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Sample records for natchitoches winn cherokee

  1. Winn Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration Winn Development is a company located...

  2. City of Natchitoches, Louisiana (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Twitter: @natchitoches Facebook: https:www.facebook.comnatchitoches.louisiana.56 Outage Hotline: (318) 357-3880 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -...

  3. Cherokee Wind

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cherokee Wind Presenter: Carol Wyatt Cherokee Nation Businesses, Inc. DOE Tribal Energy Program October 26, 2010 KA W PA W N EE TO NK AW A PO NC A OT OE -M IS S OU RI CH E RO KE E Acr es: 2,633 .348 CH E RO KE E Acr es: 1,641 .687 CHEROKEE NATION Kay County Chilocco Property DATA SOU RC ES: US Census Bureau (T iger Files ) D OQQ's , USGS D RG's, USGS Cherokee Nation Realty D epartment C herokee N ation GeoD ata C enter Date: 12/19/01 e:\project\land\c hilocc o N E W S Tribal Land Chilocco

  4. Cherokee Chilocco Wind

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presenter: Carol Wyatt Cherokee Nation Businesses, Inc. DOE Tribal Energy Program November 15, 2011 Cherokee Chilocco Wind North Central Oklahoma Location KAW PAWNEE TONKAWA PONCA OTOE-MISSOURI CHEROKEE Acres: 2,633.348 CHEROKEE Acres: 1,641.687 C H ERO KEE N ATION Kay C ounty Chilocco Property DATA SOURCES: US Census Bureau (Tiger Files) DOQQ's, USGS DRG's, USGS Cherokee Nation Realty Department Cherokee Nation GeoData Center Date: 12/19/01 e:\project\land\chilocco N E W S Tribal Land Chilocco

  5. Cherokee Nation - Wind Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cherokee Nation Enterprises Presented by: Carol Wyatt Cherokee Nation Enterprises Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program November 6, 2007 Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program November 6, 2007 HEROKEE HEROKEE C N E R G C N E R G ATION ATION NERGY by NERGY by ENEWABLE ENEWABLE ENERATION ENERATION 1 Cooperative interaction among groups, especially among the acquired subsidiaries or merged parts of an entity or corporation, that creates an enhanced combined effect. 1 Cooperative

  6. Status of Cherokee Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This is the first in a series of reports prepared by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overviews of Cherokee Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports, publications, and data available, and interviews with water resource professionals in various Federal, state, and local agencies and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Cherokee Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cherokee Electric Coop Place: Alabama Phone Number: 1-800-952-2667 or (256) 927-5524 Website: www.cherokee.coop Outage Hotline:...

  8. Cherokee Nation - Wind Power Generation Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wyatt, CNE 24 October 2006 - Tribal Energy Program Denver, Colorado Presented by: Carol Wyatt, CNE 24 October 2006 - Tribal Energy Program Denver, Colorado Cherokee Wind Project Synopsis Cherokee Wind Project Synopsis Financially Feasible Wind Resource Electrical Load for all Cherokee Entities is $8 million 100 megawatt (40 Wind Turbines) Offset Entire $8 million Tribal Electrical costs Recover Initial Project Investment in 5 Years Gross $198,764,490.00 in Years 6 - 20 Other Commercial,

  9. Cherokee Nation Businesses, LLC.- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cherokee Nation Businesses, LLC (CNB) will conduct pre-construction activities in support of the design and installation of a 127.5 MW wind farm.

  10. Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) is using the grant funds from the Department of Energy to complete the Energy Efficiency Improvements to seven EBCI facilities.

  11. Cherokee Nation - Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    8, 2005 Oklahoma - 8 th in the Nation for wind 13 Month Wind Energy Feasibility Study - U.S. Dept of Energy grant Cherokee Nation, 2nd largest Indian Tribe - 256,938 members ...

  12. Cherokee Nation Businesses, LLC.- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the goal of the Cherokee Nation to have profitable enterprises so that the tribe can become self-sufficient. The Cherokee Nation will perform a wind energy feasibility study on land owned by the tribe in Kay County, north-central Oklahoma. This land consists of two tracts of fee and trust land totaling approximately 4,275 acres. The land is presently leased for grazing.

  13. Cherokee County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    169-2006 Climate Zone Number 6 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Cherokee County, Iowa Aurelia, Iowa Cherokee, Iowa Cleghorn, Iowa Larrabee, Iowa Marcus, Iowa Meriden, Iowa Quimby,...

  14. Cherokee County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Cherokee County, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates...

  15. Project Reports for Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) is using the grant funds from the Department of Energy to complete the Energy Efficiency Improvements to seven EBCI facilities.

  16. Project Reports for Cherokee Nation Businesses, LLC.- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cherokee Nation Businesses, LLC (CNB) will conduct pre-construction activities in support of the design and installation of a 127.5 MW wind farm.

  17. Project Reports for Cherokee Nation Businesses, LLC. - 2003 Project |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Cherokee Nation Businesses, LLC. - 2003 Project Project Reports for Cherokee Nation Businesses, LLC. - 2003 Project It is the goal of the Cherokee Nation to have profitable enterprises so that the tribe can become self-sufficient. The Cherokee Nation will perform a wind energy feasibility study on land owned by the tribe in Kay County, north-central Oklahoma. This land consists of two tracts of fee and trust land totaling approximately 4,275 acres. The land is presently

  18. Cherokee Nation Enterprises Wind Energy Feasibility Study Grant Report, October 19, 2004

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ENERGY WIND ENERGY FEASIBILITY STUDY FEASIBILITY STUDY Grant Report Grant Report October 19, 2004 October 19, 2004 Cherokee Nation Enterprises Cherokee Nation Enterprises Cherokee Nation Enterprises * Cherokee Nation - 2 nd Largest Tribe in the United States - 14-county Jurisdiction in Northeastern Oklahoma * 13-month study - Approximately $270,000 - Location in Kay County, Oklahoma on 4,275 acre property Cherokee Nation Enterprises * Model 4000 MiniSODAR High Frequency Doppler Equipment - Wind

  19. Eastern Band of Cherokee Strategic Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souther Carolina Institute of energy Studies-Robert Leitner

    2009-01-30

    The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians was awarded a grant under the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program (TEP) to develop a Tribal Strategic Energy Plan (SEP). The grant, awarded under the “First Steps” phase of the TEP, supported the development of a SEP that integrates with the Tribe’s plans for economic development, preservation of natural resources and the environment, and perpetuation of Tribal heritage and culture. The Tribe formed an Energy Committee consisting of members from various departments within the Tribal government. This committee, together with its consultant, the South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies, performed the following activities: • Develop the Tribe’s energy goals and objectives • Establish the Tribe’s current energy usage • Identify available renewable energy and energy efficiency options • Assess the available options versus the goals and objectives • Create an action plan for the selected options

  20. $1.4 million to Cherokee Services Group for Administrative and Property Support Services

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "When CSG undertakes a project, we are not simply representing a brand or even a corporation.  We are representing the reputation of an entire nation and culture.  The name Cherokee and the...

  1. Cherokee Nation Enterprises Wind Energy Feasibility Study Final Report to U.S. DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carol E. Wyatt

    2006-04-30

    CNE has conducted a feasibility study on the Chilocco property in north-central Oklahoma since the grant award on July 20, 2003. This study has concluded that there is sufficient wind for a wind farm and that with the Production Tax Credits and Green Tags, there will be sufficient energy to, not only cover the costs of the Nation’s energy needs, but to provide a profit. CNE has developed a wind energy team and is working independently and with industry partners to bring its renewable energy resources to the marketplace. We are continuing with the next phase in conducting avian, cultural and transmission studies, as well as continuing to measure the wind with the SoDAR unit. Cherokee Nation Enterprises, Inc. is a wholly-owned corporation under Cherokee Nation and has managed the Department of Energy grant award since July 20, 2003. In summary, we have determined there is sufficient wind for a wind farm at the Chilocco property where Cherokee Nation owns approximately 4,275 acres. The primary goal would be more of a savings in light of the electricity used by Cherokee Nation and its entities which totals an estimated eight million dollars per year. Cherokee Nation Enterprises (CNE), working independently and with industry partners, plans to bring its renewable energy resources into the marketplace through a well-documented understanding of our undeveloped resource. Our plan is to cultivate this resource in a way that will ensure the development and use for our energy will be in an environmentally and culturally acceptable form.

  2. Winn, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.4856144, -68.372245 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":...

  3. Solute concentrations influence microbial methanogenesis in coal-bearing strata of the Cherokee basin, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kirk, Matthew F.; Wilson, Brien H.; Marquart, Kyle A.; Zeglin, Lydia H.; Vinson, David S.; Flynn, Theodore M.

    2015-11-18

    In this study, microorganisms have contributed significantly to subsurface energy resources by converting organic matter in hydrocarbon reservoirs into methane, the main component of natural gas. In this study, we consider environmental controls on microbial populations in coal-bearing strata of the Cherokee basin, an unconventional natural gas resource in southeast Kansas, USA. Pennsylvanian-age strata in the basin contain numerous thin (0.4–1.1 m) coalbeds with marginal thermal maturities (0.5–0.7% Ro) that are interbedded with shale and sandstone. We collected gas, water, and microbe samples from 16 commercial coalbed methane wells for geochemical and microbiological analysis. The water samples were Na–Cl typemore » with total dissolved solids (TDS) content ranging from 34.9 to 91.3 g L–1. Gas dryness values [C1/(C2 + C3)] averaged 2640 and carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of methane differed from those of carbon dioxide and water, respectively, by an average of 65 and 183‰. These values are thought to be consistent with gas that formed primarily by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Results from cultivation assays and taxonomic analysis of 16S rRNA genes agree with the geochemical results. Cultivable methanogens were present in every sample tested, methanogen sequences dominate the archaeal community in each sample (avg 91%), and few archaeal sequences (avg 4.2%) were classified within Methanosarcinales, an order of methanogens known to contain methylotrophic methanogens. Although hydrogenotrophs appear dominant, geochemical and microbial analyses both indicate that the proportion of methane generated by acetoclastic methanogens increases with the solute content of formation water, a trend that is contrary to existing conceptual models. Consistent with this trend, beta diversity analyses show that archaeal diversity significantly correlates with formation water solute content. In contrast, bacterial diversity more strongly correlates with location

  4. Solute concentrations influence microbial methanogenesis in coal-bearing strata of the Cherokee basin, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirk, Matthew F.; Wilson, Brien H.; Marquart, Kyle A.; Zeglin, Lydia H.; Vinson, David S.; Flynn, Theodore M.

    2015-11-18

    In this study, microorganisms have contributed significantly to subsurface energy resources by converting organic matter in hydrocarbon reservoirs into methane, the main component of natural gas. In this study, we consider environmental controls on microbial populations in coal-bearing strata of the Cherokee basin, an unconventional natural gas resource in southeast Kansas, USA. Pennsylvanian-age strata in the basin contain numerous thin (0.4–1.1 m) coalbeds with marginal thermal maturities (0.5–0.7% Ro) that are interbedded with shale and sandstone. We collected gas, water, and microbe samples from 16 commercial coalbed methane wells for geochemical and microbiological analysis. The water samples were Na–Cl type with total dissolved solids (TDS) content ranging from 34.9 to 91.3 g L–1. Gas dryness values [C1/(C2 + C3)] averaged 2640 and carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of methane differed from those of carbon dioxide and water, respectively, by an average of 65 and 183‰. These values are thought to be consistent with gas that formed primarily by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Results from cultivation assays and taxonomic analysis of 16S rRNA genes agree with the geochemical results. Cultivable methanogens were present in every sample tested, methanogen sequences dominate the archaeal community in each sample (avg 91%), and few archaeal sequences (avg 4.2%) were classified within Methanosarcinales, an order of methanogens known to contain methylotrophic methanogens. Although hydrogenotrophs appear dominant, geochemical and microbial analyses both indicate that the proportion of methane generated by acetoclastic methanogens increases with the solute content of formation water, a trend that is contrary to existing conceptual models. Consistent with this trend, beta diversity analyses show that archaeal diversity significantly correlates with formation water solute content. In contrast

  5. Biotelemetry study of spring and summer habitat selection by striped bass in Cherokee Reservoir, Tennessee, 1978. [Morone saxatilis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaich, B.A.; Coutant, C.C.

    1980-08-01

    Habitat selection of 31 adult striped bass was monitored by temperature sensing ultrasonic and radio transmitters in Cherokee Reservoir, Tennessee, from March through October 1978. This study sought to corroborate summer data obtained by Waddle (1979) in 1977 and to examine mechanisms of habitat selection by observing establishment of the summer distribution. During the spring and early summer months the striped bass ranged throughout the study area in the downstream half of the reservoir. Fish stayed near the bottom at the preferred temperatures throughout the whole study, and no individuals were observed in open water. Movement rates of up to 2.6 km/day were estimated, and rates of 1 km/day were common in the spring. By late July they were apparently avoiding low dissolved oxygen (D.O.) concentrations (<3 mg/l) near the bottom of the main reservoir and epilimnion temperatures greater than 22/sup 0/C, and they moved into cool, oxygenated spring or creek channels (refuges). Low movement rates of 0 to 25 m/day within these refuges occurred. The rates of the few migrations between refuges could not be estimated. Tagged fish moved out of the refuges 3 to 4 weeks after the fall overturn when reservoir temperatures approximated 22 to 24/sup 0/C.

  6. Cherokee Chilocco Wind

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    agreements * Contracts (leases, budgets, ownership) * Need to present again to Council * Waiting for PTC extension * Senate Bill 1440 * Blocking wind farm development East of I-35

  7. Cherokee Chiloccco Wind

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    C H ERO KEE N ATION Kay C ounty Chilocco Property DATA SOURCES: US Census Bureau (Tiger ... N E W S Tribal Land Chilocco Property PNE WIND USA II Project Development Cycle ...

  8. Cherokee Nation Enterprises - Wind Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Businesses Tribal Energy Program 2008 November 18, 2008 HEROKEE C N E R G ATION NERGY by ENEWABLE ENERATION Wind Farm Project Location Wind Speeds Measured for 4 Years at Chilocco. . . Class III Commercial Wind! ROI in less than 6 years $672+ Million Net Income for 25 yrs. ONLY if we own 100% Precise Project Management *Vendor Reliability *Knowledgeable Personnel *Timetables and Schedule Mgmt. Risk Management Risk Management Risk Management Investment vs. Expenses (Revenue for 2007) GAMING WIND

  9. Evaluation of Gas Reburning & Low NOx Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler Performance and Economics Report Gas Reburning-Low NOx Burner System Cherokee Station Unit 3 Public Service Company of Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NOX reduction (70%) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was performed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado Bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NOX emission level of 0.73 lb/106 Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50%. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NOX in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NOX emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was

  10. Eastern Band of Cherokee - Strategic Energy Planning

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Project Participants * Sub consultant and Energy Committee - Energy Committee: Staff from CDOT, Planning and Development, Environmental Department, Executive Office, GIS ...

  11. Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians- 2007 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    An Energy Committee consisting of key tribal government personnel will be established to formulate the tribe's energy vision, goals, and objectives, with input from and approval by the Tribal Budget Council, Tribal Council, and Principal Chief.

  12. Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians - Strategic Energy Planning

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Studies - Clemson University 2 Tribal Energy Program - FY07 Program Review Meeting - 5-8 Nov ... system - Tribe is partitioned into 6 communities - Each community has 2 ...

  13. Cherokee County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.8994729, -94.976654 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googl...

  14. Cherokee County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.1134803,"lon":-84.059029,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  15. Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians - Facility Retrofit Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of HVAC system Replace fluorescent lighting with T-8 system Provide insulation on copper hot water heater lines 15 16 Reductions *Savings of at least 2,195 per year *Energy ...

  16. Cherokee County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ball Ground, Georgia Canton, Georgia Holly Springs, Georgia Mountain Park, Georgia Nelson, Georgia Waleska, Georgia Woodstock, Georgia Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  17. Project Reports for Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians- 2007 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An Energy Committee consisting of key tribal government personnel will be established to formulate the tribe's energy vision, goals, and objectives, with input from and approval by the Tribal Budget Council, Tribal Council, and Principal Chief.

  18. Cherokee County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kansas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.1142482, -94.8105955 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googl...

  19. Other Participants 1998 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    School , Lincoln , NE Louisiana School for Math & Science, Natchitoches , LA McCallie ... , Freemont , CA Mississippi School for Math & Science, Columbus , MS Montgomery Blair ...

  20. BPA-2015-01165-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sent: Tuesday, April 14, 2015 2:04 AM To: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - CGC-B1 Subject: Corona & Field Effects Software and AnyPole Software Dear Ms. Winn, Date Recd 4142015 Due...

  1. BPA-2013-00362-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Email dated January 16, 2013 Winn,Kim S (BPA) - DK-7 From: Korsness,Mark A (BPA) - TEP-TPP-3 Sent: Tuesday, January 15, 2013 5:27 PM To: Cheryl Brantley Cc: Winn,Kim S (BPA) -...

  2. BPA-2016-00257-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dear Kim Winn, Born Dennis van der Winn Kim S CBPAl - CGI -Bl RE: Bonneville Power Administration software Friday, December 04, 2015 8:09:45 AM My ma iling address is: P.O. Box...

  3. BPA-2015-01323-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dun Carbanan To: Winn-Kim S (BPA) CGLbl Subject: RE: FOIA C larification Date: Monday, May 18, 2015 11:28:53 AM From the present to 2012 please. From: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - CGC-B1...

  4. BPA-2013-01582-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    jq Winn,Kim S (BPA) - NN-1 From: Srini Kailasam Sent: Monday, August 26, 2013 9:58 PM To: Winn,Kim S (BPA) NN-1 Subject: Corona and Field...

  5. BPA-2014-00016-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Winn,Kim S (BPA) - NN-1 l f IIHS From: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - NN-1 Sent: Thursday, October 03, 2013 6:37 AM To: 'Pfeiffer Martin' Subject: RE: International FOIA request Received. I...

  6. CARBON AND OXYGEN ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS: BUG, CHEROKEE, AND PATTERSON CANYON FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan; Stephen T. Nelson

    2003-12-01

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  7. USET Tribal Utility Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United South and Eastern Tribes (USET) is hosting its annual Tribal Utility Summit at the Harrah's Cherokee Casino and hosted by Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.

  8. BPA-2013-01353-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (when available), date of college graduation (when available), and qualification status, and outcome." In a phone conversation with Kim Winn, FOIA Specialist, on Tuesday,...

  9. BPA-2013-01337-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (when available), date of college graduation (when available), and qualification status, and outcome." In a phone conversation with Kim Winn, FOIA Specialist, on Tuesday,...

  10. SREL Reprint #3048

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    getula, in South Carolina Christopher T. Winne, John D. Willson, Brian D. Todd, Kimberly M. Andrews, and J. Whitfield Gibbons Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, The...

  11. BPA-2013-00513-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at 206-232-0776 Very truly yours, ACKLEY LAW GROUP Courtney K. Ackley Page 1 of 3 Winn,Kim S (BPA) - DK-7 From: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - DK-7 Sent: Thursday, February 07, 2013 3:10 PM...

  12. BPA-2013-01589-FOIA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    y BPA FOJAOFflPhlS DATE: DUE DATE: q11 k -5 Winn,Kim S (BPA) - NN-1 From: Johnson,G Douglas (BPA) - DKPM-7 Sent: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 8:43 AM To: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - NN-1...

  13. BPA-2014-01689-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Winn,Kim S (BPA) - D-1 From: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - D-1 Sent: Wednesday, August 13, 2014 3:13 PM To: 'Bartos, Miriam' (Miriam.Bartos@ch.doe.gov) Subject: HQ-2014-01285-F BPA has no...

  14. BPA-2012-01815-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Winn,Kim S (BPA) - DK-7 From: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - DK-7 Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2012 1:51 PM To: 'A Better Way for BPA Executive Board' Subject: RE: BPA FOIA request RtCE1'El)...

  15. CX-003586: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Georgia-County-CherokeeCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1Date: 08/25/2010Location(s): Cherokee County, GeorgiaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  16. GEOPHYSICAL WELL LOG/CORE DESCRIPTIONS, CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

    2003-12-01

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  17. CROSS SECTIONS AND FIELD MAPS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

    2003-12-01

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  18. POROSITY/PERMEABILITY CROSS-PLOTS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

    2003-12-01

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  19. SREL Reprint #3086

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Richard N.Winn1, Audrey J. Majeske2,3, Charles H. Jagoe2, Travis C. Glenn2, Michael H. Smith2, and Michelle B. Norris1 1Aquatic Biotechnology and Environmental Laboratory, Warnell ...

  20. BPA-2015-01892-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Date: Ms. Winn: Steve Rodick Wjnn.Kjm S CBPA) - CGI - Bl FOIA - BPA Corona and Field Effects Program Friday, September 25, 2015 11:20:25 AM This is to request a copy of the BPA...

  1. SREL Reprint #3066

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Aspects of the Ecology of the Earth Snakes (Virginia valeriae and V. striatula) in the Upper Coastal Plain Brian D. Todd, John D. Willson, Christopher T. Winne, and J. Whitfield...

  2. BPA-2014-00629 FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S (BPA) - NN-1 Subject: Request for Corona Field Effects Program (CAFEP) Version 3 Hi Kim Winn I am a Power Engineer based in Australia I am wanting to know whether it would...

  3. BPA-2013-01284-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    29, 2014 4:06 PM To: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - NN-1 Subject: RE: FOIA Requst BPA-2013-01284-F Hi Kim, We are fine with limiting our FOIA request to correspondence to and from the two...

  4. BPA-2013-00015-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    To: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - NN-1 Subject: FOIA request for Corona and Field Effects Program Hi Kim, Pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act, I would like to request a copy of your...

  5. BPA-2014-00269-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capra Davide Sent: Thursday, November 28, 2013 8:45 AM To: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - NN-1 Subject: ANYPOLE Software request Attachments: imageO02.jpg Dear Ms....

  6. BPA-2013-01066-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aaron Silberstein Sent: Monday, May 13, 2013 8:23 AM To: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - NN-1 RECEIVED BY BPA Subject: FOIA request FO 1A OFFICE THIS DATE: 1 5110 1115 DUE DATE: Request for...

  7. Morris, Alexander From: DOECMS-Support

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    http:Ienergy.govnode 268183--submission30553 I kO( L- 61Ic1 Page 1 of 1 Winn,Kim S (BPA) - DK-7 From: Ogbazghi, Joan Joan.Ogbazghi @ hq.doe.gov Sent: Tuesday, May 15,...

  8. BPA-2014-00028-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mailto: Shelly.Cooper@hq.doe.gov Sent: Friday, October 04, 2013 7:33 AM To: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - NN-1; Ogbazghi, Joan Cc: Munro,Christy (BPA) - NN-1; Jordan, Christine...

  9. BPA-2014-01562-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Barbara Backman To: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - D-1 Subject: RE: FOIA request BPA-2014-01562-F Date: Wednesday, September 03, 2014 2:50:46 PM Thank you, Kim. I agree to the revision to the...

  10. BPA-2015-01221-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the pricing is the route you want to go. Kim Winn From: Sent: To: Subject: Attachments: Hello, Melissa Genson Saturday, April 25, 2015 7:46 AM...

  11. BPA-2014-01838-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Subject: Corona and Field Effects Program Date: Monday, September 08, 2014 9:37:14 AM Hello Ms. Winn, I am doing a project related to health and safety of powerline fields, for a...

  12. BPA-2013-01154-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 07, 2013 8:17 AM To: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - NN-1 Subject: BPA Corona and Field Effecs Hello Kim, I would like to obtain a copy of the BPA Corona and Field Effects Software. I am...

  13. BPA-2013-01583-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Johnson,G Douglas (BPA) - DKPM-7 Sent: Tuesday, August 27, 2013 1:03 PM To: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - NN-1; Mautner,PauI F (BPA) - LC-7 Subject: Fw: BPA Ethics Hotline information I...

  14. BPA-2012-00676-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Munro Freedom of Information ActPrivacy Act Officer Enclosed: CD From: Perkins,Sam C (BPA) - TESD-CSB-2 Sent: Thursday, February 02, 2012 12:36 PM To: Winn,Kim S (BPA) -...

  15. BPA-2013-01295-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rose rosecmresearch.com Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2013 3:08 PM To: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - NN-1 Subject: FOIA request for budget materials Signed By: rosemresearch.com Kim, Thank you...

  16. BPA-2015-00300-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ryan Callahan To: Winn.Kim S (BPA) - CGF-B1 Subject: RE: Corona & Field Effects software Date: Thursday, December 04, 2014 8:02:00 AM Thank you Ryan T. Callahan, INCE...

  17. BPA-2014-00538-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    archaeological survey done for the BPA line east of Missoula, in the area of Beavertail Hill to Bearmouth stretch." In a phone conversation with Kim Winn on February 3, you noted...

  18. Microsoft Word - BPA-2012-01412-FResponse.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CD Page 1 of 1 Winn,Kim S (BPA) - DK-7 From: Ratnathicam,Shantini (BPA) - TETQ-TPP-3 Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2012 5:23 PM To: Berry,Theresa M (BPA) - TEP-TPP-3;...

  19. SREL Reprint #3041

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Glaudas, X. and C. T. Winne 2007. Do warning displays predict striking behavior in a viperid snake, the cottonmouth (Agkistrodon piscivorus)? Canadian Journal of Zoology 85:574-578...

  20. BPA-2012-00089-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TMS DATE: O Cd DUE DATE: Page 1 of 1 Winn,Kim S - DK -7 From: findeysrnithlewis.com Sent: Thursday, October 13, 2011 1:58 PM To: FOIA Subject: FOIA Request The following is...

  1. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Zhong, Ruidan (6) Birgeneau, R. J. (5) Li, Qiang (5) ... John A. ; Gu, Genda ; Mason, Nadya Zero-bias anomalies ... A. ; Wen, Jinsheng ; Bozin, E. S. ; Granroth, G. E. ; Winn, ...

  2. BPA-2012-01658-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 17, 2012 Ms. Kim Winn FOIA Specialist Bonneville Power Administration Routing: DK-7 P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208 KFxE1VED BY BPA FOIA OFFICE TillS DATE: *7 i DUE...

  3. BPA-2013-01493-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Winn,Kim S (BPA) - NN-1 Sent: Wednesday, August 14, 2013 8:05 AM To: 'WANG Zhilin Subject: RE: BPA ANYPOLE computer program Thank you for your inteset in the Bonneville Power...

  4. BPA-2015-01157-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kraby, David Sent: Monday, April 13, 2015 10:02 AM To: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - CGC-131 Subject: RE: Your Freedom of Information Act Request Thanks Lets only...

  5. BPA-2011-00926-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RF:CEIVEU BY 13PA FOIA OFFICE THIS DATE: e, 1 , , DUE DATE: Page 1 of 2 Winn,Kim S - DK-7 From: Sent: Thursday, April 07, 2011 9:10 AM To: FOIA Subject: FOIA Request The...

  6. BPA-2013-00808-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David Stobart dstobart@henkels.com Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2013 12:38 PM To: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - DK-7 Subject: FOIA request for bid results Kim, I was on your website trying to...

  7. BPA-2013-00088-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kirk Brown Sent: Thursday, October 18, 2012 2:13 PM To: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - DK-7 Ri CE VEt) flY BPA Subject: FOIA Request- BPA FOLA OFFICE Tftf I DATE: 'Ci, To Whom it May...

  8. How to Make Biomass-to-Energy Work in Rural Alaska

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cherokee Nation Northern Arapaho Cheyenne River Sioux Northern Cheyenne Tribe Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma Oglala Sioux Tribe Chippewa Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boys ...

  9. Chattanooga Eagle Ford Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform ... Shale Gas Plays, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles Source: Energy Information ...

  10. Chicago Area Alternative Fuels Deployment Project (CAAFDP) | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Inc. KAW PAWNEE TONKAWA PONCA OTOE-MISSOURI CHEROKEE Acres: 2,633.348 CHEROKEE Acres: 1,641.687 C H ERO KEE N ATION Kay C ounty Chilocco Property DATA SOURCES: US Census Bureau (Tiger Files) DOQQ's, USGS DRG's, USGS Cherokee Nation Realty Department Cherokee Nation GeoData Center Date: 12/19/01 e:\project\land\chilocco N E W S Tribal Land Chilocco Property PNE WIND USA II Project Development Cycle Implemented Globally for Reliable Success Accomplishments: * Feasibility study * Business plan

  11. Fulton County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    169-2006 Climate Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Fulton County, Arkansas Ash Flat, Arkansas Cherokee Village, Arkansas Hardy, Arkansas Horseshoe Bend, Arkansas...

  12. Sharp County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    169-2006 Climate Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Sharp County, Arkansas Ash Flat, Arkansas Cave City, Arkansas Cherokee Village, Arkansas Evening Shade, Arkansas...

  13. Colbert County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Colbert County, Alabama Cherokee, Alabama Leighton, Alabama Littleville, Alabama Muscle Shoals, Alabama Sheffield, Alabama Tuscumbia,...

  14. BPA-2011-00311-Privacy Act Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B1' YOU OFFICE THIS DATE: 11,f11 DUE DATE: LOG 0 -)i -- Dd--A4 Page 1 of 2 Winn,Kim S - DK-7 From: Sent: Sunday, April 17, 2011 11:22 PM To: FOIA Subject: FOIA Request The...

  15. BPA 2012 00552 FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    f'. CI 'i ED BY BPA I O1A OFFICE THIS DATE: DUE DATE: LOG Page 1 of 1 Winn,Kim S (BPA) - DK -7 From: mgweisberg@bpa.gov Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2012 11:31 AM To: FOIA...

  16. BPA-2010-01994-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    t:; CEIVED BY IM > I I k QIA OFFI E THIS ; DATE: e 1a ) 1E DATE: Subject: FOIA Request Page 1 of 2 Winn,Kim S - DK-7 From: Ex 6 Sent: Sunday, August 29, 2010 8:36 PM To: FOJA...

  17. BPA-2011-01701-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    :ti:(I IVED BY BPA ;:()IA OFFICE Tfl1S DATE: 0y DUE DATE: LOG 0 3p9 o2t - & 7 - :- Page 1 of 2 Winn,Kim S - DK-7 From: Sent: Sunday, August 14, 2011 2:44 PM To: FOIA...

  18. Freedom of Information Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rose To: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - D-1 Subject: Re: HydroAMp info Date: Tuesday, June 03, 2014 6:27:50 PM Kim, We'd like to change our request to ask for documents describing the contents...

  19. BPA-2011-00766-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPA t'OJA OFFICE THIS DATE :3 r DUE DATE: LOG 0 4 - @ J- c i '7h -,- Page 1 of 2 Winn,Kim S - DK-7 From: charlespace @gorge.net Sent: Monday, March 07, 2011 3:54 AM To: FOIA...

  20. CX-000127: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians Energy Efficiency and Conservation ProgramCX(s) Applied: B5.1, A9Date: 12/14/2009Location(s): OklahomaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  1. CX-003190: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cherokee Nation BusinessesCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1Date: 07/21/2010Location(s): Kay County, OklahomaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  2. Southwestern Power Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southwestern Duty Locations The City of Gore, Oklahoma, established in 1903 at the southern edge of the Cherokee Nation in eastern Oklahoma, is known as the "Trout Capital of ...

  3. Storm Lake I Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GE Energy Energy Purchaser MidAmerican Energy Location Buena Vista and Cherokee Counties IA Coordinates 42.57215, -95.340693 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  4. Storm Lake II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Energy Purchaser AlliantIES Utilities Location Buena Vista and Cherokee Counties IA Coordinates 42.655334, -95.383651 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  5. Tommy Jones

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tommy Jones is both an Aleut and Cherokee Tribe member from Jones, Oklahoma. He attended Oklahoma City University and graduated with a bachelor’s in biology and Spanish. Afterward, he went to...

  6. Electronic and thermoelectric properties of InN studied using ab initio density functional theory and Boltzmann transport calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borges, P. D. E-mail: lscolfaro@txstate.edu; Scolfaro, L. E-mail: lscolfaro@txstate.edu

    2014-12-14

    The thermoelectric properties of indium nitride in the most stable wurtzite phase (w-InN) as a function of electron and hole concentrations and temperature were studied by solving the semiclassical Boltzmann transport equations in conjunction with ab initio electronic structure calculations, within Density Functional Theory. Based on maximally localized Wannier function basis set and the ab initio band energies, results for the Seebeck coefficient are presented and compared with available experimental data for n-type as well as p-type systems. Also, theoretical results for electric conductivity and power factor are presented. Most cases showed good agreement between the calculated properties and experimental data for w-InN unintentionally and p-type doped with magnesium. Our predictions for temperature and concentration dependences of electrical conductivity and power factor revealed a promising use of InN for intermediate and high temperature thermoelectric applications. The rigid band approach and constant scattering time approximation were utilized in the calculations.

  7. SREL Reprint #3054

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Getting the Drift: Examining the Effects of Timing, Trap Type and Taxon on Herpetofaunal Drift Fence Surveys Brian D. Todd, Christopher T. Winne, John D. Willson, and J. Whitfield Gibbons University of Georgia, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Drawer E, Aiken, South Carolina 29802 Abstract: The evaluation of appropriate sampling methodologies is critical for accurately determining the distribution and status of herpetofaunal populations. We report the results of a year-long drift fence

  8. SREL Reprint #3099

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Ambush site selection and ontogenetic shifts in foraging strategy in a semi-aquatic pit viper, the Eastern cottonmouth E. A. Eskew, J. D. Willson, and C. T. Winne University of Georgia’s Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken, SC, USA Abstract: Although habitat selection has been studied in a variety of snake taxa, little is known about habitat selection in aquatic snake species. Additionally, due to their small size and secretive nature, juvenile snakes are seldom included in habitat

  9. SREL Reprint #3178

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Needles in haystacks: Estimating detection probability and occupancy of rare and cryptic snakes Andrew M. Durso, John D. Willson, and Christopher T. Winne Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA Abstract: The species most in need of conservation or management are often also the most difficult to monitor, because of their rarity, secretive habits, or both. To combat these challenges, presence/absence

  10. PURADYN Oil Bypass Filtration System Evaluation Test Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies & Infrastructure Department PURADYN OIL BYPASS FILTRATION SYSTEM EVALUATION TEST PLAN October 2002 Reviewed: INEEL Fleet Maintenance Supervisor (Thomas) Date Reviewed: INEEL Bus & Heavy Equipment Foreman (Murdock) Date Reviewed: INEEL Fleet Maintenance Department Manager (Bullock) Date Approved: INEEL Central/Idaho Falls Facilities Director (Winn) Date Reviewed: INEEL Test Engineer (Zirker) Date Reviewed: INEEL Project Manager (Francfort) Date Approved: INEEL TT&I

  11. CX-002078: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Carolina-Tribal Energy Program-Eastern Band of the CherokeeCX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1Date: 04/13/2010Location(s): North CarolinaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  12. CX-003655: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oklahoma - Tribe - Cherokee Nation, OklahomaCX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.15, B2.5, B4.12, B5.1Date: 09/03/2010Location(s): OklahomaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  13. EPA Native Science and Environmental Health Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is hosting a webinar on the complex environmental issues facing many tribal and indigenous communities. The guest speaker Dr. Clint Carroll, Cherokee Nation, explores the intersection of indigenous governance and indigenous environmental perspectives in settler state contexts.

  14. CX-001931: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Oklahoma State Energy Program (SEP) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - New Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling StationsCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 03/10/2010Location(s): Cherokee County, OklahomaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  15. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy laboratory managed by UChicago-Argonne, LLC Re-establishment of the MFRSR Calibration Facility at the SGP Dan Nelson 1 , Craig Webb 1 , Joseph Michalsky 2 , Gary Hodges 2 , Piotr Kiedron 2 , Patrick Disterhoft 2 , John Schmelzer 3 , Jerry Berndt 4 1 ACRF/SGP, Cherokee Nation Distributors, Stilwell, OK 2 National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO 3 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 4 Consultant to NOAA, Everett, WA CSPHOT SWS 90/150 GHz Radiometer

  16. Sandia National Laboratories:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    18, 2016 Articles R3 Technologies is working with a group of small businesses to develop a way to prevent suicide attacks by detecting concealed bombs before they go off. Hide and Seek Speaker Norm Augustine laments low US value given education, research The foundations of national security Iron nitride transformers could boost energy storage options Lighter. Cheaper. Better. Eastern Cherokees explore IT and partnership at Sandia Opportunity knocks Introducing STEM students to careers in

  17. Council of Energy Resource Tribes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy TRIBAL ENERGY PROGRAM 2006 Program Review Meeting 23 October 2006 Council of Energy Resource Tribes Council of Energy Resource Tribes Presentation Outline * Project Overview - CERT/DOE Cooperative Agreement * Objectives * Project Status - Accomplishments - Technical/Management Issues - Activities yet to be completed * Future Plans CERT Mission ACOMA PUEBLO - BLACKFEET TRIBE CHEROKEE NATION - CHEYENNE ARAPAHO TRIBES - CHEYENNE RIVER SIOUX TRIBE -

  18. bectno-evgreb | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low-NOx Burners on a Wall-Fired Boiler - Project Brief [PDF-252KB] Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Denver, CO PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low NOx Burners on a Wall-Fired Boiler: Performance and Economics Report, Gas Reburning-Low NOx Burner System, Cherokee Station Unit No. 3, Final Report [PDF-17.2MB] (July 1998) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Evaluation

  19. Gary Davis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Davis About Us Gary Davis - President & CEO - National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development (NCAIED) Gary Davis Gary "Litefoot" Davis is an enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. Before being appointed as President and CEO of the NCAIED, Mr. Davis served on the Board of Directors. He served as VP of Native Affairs for the Triple Five Group and he previously served as co-chair of the National Indian Gaming Association's, American Indian Business Network.

  20. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deployment of an Infrared Thermometer Network at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains Climate Research Facility V.R. Morris and C.N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington D. Nelson Cherokee Nation Distributors Stilwell, Oklahoma Introduction To infer information about vertical distribution and character of cloudiness across the Southern Great Plains (SGP) domain, downwelling infrared thermometers are being deployed at the SGP extended

  1. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Developments and Accomplishments at the ARM Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains Site During 2005 B.W. Orr and D.L. Sisterson Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois D.J. Rusk ARM Climate Research Facility/Southern Great Plains Cherokee Nation Distributors Stilwell, Oklahoma New Instruments New instruments were installed at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in 2005. This paper discusses these developments as well as accomplishments that occurred during the year. W-Band

  2. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas - Near-term, Class I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Reynolds, Rodney R.; McCune, A. Dwayne; Michnick, Michael J.; Walton, Anthony W.; Watney, W. Lynn

    2000-06-08

    This project involved two demonstration projects, one in a Marrow reservoir located in the southwestern part of the state and the second in the Cherokee Group in eastern Kansas. Morrow reservoirs of western Kansas are still actively being explored and constitute an important resource in Kansas. Cumulative oil production from the Morrow in Kansas is over 400,000,000 bbls. Much of the production from the Morrow is still in the primary stage and has not reached the mature declining state of that in the Cherokee. The Cherokee Group has produced about 1 billion bbls of oil since the first commercial production began over a century ago. It is a billion-barrel plus resource that is distributed over a large number of fields and small production units. Many of the reservoirs are operated close to the economic limit, although the small units and low production per well are offset by low costs associated with the shallow nature of the reservoirs (less than 1000 ft. deep).

  3. Transmission integral analysis of Mssbauer spectra displaying hyperfine parameter distributions with arbitrary profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klencsr, Zoltn

    2014-10-27

    Accurate quantitative analysis of Mssbauer spectra displaying thickness effects requires the consideration of the so-called transmission integral when modeling the spectral shape. Whereas this is straightforward when the correct model for the decomposition of the absorber's nuclear resonance absorption cross-section into individual components is a priori known, in the absence of such knowledge and notably in the presence of hyperfine parameter distributions with an unknown profile, the so-called model-independent evaluation methods could be used to fit the spectra. However, the methods available for this purpose were developed for the analysis of spectra for which the thin absorber approximation is valid, and thus they do not take the sample thickness and related effects into account. Consequently, in order to use them for spectra displaying thickness effects, their usage needs to be generalized by combining them with transmission integral fitting. A new algorithm realizing such a generalized version of the Hesse-Rbartsch model-independent evaluation method was developed recently as an integral part of the MossWinn program. In the present work, the working principle of the newly developed algorithm is described in details along with examples illustrating the capabilities of the method for the case of {sup 57}Fe Mssbauer spectroscopy.

  4. Microsoft Word - Tribal Call Jan 17 Summary 1-25-07 wep

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tri---State's s ervice a rea includes parts of Fannin County, G eorgia; P olk County, T ennessee; a nd Cherokee County, N orth C arolina. Smarter M eters H elp C ustomers B udget E lectric S ervice C osts T ri---State E lectric M embership C ooperative ( Tri---State) i s a d istribution r ural e lectric c ooperative t hat primarily s erves m ore t han 1 2,000 r ural c ustomers, m any o f w hom h ave l ow---incomes l iving a t o r n ear poverty l evel a cross a m ulti---state r egion ( see m ap).

  5. INVESTIGATION AND DEMONSTRATION OF DRY CARBON-BASED SORBENT INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Hunt; Mark Fox; Lillian Stan; Sheila Haythornthwaite; Justin Smith; Jason Ruhl

    1998-10-01

    This quarterly report describes the activities that have taken place during the first full quarter of the Phase II project ''Investigation and Demonstration of Dry Carbon-Based Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control''. Modifications were completed and sampling began at the 600 acfm pilot-scale particulate control module (PCM) located at the Comanche Station in Pueblo, CO. The PCM was configured as an electrostatic precipitator for these tests. A Perkin-Elmer flue gas mercury analyzer was installed on-site and operated. Initial test results using both manual sampling methodology and the mercury analyzer are presented herein. Preparations were made during this period for full-scale mercury testing of several PSCo units. A site visit was made to Arapahoe and Cherokee Generating Stations to determine sample locations and to develop a test plan.

  6. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas - near-term. Quarterly report, April 1 - June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1996-07-01

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites, Stewart Field, and Savonburg Field, operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. General topics to be addressed are: (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation; (2) waterflood optimization; and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. For the Stewart Field project, work is summarized for the last quarter on waterflood operations and reservoir management. For the Savonburg Field project, work on water plant development, and pattern changes and wellbore cleanup are briefly described.

  7. Tectonic history and analysis of structures in eastern Kansas and western Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berendsen, P.; Wilson, F.W. . Kansas Geological Survey)

    1993-03-01

    Orogenic events in and around the midcontinent in Proterozoic time were responsible for the formation of the dominant master set of younger northeast- and older northwest-trending faults that dominate the structure of the area today. Reactivation of these faults throughout geologic time gave rise to tectonic zones consisting of sets of anastomosing faults or other complex patterns. These zones are likely important in helping to determine the configuration of major uplifts and basins that involve the crust. The Nemaha tectonic zone defines the western boundary of both the Forest City and Cherokee basins, while a structural block delineated by the Chesapeake and Bolivar-Mansfield regional faults coincides with the approximate position of the Bourbon Arch, which is reflected in the thickness of Mississippian carbonate rocks. Rocks of the Ozark uplift began to be uplifted by the end of Maquoketa time. The uplift has historically been described as a landform, rather than a geologic structure. Hence, the extent and the boundaries of the uplift are ill-defined. The northeast-trending line forming the contact between Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks is commonly regarded as the western boundary. This boundary coincides with a major tectonic zone, extending northeastward from Oklahoma through Kansas and Missouri into at least southern Iowa. In the Tri-State area of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri the zone is referred to as the Miami trough and features prominently in the localization of major ore deposits. This zone may then also be regarded as the eastern boundary of the Forest City and Cherokee basins.

  8. Classifying forest productivity at different scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Spatial scale is an important consideration when evaluating, using, or constructing forest productivity classifications. First, the factors which dominate spatial variability in forest productivity are scale dependent. For example, within a stand, spatial variability in productivity is dominated by microsite differences; within a national forest such as the Cherokee National Forest, spatial variability is dominated by topography and land-use history (e.g., years since harvest); within a large region such as the southeast, spatial variability is dominated by climatic patterns. Second, classifications developed at different spatial scales are often used for different purposes. For example, stand-level classifications are often keys or rules used in the field to judge the quality or potential of a site. National-forest classifications are often presented as maps or tables and may be used in forest land planning. Regional classifications may be maps or tables and may be used to quantify or predict resource availability. These scale-related differences in controlling factors and purposes will affect both the methods and the data used to develop classifications. In this paper, I will illustrate these points by describing and comparing three forest productivity classifications, each developed for a specific purpose at a specific scale. My objective is not to argue for or against any of these particular classifications but rather to heighten awareness of the critical role that spatial scale plays in the use and development of forest productivity classifications. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- Near term. Quarterly report, June 30--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1995-10-15

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas and in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. General topics to be addressed will be (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation; (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. The reservoir management portion of the project will involve performance evaluation and will include such work as (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (5) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. The waterflood optimization portion of the project involves only the Nelson Lease. It will be based on the performance evaluation and will involve (1) design and implementation of a water cleanup system for the waterflood, (2) application of well remedial work such as polymer gel treatments to improve vertical sweep efficiency, and (3) changes in waterflood patterns to increase sweep efficiency. Finally, it is planned to implement an improved recovery process on both field demonstration sites.

  10. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-term. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; McCune, D.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1997-01-15

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. Progress in the Stewart field project is described for the following tasks: design/construct waterflood plant; design/construct injection system; design/construct battery consolidation and gathering system; waterflood operations and reservoir management; and technology transfer. Progress in the Savonburg field project is described for the following tasks: profile modification treatments; pattern changes and wellbore cleanup; reservoir development (polymer flooding); and technology transfer.

  11. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-term. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; McCune, D.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1998-04-15

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. Progress is described for the Stewart field on the following tasks: design/construct waterflood plant; design/construct injection system; design/construct battery consolidation and gathering system; waterflood operations and reservoir management; and technology transfer. Progress for the Savonburg Field includes: water plant development; profile modification treatments; pattern changes and wellbore cleanup; reservoir development (polymer flooding); field operations; and technology transfer.

  12. Revised fusulinid biostratigraphic zonation and depositional sequence correlation, subsurface Permian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, A.M.; Reid, S.T.; Mazzullo, S.J.; Robbins, S.T.

    1988-01-01

    Current revisions in fusulinid zonation enable them to subdivide the fossiliferous Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian section in the Permian basin into more biostratigraphic zones than the older scheme of R.V. Hollingsworth, each zone of shorter temporal duration than has previously been recognized. The identification of distinct fusulinid assemblage subzones within the absolute chronology of radiometric dating provides the basis for these stratigraphic subdivisions. The Atoka is divided into five assemblage subzones, each with an approximate duration of 1.0 m.y. In the Strawn, five subzones each of about 0.8 m.y. duration are recognized within the Cherokee; the three subzones in the Marmaton are each of 0.67 m.y. duration. Within Canyon and Cisco shelf carbonate sections are presently recognized seven and six subzones, respectively; the approximate duration of each is 0.33 and 1.03 m.y. The shelf Wolfcamp section is divisible into seven subzones, each of about 2.36 m.y. span. The entire Leonard shelf section comprises six subzones, each of about 1.83 m.y. duration; three subzones are presently recognized in the lower Leonard and three cumulatively in the middle and upper Leonard sections. These biostratigraphic subzones correspond to single or composite sediment packages (parasequences) that can be correlated regionally from shelf into basinal strata, using wireline log and conventional and processed seismic sections. Such packages comprise parts of individual depositional sequences as recognized by seismic-stratigraphic interpretations. Carbonate (various shelf and foreshelf detrital facies) and sandstone reservoirs occur within individual subzones within these sequences and can be readily defined and mapped by subsurface facies studies.

  13. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Midcontinent region (Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

    1993-08-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility/constraints of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers a select area of the United States. The Midcontinent (Kansas, Nssouri, Oklahoma) has produced significant oil, but contrary to early reports, the area does not contain the huge volumes of heavy oil that, along with the development of steam and in situ combustion as oil production technologies, sparked the area`s oil boom of the 1960s. Recovery of this heavy oil has proven economically unfeasible for most operators due to the geology of the formations rather than the technology applied to recover the oil. The geology of the southern Midcontinent, as well as results of field projects using thermal enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) methods to produce the heavy oil, was examined based on analysis of data from secondary sources. Analysis of the performance of these projects showed that the technology recovered additional heavy oil above what was produced from primary production from the consolidated, compartmentalized, fluvial dominated deltaic sandstone formations in the Cherokee and Forest City basins. The only projects producing significant economic and environmentally acceptable heavy oil in the Midcontinent are in higher permeability, unconsolidated or friable, thick sands such as those found in south-central Oklahoma. There are domestic heavy oil reservoirs in other sedimentary basins that are in younger formations, are less consolidated, have higher permeability and can be economically produced with current TEOR technology. Heavy oil production from the carbonates of central and wester Kansas has not been adequately tested, but oil production is anticipated to remain low. Significant expansion of Midcontinent heavy oil production is not anticipated because the economics of oil production and processing are not favorable.

  14. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- near-term. Seventh quarterly report, February 1, 1995--April 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1995-04-15

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas and in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The Stewart Field (on latter stage of primary production) is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by Sharon Resources, Inc. General topics to be addressed will be (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. The reservoir management portion of the project will involve performance evaluation and will include such work as (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (5) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. The waterflood optimization portion of the project involves only the Nelson Lease. It will be based on the performance evaluation and will involve (1) design and implementation of a water cleanup system for the waterflood, (2) application of well remedial work such as polymer gel treatments to improve vertical sweep efficiency, and (3) changes in waterflood patterns to increase sweep efficiency. Finally, it is planned to implement an improved recovery process, possibly polymer augmented waterflood: on both field demonstration sites.

  15. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- near-term. Eighth quarterly report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1995-07-15

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas and in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The Stewart Field (on latter stage of primary production) is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company General topics to be addressed will be (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration, of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. The reservoir management portion of the project will involve performance evaluation and will include such work as (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and 5) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. The waterflood optimization portion of the project involves only the Nelson Lease. It will be based on the performance evaluation and will involve (1) design and implementation of a water cleanup system for the waterflood, (2) application of well remedial work such as polymer gel treatments to improve vertical sweep efficiency, and (3) changes in waterflood patterns to increase sweep efficiency. Finally, it is planned to implement an improved recovery process on both field demonstration sites.

  16. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; McCune, D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite G.P.

    1999-10-29

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. Te Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2.

  17. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Don W.; McCune, A.D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite, G. Paul

    1999-11-03

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. Te Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) Identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2.

  18. Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NO, reduction (70VO) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Depatiment of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was petformed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NO, emission level of 0.73 lb/1 OG Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50Y0. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NO, in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of' natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NO, emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65

  19. Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, especially NOX. The project involved operating gas reburning technology combined with low NO, burner technology (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired utility boiler. Low NOX burners are designed to create less NOX than conventional burners. However, the NO, control achieved is in the range of 30-60-40, and typically 50%. At the higher NO, reduction levels, CO emissions tend to be higher than acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce the level of NO. in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. When combined, GR and LNBs work in harmony to both minimize NOX emissions and maintain an acceptable level of CO emissions. The demonstration was performed at Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit 3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW. wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal and had a pre GR-LNB baseline NOX emission of 0.73 lb/1 Oe Btu. The target for the project was a reduction of 70 percent in NOX emissions. Project sponsors included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER). EER conducted a comprehensive test demonstration program over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved. Intensive measurements were taken to quantify the reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability, and all factors influencing costs. The results showed that GR-LNB technology achieved excellent emission reductions. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was somewhat less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 180A. The performance goal of 70

  20. Pawnee Nation Energy Option Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matlock, M.; Kersey, K.; Riding In, C.

    2009-07-31

    introduced two model energy codes Pawnee Nation should consider for adoption. Summary of Current and Expected Future Electricity Usage The research team provided a summary overview of electricity usage patterns in current buildings and included discussion of known plans for new construction. Utility Options Review Pawnee Nation electric utility options were analyzed through a four-phase process, which included: 1) summarizing the relevant utility background information; 2) gathering relevant utility assessment data; 3) developing a set of realistic Pawnee electric utility service options, and 4) analyzing the various Pawnee electric utility service options for the Pawnee Energy Team’s consideration. III. Findings and Recommendations Due to a lack of financial incentives for renewable energy, particularly at the state level, combined mediocre renewable energy resources, renewable energy development opportunities are limited for Pawnee Nation. However, near-term potential exists for development of solar hot water at the gym, and an exterior wood-fired boiler system at the tribe’s main administrative building. Pawnee Nation should also explore options for developing LFGTE resources in collaboration with the City of Pawnee. Significant potential may also exist for development of bio-energy resources within the next decade. Pawnee Nation representatives should closely monitor market developments in the bio-energy industry, establish contacts with research institutions with which the tribe could potentially partner in grant-funded research initiatives. In addition, a substantial effort by the Kaw and Cherokee tribes is underway to pursue wind development at the Chilocco School Site in northern Oklahoma where Pawnee is a joint landowner. Pawnee Nation representatives should become actively involved in these development discussions and should explore the potential for joint investment in wind development at the Chilocco site.

  1. Pawnee Nation Energy Option Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matlock, M.; Kersey, K.; Riding In, C.

    2009-07-21

    market developments in the bio-energy industry, establish contacts with research institutions with which the tribe could potentially partner in grant-funded research initiatives. In addition, a substantial effort by the Kaw and Cherokee tribes is underway to pursue wind development at the Chilocco School Site in northern Oklahoma where Pawnee is a joint landowner. Pawnee Nation representatives should become actively involved in these development discussions and should explore the potential for joint investment in wind development at the Chilocco site. Financial incentives for project development are generally structured to provide tribes with access to conventional financing mechanisms. Grant funding for project construction is currently difficult to obtain. Substantial new opportunities for bio-fuel development may exist in the next few years with passage of the 2007 Farm Bill, and through opportunities made available through Oklahoma’s new Bio-energy Center. A review of potential alternatives to Pawnee Nation’s current electricity supply scenario revealed that a range of options could be viable. These include the following scenarios: business as usual, alternative supply, negotiate lower rates with City of Pawnee, focus on reducing energy usage, develop electric utility organization. Under any circumstances, Pawnee Nation should purse strategies to reduce energy usage, as this is the simplest means of reducing electric costs and environmental impacts. The research team also recommends that Pawnee Nation initiate some focused discussions with the City of Pawnee, with GRDA, and with IEC to discuss its wholesale supply purchase options. These discussions will better inform the Pawnee Energy Team of the specific pros and cons of its wholesale power supply options, and will assist the Team’s broader decision-making on utility-related issues. The ultimate path chosen by Pawnee Nation will depend on further consideration of priorities and potential barriers by Pawnee

  2. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Walton; Don W. Green; G. Paul Whillhite; L. Schoeling; L. Watney; M. Michnick; R. Reynolds

    1997-07-15

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are 1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, 2) waterflood optimization, and 3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included 1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, 2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, 3) reservoir modeling, 4) laboratory work, 5) identification of operational problems, 6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and 7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were 1) geological and engineering analysis, 2) laboratory testing, and 3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2. Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of the design, construction, and operation of a field-wide waterflood utilizing state-of-the-art, off-the-shelf technologies in an attempt to

  3. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas Near Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhlte, C.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1997-04-15

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period I involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2. Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of the design, construction, and operation of a field-wide waterflood utilizing state-of-the-art, off-the-shelf technologies in an

  4. Carbon Dioxide Sealing Capacity: Textural or Compositional Controls?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cranganu, Constantin; Soleymani, Hamidreza; Sadiqua, Soleymani; Watson, Kieva

    2013-11-30

    This research project is aiming to assess the carbon dioxide sealing capacity of most common seal-rocks, such as shales and non-fractured limestones, by analyzing the role of textural and compositional parameters of those rocks. We hypothesize that sealing capacity is controlled by textural and/or compositional pa-rameters of caprocks. In this research, we seek to evaluate the importance of textural and compositional parameters affecting the sealing capacity of caprocks. The conceptu-al framework involves two testable end-member hypotheses concerning the sealing ca-pacity of carbon dioxide reservoir caprocks. Better understanding of the elements controlling sealing quality will advance our knowledge regarding the sealing capacity of shales and carbonates. Due to relatively low permeability, shale and non-fractured carbonate units are considered relatively imper-meable formations which can retard reservoir fluid flow by forming high capillary pres-sure. Similarly, these unites can constitute reliable seals for carbon dioxide capture and sequestration purposes. This project is a part of the comprehensive project with the final aim of studying the caprock sealing properties and the relationship between microscopic and macroscopic characteristics of seal rocks in depleted gas fields of Oklahoma Pan-handle. Through this study we examined various seal rock characteristics to infer about their respective effects on sealing capacity in special case of replacing reservoir fluid with super critical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}). To assess the effect of textural and compositional properties on scCO{sub 2} maximum reten-tion column height we collected 30 representative core samples in caprock formations in three counties (Cimarron, Texas, Beaver) in Oklahoma Panhandle. Core samples were collected from various seal formations (e.g., Cherokee, Keys, Morrowan) at different depths. We studied the compositional and textural properties of the core samples using several techniques

  5. Worksheet

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ;Tennessee Valley Authority",22,"MEC","Finley",100,0.61,"OH","AC",161,161,954,"ASCR","Single",1,2,"Steel Tower",,9879,303540,156165,181613,651197,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",23,"Pickwick-South Jackson","Magic Valley",100,1.38,"OH","AC",161,161,954,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Pole",,78377,284367,113237,237716,713697,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",24,"Wolf Creek-Choctaw 500 kV TL","Reliant French Camp Gener Plt",100,0.11,"OH","AC",500,500,954,"ASCR","Triple",1,2,"Steel Tower",,0,863770,411493,891161,2166424,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",25,"Widows Creek Ft. Payne 161 kV","Flat Rock 161 kV SS",100,2.05,"OH","AC",161,161,397.5,"ASCR","Single",1,1,"Steel Tower",,130460,443384,182965,410228,1167037,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",26,"Volunteer-Cherokee HP 161 kV T","Oakland 161 kV SS",100,0.5,"OH","AC",161,161,1351,"ASCR","Single",1,2,"Steel Tower",,0,159020,71787,133784,364591,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,18642,"Tennessee Valley Authority",27,"Cordell-Hull-Carthage 161 kV","South Carthage 161 kV SS",100,1.68,"OH","AC",161,161,636,"ASCR","Single",1,2,"Steel Tower",,0,209664,102390,256537,568591,"application/vnd.ms-excel" 2003,20447,"Western Farmers Elec Coop Inc",1,"Arco","Sprectrum",100,5.89,"OH","AC",138,138,336.4,"ACSR","Single",1,1,"