Sample records for national biofuels action

  1. Fact Sheet: National Biofuels Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment6 FY Fact Sheet:2012) ||2012) |Sheet:

  2. Release of the National Biofuels Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -Department of Energyasto the NRC CommitteeRelease of the

  3. Release of the National Biofuels Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergy Small TeamNOTDelivery andConference |Fiscal Year 2009Department

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofuels "Bionic" Liquids from Lignin: Joint BioEnergy Institute Results Pave the Way for Closed-Loop Biofuel Refineries On December 11, 2014, in Biofuels, Biomass, Capabilities,...

  5. National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap MAY 2010 BIOMASS PROGRAM #12;#12;U.S. DOE 2010. National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap. U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Biomass Program. Visit http://biomass.energy.gov for more information National Algal Biofuels

  6. National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap MAY 2010 BIOMASS PROGRAM U.S. DOE 2010. National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap. U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and...

  7. Biofuels | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofuels The biofuel supply chain affects quantity and quality of water in a variety of ways. The biofuel supply chain affects quantity and quality of water in a variety of ways....

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EnergyBiomassBiofuels Biofuels Sandia researchers are turning cellulosic biomass into jet fuel. Global demand for energy has risen dramatically in recent years, yet the world...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    production targets established by the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS-2) as part of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. Advanced biofuels derived from...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: commercializing algae biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercializing algae biofuels The National Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership Kick-Off Meeting at Arizona State University On July 25, 2013, in Biofuels, Energy, News, News...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Biofuels Biofuels Blend Right In: Researchers Show Ionic Liquids Effective for Pretreating Mixed Blends of Biofuel Feedstocks On February 26, 2013, in Biofuels, Biomass,...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Biofuels Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SystemsRenewable EnergyBiomassBiofuelsBiofuels Publications Biofuels Publications Undergirded by the powerful capabilities, state-of-the-art facilities, and brilliant minds that...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: lignocellulosic biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lignocellulosic biofuels Sandia Video Featured by DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office On December 10, 2014, in Biofuels, Biomass, Capabilities, Energy, Facilities, JBEI, News, News &...

  14. National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts Synopsis...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts Synopsis (NAABB) Final Report National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts Synopsis (NAABB) Final Report In 2010,...

  15. Biofuels National Strategic Benefits Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximately 10 wt% moisture,Biofuels Biofuels

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: producing advanced biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advanced biofuels Sandia Video Featured by DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office On December 10, 2014, in Biofuels, Biomass, Capabilities, Energy, Facilities, JBEI, News, News &...

  17. Engineering Biofuels from Photosynthetic Bacteria | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Biofuels from Photosynthetic Bacteria Technology available for licensing: Using photosynthetic bacteria to produce biofuels. 30-70% of the fuel's waste can be used to...

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSSStrategicSyntheticBiodefense

  19. National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts Synopsis...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    aabbsynopsisreport.pdf More Documents & Publications National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts Synopsis (NAABB) Final Report 2015 Peer Review Presentations-Algal...

  20. National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC), Biofuels for Advancing America (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction to the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium, a collaboration between 17 national laboratory, university, and industry partners that is conducting cutting-edge research to develop infrastructure-compatible, sustainable, biomass-based hydrocarbon fuels.

  1. Watershed Modeling for Biofuels | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Watershed Modeling for Biofuels Argonne's watershed modeling research addresses water quality in tributary basins of the Mississippi River Basin Argonne's watershed modeling...

  2. Biofuels: Anywhere, anytime | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for diesel fuel that can be used alone or in blends to power vehicles or generators. Biofuels: Anywhere, anytime By Jared Sagoff * August 2, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint Five questions...

  3. National Bio-fuel Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jezierski, Kelly

    2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Biofuel Energy Laboratory or NBEL was a consortia consisting of non-profits, universities, industry, and OEM’s. NextEnergy Center (NEC) in Detroit, Michigan was the prime with Wayne State University as the primary subcontractor. Other partners included: Art Van Furniture; Biodiesel Industries Inc. (BDI); Bosch; Clean Emission Fluids (CEF); Delphi; Oakland University; U.S. TARDEC (The Army); and later Cummins Bridgeway. The program was awarded to NextEnergy by U.S. DOE-NREL on July 1, 2005. The period of performance was about five (5) years, ending June 30, 2010. This program was executed in two phases: 1.Phase I focused on bench-scale R&D and performance-property-relationships. 2.Phase II expanded those efforts into further engine testing, emissions testing, and on-road fleet testing of biodiesel using additional types of feedstock (i.e., corn, and choice white grease based). NextEnergy – a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization based in Detroit was originally awarded a $1.9 million grant from the U.S. Dept. of Energy for Phase I of the NBEL program. A few years later, NextEnergy and its partners received an additional $1.9MM in DOE funding to complete Phase II. The NBEL funding was completely exhausted by the program end date of June 30, 2010 and the cost share commitment of 20% minimum has been exceeded nearly two times over. As a result of the work performed by the NBEL consortia, the following successes were realized: 1.Over one hundred publications and presentations have been delivered by the NBEL consortia, including but not limited to: R&D efforts on algae-based biodiesel, novel heterogeneous catalysis, biodiesel properties from a vast array of feedstock blends, cold flow properties, engine testing results (several Society of Automotive Engineers [SAE] papers have been published on this research), emissions testing results, and market quality survey results. 2.One new spinoff company (NextCAT) was formed by two WSU Chemical Engineering professors and another co-founder, based on a novel heterogeneous catalyst that may be retrofitted into idled biodiesel manufacturing facilities to restart production at a greatly reduced cost. 3.Three patents have been filed by WSU and granted based on the NextCAT focus. 4.The next-generation advanced biodiesel dispensing unit (CEF F.A.S.T. unit version 2) was developed by Clean Emission Fluids (CEF). 5.NBEL aided in the preparing a sound technical basis for setting an ASTM B20 standard: ASTM Standard D7467-08 was passed in June of 2008 and officially published on October of 2008. 6.NBEL has helped to understand composition-property-performance relationships, from not only a laboratory and field testing scale, for biodiesel blends from a spectrum of feedstocks. 7.NBEL helped propel the development of biodiesel with improved performance, cetane numbers, cold flow properties, and oxidative stability. 8.Data for over 30,000 miles has been logged for the fleet testing that select members of the consortia participated in. There were five vehicles that participated in the fleet testing. Art Van provided two vehicles, one that remained idle for most of the time and one that was used often for commercial furniture deliveries, Oakland University provided one vehicle, NEC provided one vehicle, and The Night Move provided one vehicle. These vehicles were light to medium duty (2.0 to 6.6 L displacement), used B5 or B20 blends from multiple sources of feedstock (corn-, choice white grease-, and soybean-based blends) and sources (NextDiesel, BDI, or Wacker Oil), experienced a broad range in ambient temperatures (from -9 °F in Michigan winters to 93 °F in the summertime), and both city and highway driving conditions.

  4. United Nations Conference on Trade and Development Biofuel production technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................... 5 3 Second-generation biofuels............................................................................................... 9 3.1 Second-generation biochemical biofuels................................................................. 10 3.2 Second-generation thermochemical biofuels

  5. Biofuels

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Kalluri, Udaya

    2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Udaya Kalluri is part of a multidisciplinary scientific team working to unlock plants in order to create more potent biofuels without harsh processing.

  6. Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalluri, Udaya

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Udaya Kalluri is part of a multidisciplinary scientific team working to unlock plants in order to create more potent biofuels without harsh processing.

  7. The Recent National Academy of Sciences Study on the Economic and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    The Recent National Academy of Sciences Study on the Economic and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel, Renewable Fuel Standard: Potential Economic and Environmental Effects of U.S. Biofuel Policy. Professor was that the U.S. is unlikely to meet the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) for 2022 for cellulosic biofuels. Wally

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: and algae-based biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and algae-based biofuels Renewables, Other Energy Issues To Be Focus of Enhanced Sandia-SINTEF Collaboration On May 28, 2014, in Biofuels, CRF, Distribution Grid Integration,...

  9. Biofuels for the future-Seth Snyder | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofuels for the future-Seth Snyder Share Description Argonne researcher Seth Snyder talks about the innovations in biofuel technology. Topic Energy Energy sources Renewable energy...

  10. National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies; (2) model biomass productivity and associated environmental impacts of annual cellulosic feedstocks; (3) simulate production of perennial biomass feedstocks grown on marginal lands; and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. We used the EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) model to simulate biomass productivity and environmental impacts of annual and perennial cellulosic feedstocks across much of the USA on both croplands and marginal lands. We used data from LTER and eddy-covariance experiments within the study region to test the performance of EPIC and, when necessary, improve its parameterization. We investigated three scenarios. In the first, we simulated a historical (current) baseline scenario composed mainly of corn-, soybean-, and wheat-based rotations as grown existing croplands east of the Rocky Mountains in 30 states. In the second scenario, we simulated a modified baseline in which we harvested corn and wheat residues to supply feedstocks to potential cellulosic ethanol biorefineries distributed within the study area. In the third scenario, we simulated the productivity of perennial cropping systems such as switchgrass or perennial mixtures grown on either marginal or Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) lands. In all cases we evaluated the environmental impacts (e.g., soil carbon changes, soil erosion, nitrate leaching, etc.) associated with the practices. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided initial simulation results on the potential of annual and perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

  11. National Microalgae Biofuel Production Potential and Resource Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard; Huesemann, Michael H.; Lane, Leonard J.

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Microalgae continue to receive global attention as a potential sustainable "energy crop" for biofuel production. An important step to realizing the potential of algae is quantifying the demands commercial-scale algal biofuel production will place on water and land resources. We present a high-resolution national resource and oil production assessment that brings to bear fundamental research questions of where open pond microalgae production can occur, how much land and water resource is required, and how much energy is produced. Our study suggests under current technology microalgae have the potential to generate 220 billion liters/year of oil, equivalent to 48% of current U.S. petroleum imports for transportation fuels. However, this level of production would require 5.5% of the land area in the conterminous U.S., and nearly three times the volume of water currently used for irrigated agriculture, averaging 1,421 L water per L of oil. Optimizing the selection of locations for microalgae production based on water use efficiency can greatly reduce total water demand. For example, focusing on locations along the Gulf Coast, Southeastern Seaboard, and areas adjacent to the Great Lakes, shows a 75% reduction in water demand to 350 L per L of oil produced with a 67% reduction in land use. These optimized locations have the potential to generate an oil volume equivalent to 17% of imports for transportation fuels, equal to the Energy Independence and Security Act year 2022 "advanced biofuels" production target, and utilizing some 25% of the current irrigation consumptive water demand for the U. S. These results suggest that, with proper planning, adequate land and water are available to meet a significant portion of the U.S. renewable fuel goals.

  12. Algal Biofuels Research Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Algal Biofuels Research Laboratory Enabling fundamental understanding of algal biology and composition of algal biomass to help develop superior bioenergy strains NREL is a...

  13. New tech could be "Mr. Fusion" for biofuel | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    convert waste from kitchens or latrines into an alcohol that can power diesel engines. The photosynthetic bacteria in the Endurance Biofuel Reactor efficiently convert...

  14. Obstacles and Call to Action as a result of the Sept. 22nd and 23rd Biofuels Sustainability portion of the conference.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyte, Michael

    Group 1 Obstacles and Call to Action as a result of the Sept. 22nd and 23rd Biofuels Sustainability. 22nd and 23rd Biofuels Sustainability portion of the confer- ence. #12;Group 3 Obstacles and Call to Action as a result of the Sept. 22nd and 23rd Biofuels Sustainability portion of the conference

  15. Sub-national TIMES model for analyzing regional future use of Biomass and Biofuels in France and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Sub-national TIMES model for analyzing regional future use of Biomass and Biofuels in France Introduction Renewable energy sources such as biomass and biofuels are increasingly being seen as important of biofuels on the final consumption of energy in transport should be 10%. The long-term target is to reduce

  16. Biofuels and Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Biofuels and Transportation Impacts and Uncertainties Some Observations of a Reformed Ethanol and Logistics Symposium 3 Topics · Why Biofuels · Ethanol Economics · Ethanol Transportation Equipment Biofuels? · National Security · Reduce Imports of oil · Peak Oil · Replace Fossil Resources

  17. National Action Plan on Demand Response

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—discusses the National Assessment of Demand Response study, the National Action Plan for Demand Response, and demand response as related to the energy outlook.

  18. Implementation Proposal for the National Action Plan on Demand...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and the Department of Energy. Implementation Proposal for the National Action Plan on Demand Response - July 2011 More Documents & Publications National Action Plan on Demand...

  19. WOODS FOR LEARNING ACTION PLAN 2010-2013 Objective National Indicators Specific actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WOODS FOR LEARNING ACTION PLAN 2010-2013 Objective National Indicators Specific actions Lead positive inspection reports Develop Forest Kindergarten with nurseries in both private and state sectors

  20. ACTION MEMO: Technical Position on the Use of National Consensus...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ACTION MEMO: Technical Position on the Use of National Consensus and Building Codes to Meet DOE Order 420. I B. ACTION MEMO: Technical Position on the Use of National Consensus and...

  1. Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel Center infrastructure. Cellulosic-based ad- vanced biofuel has a target of 21 billion gallons by 2022 and requires into a national economic model of biofuel sustainability. Cellulosic biomass relocates the demand

  2. ABPDU - Advanced Biofuels Process Demonstration Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Berkeley National Lab opened its Advanced Biofuels Process Demonstration Unit on Aug. 18, 2011.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: International Smart Grid Action...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Smart Grid Action Network Mesa del Sol Project Is Finalist for International Smart Grid Action Network 2014 Award of Excellence On July 31, 2014, in Distribution Grid Integration,...

  4. ACTION: Technical Position on the Use of National Consensus and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ACTION: Technical Position on the Use of National Consensus and Building Codes to Meet DOE Order 420.18, Facility Safety, Albright, 91307 ACTION: Technical Position on the Use of...

  5. Integrated Evaluation of Cost, Emissions, and Resource Potential for Algal Biofuels at the National Scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Ryan; Fishman, Daniel; Frank, Edward D.; Johnson, Michael C.; Jones, Susanne B.; Kinchin, Christopher; Skaggs, Richard; Venteris, Erik R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Costs, emissions, and resource availability were modeled for the production of 5 billion gallons yr-1 (5 BGY) of renewable diesel in the United States from Chlorella biomass by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). The HTL model utilized data from a continuous 1-L reactor including catalytic hydrothermal gasification of the aqueous phase, and catalytic hydrotreatment of the HTL oil. A biophysical algae growth model coupled with weather and pond simulations predicted biomass productivity from experimental growth parameters, allowing site-by-site and temporal prediction of biomass production. The 5 BGY scale required geographically and climatically distributed sites. Even though screening down to 5 BGY significantly reduced spatial and temporal variability, site-to-site, season-to-season, and inter-annual variations in productivity affected economic and environmental performance. Performance metrics based on annual average or peak productivity were inadequate; temporally and spatially explicit computations allowed more rigorous analysis of these dynamic systems. For example, 3-season operation with a winter shutdown was favored to avoid high greenhouse gas emissions, and economic performance was harmed by underutilized equipment during slow-growth periods. Thus, analysis of algal biofuel pathways must combine spatiotemporal resource assessment, economic analysis, and environmental analysis integrated over many sites when assessing national scale performance.

  6. 2012 National Energy Assurance Planning Conference After-Action...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 National Energy Assurance Planning Conference June 28-29, 2012 Gaylord Hotel and Convention Center, National Harbor, MD After-Action Report August 2012 Co-Sponsored by: U.S....

  7. New Studies Portray Unbalanced Perspective on Biofuels DOE Committed to Environmentally Sound Biofuels Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    New Studies Portray Unbalanced Perspective on Biofuels DOE Committed to Environmentally Sound Biofuels Development DOE Response based on contributions from Office of Biomass Program; Argonne National, Hill, Tilman, Polasky and Hawthorne study ("Land Clearing and the Biofuel Carbon Debt") claims

  8. Control and Optimization of Light Transfer in Photobioreactors Used for Biofuel Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandilian, Razmig

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    History of biofuels in the UnitedCO 2 and producing biofuels and biomass. . . . . . .Reed, “National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap”, Tech.

  9. biofuels | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biofuels biofuels Leads No leads are available at this time. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella...

  10. Biofuels in Oregon and Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PNNL-17351 Biofuels in Oregon and Washington A Business Case Analysis of Opportunities and Challenges Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory #12;#12;Biofuels in Oregon and Washington, particularly in light of the recent growth experienced by the biofuels industry in the Midwest. Policymakers

  11. Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Results of two Reports from the National Research Council...

  12. Algal Biofuels Research Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides information about Algal Biofuels Research Laboratory capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center.

  13. Legislating Biofuels in the United States (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, W.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Legislation supporting U.S. biofuels production can help to reduce petroleum consumption and increase the nation's energy security.

  14. Action Codes Table | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AO 474.2 Chg 1KANSAS CITY FIELD 10

  15. National Action Plan on Demand Response

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartment of Energyof Energy U.S. Department of 6 3 9 12 6 3 9

  16. Liquid Biofuels Strategies and Policies in selected

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    June 2011 Liquid Biofuels Strategies and Policies in selected African Countries A review of some of the challenges, activities and policy options for liquid biofuels Prepared for PISCES by Practical Action Biofuels Strategies and Policies in selected African Countries Although this research is funded by DFID

  17. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Plan has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 562, Waste Systems, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996; as amended March 2010). CAU 562 consists of 13 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada National Security Site. Site characterization activities were performed in 2009 and 2010, and the results are presented in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 562. The scope of work required to implement the recommended closure alternatives is summarized. (1) CAS 02-26-11, Lead Shot, will be clean closed by removing shot. (2) CAS 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain, will be clean closed by removing paint and contaminated soil. As a best management practice (BMP), asbestos tile will be removed. (3) CAS 02-59-01, Septic System, will be clean closed by removing septic tank contents. As a BMP, the septic tank will be removed. (4) CAS 02-60-01, Concrete Drain, contains no contaminants of concern (COCs) above action levels. No further action is required; however, as a BMP, the concrete drain will be removed. (5) CAS 02-60-02, French Drain, was clean closed. Corrective actions were completed during corrective action investigation activities. As a BMP, the drain grates and drain pipe will be removed. (6) CAS 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil. As a BMP, the steam cleaning sump grate and outfall pipe will be removed. (7) CAS 02-60-04, French Drain, was clean closed. Corrective actions were completed during corrective action investigation activities. (8) CAS 02-60-05, French Drain, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil. (9) CAS 02-60-06, French Drain, contains no COCs above action levels. No further action is required. (10) CAS 02-60-07, French Drain, requires no further action. The french drain identified in historical documentation was not located during corrective action investigation activities. (11) CAS 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall, will be clean closed by removing sediment from the mud trap. As a BMP, the mud trap and outfall pipe will be removed. (12) CAS 23-99-06, Grease Trap, will be clean closed by removing sediment from the grease trap and backfilling the grease trap with grout. (13) CAS 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil and the sludge-containing outfall pipe.

  18. EMSL - biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biofuels en New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

  19. USDA & DOE Release National Biofuels Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 -Helicopter AccidentSeptember 2009JulyUS-China

  20. USDA & DOE Release National Biofuels Action Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and BatteryUS-EU-Japan Working Group onPHEV

  1. Biofuels and indirect land use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation October 2011 #12;About this study), Malaysian Palm Oil Board, National Farmers Union, Novozymes, Northeast Biofuels Collaborative, Patagonia Bio contributed views on a confidential basis. #12;1Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation

  2. Legislating Biofuels in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legislating Biofuels in the United States Wendy Clark National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado, USA 2008 SAE Biofuels Specifications and Performance Symposium July 7-9, 2008, Paris NREL PR-540 Legislate Biofuels? · Plentiful U.S. biomass resources: energy crops, agricultural and forestry residues

  3. International Trade of Biofuels (Brochure), Energy Analysis, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes | National NuclearInterlibrary LoanSafeguards |

  4. Biofuels News, Spring/Summer 2001, Vol. 4, No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuttle, J.

    2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Newsletter for the DOE biofuels program. This issue contains articles on the National Energy Policy Plan, national energy policy, the proposed budget for biofuels, and new faces at DOE.

  5. BETO Live Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Dr. Jose Olivares of Los Alamos National Laboratory will present the results of algal biofuels research conducted by the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB). NAABB is...

  6. Algal Biofuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office's (BETO's) Algae Program is carrying out a long-term applied research and development (R&D) strategy to increase the yields and lower the costs of algal biofuels by working with partners to develop new technologies, to integrate technologies at commercially-relevant scales, and conduct crosscutting analyses to understand the potential and challenges of an algal biofuel industry that is capable of annually producing billions of gallons of renewable diesel, gasoline, and jet fuels. These activities are integrated with BETO's longstanding approach to accelerate the commercialization of lignocellulosic biofuels.

  7. Biofuel breakdown | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofuel breakdown Biofuel breakdown SCF1 frees plant sugars in lignin for sustainable biofuels Lignin, the tough woody polymer in the walls of plant, binds and protects cellulose...

  8. Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Agency, Biofuels for Transport, Organization forJohnson, Potential for Biofuels for Transport in DevelopingMitigation Through Biofuels in the Transport Sector, Status

  9. Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    08 Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels Draft Report (May be citedLIFECYCLE ANALYSES OF BIOFUELS Draft manuscript (may belifecycle analysis (LCA) of biofuels for transportation has

  10. PNNL Aviation Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plaza, John; Holladay, John; Hallen, Rich

    2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial airplanes really don’t have the option to move away from liquid fuels. Because of this, biofuels present an opportunity to create new clean energy jobs by developing technologies that deliver stable, long term fuel options. The Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is working with industrial partners on processes to convert biomass to aviation fuels.

  11. Biofuels Impact on DPF Durability

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biofuels Impact on DPF Durability Michael J. Lance, Bruce G. Bunting, Andrew A. Wereszczak, Todd J. Toops, and Matt Ferber Oak Ridge National Laboratory May 15 th , 2012 PM040 This...

  12. I-75 Project Brings Biofuels to one of the Nation's Longest Highways |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral TestimonyEnergy Hydrogen5 , 3004 SIJI3JII( ' '

  13. Increasing Biofuel Deployment through Renewable Super Premium

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by 2022 (EISA 2007) RENEWABLE FUEL STANDARD * BETO Office Goal: "Enable nation-wide production of biofuels compatible with today's transportation infrastructure, reduce...

  14. World Biofuels Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfstad,T.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report forms part of a project entitled 'World Biofuels Study'. The objective is to study world biofuel markets and to examine the possible contribution that biofuel imports could make to help meet the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). The study was sponsored by the Biomass Program of the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), U.S. Department of Energy. It is a collaborative effort among the Office of Policy and International Affairs (PI), Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The project consisted of three main components: (1) Assessment of the resource potential for biofuel feedstocks such as sugarcane, grains, soybean, palm oil and lignocellulosic crops and development of supply curves (ORNL). (2) Assessment of the cost and performance of biofuel production technologies (NREL). (3) Scenario-based analysis of world biofuel markets using the ETP global energy model with data developed in the first parts of the study (BNL). This report covers the modeling and analysis part of the project conducted by BNL in cooperation with PI. The Energy Technology Perspectives (ETP) energy system model was used as the analytical tool for this study. ETP is a 15 region global model designed using the MARKAL framework. MARKAL-based models are partial equilibrium models that incorporate a description of the physical energy system and provide a bottom-up approach to study the entire energy system. ETP was updated for this study with biomass resource data and biofuel production technology cost and performance data developed by ORNL and NREL under Tasks 1 and 2 of this project. Many countries around the world are embarking on ambitious biofuel policies through renewable fuel standards and economic incentives. As a result, the global biofuel demand is expected to grow very rapidly over the next two decades, provided policymakers stay the course with their policy goals. This project relied on a scenario-based analysis to study global biofuel markets. Scenarios were designed to evaluate the impact of different policy proposals and market conditions. World biofuel supply for selected scenarios is shown in Figure 1. The reference case total biofuel production increases from 12 billion gallons of ethanol equivalent in 2005 to 54 billion gallons in 2020 and 83 billion gallons in 2030. The scenarios analyzed show volumes ranging from 46 to 64 billion gallons in 2020, and from about 72 to about 100 billion gallons in 2030. The highest production worldwide occurs in the scenario with high feedstock availability combined with high oil prices and more rapid improvements in cellulosic biofuel conversion technologies. The lowest global production is found in the scenario with low feedstock availability, low oil prices and slower technology progress.

  15. Biomass and Biofuels: Technology and Economic Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, A

    2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation on biomass and biofuels technology and economics presented at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, May 23, 2007.

  16. National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and PostgreSQL database hosting. The second resource was the DOE-JGCRI 'Evergreen' cluster, capable of executing millions of simulations in relatively short periods. ARRA funding also supported a PhD student from UMD who worked on creating the geodatabases and executing some of the simulations in this study. Using a physically based classification of marginal lands, we simulated production of cellulosic feedstocks from perennial mixtures grown on these lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands in the western states of the US Midwest appear to have significant potential to supply feedstocks to a cellulosic biofuel industry. Similar results were obtained with simulations of N-fertilized perennial mixtures. A detailed spatial analysis allowed for the identification of possible locations for the establishment of 34 cellulosic ethanol biorefineries with an annual production capacity of 5.6 billion gallons. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided simulation results on the potential of perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. The results of this study will be submitted to the USDOE Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework as a way to contribute to the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

  17. Quality, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biofuels and Biofuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Quality, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biofuels and Biofuel Blends Quality, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biofuels and Biofuel Blends 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies...

  18. Quality, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biofuels and Biofuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Quality, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biofuels and Biofuel Blends Quality, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biofuels and Biofuel Blends 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  19. International Trade of Biofuels (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the production and trade of biofuels has increased to meet global demand for renewable fuels. Ethanol and biodiesel contribute much of this trade because they are the most established biofuels. Their growth has been aided through a variety of policies, especially in the European Union, Brazil, and the United States, but ethanol trade and production have faced more targeted policies and tariffs than biodiesel. This fact sheet contains a summary of the trade of biofuels among nations, including historical data on production, consumption, and trade.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Biofuel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    heat-loving fungi, often found in composts that self-ignite without flame or spark, could soon have new vocations. The complete genetic makeup of Myceliophthora thermophi-la and...

  1. Biofuel impacts on water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories and General Motors Global Energy Systems team conducted a joint biofuels systems analysis project from March to November 2008. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, implications, limitations, and enablers of large-scale production of biofuels. 90 billion gallons of ethanol (the energy equivalent of approximately 60 billion gallons of gasoline) per year by 2030 was chosen as the book-end target to understand an aggressive deployment. Since previous studies have addressed the potential of biomass but not the supply chain rollout needed to achieve large production targets, the focus of this study was on a comprehensive systems understanding the evolution of the full supply chain and key interdependencies over time. The supply chain components examined in this study included agricultural land use changes, production of biomass feedstocks, storage and transportation of these feedstocks, construction of conversion plants, conversion of feedstocks to ethanol at these plants, transportation of ethanol and blending with gasoline, and distribution to retail outlets. To support this analysis, we developed a 'Seed to Station' system dynamics model (Biofuels Deployment Model - BDM) to explore the feasibility of meeting specified ethanol production targets. The focus of this report is water and its linkage to broad scale biofuel deployment.

  2. Secretary Moniz Announces New Biofuels Projects to Drive Cost...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biomass 2013 annual conference, Secretary Moniz today highlighted the important role biofuels play in the Administration's Climate Action Plan to increase our energy security and...

  3. Biofuels Overview CLIMATETECHBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page | 1 May 2009 Biofuels Overview CLIMATETECHBOOK What are Biofuels? A biofuel is defined as any dependence on petroleum-based fuels, biofuels are gaining increasing attention as one possible solution. Biofuels offer a way to produce transportation fuels from renewable sources or waste materials and to help

  4. Biofuels in Minnesota: A Success Story

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This PDF provides a Minnesota biofuels success story. It shows the timeline of state actions, the number of biodiesel plants in the state, production and consumption rates, and the NextGen Energy Initiative.

  5. Ecofys-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions: Insights from...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Actions: Insights from Example Development1 "Ecofys elaborated in several projects, concrete examples of NAMAs to understand the issues arising from this concept. This report...

  6. Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin AgencyCompany Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy,...

  7. Cameroon-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin AgencyCompany Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy,...

  8. Burundi-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin AgencyCompany Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy,...

  9. Central African Republic-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin AgencyCompany Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy,...

  10. Rwanda-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin AgencyCompany Organization Environment Canada, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector Climate, Energy,...

  11. Lifecycle Analyses of Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Balances for a Range of Biofuel Options, Project Number8. F UELCYCLE EMISSIONS FOR BIOFUEL VEHICLES IN DIFFERENTch. and LEM % ch. For a few biofuel lifecycles there can be

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 573: Alpha Contaminated Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 573 is located in Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 573 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with non-nuclear experiments and nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 573, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 05-23-02, GMX Alpha Contaminated Area • 05-45-01, Atmospheric Test Site - Hamilton These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives.

  13. Strategic Perspectives on Biofuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Biofuels and Sustainability: Acknowledging Challenges and Confronting MisconceptionsQuantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG EmissionsLee R. Lynd,...

  14. Lipid Biofuels | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lipid Biofuels Lipid Biofuels Released: March 30, 2015 Enhancing microbial lipid production By revealing a novel molecular pathway involved in microbial lipid accumulation in the...

  15. Biofuels Information Center

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biofuels Information Center BETO 2015 Peer Review Kristi Moriarty March 24, 2015 2 Goal Statement * The purpose of the Biofuels Information Center (BIC) task is to increase...

  16. The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use Suhail Ahmad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad B.E., Avionics Engineering National, Technology and Policy Program #12;#12;3 The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad Submitted of Master of Science in Technology and Policy ABSTRACT The use of biofuels in domestic transportation sector

  17. FULLY FUNDED DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BIOFUELS RESEARCH INTERNSHIP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    FULLY FUNDED DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BIOFUELS RESEARCH INTERNSHIP AT PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY Position Description The overall project objective is to utilize marine microalgae for biofuels (i.e., lipids for biodiesel or jet biofuel) production. The student will set up a series

  18. National Energy Action Month Takes Energy Department Officials...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    in events to emphasize the important role that the Administration's all-of-the-above energy strategy plays in strengthening America's economic, environmental and national...

  19. Final Week of National Energy Action Month Features Technological...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    in events to emphasize the important role that the Administration's all-of-the-above energy strategy plays in strengthening America's economic, environmental and national...

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 365: Baneberry Contamination Area, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 365 comprises one corrective action site (CAS), CAS 08-23-02, U-8d Contamination Area. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for the CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 6, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for the Baneberry site. The primary release associated with Corrective Action Unit 365 was radiological contamination from the Baneberry nuclear test. Baneberry was an underground weapons-related test that vented significant quantities of radioactive gases from a fissure located in close proximity to ground zero. A crater formed shortly after detonation, which stemmed part of the flow from the fissure. The scope of this investigation includes surface and shallow subsurface (less than 15 feet below ground surface) soils. Radionuclides from the Baneberry test with the potential to impact groundwater are included within the Underground Test Area Subproject. Investigations and corrective actions associated with the Underground Test Area Subproject include the radiological inventory resulting from the Baneberry test.

  1. 36 SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN July 2008 In a dramatic call to action in April, United Nations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OPINION 36 SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN July 2008 In a dramatic call to action in April, United Nations on an accelerated timeta- ble. The international system is a congeries of overlapping public and private effectively take a shared action. Success will enable us to consider similarly urgent challenges in food

  2. Biofuel Basics | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Addthis Text Version Photo of a woman in goggles handling a machine filled with biofuels. Biofuels are liquid or gaseous fuels produced from biomass. Most biofuels are used...

  3. Recapping National Energy Action Month | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition toDOE reassessed the NationalPhoto

  4. Biofuels: 1995 project summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Domestic transportation fuels are derived primarily from petroleum and account for about two-thirds of the petroleum consumption in the United States. In 1994, more than 40% of our petroleum was imported. That percentage is likely to increase, as the Middle East has about 75% of the world`s oil reserves, but the United States has only about 5%. Because we rely so heavily on oil (and because we currently have no suitable substitutes for petroleum-based transportation fuels), we are strategically and economically vulnerable to disruptions in the fuel supply. Additionally, we must consider the effects of petroleum use on the environment. The Biofuels Systems Division (BSD) is part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The day-to-day research activities, which address these issues, are managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. BSD focuses its research on biofuels-liquid and gaseous fuels made from renewable domestic crops-and aggressively pursues new methods for domestically producing, recovering, and converting the feedstocks to produce the fuels economically. The biomass resources include forage grasses, oil seeds, short-rotation woody crops, agricultural and forestry residues, algae, and certain industrial and municipal waste streams. The resulting fuels include ethanol, methanol, biodiesel, and ethers.

  5. Energy Department Officials Kick Off National Energy Action Month |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrackEllen O'KaneSystemsDepartment

  6. Final Week of National Energy Action Month Features Technological Advances

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrackEllen|JulyR--FOIADepartmentJuly 16, 2015 Securityin

  7. NNSA Contract Reform in Action: Supply Chain Management Center | National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLoveReferenceAgenda WorkshopAdministrationExplosions

  8. Implementation Proposal for the National Action Plan on Demand Response -

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOralGovernmentStandardsIdahoby4and ExamplePostingJuly 2011

  9. 2012 National Energy Assurance Planning Conference After-Action Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy:Whether you're a homeZappos.com Innovative81ofDepartment

  10. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded Actions |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed Khan -Department of Energy 8, 2011, DOERFIDepartment

  11. FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIkNATION REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,

  12. of Biofuels Sustainable Feedstocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Next Generation of Biofuels Sustainable Feedstocks Cost-Competitive Options #12;Photos courtesy the evolutionary code for an entirely new generation of biofuels capable of transforming the American automobile biofuels at a cost competitive with that of gasoline. Equally important, they are using crops

  13. Biofuels: A Solution for Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, S.

    1999-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Our lives are linked to weather and climate, and to energy use. Since the late 1970s, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has invested in research and technology related to global climate change. DOE's Office Fuels Development (OFD) manages the National Biofuels Program and is the lead technical advisor on the development of biofuels technologies in the United States. Together with industry and other stakeholders, the program seeks to establish a major biofuels industry. Its goals are to develop and commercialize technologies for producing sustainable, domestic, environmentally beneficial, and economically viable fuels from dedicated biomass feedstocks.

  14. NREL Breaks New Ground in Plant Pretreatment for Biofuels (Fact Sheet), Highlights in Science, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit | National Nuclear SecurityJune 4,Report

  15. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 547: Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to present the corrective action alternatives (CAAs) evaluated for CAU 547, provide justification for selection of the recommended alternative, and describe the plan for implementing the selected alternative. Corrective Action Unit 547 consists of the following three corrective action sites (CASs): (1) CAS 02-37-02, Gas Sampling Assembly; (2) CAS 03-99-19, Gas Sampling Assembly; and(3) CAS 09-99-06, Gas Sampling Assembly. The gas sampling assemblies consist of inactive process piping, equipment, and instrumentation that were left in place after completion of underground safety experiments. The purpose of these safety experiments was to confirm that a nuclear explosion would not occur in the case of an accidental detonation of the high-explosive component of the device. The gas sampling assemblies allowed for the direct sampling of the gases and particulates produced by the safety experiments. Corrective Action Site 02-37-02 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and is associated with the Mullet safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U2ag on October 17, 1963. Corrective Action Site 03-99-19 is located in Area 3 of the NNSS and is associated with the Tejon safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U3cg on May 17, 1963. Corrective Action Site 09-99-06 is located in Area 9 of the NNSS and is associated with the Player safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U9cc on August 27, 1964. The CAU 547 CASs were investigated in accordance with the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAU 547. Existing radiological survey data and historical knowledge of the CASs were sufficient to meet the DQOs and evaluate CAAs without additional investigation. As a result, further investigation of the CAU 547 CASs was not required. The following CAAs were identified for the gas sampling assemblies: (1) clean closure, (2) closure in place, (3) modified closure in place, (4) no further action (with administrative controls), and (5) no further action. Based on the CAAs evaluation, the recommended corrective action for the three CASs in CAU 547 is closure in place. This corrective action will involve construction of a soil cover on top of the gas sampling assembly components and establishment of use restrictions at each site. The closure in place alternative was selected as the best and most appropriate corrective action for the CASs at CAU 547 based on the following factors: (1) Provides long-term protection of human health and the environment; (2) Minimizes short-term risk to site workers in implementing corrective action; (3) Is easily implemented using existing technology; (4) Complies with regulatory requirements; (5) Fulfills FFACO requirements for site closure; (6) Does not generate transuranic waste requiring offsite disposal; (7) Is consistent with anticipated future land use of the areas (i.e., testing and support activities); and (8) Is consistent with other NNSS site closures where contamination was left in place.

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 550: Smoky Contamination Area Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550 is located in Areas 7, 8, and 10 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 550, Smoky Contamination Area, comprises 19 corrective action sites (CASs). Based on process knowledge of the releases associated with the nuclear tests and radiological survey information about the location and shape of the resulting contamination plumes, it was determined that some of the CAS releases are co-located and will be investigated as study groups. This document describes the planned investigation of the following CASs (by study group): (1) Study Group 1, Atmospheric Test - CAS 08-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T-2C; (2) Study Group 2, Safety Experiments - CAS 08-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-8B - CAS 08-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-8A - CAS 08-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site T-8C; (3) Study Group 3, Washes - Potential stormwater migration of contaminants from CASs; (4) Study Group 4, Debris - CAS 08-01-01, Storage Tank - CAS 08-22-05, Drum - CAS 08-22-07, Drum - CAS 08-22-08, Drums (3) - CAS 08-22-09, Drum - CAS 08-24-03, Battery - CAS 08-24-04, Battery - CAS 08-24-07, Batteries (3) - CAS 08-24-08, Batteries (3) - CAS 08-26-01, Lead Bricks (200) - CAS 10-22-17, Buckets (3) - CAS 10-22-18, Gas Block/Drum - CAS 10-22-19, Drum; Stains - CAS 10-22-20, Drum - CAS 10-24-10, Battery. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each study group. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 31, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 550. The potential contamination sources associated with the study groups are from nuclear testing activities conducted at CAU 550. The DQO process resulted in an assumption that the total effective dose (TED) within the default contamination boundary of CAU 550 exceeds the final action level and requires corrective action. The presence and nature of contamination outside the default contamination boundary at CAU 550 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the TED at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each group of CASs.

  17. Five-Year Review of CERCLA Response Actions at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. L. Jolley

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the documentation submitted in support of the five-year review or remedial actions implemented under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Sitewide at the Idaho National Laboratory. The report also summarizes documentation and inspections conducted at the no-further-action sites. This review covered actions conducted at 9 of the 10 waste area groups at the Idaho National Laboratory, i.e. Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10. Waste Area Group 8 was not subject to this review, because it does not fall under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office. The review included past site inspections and monitoring data collected in support of the remedial actions. The remedial actions have been completed at Waste Area Groups 2, 4, 5, 6, and 9. Remedial action reports have been completed for Waste Area Groups 2 and 4, and remedial action reports are expected to be completed during 2005 for Waste Area Groups 1, 5, and 9. Remediation is ongoing at Waste Area Groups 3, 7, and 10. Remedial investigations are yet to be completed for Operable Units 3-14, 7-13/14, and 10-08. The review showed that the remedies have been constructed in accordance with the requirements of the Records of Decision and are functioning as designed. Immediate threats have been addressed, and the remedies continue to be protective. Potential short-term threats are being addressed though institutional controls. Soil cover and cap remedies are being maintained properly and inspected in accordance with the appropriate requirements. Soil removal actions and equipment or system removals have successfully achieved remedial action objectives identified in the Records of Decision. The next Sitewide five-year review is scheduled for completion by 2011.

  18. New Cellulase Identification Method Holds Promise for Lower-Cost Biofuels (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilverNephelineNeuralNew Advances inDepartmentNewA

  19. Advantages of Enzyme Could Lead to Improved Biofuels Production (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Science, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA, a highly active and stable

  20. Novel Combination of Enzyme Systems Could Lower Biofuel Costs (Fact Sheet), Highlights in Science, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project TapsDOE Directives,83 Federal Register /Two

  1. Algal Pretreatment Improves Biofuels Yield and Value (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA, adefaultRuns forAndrew

  2. Ethanol Distribution, Dispensing, and Use: Analysis of a Portion of the Biomass-to-Biofuels Supply Chain Using System Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vimmerstedt, L. J.; Bush, B.; Peterson, S.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 targets use of 36 billion gallons of biofuels per year by 2022. Achieving this may require substantial changes to current transportation fuel systems for distribution, dispensing, and use in vehicles. The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory designed a system dynamics approach to help focus government action by determining what supply chain changes would have the greatest potential to accelerate biofuels deployment. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed the Biomass Scenario Model, a system dynamics model which represents the primary system effects and dependencies in the biomass-to-biofuels supply chain. The model provides a framework for developing scenarios and conducting biofuels policy analysis. This paper focuses on the downstream portion of the supply chain-represented in the distribution logistics, dispensing station, and fuel utilization, and vehicle modules of the Biomass Scenario Model. This model initially focused on ethanol, but has since been expanded to include other biofuels. Some portions of this system are represented dynamically with major interactions and feedbacks, especially those related to a dispensing station owner's decision whether to offer ethanol fuel and a consumer's choice whether to purchase that fuel. Other portions of the system are modeled with little or no dynamics; the vehicle choices of consumers are represented as discrete scenarios. This paper explores conditions needed to sustain an ethanol fuel market and identifies implications of these findings for program and policy goals. A large, economically sustainable ethanol fuel market (or other biofuel market) requires low end-user fuel price relative to gasoline and sufficient producer payment, which are difficult to achieve simultaneously. Other requirements (different for ethanol vs. other biofuel markets) include the need for infrastructure for distribution and dispensing and widespread use of high ethanol blends in flexible-fuel vehicles.

  3. National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency Vision for 2025: A Framework for Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), addresses the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency. This webinar is part of a 7-part series created for 5 states (Kentucky, Mississippi, Texas, Puerto Rico, and Alaska) with a cooperative agreement and funding under the State Energy Program with DOE.

  4. The International Plan of Action for Sharks: How does national implementation measure up?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Ransom A.

    the original FAO guidelines. For comprehensiveness, additional management and conservation measures for sharksThe International Plan of Action for Sharks: How does national implementation measure up? Brendal a greater need for effective conservation measures. In 1999 the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO

  5. A National-Scale Comparison of Resource and Nutrient Demands for Algae-Based Biofuel Production by Lipid Extraction and Hydrothermal Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Algae’s high productivity provides potential resource advantages over other fuel crops. However, demand for land, water, and nutrients must be minimized to avoid impacts on food production. We apply our national-scale, open-pond, growth and resource models to assess several biomass to fuel technological pathways based on Chlorella. We compare resource demands between hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and lipid extraction (LE) to meet 1.89E+10 and 7.95E+10 L yr-1 biofuel targets. We estimate nutrient demands where post-fuel biomass is consumed as co-products and recycling by anaerobic digestion (AD) or catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG). Sites are selected through prioritization based on fuel value relative to a set of site-specific resource costs. The highest priority sites are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast, but potential sites exist nationwide. We find that HTL reduces land and freshwater consumption by up to 46% and saline groundwater by around 70%. Without recycling, nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) demand is reduced 33%, but is large relative to current U.S. agricultural consumption. The most nutrient-efficient pathways are LE+CHG for N and HTL+CHG for P (by 42%). Resource gains for HTL+CHG are offset by a 344% increase in N consumption relative to LE+CHG (with potential for further recycling). Nutrient recycling is essential to effective use of alternative nutrient sources. Modeling of utilization availability and costs remains, but we find that for HTL+CHG at the 7.95E+10 L yr-1 production target, municipal sources can offset 17% of N and 40% of P demand and animal manures can generally meet demands.

  6. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 567: Miscellaneous Soil Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 567: Miscellaneous Soil Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 567 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. The corrective actions implemented at CAU 567 were developed based on an evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, the assumed presence of COCs at specific locations, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the CAAs. The CAAs were selected on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. The implemented corrective actions meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The CAAs meet all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site. Based on the implementation of these corrective actions, the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 567. • The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection issue a Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office for closure of CAU 567. • CAU 567 be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  7. National climate change action plans: Interim report for developing and transition countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benioff, R.; Ness, E.; Hirst, J. [eds.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under its Support for National Action Plans (SNAP) initiative, the U.S. Country Studies Program is providing financial and technical assistance to 18 countries for the development of climate change action plans. Although most of the countries have not yet completed their plans, the important lessons learned thus far are valuable and should be shared with other countries and international institutions that have an interest in the process of action plan development. This interim report describes the experience of 11 countries that are the furthest along in their planning activity and who have offered to share their results to date with the larger community of interested nations. These action plans delineate specific mitigation and adaptation measures that the countries will implement and integrate into their ongoing development programs. This report focuses on the measures the countries have selected and the methods they used to prepare their action plans. This executive summary presents key lessons and common themes using a structure similar to that used in the individual country chapters.

  8. Georgia Biofuel Directory A directory of Georgia industries that use biofuels.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia Biofuel Directory · A directory of Georgia industries that use biofuels. · Completed in May _________________________________________________________________ 3 Biofuels_____________________________________________________________________ 4 Biofuel Use in Georgia that Burn Self-Generated Biofuels as of May 2003__ 4 Chart 1.0 Biofuel Use from Contacted

  9. An Illustration of the Corrective Action Process, The Corrective Action Management Unit at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irwin, M.; Kwiecinski, D.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Management Units (CAMUs) were established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to streamline the remediation of hazardous waste sites. Streamlining involved providing cost saving measures for the treatment, storage, and safe containment of the wastes. To expedite cleanup and remove disincentives, EPA designed 40 CFR 264 Subpart S to be flexible. At the heart of this flexibility are the provisions for CAMUs and Temporary Units (TUs). CAMUs and TUs were created to remove cleanup disincentives resulting from other Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste provisions--specifically, RCRA land disposal restrictions (LDRs) and minimum technology requirements (MTRs). Although LDR and MTR provisions were not intended for remediation activities, LDRs and MTRs apply to corrective actions because hazardous wastes are generated. However, management of RCRA hazardous remediation wastes in a CAMU or TU is not subject to these stringent requirements. The CAMU at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM) was proposed through an interactive process involving the regulators (EPA and the New Mexico Environment Department), DOE, SNL/NM, and stakeholders. The CAMU at SNL/NM has been accepting waste from the nearby Chemical Waste Landfill remediation since January of 1999. During this time, a number of unique techniques have been implemented to save costs, improve health and safety, and provide the best value and management practices. This presentation will take the audience through the corrective action process implemented at the CAMU facility, from the selection of the CAMU site to permitting and construction, waste management, waste treatment, and final waste placement. The presentation will highlight the key advantages that CAMUs and TUs offer in the corrective action process. These advantages include yielding a practical approach to regulatory compliance, expediting efficient remediation and site closure, and realizing potentially significant cost savings compared to off-site disposal. Specific examples of CA MU advantages realized by SNL/NM will be presented along with the above highlighted process improvements, Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) performance, and associated lessons learned.

  10. Computer Modeling of Carbon Metabolism Enables Biofuel Engineering (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to reduce the cost of biofuels, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has merged biochemistry with modern computing and mathematics. The result is a model of carbon metabolism that will help researchers understand and engineer the process of photosynthesis for optimal biofuel production.

  11. The Effects of Timber as a Biofuel on the Occupancy and Habitat Suitability of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 The Effects of Timber as a Biofuel on the Occupancy and Habitat Suitability of the Indiana Bat of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries Introduction · Biofuel: ­ National Security ­ Stimulate Local Economies Negative Impacts of Biofuel Production ­ Decreased Site Productivity/Decreased Soil Conservation

  12. BIOFUELS FOR TRANSPORT IN THE 21st WHY FIRE SAFETY IS A REAL ISSUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BIOFUELS FOR TRANSPORT IN THE 21st CENTURY: WHY FIRE SAFETY IS A REAL ISSUE Guy Marlair1 , Patricia's), with thé new century venue we are assisting of a booming industry regarding biofuels of biofuels for transport. This contribution is a fîrst output from a National research program named

  13. National Advanced Biofuels Consortium Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash,EnergyNanophosphateas AnodesNanostructures 6

  14. National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash,EnergyNanophosphateas AnodesNanostructuresAlgal

  15. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Plan has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996 as amended). CAU 366 consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 11 of the Nevada National Security Site: · CAS 11-08-01, Contaminated Waste Dump #1 · CAS 11-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump #2 · CAS 11-23-01, Radioactively Contaminated Area A · CAS 11-23-02, Radioactively Contaminated Area B · CAS 11-23-03, Radioactively Contaminated Area C · CAS 11-23-04, Radioactively Contaminated Area D Site characterization activities were performed in 2011 and 2012, and the results are presented in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for CAU 366 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2012a). The following closure alternatives were recommended in the CADD: · No further action for CAS 11-23-01 · Closure in place for CASs 11-08-01, 11-08-02, 11-23-02, 11-23-03, and 11-23-04 The scope of work required to implement the recommended closure alternatives includes the following: · Non-engineered soil covers approximately 3 feet thick will be constructed at CAS 11-08-01 over contaminated waste dump (CWD) #1 and at CAS 11-08-02 over CWD #2. · FFACO use restrictions (URs) will be implemented for the areas where the total effective dose (TED) exceeds the final action level (FAL) of 25 millirems per Occasional Use Area year (mrem/OU-yr). The FAL is based on an assumption that the future use of the site includes occasional work activities and that workers will not be assigned to the area on a regular basis. A site worker under this scenario is assumed to be on site for a maximum of 80 hours per year for 5 years. The FFACO UR boundaries will encompass the areas where a worker would be exposed to 25 millirems of radioactivity per year if they are present for 80 hours per year. These boundaries will be defined as follows: – It is assumed that radiological contaminants are present at CAS 11-08-01 and CAS 11-08-02 within CWDs #1 and #2 at levels exceeding the FAL. Therefore, UR boundaries will be established around the perimeters of the soil covers that will be constructed at CWD #1 and CWD #2. A geophysical survey revealed buried metallic debris outside the fence and adjacent to CWD #1. Therefore, the UR boundary for CWD #1 will be expanded to include the mound containing buried material. – It is assumed that radiological contaminants are present at CAS 11-23-02, CAS 11-23-03, and CAS 11-23-04, within the three High Contamination Area (HCA) boundaries associated with the 11b, 11c, and 11d test areas at levels exceeding the FAL. Therefore, the UR boundaries will be established around the perimeters of the HCAs. The TED at an area of soil impacted by radiological debris outside the fence and adjacent to the 11c test area HCA exceeds the FAL of 25 mrem/OU-yr. Because the radiological impact from the debris at this location is visible on the aerial flyover radiological survey, all other areas within this isopleth of the flyover survey are conservatively also assumed to exceed the FAL. Therefore, the UR boundaries for the 11b, 11c, and 11d test areas will be expanded to include the areas within this isopleth. · The FFACO URs will all be located within the large Contamination Area (CA) that encompasses Plutonium Valley. Because access to the CA is limited and entry into the CA for post-closure inspections and maintenance would be impractical, UR warning signs will be posted along the existing CA fence. In accordance with the Soils Risk-Based Corrective Action Evaluation Process (NNSA/NSO, 2012b), an administrative UR will be implemented as a best management practice for the areas where the TED exceeds 25 millirems per Industrial Area year. This limit is based on continuous industrial use of the site and addresses exposure to industrial workers who would regularly be assigned to the work area for an entire career (250 days

  16. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. CAU 105 comprises the following five corrective action sites (CASs): -02-23-04 Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney Closure In Place -02-23-05 Atmospheric Test Site T-2A Closure In Place -02-23-06 Atmospheric Test Site T-2B Clean Closure -02-23-08 Atmospheric Test Site T-2 Closure In Place -02-23-09 Atmospheric Test Site - Turk Closure In Place The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 105 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 22, 2012, through May 23, 2013, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices.

  17. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 547: Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 547 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 as amended). CAU 547 consists of the following three Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 2, 3, and 9 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 02-37-02, Gas Sampling Assembly; (2) CAS 03-99-19, Gas Sampling Assembly; AND (3) CAS 09-99-06, Gas Sampling Assembly Closure activities began in August 2011 and were completed in June 2012. Activities were conducted according to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) for CAU 547 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2011). The recommended corrective action for the three CASs in CAU 547 was closure in place with administrative controls. The following closure activities were performed: (1) Open holes were filled with concrete; (2) Steel casings were placed over vertical expansion joints and filled with cement; (3) Engineered soil covers were constructed over piping and exposed sections of the gas sampling system components; (4) Fencing, monuments, Jersey barriers, radiological postings, and use restriction (UR) warning signs were installed around the perimeters of the sites; (5) Housekeeping debris was picked up from around the sites and disposed; and (6) Radiological surveys were performed to confirm final radiological postings. UR documentation is included in Appendix D. The post-closure plan was presented in detail in the CADD/CAP for CAU 547 and is included as Appendix F of this report. The requirements are summarized in Section 5.2 of this report. The proposed post-closure requirements consist of visual inspections to determine the condition of postings and radiological surveys to verify contamination has not migrated. NNSA/NSO requests the following: (1) A Notice of Completion from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to NNSA/NSO for closure of CAU 547; and (2) The transfer of CAU 547 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO.

  18. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 562, Waste Systems, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 562 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 as amended). CAU 562 consists of the following 13 Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada National Security Site: · CAS 02-26-11, Lead Shot · CAS 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain · CAS 02-59-01, Septic System · CAS 02-60-01, Concrete Drain · CAS 02-60-02, French Drain · CAS 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain · CAS 02-60-04, French Drain · CAS 02-60-05, French Drain · CAS 02-60-06, French Drain · CAS 02-60-07, French Drain · CAS 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall · CAS 23-99-06, Grease Trap · CAS 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls Closure activities began in October 2011 and were completed in April 2012. Activities were conducted according to the Corrective Action Plan for CAU 562 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2011). The corrective actions included No Further Action and Clean Closure. Closure activities generated sanitary waste and hazardous waste. Some wastes exceeded land disposal limits and required offsite treatment prior to disposal. Other wastes met land disposal restrictions and were disposed in appropriate onsite or offsite landfills. NNSA/NSO requests the following: · A Notice of Completion from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to NNSA/NSO for closure of CAU 562 · The transfer of CAU 562 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO

  19. future science group 9ISSN 1759-726910.4155/BFS.11.151 2012 Future Science Ltd Synthetic biology approaches to biofuel production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasty, Jeff

    approaches to biofuel production Editorial Biofuels (2012) 3(1), 9­12 "...it is important for synthetic there is a tendency, par- ticularly in the algae biofuel space, to prioritize high yields without sufficient regard large enough volumes of biofuels at a low enough cost to make this significant leap in the national

  20. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The purpose of the CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed.

  1. DOE and FERC Jointly Submit Implementation Proposal for The National Action Plan on Demand Response to Congress

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) jointly submitted to Congress a required “Implementation Proposal for The National Action Plan on Demand Response.”

  2. The Future of Biofuels | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Future of Biofuels The Future of Biofuels Addthis Description Secretary Chu discusses why feedstock grasses such as miscanthus could be the future of biofuels. Speakers...

  3. ON THE INDIRECT EFFECT OF BIOFUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilberman, D; Barrows, G; Hochman, G; Rajagopal, D

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and H. de Gorter. 2011. Biofuel Policies and Carbon Leakage.Environmental Impact of Biofuel Policies. Energy Policy.sions and Uncertainty for Biofuel Policies. Energy Policy.

  4. Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China Christer Janssoncassava; bioethanol; biofuel; metabolic engineering; Chinathe potentials of cassava in the biofuel sector and point to

  5. On mitigating emissions leakage under biofuel policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, D; Rajagopal, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that are applicable to biofuel policies and beyond. Thisso marginal land for biofuel crops is limited. EnergyIndirect emissions of biofuel policies Figure 1 provides a

  6. Enzymes with agriculture and biofuel applications | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzymes with agriculture and biofuel applications Enzymes with agriculture and biofuel applications Released: November 20, 2014 Enzyme insights may help agriculture, biofuels Plant...

  7. Biofuels: Review of Policies and Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janda, Karel; Kristoufek, Ladislav; Zilberman, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of ?rst and second generation biofuels: A comprehensive re-of the second generation biofuels and a successful develop-R. Timilsina. Second generation biofuels: Economics and

  8. Water gunks up biofuels production | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gunks up biofuels production Water gunks up biofuels production Released: August 21, 2014 Findings provide scientific principles to speed up biofuel development Green gold -...

  9. Bioproducts and Biofuels - Growing Together! | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioproducts and Biofuels - Growing Together Bioproducts and Biofuels - Growing Together Breakout Session 2B-Integration of Supply Chains II: Bioproducts-Enabling Biofuels and...

  10. Biofuels Market Opportunities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biofuels Market Opportunities Biofuels Market Opportunities Breakout Session 2C-Fostering Technology Adoption II: Expanding the Pathway to Market Biofuels Market Opportunities John...

  11. Biofuels and Renewable Energy Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteries Batteries An errorA Mostbio BioFuels Renewable

  12. Post-Closure Inspection Letter Report for Corrective Action Units on the Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehleke, R. F.

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter serves as the post-closure inspection letter report for Corrective Action Units (CAUs) on the Nevada National Security Site for calendar year 2013. The inspections identified maintenance and repair is required at the following sites: sign and/or fence repair is necessary at CAUs 113, 137, 139, 140, 143, 262, 370, 371, 372, 374, 476, 478, 529, 542, and 560; animal burrows were identified at CAU 547; and erosion was identified at CAUs 366, 367, 383, 551, and 574. In addition, the following use restrictions were removed during 2013 and will no longer be inspected in 2014: 165, 357, and 528.

  13. The President's Biofuels Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biofuels Initiative Neil Rossmeissl Office of the Biomass Program Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Why Can't We Regulate Our Way There? 25 20 15 10 5 0 1970 1980 1990 2000...

  14. Sandia's Biofuels Program

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema; Lane, Todd; Reichardt, Tom; Davis, Ryan

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia's biofuels program is focused on developing next-generation, renewable fuel solutions derived from biomass. In this video, various Sandia researchers discuss the program and the tools they employ to tackle the technical challenges they face.

  15. Sandia's Biofuels Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema; Lane, Todd; Reichardt, Tom; Davis, Ryan

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia's biofuels program is focused on developing next-generation, renewable fuel solutions derived from biomass. In this video, various Sandia researchers discuss the program and the tools they employ to tackle the technical challenges they face.

  16. Biofuel Feedstock Assessment For Selected Countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Wolfe, Amy K [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Findings from biofuel feedstock production assessments and projections of future supply are presented and discussed. The report aims to improve capabilities to assess the degree to which imported biofuel could contribute to meeting future U.S. targets to reduce dependence on imported oil. The study scope was focused to meet time and resource requirements. A screening process identified Argentina, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, India, Mexico, and the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) region for initial analysis, given their likely role in future feedstock supply relevant to U.S. markets. Supply curves for selected feedstocks in these countries are projected for 2012, 2017 and 2027. The supply functions, along with calculations to reflect estimated supplies available for export and/or biofuel production, were provided to DOE for use in a broader energy market allocation study. Potential cellulosic supplies from crop and forestry residues and perennials were also estimated for 2017 and 2027. The analysis identified capacity to potentially double or triple feedstock production by 2017 in some cases. A majority of supply growth is derived from increasing the area cultivated (especially sugarcane in Brazil). This is supplemented by improving yields and farming practices. Most future supplies of corn and wheat are projected to be allocated to food and feed. Larger shares of future supplies of sugarcane, soybean and palm oil production will be available for export or biofuel. National policies are catalyzing investments in biofuel industries to meet targets for fuel blending that generally fall in the 5-10% range. Social and environmental concerns associated with rapid expansion of feedstock production are considered. If the 2017 projected feedstock supply calculated as 'available' for export or biofuel were converted to fuel, it would represent the equivalent of about 38 billion gallons of gasoline. Sugarcane and bagasse dominate the available supply, representing 64% of the total. Among the nations studied, Brazil is the source of about two-thirds of available supplies, followed distantly by Argentina (12%), India and the CBI region.

  17. Biofuel Feedstock Assessment for Selected Countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, K.L.; Oladosu, G.A.; Wolfe, A.K.; Perlack, R.D.; Dale, V.H.

    2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Findings from biofuel feedstock production assessments and projections of future supply are presented and discussed. The report aims to improve capabilities to assess the degree to which imported biofuel could contribute to meeting future U.S. targets to reduce dependence on imported oil. The study scope was focused to meet time and resource requirements. A screening process identified Argentina, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, India, Mexico, and the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) region for initial analysis, given their likely role in future feedstock supply relevant to U.S. markets. Supply curves for selected feedstocks in these countries are projected for 2012, 2017 and 2027. The supply functions, along with calculations to reflect estimated supplies available for export and/or biofuel production, were provided to DOE for use in a broader energy market allocation study. Potential cellulosic supplies from crop and forestry residues and perennials were also estimated for 2017 and 2027. The analysis identified capacity to potentially double or triple feedstock production by 2017 in some cases. A majority of supply growth is derived from increasing the area cultivated (especially sugarcane in Brazil). This is supplemented by improving yields and farming practices. Most future supplies of corn and wheat are projected to be allocated to food and feed. Larger shares of future supplies of sugarcane, soybean and palm oil production will be available for export or biofuel. National policies are catalyzing investments in biofuel industries to meet targets for fuel blending that generally fall in the 5-10% range. Social and environmental concerns associated with rapid expansion of feedstock production are considered. If the 2017 projected feedstock supply calculated as ‘available’ for export or biofuel were converted to fuel, it would represent the equivalent of about 38 billion gallons of gasoline. Sugarcane and bagasse dominate the available supply, representing 64% of the total. Among the nations studied, Brazil is the source of about two-thirds of available supplies, followed distantly by Argentina (12%), India and the CBI region.

  18. Quality, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biofuels and Biofuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Impacts of Biofuels and Biofuel Blends Bob McCormick (PI) With Teresa Alleman, Jon Burton, Earl Christensen, Gina Chupka, Wendy Clark, Lisa Fouts, John Ireland, Mike Lammert, Jon...

  19. GLOBAL BIOFUELS OUTLOOK MAELLE SOARES PINTO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLOBAL BIOFUELS OUTLOOK 2010-2020 MAELLE SOARES PINTO DIRECTOR BIOFUELS EUROPE & AFRICA WORLD BIOFUELS MARKETS, ROTTERDAM MARCH 23, 2011 #12;Presentation Overview · Global Outlook ­ Biofuels Mandates in 2010 ­ Total Biofuels Supply and Demand ­ Regional Supply and Demand Outlook to 2020 ­ Biofuels

  20. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 106: Area 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews and Dawn Peterson

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises four corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 05-20-02, Evaporation Pond; (2) 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able; (3) 05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area; (4) 05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 106 based on the implementation of corrective actions. The corrective action of clean closure was implemented at CASs 05-45-04 and 05-45-05, while no corrective action was necessary at CASs 05-20-02 and 05-23-05. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 20, 2010, through June 1, 2011, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides, and investigation of other releases (mechanical displacement and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 106 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is complete and acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Investigation results were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A radiological dose FAL of 25 millirem per year was established based on the Industrial Area exposure scenario (2,250 hours of annual exposure). The only radiological dose exceeding the FAL was at CAS 05-45-05 and was associated with potential source material (PSM). It is also assumed that additional PSM in the form of depleted uranium (DU) and DU-contaminated debris at CASs 05-45-04 and 05-45-05 exceed the FAL. Therefore, corrective actions were undertaken at these CASs that consisted of removing PSM and collecting verification samples. Results of verification samples show that remaining soil does not contain contamination exceeding the FALs. Therefore, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) provides the following recommendations: (1) No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 106. (2) A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 106. (3) Corrective Action Unit 106 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  1. Action

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov Office of the Administrator NNSA POLICY LETTER

  2. Biofuels: Microbially Generated Methane and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    Biofuels: Microbially Generated Methane and Hydrogen Michael J McAnulty, Pennsylvania State, Thomas K; and Ferry, James G (March 2013) Biofuels: Microbially Generated Methane and Hydrogen. In: e

  3. BioFuels Atlas (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, K.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation for biennial merit review of Biofuels Atlas, a first-pass visualization tool that allows users to explore the potential of biomass-to-biofuels conversions at various locations and scales.

  4. Bioproducts and Biofuels – Growing Together!

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2B—Integration of Supply Chains II: Bioproducts—Enabling Biofuels and Growing the Bioeconomy Bioproducts and Biofuels – Growing Together! Andrew Held, Senior Director, Deployment and Engineering, Virent, Inc.

  5. Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    11 Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug and projected improvements in gasoline internal combustion engine technology are introduced rapidly 3) BIOFUELS Large scale use of biofuels, including ethanol and biodiesel 4) PLUG-IN HYBRID SUCCESS PHEVs play

  6. The Ecological Impact of Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    The Ecological Impact of Biofuels Joseph E. Fargione,1 Richard J. Plevin,2 and Jason D. Hill3 1 land-use change Abstract The ecological impact of biofuels is mediated through their effects on land, air, and water. In 2008, about 33.3 million ha were used to produce food- based biofuels

  7. Biofuel and Bioenergy implementation scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuel and Bioenergy implementation scenarios Final report of VIEWLS WP5, modelling studies #12;Biofuel and Bioenergy implementation scenarios Final report of VIEWLS WP5, modelling studies By André of this project are to provide structured and clear data on the availability and performance of biofuels

  8. Danielle Goldtooth Paper #6 -Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lega, Joceline

    Jon Kroc Danielle Goldtooth IS 195A Paper #6 - Biofuels Green Dreams In the modern era science has. Biofuels are increasingly becoming viable alternatives to gasoline, diesel, and other non-renewable fuels." There are still many issues that must be dealt with before the production of biofuels is energy-efficient enough

  9. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 367: Area 10 Sedan, Ess and Uncle Unit Craters Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 367 comprises four corrective action sites (CASs): • 10-09-03, Mud Pit • 10-45-01, U-10h Crater (Sedan) • 10-45-02, Ess Crater Site • 10-45-03, Uncle Crater Site The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation of the corrective actions and site closure activities implemented at CAU 367. A corrective action of closure in place with use restrictions was completed at each of the three crater CASs (10-45-01, 10-45-02, and 10-45-03); corrective actions were not required at CAS 10-09-03. In addition, a limited soil removal corrective action was conducted at the location of a potential source material release. Based on completion of these correction actions, no additional corrective action is required at CAU 367, and site closure is considered complete. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from February 2010 through March 2011, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 367: Area 10 Sedan, Ess and Uncle Unit Craters, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides, and investigation of non-test or other releases (e.g., migration in washes and potential source material). Based on the proximity of the Uncle, Ess, and Sedan craters, the impact of the Sedan test on the fallout deposited from the two earlier tests, and aerial radiological surveys, the CAU 367 investigation was designed to study the releases from the three crater CASs as one combined release (primary release). Corrective Action Site 10-09-03, Mud Pit, consists of two mud pits identified at CAU 367. The mud pits are considered non-test releases or other releases and were investigated independent of the three crater CASs. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 367 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is complete and acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. For the primary release, radiological doses exceeding the FAL of 25 millirem per year were not found to be present in the surface or shallow subsurface soil outside the default contamination boundary. However, it was assumed that radionuclides are present in subsurface media within each of the three craters (Sedan, Ess, and Uncle) due to prompt injection of radionuclides from the tests. Based on the assumption of radiological dose exceeding the FAL, corrective actions were undertaken that consisted of implementing a use restriction and posting warning signs at each crater CAS. These use restrictions were recorded in the FFACO database; the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Facility Information Management System; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. With regard to other releases, no contaminants of concern were identified at the mud pits or any of the other release locations, with one exception. Potential source material in the form of lead was found at one location. A corrective action of clean closure was implemented at this location, and verification samples indicated that no further action is necessary. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: • A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 367. • Corrective Action Unit 367 should be promoted from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  10. Transportation Biofuels in the USA Preliminary Innovation Systems Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggert, Anthony

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a greater focus on specific biofuel production technologies.differences for certain biofuel feedstocks as well as policy24 Biofuel

  11. Transportation Biofuels in the US A Preliminary Innovation Systems Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggert, Anthony

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a greater focus on specific biofuel production technologies.differences for certain biofuel feedstocks as well as policy24 Biofuel

  12. Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortman, J.L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbialtechnologies that enable biofuel production. Decades of workstrategy for producing biofuel. Although ethanol currently

  13. Biofuel Boundaries: Estimating the Medium-Term Supply Potential of Domestic Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Andrew; O'Hare, Michael; Farrell, Alexander

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biofuel Boundaries: Estimating the Medium-Term SupplyAugust 22, 2007 Biofuel Boundaries: Estimating the Medium-significant amount of liquid biofuel (equivalent to 30-100%

  14. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 365: Baneberry Contamination Area, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 365 comprises one corrective action site (CAS), CAS 08-23-02, U-8d Contamination Area. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 365 based on the implementation of the corrective action of closure in place with a use restriction (UR). Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from January 18, 2011, through August 2, 2011, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 365: Baneberry Contamination Area. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 365 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is complete and acceptable for use in supporting the DQO decisions. Investigation results were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A radiological dose FAL of 25 millirem per year was established based on the Remote Work Area exposure scenario (336 hours of annual exposure). Radiological doses exceeding the FAL were found to be present to the southwest of the Baneberry crater. It was also assumed that radionuclide levels present within the crater and fissure exceed the FAL. Corrective actions were undertaken that consisted of establishing a UR and posting warning signs for the crater, fissure, and the area located to the southwest of the crater where soil concentrations exceeded the FAL. These URs were recorded in the FFACO database; the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Facility Information Management System; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: (1) No further corrective actions beyond what are described in this document are necessary for CAU 365. (2) A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 365. (3) Corrective Action Unit 365 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  15. Economic Policy and Resource Implications of Biofuel Feedstock Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adusumilli, Naveen

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Page 3-4 Net Biofuel Production From Biomass Feedstocks Taking Into Account The Net Energy Ratio Associated With Each Of The Biomass Feedstocks, Switchgrass And High Energy Sorghum In This Case....S. energy supply and the consequent impact on cost of production of biofuels, 4 4 expanding to a national analysis viewing the macro implications of the RFS related to biomass feedstock. The results are of value to decision and policy makers. 1...

  16. Agriculture - Sustainable biofuels Redux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, G. Phillip [W.K. Kellogg Biological Station and Great Lakes Bioenergy Research; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Doering, Otto C. [Purdue University; Hamburg, Steven P [Brown University; Melillo, Jerry M [ORNL; Wander, Michele M [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Parton, William [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Last May's passage of the 2008 Farm Bill raises the stakes for biofuel sustainability: A substantial subsidy for the production of cellulosic ethanol starts the United States again down a path with uncertain environmental consequences. This time, however, the subsidy is for both the refiners ($1.01 per gallon) and the growers ($45 per ton of biomass), which will rapidly accelerate adoption and place hard-to-manage pressures on efforts to design and implement sustainable production practices - as will a 2007 legislative mandate for 16 billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol per year by 2022. Similar directives elsewhere, e.g., the European Union's mandate that 10% of all transport fuel in Europe be from renewable sources by 2020, make this a global issue. The European Union's current reconsideration of this target places even more emphasis on cellulosic feedstocks (1). The need for knowledge- and science-based policy is urgent. Biofuel sustainability has environmental, economic, and social facets that all interconnect. Tradeoffs among them vary widely by types of fuels and where they are grown and, thus, need to be explicitly considered by using a framework that allows the outcomes of alternative systems to be consistently evaluated and compared. A cellulosic biofuels industry could have many positive social and environmental attributes, but it could also suffer from many of the sustainability issues that hobble grain-based biofuels, if not implemented the right way.

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 05-20-02, Evaporation Pond • 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able • 05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area • 05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 19, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 106. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 106 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. The CAU includes land areas impacted by the release of radionuclides from groundwater pumping during the Radionuclide Migration study program (CAS 05-20-02), a weapons-related airdrop test (CAS 05-23-05), and unknown support activities at two sites (CAS 05-45-04 and CAS 05-45-05). The presence and nature of contamination from surface-deposited radiological contamination from CAS 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able, and other types of releases (such as migration and excavation as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation) from the remaining three CASs will be evaluated using soil samples collected from the locations most likely containing contamination, if present. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 106 includes the following activities: • Conduct radiological surveys. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine internal dose rates and the presence of contaminants of concern. • If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional samples to define the extent of the contamination and determine the area where the total effective dose at the site exceeds final action levels (i.e., corrective action boundary). • Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

  18. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 372: Area 20 Cabriolet/Palanquin Unit Craters, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick and Sloop, Christy

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 372, Area 20 Cabriolet/Palanquin Unit Craters, located within Areas 18 and 20 at the Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 372 comprises four corrective action sites (CASs): • 18-45-02, Little Feller I Surface Crater • 18-45-03, Little Feller II Surface Crater • 20-23-01, U-20k Contamination Area • 20-45-01, U-20L Crater (Cabriolet) The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 372 based on the implementation of the corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls at all CASs. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from November 9, 2009, through December 10, 2010, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 372: Area 20 Cabriolet/Palanquin Unit Craters. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides and investigation of other releases (migration in washes and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 372 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Investigation results were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A radiological dose FAL was established of 25 millirem per year based on the Remote Work Area exposure scenario (336 hours of annual exposure). Radiological doses exceeding the FAL were found to be present at all four CASs. It is assumed that radionuclide levels present within the Little Feller I and Cabriolet high contamination areas and within the craters at Palanquin and Cabriolet exceed the FAL. It is also assumed that potential source material in the form of lead bricks at Little Feller I and lead-acid batteries at Palanquin and Cabriolet exceed the FAL. Therefore, corrective actions were undertaken that consist of removing potential source material, where present, and implementing a use restriction and posting warning signs at each CAS. These use restrictions were recorded in the FFACO database; the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Facility Information Management System; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 372. • A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 372. • Corrective Action Unit 372 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  19. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 567: Miscellaneous Soil Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, with ROTC 1 Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick K.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 567 is located in Areas 1, 3, 5, 20, and 25 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 567 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 567, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 01-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-1 • 03-23-25, Seaweed E Contamination Area • 05-23-07, A5b RMA • 20-23-08, Colby Mud Spill • 25-23-23, J-11 Soil RMA These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on May 6, 2013, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 567. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with CAU 567 releases are nuclear test operations and other NNSS operations. The DQO process resulted in an assumption that total effective dose (TED) within a default contamination boundary at Atmospheric Test Site T-1 exceeds the final action level (FAL) and requires corrective action. The presence and nature of contamination outside the default contamination boundary at Atmospheric Test Site T-1 and all other CAU 567 CASs will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the TED at sample locations to the dose-based FAL. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  20. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 374: Area 20 Schooner Unit Crater, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC 1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 374 comprises five corrective action sites (CASs): • 18-22-05, Drum • 18-22-06, Drums (20) • 18-22-08, Drum • 18-23-01, Danny Boy Contamination Area • 20-45-03, U-20u Crater (Schooner) The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 374 based on the implementation of corrective actions. The corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls was implemented at CASs 18-23-01 and 20-45-03, and a corrective action of removing potential source material (PSM) was conducted at CAS 20-45-03. The other CASs require no further action; however, best management practices of removing PSM and drums at CAS 18-22-06, and removing drums at CAS 18-22-08 were performed. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from May 4 through October 6, 2010, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 374: Area 20 Schooner Unit Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigating the primary release of radionuclides and investigating other releases (migration in washes and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 374 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the dataset is acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. Radiological doses exceeding the FAL of 25 millirem per year were found to be present in the surface soil that was sampled. It is assumed that radionuclide levels present in subsurface media within the craters and ejecta fields (default contamination boundaries) at the Danny Boy and Schooner sites exceed the FAL. It is also assumed that PSM in the form of lead-acid batteries at Schooner exceeds the FAL. Therefore, corrective actions were undertaken that consist of removing PSM, where present, and implementing a use restriction and posting warning signs at the Danny Boy and Schooner sites. These use restrictions were recorded in the FFACO database; the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Facility Information Management System; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 374. • A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 374. • Corrective Action Unit 374 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  1. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 574: Neptune, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 574 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as 'Neptune' and consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 12 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 12-23-10, U12c.03 Crater (Neptune); and (2) CAS 12-45-01, U12e.05 Crater (Blanca). This Closure Report presents information supporting closure of CAU 574 according to the FFACO (FFACO, 1996 [as amended March 2010]) and the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 574 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2011). The following activities were performed to support closure of CAU 574: (1) In situ external dose rate measurements were collected using thermoluminescent dosimeters at CAS 12-45-01, U12e.05 Crater (Blanca). (2) Total effective dose rates were determined at both sites by summing the internal and external dose rate components. (3) A use restriction (UR) was implemented at CAS 12-23-10, U12c.03 Crater (Neptune). Areas that exceed the final action level (FAL) of 25 millirems per year (mrem/yr) based on the Occasional Use Area exposure scenario are within the existing use restricted area for CAU 551. The 25-mrem/yr FAL is not exceeded outside the existing CAU 551 UR for any of the exposure scenarios (Industrial Area, Remote Work Area, and Occasional Use Area). Therefore, the existing UR for CAU 551 is sufficient to bound contamination that exceeds the FAL. (4) An administrative UR was implemented at CAS 12-45-01, U12e.05 Crater (Blanca) as a best management practice (BMP). The 25-mrem/yr FAL was not exceeded for the Remote Work Area or Occasional Use Area exposure scenarios; therefore, a UR is not required. However, because the 25-mrem/yr FAL was exceeded for the Industrial Area exposure scenario, an administrative UR was established as a BMP. UR documentation is included as Appendix B. The UR at CAS 12-23-10, U12c.03 Crater (Neptune), is within the existing UR for CAU 551. Additional postings were not installed, and annual post-closure inspections will be performed in conjunction with the inspections performed for CAU 551. At CAS 12-45-01, U12e.05 Crater (Blanca), the administrative UR does not require postings or inspections. NNSA/NSO requests the following: (1) A Notice of Completion from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to NNSA/NSO for closure of CAU 574; and (2) The transfer of CAU 574 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO

  2. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 541: Small Boy Nevada National Security Site and Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 541 is co-located on the boundary of Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site and Range 65C of the Nevada Test and Training Range, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 541 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 541, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 05-23-04, Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site • 05-45-03, Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 1, 2014, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Air Force; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 541. The site investigation process also will be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with CASs 05-23-04 and 05-45-03 are from nuclear testing activities conducted at the Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site and Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy sites. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 541 will be evaluated based on information collected from field investigations. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  3. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 1, Technology Evaluation: Part B, Remedial Action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on D&D. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the ranking os remedial technologies. Volume 2 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. The focus of Vol. 1, Pt. B, is RA, and it has been divided into six chapters. The first chapter is an introduction, which defines problems specific to the ER Program for ORNL. Chapter 2 provides a general overview of the TLD. Chapters 3 through 5 are organized into necessary subelement categories: RA, characterization, and robotics and automation. The final chapter contains regulatory compliance information concerning RA.

  4. Renewable Energy Laboratory Development for Biofuels Advanced Combustion Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentin Soloiu

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The research advanced fundamental science and applied engineering for increasing the efficiency of internal combustion engines and meeting emissions regulations with biofuels. The project developed a laboratory with new experiments and allowed investigation of new fuels and their combustion and emissions. This project supports a sustainable domestic biofuels and automotive industry creating economic opportunities across the nation, reducing the dependence on foreign oil, and enhancing U.S. energy security. The one year period of research developed fundamental knowledge and applied technology in advanced combustion, emissions and biofuels formulation to increase vehicle's efficiency. Biofuelsâ?? combustion was investigated in a Compression Ignition Direct Injection (DI) to develop idling strategies with biofuels and an Indirect Diesel Injection (IDI) intended for auxiliary power unit.

  5. Setting priorities for action plans at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, A.C.

    1992-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work done by Applied Decision Analysis (ADA) for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) under Subcontract Number 9-XQ2-Y3837-1 with the University of California. The purpose of this work was to develop a method of setting priorities for environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) deficiencies at Los Alamos. The deficiencies were identified by a DOE Tiger Team that visited LANL in the fall of 1991, and by self assessments done by the Laboratory. ADA did the work described here between October 1991 and the end of September 1992. The ADA staff working on this project became part of a Risk Management Team in the Laboratory`s Integration and Coordination Office (ICO). During the project, the Risk Management Team produced a variety of documents describing aspects of the action-plan prioritization system. Some of those documents are attached to this report. Rather than attempt to duplicate their contents, this report provides a guide to those documents, and references them whenever appropriate.

  6. Data base management activities for the Remedial Action Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hook, L.A.; Voorhees, L.D.; Gentry, M.J.; Faulkner, M.A.; Shaakir-Ali, J.A.; Newman, K.A.; McCord, R.A.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Remedial Action Program (RAP) was established in 1985 in response to state and federal regulations requiring comprehensive control over facility discharges and cleanup of contaminated sites. A computerized Data and Information Management System (DIMS) was developed for RAP to (1) provide a centralized repository for data pertinent to RAP and (2) provide support for the investigations and assessments leading to the long-term remediation of contaminated facilities and sites. The current status of DIMS and its role in supporting RAP during 1989 are described. The DIMS consists of three components: (1) the Numeric Data Base, (2) the Bibliographic Data Base, and (3) the Records Control Data Base. This report addresses all three data bases, but focuses on the contents of the Numeric Data Base. Significant progress was made last year with the geographic information system (GIS) and ARC/INFO, which can be interfaced with SAS/GRAPH to provide combined mapping and statistical graphic products. Several thematic layers of GIS data for the Oak Ridge Reservation are now available. 18 refs., 8 figs., 19 tabs.

  7. Biofuel policy must evaluate environmental, food security and energy goals to maximize net benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sexton, Steven E; Rajagapol, Deepak; Hochman, Gal; Zilberman, David D; Roland-Holst, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10, 2008). Wiebe K. 2008. Biofuels: Implications for naturalcountries. Sustainable Biofuels and Human Securitydistribution implications of biofuels. Sustainable Biofuels

  8. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAU 104 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C • 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 • 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site • 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a • 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) • 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) • 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) • 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) • 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) • 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth • 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 • 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b • 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These 15 CASs include releases from 30 atmospheric tests conducted in the approximately 1 square mile of CAU 104. Because releases associated with the CASs included in this CAU overlap and are not separate and distinguishable, these CASs are addressed jointly at the CAU level. The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives (CAAs), provide the rationale for the selection of recommended CAAs, and provide the plan for implementation of the recommended CAA for CAU 104. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 4, 2011, through May 3, 2012, as set forth in the CAU 104 Corrective Action Investigation Plan.

  9. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 375: Area 30 Buggy Unit Craters, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 375 comprises three corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 25-23-22, Contaminated Soils Site; (2) 25-34-06, Test Cell A Bunker; and (3) 30-45-01, U-30a, b, c, d, e Craters. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 375 based on the implementation of corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls at CAS 25-23-22, no further action at CAS 25-34-06, and closure in place with administrative controls and removal of potential source material (PSM) at CAS 30-45-01. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from July 28, 2010, through April 4, 2011, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 375: Area 30 Buggy Unit Craters. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides, and investigation of other releases (migration in washes and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 375 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Investigation results were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A radiological dose FAL of 25 millirem per year was established based on the Remote Work Area exposure scenario (336 hours of annual exposure). Radiological doses exceeding the FAL were assumed to be present within the default contamination boundaries at CASs 25-23-22 and 30-45-01. No contaminants were identified at CAS 25-34-06, and no corrective action is necessary. Potential source material in the form of lead plate, lead-acid batteries, and oil within an abandoned transformer were identified at CAS 30-45-01, and corrective actions were undertaken that consisted of removing the PSM. Use restrictions and warning signs were implemented for the remaining radiological contamination at CASs 25-23-22 and 30-45-01. These use restrictions were recorded in the FFACO database; the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Facility Information Management System; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: (1) No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 375; (2) A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 375; and (3) Move CAU 375 from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  10. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 105 is a geographical grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with atmospheric nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 105, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney • 02-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site T-2A • 02-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-2B • 02-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site T-2 • 02-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Turk These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 105. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with all CAU 105 CASs are from atmospheric nuclear testing activities. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 105 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; DOE, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted after the plan is approved.

  11. Using Biofuel Tracers to Study Alternative Combustion Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mack, John Hunter; Flowers, Daniel L.; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Dibble, Robert W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Section B (NIMB) Using Biofuel Tracers to Study Alternativeinjection. We investigate biofuel HCCI combustion, and use

  12. Spectral optical properties of selected photosynthetic microalgae producing biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Euntaek; Heng, Ri-Liang; Pilon, Laurent

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photosynthetic Microalgae Producing Biofuels Euntaek Lee,Photosyn- thetic Microalgae Producing Biofuels”, Journal of

  13. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 566 comprises Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-99-20, EMAD Compound, located within Area 25 of the Nevada National Security Site. The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CAU 566 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 566 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. From October 2010 through May 2011, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were as follows: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) to determine COCs for CAU 566. Assessment of the data from collected soil samples, and from radiological and visual surveys of the site, indicates the FALs were exceeded for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and radioactivity. Corrective actions were implemented to remove the following: • Radiologically contaminated soil assumed greater than FAL at two locations • Radiologically contaminated soil assumed greater than FAL with lead shot • PCB-contaminated soil • Radiologically contaminated filters and equipment • Fuels, lubricants, engine coolants, and oils • Lead debris • Electrical and lighting components assumed to be potential source materials, including - fluorescent light bulbs - mercury switches (thermostats) - circuit boards - PCB-containing ballasts Closure of CAU 566 was achieved through a combination of removal activities and closure in place. Corrective actions to remove COCs, and known and assumed potential source materials, were implemented as was practical. The PCBs remaining at the site are bounded laterally, but not vertically, within CAS 25-99-20 based upon step-out sampling; the sources (e.g., PCB transformer oils, diesel fuel from locomotive reservoirs) have been removed; the practice of the application of PCB-containing oils for soil stabilization has ceased; and the COCs are not readily mobile in the environment. Closure in place is necessary, and future land use of the site will be restricted from intrusive activities. This will effectively eliminate inadvertent contact by humans with the contaminated media. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective action is required at CAS 25-99-20. • Closure in place of CAS 25-99-20. • A use restriction is required at CAU 566. • A Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 566. • Corrective Action Unit 566 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

  14. Biofuels: Review of Policies and Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janda, Karel; Kristoufek, Ladislav; Zilberman, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Linda Nostbakken. Will biofuel mandates raise food prices?impacts of alternative biofuel and energy policies. WorkingJust. The welfare economics of a biofuel tax credit and the

  15. Biofuels: Review of Policies and Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janda, Karel; Kristoufek, Ladislav; Zilberman, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gri?ths, and Jane E. Ihrig. Biofuels impact on crop and foodimplications of U.S. biofuels policies in an integrated par-Second generation biofuels: Economics and policies. Energy

  16. On mitigating emissions leakage under biofuel policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, D; Rajagopal, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Article Steven T. Berry. Biofuels policy and the empiricaluse change impacts of biofuels in the gtap-bio framework.Genomics of cellulosic biofuels. Nature, 454(7206):841–845,

  17. Complexity and Systems Biology of Microbial Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rand, David

    Complexity and Systems Biology of Microbial Biofuels 20-24 June 2011 (All and issues Theme: Biofuel systems and issues (Chair: Nigel Burroughs) 13 (Bielefeld) Biofuels from algae- challenges for industrial levels

  18. Renewable Chemicals and Advanced Biofuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Advanced Biofuels & Policy—Brett Lund, Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary, Gevo Inc.

  19. Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy Light Duty Vehicle...

  20. BioFuels Atlas Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kristi Moriarity's presentation on NREL's BioFuels Atlas from the May 12, 2011, Clean Cities and Biomass Program State webinar.

  1. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 544: Cellars, Mud Pits, and Oil Spills, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss and Catherine Birney

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 544: Cellars, Mud Pits, and Oil Spills, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 544 are located within Areas 2, 7, 9, 10, 12, 19, and 20 of the Nevada National Security Site. Corrective Action Unit 544 comprises the following CASs: • 02-37-08, Cellar & Mud Pit • 02-37-09, Cellar & Mud Pit • 07-09-01, Mud Pit • 09-09-46, U-9itsx20 PS #1A Mud Pit • 10-09-01, Mud Pit • 12-09-03, Mud Pit • 19-09-01, Mud Pits (2) • 19-09-03, Mud Pit • 19-09-04, Mud Pit • 19-25-01, Oil Spill • 19-99-06, Waste Spill • 20-09-01, Mud Pits (2) • 20-09-02, Mud Pit • 20-09-03, Mud Pit • 20-09-04, Mud Pits (2) • 20-09-06, Mud Pit • 20-09-07, Mud Pit • 20-09-10, Mud Pit • 20-25-04, Oil Spills • 20-25-05, Oil Spills The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 544 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 544 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection.

  2. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAU 570 comprises the following six corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Tesla • 09-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site T-9 • 09-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site S-9G • 09-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Rushmore • 09-23-15, Eagle Contamination Area • 09-99-01, Atmospheric Test Site B-9A These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 570. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 570 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed near the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 571: Area 9 Yucca Flat Plutonium Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Bernadine; Matthews, Patrick

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAU 571 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 571, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 09-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site S-9F • 09-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T9-C • 09-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site S-9E • 09-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site T-9D • 09-45-01, Windrows Crater These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on March 6, 2013, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (now the Nevada Field Office). The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 571. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with CAU 571 CASs are from nuclear testing activities. The DQO process resulted in an assumption that total effective dose (TED) within a default contamination boundary exceeds the final action level (FAL) and requires corrective action. The presence and nature of contamination outside the default contamination boundaries at CAU 571 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the TED at sample locations to the dose-based FAL. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Chemical contamination will be evaluated by comparing soil sample results to the FAL. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  4. USDA Biofuels R&D | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    USDA Biofuels R&D USDA Biofuels R&D USDA Biofuels R&D USDA Biofuels R&D More Documents & Publications Webinar: Biofuels for the Environment and Communities 2015 Peer Review...

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews; Christy Sloop

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 569 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 569 comprises the nine numbered corrective action sites (CASs) and one newly identified site listed below: (1) 03-23-09, T-3 Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Annie, Franklin, George, and Moth); (2) 03-23-10, T-3A Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Harry and Hornet); (3) 03-23-11, T-3B Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Fizeau); (4) 03-23-12, T-3S Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Rio Arriba); (5) 03-23-13, T-3T Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Catron); (6) 03-23-14, T-3V Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Humboldt); (7) 03-23-15, S-3G Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Coulomb-B); (8) 03-23-16, S-3H Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Coulomb-A); (9) 03-23-21, Pike Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Pike); and (10) Waste Consolidation Site 3A. Because CAU 569 is a complicated site containing many types of releases, it was agreed during the data quality objectives (DQO) process that these sites will be grouped. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each study group. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the DQOs developed on September 26, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 569. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 569 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) at sample locations to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. A field investigation will be performed to define any areas where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether contaminants of concern are present at the site from other potential releases. The presence and nature of contamination from other types of releases (e.g., excavation, migration, and any potential releases discovered during the investigation) will be evaluated using soil samples collected from biased locations indicating the highest levels of contamination. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the objectives specific to each study group.

  6. Post-Closure Inspection Letter Report for Corrective Action Units on the Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehlecke, Robert F.

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter serves as the post-closure inspection letter report for corrective action units on the Nevada Naational Security Site for calendar year 2012.

  7. Implementing the Corrective Action Management Unit at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MOORE,DARLENE R.; SCHRADER,SCOTT A.; KING,GABRIEL G.; CORMIER,JOHN

    2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1997, following significant public and regulator interaction, Sandia Corporation (Sandia) was granted a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Hazardous Solid Waste Amendment (HSWA) permit modification allowing construction and operation of a Correction Action Management Unit (CAMU). The CAMU follows recent regulatory guidance that allows for cost-effective, expedient cleanup of contaminated sites and management of hazardous remediation wastes. The CAMU was designed to store, treat, and provide long-term management for Environmental Restoration (ER) derived wastes. The 154 square meter CAMU site at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM), includes facilities for storing bulk soils and containerized wastes, for treatment of bulk soils, and has a containment cell for long-term disposition of waste. Proposed treatment operations include soil washing and low temperature thermal desorption. The first waste was accepted into the CAMU for temporary storage in January 1999. Construction at the CAMU was completed in March 1999, and baseline monitoring of the containment cell has commenced. At completion of operations the facility will be closed, the waste containment cell will be covered, and long-term post-closure monitoring will begin. Sandia's CAMU is the only such facility within the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Implementing this innovative approach to ER waste management has required successful coordination with community representatives, state and federal regulators, the DOE, Sandia corporate management, and contractors. It is expected that cost savings to taxpayers will be significant. The life-cycle CAMU project cost is currently projected to be approximately $12 million.

  8. Better Enzymes for Biofuels and Green Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Better Enzymes for Biofuels and Green Chemistry: Solving the Cofactor Imbalance Problem Imbalances for the production of biofuels or other valuable chemicals. Though several research groups have re

  9. The President's Biofuels Initiative | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The President's Biofuels Initiative The President's Biofuels Initiative Presentation by Neil Rossmeissl at the October 24, 2006 Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed...

  10. Biofuels: Review of Policies and Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janda, Karel; Kristoufek, Ladislav; Zilberman, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. Huijbregts. Biofuels for road transport: A seed to wheelof 2% of biofuels to be used in the transport sector by 2005

  11. Algal Biofuels Strategy Workshop - Spring Event | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Algal Biofuels Strategy Workshop - Spring Event Algal Biofuels Strategy Workshop - Spring Event The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's...

  12. Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results Dr. Jose Olivares of Los...

  13. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irene Farnham and Sam Marutzky

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This CADD/CAP follows the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) stage, which results in development of a set of contaminant boundary forecasts produced from groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling of the Frenchman Flat CAU. The Frenchman Flat CAU is located in the southeastern portion of the NNSS and comprises 10 underground nuclear tests. The tests were conducted between 1965 and 1971 and resulted in the release of radionuclides in the subsurface in the vicinity of the test cavities. Two important aspects of the corrective action process are presented within this CADD/CAP. The CADD portion describes the results of the Frenchman Flat CAU data-collection and modeling activities completed during the CAI stage. The corrective action objectives and the actions recommended to meet the objectives are also described. The CAP portion describes the corrective action implementation plan. The CAP begins with the presentation of CAU regulatory boundary objectives and initial use restriction boundaries that are identified and negotiated by NNSA/NSO and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). The CAP also presents the model evaluation process designed to build confidence that the flow and contaminant transport modeling results can be used for the regulatory decisions required for CAU closure. The first two stages of the strategy have been completed for the Frenchman Flat CAU. A value of information analysis and a CAIP were developed during the CAIP stage. During the CAI stage, a CAIP addendum was developed, and the activities proposed in the CAIP and addendum were completed. These activities included hydrogeologic investigation of the underground testing areas, aquifer testing, isotopic and geochemistry-based investigations, and integrated geophysical investigations. After these investigations, a groundwater flow and contaminant transport model was developed to forecast contaminant boundaries that enclose areas potentially exceeding the Safe Drinking Water Act radiological standards at any time within 1,000 years. An external peer review of the groundwater flow and contaminant transport model was completed, and the model was accepted by NDEP to allow advancement to the CADD/CAP stage. The CADD/CAP stage focuses on model evaluation to ensure that existing models provide adequate guidance for the regulatory decisions regarding monitoring and institutional controls. Data-collection activities are identified and implemented to address key uncertainties in the flow and contaminant transport models. During the CR stage, final use restriction boundaries and CAU regulatory boundaries are negotiated and established; a long-term closure monitoring program is developed and implemented; and the approaches and policies for institutional controls are initiated. The model evaluation process described in this plan consists of an iterative series of five steps designed to build confidence in the site conceptual model and model forecasts. These steps are designed to identify data-collection activities (Step 1), document the data-collection activities in the 0CADD/CAP (Step 2), and perform the activities (Step 3). The new data are then assessed; the model is refined, if necessary; the modeling results are evaluated; and a model evaluation report is prepared (Step 4). The assessments are made by the modeling team and presented to the pre-emptive review committee. The decision is made by the modeling team with the assistance of the pre-emptive review committee and concurrence of NNSA/NSO to continue data and model assessment/refinement, recommend additional data collection, or recommend advancing to the CR stage. A recommendation to advance to the CR stage is based on whether the model is considered to be sufficiently reliable for designing a monitoring system and developing effective institutional controls. The decision to advance to the CR stage or to return to step 1 of the process is then made by NDEP (Step 5).

  14. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit 366 comprises the six corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 11-08-01, Contaminated Waste Dump No.1; (2) 11-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump No.2; (3) 11-23-01, Radioactively Contaminated Area A; (4) 11-23-02, Radioactively Contaminated Area B; (5) 11-23-03, Radioactively Contaminated Area C; and (6) 11-23-04, Radioactively Contaminated Area D. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed July 6, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 366. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 366 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) at sample locations to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The TED will be calculated by summing the estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples collected from sample plots will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Based on historical documentation of the releases associated with the nuclear tests, it was determined that CASs 11-23-02, 11-23-03, and 11-23-04 will be investigated as one release site. The three test areas associated with these CASs are in close proximity; the devices tested were all composed of plutonium and enriched uranium; and the ground zeroes are all posted high contamination areas (HCAs). Because the device tested at CAS 11-23-01 was composed primarily of enriched uranium and the ground zero is not a posted HCA, the CAS will be investigated as a separate release. The DQO process also resulted in an assumption that TED within the HCAs and contaminated waste dumps exceeds the FAL and requires corrective action. A field investigation will be performed to define where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether other contaminants of concern are present at the site associated with other activities that took place at the site or from spills or waste discovered during the investigation. The presence and nature of contamination from other types of releases (such as migration and any potential releases discovered during the investigation) will be evaluated using soil samples collected from the locations most likely containing contamination, if present. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  15. Biofuels: Project summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE, through the Biofuels Systems Division (BSD) is addressing the issues surrounding US vulnerability to petroleum supply. The BSD goal is to develop technologies that are competitive with fossil fuels, in both cost and environmental performance, by the end of the decade. This document contains summaries of ongoing research sponsored by the DOE BSD. A summary sheet is presented for each project funded or in existence during FY 1993. Each summary sheet contains and account of project funding, objectives, accomplishments and current status, and significant publications.

  16. CONNECTICUT BIOFUELS TECHNOLOGY PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARTONE, ERIK

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    DBS Energy Inc. (“DBS”) intends on using the Connecticut Biofuels Technology Project for the purpose of developing a small-scale electric generating systems that are located on a distributed basis and utilize biodiesel as its principle fuel source. This project will include research and analysis on the quality and applied use of biodiesel for use in electricity production, 2) develop dispatch center for testing and analysis of the reliability of dispatching remote generators operating on a blend of biodiesel and traditional fossil fuels, and 3) analysis and engineering research on fuel storage options for biodiesel of fuels for electric generation.

  17. Biofuels Information Center

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximately 10 wt% moisture,Biofuels

  18. Sandia Energy - Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton6AndyBenjamin KarlsonBiofuels Home

  19. Biofuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher HomesLyons BiomassBiofuels) Jump to: navigation,

  20. Thomas Wallner | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Omnivorous Engine Argonne National Laboratory's Omnivorous Engine Browse by Topic Energy Energy efficiency Vehicles Alternative fuels Automotive engineering Biofuels Diesel Fuel...

  1. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 104, Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 104 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. CAU 104 consists of the following 15 Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 7 of the Nevada National Security Site: · CAS 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C · CAS 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 · CAS 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site · CAS 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a · CAS 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) · CAS 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) · CAS 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) · CAS 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie · CAS 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie · CAS 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) · CAS 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) · CAS 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth · CAS 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 · CAS 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b · CAS 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax Closure activities began in October 2012 and were completed in April 2013. Activities were conducted according to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for CAU 104. The corrective actions included No Further Action and Clean Closure. Closure activities generated sanitary waste, mixed waste, and recyclable material. Some wastes exceeded land disposal limits and required treatment prior to disposal. Other wastes met land disposal restrictions and were disposed in appropriate onsite landfills. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) requests the following: · A Notice of Completion from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to NNSA/NFO for closure of CAU 104 · The transfer of CAU 104 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO

  2. Analysis of advanced biofuels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dec, John E.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Welz, Oliver; Yang, Yi

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long chain alcohols possess major advantages over ethanol as bio-components for gasoline, including higher energy content, better engine compatibility, and less water solubility. Rapid developments in biofuel technology have made it possible to produce C{sub 4}-C{sub 5} alcohols efficiently. These higher alcohols could significantly expand the biofuel content and potentially replace ethanol in future gasoline mixtures. This study characterizes some fundamental properties of a C{sub 5} alcohol, isopentanol, as a fuel for homogeneous-charge compression-ignition (HCCI) engines. Wide ranges of engine speed, intake temperature, intake pressure, and equivalence ratio are investigated. The elementary autoignition reactions of isopentanol is investigated by analyzing product formation from laser-photolytic Cl-initiated isopentanol oxidation. Carbon-carbon bond-scission reactions in the low-temperature oxidation chemistry may provide an explanation for the intermediate-temperature heat release observed in the engine experiments. Overall, the results indicate that isopentanol has a good potential as a HCCI fuel, either in neat form or in blend with gasoline.

  3. Biofuel Science Research at the University of Maryland Biofuels promise energy alternatives that are renewable and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    Biofuel Science Research at the University of Maryland Biofuels promise energy alternatives of biofuels would absorb as much pollution as the fuels release during combustion, since plant stocks can-neutral energy to be realized, new sources of biofuels must be found. The current manufacture of biofuels from

  4. U.S. Biofuels Baseline and Impact of E-15 Expansion on Biofuel Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    May 2012 U.S. Biofuels Baseline and Impact of E-15 Expansion on Biofuel Markets FAPRI-MU Report #02 for agricultural and biofuel markets.1 That baseline assumes current biofuel policy, including provisions credit expired, as scheduled, at the end of 2011. The additional tax credit for cellulosic biofuel

  5. Socio-economic dynamics of biofuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i Socio-economic dynamics of biofuel development in Asia Pacific Christina Schott Jakarta, 2009 #12;ii Socio-economic dynamics of biofuel development in Asia Pacific Socio-economic dynamics of biofuel of many biofuels has turned out to be far from sustainable. The carbon balance often proves to be negative

  6. Aviation Sustainable Biofuels: An Asian Airline Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aviation Sustainable Biofuels: An Asian Airline Perspective Dr Mark Watson Head of Environmental Affairs, Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd, Hong Kong Aviation Biofuels Session World Biofuels Markets, Rotterdam 24 March 2011 #12;Aviation Biofuels in Asia: Current Status · Focus on "2nd generation" sustainable

  7. Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels Certification Readiness Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels Certification Readiness Study: Hawai`i Biofuel Projects Prepared 12.1 Deliverable (item 2) Bioenergy Analyses Prepared by Hawai`i Biofuel Foundation And NCSI Americas: Hawaii Biofuel Projects Prepared For Hawaii Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean Earth Sciences

  8. LIHD biofuels: toward a sustainable future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Michael W.

    LIHD biofuels: toward a sustainable future 115 Linda Wallace, Department of Botany and Microbiology of America www.frontiersinecology.org Will biofuels help to wean the US off of oil, or at least off simple. First, we need to understand what is meant by the term "biofuel". All biofuels are organic

  9. Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels Certification Readiness Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels Certification Readiness Study: Hawai`i Biofuel Projects Prepared 12.1 Deliverable Bioenergy Analyses Prepared by Hawai`i Biofuel Foundation And NCSI Americas Inc agency thereof. #12;1 RSB Certification Readiness Study: Hawaii Biofuel Projects Prepared For Hawaii

  10. Nebraska shows potential to produce biofuel crops

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Researchers are searching for ways to change how American farmers and consumers think about biofuels.

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAU 104 comprises the 15 CASs listed below: (1) 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C; (2) 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1; (3) 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site; (4) 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a; (5) 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S); (6) 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S); (7) 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S); (8) 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (9) 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (10) 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus); (11) 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster); (12) 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth; (13) 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4; (14) 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b; (15) 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 28, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 104. The releases at CAU 104 consist of surface-deposited radionuclides from 30 atmospheric nuclear tests. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 104 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The presence of TED exceeding the FAL is considered a radiological contaminant of concern (COC). Anything identified as a COC will require corrective action. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters will be used to measure external radiological dose. Based on process knowledge of the releases associated with the nuclear tests and radiological survey information about the location and shape of the resulting contamination plume, it was determined that the releases from the nuclear tests are co-located and will be investigated concurrently. A field investigation will be performed to define areas where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether other COCs are present at the site. The investigation will also collect information to determine the presence and nature of contamination associated with migration and excavation, as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  12. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 [as amended March 2010]). CAU 116 consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 25 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 consisted of Building 3210 and the attached concrete shield wall. CAS 25-23-20 consisted of the nuclear furnace piping and tanks. Closure activities began in January 2007 and were completed in August 2011. Activities were conducted according to Revision 1 of the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 116 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2008). This CR provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provides data confirming that closure objectives for CAU 116 were met. Site characterization data and process knowledge indicated that surface areas were radiologically contaminated above release limits and that regulated and/or hazardous wastes were present in the facility.

  13. Algal Biofuels; Algal Biofuels R&D at NREL (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of NREL's algal biofuels projects, including U.S. Department of Energy-funded work, projects with U.S. and international partners, and Laboratory Directed Research and Development projects.

  14. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 574: Neptune, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 574, Neptune. CAU 574 is included in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996 [as amended March 2010]) and consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 12 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 12-23-10, U12c.03 Crater (Neptune); (2) CAS 12-45-01, U12e.05 Crater (Blanca). This plan provides the methodology for the field activities that will be performed to gather the necessary information for closure of the two CASs. There is sufficient information and process knowledge regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 574 using the SAFER process. Based on historical documentation, personnel interviews, site process knowledge, site visits, photographs, field screening, analytical results, the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process (Section 3.0), and an evaluation of corrective action alternatives (Appendix B), closure in place with administrative controls is the expected closure strategy for CAU 574. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation to verify and support the expected closure strategy and provide a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. This will be presented in a Closure Report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval.

  15. Algal Biofuels Strategy Spring Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Algal Biofuels Strategy Spring Workshop Algal Biofuels Strategy Spring Workshop Algal Biofuels Strategy Spring Workshop Agenda algaeworkshopagenda.pdf More Documents &...

  16. Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortman, J. L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007) Cellulosic ethanol: biofuel researchers prepare toBiofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial welltechnologies that enable biofuel production. Decades of work

  17. Assessments of biofuel sustainability: air pollution and health impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsao, Chi-Chung

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land clearing and the biofuel carbon debt. Science 2008,of reactive nitrogen during biofuel ethanol production.of reactive nitrogen during biofuel ethanol production.

  18. Genetic and biotechnological approaches for biofuel crop improvement.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vega-Sánchez, Miguel E; Ronald, Pamela C

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant genetic engineering for biofuel production: towardsbiomass feedstocks for biofuel production. Genome Biol 2008,3:354-359. 25. Fairless D: Biofuel: the little shrub that

  19. Model estimates food-versus-biofuel trade-off

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagapol, Deepak; Sexton, Steven; Hochman, Gal; Roland-Holst, David; Zilberman, David D

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. 2007. Challenge of biofuel: Filling the tank withoutaddition to policies such as biofuel subsidies and mandates.Whereas biofuel subsidies and man- dates increase the

  20. The Economics of Trade, Biofuel, and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochman, Gal; Sexton, Steven; Zilberman, David D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    productivity (e.g. , second-generation biofuels), are showndependence on land. Second generation biofuels are much moreas well as second generation biofuels, may be needed to

  1. Engineering microbial biofuel tolerance and export using efflux pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunlop, Mary

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    yields for selected biofuels. (A) Plasmid levels for each ofas candidates for advanced biofuels are toxic to micro-seven representative biofuels. By using a competitive growth

  2. Model estimates food-versus-biofuel trade-off

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagapol, Deepak; Sexton, Steven; Hochman, Gal; Roland-Holst, David; Zilberman, David D

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. 2008. Income distribution implica- tions of biofuels.Sustainable Biofuels and Human Security Conference,of Food and Agriculture 2008: Biofuels: Prospects, risks and

  3. Assessments of biofuel sustainability: air pollution and health impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsao, Chi-Chung

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of biodiesel and ethanol biofuels. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.Use of US croplands for biofuels increases greenhouse gasesovercome carbon savings from biofuels in Brazil. Proc. Natl.

  4. High biofuel production of Botryococcus braunii using optimized cultivation strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Wei

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from feedstock crops. Microalgae biofuels and differentproduction of biofuels from microalgae. One strategy toin the current world, microalgae biofuels provide such an

  5. Creating Markets for Green Biofuels: Measuring and improving environmental performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Brian T.; Plevin, Richard J.; O'Hare, Michael; Farrell, Alexander E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004). Growing Energy: How Biofuels Can Help End America'sCreating Markets For Green Biofuels Kalaitzandonakes, N. ,166. Lancaster, C. (2006). Biofuels assurance schemes and

  6. Spectral optical properties of selected photosynthetic microalgae producing biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Euntaek; Heng, Ri-Liang; Pilon, Laurent

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microalgae Producing Biofuels Euntaek Lee, Ri-Liang Heng,Microalgae Producing Biofuels”, Journal of Quantitativeconverted into liquid biofuels [50–53]. On the other hand,

  7. Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortman, J.L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conversion of biomass to biofuels has been the subject ofdiesel transport fuels with biofuels by 2010 [4]. Owing tobelieved that future biofuels will, by necessity, originate

  8. Can feedstock production for biofuels be sustainable in California?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaffka, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tolife.org/biofuels. [US EPA] US Environmental Protection1–9. The path forward for biofuels and biomaterials. Scienceof individual assessment of biofuels. EMPA, Technology and

  9. Sandia Energy - Biofuels Blend Right In: Researchers Show Ionic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofuels Blend Right In: Researchers Show Ionic Liquids Effective for Pretreating Mixed Blends of Biofuel Feedstocks Home Renewable Energy Energy Transportation Energy Biofuels...

  10. 2nd Week of National Energy Action Month Takes Energy Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the country to emphasize the important role that the Administration's all-of-the-above energy strategy plays in strengthening America's economic, environmental and national...

  11. Biofuel Boundaries: Estimating the Medium-Term Supply Potential of Domestic Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Andrew; O'Hare, Michael; Farrell, Alexander

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    O'Hare M, Kammen DM. 2006. Biofuels Can Contribute to EnergyN. 2004. Growing Energy: How Biofuels Can Help End America’sService Koplow D. 2006. Biofuels - At What Cost? Governement

  12. Biofuels - Biomass Feedstock - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find More Like ThisBioenergyBiofuel ResearchBiomass

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Biofuel Impacts on Aftertreatment Devices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about biofuel impacts...

  14. Biofuels Impact on DPF Durability

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biofuels Impact on DPF Durability Michael J. Lance, Todd J. Toops, Andrew A. Wereszczak, John M.E. Storey, Dane F. Wilson, Bruce G. Bunting, Samuel A. Lewis Sr., and Andrea...

  15. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC 1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloop, Christy

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. CAU 569 comprises the following nine corrective action sites (CASs): • 03-23-09, T-3 Contamination Area • 03-23-10, T-3A Contamination Area • 03-23-11, T-3B Contamination Area • 03-23-12, T-3S Contamination Area • 03-23-13, T-3T Contamination Area • 03-23-14, T-3V Contamination Area • 03-23-15, S-3G Contamination Area • 03-23-16, S-3H Contamination Area • 03-23-21, Pike Contamination Area The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 569 based on the implementation of the corrective actions listed in Table ES-2.

  16. Multiphase Flow Modeling of Biofuel Production Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Gaston; D. P. Guillen; J. Tester

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Secure Energy Initiative, the INL is performing research in areas that are vital to ensuring clean, secure energy supplies for the future. The INL Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory is being established to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective to safeguard U.S. Energy Security by reducing dependence on foreign petroleum. HYTEST involves producing liquid fuels in a Hybrid Energy System (HES) by integrating carbon-based (i.e., bio-mass, oil-shale, etc.) with non-carbon based energy sources (i.e., wind energy, hydro, geothermal, nuclear, etc.). Advances in process development, control and modeling are the unifying vision for HES. This paper describes new modeling tools and methodologies to simulate advanced energy processes. Needs are emerging that require advanced computational modeling of multiphase reacting systems in the energy arena, driven by the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act, which requires production of 36 billion gal/yr of biofuels by 2022, with 21 billion gal of this as advanced biofuels. Advanced biofuels derived from microalgal biomass have the potential to help achieve the 21 billion gal mandate, as well as reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Production of biofuels from microalgae is receiving considerable interest due to their potentially high oil yields (around 600 gal/acre). Microalgae have a high lipid content (up to 50%) and grow 10 to 100 times faster than terrestrial plants. The use of environmentally friendly alternatives to solvents and reagents commonly employed in reaction and phase separation processes is being explored. This is accomplished through the use of hydrothermal technologies, which are chemical and physical transformations in high-temperature (200-600 C), high-pressure (5-40 MPa) liquid or supercritical water. Figure 1 shows a simplified diagram of the production of biofuels from algae. Hydrothermal processing has significant advantages over other biomass processing methods with respect to separations. These 'green' alternatives employ a hybrid medium that, when operated supercritically, offers the prospect of tunable physicochemical properties. Solubility can be rapidly altered and phases partitioned selectively to precipitate or dissolve certain components by altering temperature or pressure in the near-critical region. The ability to tune the solvation properties of water in the highly compressible near-critical region facilitates partitioning of products or by-products into separate phases to separate and purify products. Since most challenges related to lipid extraction are associated with the industrial scale-up of integrated extraction systems, the new modeling capability offers the prospect of addressing previously untenable scaling issues.

  17. Supply Chain Sustainability Analysis of Three Biofuel Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Erin Searcy; Kara Cafferty; Jennifer B. Dunn; Michael Johnson; Zhichao Wang; Michael Wang; Mary Biddy; Abhijit Dutta; Daniel Inman; Eric Tan; Sue Jones; Lesley Snowden-Swan

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) collaborates with industrial, agricultural, and non-profit partners to develop and deploy biofuels and other biologically-derived products. As part of this effort, BETO and its national laboratory teams conduct in-depth techno-economic assessments (TEA) of technologies to produce biofuels as part state of technology (SOT) analyses. An SOT assesses progress within and across relevant technology areas based on actual experimental results relative to technical targets and cost goals from design cases and includes technical, economic, and environmental criteria as available. Overall assessments of biofuel pathways begin with feedstock production and the logistics of transporting the feedstock from the farm or plantation to the conversion facility or biorefinery. The conversion process itself is modeled in detail as part of the SOT analysis. The teams then develop an estimate of the biofuel minimum selling price (MSP) and assess the cost competitiveness of the biofuel with conventional fuels such as gasoline.

  18. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 105 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 22, 2012, through May 23, 2013, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices.

  19. Introduction slide 2 Biofuels and Algae Markets, Systems,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction slide 2 Biofuels and Algae Markets, Systems, Players and Commercialization Outlook http://www.emerging-markets.com Consultant, Global Biofuels Business Development Author, Biodiesel 2020: A Global Market Survey (2008) Algae 2020: Biofuels Commercialization Outlook (2009) Columnist, Biofuels

  20. From Biomass to Biofuels: NREL Leads the Way

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure covers how biofuels can help meet future needs for transportation fuels, how biofuels are produced, U.S. potential for biofuels, and NREL's approach to efficient affordable biofuels.

  1. Importance of systems biology in engineering microbes for biofuel production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TS, Steen E, Keasling JD: Biofuel Alternatives to ethanol:in engineering microbes for biofuel production Aindrila

  2. Financing Advanced Biofuels, Biochemicals And Biopower In Integrated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Financing Advanced Biofuels, Biochemicals And Biopower In Integrated Biorefineries Financing Advanced Biofuels, Biochemicals And Biopower In Integrated Biorefineries Afternoon...

  3. Methods for the economical production of biofuel from biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawkins, Andrew C; Glassner, David A; Buelter, Thomas; Wade, James; Meinhold, Peter; Peters, Matthew W; Gruber, Patrick R; Evanko, William A; Aristidou, Aristos A; Landwehr, Marco

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for producing a biofuel are provided. Also provided are biocatalysts that convert a feedstock to a biofuel.

  4. BETO Announces June Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results BETO Announces June Webinar: Algal Biofuels Consortium Releases Groundbreaking Research Results...

  5. Workshop on Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Carbohydra...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Carbohydrates Production Innovative Topics for Advanced Biofuels Cross-cutting...

  6. LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, January 14, 2010-Los Alamos National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and other national laboratories to create a proof-of-concept system for commercializing algae-based biofuels or other advanced biofuels that can be transported and sold using the...

  7. A woman like you: Women scientists and engineers at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Careers in action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication by the women in Science and Engineering introduces career possibilities in science and engineering. It introduces what work and home life are like for women who have already entered these fields. Women at Brookhaven National Laboratory work in a variety of challenging research roles -- from biologist and environmental scientist to safety engineer, from patent lawyer to technician. Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-program laboratory which carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated University, Inc., under contract with the US Department of Energy. Brookhaven and the other national laboratories, because of their enormous research resources, can play a critical role in a education and training of the workforce.

  8. Accelerating Commercialization of Algal Biofuels Through Partnerships (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure describes National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) algal biofuels research capabilities and partnership opportunities. NREL is accelerating algal biofuels commercialization through: (1) Advances in applied biology; (2) Algal strain development; (3) Development of fuel conversion pathways; (4) Techno-economic analysis; and (5) Development of high-throughput lipid analysis methodologies. NREL scientists and engineers are addressing challenges across the algal biofuels value chain, including algal biology, cultivation, harvesting and extraction, and fuel conversion. Through partnerships, NREL can share knowledge and capabilities in the following areas: (1) Algal Biology - A fundamental understanding of algal biology is key to developing cost-effective algal biofuels processes. NREL scientists are experts in the isolation and characterization of microalgal species. They are identifying genes and pathways involved in biofuel production. In addition, they have developed a high-throughput, non-destructive technique for assessing lipid production in microalgae. (2) Cultivation - NREL researchers study algal growth capabilities and perform compositional analysis of algal biomass. Laboratory-scale photobioreactors and 1-m2 open raceway ponds in an on-site greenhouse allow for year-round cultivation of algae under a variety of conditions. A bioenergy-focused algal strain collection is being established at NREL, and our laboratory houses a cryopreservation system for long-term maintenance of algal cultures and preservation of intellectual property. (3) Harvesting and Extraction - NREL is investigating cost-effective harvesting and extraction methods suitable for a variety of species and conditions. Areas of expertise include cell wall analysis and deconstruction and identification and utilization of co-products. (4) Fuel Conversion - NREL's excellent capabilities and facilities for biochemical and thermochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels are being applied to algal biofuels processes. Analysts are also testing algal fuel properties to measure energy content and ensure compatibility with existing fueling infrastructure. (5) Cross-Cutting Analysis - NREL scientists and engineers are conducting rigorous techno-economic analyses of algal biofuels processes. In addition, they are performing a full life cycle assessment of the entire algae-to-biofuels process.

  9. 2012 National Energy Assurance Planning Conference After-Action Report (August 2012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment ofCBFO-13-3322(EE) |2 National Energy Assurance Planning Conference

  10. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for the 92-Acre Area and Corrective Action Unit 111: Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the 92-Acre Area, the southeast quadrant of the Radioactive Waste Management Site, located in Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The 92-Acre Area includes Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111, 'Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits.' Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) were developed for the 92-Acre Area, which includes CAU 111. The result of the DQO process was that the 92-Acre Area is sufficiently characterized to provide the input data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) without the collection of additional data. The DQOs are included as Appendix A of this document. This CADD/CAP identifies and provides the rationale for the recommended CAA for the 92-Acre Area, provides the plan for implementing the CAA, and details the post-closure plan. When approved, this CADD/CAP will supersede the existing Pit 3 (P03) Closure Plan, which was developed in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities.' This document will also serve as the Closure Plan and the Post-Closure Plan, which are required by 40 CFR 265, for the 92-Acre Area. After closure activities are complete, a request for the modification of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit that governs waste management activities at the NNSS will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to incorporate the requirements for post-closure monitoring. Four CAAs, ranging from No Further Action to Clean Closure, were evaluated for the 92-Acre Area. The CAAs were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. Based on the evaluation of the data used to develop the conceptual site model; a review of past, current, and future operations at the site; and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, Closure in Place with Administrative Controls is the preferred CAA for the 92-Acre Area. Closure activities will include the following: (1) Constructing an engineered evapotranspiration cover over the 92-Acre Area; (2) Installing use restriction (UR) warning signs, concrete monuments, and subsidence survey monuments; (3) Establishing vegetation on the cover; (4) Implementing a UR; and (5) Implementing post-closure inspections and monitoring. The Closure in Place with Administrative Controls alternative meets all requirements for the technical components evaluated, fulfills all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site, and will minimize potential future exposure pathways to the buried waste at the site.

  11. IOL: Africa's big plans for biofuel Africa's big plans for biofuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IOL: Africa's big plans for biofuel Africa's big plans for biofuel By Clare Byrne Visitors to Madagascar, Senegal to South Africa, biofuels is the buzzword as African countries wake up to the possibility of using their vast spaces to grow crops that reduce their fossil fuel bill. Biofuels also carry

  12. Viability Studies of Biofuels Though biofuels (like ethanol) promise renewable "green" energy, these

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    Viability Studies of Biofuels Though biofuels (like ethanol) promise renewable "green" energy cannot possibly meet U.S. energy demands, and current methods of biofuel production often consume as much energy as they produce. If biofuels are to be viable long-term energy solutions, we need new sources

  13. Biofuel Feedstock Inter-Island Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuel Feedstock Inter-Island Transportation Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office ........................................................................... 11 Options for liquid biofuel feedstock transport ............................................................................. agency thereof. #12;A Comparison of Hawaii's Inter-Island Maritime Transportation of Solid Versus Liquid

  14. Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session IA—Conversion Technologies I: Industrial Perspectives on Pathways to Advanced Biofuels Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels David C. Carroll, President and Chief Executive Officer, Gas Technology Institute

  15. A New Biofuels Technology Blooms in Iowa

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cellulosic biofuels made from agricultural waste have caught the attention of many farmers and could be the next revolution in renewable biofuels production. This video shows how an innovative...

  16. A New Biofuels Technology Blooms in Iowa

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mathisen, Todd; Bruch, Don;

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulosic biofuels made from agricultural waste have caught the attention of many farmers and could be the next revolution in renewable biofuels production. This video shows how an innovative technology that converts waste products from the corn harvest into renewable biofuels will help the U.S. produce billions of gallons of cellulosic biofuels over the coming decade. It will also stimulate local economies and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil.

  17. On mitigating emissions leakage under biofuel policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, D; Rajagopal, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    than 1:1 replacement of oil products with biofuel, which isshow how different oil products are affected differently

  18. A New Biofuels Technology Blooms in Iowa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathisen, Todd; Bruch, Don

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulosic biofuels made from agricultural waste have caught the attention of many farmers and could be the next revolution in renewable biofuels production. This video shows how an innovative technology that converts waste products from the corn harvest into renewable biofuels will help the U.S. produce billions of gallons of cellulosic biofuels over the coming decade. It will also stimulate local economies and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil.

  19. Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    See how organic materials are used to create biofuels, reducing dependence on foreign oil and creating jobs.

  20. Biofuels from Microalgae and Seaweeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Benemann, John; Metting, F. Blaine

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    8.1 Introduction: Seaweeds and microalgae have a long history of cultivation as sources of commercial products (McHugh 2003; Pulz and Gross 2004). They also have been the subject of extensive investigations related to their potential as fuel source since the 1970s (Chynoweth 2002). As energy costs rise, these photosynthetic organisms are again a focus of interest as potential sources of biofuels, particularly liquid transportation fuels. There have been many recent private sector investments to develop biofuels from microalgae, in part building on a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program from 1976 to 1996 which focused on microalgal oil production (Sheehan et al. 1998). Seaweed cultivation has received relatively little attention as a biofuel source in the US, but was the subject of a major research effort by the DOE from 1978 to 1983 (Bird and Benson 1987), and is now the focus of significant interest in Japan, Europe and Korea...

  1. Biofuels and bio-products derived from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    NEED Biofuels and bio- products derived from lignocellulosic biomass (plant materials) are part improve the energy and carbon efficiencies of biofuels production from a barrel of biomass using chemical and thermal catalytic mechanisms. The Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels IMPACT

  2. Oil To Biofuels Case Study Objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auerbach, Scott M.

    Oil To Biofuels Case Study Objectives - Critically evaluate the nature of certain societal", and the consequences of various sources. - How could this diagram be modified through the use of biofuels? Research. - What are biomass and biofuels? How are they used, what are their benefits and negative consequences

  3. How sustainable are current transport biofuels?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How sustainable are current transport biofuels? Jérémie Mercier 7th BIEE Academic Conference biofuels and what is expected from them? 2) Sustainability impacts of agrofuels and the UK certification Conference - Oxford 24th September 2008 1) What are current transport biofuels and what is expected from them

  4. Can biofuels justify current transport policies?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Can biofuels justify current transport policies? Jérémie Mercier IARU Climate Congress - Copenhagen is growing 2) Today biofuels bring little or no greenhouse gas benefits 3) We need to change #12;IARU Climate;IARU Climate Congress, Copenhagen, 11th March 2009 - Jérémie Mercier 4 Biofuels consumption growing

  5. SEE ALSO SIDEBARS: RECOURCES SOLARRESOURCES BIOMASS & BIOFUELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    373 SEE ALSO SIDEBARS: RECOURCES · SOLARRESOURCES · BIOMASS & BIOFUELS Engineered and Artificial, and the production of liquid biofuels for transportation is growing rapidly. However, both traditional biomass energy and crop-based biofuels technologies have negative environmental and social impacts. The overall research

  6. School of Engineering and Science Algae Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    School of Engineering and Science Algae Biofuels BY: Alessandro Faldi, Ph.D. Section Head is algae- based biofuels, which we believe could be a meaningful part of the energy mix in the future. Algae biofuels have potential to be an economically viable, low-net carbon transportation fuel

  7. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 571: Area 9 Yucca Flat Plutonium Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide documentation and justification that no further corrective action is needed for the closure of CAU 571 based on the implementation of corrective actions. This includes a description of investigation activities, an evaluation of the data, and a description of corrective actions that were performed. The CAIP provides information relating to the scope and planning of the investigation. Therefore, that information will not be repeated in this document.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: growing autotrophic microalgae

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    growing autotrophic microalgae The National Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership Kick-Off Meeting at Arizona State University On July 25, 2013, in Biofuels, Energy, News, News...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: processing autotrophic microalgae

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    processing autotrophic microalgae The National Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership Kick-Off Meeting at Arizona State University On July 25, 2013, in Biofuels, Energy, News,...

  10. Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fingerman, Kevin Robert

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The  United  States'  Biofuel  Policies   and  Compliance  Water  Impacts  of  Biofuel  Extend  Beyond   Irrigation."  for  assessing  sustainable  biofuel  production."  

  11. Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fingerman, Kevin Robert

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L.  (2004).  Biofuels  for  transport:  an  international  renewable  electric  transport  and  biofuels  made  from  “and  transport  consumption  associated  with  biofuels  

  12. Supramolecular self-assembled chaos: polyphenolic lignin's barrier to cost-effective lignocellulosic biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achyuthan, Komandoor

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thereby  cost-­? effective  biofuels  production.   PMID:  effective  lignocellulosic  biofuels.   Achyuthan  KE,  effective   lignocellulosic  biofuels.  Post-­?synthesis  

  13. Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Corrective Action Effectiveness Review, January 2013

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -DepartmentRetail Demand ResponseIndependent Oversight Review

  14. National Action Plan on Demand Response, June 2010 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_Cost Estimating35.docMusings on| Department of0Register:Nat i o

  15. National Action Plan on Demand Response, June 2010 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC)TABLEChallenges|Advanced AuthoringIt'sNanoparticle U.S.The 6

  16. Using System Dynamics to Model the Transition to Biofuels in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, B.; Duffy, M.; Sandor, D.; Peterson, S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, the U.S. consumes almost 21 million barrels of crude oil per day; approximately 60% of the U.S. demand is supplied by imports. The transportation sector alone accounts for two-thirds of U.S. petroleum use. Biofuels, liquid fuels produced from domestically-grown biomass, have the potential to displace about 30% of current U.S. gasoline consumption. Transitioning to a biofuels industry on this scale will require the creation of a robust biomass-to-biofuels system-of-systems that operates in concert with the existing agriculture, forestry, energy, and transportation markets. The U.S. Department of Energy is employing a system dynamics approach to investigate potential market penetration scenarios for cellulosic ethanol, and to aid decision makers in focusing government actions on the areas with greatest potential to accelerate the deployment of biofuels and ultimately reduce the nationpsilas dependence on imported oil.

  17. Chromatin landscaping in algae reveals novel regulation pathway for biofuels production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngan, Chew Yee

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regulation pathway for biofuels production Chew Yee Ngan ,regulation pathway for biofuels production Chew Yee Ngan,for the development of biofuels. Biofuels are produced from

  18. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAU 366 comprises six corrective action sites (CASs): • 11-08-01, Contaminated Waste Dump #1 • 11-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump #2 • 11-23-01, Radioactively Contaminated Area A • 11-23-02, Radioactively Contaminated Area B • 11-23-03, Radioactively Contaminated Area C • 11-23-04, Radioactively Contaminated Area D The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of corrective action alternatives (CAA) for the six CASs within CAU 366. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 12, 2011, to May 14, 2012, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites.

  19. Estimates of US biofuels consumption, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the sixth in the series of publications developed by the Energy Information Administration to quantify the amount of biofuel-derived primary energy used by the US economy. It provides preliminary estimates of 1990 US biofuels energy consumption by sector and by biofuels energy resource type. The objective of this report is to provide updated annual estimates of biofuels energy consumption for use by congress, federal and state agencies, and other groups involved in activities related to the use of biofuels. 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. Technology Roadmap Biofuels for Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2035 2040 2045 2050 Technology Roadmap Biofuels for Transport #12;INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AGENCY Agency (IEA), at the request of the G8, is developing a series of roadmaps for some of the most important roadmap develops a growth path for the covered technologies from today to 2050, and identifies technology

  1. Algae to Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973ManagedStrategic| NationalAlexander

  2. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 568: Area 3 Plutonium Dispersion Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAU 568 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 568, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 03-23-17, S-3I Contamination Area • 03-23-19, T-3U Contamination Area • 03-23-20, Otero Contamination Area • 03-23-22, Platypus Contamination Area • 03-23-23, San Juan Contamination Area • 03-23-26, Shrew/Wolverine Contamination Area These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report.

  3. Response to WAG Consultation on the Alternative Transport Fuels in Wales Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    of the use of biofuels or other renewable fuels for transport at http://europa.eu.int/comm/energy/res/legislation/biofuelsResponse to WAG Consultation on the Alternative Transport Fuels in Wales Action Plan Centre of alternative transport fuels in its own policy documents, notably the Sustainable Development Action Plan 2004

  4. Fueling the Navy's Great Green Fleet with Advanced Biofuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    From transporting the oil necessary to fuel jets and vehicles to supplying battery packs to infantry, energy plays a central role in almost everything the U.S. military does. Because of this reliance, it’s imperative that the military cultivate energy sources that are not subject to the whims of outside nations. While renewables like solar are playing a large role in this effort, advanced biofuels produced domestically are rapidly becoming another choice for transportation fuel.

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Biofuel Impacts on Aftertreatment Devices (Agreement ID:26463) Project ID:18519

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about biofuel impacts...

  6. World Biofuels Production Potential Understanding the Challenges to Meeting the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sastri, B.; Lee, A.

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates the worldwide potential to produce biofuels including biofuels for export. It was undertaken to improve our understanding of the potential for imported biofuels to satisfy the requirements of Title II of the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) in the coming decades. Many other countries biofuels production and policies are expanding as rapidly as ours. Therefore, we modeled a detailed and up-to-date representation of the amount of biofuel feedstocks that are being and can be grown, current and future biofuels production capacity, and other factors relevant to the economic competitiveness of worldwide biofuels production, use, and trade. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) identified and prepared feedstock data for countries that were likely to be significant exporters of biofuels to the U.S. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) calculated conversion costs by conducting material flow analyses and technology assessments on biofuels technologies. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) integrated the country specific feedstock estimates and conversion costs into the global Energy Technology Perspectives (ETP) MARKAL (MARKet ALlocation) model. The model uses least-cost optimization to project the future state of the global energy system in five year increments. World biofuels production was assessed over the 2010 to 2030 timeframe using scenarios covering a range U.S. policies (tax credits, tariffs, and regulations), as well as oil prices, feedstock availability, and a global CO{sub 2} price. All scenarios include the full implementation of existing U.S. and selected other countries biofuels policies (Table 4). For the U.S., the most important policy is the EISA Title II Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). It progressively increases the required volumes of renewable fuel used in motor vehicles (Appendix B). The RFS requires 36 billion (B) gallons (gal) per year of renewable fuels by 2022. Within the mandate, amounts of advanced biofuels, including biomass-based diesel and cellulosic biofuels, are required beginning in 2009. Imported renewable fuels are also eligible for the RFS. Another key U.S. policy is the $1.01 per gal tax credit for producers of cellulosic biofuels enacted as part of the 2008 Farm Bill. This credit, along with the DOE's research, development and demonstration (RD&D) programs, are assumed to enable the rapid expansion of U.S. and global cellulosic biofuels production needed for the U.S. to approach the 2022 RFS goal. While the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has yet to issue RFS rules to determine which fuels would meet the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction and land use restrictions specified in EISA, we assume that cellulosic ethanol, biomass-to-liquid fuels (BTL), sugar-derived ethanol, and fatty acid methyl ester biodiesel would all meet the EISA advanced biofuel requirements. We also assume that enough U.S. corn ethanol would meet EISA's biofuel requirements or otherwise be grandfathered under EISA to reach 15 B gal per year.

  7. YOKAYO BIOFUELS, INC. GRANT FOR IMPROVEMENTS AND EXPANSION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YOKAYO BIOFUELS, INC. GRANT FOR IMPROVEMENTS AND EXPANSION OF AN EXISTING FACILITY INITIAL STUDY-11-601) to expand an existing biofuels production facility (Yokayo Biofuels, Inc.) located at 350 Orr: THE PROPOSED PROJECT: Yokayo Biofuels, Inc. is an existing biofuels facility located at 350 Orr Springs Road

  8. Biofuels | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplexMaterial Science

  9. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Dismantlement, Remedial action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1, Technology Evaluation; Vol. 2, Technology Logic Diagram and Vol. 3, Technology EvaLuation Data Sheets. Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the D&D of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TM, an explanation of the problems facing the volume-specific program, a review of identified technologies, and rankings of technologies applicable to the site. Volume 2 (Pts. A. B. and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A. B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. This volume provides the technology evaluation data sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (D&D, RA and WM) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than is given for the technologies in Vol. 2.

  10. Biofuels Issues and Trends

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14SalesSameCommercial

  11. Advanced Biofuels Workshop

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 N Energy InformationEnd

  12. Sandia Energy - Biofuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatings Initiated at PNNL's Sequim Bay Coatings Initiated at

  13. Biofuels and food security

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR SEPARATION BYAbrasionAuthorDepartment ofreport

  14. Life of Sugar: Developing Lifecycle Methods to Evaluate the Energy and Environmental Impacts of Sugarcane Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopal, Anand Raja

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    much superior bridge to second-generation biofuels than corncommercialization of second generation biofuels. In addition

  15. Biofuels technology blooms in Iowa | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biofuels technology blooms in Iowa Biofuels technology blooms in Iowa May 7, 2010 - 4:45pm Addthis Cellulosic biofuels made from agricultural waste have caught the attention of...

  16. Engineering microbial biofuel tolerance and export using efflux pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunlop, Mary

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biology 2011 3 Engineering biofuel tolerance using ef?uxPublishers Limited Engineering biofuel tolerance using ef?uxFigure 2 When grown with biofuel, strains with bene?cial

  17. Plant and microbial research seeks biofuel production from lignocellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartley, Laura E; Ronald, Pamela C

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sugar yields for biofuel production. Nat Biotechnol 25(7):Plant and microbial research seeks biofuel production fromA key strategy for biofuel produc- tion is making use of the

  18. The effect of biofuel on the international oil market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper 1099 The Effect of Biofuel on the International Oilby author(s). The e?ect of biofuel on the international oilto quantify the impact of biofuel on fuel markets, assuming

  19. The Economics of Trade, Biofuel, and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochman, Gal; Sexton, Steven; Zilberman, David D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    prices. The reason: demand for biofuel increases, and ?rst-The Economics of Trade, Biofuel, and the Environment GalThe Economics of Trade, Biofuel, and the Environment ? Gal

  20. High biofuel production of Botryococcus braunii using optimized cultivation strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Wei

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. N2O release from agro-biofuel production negates globalcultivation and biofuel production (www.lyxia.com).183 (2001) Amin S. Review on biofuel oil and gas production

  1. High biofuel production of Botryococcus braunii using optimized cultivation strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Wei

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009) 55. M. Tredici, Biofuels, 1: 143 (2010) 56. Q. Hu, A.Barbosa, M. H. M. Eppink, Biofuels Bioproducts Biorefining,and recent trends in biofuels. Prog. Energy Combust. Sci. ,

  2. The effect of biofuel on the international oil market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that the introduction of biofuels reduces global fossil fuele?ects of introducing biofuels using the cartel-of-nationsthe e?ect of introducing biofuels under a competitive fuel

  3. NextSTEPS White Paper: Three Routes Forward for Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    NextSTEPS White Paper: Three Routes Forward for Biofuels: Incremental, Transitional, and Leapfrog NOT CITE #12;Three Routes Forward for Biofuels: Incremental, Transitional, and Leapfrog 2 Contents ......................................................................................................................................12 1.a. The Need for Low Carbon Biofuels

  4. Transportation Biofuels in the US A Preliminary Innovation Systems Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggert, Anthony

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12): p. Koplow, D. , Biofuels – At What Cost? : GovernmentResulting from the Biomass to Biofuels Workshop Sponsored byN. , Growing Energy: How biofuels can help end America's oil

  5. Engineering of bacterial methyl ketone synthesis for biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goh, Ee-Been

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ketone synthesis for biofuels Ee-Been Goh†† 1,3 , Edward E.microbes for use as biofuels, such as fatty acid ethylother fatty acid-derived biofuels, such as fatty acid ethyl

  6. Energy and Greenhouse Impacts of Biofuels: A Framework for Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J.; Jones, Andrew D.; Nemet, Gregory F.; Delucchi, Mark A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels Wang, M. (2001) "Energy & Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels Fuels and MotorLifecycle Analysis of Biofuels." Report UCD-ITS-RR-06-08.

  7. Developing genome-enabled sustainable lignocellulosic biofuels technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing genome-enabled sustainable lignocellulosic biofuels technologies Timothy Donohue a technically advanced biofuels industry that is economically & environmentally sustainable." [GLBRC Roadmap sugars, lignin content, etc.) Cellulosic Biofuels "Opportunities & Challenges" 5 #12;Variable Composition

  8. Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortman, J. L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of biodiesel and ethanol biofuels. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S. (2006) Bonkers about biofuels. Nat. Biotechnol. 24, 755–Schubert, C. (2006) Can biofuels finally take center stage?

  9. Transportation Biofuels in the USA Preliminary Innovation Systems Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggert, Anthony

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12): p. Koplow, D. , Biofuels – At What Cost? : GovernmentResulting from the Biomass to Biofuels Workshop Sponsored byN. , Growing Energy: How biofuels can help end America's oil

  10. Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement: Supplementary Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement: Supplementary Material Erin Baker Keywords: Biofuels; Technology R&D; Uncertainty; Environmental policy 2 #12;1 Introduction This paper contains supplementary material for "Cellulosic Biofuels: Expert Views on Prospects for Advancement

  11. National Energy Action Month

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    President Obama calls on Americans to work together to achieve greater U.S. energy security and build a more robust economy.

  12. Biofuels: Review of Policies and Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janda, Karel; Kristoufek, Ladislav; Zilberman, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the international oil market. Applied Economic Perspectivesand Lucia Baldi. Vegetable oil market and biofuel policy: Anspillover from the crude oil market to the corn market.

  13. Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    18-673389 Keywords: cassava; bioethanol; biofuel; metabolicRecently, cassava-derived bioethanol production has beenbenefits compared to other bioethanol- producing crops in

  14. Biofuels: Review of Policies and Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janda, Karel; Kristoufek, Ladislav; Zilberman, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modi?cations. The advances in the biofuel feedstock relevantbiofuel feedstocks will be in- ?uenced by policy concerns and by advances

  15. Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Carbohydrates...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Upgrading Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Carbohydrates Upgrading PNNL report-out presentation at the CTAB webinar on carbohydrates upgrading. ctabwebinarcarbohyd...

  16. Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Carbohydrates...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Production Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels - Carbohydrates Production Purdue University report-out presentation at the CTAB webinar on Carbohydrates Production....

  17. Global Biofuels Modeling and Land Use

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biofuels Modeling and Land Use DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Strategic Analysis & Cross-cutting Sustainability March 25 2015 Gbadebo Oladosu...

  18. On mitigating emissions leakage under biofuel policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current Sustainable and Renewable Energy Reports, 1(3):104–Current Sustainable and Renewable Energy Reports, 1(3):104–extreme. Biofuel (and renewable energy) policies are multi-

  19. A Prospective Target for Advanced Biofuel Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to bisabolane, an advanced biofuel with physico-chemical properties similar to D2 diesel. High titer microbial bisabolene production was achieved using Abies grandis...

  20. Systems analysis and futuristic designs of advanced biofuel factory concepts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chianelli, Russ; Leathers, James; Thoma, Steven George; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. is addicted to petroleum--a dependency that periodically shocks the economy, compromises national security, and adversely affects the environment. If liquid fuels remain the main energy source for U.S. transportation for the foreseeable future, the system solution is the production of new liquid fuels that can directly displace diesel and gasoline. This study focuses on advanced concepts for biofuel factory production, describing three design concepts: biopetroleum, biodiesel, and higher alcohols. A general schematic is illustrated for each concept with technical description and analysis for each factory design. Looking beyond current biofuel pursuits by industry, this study explores unconventional feedstocks (e.g., extremophiles), out-of-favor reaction processes (e.g., radiation-induced catalytic cracking), and production of new fuel sources traditionally deemed undesirable (e.g., fusel oils). These concepts lay the foundation and path for future basic science and applied engineering to displace petroleum as a transportation energy source for good.

  1. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Kauss

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 539 are located within Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada National Security Site. Corrective Action Unit 539 comprises the following CASs: • 25-99-21, Area 25 Railroad Tracks • 26-99-05, Area 26 Railroad Tracks The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 539 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Reviewed documentation on historical and current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Conducted radiological walkover surveys of railroad tracks in both Areas 25 and 26. • Collected ballast and soil samples and calculated internal dose estimates for radiological releases. • Collected in situ thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements and calculated external dose estimates for radiological releases. • Removed lead bricks as potential source material (PSM) and collected verification samples. • Implemented corrective actions as necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly disposed of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Implemented an FFACO use restriction (UR) for radiological contamination at CAS 25-99-21. The approved UR form and map are provided in Appendix F and will be filed in the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Facility Information Management System; the FFACO database; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. From November 29, 2010, through May 2, 2011, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 539: Areas 25 and 26 Railroad Tracks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were as follows: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) to determine COCs for CAU 539. Assessment of the data generated from closure activities revealed the following: • At CAS 26-99-05, the total effective dose for radiological releases did not exceed the FAL of 25 millirem per Industrial Area year. Potential source material in the form of lead bricks was found at three locations. A corrective action of clean closure was implemented at these locations, and verification samples indicated that no further action is necessary. • At CAS 25-99-21, the total effective dose for radiological releases exceeds the FAL of 25 millirem per Industrial Area year. Potential source material in the form of lead bricks was found at eight locations. A corrective action was implemented by removing the lead bricks and soil above FALs at these locations, and verification samples indicated that no further action is necessary. Pieces of debris with high radioactivity were identified as PSM and remain within the CAS boundary. A corrective action of closure in place with a UR was implemented at this CAS because closure activities showed evidence of remaining soil contamination and radioactive PSM. Future land use will be restricted from surface and intrusive activities. Closure activities generated waste streams consisting of industrial solid waste, recyclable materials, low-level radioactive waste, and mixed low-level radioactive waste. Wastes were disposed of in the appropriate onsite landfills. The NNSA/NSO prov

  2. Improved Method for Isolation of Microbial RNA from Biofuel Feedstock...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Method for Isolation of Microbial RNA from Biofuel Feedstock for Metatranscriptomics. Improved Method for Isolation of Microbial RNA from Biofuel Feedstock for Metatranscriptomics....

  3. Five Harvesting Technologies are Making Biofuels More Competitive...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Five Harvesting Technologies are Making Biofuels More Competitive in the Marketplace Five Harvesting Technologies are Making Biofuels More Competitive in the Marketplace March 17,...

  4. California: Advanced 'Drop-In' Biofuels Power the Navy's Green...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Developing Cheaper Algae Biofuels, Brings Jobs to Pennsylvania Fueling the Navy's Great Green Fleet with Advanced Biofuels Cellana, Inc.'s Kona Demonstration Facility is working...

  5. australian biofuel industry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    terms of subsidies for biofuel production such that the supply-side responses by fossil fuel producers may more than offset the substitution to biofuels. Analytical results are...

  6. assessing biofuel crop: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    terms of subsidies for biofuel production such that the supply-side responses by fossil fuel producers may more than offset the substitution to biofuels. Analytical results are...

  7. analysis biofuels implications: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    terms of subsidies for biofuel production such that the supply-side responses by fossil fuel producers may more than offset the substitution to biofuels. Analytical results are...

  8. Thermochemical Conversion: Using Heat and Catalysis to Make Biofuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conversion: Using Heat and Catalysis to Make Biofuels and Bioproducts Thermochemical Conversion: Using Heat and Catalysis to Make Biofuels and Bioproducts The Bioenergy...

  9. Microbial who-done-it for biofuels | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    who-done-it for biofuels Microbial who-done-it for biofuels New technique identifies populations within a microbial community responsible for biomass deconstruction The microbial...

  10. Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortman, J.L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbialproducts, pharmaceuticals, ethanol fuel and more. Even so,producing biofuel. Although ethanol currently dominates the

  11. Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortman, J.L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and diesel transport fuels with biofuels by 2010 [4]. Owingtransport systems, the improvement of the resistance of biofuelstransport to consumers. Although discussion of the properties for the biofuels

  12. Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortman, J. L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and diesel transport fuels with biofuels by 2010 [4]. Owingtransport systems, the improvement of the resistance of biofuelstransport to consumers. Although discussion of the properties for the biofuels

  13. Biofuels and Barbecue Chips: Small Business Develops Process...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biofuels and Barbecue Chips: Small Business Develops Process to Create Versatile Chemicals Biofuels and Barbecue Chips: Small Business Develops Process to Create Versatile...

  14. Second-Generation Biofuels from Multi-Product Biorefineries Combine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Second-Generation Biofuels from Multi-Product Biorefineries Combine Economic Sustainability With Environmental Sustainability Second-Generation Biofuels from Multi-Product...

  15. Cellu-WHAT?-sic: Communicating the Biofuels Message to Local...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cellu-WHAT?-sic: Communicating the Biofuels Message to Local Stakeholders Cellu-WHAT?-sic: Communicating the Biofuels Message to Local Stakeholders Breakout Session 3D-Building...

  16. Bioproducts: Enabling Biofuels and Growing the Bioeconomy | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioproducts: Enabling Biofuels and Growing the Bioeconomy Bioproducts: Enabling Biofuels and Growing the Bioeconomy Breakout Session 2B-Integration of Supply Chains II:...

  17. Brazil's Biofuels Scenario: What are the Main Drivers Which will...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Brazil's Biofuels Scenario: What are the Main Drivers Which will Shape Investments in the Long Term? Brazil's Biofuels Scenario: What are the Main Drivers Which will Shape...

  18. Algal Biofuels Strategy: Report on Workshop Results and Recent...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biofuels Strategy: Report on Workshop Results and Recent Work Algal Biofuels Strategy: Report on Workshop Results and Recent Work Breakout Session 3B-Integration of Supply Chains...

  19. Five Harvesting Technologies are Making Biofuels More Competitive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Harvesting Technologies are Making Biofuels More Competitive in the Marketplace Five Harvesting Technologies are Making Biofuels More Competitive in the Marketplace March 17, 2015...

  20. DOE Announces Webinars on Algal Biofuels Consortium Research...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Algal Biofuels Consortium Research Results, Solar Energy Maps, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Algal Biofuels Consortium Research Results, Solar Energy Maps, and More June 10,...

  1. California: Cutting-Edge Biofuels Research and Entrepreneurship...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Cutting-Edge Biofuels Research and Entrepreneurship Provide a Proving Ground California: Cutting-Edge Biofuels Research and Entrepreneurship Provide a Proving Ground April 18, 2013...

  2. Maine biofuels project saves livelihood of town | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    biofuels project saves livelihood of town Maine biofuels project saves livelihood of town January 7, 2010 - 2:21pm Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist,...

  3. Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the Bradbury Science Museum The Bradbury Science Museum is...

  4. Advanced and Cellulosic Biofuels and Biorefineries: State of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Cellulosic Biofuels and Biorefineries: State of the Industry, Policy and Politics Advanced and Cellulosic Biofuels and Biorefineries: State of the Industry, Policy and Politics...

  5. Biofuels and certification. A workshop at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devereaux, Charan; Lee, Henry

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid biofuels can provide a substitute for fossil fuels in the transportation sector. Many countries have mandated the use of biofuels, by creating targets for their use. If not implemented with care, however, actions that increase biofuel production can put upward pressure on food prices, increase greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and exacerbate degradation of land, forest, and water sources. A strong global biofuels industry will not emerge unless these environmental and social concerns are addressed. Interested parties around the world are actively debating the design and implementation of policies to meet the biofuel goals, particularly those established in the United States and Europe. In general, policy options for managing the potential risks and benefits of biofuel development should specify not only clear standards governing biofuel content and production processes, but also certification processes for verifying whether particular biofuels meet those standards, and specific metrics or indicators on which to base the certification. Historically, many standards in the energy and environment fields have ultimately been set or supported by governments. Many of the certification processes have been voluntary, carried out by independent third parties. The biofuels case is a young one, however, with questions of goals, standards, certification, and metrics still in interdependent flux. The workshop focused its discussions on certification issues, but found the discussions naturally reaching into ongoing debates regarding possible goals, standards, and metrics. Many countries are proposing that for a biofuel to qualify as contributing to government-mandated targets or goals, it must be certified to meet certain standards. These standards could be limited to the amount of GHG emitted in the production process or could include a number of other environmental sustainability concerns ranging from deforestation and biodiversity to water resources. While the threat to both forests and food supplies from increased biofuel production is real, it is not clear that setting broad sustainability standards and then requiring sellers to certify that all of those standards have been met is the best way to address these interconnected problems. In particular, if too many standards and related certification requirements are put in place too soon, this could constrain the development of a global biofuels market. In contrast, certification targeted at a specific and limited set of problems and designed with the flexibility to adjust to changes in policies and programs can enhance the public's acceptance of the biofuel option while protecting key social and environmental goals. A second set of questions revolves around the locus of responsibility for certifying whether biofuel production meets sustainability targets. Should the biofuel processing firms, third parties, or governments be responsible for certifying the production of biofuels? This question also elicited significant discussion. While it could be easier to have individual country governments assume the certification of production responsibility, some governments may not have the capacity to implement an effective certification process. Production facilities that comply with international standards should not be kept out of the market because of their government's inability to manage the process. The possible contribution to effective certification of third party organizations or public-private partnerships should not be underestimated.

  6. Producing biofuels using polyketide synthases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides for a non-naturally occurring polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a carboxylic acid or a lactone, and a composition such that a carboxylic acid or lactone is included. The carboxylic acid or lactone, or derivative thereof, is useful as a biofuel. The present invention also provides for a recombinant nucleic acid or vector that encodes such a PKS, and host cells which also have such a recombinant nucleic acid or vector. The present invention also provides for a method of producing such carboxylic acids or lactones using such a PKS.

  7. Acciona Biofuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind6:00-06:00About OpenEIAcciona Biofuels Place:

  8. Shirke Biofuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AGShandongShirke Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search

  9. Keystone Biofuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa:Washington: EnergyFacility |Keystone Biofuels Jump to:

  10. Yokayo Biofuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch, NewYanceyYokayo Biofuels Jump to: navigation,

  11. Piedmont Biofuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: Energy ResourcesPicket Lake, Minnesota:Piedmont Biofuels Jump to:

  12. Biofuels Digest | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher HomesLyons Biomass FacilityBioethanolBiofuels

  13. Mead Biofuel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group JumpNewMassachusettsMayo PowerMcLeodMead Biofuel Jump

  14. Mint Biofuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreen Polymers Inc JumpFinancingMinnesotaMint Biofuels

  15. Border Biofuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthby 2022Illinois: Energy Resources JumpBoone,Biofuels Jump

  16. Rusni Biofuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:Roscommon County,Vermont: EnergyEasementsRushville,Rusni Biofuels

  17. Final Status Survey Report for Corrective Action Unit 117 - Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the process knowledge, radiological data and subsequent statistical methodology and analysis to support approval for the radiological release of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201 located in Area 26 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Preparations for release of the building began in 2009 and followed the methodology described in the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM is the DOE approved process for release of Real Property (buildings and landmasses) to a set of established criteria or authorized limits. The pre-approved authorized limits for surface contamination values and corresponding assumptions were established by DOE O 5400.5. The release criteria coincide with the acceptance criteria of the U10C landfill permit. The U10C landfill is the proposed location to dispose of the radiologically non-impacted, or “clean,” building rubble following demolition. However, other disposition options that include the building and/or waste remaining at the NNSS may be considered providing that the same release limits apply. The Final Status Survey was designed following MARSSIM guidance by reviewing historical documentation and radiological survey data. Following this review a formal radiological characterization survey was performed in two phases. The characterization revealed multiple areas of residual radioactivity above the release criteria. These locations were remediated (decontaminated) and then the surface activity was verified to be less than the release criteria. Once remediation efforts had been successfully completed, a Final Status Survey Plan (10-015, “Final Status Survey Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201”) was developed and implemented to complete the final step in the MARSSIM process, the Final Status Survey. The Final Status Survey Plan consisted of categorizing each individual room into one of three categories: Class 1, Class 2 or Class 3 (a fourth category is a “Non-Impacted Class” which in the case of Building 2201 only pertained to exterior surfaces of the building.) The majority of the rooms were determined to fall in the less restrictive Class 3 category, however, Rooms 102, 104, 106, and 107 were identified as containing Class 1 and 2 areas. Building 2201 was divided into “survey units” and surveyed following the requirements of the Final Status Survey Plan for each particular class. As each survey unit was completed and documented, the survey results were evaluated. Each sample (static measurement) with units of counts per minute (cpm) was corrected for the appropriate background and converted to a value with units of dpm/100 cm2. With a surface contamination value in the appropriate units, it was compared to the surface contamination limits, or in this case the derived concentration guideline level (DCGLw). The appropriate statistical test (sign test) was then performed. If the survey unit was statistically determined to be below the DCGLw, then the survey unit passed and the null hypothesis (that the survey unit is above limits) was rejected. If the survey unit was equal to or below the critical value in the sign test, the null hypothesis was not rejected. This process was performed for all survey units within Building 2201. A total of thirty-three “Class 1,” four “Class 2,” and one “Class 3” survey units were developed, surveyed, and evaluated. All survey units successfully passed the statistical test. Building 2201 meets the release criteria commensurate with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (for radiological purposes) of the U10C landfill permit residing within NNSS boundaries. Based on the thorough statistical sampling and scanning of the building’s interior, Building 2201 may be considered radiologically “clean,” or free of contamination.

  18. Finding of no significant impact for the interim action for cleanup of Pit 9 at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0854, for an interim action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The proposed action would be conducted at Pit 9, Operable Unit 7--10, located at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The proposed action consists of construction of retrieval and processing buildings, excavation and retrieval of wastes from Pit 9, selective physical separation and chemical extraction, and stabilization of wastes either through thermal processing or by forming a stabilized concentrate. The proposed action would involve limited waste treatment process testing and full-scale waste treatment processing for cleaning up pre-1970 Transuranic (TRU) wastes in Pit 9. The purpose of this interim action is to expedite the overall cleanup at the RWMC and to reduce the risks associated with potential migration of Pit 9 wastes to the Snake River Plain Aquifer.

  19. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 575: Area 15 Miscellaneous Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 575, Area 15 Miscellaneous Sites, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). CAU 575 comprises the following four corrective action sites (CASs) located in Area 15 of the Nevada National Security Site: • 15-19-02, Waste Burial Pit • 15-30-01, Surface Features at Borehole Sites • 15-64-01, Decontamination Area • 15-99-03, Aggregate Plant This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 575 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation to document and verify the adequacy of existing information, to affirm the predicted corrective action decisions, and to provide sufficient data to implement the corrective actions. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval.

  20. October 2006 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Project No. SAFT-0109 Continued on next page Standards Actions Page 2 October 2006 2.0 NON-GOVERNMENT STANDARDS ACTIONS 2.1 American National Standards Institute American...

  1. July 2006 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    were received in June 2006. Continued on next page Standards Actions Page 2 July 2005 2.0 Non-Government Standards Actions 2.1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI)...

  2. EPA and RFS2: Market Impacts of Biofuel Mandate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    July 2012 EPA and RFS2: Market Impacts of Biofuel Mandate Waiver Options The EPA is required by law to implement biofuel use mandates and it has proposed to waive the cellulosic biofuels other than cellulosic biofuels. If other mandates are decreased, then that imperative to replace

  3. Creating Markets for Green Biofuels: Measuring and improving environmental performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Brian T.; Plevin, Richard J.; O'Hare, Michael; Farrell, Alexander E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    biofuel production processes, the ability to measure environmental performance, and environmental goals all advance.

  4. III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    29 III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27 The previous chapters focused on first generation biofuels. In this chapter we focus on second generation biofuels, specifically biofuels derived from cellulosic or lignocellulosic conversion. Advocates for the development of cellulosic

  5. RESEARCH ARTICLE A model for improving microbial biofuel production using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunlop, Mary

    RESEARCH ARTICLE A model for improving microbial biofuel production using a synthetic feedback loop be compared. We propose a model for microbial biofuel production where a synthetic control system is used to increase cell viability and biofuel yields. Although microbes can be engineered to produce biofuels

  6. Biofuels, biodiversity, and people: Understanding the conflicts and finding opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Review Biofuels, biodiversity, and people: Understanding the conflicts and finding opportunities interests in biofuels. Biofuels are viewed by many policy makers as a key to reducing reliance on foreign concerns, and by reports questioning the rationale that biofuels substantially reduce carbon emissions. We

  7. Potential Land Use Implications of a Global Biofuels Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurgel, Angelo C.

    In this paper we investigate the potential production and implications of a global biofuels industry. We

  8. Special Seminar Realizing the Full Potential of Algal Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    of Algal Biofuels Dr. Ronald R. Chance Senior Scientific Advisor, Physical Sciences Algenol Biofuels Fort: Although biofuels have great potential as lower-carbon-footprint, drop-in fuels for existing transportation, economic viability, and achievable reduction in carbon footprint. A cyanobacteria-based biofuels system

  9. Growing the renewable chemicals and advanced biofuels cluster in MN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    Growing the renewable chemicals and advanced biofuels cluster in MN #12;Renewable Chemical Value% Reduction 60% Reduction 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Gasoline Corn Ethanol Advanced Biofuel Cellulosic Biofuel Corn Ethanol 20% GHG Reduction Compared to gasoline: Advanced Biofuel 50% GHG Reduction e

  10. Scrap biofuels targets and focus on improved public transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scrap biofuels targets and focus on improved public transport Friends of the Earth's biofuels campaigner Kenneth Richter argues that biofuel targets are a distraction from tried-and-tested ways to biofuel crops such as rapeseed have changed as more research has been done into their impact

  11. US Biofuels Baseline and impact of extending the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    June 2011 US Biofuels Baseline and impact of extending the $0.45 ethanol blenders baseline projections for agricultural and biofuel markets.1 That baseline assumed current biofuel policy for cellulosic biofuels was assumed to expire at the end of 2012. This report compares a slightly modified

  12. VIEWLS Final recommendations report Shift Gear to Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VIEWLS Final recommendations report 1 Shift Gear to Biofuels Results and recommendations from the VIEWLS project November 2005 #12;Shift Gear to Biofuels Final report of the VIEWLS project 2 #12;Shift Gear to Biofuels Final report of the VIEWLS project 3 Preface Biofuels are fuels made from

  13. ACTION MEMO: Technical Position on the Use of National Consensus and Building Codes to Meet DOE Order 420. I B.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The attached technical position on the Use of National Consensus and Building Codes to meet Department of Energy (DOE) Order 420.1b Facility Safety, clarifies the use of national consensus and...

  14. Europe report discloses biofuels' embarrassing secret

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    According to a recently released European Union (EU) internal document, biofuels can produce up to four times more greenhouse gas emissions than the conventional diesel or gasoline they are intended to replace. Conventional gasoline and diesel emit around 85 kilograms of CO2-equivalent per gigajoule of energy. For biofuels to make any sense, they have to beat this by a margin, or else why bother given all the negative externalities associated with growing biofuels? The EU study suggests that the carbon footprint of typical European biofuels is in the range of 100--150 and North American soybeans score around 340 -- at least four times higher than conventional transportation fuels. By contrast, Latin American sugar cane and bioethanol from palm oil from Southeast Asia, is relatively better at 82 and 74 kilograms per gigajoule, respectively. But even in these cases, it is far from clear if biofuels are superior to conventional fuels due to the many externalities associated with biofuels, including clearing of virgin forests and loss of habitat and biodiversity. Moreover, biofuel production in many regions competes directly with food production, resulting in higher food costs.

  15. Global Biofuel Use, 1850-2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandes, S. D.; Trautmann, N. M.; Streets, D. G.; Roden, C. A.; Bond, T. C.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Illinois

    2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents annual, country-level estimates of biofuel use for the period 1850-2000. We estimate that global biofuel consumption rose from about 1000 Tg in 1850 to 2460 Tg in 2000, an increase of 140%. In the late 19th century, biofuel consumption in North America was very high, {approx}220-250 Tg/yr, because widespread land clearing supplied plentiful fuelwood. At that time biofuel use in Western Europe was lower, {approx}180-200 Tg/yr. As fossil fuels became available, biofuel use in the developed world fell. Compensating changes in other parts of the world, however, caused global consumption to remain remarkably stable between 1850 and 1950 at {approx}1200 {+-} 200 Tg/yr. It was only after World War II that biofuel use began to increase more rapidly in response to population growth in the developing world. Between 1950 and 2000, biofuel use in Africa, South Asia, and Southeast Asia grew by 170%, 160%, and 130%, respectively.

  16. As corn-based biofuels reach their practical limits, advanced algae-based biofuels are poised to supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    SEMTE abstract As corn-based biofuels reach their practical limits, advanced algae-based biofuels of Energy, General Electric, Algenol Biofuels, and Southern Company. Currently a post-doctoral fellow working for Algenol Biofuels, Dr. Lively is expanding his expertise in gas and liquid separations

  17. Partnering with Industry to Advance Biofuels and Bioproducts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describing NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility, a biochemical pilot plant and partnership facility containing equipment and lab space for pretreatement, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, compositional analysis, and downstream processing. For more than 30 years, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been at the leading edge of research and technology advancements to develop renewable fuels and bioproducts. NREL works to develop cost-competitive alternatives to conventional transportation fuels and value-added biobased chemicals that can be used to manufacture clothing, plastics, lubricants, and other products. NREL is developing technologies and processes to produce a range of sustainable, energy-dense advanced biofuels that are compatible with our existing transportation fuel infrastructure. As part of that effort, NREL's National Bioenergy Center has entered into more than 90 collaborations in the past five years with companies ranging in size from start-ups to those that appear on Fortune magazine's Fortune 100 list. The new Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) showcases NREL's commitment to collaboration and to meeting the nation's biofuels and bioproducts development and deployment goals. Designed to speed the growth of the biofuels and bioproducts industries, the IBRF is a unique $33.5 million pilot facility capable of supporting a variety of projects. The IBRF is available to industry partners who work with NREL through cooperative research and development, technical, and analytical service agreements. With 27,000 ft2 of high bay space, the IBRF provides industry partners with the opportunity to operate, test, and develop their own biorefining technology and equipment.

  18. Global Economic Effects of USA Biofuel Policy and the Potential Contribution from Advanced Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gbadebo Oladosu; Keith Kline; Paul Leiby; Rocio Uria-Martinez; Maggie Davis; Mark Downing; Laurence Eaton

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the global economic effects of the USA renewable fuel standards (RFS2), and the potential contribution from advanced biofuels. Our simulation results imply that these mandates lead to an increase of 0.21 percent in the global gross domestic product (GDP) in 2022, including an increase of 0.8 percent in the USA and 0.02 percent in the rest of the world (ROW); relative to our baseline, no-RFS scenario. The incremental contributions to GDP from advanced biofuels in 2022 are estimated at 0.41 percent and 0.04 percent in the USA and ROW, respectively. Although production costs of advanced biofuels are higher than for conventional biofuels in our model, their economic benefits result from reductions in oil use, and their smaller impacts on food markets compared with conventional biofuels. Thus, the USA advanced biofuels targets are expected to have positive economic benefits.

  19. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 561: Waste Disposal Areas, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAU 561 comprises 10 CASs: (1) 01-19-01, Waste Dump; (2) 02-08-02, Waste Dump and Burn Area; (3) 03-19-02, Debris Pile; (4) 05-62-01, Radioactive Gravel Pile; (5) 12-23-09, Radioactive Waste Dump; (6) 22-19-06, Buried Waste Disposal Site; (7) 23-21-04, Waste Disposal Trenches ; (8) 25-08-02, Waste Dump; (9) 25-23-21, Radioactive Waste Dump; and (10) 25-25-19, Hydrocarbon Stains and Trench. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 561 with no further corrective action. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the DQO process: (1) Determine whether COCs are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The following contaminants were determined to be present at concentrations exceeding their corresponding FALs: (1) No contamination exceeding FALs was identified at CASs 01-19-01, 03-19-02, 05-62-01, 12-23-09, and 22-19-06. (2) The surface and subsurface soil within the burn area at CAS 02-08-02 contains arsenic and lead above the FALs of 23 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) and 800 mg/kg, respectively. The surface and subsurface soil within the burn area also contains melted lead slag (potential source material [PSM]). The soil within the waste piles contains polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) above the FALs. The contamination within the burn area is spread throughout the area, as it was not feasible to remove all the PSM (melted lead), while at the waste piles, the contamination is confined to the piles. (3) The surface and subsurface soils within Trenches 3 and 5 at CAS 23-21-04 contain arsenic and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) above the FALs of 23 mg/kg and 0.74 mg/kg, respectively. The soil was removed from both trenches, and the soil that remains at this CAS does not contain contamination exceeding the FALs. Lead bricks and counterweights were also removed, and the soil below these items does not contain contamination that exceeds the FAL for lead. (4) The concrete-like material at CAS 25-08-02 contains arsenic above the FAL of 23 mg/kg. This concrete-like material was removed, and the soil that remains at this CAS does not contain contamination exceeding the FALs. Lead-acid batteries were also removed, and the soil below the batteries does not contain contamination that exceeds the FAL for lead. (5) The surface soils within the main waste dump at the posted southern radioactive material area (RMA) at CAS 25-23-21 contain cesium (Cs)-137 and PCBs above the FALs of 72.9 picocuries per gram (pCi/g) and 0.74 mg/kg, respectively. The soil was removed from the RMA, and the soil that remains at this CAS does not contain contamination exceeding the FALs. (6) The surface and subsurface soils at CAS 25-25-19 do not contain contamination exceeding the FALs. In addition, lead bricks were removed, and the soil below these items does not contain contamination that exceeds the FAL for lead. The following best management practices were implemented: (1) Housekeeping debris at CASs 02-08-02, 23-21-04, 25-08-02, 25-23-21, and 25-25-19 was removed and disposed of; (2) The open trenches at CAS 23-21-04 were backfilled; (3) The waste piles at CAS 25-08-02 were removed and the area leveled to ground surface; and (4) The remaining waste piles at the main waste dump at CAS 25-23-21 were leveled to ground surface. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: (1) No further action for CASs 01-19-01, 03-19-02, 05-62-01, 12-23-09, and 22-19-06; (2) Closure in place with an FFACO use restriction (UR) at CAS 02-08-02 for the remaining PAH-, arsenic-, and lead-contaminated soil, and the melted lead PSM. The UR form and map have been filed in the NNSA/NSO Facility Information Management System, the FFACO database, and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files; (3) No further corrective action at CAS 23-21-04, as the lead bricks and counterweights (PSM) have been removed, and the COCs of arsenic and PCBs in soil have be

  20. Traffic lights for crop-based biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phalan, Ben

    Traffic lights for crop-based biofuels Ben Phalan Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK Email: btp22@cam.ac.uk Nobody likes to have limits put on their freedom. However, in all areas of life... of having to slow down is an acceptable price to pay if it reduces the number of pedestrians killed and injured. How is this relevant to biofuels? There are many different kinds of biofuels, including some with considerable potential to generate cleaner...

  1. Drought-tolerant Biofuel Crops could be a Critical Hedge for Biorefineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, III, William R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Criteria for Sustainable Biofuel Production, Version 2.0.sustainability concepts in biofuel supply chain management:of switchgrass-for-biofuel systems. Biomass & Bioenergy,

  2. A model for improving microbial biofuel production using a synthetic feedback loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunlop, Mary

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for improving microbial biofuel production using a synthetica model for microbial biofuel production where a syntheticcell viability and biofuel yields. Although microbes can be

  3. Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Garima

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using YeastBiomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using YeastConsortium for efficient biofuel production: A New Candidate

  4. Structure and dynamics of the microbial communities underlying the carboxylate platform for biofuel production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollister, E.B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carboxylate platform for biofuel production E.B. Hollisterbiomass conversion and biofuel production. Keywords: mixedbiomass conversion and biofuel production. Materials and

  5. Switchgrass is a promising, high-yielding crop for California biofuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    both as forage and as a biofuel crop, switchgrass may bepanic grass grown as a biofuel in southern England. Bioresfor switchgrass for biofuel systems. Biomass Bioenergy 30:

  6. Comparative genomics of xylose-fermenting fungi for enhanced biofuel production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wohlbach, Dana J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fermenting fungi for enhanced biofuel production Dana J.fermenting fungi for enhanced biofuel production Dana J.fermenting fungi for enhanced biofuel production Dana J.

  7. Construction of a rice glycoside hydrolase phylogenomic database and identification of targets for biofuel research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Rita; Cao, Peijian; Jung, Ki-Hong; Sharma, Manoj K; Ronald, Pamela C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fication of targets for biofuel research. Front. Plant Sci.identification of targets for biofuel research Rita Sharmawall modification. Keywords: biofuel, cell wall, database,

  8. For switchgrass cultivated as biofuel in California, invasiveness limited by several steps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DiTomaso, Joseph M; Barney, Jacob N; Mann, J Jeremiah; Kyser, Guy

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    United States. In selecting biofuel crops, a balance must bethe degree of risk that a biofuel crop (including cultivarsthe risk potential of biofuel crops: qualitative and

  9. The in vitro characterization of heterologously expressed enzymes to inform in vivo biofuel production optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, David Ernest

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    enzymes to inform in vivo biofuel production optimization Byenzymes to inform in vivo biofuel production optimization byE & Keasling JD (2008) Biofuel alternatives to ethanol:

  10. Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Impacts of United States Biofuel Policies: The Importance ofcoproduct substitution in the biofuel era. Agribusiness 27 (CGE: assessing the EU biofuel mandates with the MIRAGE-BioF

  11. Control and Optimization of Light Transfer in Photobioreactors Used for Biofuel Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandilian, Razmig

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sp. used for fixation and biofuel produc- tion”, Journal ofas feedstocks for biofuel production: per- spectives andPhotobioreactors Used for Biofuel Production A dissertation

  12. A model for improving microbial biofuel production using a synthetic feedback loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunlop, Mary J.; Keasling, Jay D.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steen E, Keasling JD (2008) Biofuel alternatives to ethanol:gene expression. Microbial biofuel production is one areaet al. 2008). Typical biofuel production processes start

  13. Manipulation of the Carbon Storage Regulator System for Metabolite Remodeling and Biofuel Production in Escherichia coli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    metabolite remodeling and biofuel production in Escherichiathrough engineered biofuel pathways. A) Overexpression ofPP, Keasling JD: Advanced biofuel production in microbes.

  14. Life of Sugar: Developing Lifecycle Methods to Evaluate the Energy and Environmental Impacts of Sugarcane Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopal, Anand Raja

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Criteria for Sustainable Biofuel Production. RSB, pages 1–and Tyner, W. (2008b). Impact of Biofuel Production on WorldClifford, P. (2009). Assessing Biofuel Crop Invasiveness: A

  15. Essays on the Economics of Climate Change, Biofuel and Food Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seguin, Charles

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    investment into second generation biofuels, and the amountinvestment in second generation biofuels and GHG abatement.investment into second generation biofuels. Because of the

  16. Essays on the Economics of Climate Change, Biofuel and Food Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seguin, Charles

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1999. K. Collins. The role of biofuels and other factors inan underproduction of biofuels, but when it does, secondis the promotion of biofuels as alternatives to fossil

  17. Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fingerman, Kevin Robert

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indirect  emissions  from  biofuels:  How   important?"  study  of  the  EU  biofuels  mandate.  Washington,  DC,  in  India  and   Sweden."  Biofuels,  Bioproducts  and  

  18. A model for improving microbial biofuel production using a synthetic feedback loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunlop, Mary J.; Keasling, Jay D.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential for great impact. Biofuels are a promising form ofbe engineered to produce biofuels, the fuels are often toxicKeywords Feedback control Á Biofuels Á Biological control

  19. Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse GasesLife-Cycle Assessment of Biofuels. Environmental Science &cellulosic ethanol. Biotechnol Biofuels 6 (1), 51. Elliott,

  20. Versatile microbial surface-display for environmental remediation and biofuels production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawkes, Daniel S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    engineering microbes for biofuels production. Science 315,xenobiotics remediation and biofuels production. TargetP. putida JS444 E. coli Biofuels Production Cellobiose

  1. Metabolic engineering of microorganisms for biofuels production: from bugs to synthetic biology to fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuk Lee, Sung

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of microbial hosts for biofuels production. Metab Eng 2008,delivers next-generation biofuels. Nat Biotechnol 27.furfural (HMF). Biotechnol Biofuels 2008, 1:12. 40. Trinh

  2. The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI): Developing New Biofuels by Overcoming Biomass Recalcitrance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Singh, Seema; Blanch, Harvey; Keasling, Jay D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JD (2009) Producing biofuels using polyketide synthases.JBEI): Developing New Biofuels by Overcoming Biomassthe next-generation of biofuels— liquid fuels derived from

  3. Modeling Poplar Growth as a Short Rotation Woody Crop for Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Quinn James

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a Short Rotation Woody Crop for Biofuels Q. J. Hart 1,? , O.for cellulosic derived biofuels. The ability to accuratelycrops for bioenergy and biofuels applications. In vitro

  4. Advanced Biofuels: How Scientists are Engineering Bacteria to Help Drive

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJune 17, 2015EnergyTheAdvanced Biofuels |ThereAdeleAmerica

  5. BioFuels and BioEnergy - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteries Batteries An errorA Mostbio BioFuels and

  6. Biofuel Research at Brazil Center of Excellence | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find More Like ThisBioenergyBiofuel Research at

  7. Biofuel-Producing Lactobacillus Strain - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find Find More Like ThisBioenergyBiofuel Research

  8. Genomic Advances to Improve Biomass for Biofuels (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rokhsar, Daniel

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Berkeley National Lab bioscientist Daniel Rokhsar discusses genomic advances to improve biomass for biofuels. He presented his talk Feb. 11, 2008 in Berkeley, California as part of Berkeley Lab's community lecture series. Rokhsar works with the U.S. Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and Berkeley Lab's Genomics Division.

  9. November 2006 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Standards Actions 2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society...

  10. October 2007 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society...

  11. May 2008 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Standards Actions 2 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society...

  12. May 2006 Standards Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Standards Actions 1 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) 2 ASTM International 2 American Nuclear Society...

  13. Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium thermocellum for Biofuel Production (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guess, Adam [ORNL

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adam Guss of Oak Ridge National Lab on "Metabolic engineering of Clostridium thermocellum for biofuel production" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  14. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 366 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 as amended).

  15. An Integrative Modeling Framework to Evaluate the Productivity and Sustainability of Biofuel Crop Production Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; West, T. O.; Post, W. M.; Thomson, Allison M.; Bandaru, V. P.; Nichols, J.; Williams, J.R.

    2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential expansion of biofuel production raises food, energy, and environmental challenges that require careful assessment of the impact of biofuel production on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, soil erosion, nutrient loading, and water quality. In this study, we describe a spatially-explicit integrative modeling framework (SEIMF) to understand and quantify the environmental impacts of different biomass cropping systems. This SEIMF consists of three major components: 1) a geographic information system (GIS)-based data analysis system to define spatial modeling units with resolution of 56 m to address spatial variability, 2) the biophysical and biogeochemical model EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) applied in a spatially-explicit way to predict biomass yield, GHG emissions, and other environmental impacts of different biofuel crops production systems, and 3) an evolutionary multi-objective optimization algorithm for exploring the trade-offs between biofuel energy production and unintended ecosystem-service responses. Simple examples illustrate the major functions of the SEIMF when applied to a 9-county Regional Intensive Modeling Area (RIMA) in SW Michigan to 1) simulate biofuel crop production, 2) compare impacts of management practices and local ecosystem settings, and 3) optimize the spatial configuration of different biofuel production systems by balancing energy production and other ecosystem-service variables. Potential applications of the SEIMF to support life cycle analysis and provide information on biodiversity evaluation and marginal-land identification are also discussed. The SEIMF developed in this study is expected to provide a useful tool for scientists and decision makers to understand sustainability issues associated with the production of biofuels at local, regional, and national scales.

  16. An integrative modeling framework to evaluate the productivity and sustainability of biofuel crop production systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X [University of Maryland; Izaurralde, R. C. [University of Maryland; Manowitz, D. [University of Maryland; West, T. O. [University of Maryland; Thomson, A. M. [University of Maryland; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL; Nichols, Jeff [ORNL; Williams, J. [AgriLIFE, Temple, TX

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential expansion of biofuel production raises food, energy, and environmental challenges that require careful assessment of the impact of biofuel production on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, soil erosion, nutrient loading, and water quality. In this study, we describe a spatially explicit integrative modeling framework (SEIMF) to understand and quantify the environmental impacts of different biomass cropping systems. This SEIMF consists of three major components: (1) a geographic information system (GIS)-based data analysis system to define spatial modeling units with resolution of 56 m to address spatial variability, (2) the biophysical and biogeochemical model Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) applied in a spatially-explicit way to predict biomass yield, GHG emissions, and other environmental impacts of different biofuel crops production systems, and (3) an evolutionary multiobjective optimization algorithm for exploring the trade-offs between biofuel energy production and unintended ecosystem-service responses. Simple examples illustrate the major functions of the SEIMF when applied to a nine-county Regional Intensive Modeling Area (RIMA) in SW Michigan to (1) simulate biofuel crop production, (2) compare impacts of management practices and local ecosystem settings, and (3) optimize the spatial configuration of different biofuel production systems by balancing energy production and other ecosystem-service variables. Potential applications of the SEIMF to support life cycle analysis and provide information on biodiversity evaluation and marginal-land identification are also discussed. The SEIMF developed in this study is expected to provide a useful tool for scientists and decision makers to understand sustainability issues associated with the production of biofuels at local, regional, and national scales.

  17. Electrolytic Methods as a Cost and Energy Effective Alternative of Harvesting Algae for Biofuel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Taylor 1986-

    2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ELECTROLYTIC METHODS AS A COST AND ENERGY EFFECTIVE ALTERNATIVE OF HARVESTING ALGAE FOR BIOFUEL A Thesis by TAYLOR LEE MORRISON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... was from the Department of Energy through the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts. The Texas A&M campus facilities available were Dr. Ron Lacey?s micro-algae lab, Dr. Nikolov?s bio-separations lab and Dr. Karthi?s water quality lab...

  18. Electrolytic Methods as a Cost and Energy Effective Alternative of Harvesting Algae for Biofuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Taylor 1986-

    2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ELECTROLYTIC METHODS AS A COST AND ENERGY EFFECTIVE ALTERNATIVE OF HARVESTING ALGAE FOR BIOFUEL A Thesis by TAYLOR LEE MORRISON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... was from the Department of Energy through the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts. The Texas A&M campus facilities available were Dr. Ron Lacey?s micro-algae lab, Dr. Nikolov?s bio-separations lab and Dr. Karthi?s water quality lab...

  19. 2013 Survey of Non-Starch Ethanol and Renewable Hydrocarbon Biofuels Producers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwab, A.; Geiger, J.; Lewis, J.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to understand the status of the industry for non-starch ethanol and renewable hydrocarbon biofuels as of the end of calendar year 2013, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted the first of what is anticipated to be an annual survey of U.S. non-starch ethanol and renewable hydrocarbon biofuels producers. This report presents the results of this initial survey and describes the survey methodology. Subsequent surveys will report on the progress over time of the development of these facilities and companies.

  20. NREL: Biomass Research - Microalgal Biofuels Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microalgal Biofuels Projects A photo of a man in a white lab coat holding a glass flask that contains a small amount of clear green liquid. An NREL researcher analyzes algae...

  1. Overview of Governor's Biofuels Coalition and Updates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the August 7, 2008 quarterly joint Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Stacey Simms (Colorado Governor's Energy Office) provided an update on Biofuels in Colorado.

  2. Future of Liquid Biofuels for APEC Economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initiated by APEC Energy Working Group (EWG) to maximize the energy sector's contribution to the region's economic and social well-being through activities in five areas of strategic importance including liquid biofuels production and development.

  3. Advanced Drop-In Biofuels Initiative Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roundtable - USDADOEDONDOT-FAA Advanced Drop-In Biofuels Initiative Agenda May 18, 2012 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Jefferson Auditorium U.S. Department of Agriculture South Building...

  4. Energy 101: Feedstocks for Biofuels and More

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    See how organic materials like corn stover, wheat straw, and woody plants are being used to create homegrown biofuels in the United States—all while reducing our dependence on foreign oil and creating jobs in rural America.

  5. COMPUTATIONAL RESOURCES FOR BIOFUEL FEEDSTOCK SPECIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buell, Carol Robin [Michigan State University; Childs, Kevin L [Michigan State University

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    While current production of ethanol as a biofuel relies on starch and sugar inputs, it is anticipated that sustainable production of ethanol for biofuel use will utilize lignocellulosic feedstocks. Candidate plant species to be used for lignocellulosic ethanol production include a large number of species within the Grass, Pine and Birch plant families. For these biofuel feedstock species, there are variable amounts of genome sequence resources available, ranging from complete genome sequences (e.g. sorghum, poplar) to transcriptome data sets (e.g. switchgrass, pine). These data sets are not only dispersed in location but also disparate in content. It will be essential to leverage and improve these genomic data sets for the improvement of biofuel feedstock production. The objectives of this project were to provide computational tools and resources for data-mining genome sequence/annotation and large-scale functional genomic datasets available for biofuel feedstock species. We have created a Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource that provides a web-based portal or �clearing house� for genomic data for plant species relevant to biofuel feedstock production. Sequence data from a total of 54 plant species are included in the Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource including model plant species that permit leveraging of knowledge across taxa to biofuel feedstock species.We have generated additional computational analyses of these data, including uniform annotation, to facilitate genomic approaches to improved biofuel feedstock production. These data have been centralized in the publicly available Bioenergy Feedstock Genomics Resource (http://bfgr.plantbiology.msu.edu/).

  6. Closure Report for the 92-Acre Area and Corrective Action Unit 111: Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of the 92-Acre Area, which includes Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111, 'Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits.' This CR provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that the closure objectives were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996 [as amended March 2010]). Closure activities began in January 2011 and were completed in January 2012. Closure activities were conducted according to Revision 1 of the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) for the 92-Acre Area and CAU 111 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2010). The following closure activities were performed: (1) Construct an engineered evapotranspiration cover over the boreholes, trenches, and pits in the 92-Acre Area; (2) Install use restriction (UR) warning signs, concrete monuments, and subsidence survey monuments; and (3) Establish vegetation on the covers. UR documentation is included as Appendix C of this report. The post-closure plan is presented in detail in Revision 1 of the CADD/CAP for the 92-Acre Area and CAU 111, and the requirements are summarized in Section 5.2 of this document. When the next request for modification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit NEV HW0101 is submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), the requirements for post-closure monitoring of the 92-Acre Area will be included. NNSA/NSO requests the following: (1) A Notice of Completion from NDEP to NNSA/NSO for closure of CAU 111; and (2) The transfer of CAU 111 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO.

  7. Biotech crops are sprouting up around the globe. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Harvested: E-mail Signup Weekly Newsletter Updates Truth About Trade & Technology - National Biofuels Action National Biofuels Action Plan released National Biofuels Action Plan released User Rating: / 1 Poor Best Original Publish Date: October 7, 2008 A National Biofuels Action Plan (NBAP) designed to speed

  8. Biofuels Fuels Technology Pathway Options for Advanced Drop-in Biofuels Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin L Kenney

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced drop-in hydrocarbon biofuels require biofuel alternatives for refinery products other than gasoline. Candidate biofuels must have performance characteristics equivalent to conventional petroleum-based fuels. The technology pathways for biofuel alternatives also must be plausible, sustainable (e.g., positive energy balance, environmentally benign, etc.), and demonstrate a reasonable pathway to economic viability and end-user affordability. Viable biofuels technology pathways must address feedstock production and environmental issues through to the fuel or chemical end products. Potential end products include compatible replacement fuel products (e.g., gasoline, diesel, and JP8 and JP5 jet fuel) and other petroleum products or chemicals typically produced from a barrel of crude. Considering the complexity and technology diversity of a complete biofuels supply chain, no single entity or technology provider is capable of addressing in depth all aspects of any given pathway; however, all the necessary expert entities exist. As such, we propose the assembly of a team capable of conducting an in-depth technology pathway options analysis (including sustainability indicators and complete LCA) to identify and define the domestic biofuel pathways for a Green Fleet. This team is not only capable of conducting in-depth analyses on technology pathways, but collectively they are able to trouble shoot and/or engineer solutions that would give industrial technology providers the highest potential for success. Such a team would provide the greatest possible down-side protection for high-risk advanced drop-in biofuels procurement(s).

  9. A national program for energy-efficient mortgages and home energy rating systems: A blueprint for action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Review Draft reports findings and recommendations of the National Collaborative on Home Energy Rating Systems and Mortgage Incentives for Energy Efficiency. The US Department of Energy, in cooperation with the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, formed this National Collaborative as a National Energy Strategy initiative. Participating in the Collaborative were representatives of the primary and secondary mortgage markets, builder and remodeler organizations, real estate and appraiser associations, the home energy rating system industry, utility associations, consumer and public interest groups, state and local government interest groups, and environmental organizations. The Collaborative's purpose was to develop a voluntary national program encouraging energy efficiency in homes through mortgage incentives linked to home energy ratings.

  10. Visioning 2050 BNL's Contribution to the NYS Climate Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    and Energy Climate change: motivations for NYS action Some energy facts New York State Climate Action Plan, and storage Energy Strategy Focus: Discovery to Deployment CFN/Nanoscience NSLS II New York Blue Core Programs improvements of heating systems, biofuels - Building controls, energy management , etc. #12;#12;The New York

  11. Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    due to first and second generation biofuels and uncertaintyIntroducing First and Second Generation Biofuels into GTAP

  12. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 465: Hydronuclear Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, with ROTC 1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 465, Hydronuclear, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 465 comprises the following four corrective action sites (CASs) located in Areas 6 and 27 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) 00-23-01, Hydronuclear Experiment; (2) 00-23-02, Hydronuclear Experiment; (3) 00-23-03, Hydronuclear Experiment; (4) 06-99-01, Hydronuclear. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 6, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for each CAS in CAU 465. For CAU 465, two potential release components have been identified. The subsurface release component includes potential releases of radiological and nonradiological contaminants from the subsurface hydronuclear experiments and disposal boreholes. The surface release component consists of other potential releases of radiological and nonradiological contaminants to surface soils that may have occurred during the pre- and post-test activities. This plan provides the methodology for collection of the necessary information for closing each CAS component. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation, contaminant characteristics, existing regional and site groundwater models, and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 465 using the SAFER process. For potential subsurface releases, flow and transport models will be developed to integrate existing data into a conservative description of contaminant migration in the unsaturated zone from the hydronuclear experiments and disposal boreholes. For the potential surface releases, additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS component. It is anticipated that results of the flow and transport models, the field investigation, and implementation of the corrective action of closure in place will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support the closure of CAU 465: (1) Perform site preparation activities (e.g., utilities clearances, and radiological and visual surveys). (2) Move or remove and dispose of debris at various CASs, as required. (3) Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., stained soil) to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern as necessary to supplement existing information. (4) Evaluate and analyze existing data to develop conservative flow and transport models to simulate the potential for contaminant migration from the hydronuclear experiments and disposal boreholes to the water table within 1,000 years. (5) Confirm the preferred closure option (closure in place with use restrictions) is sufficient to protect human health and the environment.

  13. Engineering microbial biofuel tolerance and export using efflux pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunlop, Mary

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    biofuel production. Two pumps consistently survived thethe native E. coli pump Molecular Systems Biology 2011 3biofuel tolerance using ef?ux pumps MJ Dunlop et al A A.

  14. From Processing Juice to Producing Biofuels | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    From Processing Juice to Producing Biofuels From Processing Juice to Producing Biofuels June 25, 2010 - 4:00pm Addthis Lindsay Gsell INEOS Bio -- one of the 17 global companies of...

  15. The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? The Farmer's Conundrum: Income from Biofuels or Protect the Soil? July 1, 2010 - 11:39am Addthis Lindsay Gsell...

  16. The effect of biofuel on the international oil market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak; Zilberman, David D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biofuel on the International Oil Market Gal Hochman, Deepakof biofuel on the international oil market ? Gal Hochman,are dominated by cartel of oil-rich countries, and that

  17. 5th International Conference on Algal Biomass, Biofuels and Bioproduct...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5th International Conference on Algal Biomass, Biofuels and Bioproducts 5th International Conference on Algal Biomass, Biofuels and Bioproducts June 7, 2015 8:00AM EDT to June 10,...

  18. Metabolic Engineering of oleaginous yeast for the production of biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tai, Mitchell

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The past few years have introduced a flurry of interest over renewable energy sources. Biofuels have gained attention as renewable alternatives to liquid transportation fuels. Microbial platforms for biofuel production ...

  19. Unintended Environmental Consequences of a Global Biofuels Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melillo, Jerry M.

    Biofuels are being promoted as an important part of the global energy mix to meet the climate change challenge. The environmental costs of biofuels produced with current technologies at small scales have been studied, but ...

  20. Video: A New Biofuels Technology Blooms in Iowa

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cellulosic biofuels made from agricultural residue have caught the attention of many farmers and could be the next revolution in renewable biofuels production. This video shows how an innovative...

  1. Biofuels from Bacteria Is PNNL Biochemist’s Goal (DOE Pulse Profile)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiley, Julie G.; Manke, Kristin L.

    2012-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    When you ask Mary Lipton what her strengths are, she quickly responds with her personality type. 'I'm an Expressive,' she says, aptly punctuating her words with her hands. 'The plus side is that I communicate and collaborate well, and I look at the bigger picture. On the other hand, I don't concentrate on details. But I can incorporate the details into a larger vision.' Regardless of how they are perceived, these traits have served Lipton well as a scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. She's nationally recognized for applying new mass spectrometry-based technologies to characterize environmental microbes and microbial communities, particularly for their use in generating biofuels. 'I work on biofuels because at some point, everyone pays for the high cost of fuel. It affects all of us, whether directly at the gas pump or by higher food and materials costs,' says Lipton. Lipton categorizes her biofuels research area as environmental proteomics, which she defines as the application of advanced protein-based techniques to understanding environmental and biological systems. But she's quick to note that environmental proteomics doesn't just aid development of new biofuels, but also helps further understanding of the impact of climate change and the use of organisms for bioremediation.

  2. World Biofuels Assessment; Worldwide Biomass Potential: Technology Characterizations (Milestone Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bain, R. L.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Milestone report prepared by NREL to estimate the worldwide potential to produce and transport ethanol and other biofuels.

  3. Spectral optical properties of selected photosynthetic microalgae producing biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Euntaek; Heng, Ri-Liang; Pilon, Laurent

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biochemical composition of microalgae from the green algalof Selected Photosynthetic Microalgae Producing Biofuelsof Selected Photosyn- thetic Microalgae Producing Biofuels”,

  4. Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Webinar transcript. sustainabilityglobalbiofuelswebinar.doc More Documents & Publications Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry Minimizing Risks and Maximizing...

  5. Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry Minimizing Risks...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    nationalpresentation.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities Webinar Transcript...

  6. Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Opportunities Sustainability for the Global Biofuels Industry: Minimizing Risks and Maximizing Opportunities Introduction slides for the webinar describing bioenergy and...

  7. Impacts of Climate Change on Biofuels Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melillo, Jerry M. [Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA (United States)

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this research project was to improve and use our biogeochemistry model, TEM, to simulate the effects of climate change and other environmental changes on the production of biofuel feedstocks. We used the improved version of TEM that is coupled with the economic model, EPPA, a part of MIT’s Earth System Model, to explore how alternative uses of land, including land for biofuels production, can help society meet proposed climate targets. During the course of this project, we have made refinements to TEM that include development of a more mechanistic plant module, with improved ecohydrology and consideration of plant-water relations, and a more detailed treatment of soil nitrogen dynamics, especially processes that add or remove nitrogen from ecosystems. We have documented our changes to TEM and used the model to explore the effects on production in land ecosystems, including changes in biofuels production.

  8. Economics of Current and Future Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, L.; Aden, A.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents detailed comparative analysis on the production economics of both current and future biofuels, including ethanol, biodiesel, and butanol. Our objectives include demonstrating the impact of key parameters on the overall process economics (e.g., plant capacity, raw material pricing, and yield) and comparing how next-generation technologies and fuels will differ from today's technologies. The commercialized processes and corresponding economics presented here include corn-based ethanol, sugarcane-based ethanol, and soy-based biodiesel. While actual full-scale economic data are available for these processes, they have also been modeled using detailed process simulation. For future biofuel technologies, detailed techno-economic data exist for cellulosic ethanol from both biochemical and thermochemical conversion. In addition, similar techno-economic models have been created for n-butanol production based on publicly available literature data. Key technical and economic challenges facing all of these biofuels are discussed.

  9. Catalysis and Synthesis | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for better catalysts has deep connections to our nation's economy. From biofuels to plastics, the majority of the products we depend on in our everyday lives rely on catalysts....

  10. Climate impacts of a large-scale biofuels expansion*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate impacts of a large-scale biofuels expansion* Willow Hallgren, C. Adam Schlosser, Erwan impacts of a large-scale biofuels expansion Willow Hallgren,1 C. Adam Schlosser,1 Erwan Monier,1 David March 2013. [1] A global biofuels program will potentially lead to intense pressures on land supply

  11. UNU-IAS Policy Report Biofuels in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNU-IAS Policy Report Biofuels in Africa Impacts on Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Human Well-being #12;#12;UNU-IAS Policy Report Biofuels in Africa Impacts on Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Human........................................................................................................... 9 1.2 Biofuel drivers, feedstocks and policies in Africa

  12. For discussion purposes only Biofuel and Poverty Nexus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    For discussion purposes only Biofuel and Poverty Nexus in Asia 13th Poverty and Environment Partnership Meeting Myo Thant Manila, 11 June 2008 #12;For discussion purposes only Interest in Biofuels has and policies · Number of countries · Different biofuel feedstock · Research on second generation technology #12

  13. Metabolic Engineering for Improved Biofuel Yield in a Marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Metabolic Engineering for Improved Biofuel Yield in a Marine Cyanobacterium/conclusion · future work that will be done to increase biofuel yield #12;Problems? · Many na@al renewable source of energy -Biofuel produc@on from aqua@c photoautotroph

  14. ORNL/TM-2007/224 BIOFUEL FEEDSTOCK ASSESSMENT FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    ORNL/TM-2007/224 BIOFUEL FEEDSTOCK ASSESSMENT FOR SELECTED COUNTRIES Keith L. Kline Gbadebo A Government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/TM-2007/224 BIOFUEL FEEDSTOCK ASSESSMENT FOR SELECTED COUNTRIES To Support the DOE study of Worldwide Potential to Produce Biofuels with a focus on U.S. Imports Keith L

  15. Spatial Modeling of Geographic Patterns in Biodiversity and Biofuel Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spatial Modeling of Geographic Patterns in Biodiversity and Biofuel Production How can the US of biodiversity. The future of the biofuel industry will depend on public investment and trust that industry for increasing biofuel production have already come under fire because of real and perceived threats

  16. Engineering microbial biofuel tolerance and export using efflux pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunlop, Mary

    REPORT Engineering microbial biofuel tolerance and export using efflux pumps Mary J Dunlop1 16.9.10; accepted 6.4.11 Many compounds being considered as candidates for advanced biofuels for biofuel production because the engineered microbes must balance production against survival. Cellular

  17. Microfluidic Glycosyl Hydrolase Screening for Biomass-to-Biofuel Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Anup

    Microfluidic Glycosyl Hydrolase Screening for Biomass-to-Biofuel Conversion Rajiv Bharadwaj such as cellulases and hemicellulases is a limiting and costly step in the conversion of biomass to biofuels. Lignocellulosic (LC) biomass is an abundant and potentially carbon-neutral resource for production of biofuels

  18. Global Assessments and Guidelines for Sustainable Liquid Biofuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Assessments and Guidelines for Sustainable Liquid Biofuel Production in Developing Countries Biofuel Production in Developing Countries FINAL REPORT A GEF Targeted Research Project Organized by Bernd for Sustainable Liquid Biofuels. A GEF Targeted Research Project. Heidelberg/Paris/Utrecht/Darmstadt, 29 February

  19. Single Glucose Biofuel Cells Implanted in Rats Power Electronic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Single Glucose Biofuel Cells Implanted in Rats Power Electronic Devices A. Zebda1,2 , S. Cosnier1 the first implanted glucose biofuel cell (GBFC) that is capable of generating sufficient power from a mammal further developments. Following recent developments in nano- and biotechnology, state-of-the-art biofuel

  20. Global Biofuel Production and Food Security: Implications for Asia Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Biofuel Production and Food Security: Implications for Asia Pacific 56th AARES Annual Conference Fremantle, Western Australia 7-10 February 2012 William T. Coyle #12;Global Biofuel Production and Food Security: Making the Connection --Past analysis and the evidence about biofuels and spiking

  1. California Policy Should Distinguish Biofuels by Differential Global Warming Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    California Policy Should Distinguish Biofuels by Differential Global Warming Effects by Richard J: _______________________________________ Date #12;California Policy Should Distinguish Biofuels by Differential Global Warming Effects Richard J, 2006 #12;#12;ABSTRACT California Policy Should Distinguish Biofuels by Differential Global Warming

  2. International Symposium Transport and Air Pollution Session 6: Biofuels 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1Sth International Symposium Transport and Air Pollution Session 6: Biofuels 2 Determination of VOC components in the exhaust of light vehicles fuelled with different biofuels F. Gazier 1,4*, A. De/bende 1 of the emissions shows changes with the composition of the biofuel in the levels of hydrocarbons, aromatic

  3. Global biofuel drive raises risk of eviction for African farmers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global biofuel drive raises risk of eviction for African farmers African farmers risk being forced from their lands by investors or government projects as global demand for biofuels encourages changes at risk if African farmland is turned over to growing crops for biofuel. With growing pressure to find

  4. Recycling Water: one step to making algal biofuels a reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Recycling Water: one step to making algal biofuels a reality Manuel Vasquez, Juan Sandoval acquisition of solar power, nuclear power, and biofuels to diversify the country's domestic energy profile, the chemical make-up of biofuels allows them to be readily converted into their petroleum counterparts making

  5. USDA Biofuels Strategic Production Report June 23, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Biofuels Strategic Production Report June 23, 2010 1 A USDA Regional Roadmap to Meeting the Biofuels Goals of the Renewable Fuels Standard by 2022 I. INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Agriculture. The strategy targets barriers to the development of a successful biofuels market that will achieve, or surpass

  6. Media Framing and Public Attitudes Toward Biofuels Ashlie Delshad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Media Framing and Public Attitudes Toward Biofuels Ashlie Delshad Department of Political Science between media framing and public opinion on the issue of biofuels--transportation fuels made from plants, animal products, or organic waste. First, the paper investigates how media framing of biofuels has

  7. Invitation/Program Technology Watch Day on Future Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Invitation/Program Technology Watch Day on Future Biofuels and 4. TMFB International Workshop;International Research Centers Focussing on Future Biofuels are Presenting Their Research Approaches and Current Concerning Future Biofuels DBFZ ­ Deutsches Biomasseforschungszentrum M. Seiffert, F. Mueller-Langer German

  8. Biofuels in the ASEAN Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) Forum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9/20/2012 1 Biofuels in the ASEAN Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS) Forum Bangkok, Thailand 19-21 September 2012 Biofuel Policy Group Asian Institute of Technology Outline of the Presentation 1. Objectives of this Presentation 2. Background 3. Status of Biofuel Development in ASEAN 4

  9. II. Greenhouse gas markets, carbon dioxide credits and biofuels17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    15 II. Greenhouse gas markets, carbon dioxide credits and biofuels17 The previous chapter analysed biofuels production. GHG policies18 that create a carbon price either through an emissions trading system or directly by taxing GHG emissions also generate increased demand for biofuels. They do so by raising

  10. Second Generation Biofuels: High-Efficiency Microalgae for Biodiesel Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kudela, Raphael M.

    Second Generation Biofuels: High-Efficiency Microalgae for Biodiesel Production Peer M. Schenk fuels make up a much larger share of the global energy demand (66%). Biofuels are therefore rapidly for transport fuels. Increasing biofuel production on arable land could have severe consequences for global food

  11. Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purpose-designed Crop Plants for Biofuels BIOENERGY PROGRAM The Texas AgriLife Research Center for the biofuels industry. This program recognizes that the ideal combination of traits required for an economically and energetically sustainable biofuels industry does not yet exist in a single plant spe- cies

  12. September 2010 FAPRI-MU US Biofuels, Corn Processing,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    September 2010 FAPRI-MU US Biofuels, Corn Processing, Distillers Grains, Fats, Switchgrass-882-4256 or the US Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights. #12;1 Overview of FAPRI-MU Biofuels, Corn listed here represent US biofuel, corn processing, distillers grains, fats, switchgrass, and corn stover

  13. Nottingham Business School Biofuels Market and Policy Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    Nottingham Business School Biofuels Market and Policy Governance The last decade has seen a dramatic growth in the global production and consumption of biofuels, as a rapidly- rising number triggered growing concerns about the downsides from different types of biofuel. This, in turn, presents

  14. Battery electric vehicles, hydrogen fuel cells and biofuels. Which will

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Battery electric vehicles, hydrogen fuel cells and biofuels. Which will be the winner? ICEPT considered are: improved internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs) powered by biofuels, battery electric. All three fuels considered (i.e.: biofuels, electricity and hydrogen) are in principle compatible

  15. Biofuels, Climate Policy, and the European Vehicle Fleet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuels, Climate Policy, and the European Vehicle Fleet Xavier Gitiaux, Sebastian Rausch, Sergey on the Science and Policy of Global Change. Abstract We examine the effect of biofuels mandates and climate incorporates current generation biofuels, accounts for stock turnover of the vehicle fleets, disaggregates

  16. Biofuels' Time of Transition Achieving high performance in a world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Biofuels' Time of Transition Achieving high performance in a world of increasing fuel diversity #12;2 Table of contents #12;3 Introduction Up close: Highlights of Accenture's first biofuels study An evolving biofuels industry 1 Consumer influence Guest commentary on land-use change In focus: The food

  17. Near-zero emissions combustor system for syngas and biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yongho, Kim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rosocha, Louis [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-institutional plasma combustion team was awarded a research project from the DOE/NNSA GIPP (Global Initiative for Prolifereation Prevention) office. The Institute of High Current Electronics (Tomsk, Russia); Leonardo Technologies, Inc. (an American-based industrial partner), in conjunction with the Los Alamos National Laboratory are participating in the project to develop novel plasma assisted combustion technologies. The purpose of this project is to develop prototypes of marketable systems for more stable and cleaner combustion of syngas/biofuels and to demonstrate that this technology can be used for a variety of combustion applications - with a major focus on contemporary gas turbines. In this paper, an overview of the project, along with descriptions of the plasma-based combustors and associated power supplies will be presented. Worldwide, it is recognized that a variety of combustion fuels will be required to meet the needs for supplying gas-turbine engines (electricity generation, propulsion), internal combustion engines (propulsion, transportation), and burners (heat and electricity generation) in the 21st Century. Biofuels and biofuel blends have already been applied to these needs, but experience difficulties in modifications to combustion processes and combustor design and the need for flame stabilization techniques to address current and future environmental and energy-efficiency challenges. In addition, municipal solid waste (MSW) has shown promise as a feedstock for heat and/or electricity-generating plants. However, current combustion techniques that use such fuels have problems with achieving environmentally-acceptable air/exhaust emissions and can also benefit from increased combustion efficiency. This project involves a novel technology (a form of plasma-assisted combustion) that can address the above issues. Plasma-assisted combustion (PAC) is a growing field that is receiving worldwide attention at present. The project is focused on research necessary to develop a novel, high-efficiency, low-emissions (near-zero, or as low as reasonably achievable), advanced combustion technology for electricity and heat production from biofuels and fuels derived from MSW. For any type of combustion technology, including the advanced technology of this project, two problems of special interest must be addressed: developing and optimizing the combustion chambers and the systems for igniting and sustaining the fuel-burning process. For MSW in particular, there are new challenges over gaseous or liquid fuels because solid fuels must be ground into fine particulates ({approx} 10 {micro}m diameter), fed into the advanced combustor, and combusted under plasma-assisted conditions that are quite different than gaseous or liquid fuels. The principal idea of the combustion chamber design is to use so-called reverse vortex gas flow, which allows efficient cooling of the chamber wall and flame stabilization in the central area of the combustor (Tornado chamber). Considerable progress has been made in design ing an advanced, reverse vortex flow combustion chamber for biofuels, although it was not tested on biofuels and a system that could be fully commercialized has never been completed.

  18. Biofuels Report Final | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximately 10 wt% moisture,BiofuelsBiofuels

  19. Assessing the environmental sustainability of biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazamia, Elena; Smith, Alison G.

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Corresponding author: Kazamia, E (ek288@cam.ac.uk) 5 6 Key Words 7 Biofuels, sustainability, life cycle analysis, evidence-based policy 8 9 Highlights 10 1. Liquid biofuels can be produced from a range of biomass feedstocks, but not all 11 approaches... in the transport sector, 46 without change in infrastructure. In theory it is possible to convert any biomass feedstock 47 into a liquid or gas fuel using appropriate chemical engineering techniques, but the 48 efficiency of conversion, cost and scale of demand...

  20. AN OVERVIEW OF BIOFUELS PROCESS DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTH CAROLINA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, S.; French, T.

    2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The South Carolina Bio-Energy Research Collaborative is working together on the development and demonstration of technology options for the production of bio-fuels using renewable non-food crops and biomass resources that are available or could be made available in abundance in the southeastern United States. This collaboration consists of Arborgen LLC, Clemson University, Savannah River National Laboratory, and South Carolina State University, with support from Dyadic, Fagen Engineering, Renewed World Energies, and Spinx. Thus far, most work has centered on development of a fermentation-based process to convert switchgrass into ethanol, with the concomitant generation of a purified lignin stream. The process is not feed-specific, and the work scope has recently expanded to include sweet sorghum and wood. In parallel, the Collaborative is also working on developing an economical path to produce oils and fuels from algae. The Collaborative envisions an integrated bio-fuels process that can accept multiple feedstocks, shares common equipment, and that produces multiple product streams. The Collaborative is not the only group working on bio-energy in South Carolina, and other companies are involved in producing biomass derived energy products at an industrial scale.