (- 5 psig) steam in a section at the bottom of the adsorber. The regenerated sorben is dehydrated of adsorbed moisture, cooled, and lifted back to the adsorber. The CO{sub 2} from the desorber is essentially pure and can be dehydrated, compressed, and transported to a sequestration site. Bench-scale tests using a simulated flue gas showed that the integrated system can be operated to provide > 90% CO{sub 2} capture from a 15% CO{sub 2} stream in the adsorber and produce > 98% CO{sub 2} at the outlet of the stripper. Long-term tests ( 1,000 cycles) showed that the system can be operated reliably without sorbent agglomeration or attrition. The bench-scale reactor was also operated using a flue gas stream from a coal-fired boil at the University of Toledo campus for about 135 h, comprising 7,000 cycles of adsorption and desorption using the desulfurized flue gas that contained only 4.5% v/v CO{sub 2}. A capture efficiency of 85 to 95% CO{sub 2} was achieved under steady-state conditi ons. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity did not change significantly during the field test, as determined from the CO{sub 2} adsorptio isotherms of fresh and used sorbents. The process is also being tested using the flue gas from a PC-fired power plant at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC), Wilsonville, AL. The cost of electricity was calculated for CO{sub 2} capture using the carbon sorbent and compared with the no-CO{sub 2} capture and CO{sub 2} capture with an amine-based system. The increase i the levelized cost of electricity (L-COE) is about 37% for CO{sub 2} capture using the carbon sorbent in comparison to 80% for an amine-based system, demonstrating the economic advantage of C capture using the carbon sorbent. The 37% increase in the L-COE corresponds to a cost of capture of $30/ton of CO{sub 2}, including compression costs, capital cost for the capture system, and increased plant operating and capital costs to make up for reduced plant efficiency. Preliminary sensitivity analyses showed capital costs, pressure drops in the adsorber, and steam requirement for the regenerator are the major variables in determining the cost of CO{sub 2} capture. The results indicate that further long-term testing with a flue gas from a pulverized coal fired boiler should be performed to obtain additional data relating to the effects of flue gas contaminants, the ability to reduce pressure drop by using alternate structural packing , and the use of low-cost construction materials.

  16. Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture by a New Dual Phase Ceramic-Carbonate Membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jerry

    2014-09-30

    This report documents synthesis, characterization and carbon dioxide permeation and separation properties of a new group of ceramic-carbonate dual-phase membranes and results of a laboratory study on their application for water gas shift reaction with carbon dioxide separation. A series of ceramic-carbonate dual phase membranes with various oxygen ionic or mixed ionic and electronic conducting metal oxide materials in disk, tube, symmetric, and asymmetric geometric configurations was developed. These membranes, with the thickness of 10 ?m to 1.5 mm, show CO2 permeance in the range of 0.5-510-7 molm-2s-1Pa-1 in 500-900oC and measured CO2/N2 selectivity of up to 3000. CO2 permeation mechanism and factors that affect CO2 permeation through the dual-phase membranes have been identified. A reliable CO2 permeation model was developed. A robust method was established for the optimization of the microstructures of ceramic-carbonate membranes. The ceramic-carbonate membranes exhibit high stability for high temperature CO2 separations and water gas shift reaction. Water gas shift reaction in the dual-phase membrane reactors was studied by both modeling and experiments. It is found that high temperature syngas water gas shift reaction in tubular ceramic-carbonate dual phase membrane reactor is feasible even without catalyst. The membrane reactor exhibits good CO2 permeation flux, high thermal and chemical stability and high thermal shock resistance. Reaction and separation conditions in the membrane reactor to produce hydrogen of 93% purity and CO2 stream of >95% purity, with 90% CO2 capture have been identified. Integration of the ceramic-carbonate dual-phase membrane reactor with IGCC process for carbon dioxide capture was analyzed. A methodology was developed to identify optimum operation conditions for a membrane tube of given dimensions that would treat coal syngas with targeted performance. The calculation results show that the dual-phase membrane reactor could improve IGCC process efficiency but the cost of the membrane reactor with membranes having current CO2 permeance is high. Further research should be directed towards improving the performance of the membranes and developing cost-effective, scalable methods for fabrication of dual-phase membranes and membrane reactors.

  17. The IMPACCT of Innovation on Carbon Capture and Storage | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy IMPACCT of Innovation on Carbon Capture and Storage The IMPACCT of Innovation on Carbon Capture and Storage August 19, 2010 - 11:57am Addthis Team member at GE Global Research Team member at GE Global Research Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Last week the Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) released a report evaluating the barriers to the wide-scale deployment of CCS. While the report indicates that CCS can be a viable

  18. Advanced modeling to accelerate the scale up of carbon capture technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David C.; Sun, XIN; Storlie, Curtis B.; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu

    2015-06-01

    In order to help meet the goals of the DOE carbon capture program, the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) was launched in early 2011 to develop, demonstrate, and deploy advanced computational tools and validated multi-scale models to reduce the time required to develop and scale-up new carbon capture technologies. This article focuses on essential elements related to the development and validation of multi-scale models in order to help minimize risk and maximize learning as new technologies progress from pilot to demonstration scale.

  19. Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More Domestic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oil | Department of Energy Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More Domestic Oil Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More Domestic Oil May 10, 2013 - 11:38am Addthis Learn more about how the Office of Fossil Energy's carbon capture, utilization and storage program is benefiting the economy and the environment. Christopher A. Smith Christopher A. Smith Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy What does this project do? More than 90% of the CO2 at

  20. New Funding Boosts Carbon Capture, Solar Energy and High Gas Mileage Cars

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Trucks | Department of Energy Boosts Carbon Capture, Solar Energy and High Gas Mileage Cars and Trucks New Funding Boosts Carbon Capture, Solar Energy and High Gas Mileage Cars and Trucks June 11, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON D.C. --- U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced more than $300 million worth of investments that will boost a range of clean energy technologies - including carbon capture from coal, solar power, and high efficiency cars and trucks. The move reflects

  1. Ten Projects Selected by DOE to Advance State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    from Coal Power Plants | Department of Energy Ten Projects Selected by DOE to Advance State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Coal Power Plants Ten Projects Selected by DOE to Advance State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Coal Power Plants July 7, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Ten projects aimed at developing advanced technologies for capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal combustion have been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under its Innovations for Existing Plants

  2. NATCARB Interactive Maps and the National Carbon Explorer: a National Look at Carbon Sequestration

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    NATCARB is a national look at carbon sequestration. The NATCARB home page, National Carbon Explorer (http://www.natcarb.org/) provides access to information and interactive maps on a national scale about climate change, DOE's carbon sequestration program and its partnerships, CO2 emissions, and sinks. This portal provides access to interactive maps based on the Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada.

  3. GE Awarded DOE Funding to Pilot Carbon Capture Technology | GE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Awarded DOE Project to Pilot CO2 Capture Technology for Power Plants Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share ...

  4. DOE Approves Field Test for Promising Carbon Capture Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Post-combustion separation and capture of CO2 is challenging due to the low pressure and diluted concentration of CO2 in the waste stream; trace impurities in the flue gas that ...

  5. High-Performance Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture from Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sholl, David; Jones, Christopher

    2013-03-13

    This project has focused on capture of CO{sub 2} from ambient air (air capture). If this process is technically and economically feasible, it could potentially contribute to net reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in ways that are complementary to better developed techniques for CO{sub 2} from concentrated point sources. We focused on cyclic adsorption processes for CO{sub 2} capture from air in which the entire cycle is performed at moderate temperatures. The project involved both experimental studies of sorbent materials and process level modeling of cyclic air capture processes. In our experimental work, a series of amine-functionalized silica adsorbents were prepared and characterized to determine the impact of molecular architecture on CO{sub 2} capture. Some key findings were: Amine functionalized silicas can be prepared with high enough CO{sub 2} capacities under ambient conditions to merit consideration for use in air capture processes. Primary amines are better candidates for CO{sub 2} capture than secondary or tertiary amines, both in terms of amine efficiency for CO{sub 2} adsorption and enhanced water affinity. Mechanistic understanding of degradation of these materials can enable control of molecular architecture to significantly improve material stability. Our process modeling work provided the first publically available cost and energy estimates for cyclic adsorption processes for air capture of CO{sub 2}. Some key findings were: Cycles based on diurnal ambient heating and cooling cannot yield useful purities or amounts of captured CO{sub 2}. Cycles based on steam desorption at 110 oC can yield CO{sub 2} purities of ~88%. The energy requirements for cycles using steam desorption are dominated by needs for thermal input, which results in lower costs than energy input in the form of electricity. Cyclic processes with operational costs of less than $100 tCO{sub 2}-net were described, and these results point to process and material improvements that could substantially reduce these costs. The most critical conclusions from our work are that (i) CO{sub 2} capture from ambient air using moderate temperature cyclic adsorption processes is technically feasible and (ii) the operational costs of realistic versions of these processes are moderate enough to encourage future development of this technology. Because of the very modest net investment that has been made in R&D associated with this approach from all sources worldwide (relative to the massive public and private investment that has been made in technologies for CO{sub 2} from concentrated point sources), our results strongly suggest that continued development of air capture is justified.

  6. Department of Energy Announces $41 Million Investment for Carbon Capture Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Washington, D.C. — The U.S. Department of Energy announced today the selection of 16 projects aimed at developing advanced post-combustion technologies for capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal...

  7. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Air Using Amine-Grafted Porous Polymer...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Dioxide Capture from Air Using Amine-Grafted Porous Polymer Networks Previous Next List Weigang Lu, Julian P. Sculley, Daqiang Yuan, Rajamani Krishna, and Hong-Cai Zhou, J....

  8. DOE Seeks Proposals to Increase Investment in Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy has issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement soliciting projects to capture and sequester carbon dioxide from industrial sources and to put CO2 to beneficial use.

  9. Ab-initio Carbon Capture in Open-Site Metal Organic Frameworks...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ab-initio Carbon Capture in Open-Site Metal Organic Frameworks Previous Next List A. Dzubak, L.-C. Lin, J. Kim, J. A. Swisher, R. Poloni, S. N. Maximoff, B. Smit, and L. Gagliardi,...

  10. U.S. and Italy Sign Agreement to Collaborate on Carbon Capture...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. and Italy Sign Agreement to Collaborate on Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies May 23, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis ROME, ITALY - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today joined ...

  11. New Membrane Technology for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Begins Pilot-Scale Test

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A promising new technology sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for economically capturing 90 percent of the carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted from a coal-burning power plant has begun pilot-scale testing.

  12. Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The successful bench-scale test of a novel carbon dioxide capturing sorbent promises to further advance the process as a possible technological option for reducing CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants.

  13. Enhanced carbon dioxide capture upon incorporation ofN,N'-dimethyleth...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhanced carbon dioxide capture upon incorporation of N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine in the metal-organic framework CuBTTri Previous Next List Thomas M. McDonald, Deanna M....

  14. Capture of Carbon Dioxide from Air and Flue Gas in the Alkylamine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capture of Carbon Dioxide from Air and Flue Gas in the Alkylamine-Appended Metal-Organic ... conditions relevant to removal of CO2 from air, and 3.14 mmolg (12.1 wt %) at 0.15 bar ...

  15. Hydrogen storage and carbon dioxide capture in an iron-based...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen storage and carbon dioxide capture in an iron-based sodalite-type metal-organic framework (Fe-BTT) discovered via high-throughput methods Previous Next List Kenji Sumida,...

  16. Proposed roadmap for overcoming legal and financial obstacles to carbon capture and sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, Wendy ); Chohen, Leah; Kostakidis-Lianos, Leah; Rundell, Sara )

    2009-03-01

    Many existing proposals either lack sufficient concreteness to make carbon capture and geological sequestration (CCGS) operational or fail to focus on a comprehensive, long term framework for its regulation, thus failing to account adequately for the urgency of the issue, the need to develop immediate experience with large scale demonstration projects, or the financial and other incentives required to launch early demonstration projects. We aim to help fill this void by proposing a roadmap to commercial deployment of CCGS in the United States.This roadmap focuses on the legal and financial incentives necessary for rapid demonstration of geological sequestration in the absence of national restrictions on CO2 emissions. It weaves together existing federal programs and financing opportunities into a set of recommendations for achieving commercial viability of geological sequestration.

  17. Energy Department Invests to Drive Down Costs of Carbon Capture, Support

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Pollution | Department of Energy to Drive Down Costs of Carbon Capture, Support Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Pollution Energy Department Invests to Drive Down Costs of Carbon Capture, Support Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Pollution November 7, 2013 - 10:30am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's Climate Action Plan, today the Energy Department announced the selection of 18 projects across the country to

  18. Readout of Secretary Chu Meetings on Carbon Capture and Sequestration and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State Grid | Department of Energy Chu Meetings on Carbon Capture and Sequestration and State Grid Readout of Secretary Chu Meetings on Carbon Capture and Sequestration and State Grid July 16, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis BEIJING, CHINA - Additional readouts from Secretary Chu's meetings in China are below, courtesy of Dan Leistikow, Public Affairs Director, U.S. Department of Energy. Secretary Chu and his delegation met Thursday morning with Cao Peixi, Chairman of the Huaneng Group to discuss an

  19. U.S. China Carbon Capture and Storage Development Project at West Virginia

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    University (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect U.S. China Carbon Capture and Storage Development Project at West Virginia University Citation Details In-Document Search Title: U.S. China Carbon Capture and Storage Development Project at West Virginia University The original overall objective of this activity was to undertake resource evaluation and planning for CCS projects and to describe and quantify the geologic, environmental, and economic challenges to successful development of

  20. Understanding the effect of side groups in ionic liquids on carbon-capture

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    properties: a combined experimental and theoretical effort (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Understanding the effect of side groups in ionic liquids on carbon-capture properties: a combined experimental and theoretical effort Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Understanding the effect of side groups in ionic liquids on carbon-capture properties: a combined experimental and theoretical effort Ionic liquids are an emerging class of materials with applications in a

  1. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Thomas Nelson; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2005-01-01

    This report describes research conducted between October 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Two supported sorbents were tested in a bench scale fluidized bed reactor system. The sorbents were prepared by impregnation of sodium carbonate on to an inert support at a commercial catalyst manufacturing facility. One sorbent, tested through five cycles of carbon dioxide sorption in an atmosphere of 3% water vapor and 0.8 to 3% carbon dioxide showed consistent reactivity with sodium carbonate utilization of 7 to 14%. A second, similarly prepared material, showed comparable reactivity in one cycle of testing. Batches of 5 other materials were prepared in laboratory scale quantities (primarily by spray drying). These materials generally have significantly greater surface areas than calcined sodium bicarbonate. Small scale testing showed no significant adsorption of mercury on representative carbon dioxide sorbent materials under expected flue gas conditions.

  2. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2 and SOsub 2. Corrosion of carbon steel in uninhibited MEA solution is increased by increased amine concentration, by addition of piperazine, and by greater COsub 2 loading. ...

  3. Pore Models Track Reactions in Underground Carbon Capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    extract from saline aquifers deep underground. The goal is to learn what will happen when fluids pass through the material should power plants inject carbon dioxide underground. ...

  4. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CONSUMPTION; MASS TRANSFER; PILOT PLANTS; POTASSIUM CARBONATES; VANADIUM; AMINES; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File size NAView Full ...

  5. U.S.-Norway Conference Focuses on Advancing Carbon Capture and Storage |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy -Norway Conference Focuses on Advancing Carbon Capture and Storage U.S.-Norway Conference Focuses on Advancing Carbon Capture and Storage July 23, 2014 - 10:00am Addthis The DOE team joins their Norwegian counterparts on a a tour of the <a href= "http://www.tcmda.com/en/">CO2 Technology Centre Mongstad project</a> – the world’s largest facility for testing and improving CO2 capture. Located just north of Bergen, this project includes a

  6. Capturing and sequestering carbon by enhancing the natural carbon cycle: Prelimary identification of basic science needs and opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, S.M.

    1997-07-01

    This document summarizes proceedings and conclusions of a US DOE workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to identify the underlying research needed to answer the following questions: (1) Can the natural carbon cycle be used to aid in stabilizing or decreasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} by: (a) Increasing carbon capture; (b) Preventing carbon from returning to the atmosphere through intermediate (<100 years) to long-term sequestration (> 100 years)?; and (2) What kind of ecosystem management practices could be used to achieve this? Three working groups were formed to discuss the terrestrial biosphere, oceans, and methane. Basic research needs identified included fundamental understanding of carbon cycling and storage in soils, influence of climate change and anthropogenic emissions on the carbon cycle, and carbon capture and sequestration in oceans. 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Los Alamos National Laboratory captures eight NNSA Pollution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    awards are based on an NNSA-wide competition that acknowledges pollution prevention, recycling, and affirmative procurement accomplishments. April 15, 2009 Los Alamos National...

  8. Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In 2009, the industrial sector accounted for slightly more than one-quarter of total U.S. carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions of 5,405 million metric tons from energy consumption, ...

  9. New Computer Model Pinpoints Prime Materials for Carbon Capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Approximately 45 percent of electricity used in the United States is produced by coal-burning power plants that spew carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere and contribute to ...

  10. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Extensive measurements of COsub 2 solubility in 7 m MEA at 40 and 60 C have confirmed the work by Jou and Mather. Corrosion of carbon steel without inhibitors increases from 19 ...

  11. Ohio State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    efficiently separate carbon dioxide (CO2) from the gas that comes from burning coal at power plants. | Photo courtesy of Office of Fossil Energy. Researchers at The Ohio State...

  12. FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in a series of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CCS "best practices" manuals. December 1, 2010 Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage Potential...

  13. Copper clusters capture and convert carbon dioxide to make fuel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The benefit of enhanced binding is that the new catalyst requires lower pressure and less energy to produce the same amount of methanol. Carbon dioxide emissions are an ongoing...

  14. Carbon dioxide capture from a cement manufacturing process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blount, Gerald C.; Falta, Ronald W.; Siddall, Alvin A.

    2011-07-12

    A process of manufacturing cement clinker is provided in which a clean supply of CO.sub.2 gas may be captured. The process also involves using an open loop conversion of CaO/MgO from a calciner to capture CO.sub.2 from combustion flue gases thereby forming CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2. The CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2 is then returned to the calciner where CO.sub.2 gas is evolved. The evolved CO.sub.2 gas, along with other evolved CO.sub.2 gases from the calciner are removed from the calciner. The reactants (CaO/MgO) are feed to a high temperature calciner for control of the clinker production composition.

  15. Amine enriched solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, McMahan L.; Soong, Yee; Champagne, Kenneth J.

    2003-04-15

    A new method for making low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. The new method entails treating a solid substrate with acid or base and simultaneous or subsequent treatment with a substituted amine salt. The method eliminates the need for organic solvents and polymeric materials for the preparation of CO.sub.2 capture systems.

  16. Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    By working closely with industry from the inception of the project to identify industrial ... CCSI is led by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and leverages the ...

  17. Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CCSI is led by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and leverages the ... The CCSI's industrial partners provide representation from the power generation industry, ...

  18. Secretary Chu Announces Carbon Capture and Storage Simulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The efforts by the organizations announced today build upon the efforts of DOE's National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP). The CCS Simulation Initiative will allow NRAP to ...

  19. Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) at Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Alan Mays; Bert R. Bock; Gregory A. Brodie; L. Suzanne Fisher; J. Devereux Joslin; Donald L. Kachelman; Jimmy J. Maddox; N. S. Nicholas; Larry E. Shelton; Nick Taylor; Mark H. Wolfe; Dennis H. Yankee; John Goodrich-Mahoney

    2005-08-30

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Department of Energy-National Energy Technologies Laboratory (DOE-NETL) are evaluating and demonstrating integration of terrestrial carbon sequestration techniques at a coal-fired electric power plant through the use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system gypsum as a soil amendment and mulch, and coal fly ash pond process water for periodic irrigation. From January to March 2002, the Project Team initiated the construction of a 40 ha Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) near TVA's Paradise Fossil Plant on marginally reclaimed surface coal mine lands in Kentucky. The CCWESTRS is growing commercial grade trees and cover crops and is expected to sequester 1.5-2.0 MT/ha carbon per year over a 20-year period. The concept could be used to meet a portion of the timber industry's needs while simultaneously sequestering carbon in lands which would otherwise remain non-productive. The CCWESTRS includes a constructed wetland to enhance the ability to sequester carbon and to remove any nutrients and metals present in the coal fly ash process water runoff. The CCWESTRS project is a cooperative effort between TVA, EPRI, and DOE-NETL, with a total budget of $1,574,000. The proposed demonstration project began in October 2000 and has continued through December 2005. Additional funding is being sought in order to extend the project. The primary goal of the project is to determine if integrating power plant processes with carbon sequestration techniques will enhance carbon sequestration cost-effectively. This goal is consistent with DOE objectives to provide economically competitive and environmentally safe options to offset projected growth in U.S. baseline emissions of greenhouse gases after 2010, achieve the long-term goal of $10/ton of avoided net costs for carbon sequestration, and provide half of the required reductions in global greenhouse gases by 2025. Other potential benefits of the demonstration include developing a passive technology for water treatment for trace metal and nutrient release reductions, using power plant by-products to improve coal mine land reclamation and carbon sequestration, developing wildlife habitat and green-space around production facilities, generating Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) credits for the use of process water, and producing wood products for use by the lumber and pulp and paper industry. Project activities conducted during the five year project period include: Assessing tree cultivation and other techniques used to sequester carbon; Project site assessment; Greenhouse studies to determine optimum plant species and by-product application; Designing, constructing, operating, monitoring, and evaluating the CCWESTRS system; and Reporting (ongoing). The ability of the system to sequester carbon will be the primary measure of effectiveness, measured by accessing survival and growth response of plants within the CCWESTRS. In addition, costs associated with design, construction, and monitoring will be evaluated and compared to projected benefits of other carbon sequestration technologies. The test plan involves the application of three levels each of two types of power plant by-products--three levels of FGD gypsum mulch, and three levels of ash pond irrigation water. This design produces nine treatment levels which are being tested with two species of hardwood trees (sweet gum and sycamore). The project is examining the effectiveness of applications of 0, 8-cm, and 15-cm thick gypsum mulch layers and 0, 13 cm, and 25 cm of coal fly ash water for irrigation. Each treatment combination is being replicated three times, resulting in a total of 54 treatment plots (3 FGD gypsum levels X 3 irrigation water levels x 2 tree species x 3 replicates). Survival and growth response of plant species in terms of sequestering carbon in plant material and soil will be the primary measure of effectiveness of each treatment. Additionally, the ability of the site soils and unsaturated zone subsurface m

  20. Amine Functionalized Nanoporous Materials for Carbon Dioxide Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Feng; Addleman, Raymond S.; Aardahl, Chris L.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Brown, Daryl R.; Zemanian, Thomas S.

    2007-04-04

    Increasing CO2 concentration level in the earth atmosphere and rising global average temperature have raised serious concerns about the effects of anthropogenic CO2 on global climate change. Meanwhile, most analyses project that fossil fuels will continue to be the dominant energy source world wide until at least the middle of the twenty first century. Significant reduction from the current level of CO2 emission due to the consumption of fossil fuels is necessary to stabilize atmospheric concentration of CO2. The focus of this chapter will be on the CO2 capture technologies related to energy production from fossil fuels, as over one third of the worlds CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel use are attributed to fossil-fuel electric power-generation plants. Solid amine sorbents have promise to overcome some of the shortcomings of liquid amines for CO2 capture in energy production. The dispersion, immobilization, and confinement of the amine functional groups into a porous solid support can result in a more stable, more mass transfer efficient, less toxic, and less corrosive material than the corresponding liquid amines. Solid amine sorbents allow a dry scrubbing process where the energy penalty associated with the evaporation of a large amount of water is avoided. Further, the amine functional groups can be tailored for lower regeneration energy requirement. The supports can be tailored independently for high stability and low mass transfer resistance. This book chapter deals with the topics of solid amine sorbents (both supported and tethered amines) as the functional materials for CO2 separation. The design rational and the performance of such materials are discussed in detail. The state of the art in the synthesis and the CO2 capture performance of solid amine sorbent is reviewed.

  1. Development of a dynamic simulator for a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with post-combustion carbon capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liese, E.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    The AVESTAR Center located at the U.S. Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory and West Virginia University is a world-class research and training environment dedicated to using dynamic process simulation as a tool for advancing the safe, efficient and reliable operation of clean energy plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The AVESTAR Center was launched with a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion carbon capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator offers full-scope Operator Training Simulator (OTS) Human Machine Interface (HMI) graphics for realistic, real-time control room operation and is integrated with a 3D virtual Immersive Training Simulator (ITS), thus allowing joint control room and field operator training. The IGCC OTS/ITS solution combines a gasification with CO{sub 2} capture process simulator with a combined cycle power simulator into a single high-performance dynamic simulation framework. This presentation will describe progress on the development of a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) dynamic simulator based on the syngas-fired combined cycle portion of AVESTARs IGCC dynamic simulator. The 574 MW gross NGCC power plant design consisting of two advanced F-class gas turbines, two heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), and a steam turbine in a multi-shaft 2x2x1 configuration will be reviewed. Plans for integrating a post-combustion carbon capture system will also be discussed.

  2. Regenerable immobilized aminosilane sorbents for carbon dioxide capture applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gay, McMahan; Choi, Sunho; Jones, Christopher W

    2014-09-16

    A method for the separation of carbon dioxide from ambient air and flue gases is provided wherein a phase separating moiety with a second moiety are simultaneously coupled and bonded onto an inert substrate to create a mixture which is subsequently contacted with flue gases or ambient air. The phase-separating moiety is an amine whereas the second moiety is an aminosilane, or a Group 4 propoxide such as titanium (IV) propoxide (tetrapropyl orthotitanate, C.sub.12H.sub.28O.sub.4Ti). The second moiety makes the phase-separating moiety insoluble in the pores of the inert substrate. The new sorbents have a high carbon dioxide loading capacity and considerable stability over hundreds of cycles. The synthesis method is readily scalable for commercial and industrial production.

  3. Carbon Capture Innovation: Making an IMPACCT on Coal | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Capture Innovation: Making an IMPACCT on Coal Carbon Capture Innovation: Making an IMPACCT on Coal February 16, 2012 - 4:48pm Addthis The ICES team from Alliant Techsystems and ACENT Laboratories (L to R): Fred Gregory, Andy Robertson, Tony Castrogiovanni, Florin Girlea, Vincenzo Verrelli, Bon Calayag, Vladimir Balepin, Kirk Featherstone. | Courtesy of the ICES team. The ICES team from Alliant Techsystems and ACENT Laboratories (L to R): Fred Gregory, Andy Robertson, Tony Castrogiovanni, Florin

  4. A framework for optimization and quantification of uncertainty and sensitivity for developing carbon capture systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslick, John C.; Ng, Brenda; Gao, Qianwen; Tong, Charles H.; Sahinidis, Nikolaos V.; Miller, David C.

    2014-12-31

    Under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energys Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI), a Framework for Optimization and Quantification of Uncertainty and Sensitivity (FOQUS) has been developed. This tool enables carbon capture systems to be rapidly synthesized and rigorously optimized, in an environment that accounts for and propagates uncertainties in parameters and models. FOQUS currently enables (1) the development of surrogate algebraic models utilizing the ALAMO algorithm, which can be used for superstructure optimization to identify optimal process configurations, (2) simulation-based optimization utilizing derivative free optimization (DFO) algorithms with detailed black-box process models, and (3) rigorous uncertainty quantification through PSUADE. FOQUS utilizes another CCSI technology, the Turbine Science Gateway, to manage the thousands of simulated runs necessary for optimization and UQ. Thus, this computational framework has been demonstrated for the design and analysis of a solid sorbent based carbon capture system.

  5. A framework for optimization and quantification of uncertainty and sensitivity for developing carbon capture systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Eslick, John C.; Ng, Brenda; Gao, Qianwen; Tong, Charles H.; Sahinidis, Nikolaos V.; Miller, David C.

    2014-12-31

    Under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI), a Framework for Optimization and Quantification of Uncertainty and Sensitivity (FOQUS) has been developed. This tool enables carbon capture systems to be rapidly synthesized and rigorously optimized, in an environment that accounts for and propagates uncertainties in parameters and models. FOQUS currently enables (1) the development of surrogate algebraic models utilizing the ALAMO algorithm, which can be used for superstructure optimization to identify optimal process configurations, (2) simulation-based optimization utilizing derivative free optimization (DFO) algorithms with detailed black-box process models, and (3) rigorous uncertainty quantification throughmore » PSUADE. FOQUS utilizes another CCSI technology, the Turbine Science Gateway, to manage the thousands of simulated runs necessary for optimization and UQ. Thus, this computational framework has been demonstrated for the design and analysis of a solid sorbent based carbon capture system.« less

  6. U.S. China Carbon Capture and Storage Development Project at West Virginia

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    University (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect U.S. China Carbon Capture and Storage Development Project at West Virginia University Citation Details In-Document Search Title: U.S. China Carbon Capture and Storage Development Project at West Virginia University × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize

  7. Secretary Chu Announces Up To $154 Million for NRG Energy's Carbon Capture

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Storage Project in Texas | Department of Energy Up To $154 Million for NRG Energy's Carbon Capture and Storage Project in Texas Secretary Chu Announces Up To $154 Million for NRG Energy's Carbon Capture and Storage Project in Texas March 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu announced today that a project with NRG Energy has been selected to receive up to $154 million, including funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Located in

  8. Secretary Chu Announces Up To $154 Million for NRG Energy's Carbon Capture

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Storage Project in Texas | Department of Energy Up To $154 Million for NRG Energy's Carbon Capture and Storage Project in Texas Secretary Chu Announces Up To $154 Million for NRG Energy's Carbon Capture and Storage Project in Texas March 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington - U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu announced today that a project with NRG Energy has been selected to receive up to $154 million, including funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Located in

  9. Multi-Phase CFD Modeling of Solid Sorbent Carbon Capture System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, Emily M.; DeCroix, David; Breault, Ronald W.; Xu, Wei; Huckaby, E. D.; Saha, Kringan; Darteville, Sebastien; Sun, Xin

    2013-07-30

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to investigate a low temperature post-combustion carbon capture reactor. The CFD models are based on a small scale solid sorbent carbon capture reactor design from ADA-ES and Southern Company. The reactor is a fluidized bed design based on a silica-supported amine sorbent. CFD models using both Eulerian-Eulerian and Eulerian-Lagrangian multi-phase modeling methods are developed to investigate the hydrodynamics and adsorption of carbon dioxide in the reactor. Models developed in both FLUENT and BARRACUDA are presented to explore the strengths and weaknesses of state of the art CFD codes for modeling multi-phase carbon capture reactors. The results of the simulations show that the FLUENT Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations (DDPM) are unstable for the given reactor design; while the BARRACUDA Eulerian-Lagrangian model is able to simulate the system given appropriate simplifying assumptions. FLUENT Eulerian-Eulerian simulations also provide a stable solution for the carbon capture reactor given the appropriate simplifying assumptions.

  10. Multi-phase CFD modeling of solid sorbent carbon capture system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, E. M.; DeCroix, D.; Breault, Ronald W.; Xu, W.; Huckaby, E. David

    2013-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to investigate a low temperature post-combustion carbon capture reactor. The CFD models are based on a small scale solid sorbent carbon capture reactor design from ADA-ES and Southern Company. The reactor is a fluidized bed design based on a silica-supported amine sorbent. CFD models using both EulerianEulerian and EulerianLagrangian multi-phase modeling methods are developed to investigate the hydrodynamics and adsorption of carbon dioxide in the reactor. Models developed in both FLUENT and BARRACUDA are presented to explore the strengths and weaknesses of state of the art CFD codes for modeling multi-phase carbon capture reactors. The results of the simulations show that the FLUENT EulerianLagrangian simulations (DDPM) are unstable for the given reactor design; while the BARRACUDA EulerianLagrangian model is able to simulate the system given appropriate simplifying assumptions. FLUENT EulerianEulerian simulations also provide a stable solution for the carbon capture reactor given the appropriate simplifying assumptions.

  11. First-of-its-Kind Carbon Capture and Conversion Demonstration Technology Opening in Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON D.C. — Today, the Department of Energy and Skyonic Corporation marked the opening of a major project demonstration for converting carbon dioxide (CO2) into commercial products. This new plant will use a first-of-its-kind process to capture 75,000 tons of CO2 from a San Antonio, Texas, cement plant and convert the greenhouse gas into other products, including sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate, hydrochloric acid and bleach.

  12. Recent advances in carbon dioxide capture with metal-organic frameworks |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Recent advances in carbon dioxide capture with metal-organic frameworks Previous Next List Yangyang Liu, Zhiyong U. Wang, Hong-Cai Zhou, Greenhouse Gas Sci Technol, 2: 239-259, 2012 DOI: 10.1002/ghg.1296 Abstract: Uncontrolled massive release of the primary greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) into atmosphere from anthropogenic activities poses a big threat and adversely affects our global climate and natural

  13. Polymer-encapsulated carbon capture liquids that tolerate precipitation of solids for increased capacity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, Roger D; Bourcier, William L; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Stolaroff, Joshuah K

    2015-02-03

    A system for carbon dioxide capture from flue gas and other industrial gas sources utilizes microcapsules with very thin polymer shells. The contents of the microcapsules can be liquids or mixtures of liquids and solids. The microcapsules are exposed to the flue gas and other industrial gas and take up carbon dioxide from the flue gas and other industrial gas and eventual precipitate solids in the capsule.

  14. PRELIMINARY CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY STUDY EVALUATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM EXISTING COAL FIRED PLANTS BY HYBRID SORPTION USING SOLID SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, Steven; Envergex, Srivats; Browers, Bruce; Thumbi, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Barr Engineering Co. was retained by the Institute for Energy Studies (IES) at University of North Dakota (UND) to conduct a technical and economic feasibility analysis of an innovative hybrid sorbent technology (CACHYS™) for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and separation from coal combustion–derived flue gas. The project team for this effort consists of the University of North Dakota, Envergex LLC, Barr Engineering Co., and Solex Thermal Science, along with industrial support from Allete, BNI Coal, SaskPower, and the North Dakota Lignite Energy Council. An initial economic and feasibility study of the CACHYS™ concept, including definition of the process, development of process flow diagrams (PFDs), material and energy balances, equipment selection, sizing and costing, and estimation of overall capital and operating costs, is performed by Barr with information provided by UND and Envergex. The technology—Capture from Existing Coal-Fired Plants by Hybrid Sorption Using Solid Sorbents Capture (CACHYS™)—is a novel solid sorbent technology based on the following ideas: reduction of energy for sorbent regeneration, utilization of novel process chemistry, contactor conditions that minimize sorbent-CO2 heat of reaction and promote fast CO2 capture, and a low-cost method of heat management. The technology’s other key component is the use of a low-cost sorbent.

  15. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    None 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored...

  16. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of high efficiency coal gasification...

  17. National Carbon Capture Center Launches Post-Combustion Test...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Washington, D.C. - The recent successful commissioning of an Alabama-based test facility ... The NCCC works collaboratively with technology developers worldwide to test and evaluate ...

  18. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology...

  19. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. ...

  20. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of high efficiency coal gasification...

  1. High Temperature Polybenzimidazole Hollow Fiber Membranes for Hydrogen Separation and Carbon Dioxide Capture from Synthesis Gas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Singh, Rajinder P.; Dahe, Ganpat J.; Dudeck, Kevin W.; Welch, Cynthia F.; Berchtold, Kathryn A.

    2014-12-31

    Sustainable reliance on hydrocarbon feedstocks for energy generation requires CO₂ separation technology development for energy efficient carbon capture from industrial mixed gas streams. High temperature H₂ selective glassy polymer membranes are an attractive option for energy efficient H₂/CO₂ separations in advanced power production schemes with integrated carbon capture. They enable high overall process efficiencies by providing energy efficient CO₂ separations at process relevant operating conditions and correspondingly, minimized parasitic energy losses. Polybenzimidazole (PBI)-based materials have demonstrated commercially attractive H₂/CO₂ separation characteristics and exceptional tolerance to hydrocarbon fuel derived synthesis (syngas) gas operating conditions and chemical environments. To realize a commerciallymore » attractive carbon capture technology based on these PBI materials, development of high performance, robust PBI hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) is required. In this work, we discuss outcomes of our recent efforts to demonstrate and optimize the fabrication and performance of PBI HFMs for use in pre-combustion carbon capture schemes. These efforts have resulted in PBI HFMs with commercially attractive fabrication protocols, defect minimized structures, and commercially attractive permselectivity characteristics at IGCC syngas process relevant conditions. The H₂/CO₂ separation performance of these PBI HFMs presented in this document regarding realistic process conditions is greater than that of any other polymeric system reported to-date.« less

  2. New Roadmap Updates Status of DOE Carbon Capture and Storage RD&D Efforts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An overview of research, development, and demonstration efforts to supply cost-effective, advanced carbon capture and storage technologies for coal-based power systems is the focus of a new roadmap published by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. Thermokinetic/mass-transfer analysis of carbon capture for reuse/sequestration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stechel, Ellen Beth; Brady, Patrick Vane; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Luketa, Anay Josephine

    2010-09-01

    Effective capture of atmospheric carbon is a key bottleneck preventing non bio-based, carbon-neutral production of synthetic liquid hydrocarbon fuels using CO{sub 2} as the carbon feedstock. Here we outline the boundary conditions of atmospheric carbon capture for recycle to liquid hydrocarbon fuels production and re-use options and we also identify the technical advances that must be made for such a process to become technically and commercially viable at scale. While conversion of atmospheric CO{sub 2} into a pure feedstock for hydrocarbon fuels synthesis is presently feasible at the bench-scale - albeit at high cost energetically and economically - the methods and materials needed to concentrate large amounts of CO{sub 2} at low cost and high efficiency remain technically immature. Industrial-scale capture must entail: (1) Processing of large volumes of air through an effective CO{sub 2} capture media and (2) Efficient separation of CO{sub 2} from the processed air flow into a pure stream of CO{sub 2}.

  4. EIS-0464: Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Project in Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of providing financial assistance for the construction and operation of a project proposed by Leucadia Energy, LLC. DOE selected this project for an award of financial assistance through a competitive process under the Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration Program.

  5. Department of Energy Awards $20 Million for Project to Advance Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy has announced that Ramgen Power Systems LLC, Bellevue, Washington, has been awarded $20 million in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to scale up a device that uses supersonic shockwaves to compress carbon dioxide (CO2) for capture and storage.

  6. High Temperature Polybenzimidazole Hollow Fiber Membranes for Hydrogen Separation and Carbon Dioxide Capture from Synthesis Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Rajinder P.; Dahe, Ganpat J.; Dudeck, Kevin W.; Welch, Cynthia F.; Berchtold, Kathryn A.

    2014-12-31

    Sustainable reliance on hydrocarbon feedstocks for energy generation requires CO? separation technology development for energy efficient carbon capture from industrial mixed gas streams. High temperature H? selective glassy polymer membranes are an attractive option for energy efficient H?/CO? separations in advanced power production schemes with integrated carbon capture. They enable high overall process efficiencies by providing energy efficient CO? separations at process relevant operating conditions and correspondingly, minimized parasitic energy losses. Polybenzimidazole (PBI)-based materials have demonstrated commercially attractive H?/CO? separation characteristics and exceptional tolerance to hydrocarbon fuel derived synthesis (syngas) gas operating conditions and chemical environments. To realize a commercially attractive carbon capture technology based on these PBI materials, development of high performance, robust PBI hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) is required. In this work, we discuss outcomes of our recent efforts to demonstrate and optimize the fabrication and performance of PBI HFMs for use in pre-combustion carbon capture schemes. These efforts have resulted in PBI HFMs with commercially attractive fabrication protocols, defect minimized structures, and commercially attractive permselectivity characteristics at IGCC syngas process relevant conditions. The H?/CO? separation performance of these PBI HFMs presented in this document regarding realistic process conditions is greater than that of any other polymeric system reported to-date.

  7. Energy Department Advances Carbon Capture and Storage Research on Two Fronts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forty-three research projects that will advance carbon capture and storage technologies while providing graduate and undergraduate student training opportunities at universities across the country will be supported by $12.7 million in U.S. Department of Energy funding announced today.

  8. Press Releases | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy ---Wind energy --Fossil fuels ---Coal ----Carbon capture & sequestration ---Oil ... & nonproliferation --Research reactor conversion -Biometrics -Biotechnology for national ...

  9. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon Dioxide Capture for Natural Gas and Industrial Applications Technology Assessment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Gas and Industrial Applications Carbon Dioxide Capture Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial

  10. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technology Assessment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Gas and Industrial Applications Carbon Dioxide Capture Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial

  11. Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative: A Case Study in Multi-Scale Modeling and New Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David C; Syamlal, Madhava; Zitney, Stephen E.

    2014-06-07

    Abstract: Advanced multi-scale modeling and simulation has the potential to dramatically reduce development time, resulting in considerable cost savings. The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and universities that is developing and deploying a suite of multi-scale modeling and simulation tools including basic data submodels, steady-state and dynamic process models, process optimization and uncertainty quantification tools, an advanced dynamic process control framework, high-resolution filtered computational-fluid-dynamic (CFD) submodels, validated high-fidelity device-scale CFD models with quantified uncertainty, and a risk analysis framework. These tools and models enable basic data submodels, including thermodynamics and kinetics, to be used within detailed process models to synthesize and optimize a process. The resulting process informs the development of process control systems and more detailed simulations of potential equipment to improve the design and reduce scale-up risk. Quantification and propagation of uncertainty across scales is an essential part of these tools and models.

  12. Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative: A Case Study in Multi-Scale Modeling and New Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David; Syamlal, Madhava; Mebane, David; Storlie, Curtis; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Sahinidis, Nikolaos V.; Agarwal, Deborah A.; Tong, Charles; Zitney, Stephen E.; Sarkar, Avik; Sun, Xin; Sundaresan, Sankaran; Ryan, Emily M.; Engel, David W.; Dale, Crystal

    2014-04-01

    Advanced multi-scale modeling and simulation has the potential to dramatically reduce development time, resulting in considerable cost savings. The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and universities that is developing and deploying a suite of multi-scale modeling and simulation tools including basic data submodels, steady-state and dynamic process models, process optimization and uncertainty quantification tools, an advanced dynamic process control framework, high-resolution filtered computational-fluid-dynamic (CFD) submodels, validated high-fidelity device-scale CFD models with quantified uncertainty, and a risk analysis framework. These tools and models enable basic data submodels, including thermodynamics and kinetics, to be used within detailed process models to synthesize and optimize a process. The resulting process informs the development of process control systems and more detailed simulations of potential equipment to improve the design and reduce scale-up risk. Quantification and propagation of uncertainty across scales is an essential part of these tools and models.

  13. Bench Scale Thin Film Composite Hollow Fiber Membranes for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glaser, Paul; Bhandari, Dhaval; Narang, Kristi; McCloskey, Pat; Singh, Surinder; Ananthasayanam, Balajee; Howson, Paul; Lee, Julia; Wroczynski, Ron; Stewart, Frederick; Orme, Christopher; Klaehn, John; McNally, Joshua; Rownaghi, Ali; Lu, Liu; Koros, William; Goizueta, Roberto; Sethi, Vijay

    2015-04-01

    GE Global Research, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), and Western Research Institute (WRI) proposed to develop high performance thin film polymer composite hollow fiber membranes and advanced processes for economical post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from pulverized coal flue gas at temperatures typical of existing flue gas cleanup processes. The project sought to develop and then optimize new gas separations membrane systems at the bench scale, including tuning the properties of a novel polyphosphazene polymer in a coating solution and fabricating highly engineered porous hollow fiber supports. The project also sought to define the processes needed to coat the fiber support to manufacture composite hollow fiber membranes with high performance, ultra-thin separation layers. Physical, chemical, and mechanical stability of the materials (individual and composite) towards coal flue gas components was considered via exposure and performance tests. Preliminary design, technoeconomic, and economic feasibility analyses were conducted to evaluate the overall performance and impact of the process on the cost of electricity (COE) for a coal-fired plant including capture technologies. At the onset of the project, Membranes based on coupling a novel selective material polyphosphazene with an engineered hollow fiber support was found to have the potential to capture greater than 90% of the CO2 in flue gas with less than 35% increase in COE, which would achieve the DOE-targeted performance criteria. While lab-scale results for the polyphosphazene materials were very promising, and the material was incorporated into hollow-fiber modules, difficulties were encountered relating to the performance of these membrane systems over time. Performance, as measured by both flux of and selectivity for CO2 over other flue gas constituents was found to deteriorate over time, suggesting a system that was more dynamic than initially hypothesized. These phenomena are believed to be associated with the physical and mechanical properties of the separation material, rather than chemical degradation by flue gas or one of its constituents. Strategies to improve the composite systems via alternate chemistries and processing techniques were only partially successful in creating a more robust system, but the research provided critical insight into the barriers to engineering sophisticated composite systems for gas separation. Promising concepts, including a re-engineering of the separation material with interpenetrating polymer networks were identified which may prove useful to future efforts in this field.

  14. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Surinder; Spiry, Irina; Wood, Benjamin; Hancu, Dan; Chen, Wei

    2014-07-01

    This report presents system and economicanalysis for a carbon-capture unit which uses an aminosilicone-based solvent for CO₂ capture in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The aminosilicone solvent is a 60/40 wt/wt mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) with tri-ethylene glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. Forcomparison purposes, the report also shows results for a carbon-capture unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). The first year removal cost of CO₂ for the aminosilicone-based carbon-capture process is $46.04/ton of CO₂ as compared to $60.25/ton of CO₂ when MEA is used. The aminosilicone- based process has <77% of the CAPEX of a system using MEA solvent. The lower CAPEX is due to several factors, including the higher working capacity of the aminosilicone solvent compared the MEA, which reduces the solvent flow rate required, reducing equipment sizes. If it is determined that carbon steel can be used in the rich-lean heat exchanger in the carbon capture unit, the first year removal cost of CO₂ decreases to $44.12/ton. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a higherthermal stability than MEA, allowing desorption to be conducted at higher temperatures and pressures, decreasing the number of compressor stages needed. The aminosilicone-based solvent also has a lowervapor pressure, allowing the desorption to be conducted in a continuous-stirred tank reactor versus a more expensive packed column. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a lowerheat capacity, which decreases the heat load on the desorber. In summary, the amino-silicone solvent has significant advantages overconventional systems using MEA.

  15. Using Advanced Modeling to Accelerate the Scale-Up of Carbon Capture Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David; Sun, Xin; Storlie, Curtis; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu

    2015-06-18

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is one of many approaches that are critical for significantly reducing domestic and global CO2 emissions. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Clean Coal Technology Program Plan envisions 2nd generation CO2 capture technologies ready for demonstration-scale testing around 2020 with the goal of enabling commercial deployment by 2025 [1]. Third generation technologies have a similarly aggressive timeline. A major challenge is that the development and scale-up of new technologies in the energy sector historically takes up to 15 years to move from the laboratory to pre-deployment and another 20 to 30 years for widespread industrial scale deployment. In order to help meet the goals of the DOE carbon capture program, the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) was launched in early 2011 to develop, demonstrate, and deploy advanced computational tools and validated multi-scale models to reduce the time required to develop and scale up new carbon capture technologies. The CCSI Toolset (1) enables promising concepts to be more quickly identified through rapid computational screening of processes and devices, (2) reduces the time to design and troubleshoot new devices and processes by using optimization techniques to focus development on the best overall process conditions and by using detailed device-scale models to better understand and improve the internal behavior of complex equipment, and (3) provides quantitative predictions of device and process performance during scale up based on rigorously validated smaller scale simulations that take into account model and parameter uncertainty[2]. This article focuses on essential elements related to the development and validation of multi-scale models in order to help minimize risk and maximize learning as new technologies progress from pilot to demonstration scale.

  16. Report of the Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-08-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) refers to a set of technologies that can greatly reduce carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from new and existing coal- and gas-fired power plants, industrial processes, and other stationary sources of CO{sub 2}. In its application to electricity generation, CCS could play an important role in achieving national and global greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction goals. However, widespread cost-effective deployment of CCS will occur only if the technology is commercially available and a supportive national policy framework is in place. In keeping with that objective, on February 3, 2010, President Obama established an Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage composed of 14 Executive Departments and Federal Agencies. The Task Force, co-chaired by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), was charged with proposing a plan to overcome the barriers to the widespread, cost-effective deployment of CCS within ten years, with a goal of bringing five to ten commercial demonstration projects online by 2016. Composed of more than 100 Federal employees, the Task Force examined challenges facing early CCS projects as well as factors that could inhibit widespread commercial deployment of CCS. In developing the findings and recommendations outlined in this report, the Task Force relied on published literature and individual input from more than 100 experts and stakeholders, as well as public comments submitted to the Task Force. The Task Force also held a large public meeting and several targeted stakeholder briefings. While CCS can be applied to a variety of stationary sources of CO{sub 2}, its application to coal-fired power plant emissions offers the greatest potential for GHG reductions. Coal has served as an important domestic source of reliable, affordable energy for decades, and the coal industry has provided stable and quality high-paying jobs for American workers. At the same time, coal-fired power plants are the largest contributor to U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and coal combustion accounts for 40 percent of global carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from the consumption of energy. EPA and Energy Information Administration (EIA) assessments of recent climate and energy legislative proposals show that, if available on a cost-effective basis, CCS can over time play a large role in reducing the overall cost of meeting domestic emissions reduction targets. By playing a leadership role in efforts to develop and deploy CCS technologies to reduce GHG emissions, the United States can preserve the option of using an affordable, abundant, and domestic energy resource, help improve national security, help to maximize production from existing oil fields through enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and assist in the creation of new technologies for export. While there are no insurmountable technological, legal, institutional, regulatory or other barriers that prevent CCS from playing a role in reducing GHG emissions, early CCS projects face economic challenges related to climate policy uncertainty, first-of-a-kind technology risks, and the current high cost of CCS relative to other technologies. Administration analyses of proposed climate change legislation suggest that CCS technologies will not be widely deployed in the next two decades absent financial incentives that supplement projected carbon prices. In addition to the challenges associated with cost, these projects will need to meet regulatory requirements that are currently under development. Long-standing regulatory programs are being adapted to meet the circumstances of CCS, but limited experience and institutional capacity at the Federal and State level may hinder implementation of CCS-specific requirements. Key legal issues, such as long-term liability and property rights, also need resolution. A climate policy designed to reduce our Nation's GHG emissions is the most important step for commercial deployment of low-carbon technologies such as CCS, because it will create a stable, long-term framework for private investments. A concerted effort to properly address financial, economic, technological, legal, institutional, and social barriers will enable CCS to be a viable climate change mitigation option that can over time play an important role in reducing the overall cost of meeting domestic and global emissions reduction targets. Federal and State agencies can use existing authorities and programs to begin addressing these barriers while ensuring appropriate safeguards are in place to protect the environment and public health and safety.

  17. EVALUATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM EXISTING COAL FIRED PLANTS BY HYBRID SORPTION USING SOLID SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, Steven; Browers, Bruce; Srinivasachar, Srivats; Laudal, Daniel

    2014-12-31

    Under contract DE-FE0007603, the University of North Dakota conducted the project Evaluation of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Existing Coal Fired Plants by Hybrid Sorption Using Solid Sorbents. As an important element of this effort, a Technical and Economic Feasibility Study was conducted by Barr Engineering Co. (Barr) in association with the University of North Dakota. The assessment developed a process flow diagram, major equipment list, heat balances for the SCPC power plant, capital cost estimate, operating cost estimate, levelized cost of electricity, cost of CO2 capture ($/ton) and three sensitivity cases for the CACHYS™ process.

  18. Method and system for capturing carbon dioxide and/or sulfur dioxide from gas stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Li, Yang; Zhao, Xinglei

    2014-07-08

    The present invention provides a system for capturing CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2, comprising: (a) a CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2 absorber comprising an amine and/or amino acid salt capable of absorbing the CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2 to produce a CO.sub.2- and/or SO.sub.2-containing solution; (b) an amine regenerator to regenerate the amine and/or amino acid salt; and, when the system captures CO.sub.2, (c) an alkali metal carbonate regenerator comprising an ammonium catalyst capable catalyzing the aqueous alkali metal bicarbonate into the alkali metal carbonate and CO.sub.2 gas. The present invention also provides for a system for capturing SO.sub.2, comprising: (a) a SO.sub.2 absorber comprising aqueous alkali metal carbonate, wherein the alkali metal carbonate is capable of absorbing the SO.sub.2 to produce an alkali metal sulfite/sulfate precipitate and CO.sub.2.

  19. Carbon Capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  20. Chemically Accelerated Carbon Mineralization: Chemical and Biological Catalytic Enhancement of Weathering of Silicate Minerals as Novel Carbon Capture and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-01

    IMPACCT Project: Columbia University is developing a process to pull CO2 out of the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants and turn it into a solid that can be easily and safely transported, stored above ground, or integrated into value-added products (e.g. paper filler, plastic filler, construction materials, etc.). In nature, the reaction of CO2 with various minerals over long periods of time will yield a solid carbonatethis process is known as carbon mineralization. The use of carbon mineralization as a CO2 capture and storage method is limited by the speeds at which these minerals can be dissolved and CO2 can be hydrated. To facilitate this, Columbia University is using a unique process and a combination of chemical catalysts which increase the mineral dissolution rate, and the enzymatic catalyst carbonic anhydrase which speeds up the hydration of CO2.

  1. Highly stable beta-class carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alvizo, Oscar; Benoit, Michael R; Novick, Scott J

    2013-08-20

    The present disclosure relates to .beta.-class carbonic anhydrase polypeptides having improved properties including increased thermostability and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides formulations and uses of the polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering. Also provided are polynucleotides encoding the carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and host cells capable of expressing them.

  2. Highly stable beta-class carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alvizo, Oscar; Benoit, Mike; Novick, Scott

    2013-04-16

    The present disclosure relates to .beta.-class carbonic anhydrase polypeptides having improved properties including increased thermostability and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides formulations and uses of the polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering. Also provided are polynucleotides encoding the carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and host cells capable of expressing them.

  3. Integrated Mid-Continent Carbon Capture, Sequestration & Enhanced Oil Recovery Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson

    2010-08-31

    A consortium of research partners led by the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration and industry partners, including CAP CO2 LLC, Blue Source LLC, Coffeyville Resources, Nitrogen Fertilizers LLC, Ash Grove Cement Company, Kansas Ethanol LLC, Headwaters Clean Carbon Services, Black & Veatch, and Schlumberger Carbon Services, conducted a feasibility study of a large-scale CCS commercialization project that included large-scale CO{sub 2} sources. The overall objective of this project, entitled the 'Integrated Mid-Continent Carbon Capture, Sequestration and Enhanced Oil Recovery Project' was to design an integrated system of US mid-continent industrial CO{sub 2} sources with CO{sub 2} capture, and geologic sequestration in deep saline formations and in oil field reservoirs with concomitant EOR. Findings of this project suggest that deep saline sequestration in the mid-continent region is not feasible without major financial incentives, such as tax credits or otherwise, that do not exist at this time. However, results of the analysis suggest that enhanced oil recovery with carbon sequestration is indeed feasible and practical for specific types of geologic settings in the Midwestern U.S.

  4. Polyamine-Tethered Porous Polymer Networks for Carbon Dioxide Capture from

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flue Gas | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Polyamine-Tethered Porous Polymer Networks for Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Previous Next List Weigang Lu, Julian P. Sculley, Daqiang Yuan, Rajamani Krishna, Zhangwen Wei, Hong-Cai Zhou, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 51, 7480-7484 (2012) DOI: 10.1002/anie.201202176 Thumbnail image of graphical abstract Abstract: The introduction of polyamines in porous polymer networks results in significant

  5. Global warming and the future of coal carbon capture and storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Berlin; Robert M. Sussman

    2007-05-15

    The paper considers how best to change the economic calculus of power plant developers so they internalize CCS costs when selecting new generation technologies. Five policy tools are analyzed: establishing a greenhouse gas cap-and-trade program; imposing carbon taxes; defining CCS systems as a so-called Best Available Control Technology for new power plants under the USA Clean Air Act's New Source Review program; developing a 'low carbon portfolio' standard that requires utilities to provide an increasing proportion of power from low-carbon generation sources over time; and requiring all new coal power plants to meet an 'emission performance' standard that limits CO{sub 2} emissions to levels achievable with CCS systems. Each of these tools has advantages and drawbacks but an emission performance standard for new power plants is likely to be most effective in spurring broad-scale adoption of CCS systems. Chapter headings are: global warming and the future of coal; new coal-fired power plants threaten all other efforts to combat global warming; a potential path to zero emissions through carbon capture and storage; CO{sub 2} capture at coal plants: the promise of IGCC and other technologies; barriers to commercialization of IGCC technology; crossing the chasm: a new policy framework to push ccs implementation forward; encouraging CCS systems with carbon caps and trading programs; using the existing Clean Air Act to require CCS systems for new coal plants; retail low carbon portfolio standard; carbon tax; emission performance standards for new coal power plants; and conclusions. 16 figs.

  6. Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture and Storage Project Topical Report: Preliminary Public Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guy Cerimele

    2011-09-30

    This Preliminary Public Design Report consolidates for public use nonproprietary design information on the Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture & Storage project. The report is based on the preliminary design information developed during the Phase I - Project Definition Phase, spanning the time period of February 1, 2010 through September 30, 2011. The report includes descriptions and/or discussions for: (1) DOE's Clean Coal Power Initiative, overall project & Phase I objectives, and the historical evolution of DOE and American Electric Power (AEP) sponsored projects leading to the current project; (2) Alstom's Chilled Ammonia Process (CAP) carbon capture retrofit technology and the carbon storage and monitoring system; (3) AEP's retrofit approach in terms of plant operational and integration philosophy; (4) The process island equipment and balance of plant systems for the CAP technology; (5) The carbon storage system, addressing injection wells, monitoring wells, system monitoring and controls logic philosophy; (6) Overall project estimate that includes the overnight cost estimate, cost escalation for future year expenditures, and major project risks that factored into the development of the risk based contingency; and (7) AEP's decision to suspend further work on the project at the end of Phase I, notwithstanding its assessment that the Alstom CAP technology is ready for commercial demonstration at the intended scale.

  7. DOE Selects Projects to Develop Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Technologies for Coal-Based Gasification Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy today announced the selection of nine projects that will develop pre-combustion carbon capture technologies that can reduce CO2 emissions in future coal-based integrated gasification combined cycle power plants.

  8. Applications of carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies in reducing emissions from fossil-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balat, M.; Balat, H.; Oz, C.

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the global contribution of carbon capture and storage technologies to mitigating climate change. Carbon capture and storage is a technology that comprises the separation of from carbon dioxide industrial- and energy-related sources, transport to a storage location (e.g., saline aquifers and depleted hydrocarbon fields), and long-term isolation from the atmosphere. The carbon dioxides emitted directly at the power stations are reduced by 80 to 90%. In contrast, the life cycle assessment shows substantially lower reductions of greenhouse gases in total (minus 65 to 79%).

  9. Carbon Capture and Storage in the Permian Basin, a Regional Technology Transfer and Training Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rychel, Dwight

    2013-09-30

    The Permian Basin Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage (CCUS) Training Center was one of seven regional centers formed in 2009 under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and managed by the Department of Energy. Based in the Permian Basin, it is focused on the utilization of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) projects for the long term storage of CO2 while producing a domestic oil and revenue stream. It delivers training to students, oil and gas professionals, regulators, environmental and academia through a robust web site, newsletter, tech alerts, webinars, self-paced online courses, one day workshops, and two day high level forums. While course material prominently features all aspects of the capture, transportation and EOR utilization of CO2, the audience focus is represented by its high level forums where selected graduate students with an interest in CCUS interact with Industry experts and in-house workshops for the regulatory community.

  10. Development of a Risk-Based Comparison Methodology of Carbon Capture Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Dale, Crystal; Thompson, Julie; Leclaire, Rene; Edward, Bryan; Jones, Edward

    2014-06-01

    Given the varying degrees of maturity among existing carbon capture (CC) technology alternatives, an understanding of the inherent technical and financial risk and uncertainty associated with these competing technologies is requisite to the success of carbon capture as a viable solution to the greenhouse gas emission challenge. The availability of tools and capabilities to conduct rigorous, riskbased technology comparisons is thus highly desirable for directing valuable resources toward the technology option(s) with a high return on investment, superior carbon capture performance, and minimum risk. To address this research need, we introduce a novel risk-based technology comparison method supported by an integrated multi-domain risk model set to estimate risks related to technological maturity, technical performance, and profitability. Through a comparison between solid sorbent and liquid solvent systems, we illustrate the feasibility of estimating risk and quantifying uncertainty in a single domain (modular analytical capability) as well as across multiple risk dimensions (coupled analytical capability) for comparison. This method brings technological maturity and performance to bear on profitability projections, and carries risk and uncertainty modeling across domains via inter-model sharing of parameters, distributions, and input/output. The integration of the models facilitates multidimensional technology comparisons within a common probabilistic risk analysis framework. This approach and model set can equip potential technology adopters with the necessary computational capabilities to make risk-informed decisions about CC technology investment. The method and modeling effort can also be extended to other industries where robust tools and analytical capabilities are currently lacking for evaluating nascent technologies.

  11. Carbon Capture and Storage FutureGen 2.0 Project Moves Forward Into Second

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Phase | Department of Energy FutureGen 2.0 Project Moves Forward Into Second Phase Carbon Capture and Storage FutureGen 2.0 Project Moves Forward Into Second Phase February 4, 2013 - 7:25pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Following the successful completion of the first phase, the Energy Department today announced the beginning of Phase II of project development with a new cooperative agreement between the FutureGen Industrial Alliance and the Department of Energy for

  12. From Fundamental Understanding To Predicting New Nanomaterials For High Capacity Hydrogen/Methane Storage and Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yildirim, Taner

    2015-03-03

    On-board hydrogen/methane storage in fuel cell-powered vehicles is a major component of the national need to achieve energy independence and protect the environment. The main obstacles in hydrogen storage are slow kinetics, poor reversibility and high dehydrogenation temperatures for the chemical hydrides; and very low desorption temperatures/energies for the physisorption materials (MOF’s, porous carbons). Similarly, the current methane storage technologies are mainly based on physisorption in porous materials but the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities are below the target values. Finally, carbon capture, a critical component of the mitigation of CO2 emissions from industrial plants, also suffers from similar problems. The solid-absorbers such as MOFs are either not stable against real flue-gas conditions and/or do not have large enough CO2 capture capacity to be practical and cost effective. In this project, we addressed these challenges using a unique combination of computational, synthetic and experimental methods. The main scope of our research was to achieve fundamental understanding of the chemical and structural interactions governing the storage and release of hydrogen/methane and carbon capture in a wide spectrum of candidate materials. We studied the effect of scaffolding and doping of the candidate materials on their storage and dynamics properties. We reviewed current progress, challenges and prospect in closely related fields of hydrogen/methane storage and carbon capture.[1-5] For example, for physisorption based storage materials, we show that tap-densities or simply pressing MOFs into pellet forms reduce the uptake capacities by half and therefore packing MOFs is one of the most important challenges going forward. For room temperature hydrogen storage application of MOFs, we argue that MOFs are the most promising scaffold materials for Ammonia-Borane (AB) because of their unique interior active metal-centers for AB binding and well defined and ordered pores. Here the main challenge is to find a chemically stable MOF required for regeneration of the AB-spent fuel. Finally, for carbon capture application of MOFs, we investigate the performance of a number of metal–organic frameworks with particular focus on their behavior at the low pressures commonly used in swing adsorption. This comparison clearly shows that it is the process that determines which MOF is optimal rather than there being one best MOF, though MOFs that possess enhanced binding at open metal sites generally perform better than those with high surface area. References: 1. Y. Peng, V. Krungleviciute, J. T. Hupp, O. K. Farha, and T. Yildirim, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 135, 11887 (2013). 2. G. Srinivas, V. Krungleviciute, Z. Guo, and T. Yildirim, Ener. Environ. Sci. 7, 335 (2014). 3. G. Burres, and T. Yildirim, Ener. Environ. Sci. 5, 6453 (2012). 4. G. Srinivas, W. Travis, J. Ford, H. Wu, Z. X. Guo, and T. Yildirim, J. Mat. Chem.1, 4167 (2013). 5. For details, please see http://www.ncnr.nist.gov/staff/taner

  13. Carbon dioxide postcombustion capture: a novel screening study of the carbon dioxide absorption performance of 76 amines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graeme Puxty; Robert Rowland; Andrew Allport; Qi Yang; Mark Bown; Robert Burns; Marcel Maeder; Moetaz Attalla

    2009-08-15

    The significant and rapid reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is recognized as necessary to mitigate the potential climate effects from global warming. The postcombustion capture (PCC) and storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) produced from the use of fossil fuels for electricity generation is a key technology needed to achieve these reductions. The most mature technology for CO{sub 2} capture is reversible chemical absorption into an aqueous amine solution. In this study the results from measurements of the CO{sub 2} absorption capacity of aqueous amine solutions for 76 different amines are presented. Measurements were made using both a novel isothermal gravimetric analysis (IGA) method and a traditional absorption apparatus. Seven amines, consisting of one primary, three secondary, and three tertiary amines, were identified as exhibiting outstanding absorption capacities. Most have a number of structural features in common including steric hindrance and hydroxyl functionality 2 or 3 carbons from the nitrogen. Initial CO{sub 2} absorption rate data from the IGA measurements was also used to indicate relative absorption rates. Most of the outstanding performers in terms of capacity also showed initial absorption rates comparable to the industry standard monoethanolamine (MEA). This indicates, in terms of both absorption capacity and kinetics, that they are promising candidates for further investigation. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  14. The lifetime of carbon capture and storage as a climate-change mitigation technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juanes, Ruben

    2013-12-30

    In carbon capture and storage (CCS), CO2 is captured at power plants and then injected underground into reservoirs like deep saline aquifers for long-term storage. While CCS may be critical for the continued use of fossil fuels in a carbon-constrained world, the deployment of CCS has been hindered by uncertainty in geologic storage capacities and sustainable injection rates, which has contributed to the absence of concerted government policy. Here, we clarify the potential of CCS to mitigate emissions in the United States by developing a storage-capacity supply curve that, unlike current large-scale capacity estimates, is derived from the fluid mechanics of CO2 injection and trapping and incorporates injection-rate constraints. We show that storage supply is a dynamic quantity that grows with the duration of CCS, and we interpret the lifetime of CCS as the time for which the storage supply curve exceeds the storage demand curve from CO2 production. We show that in the United States, if CO2 production from power generation continues to rise at recent rates, then CCS can store enough CO2 to stabilize emissions at current levels for at least 100 years. This result suggests that the large-scale implementation of CCS is a geologically viable climate-change mitigation option in the United States over the next century.

  15. Multiphase flow simulations of a moving fluidized bed regenerator in a carbon capture unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, Avik; Pan, Wenxiao; Suh, Dong-Myung; Huckaby, E. D.; Sun, Xin

    2014-10-01

    To accelerate the commercialization and deployment of carbon capture technologies, computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based tools may be used to model and analyze the performance of carbon capture devices. This work presents multiphase CFD-based flow simulations for the regeneration device responsible for extracting CO2 from CO2-loaded sorbent particles before the particles are recycled. The use of solid particle sorbents in this design is a departure from previously reported systems, where aqueous sorbents are employed. Another new feature is the inclusion of a series of perforated plates along the regenerator height. The influence of these plates on sorbent distribution is examined for varying sorbent holdup, fluidizing gas velocity, and particle size. The residence time distribution of sorbents is also measured to classify the low regime as plug flow or well-mixed flow. The purpose of this work is to better understand the sorbent flow characteristics before reaction kinetics of CO2 desorption can be implemented.

  16. Conceptual Design of Optimized Fossil Energy Systems with Capture and Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nils Johnson; Joan Ogden

    2010-12-31

    In this final report, we describe research results from Phase 2 of a technical/economic study of fossil hydrogen energy systems with carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture and storage (CCS). CO{sub 2} capture and storage, or alternatively, CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration, involves capturing CO{sub 2} from large point sources and then injecting it into deep underground reservoirs for long-term storage. By preventing CO{sub 2} emissions into the atmosphere, this technology has significant potential to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from fossil-based facilities in the power and industrial sectors. Furthermore, the application of CCS to power plants and hydrogen production facilities can reduce CO{sub 2} emissions associated with electric vehicles (EVs) and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs) and, thus, can also improve GHG emissions in the transportation sector. This research specifically examines strategies for transitioning to large-scale coal-derived energy systems with CCS for both hydrogen fuel production and electricity generation. A particular emphasis is on the development of spatially-explicit modeling tools for examining how these energy systems might develop in real geographic regions. We employ an integrated modeling approach that addresses all infrastructure components involved in the transition to these energy systems. The overall objective is to better understand the system design issues and economics associated with the widespread deployment of hydrogen and CCS infrastructure in real regions. Specific objectives of this research are to: Develop improved techno-economic models for all components required for the deployment of both hydrogen and CCS infrastructure, Develop novel modeling methods that combine detailed spatial data with optimization tools to explore spatially-explicit transition strategies, Conduct regional case studies to explore how these energy systems might develop in different regions of the United States, and Examine how the design and cost of coal-based H{sub 2} and CCS infrastructure depend on geography and location.

  17. Combustion systems and power plants incorporating parallel carbon dioxide capture and sweep-based membrane separation units to remove carbon dioxide from combustion gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijmans, Johannes G.; Merkel, Timothy C; Baker, Richard W.

    2011-10-11

    Disclosed herein are combustion systems and power plants that incorporate sweep-based membrane separation units to remove carbon dioxide from combustion gases. In its most basic embodiment, the invention is a combustion system that includes three discrete units: a combustion unit, a carbon dioxide capture unit, and a sweep-based membrane separation unit. In a preferred embodiment, the invention is a power plant including a combustion unit, a power generation system, a carbon dioxide capture unit, and a sweep-based membrane separation unit. In both of these embodiments, the carbon dioxide capture unit and the sweep-based membrane separation unit are configured to be operated in parallel, by which we mean that each unit is adapted to receive exhaust gases from the combustion unit without such gases first passing through the other unit.

  18. Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture by a Nanoporous, Superhydrophobic Membrane Contactor Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Meyer; S.James Zhou; Yong Ding; Ben Bikson

    2012-03-31

    This report summarizes progress made during Phase I and Phase II of the project: "Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture by a Nanoporous, Superhydrophobic Membrane Contactor Process," under contract DE-FE-0000646. The objective of this project is to develop a practical and cost effective technology for CO{sub 2} separation and capture for pre-combustion coal-based gasification plants using a membrane contactor/solvent absorption process. The goals of this technology development project are to separate and capture at least 90% of the CO{sub 2} from Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants with less than 10% increase in the cost of energy services. Unlike conventional gas separation membranes, the membrane contactor is a novel gas separation process based on the gas/liquid membrane concept. The membrane contactor is an advanced mass transfer device that operates with liquid on one side of the membrane and gas on the other. The membrane contactor can operate with pressures that are almost the same on both sides of the membrane, whereas the gas separation membranes use the differential pressure across the membrane as driving force for separation. The driving force for separation for the membrane contactor process is the chemical potential difference of CO{sub 2} in the gas phase and in the absorption liquid. This process is thus easily tailored to suit the needs for pre-combustion separation and capture of CO{sub 2}. Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and PoroGen Corporation (PGC) have developed a novel hollow fiber membrane technology that is based on chemically and thermally resistant commercial engineered polymer poly(ether ether ketone) or PEEK. The PEEK membrane material used in the membrane contactor during this technology development program is a high temperature engineered plastic that is virtually non-destructible under the operating conditions encountered in typical gas absorption applications. It can withstand contact with most of the common treating solvents. GTI and PGC have developed a nanoporous and superhydrophobic PEEK-based hollow fiber membrane contactor tailored for the membrane contactor/solvent absorption application for syngas cleanup. The membrane contactor modules were scaled up to 8-inch diameter commercial size modules. We have performing extensive laboratory and bench testing using pure gases, simulated water-gas-shifted (WGS) syngas stream, and a slipstream from a gasification derived syngas from GTI’s Flex-Fuel Test Facility (FFTF) gasification plant under commercially relevant conditions. The team have also carried out an engineering and economic analysis of the membrane contactor process to evaluate the economics of this technology and its commercial potential. Our test results have shown that 90% CO{sub 2} capture can be achieved with several physical solvents such as water and chilled methanol. The rate of CO{sub 2} removal by the membrane contactor is in the range of 1.5 to 2.0 kg/m{sup 2}/hr depending on the operating pressures and temperatures and depending on the solvents used. The final economic analysis has shown that the membrane contactor process will cause the cost of electricity to increase by 21% from the base plant without CO{sub 2} capture. The goal of 10% increase in levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) from base DOE Case 1(base plant without capture) is not achieved by using the membrane contactor. However, the 21% increase in LCOE is a substantial improvement as compared with the 31.6% increase in LCOE as in DOE Case 2(state of art capture technology using 2-stages of Selexol{TM}).

  19. EVALUATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM EXISTING COAL FIRED PLANTS BY HYBRID SORPTION USING SOLID SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, Steven; Palo, Daniel; Srinivasachar, Srivats; Laudal, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Under contract DE-FE0007603, the University of North Dakota conducted the project Evaluation of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Existing Coal Fired Plants by Hybrid Sorption Using Solid Sorbents. As an important element of this effort, an Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) Assessment was conducted by Barr Engineering Co. (Barr) in association with the University of North Dakota. The assessment addressed air and particulate emissions as well as solid and liquid waste streams. The magnitude of the emissions and waste streams was estimated for evaluation purposes. EH&S characteristics of materials used in the system are also described. This document contains data based on the mass balances from both the 40 kJ/mol CO2 and 80 kJ/mol CO2 desorption energy cases evaluated in the Final Technical and Economic Feasibility study also conducted by Barr Engineering.

  20. Space Geodesy and Geochemistry Applied to the Monitoring, Verification of Carbon Capture and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swart, Peter

    2013-11-30

    This award was a training grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of this award was solely to provide training for two PhD graduate students for three years in the general area of carbon capture and storage (CCS). The training consisted of course work and conducting research in the area of CCS. Attendance at conferences was also encouraged as an activity and positive experience for students to learn the process of sharing research findings with the scientific community, and the peer review process. At the time of this report, both students have approximately two years remaining of their studies, so have not fully completed their scientific research projects.

  1. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnum, Rachel; Perry, Robert; Wood, Benjamin

    2014-12-31

    GE Global Research is developing technology to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2) from the flue gas of coal-fired powerplants. A mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) and triethylene glycol (TEG) is the preferred CO2-capture solvent. GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to test a pilot-scale continuous CO2 absorption/desorption system using a GAP-1m/TEG mixture as the solvent. As part of that effort, an Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH&S) assessment for a CO2-capture system for a 550 MW coal-fired powerplant was conducted. Five components of the solvent, CAS#2469-55-8 (GAP-0), CAS#106214-84-0 (GAP-1-4), TEG, and methanol and xylene (minor contaminants from the aminosilicone) are included in this assessment. One by-product, GAP- 1m/SOX salt, and dodecylbenzenesulfonicacid (DDBSA) were also identified foranalysis. An EH&S assessment was also completed for the manufacturing process for the GAP-1m solvent. The chemicals associated with the manufacturing process include methanol, xylene, allyl chloride, potassium cyanate, sodium hydroxide (NaOH), tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDSO), tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide, Karstedt catalyst, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), Aliquat 336, methyl carbamate, potassium chloride, trimethylamine, and (3-aminopropyl) dimethyl silanol. The toxicological effects of each component of both the CO2 capture system and the manufacturing process were defined, and control mechanisms necessary to comply with U.S. EH&S regulations are summarized. Engineering and control systems, including environmental abatement, are described for minimizing exposure and release of the chemical components. Proper handling and storage recommendations are made for each chemical to minimize risk to workers and the surrounding community.

  2. Atmospheric measurements of carbonyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide using the electron capture sulfur detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.E.; Bates, T.S. [NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Measurements of atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were conducted over the Atlantic Ocean on board the NASA Electra aircraft during the Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (CITE 3) project using the electron capture sulfur detector (ECD-S). The system employed cryogenic preconcentration of air samples, gas chromatographic separation, catalytic fluorination, and electron capture detection. Samples collected for DMS analysis were scrubbed of oxidants with NaOH impregnated glass fiber filters to preconcentration. The detection limits (DL) of the system for COS, DMS, and CS2 were 5, 5, and 2 ppt, respectively. COS concentrations ranged from 404 to 603 ppt with a mean of 489 ppt for measurements over the North Atlantic Ocean (31 deg N to 41 deg N), and from 395 to 437 ppt with a mean of 419 ppt for measurements over the Tropical Atlantic Ocean (11 deg S to 2 deg N). DMS concentrations in the lower marine boundary layer, below 600-m altitude, ranged from below DL to 150 ppt from flights over the North Atlantic, and from 9 to 104 ppt over the Tropical Atlantic. CS2 concentrations ranged from below DL to 29 ppt over the North Atlantic. Almost all CS2 measurements over the Tropical Atlantic were below DL.

  3. Carbon Capture and Sequestration from a Hydrogen Production Facility in an Oil Refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engels, Cheryl; Williams, Bryan, Valluri, Kiranmal; Watwe, Ramchandra; Kumar, Ravi; Mehlman, Stewart

    2010-06-21

    The project proposed a commercial demonstration of advanced technologies that would capture and sequester CO2 emissions from an existing hydrogen production facility in an oil refinery into underground formations in combination with Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). The project is led by Praxair, Inc., with other project participants: BP Products North America Inc., Denbury Onshore, LLC (Denbury), and Gulf Coast Carbon Center (GCCC) at the Bureau of Economic Geology of The University of Texas at Austin. The project is located at the BP Refinery at Texas City, Texas. Praxair owns and operates a large hydrogen production facility within the refinery. As part of the project, Praxair would construct a CO2 capture and compression facility. The project aimed at demonstrating a novel vacuum pressure swing adsorption (VPSA) based technology to remove CO2 from the Steam Methane Reformers (SMR) process gas. The captured CO2 would be purified using refrigerated partial condensation separation (i.e., cold box). Denbury would purchase the CO2 from the project and inject the CO2 as part of its independent commercial EOR projects. The Gulf Coast Carbon Center at the Bureau of Economic Geology, a unit of University of Texas at Austin, would manage the research monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) project for the sequestered CO2, in conjunction with Denbury. The sequestration and associated MVA activities would be carried out in the Hastings field at Brazoria County, TX. The project would exceed DOE?s target of capturing one million tons of CO2 per year (MTPY) by 2015. Phase 1 of the project (Project Definition) is being completed. The key objective of Phase 1 is to define the project in sufficient detail to enable an economic decision with regard to proceeding with Phase 2. This topical report summarizes the administrative, programmatic and technical accomplishments completed in Phase 1 of the project. It describes the work relative to project technical and design activities (associated with CO2 capture technologies and geologic sequestration MVA), and Environmental Information Volume. Specific accomplishments of this Phase include: 1. Finalization of the Project Management Plan 2. Development of engineering designs in sufficient detail for defining project performance and costs 3. Preparation of Environmental Information Volume 4. Completion of Hazard Identification Studies 5. Completion of control cost estimates and preparation of business plan During the Phase 1 detailed cost estimate, project costs increased substantially from the previous estimate. Furthermore, the detailed risk assessment identified integration risks associated with potentially impacting the steam methane reformer operation. While the Phase 1 work identified ways to mitigate these integration risks satisfactorily from an operational perspective, the associated costs and potential schedule impacts contributed to the decision not to proceed to Phase 2. We have concluded that the project costs and integration risks at Texas City are not commensurate with the potential benefits of the project at this time.

  4. Bayesian Treed Multivariate Gaussian Process with Adaptive Design: Application to a Carbon Capture Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konomi, Bledar A.; Karagiannis, Georgios; Sarkar, Avik; Sun, Xin; Lin, Guang

    2014-05-16

    Computer experiments (numerical simulations) are widely used in scientific research to study and predict the behavior of complex systems, which usually have responses consisting of a set of distinct outputs. The computational cost of the simulations at high resolution are often expensive and become impractical for parametric studies at different input values. To overcome these difficulties we develop a Bayesian treed multivariate Gaussian process (BTMGP) as an extension of the Bayesian treed Gaussian process (BTGP) in order to model and evaluate a multivariate process. A suitable choice of covariance function and the prior distributions facilitates the different Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) movements. We utilize this model to sequentially sample the input space for the most informative values, taking into account model uncertainty and expertise gained. A simulation study demonstrates the use of the proposed method and compares it with alternative approaches. We apply the sequential sampling technique and BTMGP to model the multiphase flow in a full scale regenerator of a carbon capture unit. The application presented in this paper is an important tool for research into carbon dioxide emissions from thermal power plants.

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- National Carbon Co - NY...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NY.48-1 - AEC Letter; Crenshaw to National Carbon Company (Attn.: Nolan); Purchase Order Request for 358 Tons of Graphite by E. I. DuPont de Nemours & Company; February 2, 1943 ...

  6. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture Preliminary Techno-Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Surinder; Spiry, Irina; Wood, Benjamin; Hance, Dan; Chen, Wei; Kehmna, Mark; McDuffie, Dwayne

    2014-03-31

    This report presents system and economic analysis for a carbon-capture unit which uses an aminosilicone-based solvent for CO{sub 2} capture in a pulverized coal (PC) boiler. The aminosilicone solvent is a 60/40 wt/wt mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) with tri-ethylene glycol (TEG) as a co-solvent. For comparison purposes, the report also shows results for a carbon-capture unit based on a conventional approach using mono-ethanol amine (MEA). The first year removal cost of CO{sub 2} for the aminosilicone-based carbon-capture process is $46.04/ton of CO2 as compared to $60.25/ton of CO{sub 2} when MEA is used. The aminosilicone-based process has <77% of the CAPEX of a system using MEA solvent. The lower CAPEX is due to several factors, including the higher working capacity of the aminosilicone solvent compared the MEA, which reduces the solvent flow rate required, reducing equipment sizes. If it is determined that carbon steel can be used in the rich-lean heat exchanger in the carbon capture unit, the first year removal cost of CO{sub 2} decreases to $44.12/ton. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a higher thermal stability than MEA, allowing desorption to be conducted at higher temperatures and pressures, decreasing the number of compressor stages needed. The aminosilicone-based solvent also has a lower vapor pressure, allowing the desorption to be conducted in a continuous-stirred tank reactor versus a more expensive packed column. The aminosilicone-based solvent has a lower heat capacity, which decreases the heat load on the desorber. In summary, the amino-silicone solvent has significant advantages over conventional systems using MEA.

  7. A research needs assessment for the capture, utilization and disposal of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel-fired power plants. Volume 1, Executive summary: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This study identifies and assesses system approaches in order to prioritize research needs for the capture and non-atmospheric sequestering of a significant portion of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emitted from fossil fuel-fired electric power plants (US power plants presently produce about 7% of the world`s CO{sub 2} emissions). The study considers capture technologies applicable either to existing plants or to those that optimistically might be demonstrated on a commercial scale over the next twenty years. Specific conclusions are as follows: (1) To implement CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration on a national scale will decrease power plant net efficiencies and significantly increase the cost of electricity. To make responsible societal decisions, accurate and consistent economic and environmental analysis of all alternatives for atmospheric CO{sub 2} mitigation are required. (2) Commercial CO{sub 2} capture technology, though expensive and energy intensive, exists today. (3) The most promising approach to more economical CO{sub 2} capture is to develop power plant systems that facilitate efficient CO{sub 2} capture. (4) While CO{sub 2} disposal in depleted oil and gas reservoirs is feasible today, the ability to dispose of large quantities Of CO{sub 2} is highly uncertain because of both technical and institutional issues. Disposal into the deep ocean or confined aquifers offers the potential for large quantity disposal, but there are technical, safety, liability, and environmental issues to resolve. Therefore, the highest priority research should focus on establishing the feasibility of large scale disposal options.

  8. Regional Opportunities for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in China: A Comprehensive CO2 Storage Cost Curve and Analysis of the Potential for Large Scale Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in the People’s Republic of China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahowski, Robert T.; Li, Xiaochun; Davidson, Casie L.; Wei, Ning; Dooley, James J.

    2009-12-01

    This study presents data and analysis on the potential for carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies to deploy within China, including a survey of the CO2 source fleet and potential geologic storage capacity. The results presented here indicate that there is significant potential for CCS technologies to deploy in China at a level sufficient to deliver deep, sustained and cost-effective emissions reductions for China over the course of this century.

  9. U.S. China Carbon Capture and Storage Development Project at...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Capture and Storage Development Project at West Virginia University Fletcher, Jerald 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT COAL - ENVIRONMENTAL PROCESSES COAL - ENVIRONMENTAL PROCESSES The...

  10. Sustainability Assessment of Coal-Fired Power Plants with Carbon Capture and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Butner, R. Scott; Elliott, Michael L.; Freeman, Charles J.

    2011-11-30

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has the ability to dramatically reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from power production. Most studies find the potential for 70 to 80 percent reductions in CO2 emissions on a life-cycle basis, depending on the technology. Because of this potential, utilities and policymakers are considering the wide-spread implementation of CCS technology on new and existing coal plants to dramatically curb greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the power generation sector. However, the implementation of CCS systems will have many other social, economic, and environmental impacts beyond curbing GHG emissions that must be considered to achieve sustainable energy generation. For example, emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur oxides (SOx), and particulate matter (PM) are also important environmental concerns for coal-fired power plants. For example, several studies have shown that eutrophication is expected to double and acidification would increase due to increases in NOx emissions for a coal plant with CCS provided by monoethanolamine (MEA) scrubbing. Potential for human health risks is also expected to increase due to increased heavy metals in water from increased coal mining and MEA hazardous waste, although there is currently not enough information to relate this potential to actual realized health impacts. In addition to environmental and human health impacts, supply chain impacts and other social, economic, or strategic impacts will be important to consider. A thorough review of the literature for life-cycle analyses of power generation processes using CCS technology via the MEA absorption process, and other energy generation technologies as applicable, yielded large variability in methods and core metrics. Nonetheless, a few key areas of impact for CCS were developed from the studies that we reviewed. These are: the impact of MEA generation on increased eutrophication and acidification from ammonia emissions and increased toxicity from MEA production and the impact of increased coal use including the increased generation of NOx from combustion and transportation, impacts of increased mining of coal and limestone, and the disposal of toxic fly ash and boiler ash waste streams. Overall, the implementing CCS technology could contribute to a dramatic decrease in global GHG emissions, while most other environmental and human health impact categories increase only slightly on a global scale. However, the impacts on human toxicity and ecotoxicity have not been studied as extensively and could have more severe impacts on a regional or local scale. More research is needed to draw strong conclusions with respect to the specific relative impact of different CCS technologies. Specifically, a more robust data set that disaggregates data in terms of component processes and treats a more comprehensive set of environmental impacts categories from a life-cycle perspective is needed. In addition, the current LCA framework lacks the required temporal and spatial scales to determine the risk of environmental impact from carbon sequestration. Appropriate factors to use when assessing the risk of water acidification (groundwater/oceans/aquifers depending on sequestration site), risk of increased human toxicity impact from large accidental releases from pipeline or wells, and the legal and public policy risk associated with licensing CO2 sequestration sites are also not currently addressed. In addition to identifying potential environmental, social, or risk-related issues that could impede the large-scale deployment of CCS, performing LCA-based studies on energy generation technologies can suggest places to focus our efforts to achieve technically feasible, economically viable, and environmentally conscious energy generation technologies for maximum impact.

  11. Expansion of Michigan EOR Operations Using Advanced Amine Technology at a 600 MW Project Wolverine Carbon Capture and Storage Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H Hoffman; Y kishinevsky; S. Wu; R. Pardini; E. Tripp; D. Barnes

    2010-06-16

    Wolverine Power Supply Cooperative Inc, a member owned cooperative utility based in Cadillac Michigan, proposes to demonstrate the capture, beneficial utilization and storage of CO{sub 2} in the expansion of existing Enhanced Oil Recovery operations. This project is being proposed in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-FOA-0000015 Section III D, 'Large Scale Industrial CCS projects from Industrial Sources' Technology Area 1. The project will remove 1,000 metric tons per day of CO{sub 2} from the Wolverine Clean Energy Venture 600 MW CFB power plant owned and operated by WPC. CO{sub 2} from the flue gas will be captured using Hitachi's CO{sub 2} capture system and advanced amine technology. The capture system with the advanced amine-based solvent supplied by Hitachi is expected to significantly reduce the cost and energy requirements of CO{sub 2} capture compared to current technologies. The captured CO{sub 2} will be compressed and transported for Enhanced Oil Recovery and CO{sub 2} storage purposes. Enhanced Oil Recovery is a proven concept, widely used to recover otherwise inaccessible petroleum reserves. While post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture technologies have been tested at the pilot scale on coal power plant flue gas, they have not yet been demonstrated at a commercial scale and integrated with EOR and storage operations. Amine-based CO{sub 2} capture is the leading technology expected to be available commercially within this decade to enable CCS for utility and industrial facilities firing coal and waste fuels such as petroleum coke. However, traditional CO{sub 2} capture process utilizing commercial amine solvents is very energy intensive for regeneration and is also susceptible to solvent degradation by oxygen as well as SOx and NO{sub 2} in the flue gas, resulting in large operating costs. The large volume of combustion flue gas with its low CO{sub 2} concentration requires large equipment sizes, which together with the highly corrosive nature of the typical amine-based separation process leads to high plant capital investment. According to recent DOE-NETL studies, MEA-based CCS will increase the cost of electricity of a new pulverized coal plant by 80-85% and reduce the net plant efficiency by about 30%. Non-power industrial facilities will incur similar production output and efficiency penalties when implementing conventional carbon capture systems. The proposed large scale demonstration project combining advanced amine CO{sub 2} capture integrated with commercial EOR operations significantly advances post-combustion technology development toward the DOE objectives of reducing the cost of energy production and improving the efficiency of CO{sub 2} Capture technologies. WPC has assembled a strong multidisciplinary team to meet the objectives of this project. WPC will provide the host site and Hitachi will provide the carbon capture technology and advanced solvent. Burns and Roe bring expertise in overall engineering integration and plant design to the team. Core Energy, an active EOR producer/operator in the State of Michigan, is committed to support the detailed design, construction and operation of the CO{sub 2} pipeline and storage component of the project. This team has developed a Front End Engineering Design and Cost Estimate as part of Phase 1 of DOE Award DE-FE0002477.

  12. Basin-Scale Leakage Risks from Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Impact on Carbon Capture and Storage Energy Market Competitiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Catherine; Fitts, Jeffrey; Wilson, Elizabeth; Pollak, Melisa; Bielicki, Jeffrey; Bhatt, Vatsal

    2013-03-13

    This three-year project, performed by Princeton University in partnership with the University of Minnesota and Brookhaven National Laboratory, examined geologic carbon sequestration in regard to CO{sub 2} leakage and potential subsurface liabilities. The research resulted in basin-scale analyses of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage in light of uncertainties in the characteristics of leakage processes, and generated frameworks to monetize the risks of leakage interference with competing subsurface resources. The geographic focus was the Michigan sedimentary basin, for which a 3D topographical model was constructed to represent the hydrostratigraphy. Specifically for Ottawa County, a statistical analysis of the hydraulic properties of underlying sedimentary formations was conducted. For plausible scenarios of injection into the Mt. Simon sandstone, leakage rates were estimated and fluxes into shallow drinking-water aquifers were found to be less than natural analogs of CO{sub 2} fluxes. We developed the Leakage Impact Valuation (LIV) model in which we identified stakeholders and estimated costs associated with leakage events. It was found that costs could be incurred even in the absence of legal action or other subsurface interference because there are substantial costs of finding and fixing the leak and from injection interruption. We developed a model framework called RISCS, which can be used to predict monetized risk of interference with subsurface resources by combining basin-scale leakage predictions with the LIV method. The project has also developed a cost calculator called the Economic and Policy Drivers Module (EPDM), which comprehensively calculates the costs of carbon sequestration and leakage, and can be used to examine major drivers for subsurface leakage liabilities in relation to specific injection scenarios and leakage events. Finally, we examined the competiveness of CCS in the energy market. This analysis, though qualitative, shows that financial incentives, such as a carbon tax, are needed for coal combustion with CCS to gain market share. In another part of the project we studied the role of geochemical reactions in affecting the probability of CO{sub 2} leakage. A basin-scale simulation tool was modified to account for changes in leakage rates due to permeability alterations, based on simplified mathematical rules for the important geochemical reactions between acidified brines and caprock minerals. In studies of reactive flows in fractured caprocks, we examined the potential for permeability increases, and the extent to which existing reactive transport models would or would not be able to predict it. Using caprock specimens from the Eau Claire and Amherstburg, we found that substantial increases in permeability are possible for caprocks that have significant carbonate content, but minimal alteration is expected otherwise. We also found that while the permeability increase may be substantial, it is much less than what would be predicted from hydrodynamic models based on mechanical aperture alone because the roughness that is generated tends to inhibit flow.

  13. An Assessment of the Commercial Availability of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies as of June 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.; Davidson, Casie L.; Dahowski, Robert T.

    2009-06-26

    Currently, there is considerable confusion within parts of the carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technical and regulatory communities regarding the maturity and commercial readiness of the technologies needed to capture, transport, inject, monitor and verify the efficacy of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in deep, geologic formations. The purpose of this technical report is to address this confusion by discussing the state of CCS technological readiness in terms of existing commercial deployments of CO2 capture systems, CO2 transportation pipelines, CO2 injection systems and measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) systems for CO2 injected into deep geologic structures. To date, CO2 has been captured from both natural gas and coal fired commercial power generating facilities, gasification facilities and other industrial processes. Transportation via pipelines and injection of CO2 into the deep subsurface are well established commercial practices with more than 35 years of industrial experience. There are also a wide variety of MMV technologies that have been employed to understand the fate of CO2 injected into the deep subsurface. The four existing end-to-end commercial CCS projects Sleipner, Snhvit, In Salah and Weyburn are using a broad range of these technologies, and prove that, at a high level, geologic CO2 storage technologies are mature and capable of deploying at commercial scales. Whether wide scale deployment of CCS is currently or will soon be a cost-effective means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions is largely a function of climate policies which have yet to be enacted and the publics willingness to incur costs to avoid dangerous anthropogenic interference with the Earths climate. There are significant benefits to be had by continuing to improve through research, development, and demonstration suite of existing CCS technologies. Nonetheless, it is clear that most of the core technologies required to address capture, transport, injection, monitoring, management and verification for most large CO2 source types and in most CO2 storage formation types, exist.

  14. Low-Energy Selective Capture of Carbon Dioxide by a Pre-designed...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    graphical abstract Abstract: Easy activation of the water-stable metal-organic framework PCN-200 provides a new route to low-energy selective CO2 capture through stimuli-responsive...

  15. EA-1846: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration of Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas Used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production, Port Arthur, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE completed a final environmental assessment (EA) for a project under Area I of the Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Industrial Sources and Innovative Concepts for Beneficial CO2...

  16. Y-12's history captured in short film | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration 's history captured in short film Thursday, February 6, 2014 - 3:00pm To close out the celebration of Y-12's 70th anniversary, a short film capturing highlights of the site's history now is available for viewing on the Y-12 public Web site at http://www.y12.doe.gov/library/videos/70-years-making-world-safer. The eight-minute film covers the chronology of Y-12 from its beginnings during WWII as an integral part of the Manhattan Project to its current missions for NNSA. Y-12's

  17. Thermal Integration of CO{sub 2} Compression Processes with Coal-Fired Power Plants Equipped with Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward Levy

    2012-06-29

    Coal-fired power plants, equipped either with oxycombustion or post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture, will require a CO{sub 2} compression system to increase the pressure of the CO{sub 2} to the level needed for sequestration. Most analyses show that CO{sub 2} compression will have a significant effect on parasitic load, will be a major capital cost, and will contribute significantly to reduced unit efficiency. This project used first principle engineering analyses and computer simulations to determine the effects of utilizing compressor waste heat to improve power plant efficiency and increase net power output of coal-fired power plants with carbon capture. This was done for units with post combustion solvent-based CO{sub 2} capture systems and for oxyfired power plants, firing bituminous, PRB and lignite coals. The thermal integration opportunities analyzed for oxycombustion capture are use of compressor waste heat to reheat recirculated flue gas, preheat boiler feedwater and predry high-moisture coals prior to pulverizing the coal. Among the thermal integration opportunities analyzed for post combustion capture systems are use of compressor waste heat and heat recovered from the stripper condenser to regenerate post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture solvent, preheat boiler feedwater and predry high-moisture coals. The overall conclusion from the oxyfuel simulations is that thermal integration of compressor heat has the potential to improve net unit heat rate by up to 8.4 percent, but the actual magnitude of the improvement will depend on the type of heat sink used and to a lesser extent, compressor design and coal rank. The simulations of a unit with a MEA post combustion capture system showed that thermal integration of either compressor heat or stripper condenser heat to preheat boiler feedwater would result in heat rate improvements from 1.20 percent to 4.19 percent. The MEA capture simulations further showed that partial drying of low rank coals, done in combination with feedwater heating, would result in heat rate reductions of 7.43 percent for PRB coal and 10.45 percent for lignite.

  18. National Carbon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth Nelson; Timothy Carr

    2009-03-31

    This annual and final report describes the results of the multi-year project entitled 'NATional CARBon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NatCarb)' (http://www.natcarb.org). The original project assembled a consortium of five states (Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky and Ohio) in the midcontinent of the United States (MIDCARB) to construct an online distributed Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) covering aspects of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) geologic sequestration. The NatCarb system built on the technology developed in the initial MIDCARB effort. The NatCarb project linked the GIS information of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) into a coordinated regional database system consisting of datasets useful to industry, regulators and the public. The project includes access to national databases and GIS layers maintained by the NatCarb group (e.g., brine geochemistry) and publicly accessible servers (e.g., USGS, and Geography Network) into a single system where data are maintained and enhanced at the local level, but are accessed and assembled through a single Web portal to facilitate query, assembly, analysis and display. This project improves the flow of data across servers and increases the amount and quality of available digital data. The purpose of NatCarb is to provide a national view of the carbon capture and storage potential in the U.S. and Canada. The digital spatial database allows users to estimate the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted by sources (such as power plants, refineries and other fossil-fuel-consuming industries) in relation to geologic formations that can provide safe, secure storage sites over long periods of time. The NatCarb project worked to provide all stakeholders with improved online tools for the display and analysis of CO{sub 2} carbon capture and storage data through a single website portal (http://www.natcarb.org/). While the external project is ending, NatCarb will continue as an internal US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) project with the continued cooperation of personnel at both West Virginia University and the Kansas Geological Survey. The successor project will continue to organize and enhance the information about CO{sub 2} sources and developing the technology needed to access, query, analyze, display, and distribute natural resource data critical to carbon management. Data are generated, maintained and enhanced locally at the RCSP level, or at the national level in specialized data warehouses, and assembled, accessed, and analyzed in real-time through a single geoportal. To address the broader needs of a spectrum of users form high-end technical queries to the general public, NatCarb will be moving to an improved and simplified display for the general public using readily available web tools such as Google Earth{trademark} and Google Maps{trademark}. The goal is for NatCarb to expand in terms of technology and areal coverage and remain the premier functional demonstration of distributed data-management systems that cross the boundaries between institutions and geographic areas, and forms the foundation of a functioning carbon cyber-infrastructure. NatCarb provides access to first-order information to evaluate the costs, economic potential and societal issues of CO{sub 2} capture and storage, including public perception and regulatory aspects.

  19. Carbon sequestration technology roadmap and program plan: ensuring the fossil energy systems through the successful deployment of carbon capture and storage technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-04-15

    The overall goal of the Carbon Sequestration Program is to develop, by 2012, fossil fuel conversion systems that achieve 90 percent CO{sub 2} capture with 99 percent storage permanence at less than a 10 percent increase in the cost of energy services. This document describes the Technology Roadmap and Program Plan that will guide the Carbon Sequestration Program in 2007 and beyond. An overview of the Program and the key accomplishments in its 10-year history are presented as well as the challenges confronting deployment and successful commercialization of carbon sequestration technologies. The research pathways that will be used to achieve Program goals and information on key contacts and web links related to the Program are included. 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Chu Issues Call to Action on Carbon Capture and Storage | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chu was delivered today to Energy Ministers and other attendees of the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum in London, where Secretary Chu is speaking on Monday and Tuesday. ...

  1. Secretary Chu Announces Nearly $1 Billion Public-Private Investment in Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Three projects will create jobs, reduce carbon emissions, and increase domestic oil production by 10 million barrels of oil per year

  2. GE Awarded DOE Funding to Pilot Carbon Capture Technology | GE Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Awarded DOE Project to Pilot CO2 Capture Technology for Power Plants Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) GE Awarded DOE Project to Pilot CO2 Capture Technology for Power Plants Same class of ingredients found in hair conditioners and fabric softeners could hold key to washing out CO2 from Power

  3. Designing and Validating Ternary Pd Alloys for Optimum Sulfur/Carbon Resistance in Hydrogen Separation and Carbon Capture Membrane Systems Using High-Throughput Combinatorial Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Amanda; Zhao, Hongbin; Hopkins, Scott

    2014-09-30

    This report summarizes the work completed under the U.S. Department of Energy Project Award No.: DE-FE0001181 titled “Designing and Validating Ternary Pd Alloys for Optimum Sulfur/Carbon Resistance in Hydrogen Separation and Carbon Capture Membrane Systems Using High-Throughput Combinatorial Methods.” The project started in October 1, 2009 and was finished September 30, 2014. Pall Corporation worked with Cornell University to sputter and test palladium-based ternary alloys onto silicon wafers to examine many alloys at once. With the specialized equipment at Georgia Institute of Technology that analyzed the wafers for adsorbed carbon and sulfur species six compositions were identified to have resistance to carbon and sulfur species. These compositions were deposited on Pall AccuSep® supports by Colorado School of Mines and then tested in simulated synthetic coal gas at the Pall Corporation. Two of the six alloys were chosen for further investigations based on their performance. Alloy reproducibility and long-term testing of PdAuAg and PdZrAu provided insight to the ability to manufacture these compositions for testing. PdAuAg is the most promising alloy found in this work based on the fabrication reproducibility and resistance to carbon and sulfur. Although PdZrAu had great initial resistance to carbon and sulfur species, the alloy composition has a very narrow range that hindered testing reproducibility.

  4. Water/carbonate stripping for CO.sub.2 capture adsorber regeneration and CO.sub.2 delivery to photoautotrophs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chance, Ronald; Koros, William J.; McCool, Benjamin; Noel, James

    2015-06-23

    The invention provides systems and methods for the delivery of carbon to photoautotrophs. The invention utilizes low energy regeneration of adsorbent for CO.sub.2 capture and provides for effective CO.sub.2 loading into liquids useful for photoautotroph growth and/or production of photosynthetic products, such as biofuels, via photoautotrophic culture media. The inventive system comprises a fluid/membrane/fluid contactor that provides selective transfer of molecular CO.sub.2 via a dense (non-porous) membrane from a carbonate-based CO.sub.2 snipping solution to a culture medium where the CO.sub.2 is consumed by a photoautotroph for the production of biofuels, biofuel precursors or other commercial products.

  5. Water/carbonate stripping for CO.sub.2 capture adsorber regeneration and CO.sub.2 delivery to photoautotrophs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chance, Ronald; Koros, William J.; McCool, Benjamin; Noel, James

    2015-08-11

    The invention provides systems and methods for the delivery of carbon to photoautotrophs. The invention utilizes low energy regeneration of adsorbent for CO.sub.2 capture and provides for effective CO.sub.2 loading into liquids useful for photoautotroph growth and/or production of photosynthetic products, such as biofuels, via photoautotrophic culture media. The inventive system comprises a fluid/membrane/fluid contactor that provides selective transfer of molecular CO.sub.2 via a dense (non-porous) membrane from a carbonate-based CO.sub.2 snipping solution to a culture medium where the CO.sub.2 is consumed by a photoautotroph for the production of biofuels, biofuel precursors or other commercial products.

  6. Evaluation of Carbon Dioxide Capture From Existing Coal Fired Plants by Hybrid Sorption Using Solid Sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, Steven; Srinivasachar, Srivats; Laudal, Daniel; Browers, Bruce

    2014-12-31

    A novel hybrid solid sorbent technology for CO₂ capture and separation from coal combustion-derived flue gas was evaluated. The technology – Capture of CO₂ by Hybrid Sorption (CACHYS™) – is a solid sorbent technology based on the following ideas: 1) reduction of energy for sorbent regeneration, 2) utilization of novel process chemistry, 3) contactor conditions that minimize sorbent-CO₂ heat of reaction and promote fast CO₂ capture, and 4) low-cost method of heat management. This report provides key information developed during the course of the project that includes sorbent performance, energy for sorbent regeneration, physical properties of the sorbent, the integration of process components, sizing of equipment, and overall capital and operational cost of the integrated CACHYS™ system. Seven sorbent formulations were prepared and evaluated at the lab-scale for energy requirements and CO₂ capture performance. Sorbent heat of regeneration ranged from 30-80 kJ/mol CO₂ and was found to be dependent on process conditions. Two sorbent formulations (designated HCK-4 & HCK-7) were down-selected for additional fixed-bed testing. Additional testing involved subjecting the sorbents to 100 continuous cycles in the fixed-bed reactor to determine performance as a function of time. The working capacity achieved for HCK-4 sorbent ranged from 5.5-8.0 g CO₂/100 g sorbent, while the HCK-7 typically ranged from 8.0-10.0 g CO₂/100 g sorbent. Overall, there was no deterioration in capacity with continuous cycling for either sorbent. The CACHYS™ bench-scale testing system designed and fabricated under this award consists of a dual circulating fluidized-bed adsorber and a moving-bed regenerator. The system takes a flue gas slipstream from the University of North Dakota’s coal-fired steam plant. Prior to being sent to the adsorber, the flue gas is scrubbed to remove SO₂ and particulate. During parametric testing of the adsorber, CO₂ capture achieved using the 2-bed configuration with recirculation in both beds was 65-70% with a high flue gas CO₂ loading (~7%) and up to 85% with a low flue gas CO₂ loading (~4%). A sorbent regenerator system consisting of a pre-heater, desorber, and cooler is used to heat the CO₂-rich sorbent with direct and indirect steam producing a nearly 100% pure stream of CO₂. Parametric testing of the regenerator system demonstrated the impact of process conditions on both desorption rate and the heat of regeneration. Clear evidence of the use of specific process conditions that lower the overall energy of desorption was identified. This observation validates measurements made at the laboratory-scale. Several longer-term continuous tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of the sorbent/process as a function of time. Using a 2-bed configuration, sustained capture efficiency of 40-60% with a high flue gas CO₂ loading (~8%) and 70-80% with a low flue gas CO₂ loading (~4%) were achieved. However, sorbent working capacity was found to be considerably lower than laboratory-scale measurements. The low working capacity is attributed to insufficient sorbent/gas contact time in the adsorber. Sorbent properties that had a significant impact on CO₂ capture performance were identified. The results show that controlling these sorbent properties substantially improves CO₂ capture performance, with preliminary estimates indicating that relative improvement of ~30% is possible. Testing culminated with an operationally trouble-free test of 15 hours with sustainable performance. Overall, several practical strategies to increase performance of the sorbent and process were identified. The initial technical and economic assessment of the CACHYS™ process estimated the cost of CO2 capture was $36.19/ton with a 48.6% increase in levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for the 550 MWe net plant. Using additional data gathered over the course of the project, and with revised technical and economic assumptions, the estimated cost of CO₂ capture with the CACHYS™ process is $39/ton (only includes the cost of the CO2 capture system) with an increase in LCOE of 55.9%. Overall, CACHYS™ represents a significant improvement over the benchmark MEA system, and has demonstrated progress towards achieving DOE’s goals for CO₂ capture technologies.

  7. Secretary Chu Announces $2.4 billion in Funding for Carbon Capture...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... and engineers with skills and competencies in geology, geophysics, geomechanics, geochemistry and reservoir engineering disciplines needed to staff a broad national CCS program. ...

  8. NWTC Aerodynamics Studies Improve Energy Capture and Lower Costs of Wind-Generated Electricity (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerodynamics Studies Improve Energy Capture and Lower Costs of Wind-Generated Electricity Researchers at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have expanded wind turbine aerodynamics research from blade and rotor aerodynamics to wind plant and atmospheric inflow effects. The energy capture from wind plants is dependent on all of these aerodynamic interactions, which impact the cumulative fatigue damage of turbine structural compo- nents

  9. Department of Energy Awards $71 Million to Accelerate Innovative Carbon Capture Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy today announced that Arizona Public Service (APS), Phoenix, Ariz., has been awarded $70.5 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to expand an existing industrial and innovative reuse carbon mitigation project.

  10. Sodium-based dry regenerable sorbent for carbon dioxide capture from power plant flue gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.B.; Ryu, C.K.; Baek, J.I.; Lee, J.H.; Eom, T.H.; Kim, S.H.

    2008-07-15

    Dry regenerable sorbent technology is one of the emerging technologies as a cost-effective and energy-efficient technology for CO{sub 2} capture from flue gas. Six sodium-based dry regenerable sorbents were prepared by spray-drying techniques. Their physical properties and reactivities were tested to evaluate their applicability to a fluidized-bed or fast transport-bed CO{sub 2} capture process. Each sorbents contained 20-50 wt% of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} or NaHCO{sub 3}. All sorbents except for Sorb NX30 were insufficient with either attrition resistance or reactivity, or both properties. Sorb NX30 sorbent satisfied most of the physical requirements for a commercial fluidized-bed reactor process along with good chemical reactivity. Sorb NX30 sorbent had a spherical shape, an average size of 89 {mu}m, a size distribution of 38-250 {mu}m, and a bulk density of approximately 0.87 g/mL. The attrition index (AI) of Sorb NX30 reached below 5% compared to about 20% for commercial fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts. CO{sub 2} sorption capacity of Sorb NX30 was approximately 10 wt% (>80% sorbent utilization) in the simulated flue gas condition compared with 6 of 30 wt% MEA solution (33% sorbent utilization). All sorbents showed almost-complete regeneration at temperatures less than 120{sup o}C.

  11. Carbon Capture and Storage Forum Round-Up | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    We were at the event, relaying some of the highlights live via twitter so that people across the nation could follow along and weigh in on the discussion. If you missed it, we've ...

  12. How to Store Carbon | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Store Carbon How to Store Carbon March 17, 2016 - 3:30pm Addthis Jenny Bowman National Energy Technology Laboratory What does this project do? Carbon capture and storage is critical to fighting climate change. (Learn the basics with our Carbon Capture 101 infographic.) Researchers are developing modeling tools to ensure carbon storage is safe, viable and worthwhile. The tools will make it easier to select and monitor underground carbon storage sites. The project is led by NETL, one of the

  13. A Sub-grid Model for an Array of Immersed Cylinders in Coarse-grid Multiphase Flow Simulations of a Carbon Capture Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, Avik; Sun, Xin; Sundaresan, Sankaran

    2012-12-01

    A post-combustion carbon-capture system utilizing a bubbling fluidized bed of sorbent particles is currently being developed as a part of the Carbon Capture and Simulation Initiative (CCSI) efforts. Adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) by these amine based sorbent particles is exothermic and arrays of immersed cylindrical heat transfer tubes are often utilized to maintain the lower temperatures favorable for CO2 capture. In multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the full-scale devices, which can be up to 10 m in size, approximately 103 cells are required in each dimension to accurately resolve the cylindrical tubes, which are only a few centimeters in diameter. Since the tubes cannot be resolved explicitly in CFD simulations, alternate methods to account for the influence of these immersed objects need to be developed.

  14. EIS-0445: American Electric Power Service Corporation's Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture and Storage Demonstration, New Haven, Mason County, West Virginia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE evaluates the potential environmental impacts of providing financial assistance for the construction and operation of a project proposed by American Electric Power Service Corporation (AEP). DOE selected tbis project for an award of financial assistance through a competitive process under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) Program. AEP's Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture and Storage Project (Mountaineer CCS II Project) would construct a commercial scale carbon dioxide (C02l capture and storage (CCS) system at AEP's existing Mountaineer Power Plant and other AEP owned properties located near New Haven, West Virginia.

  15. Carbon Capture and Sequestration (via Enhanced Oil Recovery) from a Hydrogen Production Facility in an Oil Refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart Mehlman

    2010-06-16

    The project proposed a commercial demonstration of advanced technologies that would capture and sequester CO2 emissions from an existing hydrogen production facility in an oil refinery into underground formations in combination with Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). The project is led by Praxair, Inc., with other project participants: BP Products North America Inc., Denbury Onshore, LLC (Denbury), and Gulf Coast Carbon Center (GCCC) at the Bureau of Economic Geology of The University of Texas at Austin. The project is located at the BP Refinery at Texas City, Texas. Praxair owns and operates a large hydrogen production facility within the refinery. As part of the project, Praxair would construct a CO2 capture and compression facility. The project aimed at demonstrating a novel vacuum pressure swing adsorption (VPSA) based technology to remove CO2 from the Steam Methane Reformers (SMR) process gas. The captured CO2 would be purified using refrigerated partial condensation separation (i.e., cold box). Denbury would purchase the CO2 from the project and inject the CO2 as part of its independent commercial EOR projects. The Gulf Coast Carbon Center at the Bureau of Economic Geology, a unit of University of Texas at Austin, would manage the research monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) project for the sequestered CO2, in conjunction with Denbury. The sequestration and associated MVA activities would be carried out in the Hastings field at Brazoria County, TX. The project would exceed DOE’s target of capturing one million tons of CO2 per year (MTPY) by 2015. Phase 1 of the project (Project Definition) is being completed. The key objective of Phase 1 is to define the project in sufficient detail to enable an economic decision with regard to proceeding with Phase 2. This topical report summarizes the administrative, programmatic and technical accomplishments completed in Phase 1 of the project. It describes the work relative to project technical and design activities (associated with CO2 capture technologies and geologic sequestration MVA), and Environmental Information Volume. Specific accomplishments of this Phase include: 1. Finalization of the Project Management Plan 2. Development of engineering designs in sufficient detail for defining project performance and costs 3. Preparation of Environmental Information Volume 4. Completion of Hazard Identification Studies 5. Completion of control cost estimates and preparation of business plan During the Phase 1 detailed cost estimate, project costs increased substantially from the previous estimate. Furthermore, the detailed risk assessment identified integration risks associated with potentially impacting the steam methane reformer operation. While the Phase 1 work identified ways to mitigate these integration risks satisfactorily from an operational perspective, the associated costs and potential schedule impacts contributed to the decision not to proceed to Phase 2. We have concluded that the project costs and integration risks at Texas City are not commensurate with the potential benefits of the project at this time.

  16. Carbonic anhydrase-facilitated CO2 absorption with polyacrylamide buffering bead capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilmore, Robert; Griffith, Craid; Liu, Zhu; Soong, Yee; Hedges, Sheila W.; Koepsel, Richard; Ataai, M [Ataai, Mohammad

    2009-07-01

    A novel CO2 separation concept is described wherein the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) is used to increase the overall rate Of CO2 absorption after which hydrated CO2 reacts with regenerable amine-bearing polyacrylamide buffering beads (PABB). Following saturation of the material's immobilized tertiary amines, CA-bearing carrier water is separated and recycled to the absorption stage while CO2-loaded material is thermally regenerated. Process application of this concept would involve operation of two or more columns in parallel with thermal regeneration with low-pressure steam taking place after the capacity of a column of amine-bearing polymeric material was exceeded. PABB CO2- bearing capacity was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for beads of three acrylamido buffering monomer ingredient concentrations: 0 mol/kg bead, 0.857 mol/kg bead, and 2 mol/kg bead. TGA results demonstrate that CO2- bearing capacity increases with increasing PABB buffering concentration and that up to 78% of the theoretical CO2- bearing capacity was realized in prepared PABB samples (0.857 mol/kg recipe). The highest observed CO2-bearing capacity of PABB was 1.37 mol of CO2 per kg dry bead. TGA was also used to assess the regenerability Of CO2-loaded PABB. Preliminary results suggest that CO2 is partially driven from PABB samples at temperatures as low as 55 degrees C, with complete regeneration occurring at 100 degrees C. Other physical characteristics of PABB are discussed. In addition, the effectiveness of bovine carbonic anhydrase for the catalysis Of CO2 dissolution is evaluated. Potential benefits and drawbacks of the proposed process are discussed. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. NREL Reveals Potential for Capturing Waste Heat via Nanotubes - News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Releases | NREL Reveals Potential for Capturing Waste Heat via Nanotubes April 4, 2016 A finely tuned carbon nanotube thin film has the potential to act as a thermoelectric power generator that captures and uses waste heat, according to researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The research could help guide the manufacture of thermoelectric devices based on either single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films or composites containing these nanotubes.

  18. Low-Energy Solvents For Carbon Dioxide Capture Enabled By A Combination Of Enzymes And Vacuum Regeneration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmon, Sonja; House, Alan; Liu, Kun; Frimpong, Reynolds; Liu, Kunlei; Freeman, Charles; Whyatt, Greg; Slater, Jonathan; Fitzgerald, David

    2015-08-31

    An integrated bench-scale system combining the attributes of the bio-renewable enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) with low-enthalpy CO2 absorption solvents and vacuum regeneration was designed, built and operated for 500 hours using simulated flue gas. The objective was to develop a CO2 capture process with improved efficiency and sustainability when compared to NETL Case 10 monoethanolamine (MEA) scrubbing technology. The use of CA accelerates inter-conversion between dissolved CO2 and bicarbonate ion to enhance CO2 absorption, and the use of low enthalpy CO2 absorption solvents makes it possible to regenerate the solvent at lower temperatures relative to the reference MEA-based solvent. The vacuum regeneration-based integrated bench-scale system operated successfully for an accumulated 500 hours using aqueous 23.5 wt% K2CO3-based solvent containing 2.5 g/L enzyme to deliver an average 84% CO2 capture when operated with a 20% enzyme replenishment rate per ~7 hour steady-state run period. The total inlet gas flow was 30 standard liters per minute with 15% CO2 and 85% N2. The absorber temperature was 40°C and the stripper operated under 35 kPa pressure with an approximate 77°C stripper bottom temperature. Tests with a 30°C absorber temperature delivered >90% capture. On- and off-line operational measurements provided a full process data set, with recirculating enzyme, that allowed for enzyme replenishment and absorption/desorption kinetic parameter calculations. Dissolved enzyme replenishment and conventional process controls were demonstrated as straightforward approaches to maintain system performance. Preliminary evaluation of a novel flow-through ultrasonically enhanced regeneration system was also conducted, yet resulted in CO2 release within the range of temperature-dependent release, and further work would be needed to validate the benefits of ultrasonic enhanced stripping. A full technology assessment was completed in which four techno-economic cases for enzyme-enhanced aqueous K2CO3 solvent with vacuum stripping were considered and a corresponding set of sensitivity studies were developed. The cases were evaluated using bench-scale and laboratory-based observations, AspenPlus® process simulation and modeling, AspenTech’s CCE® Parametric Software, current vendor quotations, and project partners’ know-how of unit operations. Overall, the DOE target of 90% CO2 capture could be met using the benign enzyme-enhanced aqueous K2CO3-based alternative to NETL Case 10. The model-predicted plant COE performance, scaled to 550 MWe net output, was 9% higher than NETL Case 10 for an enzyme-activated case with minimized technical risk and highest confidence in physical system performance utilizing commercially available equipment. A COE improvement of 2.8% versus NETL Case 10 was predicted when favorable features of improved enzyme longevity and additional power output from a very low pressure (VLP) turbine were combined, wherein corresponding high capital and operational costs limited the level of COE benefit. The environmental, health and safety (EH&S) profile of the system was found to be favorable and was compliant with the Federal EH&S legislation reviewed. Further work on a larger scale test unit is recommended to reduce the level of uncertainty inherent in extrapolating findings from a bench-scale unit to a full scale PCC plant, and to further investigate several identified opportunities for improvement. Production feasibility and suitability of carbonic anhydrases for scale-up testing was confirmed both through the current project and through parallel efforts.

  19. Sandia Energy Carbon Capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandians Participate in 46th Annual American Geophysical Union (AGU) Conference http:energy.sandia.govsandians-participate-in-46th-annual-american-geophysical-union-agu-conferen...

  20. Carbon Capture & Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page 2 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  1. Carbon Capture & Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  2. High Purity Hydrogen Production with In-Situ Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Capture in a Single Stage Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nihar Phalak; Shwetha Ramkumar; Daniel Connell; Zhenchao Sun; Fu-Chen Yu; Niranjani Deshpande; Robert Statnick; Liang-Shih Fan

    2011-07-31

    Enhancement in the production of high purity hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from fuel gas, obtained from coal gasification, is limited by thermodynamics of the water gas shift (WGS) reaction. However, this constraint can be overcome by conducting the WGS in the presence of a CO{sub 2}-acceptor. The continuous removal of CO{sub 2} from the reaction mixture helps to drive the equilibrium-limited WGS reaction forward. Since calcium oxide (CaO) exhibits high CO{sub 2} capture capacity as compared to other sorbents, it is an ideal candidate for such a technique. The Calcium Looping Process (CLP) developed at The Ohio State University (OSU) utilizes the above concept to enable high purity H{sub 2} production from synthesis gas (syngas) derived from coal gasification. The CLP integrates the WGS reaction with insitu CO{sub 2}, sulfur and halide removal at high temperatures while eliminating the need for a WGS catalyst, thus reducing the overall footprint of the hydrogen production process. The CLP comprises three reactors - the carbonator, where the thermodynamic constraint of the WGS reaction is overcome by the constant removal of CO{sub 2} product and high purity H{sub 2} is produced with contaminant removal; the calciner, where the calcium sorbent is regenerated and a sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} stream is produced; and the hydrator, where the calcined sorbent is reactivated to improve its recyclability. As a part of this project, the CLP was extensively investigated by performing experiments at lab-, bench- and subpilot-scale setups. A comprehensive techno-economic analysis was also conducted to determine the feasibility of the CLP at commercial scale. This report provides a detailed account of all the results obtained during the project period.

  3. Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westendorf, Tiffany; Caraher, Joel; Chen, Wei; Farnum, Rachael; Perry, Robert; Spiry, Irina; Wilson, Paul; Wood, Benjamin

    2015-03-31

    The objective of this project is to design and build a bench-scale process for a novel phase-changing aminosilicone-based CO2-capture solvent. The project will establish scalability and technical and economic feasibility of using a phase-changing CO2-capture absorbent for post-combustion capture of CO2 from coal-fired power plants with 90% capture efficiency and 95% CO2 purity at a cost of $40/tonne of CO2 captured by 2025 and a cost of <$10/tonne of CO2 captured by 2035. In the first budget period of this project, the bench-scale phase-changing CO2 capture process was designed using data and operating experience generated under a previous project (ARPA-e project DE-AR0000084). Sizing and specification of all major unit operations was completed, including detailed process and instrumentation diagrams. The system was designed to operate over a wide range of operating conditions to allow for exploration of the effect of process variables on CO2 capture performance.

  4. Inventory of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Kora, Angela R.; Shankle, Steve A.; Fowler, Kimberly M.

    2009-06-29

    The Carbon Management Strategic Initiative (CMSI) is a lab-wide initiative to position the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as a leader in science, technology and policy analysis required to understand, mitigate and adapt to global climate change as a nation. As part of an effort to walk the talk in the field of carbon management, PNNL conducted its first carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions inventory for the 2007 calendar year. The goal of this preliminary inventory is to provide PNNL staff and management with a sense for the relative impact different activities at PNNL have on the labs total carbon footprint.

  5. Tennessee: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Optimizes Carbon Fiber...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Further optimization of these processes has the potential to result in carbon fibers with ... and institutional barriers to the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cells. ...

  6. Relationship between textural properties, fly ash carbons, and Hg capture in fly ashes derived from the combustion of anthracitic pulverized feed blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isabel Surez-Ruiz; Jose B. Parra

    2007-08-15

    In this work, the textural properties of a series of whole anthracitic-derived fly ashes sampled in eight hoppers from the electrostatic precipitators and their sized fractions (from {gt}150 to {lt}25 {mu}m) are investigated. Data from N{sub 2} adsorption isotherms at 77 K, helium density, and mercury porosimetry have contributed to establish a relationship between the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas, VTOT, porosity, carbon content (the type of fly ash carbons), and Hg retention in these fly ashes. The unburned carbons in these ashes are macroporous materials, and they are different from the carbons in fly ashes from classes C and F (the latter derived from the combustion of bituminous coals) and show different textural properties. These ashes represent the end member of the fly ash classes C and F with respect to certain textural properties. Although the BET surface area and VTOT values for the studied samples are the lowest reported, they increase with the increase in carbon content, anisotropic carbon content, and particle size of the ashes. Thus, a positive relationship between all these parameters and Hg capture by the coarser ash fractions was found. The finest fraction of carbons ({lt}25 {mu}m) represented an exception. Although it makes a significant contribution to the total carbon of the whole fly ashes and shows relatively higher surface areas and VTOT values, its Hg concentration was found to be the lowest. This suggests that the type of unburned carbons in the finest fraction and/or other adsorption mechanisms may play a role in Hg concentration. Because the textural properties of anisotropic carbons depend on their subtype and on their origin, the need for its differentiation has been evidenced. 54 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Fabrication and Scale-up of Polybenzimidazole (PBI) Membrane Based System for Precombustion-Based Capture of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopala Krishnan; Indira Jayaweera; Angel Sanjrujo; Kevin O'Brien; Richard Callahan; Kathryn Berchtold; Daryl-Lynn Roberts; Will Johnson

    2012-03-31

    The primary objectives of this project are to (1) demonstrate the performance and fabrication of a technically and economically viable pre-combustion-based CO{sub 2} capture system based on the high temperature stability and permeance of PBI membranes, (2) optimize a plan for integration of PBI capture system into an IGCC plant and (3) develop a commercialization plan that addresses technical issues and business issues to outline a clear path for technology transfer of the PBI membrane technology. This report describes research conducted from April 1, 2007 to March 30, 2012 and focused on achieving the above objectives. PBI-based hollow fibers have been fabricated at kilometer lengths and bundled as modules at a bench-scale level for the separation of CO{sub 2} from H{sub 2} at high temperatures and pressures. Long term stability of these fibers has been demonstrated with a relatively high H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity (35 to 50) and H{sub 2} permeance (80 GPU) at temperatures exceeding 225°C. Membrane performance simulations and systems analysis of an IGCC system incorporating a PBI hollow fiber membrane modules have demonstrated that the cost of electricity for CO{sub 2} capture (<10%) using such a high temperature separator. When the cost of transporting, storing, and monitoring the CO{sub 2} is accounted for, the increase in the COE is only 14.4%.

  8. A research needs assessment for the capture, utilization and disposal of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel-fired power plants. Volume 2, Topical reports: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This study, identifies and assesses system approaches in order to prioritize research needs for the capture and non-atmospheric sequestering of a significant portion of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emitted from fossil fuel-fired electric power plants (US power plants presently produce about 7% of the world`s CO{sub 2} emissions). The study considers capture technologies applicable either to existing plants or to those that optimistically might be demonstrated on a commercial scale over the next twenty years. The research needs that have high priority in establishing the technical, environmental, and economic feasibility of large-scale capture and disposal of CO{sub 2} from electric power plants are:(1) survey and assess the capacity, cost, and location of potential depleted gas and oil wells that are suitable CO{sub 2} repositories (with the cooperation of the oil and gas industry); (2) conduct research on the feasibility of ocean disposal, with objectives of determining the cost, residence time, and environmental effects for different methods of CO{sub 2} injection; (3) perform an in-depth survey of knowledge concerning the feasibility of using deep, confined aquifers for disposal and, if feasible, identify potential disposal locations (with the cooperation of the oil and gas industry); (4) evaluate, on a common basis, system and design alternatives for integration of CO{sub 2} capture systems with emerging and advanced technologies for power generation; and prepare a conceptual design, an analysis of barrier issues, and a preliminary cost estimate for pipeline networks necessary to transport a significant portion of the CO{sub 2} to potentially feasible disposal locations.

  9. Steam-Coal Gasification Using CaO and KOH for in Situ Carbon and Sulfur Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siefert, Nicholas S.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Litster, Shawn; Berry, David A.

    2013-08-15

    We present experimental results of coal gasification with and without the addition of calcium oxide and potassium hydroxide as dual-functioning catalyst-capture agents. Using two different coal types and temperatures between 700 and 900 °C, we studied the effect of these catalyst-capture agents on (1) the syngas composition, (2) CO2 and H2S capture, and (3) the steam-coal gasification kinetic rate. The syngas composition from the gasifier was roughly 20% methane, 70% hydrogen, and 10% other species when a CaO/C molar ratio of 0.5 was added. We demonstrated significantly enhanced steam–coal gasification kinetic rates when adding small amounts of potassium hydroxide to coal when operating a CaO-CaCO3 chemical looping gasification reactor. For example, the steam–coal gasification kinetic rate increased 250% when dry mixing calcium oxide at a Ca/C molar ratio of 0.5 with a sub-bituminous coal, and the kinetic rate increased 1000% when aqueously mixing calcium oxide at a Ca/C molar ratio of 0.5 along with potassium hydroxide at a K/C molar ratio of 0.06. In addition, we conducted multi-cycle studies in which CaCO3 was calcined by heating to 900 °C to regenerate the CaO, which was then reused in repeated CaO-CaCO3 cycles. The increased steam-coal gasification kinetics rates for both CaO and CaO + KOH persisted even when the material was reused in six cycles of gasification and calcination. The ability of CaO to capture carbon dioxide decreased roughly 2-4% per CaO-CaCO3 cycle. We also discuss an important application of this combined gasifier-calciner to electricity generation and selling the purge stream as a precalcined feedstock to a cement kiln. In this scenario, the amount of purge stream required is fixed not by the degradation in the capture ability but rather by the requirements at the cement kiln on the amount of CaSO4 and ash in the precalcined feedstock.

  10. The National Ignition Facility: The Path to a Carbon-Free Energy Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stolz, C J

    2011-03-16

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF will enable exploration of scientific problems in national strategic security, basic science and fusion energy. One of the early NIF goals centers on achieving laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and energy gain, demonstrating the feasibility of laser fusion as a viable source of clean, carbon-free energy. This talk will discuss the precision technology and engineering challenges of building the NIF and those we must overcome to make fusion energy a commercial reality.

  11. Engineering and Economic Analysis of an Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plant with and without Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Task 7. Design and Economic Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booras, George; Powers, J.; Riley, C.; Hendrix, H.

    2015-09-01

    This report evaluates the economics and performance of two A-USC PC power plants; Case 1 is a conventionally configured A-USC PC power plant with superior emission controls, but without CO2 removal; and Case 2 adds a post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) system to the plant from Case 1, using the design and heat integration strategies from EPRI’s 2015 report, “Best Integrated Coal Plant.” The capture design basis for this case is “partial,” to meet EPA’s proposed New Source Performance Standard, which was initially proposed as 500 kg-CO2/MWh (gross) or 1100 lb-CO2/MWh (gross), but modified in August 2015 to 635 kg-CO2/MWh (gross) or 1400 lb-CO2/MWh (gross). This report draws upon the collective experience of consortium members, with EPRI and General Electric leading the study. General Electric provided the steam cycle analysis as well as v the steam turbine design and cost estimating. EPRI performed integrated plant performance analysis using EPRI’s PC Cost model.

  12. Integrated Removal of NOx with Carbon Monoxide as Reductant, and Capture of Mercury in a Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neville Pinto; Panagiotis Smirniotis; Stephen Thiel

    2010-08-31

    Coal will likely continue to be a dominant component of power generation in the foreseeable future. This project addresses the issue of environmental compliance for two important pollutants: NO{sub x} and mercury. Integration of emission control units is in principle possible through a Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor (LTSCAR) in which NO{sub x} removal is achieved in a traditional SCR mode but at low temperature, and, uniquely, using carbon monoxide as a reductant. The capture of mercury is integrated into the same process unit. Such an arrangement would reduce mercury removal costs significantly, and provide improved control for the ultimate disposal of mercury. The work completed in this project demonstrates that the use of CO as a reductant in LTSCR is technically feasible using supported manganese oxide catalysts, that the simultaneous warm-gas capture of elemental and oxidized mercury is technically feasible using both nanostructured chelating adsorbents and ceria-titania-based materials, and that integrated removal of mercury and NO{sub x} is technically feasible using ceria-titania-based materials.

  13. NETL emphasizes CO{sub 2} capture from existing plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-04-01

    This paper gives brief description of several carbon dioxide capture projects that were directed toward a broader range of capture technologies.

  14. Grangemouth Advanced CO2 Capture Project GRACE | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Grangemouth Advanced CO2 Capture Project GRACE Jump to: navigation, search Name: Grangemouth Advanced CO2 Capture Project (GRACE) Place: United Kingdom Sector: Carbon Product:...

  15. Comparative assessment of status and opportunities for carbon Dioxide Capture and storage and Radioactive Waste Disposal In North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2011-07-22

    Aside from the target storage regions being underground, geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) and radioactive waste disposal (RWD) share little in common in North America. The large volume of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) needed to be sequestered along with its relatively benign health effects present a sharp contrast to the limited volumes and hazardous nature of high-level radioactive waste (RW). There is well-documented capacity in North America for 100 years or more of sequestration of CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plants. Aside from economics, the challenges of GCS include lack of fully established legal and regulatory framework for ownership of injected CO{sub 2}, the need for an expanded pipeline infrastructure, and public acceptance of the technology. As for RW, the USA had proposed the unsaturated tuffs of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the region's first high-level RWD site before removing it from consideration in early 2009. The Canadian RW program is currently evolving with options that range from geologic disposal to both decentralized and centralized permanent storage in surface facilities. Both the USA and Canada have established legal and regulatory frameworks for RWD. The most challenging technical issue for RWD is the need to predict repository performance on extremely long time scales (10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} years). While attitudes toward nuclear power are rapidly changing as fossil-fuel costs soar and changes in climate occur, public perception remains the most serious challenge to opening RW repositories. Because of the many significant differences between RWD and GCS, there is little that can be shared between them from regulatory, legal, transportation, or economic perspectives. As for public perception, there is currently an opportunity to engage the public on the benefits and risks of both GCS and RWD as they learn more about the urgent energy-climate crisis created by greenhouse gas emissions from current fossil-fuel combustion practices.

  16. FutureGen 2.0 Oxy-Coal Combustion Carbon Capture Plant Pre-FEED Design and Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanigan, Tom; Pybus, Craig; Roy, Sonya; Lockwood, Frederick; McDonald, Denny; Maclnnis, Jim

    2011-09-30

    This report summarizes the results of the Pre-Front End Engineering Design (pre-FEED) phase of a proposed advanced oxy-combustion power generation plant to repower the existing 200 MWe Unit 4 at Ameren Energy Resources’ (AER) Meredosia Power Plant. AER has formed an alliance with Air Liquide Process and Construction, Inc. (ALPC) and Babcock & Wilcox Power Generation Group (B&W PGG) for the design, construction, and testing of the facility, and has contracted with URS Corporation (URS) for preliminary design and Owner’s engineering services. The Project employs oxy-combustion technology – combustion of coal with nearly pure oxygen and recycled flue gas (instead of air) – to capture approximately 90% of the flue gas CO2 for transport and sequestration by another Project. Plant capacity and configuration has been developed based on the B&W PGG-ALPC cool recycle process firing high-sulfur bituminous coal fuel, assuming baseload plant operation to maximize existing steam turbine capability, with limited consideration for plant redundancy and performance optimization in order to keep plant costs as low as practical. Activities and preliminary results from the pre-FEED phase addressed in this report include the following: Overall plant thermal performance; Equipment sizing and system configuration; Plant operation and control philosophy; Plant emissions and effluents; CO2 production and recovery characteristics; Project cost estimate and economic evaluation; Integrated project engineering and construction schedule; Project risk and opportunity assessment; Development of Project permitting strategy and requirements During the Phase 2 of the Project, additional design details will be developed and the Phase 1 work products updated to support actual construction and operation of the facility in Phase 3. Additional information will be provided early in Phase 2 to support Ameren-Environmental in finalizing the appropriate permitting strategies and permit applications. Additional performance and reliability enhancements will also be evaluated in Phase 2 to try to improve overall project economics.

  17. Gelled Ionic Liquid-Based Membranes: Achieving a 10,000 GPU Permeance for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture with Gelled Ionic Liquid-Based Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-02-02

    IMPACCT Project: Alongside Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Electric Power Research Institute, CU-Boulder is developing a membrane made of a gelled ionic liquid to capture CO2 from the exhaust of coal-fired power plants. The membranes are created by spraying the gelled ionic liquids in thin layers onto porous support structures using a specialized coating technique. The new membrane is highly efficient at pulling CO2 out of coal-derived flue gas exhaust while restricting the flow of other materials through it. The design involves few chemicals or moving parts and is more mechanically stable than current technologies. The team is now working to further optimize the gelled materials for CO2 separation and create a membrane layer that is less than 1 micrometer thick.

  18. Large Scale U.S. Unconventional Fuels Production and the Role of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies in Reducing Their Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

    2008-11-18

    This paper examines the role that carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies could play in reducing greenhouse gas emissions if a significant unconventional fuels industry were to develop within the United States. Specifically, the paper examines the potential emergence of a large scale domestic unconventional fuels industry based on oil shale and coal-to-liquids (CTL) technologies. For both of these domestic heavy hydrocarbon resources, this paper models the growth of domestic production to a capacity of 3 MMB/d by 2050. For the oil shale production case, we model large scale deployment of an in-situ retorting process applied to the Eocene Green River formation of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming where approximately 75% of the high grade oil shale resources within the United States lies. For the CTL case, we examine a more geographically dispersed coal-based unconventional fuel industry. This paper examines the performance of these industries under two hypothetical climate policies and concludes that even with the wide scale availability of cost effective carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies, these unconventional fuels production industries would be responsible for significant increases in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The oil shale production facilities required to produce 3MMB/d would result in net emissions to the atmosphere of between 3000-7000 MtCO2 in addition to storing potentially 1000 to 5000 MtCO2 in regional deep geologic formations in the period up to 2050. A similarly sized domestic CTL industry could result in 4000 to 5000 MtCO2 emitted to the atmosphere in addition to potentially 21,000 to 22,000 MtCO2 stored in regional deep geologic formations over the same period up to 2050. Preliminary analysis of regional CO2 storage capacity in locations where such facilities might be sited indicates that there appears to be sufficient storage capacity, primarily in deep saline formations, to accommodate the CO2 from these industries. However, additional analyses plus detailed regional and site characterization is needed, along with a closer examination of competing storage demands.

  19. Energy Department Project Captures and Stores more than One Million...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    new carbon-capture units and central co-gen and CO2 product compressor. | Photo ... new carbon-capture units and central co-gen and CO2 product compressor. | Photo ...

  20. Toward transformational carbon capture systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miller, David C.; Litynski, John T.; Brickett, Lynn A.; Morreale, Bryan D.

    2015-10-28

    Since the industrial revolution, fossil energy has promoted economic growth leading to widespread prosperity.

  1. Jumpstarting the carbon capture industry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July/August 2011 July/August 2011 August 26, 2011 In this issue: U.S., Russia Reaffirm Commitment to Dispose of Surplus Weapons-grade Plutonium NNSA Conference Highlights Work Critical to Stewardship Science NNSA Rolls Out Mobile Radiation Detection System for INTERPOL Members NNSA Monitors Major League Baseball's All-Star Game NNSA Rolls Out Mobile Radiation Detection System for INTERPOL Members Newsletter PDF: PDF icon 2011 July_August NNSA NEWS.pdf Printer Friendly Newsletter PDF: PDF icon

  2. Sandia Energy Carbon Capture & Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expansion of DOE-DOT Tight Oil Research Work http:energy.sandia.govexpansion-of-doe-dot-tight-oil-research-work http:energy.sandia.govexpansion-of-doe-dot-tight-oil-research...

  3. Large-Scale Utilization of Biomass Energy and Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in the Transport and Electricity Sectors under Stringent CO2 Concentration Limit Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

    2010-08-05

    This paper examines the potential role of large scale, dedicated commercial biomass energy systems under global climate policies designed to meet atmospheric concentrations of CO2 at 400ppm and 450ppm by the end of the century. We use an integrated assessment model of energy and agriculture systems to show that, given a climate policy in which terrestrial carbon is appropriately valued equally with carbon emitted from the energy system, biomass energy has the potential to be a major component of achieving these low concentration targets. A key aspect of the research presented here is that the costs of processing and transporting biomass energy at much larger scales than current experience are explicitly incorporated into the modeling. From the scenario results, 120-160 EJ/year of biomass energy is produced globally by midcentury and 200-250 EJ/year by the end of this century. In the first half of the century, much of this biomass is from agricultural and forest residues, but after 2050 dedicated cellulosic biomass crops become the majority source, along with growing utilization of waste-to-energy. The ability to draw on a diverse set of biomass based feedstocks helps to reduce the pressure for drastic large-scale changes in land use and the attendant environmental, ecological, and economic consequences those changes would unleash. In terms of the conversion of bioenergy feedstocks into value added energy, this paper demonstrates that biomass is and will continue to be used to generate electricity as well as liquid transportation fuels. A particular focus of this paper is to show how climate policies and technology assumptions - especially the availability of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies - affect the decisions made about where the biomass is used in the energy system. The potential for net-negative electric sector emissions through the use of CCS with biomass feedstocks provides an attractive part of the solution for meeting stringent emissions constraints; we find that at carbon prices above 150$/tCO2, over 90% of biomass in the energy system is used in combination with CCS. Despite the higher technology costs of CCS, it is a very important tool in controlling the cost of meeting a target, offsetting the venting of CO2 from sectors of the energy system that may be more expensive to mitigate, such as oil use in transportation. CCS is also used heavily with other fuels such as coal and natural gas, and by 2095 a total of 1530 GtCO2 has been stored in deep geologic reservoirs. The paper also discusses the role of cellulosic ethanol and Fischer-Tropsch biomass derived transportation fuels as two representative conversion processes and shows that both technologies may be important contributors to liquid fuels production, with unique costs and emissions characteristics.

  4. Application of a High-Throughput Analyzer in Evaluating Solid Adsorbents for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture via Multicomponent Adsorption of CO2, N-2, and H2O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, JA; McDonald, TM; Bae, TH; Bachman, JE; Sumida, K; Dutton, JJ; Kaye, SS; Long, JR

    2015-04-15

    Despite the large number of metal-organic frameworks that have been studied in the context of post-combustion carbon capture, adsorption equilibria of gas mixtures including CO2, N-2, and H2O, which are the three biggest components of the flue gas emanating from a coal- or natural gas-fired power plant, have never been reported. Here, we disclose the design and validation of a high-throughput multicomponent adsorption instrument that can measure equilibrium adsorption isotherms for mixtures of gases at conditions that are representative of an actual flue gas from a power plant. This instrument is used to study 15 different metal-organic frameworks, zeolites, mesoporous silicas, and activated carbons representative of the broad range of solid adsorbents that have received attention for CO2 capture. While the multicomponent results presented in this work provide many interesting fundamental insights, only adsorbents functionalized with alkylamines are shown to have any significant CO2 capacity in the presence of N-2 and H2O at equilibrium partial pressures similar to those expected in a carbon capture process. Most significantly, the amine-appended metal organic framework mmen-Mg-2(dobpdc) (mmen = N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine, dobpdc (4-) = 4,4'-dioxido-3,3'-biphenyldicarboxylate) exhibits a record CO2 capacity of 4.2 +/- 0.2 mmol/g (16 wt %) at 0.1 bar and 40 degrees C in the presence of a high partial pressure of H2O.

  5. Energy Secretary Moniz visits Y-12 | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Visits Clean Coal Facility in Mississippi Energy Secretary Moniz Visits Clean Coal Facility in Mississippi November 8, 2013 - 3:36pm Addthis On Friday, Nov. 8, 2013, Secretary Moniz and international energy officials toured Kemper, the nation's largest carbon capture and storage facility, in Liberty, Mississippi. On Friday, Nov. 8, 2013, Secretary Moniz and international energy officials toured Kemper, the nation's largest carbon capture and storage facility, in Liberty,

  6. Photos | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -Energy sources --Renewable energy ---Bioenergy ---Geothermal energy ---Hydropower ---Solar energy ---Wind energy --Fossil fuels ---Coal ----Carbon capture & sequestration ---Oil...

  7. EA-1616: National Carbon Research Center Project at Southern Company Services' Power Systems Development Facility near Wilsonville, Alabama

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates and updates the potential environmental impacts of DOE’s proposed continued operations of the NCCC Project at the PSDF plant. The NCCC is designed to test and evaluate carbon dioxide (CO2) control technologies for power generation facilities, including CO2 capture solvents and sorbents, mass-transfer devices, lower cost water-gas shift reactors, and scaled-up membrane technologies. Additionally, the NCCC evaluates methods to integrate CO2 capture technologies with other coal-based power plant systems by testing both pre-combustion and post-combustion technologies. The NCCC provides the capability to test these systems under a wide range of fuels, including bituminous and sub-bituminous coals, lignites and biomass/coal mixtures. The goal of the NCCC project is to accelerate the development, optimization, and commercialization of viable CO2 control technologies.

  8. Capture sunlight with your window

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capture sunlight with your window Capture sunlight with your window A luminescent solar concentrator is an emerging sunlight harvesting technology that has the potential to disrupt the way we think about energy. August 24, 2015 The luminescent solar concentrator could turn any window into a daytime power source. The luminescent solar concentrator could turn any window into a daytime power source. Contact Los Alamos National Laboratory Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email

  9. HAWC Observatory captures first image

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HAWC Observatory captures first image HAWC Observatory captures first image The facility is designed to detect cosmic rays and the highest energy gamma rays ever observed from astrophysical sources. April 30, 2013 The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is under construction. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is under construction. HAWC is under construction inside the Parque Nacional Pico de Orizaba, a Mexican national park. An international team of researchers,

  10. An Analysis Of The Impact Of Selected Carbon Capture And Storage Policy Scenarios On The US Fossil-Based Electric Power Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, Casie L.; Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Mahasenan, N Maha

    2003-09-13

    CO2 capture and storage (CCS) is rapidly emerging as a potential key climate change mitigation option. However, as policymakers and industrial stakeholders begin the process of formulating new policy for implementing CCS technologies, participants require a tool to assess large-scale CCS deployment over a number of different possible future scenarios. This paper will analyze several scenarios using two state-of-the-art Battelle developed models, the MiniCAM and the CO2-GIS for examining CCS deployment. Outputs include the total amount of CO2 captured, total annual emissions, and fossil-based generating capacity.

  11. Novel Solvent System for Post Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture Brown...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    COsub 2 Capture Brown, Alfred; Brown, Nathan 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS Clean Coal Technology Coal - Environmental (Carbon Capture) Clean Coal Technology Coal -...

  12. CO2 Capture Poject CCP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CO2 Capture Poject CCP Jump to: navigation, search Name: CO2 Capture Poject (CCP) Place: United Kingdom Sector: Carbon Product: CCP is a partnership of energy companies and...

  13. Robust automated knowledge capture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens-Adams, Susan Marie; Abbott, Robert G.; Forsythe, James Chris; Trumbo, Michael Christopher Stefan; Haass, Michael Joseph; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes research conducted through the Sandia National Laboratories Robust Automated Knowledge Capture Laboratory Directed Research and Development project. The objective of this project was to advance scientific understanding of the influence of individual cognitive attributes on decision making. The project has developed a quantitative model known as RumRunner that has proven effective in predicting the propensity of an individual to shift strategies on the basis of task and experience related parameters. Three separate studies are described which have validated the basic RumRunner model. This work provides a basis for better understanding human decision making in high consequent national security applications, and in particular, the individual characteristics that underlie adaptive thinking.

  14. PRELIMINARY TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY STUDY ON THE INTEGRATION OF A PROCESS UTILIZING LOW-ENERGY SOLVENTS FOR CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE ENABLED BY A COMBINATION OF ENZYMES AND ULTRASONICS WITH A SUBCRITICAL PC POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swaminathan, Saravanan; Kuczynska, Agnieszka; Hume, Scott; Mulgundmath, Vinay; Freeman, Charles; Bearden, Mark; Remias, Joe; Ambedkar, Balraj; Salmon, Sonja; House, Alan

    2012-11-01

    The results of the preliminary techno-economic assessment for integrating a process utilizing low-energy solvents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture enabled by a combination of enzymes and ultrasonics with a subcritical pulverized coal (PC) power plant are presented. Four cases utilizing the enzyme-activated solvent are compared using different methodologies of regeneration against the DOE/NETL reference MEA case. The results are shown comparing the energy demand for post-combustion CO2 capture and the net higher heating value (HHV) efficiency of the power plant integrated with the post-combustion capture (PCC) plant. A levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) assessment was performed showing the costs of the options presented in the study. The key factors contributing to the reduction of LCOE were identified as enzyme make-up rate and the capability of the ultrasonic regeneration process. The net efficiency of the integrated PC power plant with CO2 capture changes from 24.9% with the reference Case 10 plant to between 24.34% and 29.97% for the vacuum regeneration options considered, and to between 26.63% and 31.41% for the ultrasonic regeneration options. The evaluation also shows the effect of the critical parameters on the LCOE, with the main variable being the initial estimation of enzyme dosing rate. The LCOE ($/MWh) values range from 112.92 to 125.23 for the vacuum regeneration options and from 108.9 to 117.50 for the ultrasonic regeneration cases considered in comparison to 119.6 for the reference Case 10. A sensitivity analysis of the effect of critical parameters on the LCOE was also performed. The results from the preliminary techno-economic assessment show that the proposed technology can be investigated further with a view to being a viable alternative to conventional CO2 scrubbing technologies.

  15. Energy Department Project Captures and Stores One Million Metric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "This milestone is an important step towards the widespread deployment of carbon capture ... approximately 7,000 feet below the surface into the Mount Simon Sandstone formation. ...

  16. Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2013 Now Accepting Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 3 Now Accepting Applications Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2013 Now Accepting Applications March 12, 2013 - 1:43pm Addthis Washington, DC - Graduate students and early career professionals can gain hands-on field research experience in areas related to carbon capture and storage (CCS) by participating in the Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration (RECS) program. The initiative, supported by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and the National Energy

  17. Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2015 Now Accepting Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 5 Now Accepting Applications Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2015 Now Accepting Applications April 13, 2015 - 12:04pm Addthis Graduate students and early career professionals can gain hands-on field research experience in areas related to carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) by participating in the Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration (RECS) program. The initiative, supported by Department's Office of Fossil Energy (FE), the National Energy

  18. NREL's Cyanobacteria Engineering Shortens Biofuel Production Process, Captures CO2 (Fact Sheet), Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The flexibility of cyanobacterial metabolism supports direct conversion of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to ethylene. Photosynthesis fuels growth in plants and algae, two of the primary components of biomass. Biomass, in turn, can be converted into various fuels and chemicals. NREL researchers have shortened this process by engineering one photosynthetic organism, cyanobacterium, so that it converts CO 2 directly into the target chemical ethylene, bypassing the biomass produc- tion and processing

  19. Carbon investment funds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-01-15

    The report is a study of the development of funds to invest in the purchase of carbon credits. It takes a look at the growing market for carbon credits, the rise of carbon investment funds, and the current state of carbon investing. Topics covered in the report include: Overview of climate change, greenhouse gases, and the Kyoto Protocols. Analysis of the alternatives for reducing carbon emissions including nitrous oxide reduction, coal mine methane capture and carbon capture and storage; Discussion of the different types of carbon credits; Discussion of the basics of carbon trading; Evaluation of the current status of carbon investing; and Profiles of 37 major carbon investment funds worldwide.

  20. Fossil Energy Research Benefits Carbon...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    has become a world leader in carbon capture and storage (CCS) science and technology. ... and storing in geologic formations carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from industrial or power plants. ...

  1. Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-05-06

    Carbon Sequestration- the process of capturing the CO2 released by the burning of fossil fuels and storing it deep withing the Earth, trapped by a non-porous layer of rock.

  2. Global Biogeochemistry Models and Global Carbon Cycle Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covey, C; Caldeira, K; Guilderson, T; Cameron-Smith, P; Govindasamy, B; Swanston, C; Wickett, M; Mirin, A; Bader, D

    2005-05-27

    The climate modeling community has long envisioned an evolution from physical climate models to ''earth system'' models that include the effects of biology and chemistry, particularly those processes related to the global carbon cycle. The widely reproduced Box 3, Figure 1 from the 2001 IPCC Scientific Assessment schematically describes that evolution. The community generally accepts the premise that understanding and predicting global and regional climate change requires the inclusion of carbon cycle processes in models to fully simulate the feedbacks between the climate system and the carbon cycle. Moreover, models will ultimately be employed to predict atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases as a function of anthropogenic and natural processes, such as industrial emissions, terrestrial carbon fixation, sequestration, land use patterns, etc. Nevertheless, the development of coupled climate-carbon models with demonstrable quantitative skill will require a significant amount of effort and time to understand and validate their behavior at both the process level and as integrated systems. It is important to consider objectively whether the currently proposed strategies to develop and validate earth system models are optimal, or even sufficient, and whether alternative strategies should be pursued. Carbon-climate models are going to be complex, with the carbon cycle strongly interacting with many other components. Off-line process validation will be insufficient. As was found in coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs, feedbacks between model components can amplify small errors and uncertainties in one process to produce large biases in the simulated climate. The persistent tropical western Pacific Ocean ''double ITCZ'' and upper troposphere ''cold pole'' problems are examples. Finding and fixing similar types of problems in coupled carbon-climate models especially will be difficult, given the lack of observations required for diagnosis and validation of biogeochemical processes.

  3. Carbon Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Fact Sheet Research Team Members Key Contacts Carbon Storage Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a key component of the U.S. carbon management portfolio. Numerous studies have shown that CCS can account for up to 55 percent of the emissions reductions needed to stabilize and ultimately reduce atmospheric concentrations of CO2. NETL's Carbon Storage Program is readying CCS technologies for widespread commercial deployment by 2020. The program's goals are: By 2015, develop technologies

  4. Carbon nanotubes for hydrogen storage as being studied by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Technical evaluation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skolnik, E.G.

    1997-08-01

    On June 17--18, the author met with Dr. Mike Heben of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to discuss his research on the development of carbon nanotubes to be used for the storage of hydrogen on-board a vehicle. Dr. Heben has been working for the past several years on a project that will develop single walled nanotubes (SWNTs) composed of carbon for storage of hydrogen. Dr. Heben has spent much time trying to develop a method by which he could produce SWNTs in sufficient quantity, and then demonstrate the adsorption and desorption of hydrogen from these nanotubes at room temperature. While Dr. Heben was able to show hydrogen adsorption levels of up to 10% on a SWNT basis, generation of SWNTs from an arc-discharge was only about 0.05% of the total soot formation. Therefore, increasing SWNT concentration was a key consideration. Findings from the meeting with Dr. Heben are presented.

  5. Intro to Carbon Sequestration

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

  6. Intro to Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-03-06

    NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

  7. NATIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION DATABASE AND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM (NATCARB) FORMER TITLE-MIDCONTINENT INTERACTIVE DIGITAL CARBON ATLAS AND RELATIONAL DATABASE (MIDCARB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy R. Carr

    2004-07-16

    This annual report describes progress in the third year of the three-year project entitled ''Midcontinent Interactive Digital Carbon Atlas and Relational Database (MIDCARB)''. The project assembled a consortium of five states (Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky and Ohio) to construct an online distributed Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) covering aspects of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) geologic sequestration (http://www.midcarb.org). The system links the five states in the consortium into a coordinated regional database system consisting of datasets useful to industry, regulators and the public. The project has been extended and expanded as a ''NATional CARBon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NATCARB)'' to provide national coverage across the Regional CO{sub 2} Partnerships, which currently cover 40 states (http://www.natcarb.org). Advanced distributed computing solutions link database servers across the five states and other publicly accessible servers (e.g., USGS) into a single system where data is maintained and enhanced at the local level but is accessed and assembled through a single Web portal and can be queried, assembled, analyzed and displayed. This project has improved the flow of data across servers and increased the amount and quality of available digital data. The online tools used in the project have improved in stability and speed in order to provide real-time display and analysis of CO{sub 2} sequestration data. The move away from direct database access to web access through eXtensible Markup Language (XML) has increased stability and security while decreasing management overhead. The MIDCARB viewer has been simplified to provide improved display and organization of the more than 125 layers and data tables that have been generated as part of the project. The MIDCARB project is a functional demonstration of distributed management of data systems that cross the boundaries between institutions and geographic areas. The MIDCARB system addresses CO{sub 2} sequestration and other natural resource issues from sources, sinks and transportation within a spatial database that can be queried online. Visualization of high quality and current data can assist decision makers by providing access to common sets of high quality data in a consistent manner.

  8. Recovery Act: 'Carbonsheds' as a Framework for Optimizing United States Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Pipeline Transport on a Regional to National Scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratson, Lincoln

    2012-11-30

    Carbonsheds are regions in which the estimated cost of transporting CO{sub 2} from any (plant) location in the region to the storage site it encompasses is cheaper than piping the CO{sub 2} to a storage site outside the region. We use carbonsheds to analyze the cost of transport and storage of CO{sub 2} in deploying CCS on land and offshore of the continental U.S. We find that onshore the average cost of transport and storage within carbonsheds is roughly $10/t when sources cooperate to reduce transport costs, with the costs increasing as storage options are depleted over time. Offshore transport and storage costs by comparison are found to be roughly twice as expensive but t may still be attractive because of easier access to property rights for sub-seafloor storage as well as a simpler regulatory system, and possibly lower MMV requirements, at least in the deep-ocean where pressures and temperatures would keep the CO{sub 2} negatively buoyant. Agent-based modeling of CCS deployment within carbonsheds under various policy scenarios suggests that the most cost-effective strategy at this point in time is to focus detailed geology characterization of storage potential on only the largest onshore reservoirs where the potential for mitigating emissions is greatest and the cost of storage appears that it will be among the cheapest.

  9. CAPTURE DOCUMENT ORAUTEAM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DATA CAPTURE DOCUMENT ORAUTEAM ---- Dose Reconstruction ~v~:7 DISCOVERY AND REVIEW dA'~ Project for NIOSH The attached document may contain Privacy Act data. This information is protected by the Privacy Act, 5 U.S.C. §552a; disclosure to any third party without written consent of the individual to whom the information pertains is strictly prohibited. Data Capture Team or Other ORAU Team Member Capturing Data: Complete all information that applies to the data/document being submitted lor

  10. PRELIMINARY ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH AND SAFETY RISK ASSESSMENT ON THE INTEGRATION OF A PROCESS UTILIZING LOW-ENERGY SOLVENTS FOR CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE ENABLED BY A COMBINATION OF ENZYMES AND VACUUM REGENERATION WITH A SUBCRITICAL PC POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, David; Vidal, Rafael; Russell, Tania; Babcock, Doosan; Freeman, Charles; Bearden, Mark; Whyatt, Greg; Liu, Kun; Frimpong, Reynolds; Lu, Kunlei; Salmon, Sonja; House, Alan; Yarborough, Erin

    2014-12-31

    The results of the preliminary environmental, health and safety (EH&S) risk assessment for an enzyme-activated potassium carbonate (K2CO3) solution post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC) plant, integrated with a subcritical pulverized coal (PC) power plant, are presented. The expected emissions during normal steady-state operation have been estimated utilizing models of the PCC plant developed in AspenTech’s AspenPlus® software, bench scale test results from the University of Kentucky, and industrial experience of emission results from a slipstream PCC plant utilizing amine based solvents. A review of all potential emission species and their sources was undertaken that identified two credible emission sources, the absorber off-gas that is vented to atmosphere via a stack and the waste removed from the PCC plant in the centrifuge used to reclaim enzyme and solvent. The conditions and compositions of the emissions were calculated and the potential EH&S effects were considered as well as legislative compliance requirements. Potential mitigation methods for emissions during normal operation have been proposed and solutions to mitigate uncontrolled releases of species have been considered. The potential emissions were found to pose no significant EH&S concerns and were compliant with the Federal legislation reviewed. The limitations in predicting full scale plant performance from bench scale tests have been noted and further work on a larger scale test unit is recommended to reduce the level of uncertainty.

  11. Capturing Energy Upgrades

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides an overview of how to capture the value of energy efficiency upgrades in the real estate market, from CNT Energy.

  12. Black hole birth captured by cosmic voyeurs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Black hole birth captured by cosmic voyeurs Black hole birth captured by cosmic voyeurs The RAPTOR system is a network of small robotic observatories that scan the skies for optical anomalies such as flashes emanating from a star in its death throes as it collapses and becomes a black hole. November 21, 2013 Los Alamos National Laboratory astrophysicist Tom Vestrand poses with a telescope array that is part of the RAPTOR (RAPid Telescopes for Optical Response) system. RAPTOR is an intelligent

  13. University Partnerships | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Multidisciplinary Simulation Center for High Efficiency Electric Power Generation with Carbon Capture," an MSC University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign,...

  14. National Energy Technology Laboratory Captures Three Sustainability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    possible when employees bring creativity, innovation, and dedication to their efforts to make the Department of Energy more sustainable," said Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman. ...

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies capture prestigious...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    composites with lasers, produce new high-value, cost-effective refractory ropes and textiles, and prototype novel high-aspect ratio microelectrical mechanical systems....

  16. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Studies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multiple files are bound together in this PDF Package. Adobe recommends using Adobe Reader or Adobe Acrobat version 8 or later to work with documents contained within a PDF Package. By updating to the latest version, you'll enjoy the following benefits: * Efficient, integrated PDF viewing * Easy printing * Quick searches Don't have the latest version of Adobe Reader? Click here to download the latest version of Adobe Reader If you already have Adobe Reader 8, click a file in this PDF Package to

  17. LanzaTech- Capturing Carbon. Fueling Growth.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-03-07

    LanzaTech will design a gas fermentation system that will significantly improve the rate at which methane gas is delivered to a biocatalyst. Current gas fermentation processes are not cost effective compared to other gas-to-liquid technologies because they are too slow for large-scale production. If successful, LanzaTech's system will process large amounts of methane at a high rate, reducing the energy inputs and costs associated with methane conversion.

  18. Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fossil fuel fired electric generating plants are the cornerstone of America's central power system. Currently, the existing fossil fuel fleet accounts for about two-thirds of all electricity...

  19. INFOGRAPHIC: Carbon Capture 101 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Carly Wilkins Carly Wilkins Multimedia Designer Power plants are vital to modern life. They produce the energy we need to light our homes,...

  20. How Carbon Capture Works | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar Works 32 likes Every four minutes, another American home or business goes solar, but how do solar panels turn sunlight into energy? We'll answer that question and more Learn...

  1. How Carbon Capture Works | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fusion Energy Works 33 likes Fusion energy is the energy source of the sun and all of the stars. As part of How Energy Works, we'll cover everything from fuel sources to plasma...

  2. High-density carbon ablator experiments on the National Ignition Facilitya)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Ross, J. S.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Divol, L.; Ho, D.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J.; Dppner, T.; Patel, P. K.; Thomas, C.; Tommasini, R.; Haan, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J.; Caggiano, J.; Hatarik, R.; Bionta, R.; Ma, T.; Spears, B.; Rygg, J. R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Dewald, E. L.; Fittinghoff, D.; Jones, O. S.; Robey, H. R.; Moody, J. D.; Khan, S.; Callahan, D. A.; Hamza, A.; Biener, J.; Celliers, P. M.; Braun, D. G.; Erskine, D. J.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Wallace, R. J.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Sater, J.; Collins, G.; Storm, E.; Hsing, W.; Landen, O.; Atherton, J. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Edwards, M. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Rinderknecht, H.; Rosenberg, M.; Sguin, F. H.; Zylstra, A.; Knauer, J. P.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F.; Olson, R.; Kyrala, G. A.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.; Moreno, K.; Hoover, D. E.; Wild, C.; Werner, E.

    2014-05-01

    High Density Carbon (HDC) is a leading candidate as an ablator material for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules in x-ray (indirect) drive implosions. HDC has a higher density (3.5?g/cc) than plastic (CH, 1?g/cc), which results in a thinner ablator with a larger inner radius for a given capsule scale. This leads to higher x-ray absorption and shorter laser pulses compared to equivalent CH designs. This paper will describe a series of experiments carried out to examine the feasibility of using HDC as an ablator using both gas filled hohlraums and lower density, near vacuum hohlraums. These experiments have shown that deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium gas filled HDC capsules driven by a hohlraum filled with 1.2?mg/cc He gas, produce neutron yields a factor of 2 higher than equivalent CH implosions, representing better than 50% Yield-over-Clean (YoC). In a near vacuum hohlraum (He?=?0.03?mg/cc) with 98% laser-to-hohlraum coupling, such a DD gas-filled capsule performed near 1D expectations. A cryogenic layered implosion version was consistent with a fuel velocity?=?410??20?km/s with no observed ablator mixing into the hot spot.

  3. High-density carbon ablator experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacKinnon, A. J. Meezan, N. B.; Ross, J. S.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Divol, L.; Ho, D.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J.; Döppner, T.; Patel, P. K.; Thomas, C.; Tommasini, R.; Haan, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J.; Caggiano, J.; Hatarik, R.; Bionta, R.; and others

    2014-05-15

    High Density Carbon (HDC) is a leading candidate as an ablator material for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules in x-ray (indirect) drive implosions. HDC has a higher density (3.5 g/cc) than plastic (CH, 1 g/cc), which results in a thinner ablator with a larger inner radius for a given capsule scale. This leads to higher x-ray absorption and shorter laser pulses compared to equivalent CH designs. This paper will describe a series of experiments carried out to examine the feasibility of using HDC as an ablator using both gas filled hohlraums and lower density, near vacuum hohlraums. These experiments have shown that deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium gas filled HDC capsules driven by a hohlraum filled with 1.2 mg/cc He gas, produce neutron yields a factor of 2× higher than equivalent CH implosions, representing better than 50% Yield-over-Clean (YoC). In a near vacuum hohlraum (He = 0.03 mg/cc) with 98% laser-to-hohlraum coupling, such a DD gas-filled capsule performed near 1D expectations. A cryogenic layered implosion version was consistent with a fuel velocity = 410 ± 20 km/s with no observed ablator mixing into the hot spot.

  4. In Milestone, Energy Department Projects Safely and Permanently Store 10 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carbon Capture and Storage projects supported by the Department reached a milestone of 10 million tons of carbon dioxide.

  5. Energy Department Project Captures and Stores One Million Metric Tons of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon | Department of Energy One Million Metric Tons of Carbon Energy Department Project Captures and Stores One Million Metric Tons of Carbon January 8, 2015 - 11:18am Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 Energy Department Project Captures and Stores One Million Metric Tons of Carbon Project Achieves Major Milestone by Successfully Injecting Carbon into Saline Formation WASHINGTON - As part of President Obama's all-of-the-above energy strategy, the Department of Energy announced today

  6. NATIVE PLANTS FOR OPTIMIZING CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN RECLAIMED LANDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. UNKEFER; M. EBINGER; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    Carbon emissions and atmospheric concentrations are expected to continue to increase through the next century unless major changes are made in the way carbon is managed. Managing carbon has emerged as a pressing national energy and environmental need that will drive national policies and treaties through the coming decades. Addressing carbon management is now a major priority for DOE and the nation. One way to manage carbon is to use energy more efficiently to reduce our need for major energy and carbon source-fossil fuel combustion. Another way is to increase our use of low-carbon and carbon free fuels and technologies. A third way, and the focus of this proposal, is carbon sequestration, in which carbon is captured and stored thereby mitigating carbon emissions. Sequestration of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere has emerged as the principle means by which the US will meet its near-term international and economic requirements for reducing net carbon emissions (DOE Carbon Sequestration: State of the Science. 1999; IGBP 1998). Terrestrial carbon sequestration provides three major advantages. First, terrestrial carbon pools and fluxes are of sufficient magnitude to effectively mitigate national and even global carbon emissions. The terrestrial biosphere stores {approximately}2060 GigaTons of carbon and transfers approximately 120 GigaTons of carbon per year between the atmosphere and the earth's surface, whereas the current global annual emissions are about 6 GigaTons. Second, we can rapidly and readily modify existing management practices to increase carbon sequestration in our extensive forest, range, and croplands. Third, increasing soil carbon is without negative environment consequences and indeed positively impacts land productivity. The terrestrial carbon cycle is dependent on several interrelationships between plants and soils. Because the soil carbon pool ({approximately}1500 Giga Tons) is approximately three times that in terrestrial vegetation ({approximately}560 GigaTons), the principal focus of terrestrial sequestration efforts is to increase soil carbon. But soil carbon ultimately derives from vegetation and therefore must be managed indirectly through aboveground management of vegetation and nutrients. Hence, the response of whole ecosystems must be considered in terrestrial carbon sequestration strategies.

  7. CO₂ Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toy, Lora; Kataria, Atish; Gupta, Raghubir

    2011-09-30

    Because the fleet of coal-fired power plants is of such importance to the nation's energy production while also being the single largest emitter of CO₂, the development of retrofit, post-combustion CO₂ capture technologies for existing and new, upcoming coal power plants will allow coal to remain a major component of the U.S. energy mix while mitigating global warming. Post-combustion carbon capture technologies are an attractive option for coal-fired power plants as they do not require modification of major power-plant infrastructures, such as fuel processing, boiler, and steam-turbine subsystems. In this project, the overall objective was to develop an advanced, hollow-fiber, polymeric membrane process that could be cost-effectively retrofitted into current pulverized coal-fired power plants to capture at least 90% of the CO₂ from plant flue gas with 95% captured CO₂ purity. The approach for this project tackled the technology development on three different fronts in parallel: membrane materials R&D, hollow-fiber membrane module development, and process development and engineering. The project team consisted of RTI (prime) and two industrial partners, Arkema, Inc. and Generon IGS, Inc. Two CO₂-selective membrane polymer platforms were targeted for development in this project. For the near term, a next-generation, high-flux polycarbonate membrane platform was spun into hollow-fiber membranes that were fabricated into both lab-scale and larger prototype (~2,200 ft²) membrane modules. For the long term, a new fluoropolymer membrane platform based on poly(vinylidene fluoride) [PVDF] chemistry was developed using a copolymer approach as improved capture membrane materials with superior chemical resistance to flue-gas contaminants (moisture, SO₂, NOx, etc.). Specific objectives were: - Development of new, highly chemically resistant, fluorinated polymers as membrane materials with minimum selectivity of 30 for CO₂ over N₂ and CO₂ permeance greater than 300 gas permeation units (GPU) targeted; - Development of next-generation polycarbonate hollow-fiber membranes and membrane modules with higher CO₂ permeance than current commercial polycarbonate membranes; - Development and fabrication of membrane hollow fibers and modules from candidate polymers; - Development of a CO₂ capture membrane process design and integration strategy suitable for end-of-pipe, retrofit installation; and - Techno-economic evaluation of the "best" integrated CO₂ capture membrane process design package In this report, the results of the project research and development efforts are discussed and include the post-combustion capture properties of the two membrane material platforms and the hollow-fiber membrane modules developed from them and the multi-stage process design and analysis developed for 90% CO₂ capture with 95% captured CO₂ purity.

  8. Probing the Mechanism of CO2 Capture in Diamine-Appended Metal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    display great promise for carbon capture applications, due to unusual step-shaped adsorption behavior that was recently attributed to a cooperative mechanism in which the...

  9. Capturing and Converting CO2 in a Single Step | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    efficient catalyst that captures carbon dioxide and creates a chemical building block. ... 5, 2921-2928 (2015). 2015 American Chemical Society A novel catalyst transforms ...

  10. Novel Solvent System for Post Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS Clean Coal Technology Coal - Environmental (Carbon Capture) Word Cloud More Like This ...

  11. Advanced CO{sub 2} Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal IGCC System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2013-09-30

    The overall objective of the project is to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low rank coals. The plant uses an integrated CO{sub 2} scrubber/Water Gas Shift (WGS) catalyst to capture over90 percent capture of the CO{sub 2} emissions, while providing a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a similar plant with conventional cold gas cleanup system based on SelexolTM technology and 90 percent carbon capture. TDA’s system uses a high temperature physical adsorbent capable of removing CO{sub 2} above the dew point of the synthesis gas and a commercial WGS catalyst that can effectively convert CO in The overall objective of the project is to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low rank coals. The plant uses an integrated CO{sub 2} scrubber/Water Gas Shift (WGS) catalyst to capture over90 percent capture of the CO{sub 2} emissions, while providing a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a similar plant with conventional cold gas cleanup system based on SelexolTM technology and 90 percent carbon capture. TDA’s system uses a high temperature physical adsorbent capable of removing CO{sub 2} above the dew point of the synthesis gas and a commercial WGS catalyst that can effectively convert CO in bituminous coal the net plant efficiency is about 2.4 percentage points higher than an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant equipped with SelexolTM to capture CO{sub 2}. We also previously completed two successful field demonstrations: one at the National Carbon Capture Center (Southern- Wilsonville, AL) in 2011, and a second demonstration in fall of 2012 at the Wabash River IGCC plant (Terra Haute, IN). In this project, we first optimized the sorbent to catalyst ratio used in the combined WGS and CO{sub 2} capture process and confirmed the technical feasibility in bench-scale experiments. In these tests, we did not observe any CO breakthrough both during adsorption and desorption steps indicating that there is complete conversion of CO to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. The overall CO conversions above 90 percent were observed. The sorbent achieved a total CO{sub 2} loading of 7.82 percent wt. of which 5.68 percent is from conversion of CO into CO{sub 2}. The results of the system analysis suggest that the TDA combined shift and high temperature PSA-based Warm Gas Clean-up technology can make a substantial improvement in the IGCC plant thermal performance for a plant designed to achieve near zero emissions (including greater than 90 percent carbon capture). The capital expenses are also expected to be lower than those of Selexol. The higher net plant efficiency and lower capital and operating costs result in substantial reduction in the COE for the IGCC plant equipped with the TDA combined shift and high temperature PSA-based carbon capture system.

  12. Spatial Knowledge Capture Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-05-16

    The Spatial Knowledge Capture Library is a set of algorithms to capture regularities in shapes and trajectories through space and time. We have applied Spatial Knowledge Capture to model the actions of human experts in spatial domains, such as an AWACS Weapons Director task simulation. The library constructs a model to predict the expert’s response to sets of changing cues, such as the movements and actions of adversaries on a battlefield, The library includes amore » highly configurable feature extraction functionality, which supports rapid experimentation to discover causative factors. We use k-medoid clustering to group similar episodes of behavior, and construct a Markov model of system state transitions induced by agents’ actions.« less

  13. Proton capture resonance studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, G.E. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States) 27695]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Bilpuch, E.G. [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Bybee, C.R. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States) 27695]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Cox, J.M.; Fittje, L.M. [Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee (United States) 38505]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Labonte, M.A.; Moore, E.F.; Shriner, J.D. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States) 27695]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Shriner, J.F. Jr. [Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee (United States) 38505]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Vavrina, G.A. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States) 27695]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708; Wallace, P.M. [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina (United States) 27708

    1997-02-01

    The fluctuation properties of quantum systems now are used as a signature of quantum chaos. The analyses require data of extremely high quality. The {sup 29}Si(p,{gamma}) reaction is being used to establish a complete level scheme of {sup 30}P to study chaos and isospin breaking in this nuclide. Determination of the angular momentum J, the parity {pi}, and the isospin T from resonance capture data is considered. Special emphasis is placed on the capture angular distributions and on a geometric description of these angular distributions. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Neutron capture therapies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.; Shefer, Ruth E.; Klinkowstein, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the .sup.10 B(n,.alpha.).sup.7 Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  15. Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas Streams at Low

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Temperatures - Energy Innovation Portal Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas Streams at Low Temperatures National Energy Technology Laboratory Contact NETL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication S-126827 (Organoclay Sorbent).pdf (292 KB) Technology Marketing Summary By incorporating amines inside clay containing quaternary ammonium salts (organoclay) minerals, this invention has created a way to prepare sorbents that capture carbon dioxide (CO2)

  16. Novel Application of Carbonate Fuel Cell for Capturing Carbon...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Jolly, Stephen ; Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein ; Willman, Carl ; Patel, Dilip ; DiNitto, M. ; Marina, Olga A. ; Pederson, Larry R. ; Steen, William A. Publication Date: 2015-09-30 ...

  17. Thermal Neutron Capture y's (CapGam)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) presents two tables showing energy and photon intensity with uncertainties of gamma rays as seen in thermal-neutron capture. One table is organized in ascending order of gamma energy, and the second is organized by Z, A of the target. In the energy-ordered table the three strongest transitions are indicated in each case. The nuclide given is the target nucleus in the capture reaction. The gamma energies given are in keV. The gamma intensities given are relative to 100 for the strongest transition. %I? (per 100 n-captures) for the strongest transition is given, where known. All data are taken from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), a computer file of evaluated nuclear structure data and from the eXperimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List (XUNDL). (Specialized Interface)

  18. Thermal Neutron Capture y's (CapGam)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) presents two tables showing energy and photon intensity with uncertainties of gamma rays as seen in thermal-neutron capture.  One table is organized in ascending order of gamma energy, and the second is organized by Z, A of the target. In the energy-ordered table the three strongest transitions are indicated in each case. The nuclide given is the target nucleus in the capture reaction. The gamma energies given are in keV. The gamma intensities given are relative to 100 for the strongest transition. %Iγ (per 100 n-captures) for the strongest transition is given, where known. All data are taken from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), a computer file of evaluated nuclear structure data and from the eXperimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List (XUNDL). (Specialized Interface)

  19. Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of carbon in forests are crucial for forest carbon management, carbon credit trading, national reporting of greenhouse gas inventories to the United Nations Framework...

  20. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors ...

  1. Cutting the Cost of Carbon Capture: A Case for Carbon Capture & Utilization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific and Technical Information Customized Resources for Others Science Search Tools Home | DOE Collections | Journal Sources | Library Tools | U.S. Federal Agencies | Global Databases OSTI applies these capabilities to provide customized information tools and services for individual DOE offices and non-DOE government entities on a cost-reimbursable basis. These services are provided under the authority of the Economy Act (31 U.S.C. 1535-36). Expertise is available in a range of

  2. Advanced Low Energy Enzyme Catalyzed Solvent for CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaks, Alex; Reardon, John

    2013-09-30

    A proof-of-concept biocatalyst enhanced solvent process was developed and demonstrated in an integrated bench-scale system using coal post combustion flue gas. The biocatalyst was deployed as a coating on M500X structured packing. Rate enhancement was evaluated using a non-volatile and non- toxic 20 wt% potassium carbonate solution. Greater than 500-fold volumetric scale-up from laboratory to bench scale was demonstrated in this project. Key technical achievements included: 10-fold mass transfer enhancement demonstrated in laboratory testing relative to blank potassium carbonate at 45°C; ~ 7-fold enhancement over blank in bench-scale field testing at National Carbon Capture Center; aerosol emissions were below detection limits (< 0.8 ppm); 90% capture was demonstrated at ~19.5 Nm{sup 3}/hr (dry basis); and ~ 80% CO{sub 2} capture was demonstrated at ~ 30 Nm{sup 3}/hr (dry basis) for more than 2800-hrs on flue gas with minimal detectible decline in activity. The regeneration energy requirement was 3.5 GJ/t CO{sub 2} for this solvent, which was below the target of <2.1 GJ/t CO{sub 2}. Bench unit testing revealed kinetic limitations in the un-catalyzed stripper at around 85°C, but process modeling based on bench unit data showed that equivalent work of less than 300 kWh/t CO{sub 2} including all CO{sub 2} compression can be achieved at lower temperature stripping conditions. Cost analysis showed that 20% potassium carbonate in a basic solvent flow sheet with biocatalyst coated packing has economic performance comparable to the reference NETL Case-12, 30% MEA. A detailed techno-economic analysis indicated that addition of catalyst in the stripper could reduce the cost of capture by ~6% and cost of avoided CO{sub 2} by ~10% below reference NETL Case-12. Based on these results, a directional plan was identified to reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture in future work.

  3. Capturing the Daylight Dividend

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Boyce; Claudia Hunter; Owen Howlett

    2006-04-30

    Capturing the Daylight Dividend conducted activities to build market demand for daylight as a means of improving indoor environmental quality, overcoming technological barriers to effective daylighting, and informing and assisting state and regional market transformation and resource acquisition program implementation efforts. The program clarified the benefits of daylight by examining whole building systems energy interactions between windows, lighting, heating, and air conditioning in daylit buildings, and daylighting's effect on the human circadian system and productivity. The project undertook work to advance photosensors, dimming systems, and ballasts, and provided technical training in specifying and operating daylighting controls in buildings. Future daylighting work is recommended in metric development, technology development, testing, training, education, and outreach.

  4. Evaluating a new approach to CO2 capture and storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evaluating a new approach to CO2 capture and storage Evaluating a new approach to CO2 capture and storage In a perspective paper published in Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology, researchers examined a new approach that could potentially overcome many barriers to deployment and jumpstart this process on a commercial scale. September 13, 2015 Map of the contiguous United States shows the location of facilities that produce high-value chemicals/products and the amount of carbon dioxide

  5. Carbon Storage Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Illinois | Department of Energy Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in Illinois Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in Illinois November 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A project important to demonstrating the commercial viability of carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technology has completed the first year of injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) from an industrial plant at a large-scale test site in

  6. Fragment capture device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Lloyd R.; Cole, David L.

    2010-03-30

    A fragment capture device for use in explosive containment. The device comprises an assembly of at least two rows of bars positioned to eliminate line-of-sight trajectories between the generation point of fragments and a surrounding containment vessel or asset. The device comprises an array of at least two rows of bars, wherein each row is staggered with respect to the adjacent row, and wherein a lateral dimension of each bar and a relative position of each bar in combination provides blockage of a straight-line passage of a solid fragment through the adjacent rows of bars, wherein a generation point of the solid fragment is located within a cavity at least partially enclosed by the array of bars.

  7. Particle capture device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2016-02-23

    In example embodiments, particle collection efficiency in aerosol analyzers and other particle measuring instruments is improved by a particle capture device that employs multiple collisions to decrease momentum of particles until the particles are collected (e.g., vaporized or come to rest). The particle collection device includes an aperture through which a focused particle beam enters. A collection enclosure is coupled to the aperture and has one or more internal surfaces against which particles of the focused beam collide. One or more features are employed in the collection enclosure to promote particles to collide multiple times within the enclosure, and thereby be vaporized or come to rest, rather than escape through the aperture.

  8. Co-production of decarbonized synfuels and electricity from coal + biomass with CO{sub 2} capture and storage: an Illinois case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Larson; Giulia Fiorese; Guangjian Liu; Robert H. Williams; Thomas G. Kreutz; Stefano Consonni

    2010-07-01

    Energy, carbon, and economic performances are estimated for facilities co-producing Fischer-Tropsch Liquid (FTL) fuels and electricity from a co-feed of biomass and coal in Illinois, with capture and storage of by-product CO{sub 2}. The estimates include detailed modeling of supply systems for corn stover or mixed prairie grasses (MPG) and of feedstock conversion facilities. Biomass feedstock costs in Illinois (delivered at a rate of one million tonnes per year, dry basis) are $ 3.8/GJ{sub HHV} for corn stover and $ 7.2/GJ{sub HHV} for MPG. Under a strong carbon mitigation policy, the economics of co-producing low-carbon fuels and electricity from a co-feed of biomass and coal in Illinois are promising. An extrapolation to the United States of the results for Illinois suggests that nationally significant amounts of low-carbon fuels and electricity could be produced this way.

  9. United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UNIDO Programs 2 References Resources UNIDO Tools A Global Technology Roadmap on Carbon Capture and Storage in Industry COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and...

  10. Resource capture by single leaves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, S.P.

    1992-05-01

    Leaves show a variety of strategies for maximizing CO{sub 2} and light capture. These are more meaningfully explained if they are considered in the context of maximizing capture relative to the utilization of water, nutrients and carbohydrates reserves. There is considerable variation between crops in their efficiency of CO{sub 2} and light capture at the leaf level. Understanding of these mechanisms indicate some ways in which efficiency of resource capture could be level cannot be meaningfully considered without simultaneous understanding of implications at the canopy level. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Lab captures five Society for Technical Communication awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab captures five Society for Technical Communication awards Lab captures five Society for Technical Communication awards Reducing Global Threats through Innovative Science and Technology rendered as a deck of playing cards, earned a Distinguished Technical Communication award. March 8, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience,

  12. Environmental Protection | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    emissions. Environment Argonne National Laboratory is helping our nation build an economy based on renewable energy, a reduced carbon footprint and freedom from foreign...

  13. DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There is considerable opportunity and growing technical sophistication to make terrestrial carbon sequestration both practical and effective, according to the latest carbon capture and storage "best practices" manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. Overview of Carbon Storage Research | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview of Carbon Storage Research Overview of Carbon Storage Research The Carbon Storage Program is focused on ensuring the safe and permanent storage and/or utilization of CO2 captured from point sources. The Carbon Storage Program is focused on ensuring the safe and permanent storage and/or utilization of CO2 captured from point sources. Roughly one third of the United States' carbon emissions come from power plants and other large point sources, such as industrial facilities. The Carbon

  15. Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Industrial Sources into Useful Products | Department of Energy Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products July 22, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the selections of six projects that aim to find ways of converting captured carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial

  16. Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Sources into Useful Products | Department of Energy Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products July 22, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the selections of six projects that aim to find ways of converting captured carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial

  17. Understanding Carbon Sequestration Options in the United States: Capabilities of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.; Brown, Daryl R.; Mizoguchi, Akiyoshi; Shiozaki, Mai

    2001-04-03

    While one can discuss various sequestration options at a national or global level, the actual carbon management approach is highly site specific. In response to the need for a better understanding of carbon management options, Battelle in collaboration with Mitsubishi Corporation, has developed a state-of-the-art Geographic Information System (GIS) focused on carbon capture and sequestration opportunities in the United States. The GIS system contains information (e.g., fuel type, location, vintage, ownership, rated capacity) on all fossil-fired generation capacity in the Untied States with a rated capacity of at least 100 MW. There are also data on other CO2 sources (i.e., natural domes, gas processing plants, etc.) and associated pipelines currently serving enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects. Data on current and prospective CO2 EOR projects include location, operator, reservoir and oil characteristics, production, and CO2 source. The system also contains information on priority deep saline aquifers and coal bed methane basins with potential for sequestering CO2. The GIS application not only enables data storage, flexible map making, and visualization capabilities, but also facilitates the spatial analyses required to solve complex linking of CO2 sources with appropriate and cost-effective sinks. A variety of screening criteria (spatial, geophysical, and economic) can be employed to identify sources and sinks most likely amenable to deployment of carbon capture and sequestration systems. The system is easily updateable, allowing it to stay on the leading edge of capture and sequestration technology as well as the ever-changing business landscape. Our paper and presentation will describe the development of this GIS and demonstrate its uses for carbon management analysis.

  18. NUCLEAR POWERED CO2 CAPTURE FROM THE ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, S

    2008-09-22

    A process for capturing CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere was recently proposed. This process uses a closed cycle of sodium and calcium hydroxide, carbonate, and oxide transformations to capture dilute CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere and to generate a concentrated stream of CO{sub 2} that is amenable to sequestration or subsequent chemical transformations. In one of the process steps, a fossil-fueled lime kiln is needed, which reduces the net CO{sub 2} capture of the process. It is proposed to replace the fossil-fueled lime kiln with a modified kiln heated by a high-temperature nuclear reactor. This will have the effect of eliminating the use of fossil fuels for the process and increasing the net CO{sub 2} capture. Although the process is suitable to support sequestration, the use of a nuclear power source for the process provides additional capabilities, and the captured CO{sub 2} may be combined with nuclear-produced hydrogen to produce liquid fuels via Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or other technologies. Conceivably, such plants would be carbon-neutral, and could be placed virtually anywhere without being tied to fossil fuel sources or geological sequestration sites.

  19. Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tech Assistance Savannah River National Laboratory- Assess Adequacy of Process Knowledge for D&D Guidance for Determining Adequacy of Process Knowledge Page 1 of 2 Savannah River National Laboratory South Carolina Capturing Process Knowledge for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning Challenge The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the disposition of a vast number of facilities at numerous sites around the country which have been declared excess to current mission

  20. Adaptive capture of expert behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.D.; Barrett, C.L.; Hand, U.; Gordon, R.C.

    1994-08-01

    The authors smoothed and captured a set of expert rules with adaptive networks. The motivation for doing this is discussed. (1) Smoothing leads to stabler control actions. (2) For some sets of rules, the evaluation of the rules can be sped up. This is important in large-scale simulations where many intelligent elements are present. (3) Variability of the intelligent elements can be achieved by adjusting the weights in an adaptive network. (4) After capture has occurred, the weights can be adjusted based on performance criteria. The authors thus have the capability of learning a new set of rules that lead to better performance. The set of rules the authors chose to capture were based on a set of threat determining rules for tank commanders. The approach in this paper: (1) They smoothed the rules. The rule set was converted into a simple set of arithmetic statements. Continuous, non-binary inputs, are now permitted. (2) An operational measure of capturability was developed. (3) They chose four candidate networks for the rule set capture: (a) multi-linear network, (b) adaptive partial least squares, (c) connectionist normalized local spline (CNLS) network, and (d) CNLS net with a PLS preprocessor. These networks were able to capture the rule set to within a few percent. For the simple tank rule set, the multi-linear network performed the best. When the rules were modified to include more nonlinear behavior, CNLS net performed better than the other three nets which made linear assumptions. (4) The networks were tested for robustness to input noise. Noise levels of plus or minus 10% had no real effect on the network performance. Noise levels in the plus or minus 30% range degraded performance by a factor of two. Some performance enhancement occurred when the networks were trained with noisy data. (5) The scaling of the evaluation time was calculated. (6) Human variation can be mimicked in all the networks by perturbing the weights.

  1. Membrane Process to Capture CO{sub 2} from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merkel, Tim; Wei, Xiaotong; Firat, Bilgen; He, Jenny; Amo, Karl; Pande, Saurabh; Baker, Richard; Wijmans, Hans; Bhown, Abhoyjit

    2012-03-31

    This final report describes work conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) on development of an efficient membrane process to capture carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from power plant flue gas (award number DE-NT0005312). The primary goal of this research program was to demonstrate, in a field test, the ability of a membrane process to capture up to 90% of CO{sub 2} in coal-fired flue gas, and to evaluate the potential of a full-scale version of the process to perform this separation with less than a 35% increase in the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). Membrane Technology and Research (MTR) conducted this project in collaboration with Arizona Public Services (APS), who hosted a membrane field test at their Cholla coal-fired power plant, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and WorleyParsons (WP), who performed a comparative cost analysis of the proposed membrane CO{sub 2} capture process. The work conducted for this project included membrane and module development, slipstream testing of commercial-sized modules with natural gas and coal-fired flue gas, process design optimization, and a detailed systems and cost analysis of a membrane retrofit to a commercial power plant. The Polaris? membrane developed over a number of years by MTR represents a step-change improvement in CO{sub 2} permeance compared to previous commercial CO{sub 2}-selective membranes. During this project, membrane optimization work resulted in a further doubling of the CO{sub 2} permeance of Polaris membrane while maintaining the CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity. This is an important accomplishment because increased CO{sub 2} permeance directly impacts the membrane skid cost and footprint: a doubling of CO{sub 2} permeance halves the skid cost and footprint. In addition to providing high CO{sub 2} permeance, flue gas CO{sub 2} capture membranes must be stable in the presence of contaminants including SO{sub 2}. Laboratory tests showed no degradation in Polaris membrane performance during two months of continuous operation in a simulated flue gas environment containing up to 1,000 ppm SO{sub 2}. A successful slipstream field test at the APS Cholla power plant was conducted with commercialsize Polaris modules during this project. This field test is the first demonstration of stable performance by commercial-sized membrane modules treating actual coal-fired power plant flue gas. Process design studies show that selective recycle of CO{sub 2} using a countercurrent membrane module with air as a sweep stream can double the concentration of CO{sub 2} in coal flue gas with little energy input. This pre-concentration of CO{sub 2} by the sweep membrane reduces the minimum energy of CO{sub 2} separation in the capture unit by up to 40% for coal flue gas. Variations of this design may be even more promising for CO{sub 2} capture from NGCC flue gas, in which the CO{sub 2} concentration can be increased from 4% to 20% by selective sweep recycle. EPRI and WP conducted a systems and cost analysis of a base case MTR membrane CO{sub 2} capture system retrofitted to the AEP Conesville Unit 5 boiler. Some of the key findings from this study and a sensitivity analysis performed by MTR include: The MTR membrane process can capture 90% of the CO{sub 2} in coal flue gas and produce high-purity CO{sub 2} (>99%) ready for sequestration. CO{sub 2} recycle to the boiler appears feasible with minimal impact on boiler performance; however, further study by a boiler OEM is recommended. For a membrane process built today using a combination of slight feed compression, permeate vacuum, and current compression equipment costs, the membrane capture process can be competitive with the base case MEA process at 90% CO{sub 2} capture from a coal-fired power plant. The incremental LCOE for the base case membrane process is about equal to that of a base case MEA process, within the uncertainty in the analysis. With advanced membranes (5,000 gpu for CO{sub 2} and 50 for CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}), operating with no feed compression and low-cost CO{sub 2} compression equipment, an incremental LCOE of $33/MWh at 90% capture can be achieved (40% lower than the advanced MEA case). Even with lower cost compression, it appears unlikely that a membrane process using high feed compression (>5 bar) can be competitive with amine absorption, due to the capital cost and energy consumption of this equipment. Similarly, low vacuum pressure (<0.2 bar) cannot be used due to poor efficiency and high cost of this equipment. High membrane permeance is important to reduce the capital cost and footprint of the membrane unit. CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity is less important because it is too costly to generate a pressure ratio where high selectivity can be useful. A potential cost ?sweet spot? exists for use of membrane-based technology, if 50-70% CO{sub 2} capture is acceptable. There is a minimum in the cost of CO{sub 2} avoided/ton that membranes can deliver at 60% CO{sub 2} capture, which is 20% lower than the cost at 90% capture. Membranes operating with no feed compression are best suited for lower capture rates. Currently, it appears that the biggest hurdle to use of membranes for post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture is compression equipment cost. An alternative approach is to use sweep membranes in parallel with another CO{sub 2} capture technology that does not require feed compression or vacuum equipment. Hybrid designs that utilize sweep membranes for selective CO{sub 2} recycle show potential to significantly reduce the minimum energy of CO{sub 2} separation.

  2. Federal Control of Geological Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reitze, Arnold

    2011-04-11

    The United States has economically recoverable coal reserves of about 261 billion tons, which is in excess of a 250-­‐year supply based on 2009 consumption rates. However, in the near future the use of coal may be legally restricted because of concerns over the effects of its combustion on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy is making significant efforts to help develop and implement a commercial scale program of geologic carbon sequestration that involves capturing and storing carbon dioxide emitted from coal-­‐burning electric power plants in deep underground formations. This article explores the technical and legal problems that must be resolved in order to have a viable carbon sequestration program. It covers the responsibilities of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Departments of Energy, Transportation and Interior. It discusses the use of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Air Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, and other applicable federal laws. Finally, it discusses the provisions related to carbon sequestration that have been included in the major bills dealing with climate change that Congress has been considering in 2009 and 2010. The article concludes that the many legal issues that exist can be resolved, but whether carbon sequestration becomes a commercial reality will depend on reducing its costs or by imposing legal requirements on fossil-­‐fired power plants that result in the costs of carbon emissions increasing to the point that carbon sequestration becomes a feasible option.

  3. Forest Carbon Index | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest Carbon Index Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Forest Carbon Index AgencyCompany Organization: Resources for the Future Partner: United Nations...

  4. Common Carbon Metric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Common Carbon Metric Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Common Carbon Metric AgencyCompany Organization: United Nations Environment Programme, World...

  5. National Smart Water Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaulieu, R A

    2009-07-13

    The United States repeatedly experiences floods along the Midwest's large rivers and droughts in the arid Western States that cause traumatic environmental conditions with huge economic impact. With an integrated approach and solution these problems can be alleviated. Tapping into the Mississippi River and its tributaries, the world's third largest fresh water river system, during flood events will mitigate the damage of flooding and provide a new source of fresh water to the Western States. The trend of increased flooding on the Midwest's large rivers is supported by a growing body of scientific literature. The Colorado River Basin and the western states are experiencing a protracted multi-year drought. Fresh water can be pumped via pipelines from areas of overabundance/flood to areas of drought or high demand. Calculations document 10 to 60 million acre-feet (maf) of fresh water per flood event can be captured from the Midwest's Rivers and pumped via pipelines to the Colorado River and introduced upstream of Lake Powell, Utah, to destinations near Denver, Colorado, and used in areas along the pipelines. Water users of the Colorado River include the cities in southern Nevada, southern California, northern Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Indian Tribes, and Mexico. The proposed start and end points, and routes of the pipelines are documented, including information on right-of-ways necessary for state and federal permits. A National Smart Water Grid{trademark} (NSWG) Project will create thousands of new jobs for construction, operation, and maintenance and save billions in drought and flood damage reparations tax dollars. The socio-economic benefits of NWSG include decreased flooding in the Midwest; increased agriculture, and recreation and tourism; improved national security, transportation, and fishery and wildlife habitats; mitigated regional climate change and global warming such as increased carbon capture; decreased salinity in Colorado River water crossing the US-Mexico border; and decreased eutrophication (excessive plant growth and decay) in the Gulf of Mexico to name a few. The National Smart Water Grid{trademark} will pay for itself in a single major flood event.

  6. Ab Initio Thermodynamic Study of the CO2 Capture Properties of Potassium

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Carbonate Sesquihydrate, K2CO3*1.5H2O (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Ab Initio Thermodynamic Study of the CO2 Capture Properties of Potassium Carbonate Sesquihydrate, K2CO3*1.5H2O Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ab Initio Thermodynamic Study of the CO2 Capture Properties of Potassium Carbonate Sesquihydrate, K2CO3*1.5H2O By combining density functional theory and lattice phonon dynamics, the thermodynamic properties of CO2 absorption/desorption reactions with

  7. Capture and release of acid-gasses with acid-gas binding organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heldebrant, David J; Yonker, Clement R; Koech, Phillip K

    2015-03-17

    A system and method for acid-gas capture wherein organic acid-gas capture materials form hetero-atom analogs of alkyl-carbonate when contacted with an acid gas. These organic-acid gas capture materials include combinations of a weak acid and a base, or zwitterionic liquids. This invention allows for reversible acid-gas binding to these organic binding materials thus allowing for the capture and release of one or more acid gases. These acid-gas binding organic compounds can be regenerated to release the captured acid gasses and enable these organic acid-gas binding materials to be reused. This enables transport of the liquid capture compounds and the release of the acid gases from the organic liquid with significant energy savings compared to current aqueous systems.

  8. COMBUSTION-ASSISTED CO2 CAPTURE USING MECC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, K.; Gray, J.

    2012-03-30

    Mixed Electron and Carbonate ion Conductor (MECC) membranes have been proposed as a means to separate CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Here a modified MECC CO{sub 2} capture process is analyzed that supplements retentate pressurization and permeate evacuation as a means to create a CO{sub 2} driving force with a process assisted by the catalytic combustion of syngas on the permeate side of the membrane. The combustion reactions consume transported oxygen, making it unavailable for the backwards transport reaction. With this change, the MECC capture system becomes exothermic, and steam for electricity production may be generated from the waste heat. Greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} in the flue gas may be captured, and a compressed CO{sub 2} product stream is produced. A fossil-fueled power plant using this process would consume 14% more fuel per unit electricity produced than a power plant with no CO{sub 2} capture system, and has the potential to meet U.S. DOE's goal that deployment of a CO{sub 2} capture system at a fossil-fueled power plant should not increase the cost of electricity from the combined facility by more than 30%.

  9. Statement by Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz on new EPA Carbon...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the range of generation types, promote advanced fossil energy technologies such as carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS), and deploy more clean energy. DOE is also...

  10. A Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for Pre-combustion CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alptekin, Gokhan

    2012-09-30

    The overall objective of the proposed research is to develop a low cost, high capacity CO{sub 2} sorbent and demonstrate its technical and economic viability for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. The specific objectives supporting our research plan were to optimize the chemical structure and physical properties of the sorbent, scale-up its production using high throughput manufacturing equipment and bulk raw materials and then evaluate its performance, first in bench-scale experiments and then in slipstream tests using actual coal-derived synthesis gas. One of the objectives of the laboratory-scale evaluations was to demonstrate the life and durability of the sorbent for over 10,000 cycles and to assess the impact of contaminants (such as sulfur) on its performance. In the field tests, our objective was to demonstrate the operation of the sorbent using actual coal-derived synthesis gas streams generated by air-blown and oxygen-blown commercial and pilot-scale coal gasifiers (the CO{sub 2} partial pressure in these gas streams is significantly different, which directly impacts the operating conditions hence the performance of the sorbent). To support the field demonstration work, TDA collaborated with Phillips 66 and Southern Company to carry out two separate field tests using actual coal-derived synthesis gas at the Wabash River IGCC Power Plant in Terre Haute, IN and the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, AL. In collaboration with the University of California, Irvine (UCI), a detailed engineering and economic analysis for the new CO{sub 2} capture system was also proposed to be carried out using Aspen PlusTM simulation software, and estimate its effect on the plant efficiency.

  11. Geological Sequestration Training and Research Program in Capture and Transport: Development of the Most Economical Separation Method for CO2 Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vahdat, Nader

    2013-09-30

    The project provided hands-on training and networking opportunities to undergraduate students in the area of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and transport, through fundamental research study focused on advanced separation methods that can be applied to the capture of CO2 resulting from the combustion of fossil-fuels for power generation . The project teams approach to achieve its objectives was to leverage existing Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) course materials and teaching methods to create and implement an annual CCS short course for the Tuskegee University community; conduct a survey of CO2 separation and capture methods; utilize data to verify and develop computer models for CO2 capture and build CCS networks and hands-on training experiences. The objectives accomplished as a result of this project were: (1) A comprehensive survey of CO2 capture methods was conducted and mathematical models were developed to compare the potential economics of the different methods based on the total cost per year per unit of CO2 avoidance; and (2) Training was provided to introduce the latest CO2 capture technologies and deployment issues to the university community.

  12. CO2 Capture Using Electrical Energy: Electrochemically Mediated Separation for Carbon Capture and Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-16

    IMPACCT Project: MIT and Siemens Corporation are developing a process to separate CO2 from the exhaust of coal-fired power plants by using electrical energy to chemically activate and deactivate sorbents, or materials that absorb gases. The team found that certain sorbents bond to CO2 when they are activated by electrical energy and then transported through a specialized separator that deactivates the molecule and releases it for storage. This method directly uses the electricity from the power plant, which is a more efficient but more expensive form of energy than heat, though the ease and simplicity of integrating it into existing coal-fired power plants reduces the overall cost of the technology. This process could cost as low as $31 per ton of CO2 stored.

  13. Metazen metadata capture for metagenomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bischof, Jared; Harrison, Travis; Paczian, Tobias; Glass, Elizabeth; Wilke, Andreas; Meyer, Folker

    2014-12-08

    Background: As the impact and prevalence of large-scale metagenomic surveys grow, so does the acute need for more complete and standards compliant metadata. Metadata (data describing data) provides an essential complement to experimental data, helping to answer questions about its source, mode of collection, and reliability. Metadata collection and interpretation have become vital to the genomics and metagenomics communities, but considerable challenges remain, including exchange, curation, and distribution. Currently, tools are available for capturing basic field metadata during sampling, and for storing, updating and viewing it. These tools are not specifically designed for metagenomic surveys; in particular, they lack the appropriate metadata collection templates, a centralized storage repository, and a unique ID linking system that can be used to easily port complete and compatible metagenomic metadata into widely used assembly and sequence analysis tools. Results: Metazen was developed as a comprehensive framework designed to enable metadata capture for metagenomic sequencing projects. Specifically, Metazen provides a rapid, easy-to-use portal to encourage early deposition of project and sample metadata. Conclusion: Metazen is an interactive tool that aids users in recording their metadata in a complete and valid format. A defined set of mandatory fields captures vital information, while the option to add fields provides flexibility.

  14. International Carbon Storage Body Praises Department of Energy Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Three U.S. Department of Energy projects have been identified by an international carbon storage organization as an important advancement toward commercialization and large-scale deployment of carbon capture, utilization, and storage technologies.

  15. HAWC Observatory captures first image

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Energy Physics program, the National Science Foundation and Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologa (Mexico's science funding agency) fund the construction of HAWC. The...

  16. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon Dioxide and Storage Value-Added Options Technology Assessment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Storage Value-Added Options Carbon Dioxide Capture for Natural Gas and Industrial Applications Carbon Dioxide Capture Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle

  17. Thermodynamic Complexity of Carbon Capture in Alkylamine-Functionalize...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    species having specific active groups. We report direct measurement of enthalpy of adsorption of CO2 on an alkylamine-appended MOF, mmen-Mg2(dobpdc) employing gas adsorption...

  18. DOE Selects 16 Transformational Carbon Capture Technologies Projects...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Enabling 10 molkg Swing Capacity via Heat Integrated Sub-ambient Pressure Swing Adsorption Researchers at Georgia Tech Research Corporation (Atlanta, GA) and Inmondo Tech ...

  19. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Stripper modeling has demonstrated that vacuum strippers will be more energy efficient if constructed short and fat rather than tall and skinny. The matrix stripper has been ...

  20. Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration Project U. S. Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Leucadia must implement additional mitigation as required and described in the permit(s). ... of the water supply and hydrogen pipeline, Leucadia must contact Louisiana ...

  1. New Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... including boilers, cement manufacturing, steel and aluminum production and chemical refining. ... University of Texas at Austin (Austin, TX) - Gulf of Mexico Miocene CO2 Site ...

  2. DOE to Provide $36 Million to Advance Carbon Dioxide Capture...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... is to develop a novel class of solvents, called ... "smart" molecules that change properties abruptly in ... Molecular and system modeling, advanced synthetic methods, ...

  3. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The best Ksup +PZ solvent, 4.5 m Ksup +4.5 m PZ, requires equivalent work of 31.8 kJmole COsub 2 when used with a double matrix stripper and an intercooled absorber. The ...

  4. Picture of the Week: Raising the bar on carbon capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a lab View on Flickr An explosion of 3D printing technology An explosion of 3D printing technology View on Flickr Hot cells for isotopes Hot cells for isotopes View on Flickr...

  5. Industrial Carbon Capture Project Selections | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Leaders | Department of Energy Industrial Assessment Center Awards: Recognizing Excellence in Future Energy Leaders Industrial Assessment Center Awards: Recognizing Excellence in Future Energy Leaders May 5, 2014 - 2:19pm Addthis Dayakar Devaru, University of West Virginia graduate student, named Outstanding IAC Engineering Student for his contributions to more than 100 energy-efficiency Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) initiative assessments. | Photo courtesy of University of West

  6. DOE Selects 16 Transformational Carbon Capture Technologies Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Corporation (Woburn, MA), and Trimeric Corporation (Buda, TX) - will combine a graphene oxide (GO) membrane unit with the polyether ether ketone (PEEK) hollow fiber membrane...

  7. Carbon Capture Turned Upside Down: High-Temperature Adsorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the same time surmounting the negative effect of H2O is therefore an attractive idea. ... a theoretical background for this entropy-driven behavior and demonstrate under ...

  8. Adding “Utilization” to Carbon Capture and Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy is doing their part to advance the all-of-the-above energy strategy by continuing to work with industry to safely, responsibly and sustainably develop our nation’s fossil energy resources.

  9. DOE-Supported Project Advances Clean Coal, Carbon Capture Technology...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    operation of their patented Coal-Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) technology - a one-step ... longest integrated operation of chemical looping technology anywhere in the world to date. ...

  10. Cooperative Carbon Capture by a Novel Material that Mimics a...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    pore of the MOF. Interestingly, the chemical environment of the MOF with the adsorbed ... the inserted CO2 reorganizes the chemical environment at the adjacent metal ion ...

  11. Carbon Capture and Sequestration: A Regulatory Gap Assessment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Org: The University Of Utah Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY Word Cloud More ...

  12. Carbon Capture Course | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topics include our current energy consumption, understanding the role of CO2 in the earth ... storage of CO2, and considerations of economics and policy related to CO2 emissions. ...

  13. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gas chromatography has been used to measure the oxidative degradation of piperazine. The heat exchangers for the pilot plant have been received. The modifications are on schedule ...

  14. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: FC26-02NT41440 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: University of Texas Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English ...

  15. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Technical Report Resource Relation: Other Information: PBD: 1 Apr 2003 Research Org: The University of Texas at Austin (US) Sponsoring Org: (US) Country of ...

  16. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Technical Report Resource Relation: Other Information: PBD: 31 Oct 2003 Research Org: University of Texas at Austin (US) Sponsoring Org: (US) Country of Publication: ...

  17. A versatile metal-organic framework for carbon dioxide capture...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exhibits selective adsorption of CO2 over CH4 and excellent catalytic activity in a tandem one-pot deacetalization-Knoevenagel condensation reaction as a cooperative catalyst....

  18. FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity from Innovative DOE-Supported Clean Coal Project An innovative clean coal technology project in Texas will supply electricity to the largest municipally owned...

  19. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 54 ... MODELS; ADSORBENTS; MATERIALS TESTING Word Cloud More Like This Full Text ...

  20. Pore Models Track Reactions in Underground Carbon Capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information Polytechnic Institute of New York University Spotlights Home DOE Applauds NYU-Poly Science and Technical Programs Secretary Steven Chu's Remarks at Commencement 2011 Keynote speaker Secretary Steven Chu focused on Prof. Donald Othmer, world-renowned chemist who spearheaded NYU-Poly's Dept. of Chemical Engineering. President Jerry Hultin encouraged graduates to give back throughout their career to teach ready and able young minds to use science

  1. Secretary Chu Announces $3 Billion Investment for Carbon Capture...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "Throughout our history, West Virginia has been a leader in energy and we have helped to ... and assure compliance with a state-of-the-art CO2 sequestration monitoring, verification ...

  2. Energy Department Invests to Drive Down Costs of Carbon Capture...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Plants Energy Department Announces Awards to Projects Advancing Innovative Clean Coal Technology Energy Department Announces Awards to Projects Advancing Innovative Clean Coal ...

  3. New Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    represent an unprecedented investment in the development of clean coal technologies. ... CO2. The projects will accelerate the technology development by conducting tests at ...

  4. Ohio State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    that comes from burning coal at power plants. | Photo courtesy of Office of Fossil Energy. ... that comes from burning coal at power plants. | Photo courtesy of Office of Fossil Energy. ...

  5. Computational Tools for Accelerating Carbon Capture Process Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David; Sahinidis, N.V,; Cozad, A; Lee, A; Kim, H; Morinelly, J.; Eslick, J.; Yuan, Z.

    2013-06-04

    This presentation reports development of advanced computational tools to accelerate next generation technology development. These tools are to develop an optimized process using rigorous models. They include: Process Models; Simulation-Based Optimization; Optimized Process; Uncertainty Quantification; Algebraic Surrogate Models; and Superstructure Optimization (Determine Configuration).

  6. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The multipressure stripper reduces energy consumption by 15% with a maximum pressure of 5 atm. The use of vanadium as a corrosion inhibitor will carry little risk of long-term ...

  7. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MATERIALS RECOVERY; AMINES; PIPERAZINES; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; THERMODYNAMICS; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File size NAView Full ...

  8. Cooperative Carbon Capture by a Novel Material that Mimics a...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community ...

  9. Hybrid absorption-adsorption carbon capture | Center for Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hubs Hubs Critical Materials Hub Critical Materials Hub How do you help ensure that American companies and entrepreneurs can access the materials they need to build and develop clean energy technologies? Read more Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors Working to predict with confidence the safe, reliable, and economically competitive performance of nuclear reactors through science-based modeling and simulation

  10. A Novel System for Carbon Dioxide Capture Utilizing Electrochemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein ; Jolly, Stephen ; Patel, Dilip ; Hunt, Jennifer ; Steen, William A. ; Richardson, Carl F. ; Marina, Olga A. Publication Date: 2013-06-03 OSTI ...

  11. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The baseline pilot plant campaign with 30% MEA has been started. Authors: Gary T. Rochelle ; Eric Chen ; Jennifer Lu ; Babatunde Oyenekan ; Ross Dugas Publication Date: 2005-04-29 ...

  12. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Gary T. Rochelle ; Eric Chen ; J.Tim Cullinane ; Marcus Hilliard ; Jennifer Lu ; Babatunde Oyenekan ; Ross Dugas Publication Date: 2004-07-29 OSTI Identifier: 829575 DOE ...

  13. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    wt% MEA. Authors: Gary T. Rochelle ; Marcus Hilliard ; Eric Chen ; Babatunde Oyenekan ; Ross Dugas ; John McLees ; Andrew Sexton ; Daniel Ellenberger Publication Date: 2005-10-26 ...

  14. CO2 CAPTURE BY ABSORPTION WITH POTASSIUM CARBONATE (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Gary T. Rochelle ; Marcus Hilliard ; Eric Chen ; Babatunde Oyenekan ; Ross Dugas ; John McLees Publication Date: 2005-07-31 OSTI Identifier: 842830 DOE Contract Number: ...

  15. CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Gary T. Rochelle ; Marcus Hilliard ; Eric Chen ; Babatunde Oyenekan ; Ross Dugas ; John McLees ; Andrew Sexton ; Amorvadee Veawab Publication Date: 2005-01-26 OSTI ...

  16. Carbon Capture and Sequestration: A Regulatory Gap Assessment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    6 DOE Contract Number: NT0005015 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: The University Of Utah Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English ...

  17. Carbon Capture and Sequestration: A Regulatory Gap Assessment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    8 DOE Contract Number: NT0005015 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: The University Of Utah Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English ...

  18. Pre-Combustion Carbon Capture Research | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compared to post-combustion technology, which removes dilute CO2 (5-15% CO2 concentration) from flue gas streams and is at low pressure, the shifted synthesis gas stream is rich ...

  19. FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the purchase of electricity produced by the Texas Clean Energy Project is an important step forward for what will be one of the world's most advanced and cleanest coal-based...

  20. New Funding from DOE Boosts Carbon Capture and Storage Research...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The projects selected will provide resources in universities across the country in the following advanced research areas: . simulation and risk assessment . monitoring, ...