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1

City of Natchitoches, Louisiana (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natchitoches, Louisiana (Utility Company) Natchitoches, Louisiana (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Natchitoches Place Louisiana Utility Id 13228 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COMMERCIAL RATE Inside Commercial COMMERCIAL RATE Outside Commercial INDUSTRIAL RATE Industrial Industrial Rate Version 2 Industrial LARGE COMMERCIAL RATE Commercial Large Commercial Rate Version 2 Commercial RESIDENTIAL RATE Inside Residential RESIDENTIAL RATE Outside Residential

2

Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.6801229°, -93.1779659° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.6801229,"lon":-93.1779659,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

3

Winn, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winn, Maine: Energy Resources Winn, Maine: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.4856144°, -68.372245° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.4856144,"lon":-68.372245,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

4

Generative Affine Localisation and Tracking John Winn Andrew Blake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generative Affine Localisation and Tracking John Winn Andrew Blake Microsoft Research Cambridge://research.microsoft.com/mlp Abstract We present an extension to the Jojic and Frey (2001) layered sprite model which allows for layers

Winn, John

5

Status of Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

This is the first in a series of reports prepared by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overviews of Cherokee Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports, publications, and data available, and interviews with water resource professionals in various Federal, state, and local agencies and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Cherokee Stories of the Supernatural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stories of personal experiences of supernatural events are a highly-valued form of verbal art for Cherokee speakers today. Both the people who tell them and those who listen regard such stories as entertaining and instructional. The stories reflect...

Scancarelli, Janine

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Application of reservoir models to Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the Cherokee Reservoir Project hydrodynamic-temperature models and water quality models hav

Kim, B.R.; Bruggink, D.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Cherokee Carvers: Tradition Renewed Exhibition and Speakers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cherokee Carvers: Tradition Renewed Exhibition and Speakers Tuesday, January 18 to Thursday, March 31, 2011, Reece Museum Cherokee Carvers: Tradition Renewed examines different aspects of late 20th and focuses on artists working in Western North Carolina today. Artists represented in Cherokee Carvers

Karsai, Istvan

9

Cherokee Nation long-range communication plan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Cherokee Nation is the second largest Indian tribe in the United States. It has the rights of a sovereign nation, though those rights are (more)

Miller, Mike

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

The Cherokee Nation: A Question of Sovereignty.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The history of the Cherokee people with the advent of white settlers in North America is a sad one. Long before Christopher Columbus set foot (more)

Magyar, Lydia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Positive income shocks and accidental deaths among Cherokee Indians: a natural experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

economic effects of Harrahs Cherokee casino and hotel onand fertility timing among Cherokee and white youth inand accidental deaths among Cherokee Indians: a natural

Bruckner, Tim A; Brown, Ryan A; Margerison-Zilko, Claire

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Overhill Cherokee archaeology at Chota-Tanasee  

SciTech Connect

The initial objective of the Tellico Archaeological Project was the study of Overhill Cherokee culture, emphasizing the excavation of Chota-Tanasee. In keeping with contemporary archaeological research, the project goals eventually incorporated a regional perspective of human cultural adaptation for the past 12,000 yrs. Nevertheless, Overhill Cherokee studies remained a prominent project focus, and what began at Chota-Tanasee was expanded to include Citico, Toqua, Tomotley, and Mialoquo. Other sites produced additional Cherokee materials and important excavations were made at contemporary Euro-American settlements including Fort Loudoun and the Tellico Blockhouse. There now exists comprehensive data for the eighteenth century Overhill Cherokee. The Chota-Tanasee studies presented in previous chapters and the comparative synthesis presented here as a result have helped fulfill the goals of Overhill Cherokee studies in the lower Little Tennessee River valley.

Schroedl, G.F. (ed.)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

An Examination of Cherokee Marriage Following the Establishment of the First Cherokee Written Laws, 1808 .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this work I challenge the view held by some scholars that the written laws published by the Cherokee Nation on September 11, 1808 attempted (more)

Gallay, Janet M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

SONGSTHAT SUSTAIN A NATION: CHEROKEE MUSIC IN CONTEMPORARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SONGSTHAT SUSTAIN A NATION: CHEROKEE MUSIC IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY Name :Amber Giffin Major;PROJECT BACKGROUND AND GOALS Background: The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) is a federally, the citizens of the EBCI remained in the southeast while the other Cherokees were forced to relocate

Crews, Stephen

15

"(T)hey ought to mind what a woman says" : early Cherokee women's rhetorical traditions and rhetorical education.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??"'(T)hey ought to mind what a woman says" : early Cherokee women's rhetorical traditions and rhetorical education," illustrates how Cherokee women reinvented a sovereign Cherokee (more)

Moulder, Mary Amanda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Water quality management plan for Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The management plan provides an assessment of Cherokee Reservoir's current water quality, identifies those factors which affect reservoir water quality, and develops recommendations aimed at restoring or maintaining water quality at levels sufficient to support diverse beneficial uses. 20 references, 8 figures, 15 tables. (ACR)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Cherokee Clitics: The Word Boundary Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The problem of identifying Cherokee clitics is complicated by the fact that the prosodic word, marked by the presence of a tonal boundary, may not match the morphological word. Clitics may or may not respect the the word boundary as marked by tone...

Haag, Marcia

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Delaware Identity in the Cherokee Nation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article examines how the Delawares responded to the challenges that living among the Cherokees posed to their identity. It also focuses on the question of how this forced co-residence developed and what the United States role in the matter was...

Haake, Claudia

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Re-Imagining Community: Political Ecology and Indigenous State Formation in the Cherokee Nation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N. Belt. 2009. "Tohi: The Cherokee Concept of Well-Being."in Under the Rattlesnake: Cherokee Health and Resiliency,H. , Jr. 2004. Plants of the Cherokee. Gatlinburg, TN: Great

Carroll, Clinton Roy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

A struggle for Cherokee community : excavating identity in post-removal North Carolina.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Cherokee Removal of 1838 was intended to remove all members of the Cherokee Nation to west of the Mississippi River. However, a small number (more)

Greene, Lance.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natchitoches winn cherokee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Re-Imagining Community: Political Ecology and Indigenous State Formation in the Cherokee Nation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Tribal environmental governance in the Cherokee Nation today is characterized by a complex interplay among community, bureaucracy, and knowledge. The Cherokee Nation is one of (more)

Carroll, Clinton Roy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Coveted Lands: Agriculture, Timber, Mining, and Transportation in Cherokee Country Before and After Removal.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Covering a period from approximately 1779 to 1850, this dissertation studies natural resources and land use in Cherokee country before and after forced Cherokee removal (more)

Rozema, Vicki Bell

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Arguing In an Age of Unreason: Elias Boudinot, Cherokee Factionalism, and the Treaty Of New Echota.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Elias Boudinot (1804 - 1839), editor of the Cherokee Phoenix and a Cherokee leader during his people's political fight to remain a sovereign nation (more)

Filler, Jonathan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

RE-WEAVING A DECOLONIZED SOUTH IN CONTEMPORARY CHEROKEE WOMEN'S POETRY.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Appalachian Cherokee women writers Marilou Awiakta, Allison Adelle Hedge Coke, and MariJo Moore have recently created poems reminiscent of an important Cherokee female tradition: basketweaving. (more)

Cornell, Caleigh Breanne

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Outside the Circle: The Juxtaposition of Powwow Imagery and Cherokee Historical Representation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis looks at the juxtaposition presented by the Eastern Cherokee's struggle to present an accurate historical representation of 'Cherokee' against the backdrop of the (more)

Brumley, Dana

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Cherokee Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cherokee Electric Coop offers loans to residential customers for making energy efficiency improvements. In association with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Energy Right program offers...

27

Incentive program for the Cherokee Nation Enterprise floor staff.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many promotions at Cherokee Casino Resort are mass marketed and are not designed for a specific guest. Often guest are unaware of the promotions that (more)

Teel, Justin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

A Nation's Charge| Cherokee Social Services, 1835 1907.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This dissertation explores the development of social services within the Cherokee Nation between removal and allotment. The specific services included in this work are (more)

Reed, Julie L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Transformations sociales chez les Cherokees, 1794-1827.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Bouleversements dmographiques, pressions assimilatrices, dfaites militaires et rivalits territoriales : ce mmoire tudie les transformations que connat la socit Cherokee sous limpulsion de ces forces (more)

Larame, Franois Dominic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A Nation's Charge: Cherokee Social Services, 1835-1907.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation explores the development of social services within the Cherokee Nation between removal and allotment. The specific services included in this work are poor (more)

Reed, Julie L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Full circle:native cherokee's perceptions of modern education.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study was to learn how enrolled members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians living on the Snowbird Reservation perceive education (more)

Ogletree, Tamra Williams

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Cherokee Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cherokee Electric Coop Cherokee Electric Coop Place Alabama Utility Id 3426 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Power Service Commercial General Power Service(Gin)- Over 15,000 kWh - >50 kW Commercial General Power Service- > 1000 kW Industrial General Power Service- Over 15,000 kWh - >50 kW Commercial Outdoor Lighting Lighting Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1160/kWh Commercial: $0.1350/kWh Industrial: $0.0673/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

33

Visualizing the Cherokee Homeland through Indigenous Historical GIS: An Interactive Map of James Mooney's Ethnographic Fieldwork and Cherokee Collective Memory.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In 1887, the Bureau of American Ethnology appointed James Mooney to work among the Eastern Band of Cherokee. From 1887 to 1916, Mooney documented the (more)

Kirk, Deborah Lyn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Cherokee Reservoir: supplement to factors affecting water quality in Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

Several rates and/or measurements were assumed in preparation of the Factors Affecting Water Quality in Cherokee Reservoir report prepared by Iwanski, et al. (1980). The following discussions and data were generated to support future modeling efforts of Cherokee Reservoir water quality. These discussions are not wholly intended to define conclusions or new findings, but rather lend support to assumed parameters in the modeling effort. The data include: (1) long-term BOD analyses; (2) limiting nutrient studies algal assays; (3) phytoplankton biomass; (4) primary productivity; and (5) solids transport. 10 references, 3 figures, 5 tables. (ACR)

Poppe, W.L.

1981-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

35

Visualizing the Cherokee Homeland through Indigenous Historical GIS: An Interactive Map of James Mooney's Ethnographic Fieldwork and Cherokee Collective Memory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1887, the Bureau of American Ethnology appointed James Mooney to work among the Eastern Band of Cherokee. From 1887 to 1916, Mooney documented the sites and stories of the Cherokee homeland as shared with him by members of the community. Mooney...

Kirk, Deborah Lyn

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Geology and Thermal Regime of Bert Winn #1 geothermal Test, Franklin County, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

The conclusions of this report are: (1) Bert Winn No.1 did not encounter high-temperature zones of permeability, except possibly at 5,575 to 5,700 feet, where chloride conductivity indicates saline fluid entry, and where stabilized temperature may be 210-215 F. (2) Structurally, Bert Winn No.1 appears to have penetrated into the horst footwall block, penetrating progressively away from the horst-bounding faults believed to leak hot fluids. (3) Projections based on disequilibrium temperatures taken at 24 and 36 hours suggest a stabilized maximum temperature of about 260-265 F at 7,450. Maximum observed temperature was 243 F. (4) Geochemically, temperatures at depth should be over 300 F. On the basis of observed temperatures and gradients, 400 F might not be encountered until 12,000 feet at this site. (5) C.H. Stocks 1-A, about one mile northwest, appears to be hotter at comparable depths, and to be better located to penetrate the range-front fault set at drillable depth. (6) Bert Winn No.1 was sited principally on a geoelectrical anomaly in an area of high temperature gradients. With the remote exception of the saline interval at 5,575 to 5,700 feet, no evidence was seen in drilling and logging of any feature that could serve as the source of the geoelectrical anomaly.

McIntyre, J.B.; Koenig, J.B.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Cherokee County (Baxter Springs and Treece Subsites), Operable Unit 3/4, Cherokee County, KS, August 20, 1997  

SciTech Connect

This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the mining and milling wastes at the Baxter Springs and Treece subsites, which are part of the Cherokee County Superfund Site in Cherokee County, Kansas.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Factors affecting water quality in Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The purpose was to: (1) define reservoir problems related to water quality conditions; (2) identify the probable causes of these problems; and (3) recommend procedures for achieving needed reservoir water quality improvements. This report presents the project findings to date and suggests steps for upgrading the quality of Cherokee Reservoir. Section II presents background information on the characteristics of the basin, the reservoir, and the beneficial uses of the reservoir. Section III identifies the impacts of existing reservoir water quality on uses of the reservoir for water supply, fishery resources, recreation, and waste assimilation. Section IV presents an assessment of cause-effect relationships. The factors affecting water quality addressed in Section IV are: (1) reservoir thermal stratification and hydrodynamics; (2) dissolved oxygen depletion; (3) eutrophication; (4) toxic substances; and (5) reservoir fisheries. Section V presents a preliminary evaluation of alternatives for improving the quality of Cherokee Reservoir. Section VI presents preliminary conclusions and recommendations for developing and implementing a reservoir water quality management plan. 7 references, 22 figures, 21 tables.

Iwanski, M.L.; Higgins, J.M.; Kim, B.R.; Young, R.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Community Action on the Cherokee Reservation in North Carolina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Great Society programs of the Lyndon Johnson Administration allowed the Cherokee Boys Club an opportunity to expand their operation and realize true self-determination. The local consequences of federal legislation are explored to reveal...

Swafford, Tamrala Greer

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Internalizing Native American History: Comprehending Cherokee and Muscogulge Identities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indigenous societies to be used as models to interpret history from the native point of view. The example used here involves the reconstruction of Cherokee and Muscogulge societies by examining the center of their socio-political systems, the clan...

Haggard, Dixie Ray

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natchitoches winn cherokee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

To Make Us Independent' : the Education of Young Men At the Cherokee National Male Seminary, 1851-1910.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the years following forced removal, Cherokee leaders considered how to prevent future assaults on tribal sovereignty. Their answer was education. In 1846, the Cherokee (more)

Panther, Natalie Brooke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Eastern Band of Cherokee Strategic Energy Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians was awarded a grant under the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program (TEP) to develop a Tribal Strategic Energy Plan (SEP). The grant, awarded under the First Steps phase of the TEP, supported the development of a SEP that integrates with the Tribes plans for economic development, preservation of natural resources and the environment, and perpetuation of Tribal heritage and culture. The Tribe formed an Energy Committee consisting of members from various departments within the Tribal government. This committee, together with its consultant, the South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies, performed the following activities: Develop the Tribes energy goals and objectives Establish the Tribes current energy usage Identify available renewable energy and energy efficiency options Assess the available options versus the goals and objectives Create an action plan for the selected options

Souther Carolina Institute of energy Studies-Robert Leitner

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

43

Influence of Mississippian Karst Topography on Deposition of the Cherokee Group: Ness County, Kansas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cherokee Group (Desmoinesian, Middle Pennsylvanian) of Ness County, Kansas was deposited on the western flank of the Central Kansas uplift. Eleven lithofacies were defined in the Cherokee Group to better understand the stratigraphy...

Ramaker, Benjamin J.

2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

44

Fire History in the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma Michael C. Stambaugh & Richard P. Guyette &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fire History in the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma Michael C. Stambaugh & Richard P. Guyette & Joseph history in northeastern Oklahoma on lands once occupied by the Cherokee Nation. A fire event chronology American groups includ- ing Cherokee was significantly correlated (r=0.84) with the number of fires per

Stambaugh, Michael C

45

Language Maintenance And Language Renewal Among Cherokee People in Oklahoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to forfeit culture and language. Today remnants of some Indian tribes are striving to find ways to maintain or renew their own languages. This paper explores some of the issues involved, and then focuses on efforts to maintain and renew Oklahoma Cherokee....

Brooks, Barbara J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Geologic challenges and opportunities of the Cherokee group play (Pennsylvanian): Anadarko basin, Oklahoma. Topical report, January-March 1993  

SciTech Connect

The report has four objectives: (1) to summarize both the geologic characteristics of the Cherokee Group and its production highlights; (2) to summarize what current Cherokee producing companies perceive to be the primary geologic challenges they face in developing the Cherokee play; (3) to suggest geologic strategies to help respond to these challenges; and (4) to assess the benefits to operators of geologic studies of the Cherokee. To increase the understanding and utilization of natural gas resources in the Cherokee Group of west-central Oklahoma and to help assess future geological and technological needs for efficient development of this resource, the report highlights current geological knowledge of the Cherokee play.

Hentz, T.F.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Exploration model for unconformity-related hydrocarbon accumulations in Cherokee Group for western Kansas  

SciTech Connect

The sandstones of the Desmoinesian Cherokee Group in western Kansas are important hydrocarbon producers. The Start oil field in Rush and Ness Counties is an example of an unconformity-related Cherokee accumulation from which an exploration model can be made. In this field, the upper Cherokee member is economically important and is interpreted to be a marine unit deposited on the distal portion of an alluvial plain. Traps and reservoirs in this unit were formed by winnowing of clay and silt-sized material from sediments deposited on the crests of paleohighs. Four maps are useful in exploring for upper Cherokee hydrocarbon accumulations such as Start. An isopach map of the Cherokee group is useful for locating thins that coincide with paleohighs on the basal Pennsylvanian unconformity. An isopach map from the Cherokee Group is useful for locating thins that coincide with paleohighs on the basal Pennsylvanian unconformity. An isopach map from the Cherokee top down to the first sandstone porosity is useful. Thins of this interval define areas where wave and current action have winnowed finer material from sands. Closed anticlines on a Cherokee structure map are areas where Cherokee reservoirs are likely to be oil bearing rather than water bearing. An isopach map from the Cimarronian stone Corral anhydrite top down to the Missourian Lansing Group top is also useful. Thins of this interval correspond to paleohighs on the basal Pennsylvanian unconformity. This interval can be picked from seismic records. Prospective areas occur where isopach thins of Stone Corral to Lansing, of Cherokee Group, and of Cherokee top to first sandstone porosity coincide with Cherokee anticlinal structure.

Bieber, D.W.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Telling our story Case study of the Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism initiative.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is a case study of the Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism initiative: planning began in 2005 and development began in 2008. This initiative resulted from (more)

Smith, Chad

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The Cherokee Kid : Will Rogers and teh tribal genealogies of American Indian celebrity.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation is the first historical-cultural exploration of the ways tribal customs made their way into mainstream America. Throughout his career, Cherokee entertainer and political (more)

Ware, Amy Melissa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Seeds of the Real People: How Cherokee Folk Ways Conflicted with Colonial Culture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The diplomatic relationship between the Cherokee and English colonists (and later the United States) was complex and affected by many variables. Chief among them were (more)

Gunn, Christopher

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

"Souls in the Treetops:" Cherokee War, Masculinity, and Community, 1760-1820 .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation focuses upon the rapid changes Cherokees underwent during the early national period in American history. They dealt with challenges that presented in a (more)

Abram, Susan Marie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The rhetoric of Nuna Dual Tsuny : retelling the Cherokee Trail of Tears.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??"This dissertation discusses ways to examine historical events such as the Cherokee Trail of Tears through various rhetorical lenses and scrutinizes how to negotiate meaning (more)

Nixon-Auguste, Nicol

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Regulating the Republic: Violence and Order in the Cherokee-Georgia Borderlands, 1820-1840.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the two decades prior to Cherokee Removal, Georgians discussed removal as a way for the state to create and maintain order, a cluster of (more)

Pratt, Adam Jeffrey

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Influence of Mississippian Karst Topography on Deposition of the Cherokee Group: Ness County, Kansas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Cherokee Group (Desmoinesian, Middle Pennsylvanian) of Ness County, Kansas was deposited on the western flank of the Central Kansas uplift. Eleven lithofacies were defined (more)

Ramaker, Benjamin J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The dialogical understanding of framing: the Cherokee Nations struggle to retain Indian Territory.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The focus of my paper is on the frames and counterframes used by the Cherokee Nation and the United States federal government and lobbyists, respectively, (more)

Dawson, Claire Suzanne Smith

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Informal and Formal Legitimation of State-Sponsored Force in the Cherokee Trail of Tears.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Cherokee Trail of Tears offers important historical insights and a novel sociological case through which to understand how the use of military force is (more)

Davis, James Jordan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The Peachtree Valley and Valley Town mission : a baptist recategorization of a Cherokee landscape.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Peachtree Valley in Clay county, North Carolina has a long history of diversity in plant, animal, and human habitation. The Cherokee, who have inhabited the (more)

Owen, James Anthony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

"If This Great Nation May Be Saved?" The Discourse of Civilization in Cherokee Indian Removal.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis examined the rhetoric and discourse of the elite political actors in the Cherokee Indian Removal crisis. Historians such as Ronald Satz and (more)

Watson, Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Writing a way home : Cherokee narratives of critical and ethical nationhood.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Writing a Way Home examines ways that Cherokees in the latter half of the 20th century who have been marginalized through the privileging of state (more)

Russell, Bryan Edward

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

A case study of two Cherokee newspapers and their fight against censorship.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study attempts to illuminate an injustice to the Cherokee Nation through denial of First Amendment rights in newspapers and communities. Through case studies and (more)

Evans, Desiree Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natchitoches winn cherokee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

$1.4 million to Cherokee Services Group for Administrative and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

nation that will exist long after our project is finished. For that reason, we take to heart these values of integrity, professionalism, and excellence." - Cherokee Services Group...

62

Stratigraphy and depositional environments of Cherokee group (Desmoinesian, middle Pennsylvanian), Central Cherokee basin, southeast Kansas  

SciTech Connect

Correlation from geophysical well logs of radioactive black shales, which extend throughout the basin and into the Sedgwick and Forest City basins, provided the basis for division of the Cherokee Group into 11 stratigraphic intervals. Black shale units below the Fort Scott Limestone and Verdigris Limestone, and above the Tebo coal are the most extensive and easily recognizable markers. The Tebo marker might be considered as a possible boundary between the Krebs and Cabaniss Formations owing to lateral extensiveness, mappability, and stratigraphic location near a distinct lithologic change. Cross sections indicate that the basin subsided during deposition of the Krebs Formation. Stratigraphic intervals in the overlying Cabaniss formation are relatively uniform in thickness, suggesting little or no subsidence during deposition. Onlap upon the Nemaha ridge occurred during Krebs and much of Cabaniss deposition. Stratigraphic markers that overlap the ridge and extend into the Sedgwick basin indicate one depositional province. Core, well-log, and well-sample studies show that lithologic characteristics within the basin appear similar to outcrop features. Basin strata are dominated by shales and sandstones with interbedded coals and thin limestones. Net-sandstone isolith maps reveal the presence of a deltaic complex characterized by both stacking and offset of major sandstone bodies. The amount of limestone significantly increases along the eastern flank of the Nemaha ridge.

Staton, M.D.; Brady, L.L.; Walton, A.W.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Cherokee County Elec Coop Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cherokee County Elec Coop Assn Cherokee County Elec Coop Assn Place Texas Utility Id 3470 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial - Single Phase Commercial Commercial - Three Phase Commercial Large Power Industrial Nonfirm Power From a Qualifying Facility Commercial Optional Large Power Time-of-Use Industrial Residential Residential Security Light Service - 100 HPS Lighting Security Light Service - 250 HPS Lighting Security Light Service - 400 MV Lighting Security Light Service- 175 MV Lighting

64

Oxygenation cost estimates for Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The capital and annual costs associated with reoxygenation of the turbine releases at Cherokee, Douglas and Norris Reservoirs using the small bubble injection technique developed for Ft. Patrick Henry Dam were computed. The weekly average dissolved oxygen (DO) deficits were computed for each reservoir for an average year (based on 16 years of records). The total annual cost of an oxygen supply and injection system for each reservoir is presented. 5 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Fain, T.G.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 7): Cherokee County Superfund Site, Cherokee County, KS, July 29, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The decision document presents the selected remedial action for the mining wastes at Operable Unit No. 07 of the Galena Subsite, which is part of the Cherokee County Superfund Site in Cherokee County, Kansas. The selected remedy includes actions for residential soils impacted by mining wastes and includes: Excavation and disposal of residential soils impacted by mining wastes; Health education for the general community and medical professionals; Institutional controls to guide future development in residential areas impacted by mining wastes; Treatability studies to evaluate the effectiveness of phosphate stabilization as a future alternative; and Operation and maintenance of all remedy aspects including, but not limited to, health education, institutional controls, and long-term monitoring.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

CHEROKEE COUNTY With 289 students and 1,168 alumni, there's no limit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

County Baruch Institute Carolina on King USC School of Medicine Greenville · The 2012 USC ColumbiaCHEROKEE COUNTY With 289 students and 1,168 alumni, there's no limit to Gamecock pride in Cherokee County. This report highlights the university's impact on your community. January 2013 As the University

Almor, Amit

67

Electronic Properties of Adsorbates on In0.37Ga0.63As(001)-(24) D. L. Winn, T. J. Grassman, and A. C. Kummel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electronic Properties of Adsorbates on In0.37Ga0.63As(001)-(2?4) D. L. Winn, T. J. Grassman, and A resulting from the adsorbates/semiconductors systems exhibited subtle differences. Both oxides induced state)-(2?4). In addition, the state density worsened with increasing adsorbate coverage. However, a greater adsorbate

Kummel, Andrew C.

68

Electronic properties of adsorbates on GaAs,,001...-c,,28.../,,24... Darby L. Winn, Michael J. Hale, Tyler J. Grassman, Jonathan Z. Sexton, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electronic properties of adsorbates on GaAs,,001...-c,,2?8.../,,2?4... Darby L. Winn, Michael J tunneling spectroscopy STS and density functional theory DFT were used to study four different adsorbates' O that out of the four adsorbates studied, only one left the Fermi level unpinned, Ga2O. DFT calculations

Kummel, Andrew C.

69

Sedimentology, diagenesis, and petrophysics of selected Cherokee group (Desmoinesian) sandstones in Southeastern Kansas. Part 1  

SciTech Connect

Pennsylvanian deposits of the Cherokee Group in S.E. Kansas and N.E. Oklahoma contain petroleum bearing sandstones that currently are being considered for the application of enhanced oil recovery processes. The objectives of this research are to determine pertinent geologic and petrophysical properties of Cherokee Group sandstones and to establish relationships among these properties to aid in understanding fluid movement in reservoirs during enhanced recovery operations. The area of study is the portion of the Cherokee Basin in S.E. Kansas. Eighteen cores containing a total of 27 individual sandstone bodies from the Cherokee Group were selected from the core library of the Kansas Geological Survey. Depths at which cores were taken range from 9 m on the eastern side of the study area to over 1050 m on the western side of the study area. These sandstones are representative of the numerous narrow, elongate, lenticular, discontinuous sand bodies characteristic of the Pennsylvanian deposits of this area.

Woody, M.D.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

$1.4 million to Cherokee Services Group for Administrative and Property Support Services  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"When CSG undertakes a project, we are not simply representing a brand or evena corporation. We are representing the reputation of anentire nation and culture. The name Cherokee and the...

71

Provenance and diagenesis of the Cherokee sandstones, deep Anadarko basin, Western Oklahoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROVENANCE AND DIAGENESIS OF THE CHEROKEE SANDSTONES, DEEP ANADARKO BASIN, WESTERN OKLAHOMA A Thesis by STEPHEN DOUGLAS LEVINE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May l984 Major Subject: Geology PROVENANCE AND DIAGENESIS OF THE CHEROKEE SANDSTONES, t DEEP ANADARKO BASIN, WESTERN OKLAHOMA A Thesis by STEPHEN DOUGLAS LEVINE Approved as to style and content by: Thomas T. Tieh (Chairman...

Levine, Stephen Douglas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

72

The leadership of Ross O. Swimmer, 1975-1985 : a case study of a modern Cherokee principal chief.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The following study examined leadership characteristics of a modern leader of the Cherokee Nation, Ross O. Swimmer, during his three elections as Principal Chief, 1975-1985. (more)

Kehle, Jo Layne Sunday

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Georgia Newspaper Coverage Discovering Conventional Practices of the 'Cherokee Question': Prelude to the Removal, 1828-1832.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis analyzes the specific journalistic conventional practices of newspapers in Georgia as they focused on the Cherokee Question in 1828-1832, the critical period during (more)

Hobgood, Jr., James Hollister

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Zinc and cadmium residues in striped bass from Cherokee, Norris, and Watts Bar reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Zinc and cadmium concentrations in muscle, liver, and kidney were measured in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) from Cherokee, Norris, and Watts Bar reservoirs in East Tennessee to determine if these metals had contributed to fish kills observed in Cherokee during the 1970's. The range of mean concentrations of zinc from collections of Cherokee striped bass (muscle 11-14, liver 98-106, kidney 88-105 mg Zn/kg dry weight) were comparable to ranges in fish from Norris and Watts Bar (muscle 12-13, liver 83-132, kidney 96-108 mg/kg dry weight). With the exception of concentrations in the kidneys of one collection, cadmium residues from Cherokee striped bass (muscle 0.02-0.09, liver 0.3-0.7, kidney 0.2-4.0 mg Cd/kg dry weight) were also similar to residues from Norris and Watts Bar fish (muscle 0.05-0.13, liver 0.3-2.1, kidney 0.3-0.5 mg Cd/kg dry weight). There were significant differences in tissue residues among seasons (summer 1979, spring 1980, summer 1980) in Cherokee Reservoir, as well as significant differences among the three reservoirs (Cherokee, Norris, Watts Bar) during the same season (spring 1980). All concentrations, however, were well below those reported for fish exposed to the maximum non-harmful concentrations of zinc and the lowest potentially harmful concentration of cadmium and moreover, were within the range typically reported for fish tissues. It is, therefore, believed that in at least the last two years, zinc and cadmium in the tissues of striped bass from Cherokee Reservoir have not been harmful to the fish.

Tisa, M.S.; Strange, R.J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Oklahoma Cherokee formation study shows benefits of gas tax credits  

SciTech Connect

To no one's surprise, the administration's recently released energy initiative package does not advocate the use of tax incentives such as the Internal Revenue Code Sec. 29 (tight sand gas) credit that expired Dec. 31, 1992. This is unfortunate since tax credits do stimulate drilling, as the authors' recent study of Oklahoma's Pennsylvanian age Cherokee formation demonstrates. Within this 783,000 acre study area, more than 130 additional wells were drilled between 1991--92 because of tax credit incentives. And such tax credits also increase total federal tax revenues by causing wells to be drilled that would not have been drilled or accelerating the drilling of wells, thereby increasing taxable revenue. In short, tax credits create a win-win situation: they stimulate commerce, increase tax revenues, reduce the outflow of capital to foreign petroleum projects, and add to the nation's natural gas reserve, which is beneficial for national security, balance of payments, the environment, and gas market development. The paper discusses the study assumptions, study results, and the tax credit policy.

Stanley, B.J.; Cline, S.B. (Hefner Corp., Oklahoma City, OK (United States))

1994-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

76

Modeling the downstream improvements in dissolved oxygen from aeration of Cherokee and Douglas releases  

SciTech Connect

This report is an evaluation of downstream improvements in dissolved oxygen (DO) which can be anticipated as a result of different levels of aeration at Cherokee and Douglas Dams. The report describes (a) field studies undertaken to describe late summer conditions for model calibration and verification; (b) development and calibration of unsteady flow and water quality models for the tailwater reaches from Cherokee and Douglas Dams to the Holston and French Broad River confluence at the head of Fort Loudoun Reservoir; and (c) model predictions of DO in the tailwater reaches and at their confluence (after mixing) with and without aeration. 7 refs., 47 figs., 4 tabs.

Hauser, G.E.; Beard, L.M.; Brown, R.T.; McKinnon, M.K.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Attitudes of Youth toward Occupational Opportunities and Social Services in Cherokee County.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUMMARY This study was conducted by 'the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station in 1956 to determine k: attitude of high school seniors toward occupational opportunities and social services in Cherokee c0un7~ All of the white senior boys... in Cherokee county prefer an average job in a town or city to o&&ship and operdie of their own farm. Senior girls prefer that their future husband hold an average job in town rather thc own and operate a farm. Most of the seniors prefer to live and work...

Nelson, Bardin H.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Quality site seasonal report: Cherokee Indian Hospital, SFBP 4058, December 1984 through April 1985  

SciTech Connect

The active solar Domestic Hot Water (DHW) and space heating system at the Cherokee Indian Hospital was designed and constructed as part of the Solar in Federal Buildings Program (SFBP). This retrofitted system is one of eight of the systems in the SFBP selected for quality monitoring. The purpose of this monitoring effort is to document the performance of quality state-of-the-art solar systems in large federal building applications. The hospital serves the Qualla Reservation of the Cherokee Indian Tribe in Cherokee, North Carolina, near the eastern entrance to the Great Smoky Mountain National Park. Solar energy is used to preheat domestic hot water (the cafeteria is the principal load) and for space heating. The hospital is expected to have a normal year-round occupancy of 200 people (patients, medical and maintenance personnel) with some 2775 expected visitors per year. The drainback solar system has 320 Owens-Illinois evacuated-tube collectors with a gross area of 5517 square feet. Solar energy is stored in a 6335-gallon storage tank. Solar energy from storage is supplied to a 700-gallon DHW preheat tank through a heat exchanger in the storage tank, and directly to heat exchangers in the heating ducts. Auxiliary energy is supplied by two large oil-fired boilers. Performance of the system at the Cherokee Indian Hospital during the period December 1984 through April 1985 are reported.

Raymond, M.G.

1987-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Deep coal resources in the Cherokee Group (middle Pennsylvanian) in eastern Kansas  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of over 800 gamma-ray/density and gamma-ray/neutron logs run for oil and gas tests in eastern Kansas shows a wide distribution of coal in the Cherokee Group in this area. With nearly 300 million tons (270 million metric tons) of high-volatile bituminous coal produced in southeastern Kansas, this group was important for further evaluation. Studies of the coals in the Cherokee Group too deep to strip mine in the Cherokee basin and the Forest City basin indicate a coal resource of nearly 50 billion tons (45 billion metric tons). This figure represents coal from 27 different coal beds in the three reliability categories of measured, indicated, and inferred. Most of the coal is recognized as thin bedded (< 28 in. or < 70 cm) like most of the coal beds in the outcrop belt in southeastern Kansas. Six coals beds with a total of over 1.4 billion tons (1.3 billion metric tons) of resources are present where coal thicknesses exceed 42 in. (105 cm) in parts of 12 different counties. Resource quantities of the Cherokee Group coal beds were made using Pacer and Garnet software developed for the National Coal Resources Data System (NCRDS) of the US Geological Survey.

Brady, L.L.; Livingston, N.D.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The problem of the twenty-first century in the Cherokee Nation is the problem of the color-line : how the Cherokee Freedmen have articulated a sense of cultural identity and citizenship claims over time.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??M.A. This research investigates the Cherokee Freedmen, who are people of African-American descent and peoples of mixed African-American and Native American descent, who were once (more)

Spears, Shannon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natchitoches winn cherokee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Rivers, Roads, and Rails: The Influence of Transportation Needs and Internal Improvements on Cherokee Treaties and Removal from 1779 to 1838.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the importance of transportation routes and internal improvements as factors in treaty negotiations and the removal of the Cherokees. Covering a period (more)

Rozema, Vicki Bell

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Sedimentology, diagenesis, and petrophysics of selected Cherokee group (Desmoinesian) sandstones in southeastern Kansas. Part 2  

SciTech Connect

Medium to very fine-grained sandstones of the Cherokee Group in S.E. Kansas were deposited by unidirectional currents in nearshore, continental channels resulting in sandstone deposits up to 35 m (116 ft) thick. Five lithofacies have been established: (1) conglomeratic sandstones subdivided into thin basal and thick sequence- capping conglomerates, (2) stacked sandstones, (3) crossbedded coarse sandstones, (4) rippled fine sandstones; and (5) interbedded sandstones, shales, and siltstones. The following diagenetic stages were established: Stage 1: rare, localized precipitation of concretionary calcite and siderite cements in both sandstones and shales; Stage 2: extensive chlorite coatings on grains and silica cementation; and Stage 3: patchy kaolinite, siderite, and dolomite-ankerite cements develop while feldspars, micas, and argillaceous rock fragments dissolve. A model is proposed for Cherokee Group sandstones which shows that coarser grain size, less cementation, and fewer argillaceous rock fragments are found in the coarse sandstone lithofacies in the lower portion of sandstone sequences. 96 references.

Woody, M.D.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Oxygenation cost estimates in 1983 dollars for Cherokee and Douglas Dams  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Reservoir Releases Program, estimates of costs associated with providing high purity oxygen injection systems at Cherokee and Douglas Dams were computed in 1983 dollars. This report presents results of the computations. An 8.125% interest rate, a 25-year economic life, and a 10-year diffuser life were assumed. Weekly average dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) and turbine flowrate data were available for the years 1958 through 1980. 4 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Fain, T.G.; Boyd, J.W.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Depositional environments and facies analysis of the Cherokee Group in west-central Kansas  

SciTech Connect

The Cherokee Group of early Desmoinesian Pennsylvanian age in west-central Kansas is comprised of a mixed siliciclastic and carbonate sequence. It was deposited in environments that are transitional from continental to marginal marine as the Hugoton Sea transgressed the Mississippian unconformity on to the Central Kansas uplift. Sandstones of the Cherokee Group are important oil reservoirs in west-central Kansas, but they are highly variable and difficult to predict. Core studies and subsurface analysis reveal two persistent and widespread limestone beds that form useful stratigraphic markers within the Cherokee. They provide a framework for facies analysis and regional mapping that may be useful as a predictive tool for oil exploration. Six basic lithofacies are interpreted from lithologies and sedimentary structures observed in cores obtained from four wells in eastern Ness County: (1) basal Pennsylvanian conglomerate, (2) fluvial sands, (3) fine-grained tidal flat deposits, (4) shallow-marine limestones, (5) shoreline sands and tidal channel sands, and (6) braided stream, sandy conglomerates. These facies are correlative with components of an ideal Kansas cyclothem. Two transgressive-regressive cycles are identified and maximum transgression is correlated with two widespread limestone beds. Following burial of the Mississippian karstic surface, deposition of peritidal sediments occurred on a uniform shallow shelf, punctuated by periods of subaerial exposure and weathering. Clastics derived from the eroding Central Kansas uplift were probably supplied to the coastal plain by braided streams and reworked by coastal processes.

Cuzella, J.J.; Gough, C.P. (NCRA, Denver, CO (United States)); Howard, S.C.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Productivity of the aquatic macrophyte community of the Holston River: implications to hypolimnetic oxygen depletions of Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

Studies were initiated in 1979 to evaluate the extensive aquatic macrophyte beds on the Holston River in upper east Tennessee. The primary aim of these studies was to determine if allochthonous input from drifting aquatic plant debris was a significant factor contributing to low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Cherokee Reservoir located downstream. This report presents the results of studies conducted in 1979-1980 to obtain refined estimate of the impact of allochthonous aquatic macrophyte input on DO levels in Cherokee Reservoir. The report also details phenological aspects of the growth and reproduction of the various species that comprise the submersed aquatic macrophyte community of the Holston River above Cherokee Reservoir and discusses the contribution of each to net primary productivity of the river. 31 references, 9 figures, 4 tables.

Young, R.C.; Dennis, W.M.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Elevated thermal maturation in Pennsylvanian rocks, Cherokee basin, southeastern Kansas: Importance of regional fluid flow  

SciTech Connect

Thermal history of sedimentary basins is commonly assumed to be dominated by burial heating. Marked contrast between reconstructed burial temperatures and other temperature determinations would suggest alternative processes. In the Cherokee basin of southeastern Kansas, reconstruction of burial and thermal history indicates that basal Pennsylvanian strata were not buried more than 1.8 km, and should have reached only about 90C. However, the study of Pennsylvanian rocks of the Cherokee basin indicates that higher temperatures were reached and that the pattern of thermal maturation is inconsistent with simple burial heating. Regional pattern of vitrinite reflectance reveals several warm spots' where thermal maturation is elevated above the regional background. Primary fluid inclusions in late Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate cements yield homogenization-temperature modes or petrographically consistent populations ranging from 100 to 150C. These data suggest that the samples experienced at least those temperatures, hence fluid inclusions closely agree with vitrinite and Rock-Eval. Elevated temperatures, warm spots, confined thermal spikes, a low R{sub m} gradient argue against simple burial heating. These observations are consistent with regional invasion of warm fluids, probably from the Ouachita-Arkoma system, and their subsequent upward migration into Pennsylvanian strata through faults and fractures. Petroleum exploration should consider the possibility of regionally elevated thermal maturation levels with even more elevated local maxima. Consequences may include local generation of hydrocarbons or local changes in diagenetic patterns.

Wojcik, K.M.; Goldstein, R.H.; Walton, A.W. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence (United States)); Barker, C.E. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Health assessment for Cherokee County-Galena Subsite National Oriorities List (NPL) Site, Galena, Cherokee County, Kansas, Region 7. CERCLIS No. KSD980741862. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Cherokee County site is on the National Priorities List. Mine wastes resulting from the shaft excavations, ore-milling processes, and smelter operations had been disposed of on the ground near mine shafts and former mill sites. Maximum contaminant concentrations in the on-site areas consist of lead (3,880 parts per million (ppm) in surface-mine wastes, 550 ppm in surface soils, 390 parts per billion (ppb) in private drinking-water wells, 290 ppb in surface water from subsidence or open-pit mine ponds, 67 ppb in other surface waters (creeks or rivers)); cadmium (60 ppm surface-mine wastes, 12 ppm in surface soils, 180 ppb in private drinking-water wells, 200 ppb in surface water from subsidence or open-pit-mine ponds, 140 ppb in other surface water (creeks or rivers)); and, chromium (total) (120 ppb in private drinking water wells). The site is of public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the probable human exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. Human exposure to heavy metals is probably occurring via ingestion, dermal, or inhalation exposure to contaminated surface soils, mine wastes, surface waters, or contaminated foodstuffs.

Not Available

1989-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

88

Summer habitat selection by striped bass, Morone Saxatilis, in Cherokee Reservoir, Tennessee, 1977  

SciTech Connect

Summer habitat selection patterns of 18 adult striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in Cherokee Reservoir were monitored with externally attached temperature-sensing acoustic or radio transmitters from June through September 1977. Mortalities of adult striped bass in this reservoir were hypothesized to be related to high summer temperatures and low dissolved oxygen (DO). The inhabited areas or refuges differed from noninhabited areas by maintaining temperatures less than or equal to 22 C and DO concentrations greater than 5 mg/liter. Total water hardness, pH, and water transparency were not significantly different among refuges and noninhabited areas. Movement of fish outside refuges occurred more frequently and for longer periods during June when the summer pattern of high temperatures and low DO was less severe. Fish experienced temperatures between 15 and 27 C with mean temperatures of individuals ranging from 18.5 to 22.0 C. Several tagged fish migrated outside the refuges and selected the lowest available temperature, generally near 21 C, even though DO concentrations at these temperatures were 3 mg/liter or less. Long-term survival of tagged and nontagged fish outside refuges was undetermined because no fish were tracked outside a refuge for more than 12 days without being lost. This study indicates that temperature strongly influences the behavior of striped bass and that adults of this species may have a thermal preferendum of approximately 21 C.

Waddle, H.R.; Coutant, C.C.; Wilson, J.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Depositional facies of hydrocarbon reservoirs of upper Cherokee Group, Anadarko basin  

SciTech Connect

The Desmoinesian upper Cherokee Group sequence in the Anadarko basin is the subsurface equivalent of the Cabaniss Group of eastern Oklahoma. This sequence includes the Pink limestone, Skinner sandstone, Verdigris limestone, and Prue sandstone intervals. The upper Skinner sandstone, which has not been well documented, is an important hydrocarbon-producing reservoir in the Anadarko basin. The Skinner sandstone is represented by channel, delta-front-prodelta, and shallow marine facies. Channel facies consist of a primary elongate trend extending 40 mi southeast-northwest across Custer and Roger Mills Counties, Oklahoma. Several small secondary channels trending northeast-southwest were also observed. Active channel-fill sequences in the primary trend exceed 100 ft in thickness and represent the major producing reservoir of the upper Skinner sandstone. Delta-front-prodelta sequences are dominated by shale and interbedded sandstone-shale units. Shallow marine facies consist of massive coarsening-upward units that reach 300 ft in thickness. This facies belt is broad and slightly elongated, approximately 12 mi wide by 20 mi long, and trends northeast-southwest somewhat normal to channel facies orientation. Lithologically, the upper Skinner channel sandstone is feldspathic litharenite with abundant feldspar and quartz overgrowth. Both primary and secondary porosity were observed in the upper Skinner sandstone. Secondary porosity evolved mainly from dissolution of feldspar and lithic fragments. However, extensive cementation in the shallow marine facies has reduced porosity to negligible amounts and consequently reduced reservoir quality.

Puckette, J.O.; Al-Shaieb, Z. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Idiosyncrasies of Cherokee genetic sequence of strata, north-central Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

In plan view, the individual genetic increments of strata that comprise the Cherokee genetic sequence of strata are, for the most part, a complex maze of anastomosing fluvial channels generally trending north-south. This picture is further complicated by many isolated pods, splays, and partially preserved minor channels between and outside of the main channels. When viewed in cross section, a few of the individual thick sandstone deposits (50-100 ft) are the result of a single depositional event. Most of these deposits are the result of the stacking of two or three individual channels. An additional complication occurs when downcutting into an underlying interval results in younger sandstones being stacked on older sandstones or occupying an interval that would appear to correlate with the older unit. The rigid use of stereotype principles, such as type electric log signatures (e.g., bell shaped indicating a channel, inverted bell a bar, etc), unimaginative isopach contouring, computer generated data and/or maps, and scout card or other published information will yield erroneous interpretations. Electric logs need to be intelligently examined and interpreted. Numerous cross sections need to be constructed to show proper stratigraphic relationships. Well cuttings need to be examined microscopically. Isopach maps must be constructed with interpretive imagination, not by rote, in order to yield valid oil-finding interpretations.

O'brien, J.E.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Log-derived evaluation of gas-bearing Cherokee, Red Fork, and Morrow formations, Custer County, OK  

SciTech Connect

Medium to low porosity and rather tight Cherokee, Red Fork and Morrow sands, located in Oklahoma, contain significant hydrocarbon resources. To evaluate the commercial importance of wells drilled in Custer County, Oklahoma, an innovative digital shaly sand analysis approach (CLASS - Epilog) has been applied, which provides information on total and effective reservoir porosity, total and effective fluid distribution based on the Waxman-Smits equation, shaliness, clay typing, and reservoir productivity. Several field case examples are presented and discussed based on (1) open hole logging suite, consisting of induction, compensated density/neutron and Spectralog, (2) CLASS analysis, (3) well completion and stimulation data, and (4) the resulting production test results.

Busch, E.A.; Fertl, W.H.; Neill, B.E.; Sinha, A.K.; Sobkowich, K.N.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Chironomid abnormalities in relation to sediment chemistry in Empire Lake, Cherokee County, Kansas  

SciTech Connect

Morphological deformities found in macroinvertebrate populations have been proposed as potential biological indicators of pollution impact in aquatic environments. Larval midges (Diptera: Chironomidae) were sampled in the Spring and fall of 1987 from the heavy metals-impacted Empire Lake watershed, Cherokee County, Kansas. The frequency and severity of morphological deformities were estimated and analyzed for correlation with zinc, cadmium and lead concentrations in sediments of the lake. Temporal, taxonomic and spatial patterns were observed. Chironomids that were present in the sediments for the greatest duration (i.e. overwintering generations) were deformed 16.69%, while summer populations were deformed only 11.30% (p < 0.05, n = 1,413). Larvae of the chironominae, generally sediment-dwelling detritivores were twice as likely to be deformed than the Tanypodinae, epibenthic predators (20.94% vs. 9.09{prime}-., p < 0.01, n = 1,408). Similarly, samples taken below the confluence of the Spring River and Short Creek, the greatest source of metals, and those within the lake itself, a major depositional area of metal-laden particulate matter, were more likely to be deformed than elsewhere in the watershed. Few patterns of severity were statistically significant, even though the most grossly deformed larvae tended to occur in samples with the highest metals concentrations. The lack of relationship between metals and the severity of deformation could have been the result of the genetic tolerance of resident versus immigrating populations. The frequency of deformation tended to be a good indicator of heavy metal impact, but severity of deformation was inconclusive in this study.

Reynolds, S.K. Jr.; Ferrington, L.C. Jr. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Kansas Biological Survey

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Cherokee County/Galena, Kansas (Second remedial action), September 1989  

SciTech Connect

The Cherokee County site is a lead and zinc mining area in the southeastern corner of Kansas. The 25 square-mile Galena subsite is one of six subsites within the Cherokee County site and consists of large areas covered by mine wastes, water-filled subsidence craters, and open mine shafts. The approximately 3,500 Galena residents receive their water supply from two deep aquifer wells. EPA began investigations of the Galena subsite in 1985 and determined that the shallow ground-water aquifer and surface water were contaminated with elevated concentrations of metals. EPA Region VII responded by installing water-treatment units on several private wells. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water and surface water are metals including cadmium, lead, and zinc. The selected remedial action for the site includes the removal, consolidation, and onsite placement in mine pits, shafts, and subsidences of surface mine wastes; diversion and channelization of surface streams with recontouring and vegetation of land surface; and investigation of deep aquifer well quality.

Not Available

1989-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

94

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Medley Farms, Cherokee County, Gaffney, SC. (First remedial action), May 1991. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The 7-acre Medley Farms site is a former waste disposal area located on a private farm used as pasture 6 miles south of Gaffney, Cherokee County, South Carolina. Land use in the area is predominantly agricultural and light residential, and six private wells are within a 1-mile radius of the site. The site overlies a shallow saprolitic and a deeper bedrock aquifer. All residents in the near vicinity of the site are connected to the public water distribution system. EPA conducted a geological study to determine the potential for ground water contamination. Subsequent EPA studies identified VOCs in both soil and ground water. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses soil and ground water contamination as a final remedy. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including benzene, PCE, and TCE; and other organics including pesticides and PCBs. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

Not Available

1991-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

95

Small-scale hydroelectric power demonstration project: Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. , Cherokee Falls, South Carolina: Final operations and maintenance report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to give a final accounting of the costs and benefits derived from the first two years of operation of the Cherokee Falls, Broad River Hydroelectric Demonstration Project which was built at Cherokee Falls, South Carolina. Prior to construction, Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. (BREC) executed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Number FC07-80ID12125 which provided $1,052,664 toward the construction of the facility. This agreement requires that BREC document for DOE a summary of the complete operating statistics, operating and maintenance cost, and revenues from power sales for a two-year operating period. A complete reporting covering the design, technical, construction, legal, institutional, environmental and other related aspects of the total project was furnished to DOE previously for publication as the ''Final Technical and Construction Cost Report''. For this reason these elements will not be addressed in detail in this report. In order to make this account a more meaningful discussion of the initial two-year and four month production period, it is necessary to detail several unique events concerning the project which set Cherokee Falls apart from other projects developed under similar Cooperative Agreements with DOE. Accordingly, this report will discuss certain major problems experienced with the design, operation and maintenance, energy production, as well as the operation and maintenance cost and value of the power produced for the first 28 months of operation. 3 figs.

Not Available

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Biotelemetry study of spring and summer habitat selection by striped bass in Cherokee Reservoir, Tennessee, 1978. [Morone saxatilis  

SciTech Connect

Habitat selection of 31 adult striped bass was monitored by temperature sensing ultrasonic and radio transmitters in Cherokee Reservoir, Tennessee, from March through October 1978. This study sought to corroborate summer data obtained by Waddle (1979) in 1977 and to examine mechanisms of habitat selection by observing establishment of the summer distribution. During the spring and early summer months the striped bass ranged throughout the study area in the downstream half of the reservoir. Fish stayed near the bottom at the preferred temperatures throughout the whole study, and no individuals were observed in open water. Movement rates of up to 2.6 km/day were estimated, and rates of 1 km/day were common in the spring. By late July they were apparently avoiding low dissolved oxygen (D.O.) concentrations (<3 mg/l) near the bottom of the main reservoir and epilimnion temperatures greater than 22/sup 0/C, and they moved into cool, oxygenated spring or creek channels (refuges). Low movement rates of 0 to 25 m/day within these refuges occurred. The rates of the few migrations between refuges could not be estimated. Tagged fish moved out of the refuges 3 to 4 weeks after the fall overturn when reservoir temperatures approximated 22 to 24/sup 0/C.

Schaich, B.A.; Coutant, C.C.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Assessment of water resources in lead-zinc mined areas in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to evaluate water-resources problems related to abandoned lead and zinc mines in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas in Missouri and Oklahoma. Past mining activities have caused changes in the hydrogeology of the area. Lead and zinc mining has caused discontinuities and perforations in the confining shale west of the Pennsylvanian-Mississippian geologic contact (referred to as the western area), which have created artificial ground-water recharge and discharge areas. Recharge to the shallow aquifer (rocks of Mississippian age) through collapses, shafts, and drill holes in the shale has caused the formation of a groundwater ''mound'' in the vicinity of the Picher Field in Kansas and Oklahoma. Discharge of mine-contaminated ground water to Tar Creek occurs in Oklahoma from drill holes and shafts where the potentiometric surface of the shallow aquifer is above the land surface. Mining of ore in the shallow aquifer has resulted in extensive fracturing and removal of material, which has created highly transmissive zones and voids and increased ground-water storage properties of the aquifer. In the area east of the Pennsylvanian-Mississippian geologic contact (referred to as the eastern area), fractured rock and tailings on the land surface increased the amount of water available for infiltration to the shallow aquifer; in the western area, tailings on the impermeable shale created artificial, perched aquifer systems that slowly drain to surface streams. 45 refs., 23 figs., 21 tabs.

Spruill, T.B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Depositional setting and sandstone diagenesis of the Upper Pennsylvanian (Missourian) Hepler Formation, Cherokee Shelf of the midcontinent  

SciTech Connect

The Hepler Formation marks the base of the Pleasanton Group which is recognized as the base of the Upper Pennsylvanian in southeastern Kansas. This formation consists of interstratified units of shales, siltstones, and sandstones, as well as a localized coal bed. These lithologies are interpreted as having formed in a prograting, fluvially-dominated deltaic sequence that was deposited as the Late Pennsylvanian sea temporarily withdrew from the Cherokee shelf. Hepler sandstone bodies in the study area are predominantly quartz arenites and sublitharenites. The diagenetic history of the Hepler consisted of alternating periods of authigenic mineral precipitation and dissolution of both detrital grains and cements. Petrographic observations indicate that silica cementation, in the form of quartz overgrowths, took place early in the paragenetic sequence. Changes in the meteoric water chemistry, resulted in partial quartz and feldspar dissolution, and alteration of feldspars to clays. Precipitation of carbonate into dissolution features was initiated by acidic surface waters (fluvial) followed by a sea level rise allowing carbonate-saturated marine waters to flush these sediments. Further burial and compaction destroyed much of remaining porosity and left concavo-convex contacts and sutured quartz grains. This was followed by anoxic conditions which allowed pyrite crystallization to take place. A subsequent fall in sea level exposed Hepler deposits once again to meteoric, low pH waters, resulting in carbonate dissolution. All observed porosity is secondary, formed by carbonate dissolution. Surface samples were subjected to weathering of iron-bearing components to iron-oxide, a product not observable in subsurface core samples.

Gilmer, M.H.; Brenner, R.L. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Geology)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Subsurface temperature anomalies as a key to petroleum-producing areas in the Cherokee and Forest City Basins, eastern Kansas?  

SciTech Connect

The relation of subsurface temperature to `plain-type fold` structure in the Midcontinent (USA) as an exploration tool has been speculated on for a long time. Structural highs, termed `plains-type folds,` are partly the result of differential compaction of sediments over rigid crystalline fault blocks in the Precambrian basement. In the Midcontinent, bottom-hole temperature (BHT) data, temperatures measured in drillstem tests (DSTs), and structural data are abundant. In the Cherokee and Forest City Basins, we analyzed BHT data by depth and stratigraphic unit (Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle carbonates; Mississippian carbonates; and Perm-Pennsylvanian clastics). By relating the BHTs to DSTs, it was noted that the thermal disturbance inherent in BHT by drilling is minor and comparable within a formation. Also, the signal-noise ratio of BHTs could be improved utilizing the large data set. Although the resulting BHT formation gradients show unexpected values from the thermal conductivity in the carbonates and from the evaluated temperature disturbance by the drilling process, analysis of the BHT spatial pattern shows a coincidence of structural highs and temperature anomalies both in the clastics and in the carbonates. These BHT anomalies are outlined by values higher than the regional temperature trend. We attribute the anomalies partly to the insulation effect of petroleum (which may include the self-generation of heat) and partly to the movement of fluids vertically through the fracture and fault system created in the sedimentary veneer. Numerous examples from the oil- and gas-producing areas in eastern Kansas show that the nature of origin of fluids contained in a porous medium can alter local geothermal conditions.

Merriam, D.F. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Foerster, A. [GeoForschungsZentrum Posdam (Germany)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

History of development and depositional environment and upper Cherokee Prue Sand, Custer and Roger Mills counties, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

In western Oklahoma the uppermost sand member of the Cherokee Group, the True sand, was first drilled and found productive in two discoveries, completed in 1980, in west-central Custer County and in central Roger Mills County, Oklahoma. For 1 1/2 to 2 years these two discoveries, some 18 mi (29 km) apart, were thought to be stratigraphic equivalents of two separate sand bodies occurring parallel to the classic northwest-southeast-trending systems of the Anadarko basin. At present, some 40 productive wells will ultimately produce more than 100 bcf of gas and 3 million bbl of condensate from an average depth of 11,500 ft (3500 m). Sand porosities range from 3 to 18% with most producing wells having porosities in the 12 to 15% range. Because Prue sand is slightly overpressured (a pressure gradient of .53 psi/foot), the reserves are generally better than normal-pressured wells at this depth. The sand body is over 40 mi (64 km) in length, 1 to 1.5 mi (1.6 to 2.4 km) wide, and 60 ft (18 m) thick. Study of the core shows the interval to grade from a medium to fine-grained sand, highly laminated and cross-bedded with black shale, to a slightly coarser grained nonstructured interval and back into a highly laminated cross-bedded sandy black shale interval. The interval is topped by a 10 ft (3 m) thick black shale layer that is a predominant bed throughout the whole area. These conclusions have implications that may assist in the exploration of other Pennsylvanian sands in this area.

Baumann, D.K.; Peterson, M.L.; Hunter, L.W.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natchitoches winn cherokee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Assessment of water resources in lead-zinc mined areas in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to evaluate water resources problems related to abandoned lead and zinc mines in Cherokee County, Kansas, and adjacent areas in Missouri and Oklahoma. Past mining activities have caused changes in the geohydrology of the area. Discharge of mine-contaminated groundwater to Tar Creek occurs in Oklahoma from drill holes and shafts where the potentiometric surface of the shallow aquifer is above the land surface. Pumping of the deep aquifer has resulted in a potential for downward movement of water from the shallow aquifer. Water from mines in the eastern area contained dissolved solids concentrations of < 500 mg/L a median pH of 3.9, sulfate concentrations that ranged between 98 and 290 mg/L, and median concentrations for zinc of 37,600 micrograms/L (ug/L) for lead of 240 ug/L, for cadmium of 180 ug/L, for iron of 70 ug/L, for manganese of 240 ug/L, and for silica of 15 mg/L. Water from mines in the western area contained dissolved solids concentrations of generally > 500 mg/L, a median pH of 6.8, sulfate concentrations that ranged between 170 and 2,150 mg/L, and median concentrations for zinc of 3,200 ug/L for lead of 0 ug/L. No conclusive evidence of lateral migration of water from the mines into domestic well water supplies in the shallow aquifer was found in the study area in Kansas. Effects of abandoned lead and zinc mines on tributaries of the Spring River in the eastern area are most severe in Short Creek. Drainage from tailings cause large concentrations of sulfate, zinc, and cadmium in Tar Creek in Kansas. Compared with four other major streams in the western area in Kansas, Tar Creek contained the largest low flow concentrations of sulfate (910 mg/L), zinc (5,800 ug/L), and cadmium (40 ug/L). 45 refs., 23 figs., 26 tabs.

Spruill, T.B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Distribution of petroleum reservoirs relative to allocycles and autocycles, upper portion of the Cherokee Group (Middle Pennsylvanian, Desmoinesian), Mid-Continent Region, U. S. A  

SciTech Connect

Sequences of mud rocks, lenticular sandstones, coals, and thin carbonates form autocycles and allocycles in the upper portion of the Cherokee Group. Autocycles delineated in eastern Kansas and northern Oklahoma are relatively local in extent, while allocycles are traceable over the entire region. All autocycles delineated in this study are embedded within the regressive portions of allocycles. Petroleum-bearing sandstones consist of shoestring-shaped and thin sheetlike units in thicker sedimentary lobes. These lobes were deposited as deltaic complexes, which included fluvial and distributary channel sands, interdistributary muds, crevasse splay sands and muds, flood-basin muds, delta-front sands, and predeltaic muds. Delta lobes prograded across the margins of the Middle Pennsylvanian epeiric sea during times of eustatic stillstand or regression. When lobes were abandoned, waves and currents winnowed their upper portions, leaving thin sheetlike lenses of sand. These reworked sands along with marine muds above regressive deltaic sequences form the transgressive parts of autocyclothems. The transgressive parts of allocyclothems, generally consisting of marine shale, resulted from sea level rises that rapidly shifted shorelines far northeastward, moving siliciclastic sources away from the study area. The positions of reservoir-containing deltaic complexes were determined by strandline positions at various sea levels. Extent of eustatic sea level changes appears to have been the major mechanism that controlled the distribution of petroleum reservoir and source units. In addition, sea level changes probably were a significant factor in the nature of diagenetic alterations that affected reservoir properties.

Brenner, R.L.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Winn Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9196124°, -92.6586401° 9196124°, -92.6586401° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.9196124,"lon":-92.6586401,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

104

BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISH COMMIRSION. 395 A GIEOQRAPHIUAL UATALOQUE O F PERSONS WHO HAVE BTATEW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................... Chambers................. -.-,-.do.................... ..... do ................... Cherokee

105

The University of Tennessee Campus Transit Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................................................................43 Cherokee Farm Campus

Tennessee, University of

106

Enrichment of trace elements in rare-metal bearing pegmatites of the muscovite class: Examples from the Jasper, Thomaston-Barnesville, Troup and Cherokee-Pickens districts in Georgia  

SciTech Connect

Pegmatites from four important mining districts in Georgia: the Cherokee-Pickens district (mica and beryl), the Thomaston-Barnesville (mica), Troup (beryl), and Jasper County (feldspar) districts, generally contain quartz, muscovite, K-feldspar and oligoclase and can be included in the muscovite class of pegmatites. No source intrusions are known for any of these pegmatite districts. The Thomaston-Barnesville district covers about 2,000 km[sup 2] compared to the < 100 km[sup 2] of the other three districts and includes 3--4 times as many pegmatites as each of the other districts. The more highly fractionated pegmatites represent 42 to 48 % of the total number of pegmatites sampled in each district except for the Thomaston-Barnesville district in which only 7 % are more highly fractionated. Muscovites from the more highly fractionated pegmatites in these districts contain mean trace element values of 1,118--1,732 ppm Rb, 1,867--3,083 ppm F, 91--278 ppm Li, 7.7-31 ppm Be, 122--147 ppm Ga, 122--315 ppm Nb, and 137--254 ppm Zn. These pegmatites have mean Ba/Rb and Rb/K[sub 2]O ratios of 0.01--0.21 and 129--177 ppm. Mean Ba is 19--234 ppm. Mean trace element values of muscovites from the least fractionated pegmatites are 381--675 ppm Rb, 748--1,622 ppm F, 33--221 ppm Li, 4:8--20.6 ppm Be, 56--80 ppm Ga, 32--152 ppm Nb, and 59--113 ppm Zn. These pegmatites have mean Ba/Rb and Rb/K[sub 2]O ratios of 0.44--2.83 and 39--76. Mean Ba is 218--857 ppm. In each district, the more highly fractionated pegmatites contain beryl or are in the vicinity of beryl-bearing pegmatites.

Cocker, M.D. (Georgia Geologic Survey, Atlanta, GA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Step-by-Step Instructions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Louisiana Louisiana based upon the simple prescriptive option of the 2012 IECC. It does not provide a guarantee for meeting the IECC. This guide is not designed to reflect the actual energy code, with amendments, if any, adopted in Louisiana and does not, therefore, provide a guarantee for meeting the state energy code. For details on the energy code adopted by Louisiana, including how it may differ from the IECC, please contact your local building code official. Additional copies of this guide are available on www.reca-codes.com. CLIMATE ZONE 3 Bienville Grant Sabine Bossier Jackson Tensas Caddo La Salle Union Caldwell Lincoln Vernon Catahoula Madison Webster Claiborne Morehouse West Carroll Concordia Natchitoches Winn De Soto Ouachita East Carroll Red River

108

Framing The Case of the Cherokee Freedmen.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Journalists inform residents living on or near Native American reservations about key policy issues. Since most tribal councils own and operate their news outlets, retaliation (more)

Williams, Kristi Barnett

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

A Reference Grammar of Oklahoma Cherokee.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The majority of Native American Languages are threatened with extinction within the next 100 years, a loss that will entail the destruction of the unique (more)

Montgomery-Anderson, Brad

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A Reference Grammar of Oklahoma Cherokee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; reason for tone follows slash - prefix or suffix : stem form of preceding form Example: shoot:CMP reads as ?Completive stem of the verb ?shoot?? The pronominal prefixes can appear in a number of ways. The person always comes first... corresponding to 5 verb stems CIS Cislocative prepronominal prefix Chapter 6, Section 1.1.8 ti-/ta- :CMP Completive stem of verb Chapter 5 , Section 3.3 n/a =CN Conjunction clitic Chapter 3, Section 4.11 =hno =CQ Conducive question clitic...

Montgomery-Anderson, Brad

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

AN AQUATIC SAFE HARBOR PROGRAM UPPER ETOWAH RIVER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) .............................................................................5 Cherokee darter (Etheostoma scotti

Rosemond, Amy Daum

112

Cherokee County, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0120404°, -81.6035062° 0120404°, -81.6035062° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.0120404,"lon":-81.6035062,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

113

Cherokee County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6°, -84.4802606° 6°, -84.4802606° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.2514526,"lon":-84.4802606,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

114

Cherokee County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

84578° 84578° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.1665322,"lon":-85.684578,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

115

Cherokee County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

29°, -94.976654° 29°, -94.976654° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.8994729,"lon":-94.976654,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

116

Cherokee County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

059029° 059029° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.1134803,"lon":-84.059029,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

117

Cherokee County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

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4.8105955° 4.8105955° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.1142482,"lon":-94.8105955,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

118

Cherokee County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

95.6457951° 95.6457951° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8027756,"lon":-95.6457951,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

119

Cherokee County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County, Texas: Energy Resources County, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.7981828°, -95.1432068° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.7981828,"lon":-95.1432068,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

120

PRODUCTION ANALYSIS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natchitoches winn cherokee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Stoking the fire : nationhood in early twentieth century Cherokee writing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??My research builds upon interdisciplinary trends in Native scholarship emphasizing tribal-specificity; attention to understudied periods, writers, and texts; and a political commitment to engage contemporary (more)

Brown, Kirby Lynn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Undergraduate March 21-22  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

And Medicine Folklore: Cherokee and Irish Bethel Bower, presenter Anne Rogers, sponsor Exploring Cherokee

Holliday, Mark A.

123

The Press and the Public Sphere: Magazine Entrepreneurs in Antebellum America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historical Society, the Cherokee Georgia Baptist Convention,association and the Cherokee Baptist convention among the

Haveman, Heather A.; Habinek, Jacob; Goodman, Leo A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

"It Became My Case Study": Professor Michael Cowan's Four Decades at UC Santa Cruz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was of mixed Irish and Cherokee roots, although her familythe displacement of the Cherokee during that particulareither entirely or half Cherokee, and I never knew which. So

Cowan, Michael; Reti, Irene

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The Renegade Heroes: A Discussion of 19th Century Popular Western Fiction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

context of Ridges Cherokee heritage, and the presentationof Minnesota Press, 2007); Cherokee heritage: John Carlosof a politically active Cherokee family during the nascent

Schack, Trevor Malcolm

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Excerpt from The Red Land to the South: American Indian Writers and Indigenous Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

premiere of a new play from Cherokee dramatist Lynn Riggs. Ain the words of Jace Weaver (Cherokee), by assimilation,by Daniel Heath Justice (Cherokee) as the hyperassimilative

Cox, James H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

"A Modest Manliness": The Boy Scouts of America and the Making of Modern Masculinity, 1910-1930  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

brave. Ralph Hubbard, a part-Cherokee and popular BSA expertwhite character teachings. Cherokees taught Oklahoma Scoutsthe Scout Laws into Cherokee. In the second half of the

Jordan, Benjamin Ren

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Identity & Relocation Policy: Using Oral History to Affectively Map the Experience of Relocated American Indians in Los Angeles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and her Father was full blood Cherokee. When allotment wasto register as full blood Cherokee because her Father wasnamely, the great Cherokee removal from the southeastern

Dobroski, Sonja Liza

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The Savage Visit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. Evans, Notable Persons in Cherokee History: Ostenaco,Journal of Cherokee Studies, vol. 1, no. 1 (1976).of 1777 into which most Cherokee were virtually forced.

Fullagar, Kate

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Life in the Living Laboratory: An Anthropological Investigation of Environmental Science, Tourism, and Design in the Contemporary Bahamas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the small settlement of Cherokee Sound on the island ofAbaco. Cherokee was selected by the designers of this pilotenvironment. Historically, Cherokee was a boat- building

Moore, Amelia M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Through Native Lenses: American Indian Vernacular Photographies and Performances of Memories, 1890-1940  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1977. Bass, Althea. A Cherokee Daughter of Mount Holyoke.Public Indians, Private Cherokees: Tourism and Tradition onlast updated 1/28/99. Cherokee Nation. Official Website.

Strathman, Nicole Dawn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

American Indians, American Imperialism, and Defying Empire at Home and Abroad  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Dispossession in the Cherokee Nation, 1866- 1907. NewCommons: Land and Labor in the Cherokee Nation, 1870-1900. 1992. ________. The Cherokee Freedmen: From Emancipation to

Miller, Robert

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

"American Indian Freedom Controversy:" Political and Social Activism by Southern California Mission Indians, 1934-1958  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Eastern Band of Cherokees," American Indian Quarterlyand the Eastern Band of Cherokee," American Indian Quarterlysocialist. Jeannette Costo (Cherokee), wife of Rupert Costo,

Daly, Heather Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Becoming Joaquin Murrieta: John Rollin Ridge and the Making of an Icon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Californias Confederate Cherokee. The Californians. 8.4 (Books, 1999. Print. ---. The Cherokee Nation: A History.Everett and Gaston Litton. Cherokee Cavaliers: Forty Years

Hausman, Blake Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

"A Most Sacred Duty": Women in the Antiremoval Movement, 1829-1838  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

against removal of the Cherokee Nation developed, itsand consequent removal of the Cherokee Nation poured inthe 1838 petition protesting Cherokee removal. Mary Wilders

Joy, Natalie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Cultural colonizers : persistence and empire in the Indian antiremoval movement, 1815-1859  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this Country, printed in the Cherokee Phoenix, Vol. II, n.32, November 11, 1829. Cherokee Phoenix 1828-1829, ANreproduced from the Cherokee Phoenix, in Smith, ed. , The

Gonzales, Christian Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Humans and models: converging truths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and accidental deaths among Cherokee Indians: a naturaland accidental deaths among Cherokee Indians in rural NorthIn our analysis of the Cherokee response to acute and large

Bruckner, Tim A; Margerison-Zilko, Claire

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Sovereignty will not be funded : indigenous citizenship in Hawai'i's non-profit industrial complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Identity in the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. Berkeley,culture, and identity in the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma (Freedmen descent from the Cherokee. 190 The lawsuit against

Arvin, Maile Renee

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Anu Vedantham Director, Weigle Information Commons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to create a web-based exhibit of Cherokee storytelling based on indigenous Cherokee knowledge systems. She will interview Freeman Owle, a Cherokee elder in Cherokee, North Carolina, and will use video-editing and web

Sharp, Kim

140

Garden Beans Offer Year-Round Source of Great Flavor, Nutrition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the amazing array of visual Cherokee Trail of Tears Carried by Native American Cherokee tribe members on their

Martin, Orin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natchitoches winn cherokee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Use Of The Evidence Base In Substance Abuse Treatment Programs for American Indians and Alaska Natives: Pursuing Quality in the Crucible Of Practice And Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center), John Gastorf (Cherokee Nation Behavioral Health),Intervention ProjectCherokee (TIP-C). Pediatr Nurs 2006,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Morgridge Center for Public Service Approved Volunteer Transportation Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GROVE RD. CHEROKEE MIDDLE SCHOOL 4301 CHEROKEE DR. CHILDREN'S SERVICE SOCIETY OF WI 2800 ROYAL AVE #310

Sheridan, Jennifer

143

SITE ADDRESS ALDO LEOPOLD ELEMENTARY 2602 POST RD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAPLE GROVE RD CHEROKEE MIDDLE SCHOOL 4301 CHEROKEE DR CHILDREN'S SERVICE SOCIETY OF WI 1716 FORDEM AVE

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

144

The "Other" in the machine : oriental automata and the mechanization of the mind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Popular Mind. 2nd ed. Cherokee Publishing Company, Atlanta,Popular Mind. 2nd ed. Cherokee Publishing Company, Atlanta,

Ayte?, Ayhan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Excerpt from Domestic Subjects: Gender, Citizenship, and Law in Native American Literature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

terms. In a ruling of 1831, Cherokee Nation v. Georgia, theJohn Milton Oskison, Cherokee; S. Alice Callahan, Creek;

Piatote, Beth H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Understanding Community Benefits Agreements: Equitable Development, Social Justice and Other Considerations for Developers, Municipalities and Community Organizations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Amy Lavine, Gates- Cherokee Redevelopment CBA, http://2008/01/ gates-cherokee-redevelopment-cba.html (Jan. 30,

Salkin, Patricia E.; Lavine, Amy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Acanthosis nigricans in the setting of niacin therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

risk factors for type 2 diabetes in Cherokee Indians:the Cherokee Diabetes Study. Diabetes Care 2002; 25:1009 [

Hartman, Rachael; DeFelice, Taylor; Tzu, Julia; Meehan, Shane; Sanchez, Miguel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Trans/National Terrain of Anishinaabe Law and Diplomacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our Fire Survives the Storm: A Cherokee Literary History.Our Fire Survives the Storm: A Cherokee Literary History (

Bauerkemper, Joseph; Stark, Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Re-Imagining Community: Political Ecology and Indigenous State Formation in the Cherokee Nation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. David, and Danney Goble. 1994. The Story of Oklahoma.Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press. Banks, William62. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. Cornell, Stephen,

Carroll, Clinton Roy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Cherokee and Crawford County Coal Field With Analyses of the Coal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The most serious objection to this method is the claim that certain non-coking coals suffer mechanical loss from the rapid heating. No evidence to support this con- tention has been submitted. 51. ASH. In the determination of ash, either a new sample... in the purchase of fuel on the B .t .u . basis. This method is used in the fuel inspection laboratory of the Bureau of Mines. ( Methods of analysing Coal and Coke, Bureau of Mines, Technical paper #8 . ) 35, CALORIFIC VALUE OF DETERMINATION. Te calorific...

Carpenter, C.B.; Brown, H.R.

1915-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

The plasticity of place : the lives of Cherokee sacred places and the struggles to protect them.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Through an analysis of a variety of primary and secondary sources, this thesis outlines the malleability of sacredness and the importance of specific places to (more)

Holly, Nathaniel Francis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

CARBON AND OXYGEN ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS: BUG, CHEROKEE, AND PATTERSON CANYON FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan; Stephen T. Nelson

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

CAPILLARY PRESSURE/MERCURY INJECTION ANALYSIS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Diagenetic history of Missourian (Upper Pennsylvanian) Chanute Shale, Cherokee Shelf, midcontinent U. S. A  

SciTech Connect

The Chanute (Ch) Shale consists of two sandstone bodies deposited in fluvial deltaic complexes separated by a shale unit and a coal. The lower Ch is characterized by very fine-to-medium-grained sandstone that fill channels at its base, while the upper Ch includes silt-to-fine-grained sandstone bodies. Petrographic analyses of both units show that they consist of quartz arenites, subarkose, sublitharenite, feldspathic litharenites, litharenites and wackes of the same compositions. Silica-supersaturated waters in the meteoric regime cemented the Ch sands creating thin and discontinuous overgrowths on detrital quartz grains. Early calcite cement precipitated afterwards, inhibiting further silica cementation and shielding feldspars and other liable grains from extensive dissolution. A change in the composition of the meteoric waters caused calcite dissolution leaving patches of cement. As Ch sands entered the compactional regime, saline and alkaline waters dissolved quartz grains and overgrowths as well as other liable grains no longer shielded by the early carbonate cement. The absence of cements and continued compaction resulted in concave-convex and sutured contacts. Dissolution and alteration of feldspars, alteration of micas to clays, and chloritization of biotite and clays continued in the compactional regime. Acidified waters released from organic matter and coal altered micas and feldspars to kaolinite and other clays, releasing Fe, Mg, and Ca necessary for late precipitation of ankerite, dolomite, and calcite cements. Extensive clay and Fe oxide coatings formed, filling embayments on the etched grains. During subsequent Pennsylvanian low sea level stands, ground water dissolved most carbonate cements, creating secondary porosity. Porosity was further enhanced on the outcrop belt during weathering, leaving higher total Fe oxide content on surface samples compared to core samples.

Fernandez, S.; Brenner, R.L. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Geology)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

THIN SECTION DESCRIPTIONS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Applying for Cherokee citizenship: constructing race, nation, and identity, 1900-1906.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines the Dawes enrollment period between 1900 and 1906. It is unique in that it recaptures the history from the perspective of the (more)

Frye, Nikolas Karl

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Cherokee households and communities in the English contact period, A.D. 1670-1740.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study focuses on issues of culture contact and the materialization of identity through an archaeological case study of a late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century (more)

Marcoux, Jon Bernard.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND PORE CASTING: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby; Louis H. Taylor

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Morphological abnormalities in chironomidae in relation to sediment metals concentrations in Empire Lake, Cherokee County, Kansas  

SciTech Connect

Morphological abnormalities of headcapsule structures of chironomid larvae were quantified in relation to concentrations of heavy metals in sediments of Empire Lake. This reservoir is situated in a catchment downstream of a US EPA Superfund Site in the Tri-State Mining District of southeast Kansas, and receives discharges from several streams that flow through the abandoned mining areas. Sediments have elevated concentrations of Zinc, Lead, and Cadmium in varying concentrations. Chironomini had the highest incidence of morphological abnormalities, followed by Procladius. Although deformities of the mentum, premandibles, and antennae were found in several taxa, no clear trends were seen for increasing concentrations of any of the metals individually or collectively. From this study it appears as if the incidence of morphological abnormalities is not a linear function of metals concentrations in sediments of this reservoir.

Ferringington, L.C. Jr. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Flight Testing of the Piper PA-28 Cherokee Archer II Aircraft.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? It is sometimes easily assumed that an experimental measurement will closely mimic the results from an associated theoretical model. The purpose of this project (more)

Johansson, Emil

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natchitoches winn cherokee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

CREATING DOMESTIC DEPENDENTS: INDIAN REMOVAL, CHEROKEE SOVEREIGNTY AND WOMENS RIGHTS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??What, this project asks, are the impacts of the alliance between women and Native Americans in the nineteenth century debate over Indian Removal? How might (more)

Collins-Frohlich, Jesslyn R.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Re-Imagining Community: Political Ecology and Indigenous State Formation in the Cherokee Nation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by lush deciduous forests and rolling hills to the east (condition, a hill country of forest with small areas ofthis was non-arable hill country and forest land). Fire

Carroll, Clinton Roy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

BPA-2012-01815-FOIA Request  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RECEIVED BY BP FOR OFFICE THIS Winn,Kim S (BPA) - DK-7 DATE: From: Winn,Kim S (BPA) - DK-7 DUE DATE: Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2012 1:51 PM To: A Better Way for BPA Executive...

164

Without reservations : native hip hop and identity in the music of W.O.R.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Allotment Act), 1831 ( Cherokee Nation v. Georgia ), 1823 (as Navajo, or Oglala, or Cherokee, but what that means tobe someone who is Choctaw/Cherokee and defines him/herself

Lechusza, Alan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Making History : : The Role of History in Contemporary Native American Art  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

who is a non-enrolled Cherokee, and will be discussed below.artists. Non-enrolled Cherokee artist Jimmie Durham isDurham declared, I am not Cherokee. I am not an American

Cluff, Leah Diane

166

Inhabiting Indianness : US colonialism and indigenous geographies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

US Census) Cluster Location 1. Cherokee Village, AR 2. LakeCluster Use of Trails 100 Map of Cherokee Village,searching for streets named Cherokee, expecting this to be a

Barnd, Natchee Blu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Acanthosis Nigricans: A practical approach to evaluation and management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wang W, Blackett PR, Cherokee Diabetes Study. Association ofrisk factors for type 2 diabetes in Cherokee Indians:the Cherokee Diabetes Study. Diabetes Care 2002;25:1009-14.

Higgins, Steven P; Freemark, Michael; Prose, Neil S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

British Troops, Colonists, Indians, and Slaves in Southeastern North America, 1756-1763  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Women .................................................................. 73 CHAPTER IV THE CHOICES OF CHEROKEES IN THE FORT DUQUESNE EXPEDITION, 1758... ........................................................................................................ 81 Fort Duquesne Expedition, Cherokees, and Catawbas ................................................ 81 Cherokee Decisions to Join the Expedition ................................................................. 86 William Byrd Meets...

Lee, Hyun Wu

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The musical representation of Asian characters in the musicals of Richard Rodgers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Penguin. Riggs, L. 2003. The Cherokee night and other plays.J. 2003. Foreward to The Cherokee night and other plays, by1997. Riggs, Lynn. The Cherokee Night and Other Plays.

Ponti, Carla M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

French Africans in Ojibwe Country: Negotiating Marriage, Identity and Race, 1780-1890  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bind: The Story of an Afro-Cherokee Family in Slavery andand the Evolution of Cherokee Society, 1540-1866. Knoxville:civilized tribes the Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek,

Harper, Mattie Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Critique by Comparison in Federal Indian Law  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bind]. 15 See discussion of Cherokee Nation v. Georgia, 30a similar critique of the Cherokee Nation holding, see VineTreaty of Hopewell with the Cherokee Nation, art. XII, Nov.

Goldberg, Carole

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

The unsung stream : the ethnic continuum in U.S. literature and film, from John Rollin Ridge to John Sayles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Rise and Fall of the Cherokee Nation. New York: AnchorPrint. Hoig, Stan. The Cherokees and Their Chiefs: In theGary, ed. John Ross: Cherokee Chief . Athens: University of

Torres, Linda Renee; Torres, Linda Renee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Barbaric sovereignty : states of emergency and their colonial legacies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as Johnson v. MIntosh (1823), Cherokee v. Georgia (1831), Worcester v. Cherokee (1832), and the Mabo (1992)the sovereign powers of the Cherokee Nation and the state of

Verinakis, Theofanis Costas Dino

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

American Indian Heritage Month 2013 "Guiding Our Destiny with Heritage and Traditions"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Lunchtime with Cherokee Recording Artist, Michael Jacobs" 11:30 am ­ 1 pm, Multicultural Center (MCC), Squires Student Center Award-winning Cherokee recording artist Student Center An enrolled member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, Lloyd

Virginia Tech

175

Full Issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bind]. 15 See discussion of Cherokee Nation v. Georgia, 30a similar critique of the Cherokee Nation holding, see VineTreaty of Hopewell with the Cherokee Nation, art. XII, Nov.

UCLA, Law School

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Outsourcing and Pass-Through  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Daimler-Chrysler Grand Cherokee Daimler-Chrysler PT CruiserDaimler-Chrysler Grand Cherokee Daimler-Chrysler PT CruiserDaimler-Chrysler Grand Cherokee Daimler-Chrysler PT Cruiser

Hellerstein, Rebecca; Villas-Boas, Sofia B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

National encounters and institutional states of exception : the US insane asylum and the first-person reform writing of mad women, 1844-1897  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CD. Exemption of the Cherokee Indians and Africans fromthe same was true for Cherokee Indians (Exemption 287-8).medical needs of 20,000 Cherokees in their forced relocation

Larson, Trina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

PREDICTING AND PREVENTING LOSSES OF IMPERILED FISH SPECIES IN AN URBANIZING ENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and spatial autocorrelation. For a species (the Cherokee darter, Etheostoma etowahae) that shows, urbanization, Cherokee darter, Etowah darter, amber darter, predictive modeling, stormwater runoff, effective

Rosemond, Amy Daum

179

Additional File 1 Specimen information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.27516 -84.73164 C EU034682 MVZ 257284 GA Cherokee 34.32599 -84.32105 E EU034684 MVZ 257285 GA Cherokee 34

Vieites, David R.

180

Analysis of the Relationship Between Vehicle Weight/Size and Safety, and Implications for Federal Fuel Economy Regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from car-based crossover SUVs (the Jeep Cherokee andGrand Cherokee, which were the first to adopt some of the

Wenzel, Thomas P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natchitoches winn cherokee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Indians and Guns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No. 11 3-4 (2013). 22. Cherokee Nation v. Georgia, 30 U.S. (5 Pet. ) 1, 4 (1831) (Cherokee nation, and the other

Riley, Angela R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

2011-12 Room Rates Student Organizations* Departments* Off-Campus  

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) University Club only $70.00 $115.00 $220.00+ Cherokee Park only $130.00 $210.00 $375.00+ Cherokee & U. Club

183

Conservation Subdivision Survey Data Collection: Erica Christoph, Kenna Hall, Amy Salley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contact information. She was able to obtain Cherokee County's full list of conservation subdivision come from Cherokee County. Cobb County eventually provided us with a list of developments

Rosemond, Amy Daum

184

Floods on Nottely River and Martin, Peachtree, and Slow Creeks in Cherokee County, North Carolina. Flood report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the flood situation along the Nottely River from the North Carolina-Georgia State line, at stream mile 18.72, downstream to the head of Hiwassee Reservoir backwater, stream mile 6.50; Martin Creek from mile 6.12 downstream to mile 1.38; Peachtree Creek from Ammon Bottom at mile 4.78 downstream to its mouth at Hiwassee River mile 100,68; and Slow Creek from mile 3.15 downstream to its mouth at Peachtree Creek mile 1.98.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Self efficacy, self reliance, adherence to self care, and glycemic control among Cherokee with Type 2 diabetes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Background: Type 2 diabetes is responsible for disability and shortened life span among Native Americans. Adherence to recommendations for diet, exercise and medication is essential (more)

Mashburn, Diana D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Joel Poinsett and the Paradox of Imperial Republicanism: Chile, Mexico, and the Cherokee Nation, 1810-1841 .  

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??This thesis examines the intersection of republicanism and imperialism in the early nineteenth-century Americas. I focus primarily on Joel Roberts Poinsett, a United States ambassador (more)

Freed, Feather Crawford, 1971-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Health assessment for Medley Farms Site, Cherokee County, Gaffney, South Carolina, Region 4. CERCLIS No. SCD980558142. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Medley Farms site is proposed for inclusion on the National Priorities List. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) had not permitted the use of the property for disposal of hazardous materials. Approximately 5,300 55-gallon drums and 15-gallon containers were discovered during an investigation by SCDHEC staff. After the Environmental Protection Agency's 1983 emergency clean-up activities, on-site groundwater samples were collected in 1984 and 1986. Contaminants found in these samples were as follows: methylene chloride, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, and trichloroethylene. From the information reviewed, the site is concluded to be of potential health concern because of the possibility of human exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations which may result in adverse health effects.

Not Available

1989-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

188

FAU ANNOUNCES RESEARCHERS AND SCHOLARS OF THE YEAR Florida Atlantic University's Division of Research has selected the 2012 "Researchers and  

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the principal investigator for several National Institutes of Health-funded research projects. As a Cherokee a relationship between FAU and the Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians. This led at the Cherokee Nation in Oklahoma for FAU students. Lowe is making an impact in other parts of the world, as well

Fernandez, Eduardo

189

Small Animal Cardiac Ultrasound Seminar & Wetlab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Center/ Cherokee Trail exit. Stay to the right and take Cherokee Trail. Make the 1st left onto highway (north 129) exit right at the medical center/Cherokee Trail exit. The Marine Corps Armory is on left just before you exit right. Stay to the right and take Cherokee Trail. Make the 1st left onto

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

190

To Brunswick Folsom Lake  

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DONALD MIDDLE RIVER WESTSIDE MOSHER CHEROKEE HAMMER STAGG FRENCH CAMP MANTECA AURORA CAL-CEDAR CHANNEL

191

American Indian Heritage Month  

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­ November 15, 2013 Wednesday, October 16, 2013 "Lunchtime with Cherokee Recording Artist, Michael Jacobs" 11:30 am ­ 1 pm, Multicultural Center (MCC), Squires Student Center Award-winning Cherokee recording artist An enrolled member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, Lloyd Arneach was born and reared on the Cherokee

Virginia Tech

192

Friend to Friend Cancer Early Detection  

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, Brooks, Burnet, Cameron, Carson, Cass, Castro, Cherokee, Childress, Clay, Colorado, Cooke, Cochran

193

AES Research Center Conference Agenda January 11, 12, and 13, 2011  

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Tuesday January 11, 2011 1:00-1:30 Lee Sommers Craig Beyrouty Welcome & Introductions Cherokee Park Ballroom 1:30-2:45 Craig Beyrouty CAS Strategic Initiatives Cherokee Park Ballroom 2:45-3:00 Break Cherokee Park Ballroom 3:00-4:00 Lou Swanson Engagement/Extension Update Cherokee Park Ballroom 4:00-5:00 Lee

194

EPA/CDC/ATSDR Community Environmental Health Collaboration The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Centers for  

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. Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma: EPA and CDC/ATSDR are collaborating with the Cherokee Nation, which is made up of 14 counties in northeast Oklahoma. The Cherokee Nation and CDC/ATSDR work in collaboration with the Cherokee Nation Clinics and Indian Health Service Hospitals to provide screening and early detection

195

Proceedings of the 2014 Workshop on the Use of Computational Methods in the Study of Endangered Languages, pages 5462, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, 26 June 2014. c 2014 Association for Computational Linguistics  

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. We experiment with two endangered languages: Cherokee and Cheyenne, and some resource-rich languages such as English, Finnish, French and Japanese2. Cherokee is the Iroquoian language spoken by 16,000 Cherokee and thesauruses are introduced in Section 2. Section 3 discusses related work. In 2 ISO 693-3 codes for Cherokee

196

Arthur Heights Baldwin City  

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Carona Castleton Catherine Cato Cedar Centropolis Chanute Chapman Chardon Charleston Cheney Cherokee

197

SREL Reprint #3146  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

influences trophic niche width and overlap in two aquatic snake species: a stable isotope approach John D. Willson, Christopher T. Winne, Melissa A. Pilgrim, Christopher S....

198

The Chemical Composition of Some Soils of Angelina, Brazoria, Cameron, Cherokee, Delta, Lamar, Hidalgo, Lavaca, Montgomery, Nacogdoches, Robertson, Rusk, Webb and Wilson Counties.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. No. 970-Barton sandy loam (12"-36"), Bastrop, Texas. . No. 971-Houston loam ( 10"-36"), Bastrop, Texas. No. 1067-Susquehanna fine sandy loam (10"-36"), 2 miles north Bastrop, Texas. I *dMW00 cn at-001 04*,-2m l-i A*? . -. - - . -. 1 0 00mm...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1909-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Small-scale hydroelectric power demonstration project: Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. , Cherokee Falls Hydroelectric Project: Final technical and construction cost report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to fulfill part of the requirement of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement Number FC07-80ID12125 of the Small Scale Hydropower Program and is submitted on behalf of the Broad River Electric Cooperative, Inc. of Gaffney, South Carolina. The project was initially studied in 1978 with construction commencing in January, 1984. The primary work elements of the project consisted of the renovation of an existing dam and a new powerhouse. The dam was rehabilitated and flashboards were installed along the top of the structure. The powerhouse was supplied with a single open pit turbine and a new substation was constructed. The project generated power in December of 1985 but has been plagued with numerous problems compounded by a flood in March, 1987 causing extensive damages. The flood of March, 1987 resulted in filing of litigative action by the developers against their project managers and engineers which has yet to reach settlement and will possibly culminate in court sometime during the fall of 1988.

Not Available

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

GEOPHYSICAL WELL LOG/CORE DESCRIPTIONS, CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO  

SciTech Connect

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natchitoches winn cherokee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

CROSS SECTIONS AND FIELD MAPS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO  

SciTech Connect

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

POROSITY/PERMEABILITY CROSS-PLOTS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO  

SciTech Connect

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A Survey of Rudy Davenport's BYNA: Life Songs of a Southern Appalachian Woman of Cherokee Indian Descent (A Chamber Work for Soprano, Piano, Oboe and Cello).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Composer Rudy Davenport aims to create music that is more relatable than the atonal compositions often associated with 20th century composers. Inspired by his own (more)

Bostic-Brown, Tiffany I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Ernest C. Bernard Professional Preparation  

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Mountains National Park. Cherokee Central School District (May 2001-March 2002). $71,000. PI: E. C. Bernard. Survey of Soil Invertebrates, Yellow Face Mountain Site. Cherokee Central School District (February

Bernard, Ernest

205

WFS 433/533 AMPHIBIAN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION  

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, and conducting one amphibian breeding call survey at the UT Cherokee Woodlot. You will earn 3% for attending each field trip, and 2% each for the call survey and amphibian disease lab. You must sign up for a Cherokee

Gray, Matthew

206

Merry Christmas from Barb, Mark, Matt, Katie, and Jenny!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a family this year. We went camping for a weekend in August in Cherokee, NC, in the Smoky Mountains. Our at Graduation Parties in June Daddy and Katie, Cherokee NC At Justin Steinfeld's Bar Mitzvah, May 2005 #12;

Guzdial, Mark

207

Saturday, auguSt 8, 2009 LittLejohn CoLiSeum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into public service. The Republican Senator for District 14, representing Cherokee, Spartanburg, Union Senate in 1980. Prior to his election to the Senate, he served a four-year term on the Cherokee County

Duchowski, Andrew T.

208

The Cultural Identities of Foreign Language Teachers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

participants, was also of Cherokee heritage. For a completet matter, you know. Because Im not there to teach Cherokeeculture, Cherokee language, Im L2 Journal Vol. 3 (2011)

Fichtner, Friederike; Chapman, Katie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

2010 Council Member Training Federal Tribal Trust Responsibilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Supreme Court Decisions The Marshall Trilogy Johnson v M'Intosh (1823) Cherokee Nation v Georgia (1831)Cherokee Nation v Georgia (1831) Worcester v Georgia (1832) 6 #12;Federal ­ Tribal Relationship Overview

210

Career Center CSU Bookstore  

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) Villa Pizza 30C (LL) Events and Meeting Spaces ASCSU Senate Chambers 107 (ML) Cherokee Park Ballroom 236

211

The effects of competition on family rankings in progeny tests of different plot design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Area Cherokee County, Texas A. J. Hodges Experimental Sabine Parish, Louisiana Temple Research Area Cherokee County, Texas Temple Research Area Cherokee County, Texas Stephen F. Austin Exp. Fo Nacogdoches County, Texas A. J. Hodges... was performed on Texas Forest Service plantation 006. The test was an open-pollinated superior loblolly pine progeny test made up of IOO-tree square block plots and was established in Cherokee 22 County, Texas in 1956-57. The test individuals were planted...

Morrow, Daniel Franklin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

212

NATIVE AMERICAN www.nas.pdx.edu  

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of Anthropology Homepage: http://web.pdx.edu/~tthornto Don Tyree (Cherokee), Prof. Emeritus of English Tabitha

213

E-Print Network 3.0 - area richland washington Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BUSINESS CENTER Summary: Richland (Sandhill REC) Charleston Charleston Charleston Cherokee Spartanburg... Kershaw Richland (Sandhill REC) Florence Florence Florence (Pee Dee...

214

Master Wellness Volunteer Program  

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of the program is that you learn new things while helping others lead healthier lives." ­ Cherokee County

215

Genetic diversity and clonality in the federally endangered plant Clematis socialis Kral (Ranunculaceae)1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the type locality until 1985, when a second population was discovered in Cherokee Coun- ty, Alabama. As of 2005, it was known from five sites in northeastern Alabama (Cherokee, Etowah, and St. Clair counties population (covering , 1 m2 ) has been found at one additional Alabama site in Cherokee County since 2005 (R

Boyd, Robert S.

216

America's Missions: The Home Missions Movement and the Story of the Early Republic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................................................................... 144 The Missionary (Mis)Adventures of Gideon Blackburn ...................... 147 The General Government Aids Blackburn's Mission to the Cherokee 153 The Presbyterian Mission to the Wyandot ........................................... 155... The Cherokee Removal Crisis of 1807-1809 ....................................... 157 Financial Troubles at Blackburn's Cherokee Mission .......................... 160 Spying and Spirits on the Coosa River...

Franklin, Brian 1983-

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Oklahoma's Native Languages with Total Population c. 1993 and Estimated Numbers of Speakers c. 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,927) 0 0 5 1(?) 24 0 Tonkawan Tonkawa (186) 0 Iroquoian Cherokee (122,000) Keetoowah Band Cherokee (7,450) Wyandotte (3,617) Seneca-Cayuga# (2,460) 9,000 (w/Cherokee) 0 0 Uto-Aztecan Comanche (8,500) Uchean Euchee

Oklahoma, University of

218

Small Animal Abdominal Ultrasound Seminar & Wetlab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highway) exit (386B) Travel south on 129 ­ ap- proximately one mile to the UT Medical Center/ Cherokee Trail exit. Stay to the right and take Cherokee Trail. Make the 1st left onto Medical Center Way SW) exit right at the medical center/Cherokee Trail exit. The Marine Corps Armory is on left just before

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

219

OSU-N History Department Faculty: Dr. Russ Coil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schedule Morning ­ OSU-N Student Presentations 9:00 ­ 10:00 Session I RS 141: Cherokee Indians: Removal, Historian: "The Sultana Disaster" #12;Session I: 9:00 ­ 10:00 Cherokee Indians: Removal, Religion, and Justice Room: RS 141 Facilitator: Dr. Lucy Murphy Presenters and Titles: Derek Martin: "The Cherokee Court

Jones, Michelle

220

Christopher R. King M.S. Candidate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Examine Cherokee National Forest Restoration Initiative Look at the methods used Facilitators (who Appalachian Restoration Project (CFLRP) ­ Under the National Forest Foundation Cherokee National Forest." Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program #12;8/21/13 6 Broad Study Area Case Study: Cherokee N

Gray, Matthew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natchitoches winn cherokee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DENDROCHRONOLOGICAL DATING OF THE CHIEF JOHN ROSS HOUSE, ROSSVILLE, GEORGIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Donald, grandfather of Chief John Ross, for his Cherokee bride. This construction date first emerged in the 1950s principal chiefof the Cherokee before the tribe'sforced removal during the Trail of Tears. Using structure was reportedly built in 1797 by John McDonald, grandfa- ther of Chief John Ross, for his Cherokee

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

222

Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service Reportto the People  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service Reportto the People November 2013 Cherokee County of their lives." Non-Formal Education Ginger Bowen Johnson, 4-H Agent Four-H in Spartanburg and Cherokee Counties-H is represented in all seven school districts in Spartanburg County. In Cherokee County 4-H is held at the Boys

Duchowski, Andrew T.

223

Ozone injury on cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata) and crown-beard (Verbesina occidentalis) in Great Smoky Mountains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK d Resource Management and Science Division, 1314 Cherokee Orchard Road, Great and 2001: Clingmans Dome, Cherokee Orchard Road and Purchase Knob. Cutleaf coneflower exhibited a greater adjacent to the Cherokee Orchard Road Loop. Ozone injury was greatest on the lower leaves for both species

Neufeld, Howard S.

224

District Date(s) Tribe(s) State(s) Program/Project Tribal Issues/Concerns Status Lakes & Rivers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Oklahoma Cherokee Nation (OK) Chickasaw Nation (OK) Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Citizen Potawatomi Nation (OK) Shawnee Tribe (OK) United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma Wyandotte Nation (OK of Cherokee Indians (NC) Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota Kickapoo Traditional Tribe

US Army Corps of Engineers

225

http://www.sil.si.edu/SILpublications/AfricanAmericanIndiansBibliography.pdf1 AFRICAN AMERICAN INDIANS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Tarcher/Putnam, 2002. Halliburton, R. Jr. Red Over Black: Black Slavery among the Cherokee Indians: Greenwood Press, 1977. May, Katja. African Americans and the Native Americans in the Creek and Cherokee of Cherokee Society, 1540-1866. 1st ed. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1979. Porter, Kenneth

Mathis, Wayne N.

226

Lighting and Dark Sky Regulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.........................................................................................................2 C. Cherokee County, Georgia's Outdoor Lighting and Road Glare Ordinance visited Apr. 0, 2008) (providing links to ordinances throughout the United States). 2 See, e.g. Cherokee Protection Ordinance (Dec. , 200). 5 See, e.g. Model Lighting Section for Zoning Ordinances and Cherokee

Rosemond, Amy Daum

227

Number 339 March 2008 Section 8-1-1 of the Aeronautical Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uncontrolled airport. [Cherokee], piloted by the author, taxied out with 1 person on board for a photo survey and call made for takeoff...A call for takeoff included the alert that the [Cherokee] would be circling off. The [Cherokee]... immediately aborted the takeoff

228

ALICE B. KASAKOFF LECTURE SERIES IN NATIVE AMERICAN AND GENDER STUDIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Duncan Cultural Revitalization and Collaboration at the Museum of the Cherokee Indian Through a process of collaboration, the Museum of the Cherokee Indian works with tribal community members to revitalize traditions with Cherokee tradition rather than other traditions, the revitalized tradition can become a source

Almor, Amit

229

College of Arts & Sciences 100 years of excellence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

royster Ph.D. Mathematics '52; Hon. Doctorate 2002 stephen sullivan Bs Geology `79 Jeff Van note Ba History `70 Kelly Wesley Ba Political science '98 Winn Williams Ba sociology `71 John crockett (ex

MacAdam, Keith

230

SREL Reprint #3066  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Aspects of the Ecology of the Earth Snakes (Virginia valeriae and V. striatula) in the Upper Coastal Plain Brian D. Todd, John D. Willson, Christopher T. Winne, and J. Whitfield...

231

BPA-2012-01700-FOIA Request  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208 SUBJECT: FOIA Request Dear Ms. Winn: RECEIVED BY BPA IOtA OFFICE TillS DATE: f, j DUE DATE: LOG Pursuant to the Freedom of Information...

232

Dielectric based resonant guided wave networks Eyal Feigenbaum1,*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dielectric based resonant guided wave networks Eyal Feigenbaum1,* and Harry A. Atwater1 1 Thomas J. 285(6), 46­55 (2001). 2. J. D. Joannopoulos, S. G. Johnson, J. N. Winn, and R. D. Meade, Photonic

Atwater, Harry

233

Programming of inhomogeneous resonant guided wave networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Harry A. Atwater1 1 Thomas J. Watson Laboratory of Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology. Joannopoulos, S. G. Johnson, J. N. Winn, and R. D. Meade, Photonic Crystals: Molding the Flow of light, 2nd Ed

Atwater, Harry

234

Windpower  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chilocco Wind Park Chilocco Wind Park Cherokee Nation (other nations as well) Cherokee Nation Businesses, LLC And PNE Wind Cherokee Chilocco Wind North Central Oklahoma Location KA W PA W N EE TO NK AW A PO NC A OT OE -M IS S OU RI CH E RO KE E Acr es: 2,633 .348 CH E RO KE E Acr es: 1,641 .687 CHEROKEE NATION Kay County Chilocco Property DATA SOU RC ES: US Census Bureau (T iger Files ) D OQQ's , USGS D RG's, USGS Cherokee Nation Realty D epartment C herokee N ation GeoD ata C enter Date: 12/19/01 e:\project\land\c hilocc o N E W S Tribal Land Chilocco Property Turbine Layout Cherokee Wind Status of Area Tribes: * Ponca - Their land would be a possible site for two turbines but they have not been approached. They previously expressed no interest. * Otoe - Missouri - They have expressed an interest but

235

OSU-Tulsa Library The Genell Smith Dellin manuscripts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OSU-Tulsa Library The Genell Smith Dellin manuscripts Rev. December 2012 Cherokee Dawn 1:1-3 Typed:4-5 p388-529. Published by Avon Books, 1990. Cherokee Nights 1:6-7 Typed draft romance novel with editor's and printer's marks, preliminary pages, p1-124. 2:1-2 p125-552. Published by Avon Books, 1991. Cherokee Sunset

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

236

RACE AND (STAKES) RECORD Age Starts 1st 2nd 3rd Earnings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

foals will arrive in 2010. MALE LINE CHELOKEE is by CHEROKEE RUN, stakes winner of 13 races, $1, Del Mar Futurity-G2, 3rd Santa Anita Derby-G1. Sire. SIR CHEROKEE. 6 wins, $628,296, Arkansas Derby-G2,HutchesonS.-G2, Fall Highweight H.-G2, etc. Sire. CHEROKEE ARTIST. 5 wins at 3 and 4, 2009, $528

Guerriero, Vince

237

Moving Toward Exclusive Tribal Autonomy over Lands and Natural Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the tribal government to the individual Indian. 3 Then, the federal * Stacy L. Leeds is a Professor of Law and Director of the Tribal Law and Govern- ment Center at the University of Kansas. Professor Leeds also serves as Justice on the Cherokee Nation....S.C. 348 (2000). 6. Some allotment agreements expressly provided for the termination of tribal governments once allotment was finalized. The 1902 agreement to allot Cherokee lands contemplated the final termination of the Cherokee Nation. See Act...

Leeds, Stacy L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

DOE Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: TRIBAL ENERGY PROGRAM OK Project Title OK-TEP-CHEROKEE NATION BUSINESSES Location: Tribal CHEROKEE NATION BUSINESSES American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Cherokee Wind Energy Development proposed project is for development, design, and installation of a 127.5 megawatt wind farm to offset Tribal electrical load; sell excess electricity to local, regional, and

239

E-Print Network 3.0 - alnus rubra amended Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cordiformis, andor Quercus rubra. Another characteristic component of this type... (Cherokee County, NC). The canopy of these forests is co dominated by Acer saccharum, Quercus...

240

Blog Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diversity Women's Business Leadership Conference. September 28, 2011 1.4 million to Cherokee Services Group for Administrative and Property Support Services "When CSG undertakes...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natchitoches winn cherokee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

E-Print Network 3.0 - area waynesboro georgia Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wildlife Habitat Conservation Summary: landowners in priority areas, has increased. Cherokee Rock Village, Walker County, Georgia Nate... , and public access to recreation areas....

242

E-Print Network 3.0 - aflp markers closely Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(AFLP) markers were generated from genomic DNA of 17 cultivars and lines... ' and Cherokee Brave', were difficult to distinguish using the AFLP ... Source: Lamour, Kurt -...

243

Orr 2007 ARM STM poster2.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rusk 2 Douglas L. Sisterson 1 1 Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 2 ACRFSGP, Cherokee Nation Distributors, Stilwell, OK INSTRUMENT SYSTEMS Shipping and Receiving The...

244

Data:B97a0ec2-de56-434d-990d-60146740f1ba | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

prior to January 1, 2008 in the former Duke Energy Carolinas Nantahala Area in Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Macon, Jackson and, Swain, counties. Existing Pole - NA New pole -...

245

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jimmy Voyles of PNNL for engineering and operations support. David Breedlove of Cherokee Nation Distributors for site operations and maintenance. Jeff Steele and Dimitri...

246

E-Print Network 3.0 - aruheina festuca rubra Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cordiformis, andor Quercus rubra. Another characteristic component of this type... (Cherokee County, NC). The canopy of these forests is co dominated by Acer saccharum, Quercus...

247

Data:Ca970684-217f-45fd-848b-09dee6ba4d3e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

prior to January 1, 2008 in the former Duke Energy Carolinas Nantahala Area in Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Macon, Jackson and, Swain, counties. Existing Pole - NA New pole - N...

248

E-Print Network 3.0 - arca zebra swainson Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& JUNE2003 NOS. 1-2 FIRST SWAINSON... University, Tahlequah,OK 74464 E-mail:rmels@cherokee,nsuok.edu Swainson's Warbler (Limnofhlypis swainsonii... (1918)also reported finding...

249

E-Print Network 3.0 - american dietetic association Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pertained to accredi- tation and educational... Studies Association Conference in Cherokee, N.C. Kridler and Dr.Anna Roberts had cre- ative exhibits... at the Tennessee...

250

We're Still Here: Culturally Sensitive Design and Planning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In the 1700s it was impossible to visit what is now known as western North Carolina without encountering the Cherokee. For the well traveled, (more)

Cooper, Ezekiel Craig

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

ARM TR-008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on June 30, 2006 (reported in the third quarterly report) has been denied by the Cherokee Nations Distributor's (CND) Workers Compensation carrier, who determined that the...

252

Data:D8f0b078-9139-42bb-a6c1-d61d66c8714f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

prior to January 1, 2008 in the former Duke Energy Carolinas Nantahala Area in Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Macon, Jackson and, Swain, counties. Existing Pole - NA New pole -...

253

Version No.: 2002.001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Bartow",,,,"IA",17,"Bremer" "DE","AK",122,"Kenai Peninsula",,,,,"LA",,,"Juneau",,,,,"Cherokee",,,"Chicot",,,"Mohave",,,"El Dorado",,,"Cheyenne",,,"Citrus",,"Ben...

254

E-Print Network 3.0 - age ethnic group Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

group on race and ethnicity four... ethnic group is the Native American Indian, and Cherokee ... Source: Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Statistics, Technical Reports...

255

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kiedron 2 , Patrick Disterhoft 2 , John Schmelzer 3 , Jerry Berndt 4 1 ACRFSGP, Cherokee Nation Distributors, Stilwell, OK 2 National Oceanographic and Atmospheric...

256

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne, Illinois D.J. Rusk ARM Climate Research FacilitySouthern Great Plains Cherokee Nation Distributors Stilwell, Oklahoma New Instruments New instruments were installed...

257

National Radon Database. Volume 5. The EPA/state residential radon surveys: AR, IL, MD, MT, MS, TX, VA, WA and the Eastern Cherokee Nation, 1990-1992 (5 1/4 inch 1. 2mb) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect

The National Radon Database (NRDB) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to distribute information in two recent radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys and the National Residential Radon Survey. The National Residential Radon Surveys collected annual average radon measurements on all levels of approximately 5,700 homes nationwide. Information collected during survey includes a detailed questionnaire on house characteristics, as well as radon measurements. The radon survey data for Volume 6 is contained on two diskettes. The data diskettes are accompanied by comprehensive documentation on the design and implementation of the survey, the development and use of sampling weights, a summary of survey results, and information concerning the household questionnaire.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Effects of heavy metals in sediments on the macroinvertebrate community in the Short Creek/Empire Lake aquatic system, Cherokee County, Kansas: A recommendation for site-specific criteria. Technical report (Final)  

SciTech Connect

This study uses statistical analysis techniques to determine the effects of four heavy metals (cadmium, lead, manganese, and zinc) on the macroinvertebrate community using the data collected in the fall 1987. The concentrations of all four metals were found to be greatly elevated throughout Empire Lake and in both the Spring River and Shoal Creek arms of the reservoir. It is concluded that density and species richness were greatly reduced. The report also includes recommendations for the upper bounds for the sediment criteria of the four metals.

Jobe, J.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

National Radon Database. Volume 5. The EPA/state residential radon surveys: AR, IL, MD, MT, MS, TX, VA, WA, and the Eastern Cherokee Nation, 1990-1992 (3 1/2 inch, 1. 44mb) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect

The National Radon Database (NRDB) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to distribute information in two recent radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys and the National Residential Radon Survey. The National Residential Radon Surveys collected annual average radon measurements on all levels of approximately 5,700 homes nationwide. Information collected during survey includes a detailed questionnaire on house characteristics, as well as radon measurements. The radon survey data for Volume 6 is contained on two diskettes. The data diskettes are accompanied by comprehensive documentation on the design and implementation of the survey, the development and use of sampling weights, a summary of survey results, and information concerning the household questionnaire.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Bikes in MSU Parking Impound 2014 Bike# Make Model Color  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peak Teal 7 Next Power Climber Maroon 8 Jeep Cherokee Blue 9 Roadmaster Mtn Sport Blue 10 Next Power climber Cherokee Black 103 Trayl Trax/1.0 Black 104 Gensis V2100 Black 105 Roadmaster Mt. Climber Purple 106 GT

Maxwell, Bruce D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natchitoches winn cherokee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The synchronization of estrus in beef cattle by an orally administered synthetic progestin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

o omm ttee ea o epartment Augus t & 1963 BIOGRAPHY John Howard Poster was born March 7, 1934, in Dallas, Texas. He grew up on a commercial Hereford ranch in San Saba County, Texas. After graduating from Cherokee High School, Cherokee, Texas...

Foster, John Howard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

John Sevier Aquatic Biological Program: Paddlefish stocking and assessment report for 1986. [Polyodon spathula  

SciTech Connect

In January, 1986, approximately 10,700 yearling paddlefish were released in Cherokee Reservoir. Initial mortality was apparently low, with fewer than 100 stocked paddlefish found dead in the vicinity of the release site. Subsequent sampling has yielded little data on distribution and abundance of paddlefish in Cherokee Reservoir. Observations suggest young paddlefish dispersed widely and may not have experienced heavy mortality. (ACR)

Pasch, R.W.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GA-County-Cherokee GA-County-Cherokee Location: County Cherokee GA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Develop energy efficiency and conservation strategy, 2) hire technical consultant, 3) energy efficiency retrofits to include: replace chiller and cooling tower in the Justice Center (1994); replace heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) controls in the Justice Center; installation of occupancy sensors in the Detention Center (1992); 4) installation of cool roofs on the Justice Center, Historic Courthouse (SHPO approval received), and the TAG Office (approximately 1988); 5) develop an overall energy plan for energy management including audits and for replacement of older inefficient roof-top packaged HVAC equipment

264

"To Feel the Drumming Earth Come Upward": Indigenizing the American Studies Discipline, Field, Movement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

two of whom (Rob ert K. Thomas and Shirley Hill Witt) identified as American Indians (Oklahoma Cherokee and Akwesasne Mohawk, Wolf Clan, respectively).17 Finally, the issue's contemporary focus contrasted with the emphasis on the past in most...

Clark, D. Anthony Tyeeme; Yetman, Norman R.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Data:F8db121f-8d6f-4571-9d36-1ee7bec61f39 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

prior to January 1, 2008 in the former Duke Energy Carolinas Nantahala Area in Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Macon, Jackson and, Swain, counties. Existing Pole - 10.57 New pole -...

266

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Co of Colorado",580 6,"Pawnee","Coal","Public Service Co of Colorado",505 7,"Cherokee","Coal","Public Service Co of Colorado",504 8,"Front Range Power Plant","Natural...

267

E-Print Network 3.0 - acl injured knee Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1, 1996 -December 31, 1996 Summary: an auger and slipped into it. 1 4151996 Aurelia Cherokee 0 Man was injured after he failed to turn off... and lacerating his face. 1 1114...

268

Data:6786732c-498a-45ae-a465-9e444c10e68f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

prior to January 1, 2008 in the former Duke Energy Carolinas Nantahala Area in Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Macon, Jackson and, Swain, counties. Existing Pole - 13.92 New pole -...

269

E-Print Network 3.0 - adiposa del brazo Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 38 G u l f O f M e x i c o Winkler Cherokee Summary: Comanche Kendall Henderson Glasscock Titus Montgomery Van Zandt Armstrong...

270

Data:8a3909a2-e852-4b8d-90fe-88818fed1db5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

prior to January 1, 2008 in the former Duke Energy Carolinas Nantahala Area in Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Macon, Jackson and, Swain, counties. Existing Pole - 13.50 New pole -...

271

E-Print Network 3.0 - airworthiness directives mcdonnell Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

John McDonnell Field. From the North: After Bella... the West: Take Hwy 412 east via Cherokee Turnpike from Tulsa, Okla., to I-540 South. See directions ... Source: Brye,...

272

Data:8352674a-3f64-4548-836d-fea90203d09e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

prior to January 1, 2008 in the former Duke Energy Carolinas Nantahala Area in Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Macon, Jackson and, Swain, counties. Existing Pole - 16.96 New pole -...

273

Data:B290b061-4c94-4fb6-ac0f-e31b54be277b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

prior to January 1, 2008 in the former Duke Energy Carolinas Nantahala Area in Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Macon, Jackson and, Swain, counties. Existing Pole - 10.53 New pole -...

274

Data:880ad105-a89b-45ca-ba55-9b6506c8c738 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

prior to January 1, 2008 in the former Duke Energy Carolinas Nantahala Area in Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Macon, Jackson and, Swain, counties. Existing Pole - 10.90 New pole -...

275

Data:D4cc5c12-830b-4339-a4a9-5cd3ae7a5076 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

prior to January 1, 2008 in the former Duke Energy Carolinas Nantahala Area in Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Macon, Jackson and, Swain, counties. Existing Pole - 29.22 New pole -...

276

Data:A1498f59-117e-415d-80cf-fd5c7e79f5b7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

prior to January 1, 2008 in the former Duke Energy Carolinas Nantahala Area in Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Macon, Jackson and, Swain, counties. Existing Pole - 9.66 New pole -...

277

Data:C170d7c5-f03c-4722-bc9a-dc72a30912cc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

prior to January 1, 2008 in the former Duke Energy Carolinas Nantahala Area in Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Macon, Jackson and, Swain, counties. Existing Pole - 49.73 New pole -...

278

Newsletter Southern Great Plains  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from setting up computers for charitable organizations to judging chili at the Annual Cherokee Strip BBQ & Chili Cook-off. In his spare time, Dan's hobbybusiness is restoring and...

279

E-Print Network 3.0 - american great plains Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OKLAHOMA THE ECOLOGY OF THEWESTERN OKLAHOMA Summary: at no great depth. 3. The Cherokee Salt Plain is the largest one in the State, having a roughly circular shape... FIGURE...

280

E-Print Network 3.0 - aupres des veterans Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Organization Phone Street Address Veterans of Foreign Wars 56 913-682-9200 519 Cherokee... St. 66048 Disabled American Veterans 913-651-2402 4101 S 4th St. 66048 American...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natchitoches winn cherokee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Wood furnance cuts fuel bills and wastes  

SciTech Connect

The use of a wood burning furnace instead of propane to heat the Saddlecraft manufacturing plant in Cherokee, North Carolina, is described. A chart shows gallons of propane usage in winter for five years. (MHR)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Data:28f46846-fe31-4929-b9da-46fe9fb19b1e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

prior to January 1, 2008 in the former Duke Energy Carolinas Nantahala Area in Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Macon, Jackson and, Swain, counties. Existing Pole - 11.77 New pole -...

283

Data:96a99a2c-3996-424a-a6b0-909198d85ef8 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

prior to January 1, 2008 in the former Duke Energy Carolinas Nantahala Area in Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Macon, Jackson and, Swain, counties. Existing Pole - 20.07 New pole -...

284

Sept.2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

paddled the dam-controlled waters of the Ocoee, which flows through a gorge in the Cherokee National Forest. The group chose to go for gold by tackling the upper stretch of the...

285

The Battle of Elkhorn Tavern: tomahawks and shooting wagons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

loss of the West. The Battle of Elkhorn Tavern is made even more intriguing by the participation of two Confederate Cherokee Indian regiments: a group of largely uncivilized, full bloods; and a group of civilized, mixed bloods. Historically, these two...

Haley, Patti Johnson

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Fluid Flow, Thermal History, and Diagenesis of the Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group and Overlying Units in South-Central Kansas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A diagenetic study of the Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group to the Middle Pennsylvanian Cherokee Group in south-central Kansas produced evidence of regional advective fluid flow and more localized fracture-controlled fluid ...

King, Bradley Donald

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

The Role of Cetaceans in the Shelf-Edge Region of the Northeastern United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Role of Cetaceans in the Shelf-Edge Region of the Northeastern United States JAMES H. W. HAIN, MARTIN A. M. HYMAN, ROBERT D. KENNEY, and HOWARD E. WINN Introduction Man has been, and continues to be, RI 02881; the present address of J. H. W. Hain is Associated Scientists at Woods Hole, Box 721, Woods

288

Habitat Use524 in UK-stranded harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena). Environ.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 238­248. Kenney, R. D., Payne, P. M., Heinemann, D. W., and Winn, H. E. (1996). Shifts in northeast. Sci. 17, 206­212. Nowacek, D. P., Thorne, L. P., Johnston, D. W., and Tyack, P. L. (2007). Responses, DC. Richardson, W. J., Greene, C. R., Jr., Malme, C. I., and Thomson, D. H. (1995). "Marine Mammals

Acevedo, Alejandro

289

Marine Fisheries On the cover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Fred M. Uaer, and Gary A. Winans 1 Patricia A. Livingston 9 James H. W. Hain, Martin A. M. Hyman, Robert D. Kenney, and Howard £. Winn 13 Mark Helvey 18 Reginald M. Gooding 27 Virginia L. Cass 36 Sidney. Dewees, and B. B. Wyau 68 Jim W. Conrad, Harold J. Bameu, Fuad M. Teeny, and Richard W. Nelson 73 J. J

290

AFFINITY PROPAGATION: CLUSTERING DATA BY PASSING MESSAGES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the people who helped me along. I would like to thank my Ph.D. supervisor, Brendan Frey, for guiding me no doubt led to a better finished product. I would also like to thank John Winn of Microsoft Research. I would like to thank my fellow members of Brendan Frey's Probabilistic and Statistical In- ference

Dueck, Delbert

291

OPTIMAi UTILIZATION OF SOLAR ENERGY IN HEATING AND COOLINGOF BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPTIMAi UTILIZATION OF SOLAR ENERGY IN HEATING AND COOLINGOF BUILDINGS C. Byron Winn Gearold R fundamental optimization problems involved in the design of a solar building. The first is a parameter for the given system configu- ration and the opt the latter problem The CSU Solar parameters such as mal set

Moore, John Barratt

292

Homogeneous studies of transiting extrasolar planets IV. Thirty systems with space-based light curves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......HAT-P-11 A in the Kepler light curve. This indicates a much...al. 2003). Further transit light curves were obtained by Gillon...et al. (2008). Two good light curves were presented by Winn...covering the transit on Christmas Day in 2007. The RM effect......

John Southworth

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Electrically controlled modulation in a photonic crystal nanocavity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Elizabeth Edwards1, Tomas Sarmiento1, James S. Harris1, David A. B. Miller1 and Jelena Vuckovi´c1 1. Joannopoulos, S. G. Johnson, J. N. Winn, and R. D. Meade, Photonic crystals: molding the flow of light, 2nd ed

Vuckovic, Jelena

294

BPA-2015-00019-FOIA Request  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Number: BPA-201 5-000 1 9-F Dear Ms. Winn, I am working on the routing of an 800 kV HVDC line in Brazil and need to calculate the electric field under the line and at edge of...

295

A study of decision making in the power plant permitting process in Appalachia. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Results of prior work and prevalent opinion in both private and public sectors suggested that an improved permitting process that assures better communications among decision-making bodies, utility companies and regulating agencies, and which removes inefficiencies could shorten this time lag. Four recently-permitted Appalachian power stations were selected for detailed analysis: Pleasants Power Station, Pleasants County, West Virginia; Miller Steam Plant, Jefferson County, Alabama; Cherokee Power Station, Cherokee County, South Carolina; Homer City Power Station, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Completion strategy includes clay and precipitate control  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the conditions which are necessary for a successful oil well completion in the Mississippi and Cherokee zones of South Central Kansas. Topics considered include paraffin precipitation, clay swelling and migration, and iron precipitation. Clays in these zones are sensitive to water-base treating fluids and tend to swell and migrate to the well bore, thereby causing permeability damage. The presence of iron in the Mississippi and Cherokee formations has been indicated by cuttings, core samples, and connate water samples.

Sandy, T.; Gardner, G.R.

1985-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

297

The Toqua site, 40MR6: A late Mississippian, Dallas phase town  

SciTech Connect

Archaeological work in the Little Tennessee River Valley was very much affected by the fluctuations in the Tellico Reservoir scheduling and funding. Stated project goals were: ''Questions regarding Cherokee origins, culture change and acculturation, and the length of time during which the valley was inhabited by man will be among the major ones to be considered.'' From the project inception, the principal research commitment was to the eighteenth century Overhill Cherokee occupation of the valley. By 1967, the inundation date was set for 1971. Four main research problems were identified: (1) a complete survey of the reservoir area to locate all prehistoric and historic sites that will be inundated; (2) a thorough testing of the eighteenth century Cherokee towns to determine the effects of acculturation; (3) to determine how long the Overhill Cherokee have occupied the Little Tennessee Valley by excavating a late prehistoric Mississippian village or an early Historic Cherokee village to discover by (sic) continuities between the prehistoric Mississippian complexes and the Historic Cherokee; and (4) to test intensively occupied sites in depth to find earlier Woodland and Archaic complexes in stratigraphic succession (Guthe, 1967). This report describes the results of these investigations.

Chapman, J.; Polhemus, R.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Consolidation of continuously reinforced concrete pavements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSOLIDATION OF CONTINUOUSLY REINFORCED CONCRETE PAVEMENTS A Thesis by DAN PARKER MINN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of ASTER OF SCIENCE MAY 1984 M aj... or Subject: Civil Engineering CONSOLIDATION OF CONTINUOUSLY REINFORCED CONCRETE PAVEMENTS A Thesis by DAN PARKER WINN Approved as to style and content by: W. B. Ledbetter (Chairman of Committee) eor e Stukhart (M ember) P&r~ ~ Mikael P. J. Olsen...

Winn, Dan Parker

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

299

CX-003655: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003655: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma - Tribe - Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.15, B2.5, B4.12, B5.1 Date: 09/03/2010 Location(s): Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. 1) Conduct energy audits on the residences of Cherokee Citizens with both privately owned residences and tribal managed housing; 2) develop a comprehensive energy policy that would encompass the Tribal government as well as its business entities; 3) construct Recycling Center Facility (150 feet by 75 feet); 4) locate a compressed natural gas fuel station on an existing, conventional filling station, adjacent to the Cherokee Nation Tribal Office to fuel

300

Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes September 6, 2013 - 2:01pm Addthis The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natchitoches winn cherokee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Blog Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 28, 2011 September 28, 2011 $1.4 million to Cherokee Services Group for Administrative and Property Support Services "When CSG undertakes a project, we are not simply representing a brand or even a corporation. We are representing the reputation of an entire nation and culture. The name Cherokee and the heritage and people it represents have been around for hundreds of years. We are proud stewards of the name of a nation that will exist long after our project is finished. For that reason, we take to heart these values of integrity, professionalism, and excellence." - Cherokee Services Group September 15, 2011 Honoring Hispanic Heritage Month and Renewing the American Dream Today we kick-off Hispanic Heritage Month, celebrating under the theme of "Renewing the American Dream." The Energy Department joins the rest of the

302

Tight Oklahoma gas sands remain an attractive play  

SciTech Connect

The Cherokee tight gas sands of Oklahoma remain an attractive play because of improvements in drilling and completion practices and actions by the Oklahoma Corporation Commission (OCC) that allow separate allowables for new wells. The expired federal tax credits for tight gas wells have not been the only reason for increased activity. Since decontrol of most regulated gas pricing and since 1986, the number of wells drilled and gas production per well have been increasing in the cherokee area while overall drilling in Oklahoma has decreased. These conclusions are based on wells as categorized by permit date and not by the spud, completion, or first production date. A few wells outside but adjacent to the Cherokee area may have been included, although, their impact on the conclusions is considered nominal. The paper discusses the tight gas credit, proration units, the concept of separate allowables, costs, completion efficiency, and the economic outlook for this area.

Cartwright, G.L. [Marathon Oil Co., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

1995-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

303

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Title NC-TEP-EASTERN BAND OF THE CHEROKEE Project Title NC-TEP-EASTERN BAND OF THE CHEROKEE Location: Tribal EASTERN BAND OF THE CHEROKEE NC American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Perform energy efficiency retrofits to seven ECBI facilities, e.g., replacement of incandescent bulbs with CFLs, improvement of weather stripping, improvement of insulation, etc. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health, including DOE and/or Executive Orders; require siting, construction, or major expansion of waste storage, disposal, recovery, or

304

Data:0acc9abf-9e39-462e-a137-f8def6bbb5ab | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

abf-9e39-462e-a137-f8def6bbb5ab abf-9e39-462e-a137-f8def6bbb5ab No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Natchitoches, Louisiana (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: INDUSTRIAL RATE Sector: Industrial Description: Additional Info: Demand Charges The monthly charge includes 300 KW of Demand Over 300 KW Demand $3.00 per KW The rate(s) are subjected to Power Cost Adjustment. Source or reference: http://www.natchitochesla.gov/content/utility-billing Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

305

Data:1db1878b-dacc-4ecf-96ed-00708161f265 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dacc-4ecf-96ed-00708161f265 dacc-4ecf-96ed-00708161f265 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Natchitoches, Louisiana (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Large Commercial Rate Version 2 Sector: Commercial Description: Power Cost Adjustments are applied to this rate. Source or reference: http://www.natchitochesla.gov/sites/nachitochescity.bedheadcreative.com/files/docs/rate%20schedule.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

306

Data:78c9600a-724e-4e76-8643-9436509ffb7b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a-724e-4e76-8643-9436509ffb7b a-724e-4e76-8643-9436509ffb7b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Natchitoches, Louisiana (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: LARGE COMMERCIAL RATE Sector: Commercial Description: Additional Info: Demand Charges The monthly charge includes 25 KW of Demand Over 25 KW Demand $3.00 per KW The rate(s) are subjected to Power Cost Adjustment. Source or reference: http://www.natchitochesla.gov/content/utility-billing Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

307

Data:62a304d6-3266-46e0-b32b-fe1e6e8eee44 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4d6-3266-46e0-b32b-fe1e6e8eee44 4d6-3266-46e0-b32b-fe1e6e8eee44 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Natchitoches, Louisiana (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Industrial Rate Version 2 Sector: Industrial Description: Power Cost Adjustments are applicable to this rate. Source or reference: http://www.natchitochesla.gov/sites/nachitochescity.bedheadcreative.com/files/docs/rate%20schedule.pdf Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

308

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA NEPA Compliance Officer (as authorized under DOE Order 451.1B), I have determined that the proposed action fits within the specified class(es) of action, the other regulatory requirements set forth above are met, and the proposed action is hereby categorically excluded U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title OK-TRIBE-CHEROKEE NATION, OKLAHOMA Location: Tribe OK-TRIBE- CHEROKEE NATION, OKLAHOMA OK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description

309

Social Security and the Texas Farmer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- vivors Insurance coverage for self-employed farmers. This report presents the results of in- terviews conducted in Wharton and Cherokee counties during the summer of 1956, approxi- mately a year and a half after this phase of t'he program went.... Figure 1. Location of study counties. Cherokee county is approximately 200 miles north of Wharton county. Figure 2. A field of rice ready for harvest in Wharton county. The comparatively level land, rich soils and plenti- ful water in Wharton county...

Skrabanek, R. L.; Ducoff, Louis J.

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Effect of "edge" on breeding bird density and diversity in young and mature pine stands in East Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20 20 28 29 32 34 35 40 62 LIST OF TABLES page Table 1. Stems and basal area per hectare of Shawnee and Cherokee woods (trees ) 22. 9 cm dbh, '(May 1978). . . 19 Table 2. Mean bird population characteristics per 25 m section in woods... and clearcut (1 Mav to 23 June, 1978) Table 3. Habitat association of bird species by vegetation types on Cherokee and Shawnee study areas (1 May to 23 June 'l978) . 21 . 23 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Map of Shawnee study area showing 4 bird census...

Strelke, William Kenneth

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Area recommendation report for the crystalline repository project: An evaluation. [Crystalline Repository Project  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation is given of DOE's recommendation of the Elk River complex in North Carolina for siting the second repository. Twelve recommendations are made including a strong suggestion that the Cherokee Tribe appeal both through political and legal avenues for inclusion as an affected area primarily due to projected impacts upon economy and public health as a consequence of the potential for reduced tourism.

Beck, J E; Lowe, H; Yurkovich, S P

1986-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

312

CX-002078: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

North Carolina-Tribal Energy Program-Eastern Band of the CherokeeCX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1Date: 04/13/2010Location(s): North CarolinaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

313

Ozone response of foliage and cells of sensitive and tolerant potato cultivars  

SciTech Connect

The ozone response was contrasted between Cherokee' and Norchip', relatively ozone-sensitive and -tolerant potato cultivars, respectively. Leaf conductance of the two cultivars was determined with a diffusive resistance porometer before, during and after a 3-hour exposure to 0.25 ppm ozone (490 ..mu..g m3). While Cherokee foliage had a higher leaf conductance at the onset of the ozone exposure, conductance of Norchip foliage was too high throughout the experiment to account for relative tolerance of the latter cultivar. Norchip and Cherokee both exhibited abaxial and bifacial necrosis with more numerous lesions on the abaxial surface. Abaxial and bifacial necrosis were characterized by injured spongy, and spongy plus palisade cells, respectively. The percent of injured cell types were the same in both cultivars, but the absolute number of cells injured was greater in Cherokee than Norchip. Two types of cell injury were observed in necrotic lesions. One type of injury was characterized by collapsed, basophilic cells and the other by intact, basophilic cells. The ozone response of isolated leaf protoplasts of the two cultivars was similar. Two types of protoplast injury were observed, one characterized by lysis and the other by reduced staining with fluorescein diacetate. Maximum protoplast response to ozone was observed within the first 5 minutes of a 15 minute exposure. Little additional protoplast response occurred after 10 minutes.

Illman, B.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

SWORDS INTO PLOUGHSHARES: The Struggle to Build an Ordered Community of Liberty on the southeast Kansas Frontier 1867-1876  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(as much as I can from the vantage point of 2008) the "why." The settlers discussed in this dissertation could have made other choices. Nearby Cherokee and Crawford counties erupted in violence as settlers took up arms to confront the railroad...

Mack, John N.

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

315

Municipal Solid Waste Landfills The following Oklahoma landfills currently accept dead livestock. As each facility has different guidelines and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Municipal Solid Waste Landfills The following Oklahoma landfills currently accept dead livestock Adair Cherokee Nation Landfill 918-696-5342 Canadian OEMA Landfill 405-262-0161 Call ahead Carter Southern Okla. Regional Disposal Landfill 580-226-1276 Comanche City of Lawton Landfill 580

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

316

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 7880 of 31,917 results. 71 - 7880 of 31,917 results. Article Renewing America's Nuclear Power Partnership for Energy Security and Economic Growth Remarks as Prepared for Delivery by Secretary Bodman http://energy.gov/articles/renewing-americas-nuclear-power-partnership-energy-security-and-economic-growth Download FY 2014 Budget Request Laboratory Table http://energy.gov/downloads/fy-2014-budget-request-laboratory-table Download fac2001-27.pdf http://energy.gov/management/downloads/fac2001-27pdf Download CX-003586: Categorical Exclusion Determination Georgia-County-Cherokee CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 08/25/2010 Location(s): Cherokee County, Georgia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003586-categorical-exclusion-determination

317

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 20300 of 26,764 results. 91 - 20300 of 26,764 results. Download CX-003586: Categorical Exclusion Determination Georgia-County-Cherokee CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 08/25/2010 Location(s): Cherokee County, Georgia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003586-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002778: Categorical Exclusion Determination Michigan-City-Sterling Heights CX(s) Applied: B2.5, A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 06/21/2010 Location(s): Sterling Heights, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002778-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002706: Categorical Exclusion Determination California-Tribe-Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 06/11/2010

318

CX-003586: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

86: Categorical Exclusion Determination 86: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003586: Categorical Exclusion Determination Georgia-County-Cherokee CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 08/25/2010 Location(s): Cherokee County, Georgia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. 1) Develop energy efficiency and conservation strategy, 2) hire technical consultant, 3) energy efficiency retrofits to include: replace chiller and cooling tower in the Justice Center (1994); replace heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) controls in the Justice Center; installation of occupancy sensors in the Detention Center (1992); 4) installation of cool roofs on the Justice Center, Historic Courthouse (State Historic Preservation Officer approval received), and the TAG Office (approximately

319

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B5.1 Actions to conserve energy B5.1 Actions to conserve energy The tribe would purchase an estimated 4,102 4-count packages of compact fluorescent light bulbs to distribute to tribal members during an annual Celebration held the first weekend in October. The tribe would also distribute energy efficiency flyers at various events over the course of the Celebration. An estimated 2,051 households, would be reached through this effort. Each household would receive 2 packages of compact fluorescent bulbs. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians Energy Efficiency and Conservation Program United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians Oklahoma Dec 14, 2009 Mary Martin Print Form for Records Submit via E-mail Billie Newland Digitally signed by Billie Newland

320

Newsletter Features | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About Us » News & Blog » Newsletter Features About Us » News & Blog » Newsletter Features Newsletter Features Below are featured articles from the Indian Energy Beat newsletter. Download full issues of the newsletter. September 6, 2013 The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians had plenty of used vegetable oil and grease on hand and a desire to convert the waste to biofuel to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. The Tribes participated in a demonstration project with the intent to share their experience and lessons learned so that other Tribes

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321

Assessment of the flowability of a crushed coal by triaxial testing  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the research is to study the effects of variations in moisture content, fine particle concentration, and initial density on the handleability of a Cherokee seam coal. Cherokee seam coal is mined in Marion County, Iowa. A theoretical analysis of the stresses acting within a stable arch will be presented. The arch analysis will take into consideration such factors as: hopper geometry, frictional characteristics of the hopper material, material unit weight, and the strength of the material. Recommendations for future research to determine the handleability of a coal will be presented along with possible approaches to obtain a practical handleability index'' for a variety of coals. 47 refs., 28 figs., 4 tabs.

Bradfield, B.E.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Kansas coal resources and their potential for utilization in the near future  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary evaluation of deep coal resources in Kansas indicates nearly 50 billion tons (45 billion MT) of coal in eastern Kansas. The Cherokee Group and Marmaton Groups of Middle Pennsylvanian age are the important coal-bearing geologic units. Most of the coal beds are thin, with only a limited amount (1.85 billion tons or 1.68 billion MT) from coal beds exceeding 42 in. (105 cm) in thickness. Most of these coal thicknesses were determined from geophysical logs run for oil and gas tests, and the potential for a much larger resource of thick coal exists in several areas of the state. Depths of this deep-coal resource range from 100 ft (30 m) down to approximately 3,000 ft (900 m) in the deeper parts of the western Cherokee basin.

Brady, L.L. (Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

CX-001931: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Categorical Exclusion Determination 1: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001931: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program (SEP) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - New Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Stations CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/10/2010 Location(s): Cherokee County, Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The State of Oklahoma intends to use $1,484,298 of Recovery Act funds for compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling stations in Cherokee and Adair counties. The Quick Fill facilities will include installation of small equipment semi-enclosures, a paved area and canopy for the CNG pumps, and entrance and exit roads. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-001931.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-001933: Categorical Exclusion Determination

324

Using waste wood as fuel saves $2000 per day  

SciTech Connect

Sawdust and wood residue replaced natural gas or number 2 fuel oil to fire 2 kilns at the Cherokee Brick Co. in Raleigh, NC, resulting in savings of $2000/day. Exhaust air from the kilns was sent directly back to a rotating dryer to dry the waste wood. The dried wood containing 8 to 12% moisture was supplied, around the clock, at a rate of 140 ton/day of dry material. (BLM)

Ragland, W. (Cherokee Brick Co., Raleigh, NC); Byrnes, D.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Mapping My Ancestors Footsteps: Historical GIS and the Trail of Tears  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Research) - Bill Jones, Shirley Lawrence, Doris Tate Trevino and Floyd Ayers ? Tennessee Trails and Greenways Mr. Robert Richards ? National Park Service ? And especially the Haskell GIS Lab Mr. RJ Rowley Historical Map Sources: University of Alabama... The Trail Where They Cried Digitizing the Northern Route of the Cherokee Removal through Tennessee By Deborah Kirk Haskell GIS LabPainting by Robert Lindneux 1942 ROUTE OF THE TRAIL OF TEARS Images from Historic Archive...

Kirk, Deborah Lyn

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

326

Saving Money with Steam Leak and Steam Trap Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

employees receive site specific training at over 50 plant sites per year ? Security Checks o Petro Chemical Energy employee background checks performed by DISA ? Drugs & Alcohol Free Workplace o Petro Chemical Energy employees are tested for Drugs... ? Bayer Chemicals ?BASF ? Bridgestone Firestone ?BP Amoco ?Cherokee Pharmaceuticals ? Chevron ? Ciba Specialty Chemicals ?Celanese Chemicals ? Columbian Chemicals ? Citgo ?ConocoPhillips, Inc. ? Cooper Tire & Rubber Co. ?Dow Chemical...

Woodruff, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Alternatives for physically modifying John Sevier detention dam to allow fish passage  

SciTech Connect

Studies conducted in the vicinity of John Sevier Steam-Electric Plant (JSF) indicated some modification of the fish assemblage from that expected. By blocking movements of fish between Cherokee Reservoir and the upper Holston River, John Sevier detention dam has affected the fisheries in both systems. Providing passage for river-spawning fish at John Sevier detention dam might improve fish communities and fisheries in Cherokee Reservoir as well as upstream habitats. This would include enhanced reproductive success of river-spawning species found in Cherokee Reservoir (e.g., white bass and possibly striped bass and paddlefish) and repopulation of John Sevier Reservoir and the upper Holston River by several species presently found only downstream of the detention dam. TVA has identified and studied several alternatives that alone or in combination might improve the fisheries. Cost estimates were developed for three alternatives. These three alternatives with cost estimates are discussed briefly along with two other alternatives for which cost estimates have not been made. Merits of the three alternatives which have at least some possibility to improve migratory fish stocks are discussed in detail. 5 references.

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1990: Physical and chemical characteristics of water and sediments  

SciTech Connect

As part of Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA`s) Reservoir Vital Signs Monitoring program, physical/chemical measurements of water and sediment were made in 1990 on twelve TVA reservoirs (the nine main steam Tennessee river reservoirs - Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary reservoirs - Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris). The objective of this monitoring program is to assess the health or integrity of these aquatic ecosystems. The physical/chemical water quality data collected in 1990 showed the water quality of these reservoirs to be very good. However, hypolimnetic anoxia during the summer months in Watts bars, Douglas, and Cherokee reservoir continues to be a concern. High concentrations of nutrients were measured in the transition zones of Cherokee and Douglas reservoirs, resulting in highly productive and eutrophic conditions in the transition zones of these reservoirs. Fecal coliform organisms were frequently detected in the forebay area of Guntersville reservoir, and higher than expected ammonia nitrogen concentrations were found at the transition zone of Wheeler reservoir. Elevated concentrations of mercury were found in Pickwick and Watts bar reservoir sediment, and high lead concentrations were found in a sediment sample collected from Guntersville reservoir. A TVA Reservoir Water Quality Index (RWQI) was developed and used to summarize water quality conditions on a scale from 0 (worst) to 100 (best).

Meinert, D.L.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1990: Physical and chemical characteristics of water and sediments  

SciTech Connect

As part of Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA's) Reservoir Vital Signs Monitoring program, physical/chemical measurements of water and sediment were made in 1990 on twelve TVA reservoirs (the nine main steam Tennessee river reservoirs - Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary reservoirs - Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris). The objective of this monitoring program is to assess the health or integrity of these aquatic ecosystems. The physical/chemical water quality data collected in 1990 showed the water quality of these reservoirs to be very good. However, hypolimnetic anoxia during the summer months in Watts bars, Douglas, and Cherokee reservoir continues to be a concern. High concentrations of nutrients were measured in the transition zones of Cherokee and Douglas reservoirs, resulting in highly productive and eutrophic conditions in the transition zones of these reservoirs. Fecal coliform organisms were frequently detected in the forebay area of Guntersville reservoir, and higher than expected ammonia nitrogen concentrations were found at the transition zone of Wheeler reservoir. Elevated concentrations of mercury were found in Pickwick and Watts bar reservoir sediment, and high lead concentrations were found in a sediment sample collected from Guntersville reservoir. A TVA Reservoir Water Quality Index (RWQI) was developed and used to summarize water quality conditions on a scale from 0 (worst) to 100 (best).

Meinert, D.L.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Investigations of the cause of fishkills in fish-rearing facilities in Raven Fork watershed  

SciTech Connect

An investigation was undertaken to determine the cause of fishkills in trout-rearing facilities located adjacent to Raven Fork Creek within the Cherokee Indian Reservation in North Carolina. Approximately 50,000 rainbow trout were lost at the Blankenship trout farm-a commercial facility-following eight storm events between March 31 and December 2, 1981. In addition, 524 trophy-size trout died in three ponds operated by the Cherokee tribe for stocking reservation streams. It was found fishkills in the trout farm could be prevented by adding lime to water from the creek as it was pumped into the facility; this strengthened the assumption acidity (H/sup +/) was responsible for the fishkills. Mortality of trophy trout was stopped by routing water from nearby springs to the ponds during and following rain events. Because of concern that these fishkills might be caused by acid rain, TVA was requested by the Cherokee tribe to assist in determining the cause. Limited studies were conducted during March through August 1982 to test two hypotheses: (1) concentrations of H/sup +/ and soluble aluminum in Raven Fork following storm events were high enough to kill rainbow trout and (2) atmospheric deposition was a greater source of stream H/sup +/ than acid-producing geologic formations or the forest soils.

Jones, H.C.; Noggle, J.C.; Young, R.C.; Kelly, J.M.; Olem, H.; Ruane, R.J.; Pasch, R.W.; Hyfantis, G.J.; Parkhurst, W.J.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas - Near-term, Class I  

SciTech Connect

This project involved two demonstration projects, one in a Marrow reservoir located in the southwestern part of the state and the second in the Cherokee Group in eastern Kansas. Morrow reservoirs of western Kansas are still actively being explored and constitute an important resource in Kansas. Cumulative oil production from the Morrow in Kansas is over 400,000,000 bbls. Much of the production from the Morrow is still in the primary stage and has not reached the mature declining state of that in the Cherokee. The Cherokee Group has produced about 1 billion bbls of oil since the first commercial production began over a century ago. It is a billion-barrel plus resource that is distributed over a large number of fields and small production units. Many of the reservoirs are operated close to the economic limit, although the small units and low production per well are offset by low costs associated with the shallow nature of the reservoirs (less than 1000 ft. deep).

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Reynolds, Rodney R.; McCune, A. Dwayne; Michnick, Michael J.; Walton, Anthony W.; Watney, W. Lynn

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

332

Publications from Research Conducted at MR | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications from Research Conducted at MR Publications from Research Conducted at MR 2013 Publications Erickson M. J., "Surface and interface effects in nanoscopic metallic spin transport devices", University of Minnesota , (2013). Ji N., Lauter V., Zhang X., Ambaye H., Wang J.-P., "Strain induced giant magnetism in epitaxial Fe16N2 thin film", Applied Physics Letters 102, 072411 (2013). Jiang C. Y., Tong X., Brown D. R., Lee W. T., Ambaye H., Craig J. W., Crow L., Culbertson H., Goyette R., Graves-Brook M. K., Hagen M. E., Kadron B., Lauter V., McCollum L. W., Robertson J. L., Winn B., Vandegrift A. E., "Polarized 3He neutron spin filters at Oak Ridge National Laboratory", Physics Procedia 42, 191-199 (2013). Ke X., Belenky L. J., Lauter V., Ambaye H., Bark C. W., Eom C. B.,

333

"2. Craig","Coal","Tri-State G & T Assn, Inc",1304 "3. Fort St Vrain","Gas","Public Service Co of Colorado",969  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado" Colorado" "1. Comanche","Coal","Public Service Co of Colorado",1426 "2. Craig","Coal","Tri-State G & T Assn, Inc",1304 "3. Fort St Vrain","Gas","Public Service Co of Colorado",969 "4. Cherokee","Coal","Public Service Co of Colorado",717 "5. Rawhide","Coal","Platte River Power Authority",666 "6. Rocky Mountain Energy Center","Gas","Rocky Mountain Energy Ctr LLC",601 "7. Pawnee","Coal","Public Service Co of Colorado",505 "8. Front Range Power Project","Gas","Colorado Springs City of",462 "9. Hayden","Coal","Public Service Co of Colorado",446

334

Evaluation of fossil plants versus hydro plants for load frequency control  

SciTech Connect

The economics of using hydroplants with Francis turbines or fossil plants for load frequency control are evaluated. Using data from the TVA Gallatin steam plant and the TVA Cherokee, Wilson, and Fontana hydroplants, a cost comparison of different modes of operation for load frequency control was performed considering two plants at a time. The results showed that when the fossil plant was used for load frequency control instead of a hydro plant a lower system generation cost was incurred. Dynamic responses of fossil and hydro units, improved controls for fossil plants, and maneuvering costs of the Gallatin plant are also considered.

Broadwater, R.P.; Johnson, R.L.; Duckett, F.E.; Boston, W.T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Piping retrofit reduces valve-damaging flow vibration  

SciTech Connect

This article describes how excessive flow-induced vibration was escalating safety relief valve maintenance at an alarming pace until simple piping modifications eliminated the problem. Public Service Co. of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Station Unit 4 had been experiencing excessive hot and cold reheat safety valve maintenance. From 1990 through 1993, expenditures exceeded $150,000, including a complete refurbishing in 1990. Furthermore, from 1990 to 1992 the incurred costs of contracting VR certificate repairs accumulated to more than $50,000. Such exorbitant maintenance costs were unique among PSCO's generating system.

Webb, M.; Ellenberger, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Autonomous land navigation in a structured environment  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a hardware and software system developed to perform autonomous navigation of a land vehicle in a structured environment. The vehicle used for development and testing of the system was the Jeep Cherokee Mobile Robotics Testbed Vehicle developed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque. Since obstacle detection and avoidance have not yet been incorporated into the system, a structured environment is postulated that presumes the paths to be traversed are free of obstacles. The system performs path planning and execution based on maps constructed using the vehicle's on board navigation system and map-maker. The system software, hardware and performance data are discussed.

Klarer, P.R. (Sandia National Lab., Advanced Technology Div., Albuquerque, NM (US))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1991: Physical and chemical characteristics of water and sediment  

SciTech Connect

In the second year of TVA's Reservoir Vital signs Monitoring program, physical/chemical measurements of water and sediment were made on fourteen TVA reservoirs (the nine mainstem Tennessee river reservoirs - Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and five tributary reservoirs - Cherokee, Douglas, Norris, Melton Hill and Tellico). In addition in 1991, limited water quality monitoring was initiated on ten tributary storage impoundments. The objective of the Vital Signs monitoring program is to assess the health or integrity of these aquatic ecosystems. Physical/chemical data collected in 1991 showed the water quality of the majority of TVA's reservoirs to be very good, but pointed out areas for improvement and further investigation.

Meinert, D.L.; Fehring, J.P.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Autonomous land navigation in a structured environment  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a hardware and software system developed to perform autonomous navigation of a land vehicle in a structured environment. The vehicle used for development and testing of the system was the Jeep Cherokee Mobile Robotics Testbed Vehicle developed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque. Since obstacle detection and avoidance have not yet been incorporated into the system, a structured environment is postulated that presumes the paths to be traversed are free of obstacles. The system performs path planning and execution based on maps constructed using the vehicle's onboard navigation system and mapmaker. The system software, hardware, and performance data are discussed. 6 refs.

Klarer, P.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Line tests show DRA's don't cross-contaminate  

SciTech Connect

Pipeline tests with a commercially available drag-reducing agent (DRA) show that such agents can be injected into one product in a multiproduct pipeline without cross-contamination from one batch to another. The tests were conducted in the Cherokee system, a three-segment Ponca City-to-Oklahoma City products line operated by Conoco Pipe Line Co. A batch of gasoline treated with a DRA, Conoco's CDR Flow Improver, preceded an untreated jet-fuel batch. The amount of DRA in the gasoline was measured as the tenders were transported through the pipeline system.

Goudy, C.F.L.; Muth, C.I.

1989-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Weed control in tomato seedbeds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paul", alber Ieeyer Bubmitted to the !JJaduate 'shool of the agricultural and ?achanical CcHego of Texac in rartial r ulfi liuent of the "Mquirejeonta for toe mdree of 'okapi i'A '3F "CT, :liCE Vapor, iub)ect g }hrt, icvlture A Tba& "sul... of importance in the production of tomatoes are Hidalgo, Cameron and Cherokee (23) ~ Not all of the tomatoes produced in Texas are marketed as fresh tomatoes. Ipproxlmatsly 20 psr cent of ths production goes to tomato processing plants (23), although Texas...

Leeper, Paul W

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natchitoches winn cherokee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The foraminiferal and lithologic characteristics of the Reklaw formation of Leon, Robertson and Milam counties, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with corresponding Wentworth grades, U. S. sieves, I/2 scale, and Phi scale i7 Oepth and time of sampi lng according to Wadeli/s law of settling velocities 17 Size comparison of the Marquez Foramini fera to the holotypes 23 Sedimentary par'ameters of the strata..., Rusk, Cherokee, Smith, and Robertson counties, Texas, John- son proved that the C'laiborne group extended into Texas. Penrose (1889) combined all of the Claiborne and part of the Wilcox into a single unit called uTlraber Be)t or Sabine River beds...

Davis, Kenneth Eugene

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Structure of the Salina-Forest City interbasin boundary from seismic studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that have been or could be reasonably exploited are depicted in fig. 2. Coal seams found in Kansas are typically less than 1 m (3.3 ft) thick. Some very minor coal (or lignite) deposits have been mined from units of Cretaceous age in central Kansas. Most... Marmton Group m DouglasGroup Cherokee Group ............. ............ ............. Kansas City Group 0 50 100 rnl - 0 50 100 km FIGURE ~??GENERA DISTRIBUTION OF STRIPPABLE COAL RESERVES BY GEOLOGIC GROUPFOR COALS UNDER 100 OR LESS FT (530 M...

Steeples, Don W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

An Analysis of Texas Waterways: A Report on the Physical Characteristics of Rivers, Streams, and Bayous in Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

through piney woods. Two major reservoirs are located on the Neches. Lake Palestine is located near the headwaters of the river in Henderson, Smith, Cherokee, and Anderson Counties; and B. A Steinhagen Lake is located on the lower section in Tyler... the m ai n strea m wh ich flows southeast through pine woods for approximately 555 miles, partially forming the boundary between Texas and Louisiana. The river then empties into the Gulf of Mexico at Sabine Lake. The Sabine has the largest volume...

Belisle, Harold J.; Josselet, Ron

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Early strawn biostratigraphy: What is the Caddo  

SciTech Connect

Caddo limestone is used to describe parts of the lower Strawn limestone on the Eastern shelf. The lower Strawn limestone as generally deposited on an eroded Ellenburger surface, but may overlie eroded Mississippian or even Atokan rocks preserved in topographic lows on the Ellenburger surface. Above the Caddo limestone is a sequence of clastics overlain by the Goen Limestone of early Strawn age. The Goen Limestone, in turn, is overlain by clastics which are overlain by the late Strawn Capps Limestone. As long as knowledge of fusulinid zonation was restricted to rocks of early Cherokee, late Cherokee, and Marmaton age, regional correlations of these carbonate units were manageable. With refinement of zonation, however, the Caddo, Goen, and Capps limestones can be subdivided into discrete units of different age. In each of these age zones, the units are further divisible on the basis of environments of deposition and subsequent diagenesis. Current results indicate that the early Strawn carbonates are cyclical and were deposited during numerous glacio-eustatic sea level fluctuations.

Reid, A.M.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Seismic expression of Red Fork channels in Major and Kay Counties, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the application of regional seismic to exploration and development Red Fork sands of the Cherokee Group, in Major and Kay Counties, Oklahoma. A computer-aided exploration system (CAEX) was used to justify the subtle seismic expressions with the geological interpretation. Modeling shows that the low-velocity shales are the anomalous rock in the Cherokee package, which is most represented by siltstone and thin sands. Because the Red Fork channel sands were incised into or deposited with laterally time-equivalent siltstones, no strong reflection coefficient is associated with the top of the sands. The objective sands become a seismic anomaly only when they cut into and replace a low-velocity shale. This knowledge allows mapping the channel thickness by interpreting the shale thickness from seismic data. A group shoot line in Major County, Oklahoma, has been tied to the geologic control, and the channel thicknesses have been interpreted assuming a detectable vertical resolution of 10 ft. A personal computer-based geophysical work station is used to construct velocity logs representative of the geology to produce forward-modeled synthetic seismic sections, and to display, in color, the seismic trace attributes. These synthetic sections are used as tools to compare with and interpret the seismic line and to evaluate the interpretative value of lowest cost, lesser quality data versus reprocessing or new data acquisition.

Hanoch, C.A.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Recycling non-hazardous industrial wastes and petroleum contaminated soils into structural clay ceramics  

SciTech Connect

Cherokee Environmental Group (CEG)--a subsidiary of the Cherokee Sanford Group, Inc. (CSG)--has developed a system to beneficially reuse non-hazardous industrial wastes and petroleum contaminated soils into the recycling process of CSG`s structural clay ceramics manufacturing operation. The wastes and soils are processed, screened, and blended with brickmaking raw materials. The resulting material is formed and fired in such a way that the bricks still exceed American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) quality standards. Prior to usage, recycled materials are rigorously tested for ceramic compatibility and environmental compliance. Ceramic testing includes strength, shrinkage, and aesthetics. Environmental compliance is insured by testing for both organic and inorganic constituents. This recycling process has been fully permitted by all required state regulatory agencies in North Carolina, Maryland, and South Carolina where facilities are located. This inter-industrial synergy has eliminated landfill reliance and liability for many companies and property owners. The recycling volume of wastes and soils is high because CSG is one of the largest brick manufacturers in the nation. Together, CEG and CSG have eliminated more than 1 billion pounds of material from landfills by beneficially reusing the non-hazardous wastes.

MacRunnels, Z.D.; Miller, H.B. Jr. [Cherokee Environmental Group, Sanford, NC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing, vertical, field wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the third project year (April 6 through October 5, 2002). This work included capillary pressure/mercury injection analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and pore casting on selected samples from Cherokee and Bug fields, Utah. The diagenetic fabrics and porosity types found at these fields are indicators of reservoir flow capacity, storage capacity, and potential for enhanced oil recovery via horizontal drilling. The reservoir quality of Cherokee and Bug fields has been affected by multiple generations of dissolution, anhydrite plugging, and various types of cementation which act as barriers or baffles to fluid flow. The most significant diagenetic characteristics are microporosity (Cherokee field) and micro-boxwork porosity (Bug field), as shown from porethroat radii histograms, and saturation profiles generated from the capillary pressure/mercury injection analysis, and identified by scanning electron microscopy and pore casting. These porosity types represent important sites for untapped hydrocarbons and primary targets for horizontal drilling. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the Rocky Mountain Section meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, and publications. The project home page was updated for the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Orr 2009 ARM STM poster2.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status: Design, testing and implementation has been begun at SGP Status: Design, testing and implementation has been begun at SGP A U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago-Argonne, LLC Accomplishments and Status of SGP During 2008 Brad W. Orr 1 Dan J. Rusk 2 John Schatz 2 David Breedlove 2 Richard Eagan 1 1 Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 2 ACRF/SGP, Cherokee Nation Distributors, Stilwell, OK INSTRUMENTS GENERAL STATISTICS * Instrument Availability - Averaged over 95% during 2008. * Electronic Repair Lab - $20,000 in savings * Calibrations - Over 140 instruments calibrated * Guest Instruments Supported - 40 * Site visitors - Over 100 visits by scientists and guests at the Central Facility. * Field Campaigns - 18 Campaigns supported last year. Acknowledgments We would like to thank the entire SGP staff for another year of excellence and for their continued support of all aspects of operations. This

349

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Oklahoma | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 10, 2010 March 10, 2010 CX-001931: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program (SEP) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - New Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Stations CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/10/2010 Location(s): Cherokee County, Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office March 10, 2010 CX-001142: Categorical Exclusion Determination Clean Cities Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuels CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 03/10/2010 Location(s): Tulsa, Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 10, 2010 CX-001930: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program (SEP) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) Systems/Revolving Loan

350

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 17850 of 26,764 results. 41 - 17850 of 26,764 results. Download CX-003985: Categorical Exclusion Determination Regional Biomass Feedstock Partnership CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B5.1 Date: 09/22/2010 Location(s): Onaway, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003985-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001931: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program (SEP) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - New Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Stations CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/10/2010 Location(s): Cherokee County, Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001931-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006181: Categorical Exclusion Determination

351

Storm Lake II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II Wind Farm II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Storm Lake II Wind Farm Facility Storm Lake II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner AES Corp. Developer GE Energy Energy Purchaser Alliant/IES Utilities Location Buena Vista and Cherokee Counties IA Coordinates 42.655334°, -95.383651° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.655334,"lon":-95.383651,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

352

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin Devonian (Ohio) Marcellus Utica Bakken*** Avalon- Bone Spring San Joaquin Basin Monterey Santa Maria, Ventura, Los Angeles Basins Monterey- Temblor Pearsall Tuscaloosa Big Horn Basin Denver Basin Powder River Basin Park Basin Niobrara* Mowry Niobrara* Heath** Manning Canyon Appalachian Basin Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville- Bossier Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley & Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest

353

Remote/New sites: Many Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remote/New sites: Many Field Remote/New sites: Many Field Campaigns require temporary installations on non-ACRF sites. This requires identification of landowners, negotiation of leases, and infrastructure logistics for electrical and internet connectivity. Argonne National Laboratory is managed by UChicago-Argonne LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy SGP Field Campaigns: The Other Side of Operations Brad W. Orr 1 Dan J. Rusk 2 John Schatz 2 Dan Nelson 2 David Breedlove 2 Douglas L. Sisterson 1 1 Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 2 ACRF/SGP, Cherokee Nation Distributors, Stilwell, OK Background Implementation All departments must work closely together to implement a campaign. In addition they must have the flexibility to adapt to new and unique instrument deployments. The

354

The University of Tennessee - Knoxville | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Ayres Hall on UT Knoxville campus Ayres Hall on UT Knoxville campus Research Office of Research Research Centers & Institutes Cherokee Farm Office of Undergraduate Research The University of Tennessee Health Science Center DOE Office of Science Research Awards DOE Research Results Experts Guide The Bredesen Center for Interdisciplinary Research & Graduate Education brings together extensive complementary resources at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to advance science, technology, engineering, and mathematics research of global significance. Energy Science and Engineering (ESE) Ph.D. program Distinguished Graduate Fellowship (DGF) Ph.D. program Search this site: Search UT is where world-class researchers, brilliant students, and corporate and

355

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2009 4, 2009 CX-006676: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geothermal Technologies Program CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B5.1, B5.2 Date: 12/14/2009 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC December 14, 2009 CX-000127: Categorical Exclusion Determination United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians Energy Efficiency and Conservation Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1, A9 Date: 12/14/2009 Location(s): Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy December 14, 2009 CX-000126: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cold Springs Rancheria of Mono Indians Community Center Energy Efficiency Audit CX(s) Applied: B5.1, A9, A11 Date: 12/14/2009 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy December 11, 2009 CX-000817: Categorical Exclusion Determination Closure of Septic Tanks 607-12G, -31G and -32G

356

Diesel Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Links Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov Web site. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you. Diesel Vehicles and Manufacturers Audi A3 (TDI models) A6 (TDI models) A7 (TDI models) A8 L (TDI model) Q5 (TDI models) Q7 (TDI models) BMW 328d Sedan 328d xDrive Sedan 328d xDrive Sports Wagon 535d Sedan 535d xDrive Sedan Chevrolet Cruze Turbo Diesel Jeep Grand Cherokee EcoDiesel Mercedes-Benz E250 BlueTEC GL350 BlueTEC GLK250 BlueTEC ML350 BlueTEC Porsche Cayenne Diesel Volkswagen Beetle (TDI models) Beetle Convertible (TDI models) Golf (TDI models) Jetta (TDI models) Jetta Sportwagen (TDI models) Passat (TDI models) Touareg (TDI models) Diesel-Related Information

357

Audit Report: OAS-RA-13-28 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Audit Report: OAS-RA-13-28 July 18, 2013 Costs Incurred by Selected Tribal Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Recipients Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the Department of Energy's (Department) Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program received $3.2 billion to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy use and fossil fuel emissions. The Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy allocated about $2.7 billion of the funds using a population-driven formula to over 2,000 entities including states and territories, cities and counties, and Native American tribes. The Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (NTUA), the Cherokee Nation, Muscogee Creek Nation, Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, and Chickasaw Nation received the

358

U.S. Department of Energy Southwestern Power Admin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Admin Admin istration Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Proposed Action Title: Moodys Radio Tower Land Acquisition Program or Field Office: Southwestern Power Administration Location(s) (City/County/State): Moodys, Cherokee County, Oklahoma Proposed Action Description: Southwestern Power Administration proposes to obtain title, in fee, for a portion of land at the Southwestern Power Administration Moody Radio Tower site. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: I 0 CFR 1021, Appendix B to Subpart D, Part B 1.24- Transfer, lease, disposition, or acquisition of interests in personal property or real property. For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, including the full text of each categorical exclusion, see Subpart D of 10 CFR Part 1021

359

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southwestern Duty Locations Southwestern Duty Locations The City of Gore, Oklahoma, established in 1903 at the southern edge of the Cherokee Nation in eastern Oklahoma, is known as the "Trout Capital of Oklahoma" owing to its location near many pristine lakes and rivers. In addition to year-round fishing, the area offers camping, hunting, scuba diving, and many other outdoor activities. The city itself boasts a number of antique stores and sponsors annual events such as car shows, arts and crafts festivals, and music festivals. With a population of approximately 1,000, Gore offers country living within easy highway driving of the larger cities of Tulsa, Oklahoma (74 miles) and Fort Smith, Arkansas (45 miles). back to top The City of Jonesboro, Arkansas, established in 1859, is the farming,

360

Smarter Meters Help Customers Budget Electric Service Costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tri-State Smart Grid Investment Grant Tri-State Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 Tri-State's service area includes parts of Fannin County, Georgia; Polk County, Tennessee; and Cherokee County, North Carolina. Smarter Meters Help Customers Budget Electric Service Costs Tri-State Electric Membership Cooperative (Tri-State) is a distribution rural electric cooperative that primarily serves more than 12,000 rural customers, many of whom have low-incomes living at or near poverty level across a multi-state region (see map). Under their smart grid project, Tri-State has replaced conventional electromechanical meters with solid-state smart meters and implemented advanced electricity service programs in order to give customers greater control over their energy use and costs.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natchitoches winn cherokee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

2012 National Tribal Forum on Air Quality | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 National Tribal Forum on Air Quality 2012 National Tribal Forum on Air Quality 2012 National Tribal Forum on Air Quality May 22, 2012 8:00AM CDT to May 24, 2012 4:30PM CDT Tulsa, Oklahoma The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) and the National Tribal Air Association (NTAA) would like to invite you to attend their joint air quality conference, the National Tribal Forum on Air Quality (NTF) to be held at the Cherokee Nation's Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Tulsa, Oklahoma. All interested tribal environmental professionals, US EPA representatives, and members of national or local organizations with links to Indian Country are encouraged to attend. This conference is designed to allow attendees a venue to share with and learn from one another. Conference highlights include: Virgil Masayesva Environmental Excellence Awards Ceremony

362

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11, 2010 11, 2010 CX-001935: Categorical Exclusion Determination Deployment of Innovative Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy - Residential Buildings CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/11/2010 Location(s): Oregon Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office March 10, 2010 CX-001931: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program (SEP) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - New Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Stations CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/10/2010 Location(s): Cherokee County, Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office March 10, 2010 CX-006361: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tennessee-City-Johnson City CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 03/10/2010 Location(s): Johnson City, Tennessee

363

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Storm of December 2007 at the SGP Ice Storm of December 2007 at the SGP Daniel Hartsock 1 , Dan J. Rusk 2 , Brad W. Orr 3 , Peter Lamb 1 1 University of Oklahoma CIMMS, 2 Cherokee Nation Industries/Atmospheric Technology Services, 3 Argonne National Laboratory 9-11 December 2007 Oklahoma and Kansas experienced a severe ice storm on December 8-11 2007 and a near miss on February 16 2008. The SGP's instrument suite can provide rare and important looks at storm evolution and can be used for forecasting and case studies. The storm's effects were widespread in Central and Eastern Oklahoma, with over 600,000 customers without power, some for weeks. Ice began in Oklahoma on the 8 th and lasted at many locations through the 10 h with ice layers that often exceeded 3/4". By contrast, the storm in February had little or no

364

Robert Jemison Van de Graaff was born on December 20, 1901 in Tuscaloosa,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Van de Graaff Picture Van de Graaff Picture Short Biography Of Robert Jemison Van de Graaff Robert Jemison Van de Graaff was born on December 20, 1901 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. His mother was Minnie Cherokee Hargrove and his father was Adrian Sebastian Van de Graaff. Robert attended the Tuscaloosa public schools and then attended the University of Alabama where he received a BS degree in 1922 and an MS degree in 1923. Both degrees were in mechanical engineering. After graduating from college he worked for the Alabama Power Company for a year as a research assistant. He studied at the Sorbonne in Paris from 1924 to 1925 and while there, attended lectures by Marie Curie on radiation. In 1925 he went to Oxford University in England as a Rhodes Scholar. At Oxford he received a BS in physics in 1926 and a Ph.D. in physics in 1928. While

365

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

SciTech Connect

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the fourth project year (April 6 through October 5, 2003). The work included (1) analysis of well-test data and oil production from Cherokee and Bug fields, San Juan County, Utah, and (2) diagenetic evaluation of stable isotopes from the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Production ''sweet spots'' and potential horizontal drilling candidates were identified for Cherokee and Bug fields. In Cherokee field, the most productive wells are located in the thickest part of the mound facies of the upper Ismay zone, where microporosity is well developed. In Bug field, the most productive wells are located structurally downdip from the updip porosity pinch out in the dolomitized lower Desert Creek zone, where micro-box-work porosity is well developed. Microporosity and micro-box-work porosity have the greatest hydrocarbon storage and flow capacity, and potential horizontal drilling target in these fields. Diagenesis is the main control on the quality of Ismay and Desert Creek reservoirs. Most of the carbonates present within the lower Desert Creek and Ismay have retained a marine-influenced carbon isotope geochemistry throughout marine cementation as well as through post-burial recycling of marine carbonate components during dolomitization, stylolitization, dissolution, and late cementation. Meteoric waters do not appear to have had any effect on the composition of the dolomites in these zones. Light oxygen values obtained from reservoir samples for wells located along the margins or flanks of Bug field may be indicative of exposure to higher temperatures, to fluids depleted in {sup 18}O relative to sea water, or to hypersaline waters during burial diagenesis. The samples from Bug field with the lightest oxygen isotope compositions are from wells that have produced significantly greater amounts of hydrocarbons. There is no significant difference between the oxygen isotope compositions from lower Desert Creek dolomite samples in Bug field and the upper Ismay limestones and dolomites from Cherokee field. Carbon isotopic compositions for samples from Patterson Canyon field can be divided into two populations: isotopically heavier mound cement and isotopically lighter oolite and banded cement. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the annual national convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, a core workshop, and publications. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

2003-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

366

INVESTIGATION AND DEMONSTRATION OF DRY CARBON-BASED SORBENT INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report describes the activities that have taken place during the first full quarter of the Phase II project ''Investigation and Demonstration of Dry Carbon-Based Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control''. Modifications were completed and sampling began at the 600 acfm pilot-scale particulate control module (PCM) located at the Comanche Station in Pueblo, CO. The PCM was configured as an electrostatic precipitator for these tests. A Perkin-Elmer flue gas mercury analyzer was installed on-site and operated. Initial test results using both manual sampling methodology and the mercury analyzer are presented herein. Preparations were made during this period for full-scale mercury testing of several PSCo units. A site visit was made to Arapahoe and Cherokee Generating Stations to determine sample locations and to develop a test plan.

Terry Hunt; Mark Fox; Lillian Stan; Sheila Haythornthwaite; Justin Smith; Jason Ruhl

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Flue gas desulfurization sludge: establishment of vegetation on ponded and soil-applied waste. Final report January 1977-September 1981  

SciTech Connect

The report gives results of research to identify and evaluate forms of vegetation and methods of their establishment for reclaiming retired flue gas desulfurization sludge ponds. Also studied were the soil liming value of limestone scrubber sludge (LSS) and plant uptake and percolation losses of some chemical nutrients in the sludge. Several vegetation schemes were evaluated between 1977 and 1982 for covering and stabilizing LSS at Colbert Steam Plant, Cherokee, AL, and Shawnee Steam Plant, Paducah, KY. Eleven tree and 10 grass or legume species were tested for adaptability and survival when planted directly in LSS or in LSS amended with soil, municipal sewage sludge, or standard potting mix. Other studies indicated that LSS apparently has sufficient unreacted limestone to be a satisfactory soil liming agent.

Giordano, P.M.; Mays, D.A.; Soileau, J.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Autonomous land navigation: A demonstration of retrotraverse  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a hardware and software system developed to perform autonomous navigation of a land vehicle in a structured environment. The vehicle used for development and testing of the system was the Jeep Cherokee Mobile Robotics Testbed Vehicle developed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque. Since obstacle detection/avoidance has not yet been incorporated into the system, a structured environment is postulated that presumes the paths to be traversed are obstacle-free. The system performs path planning and execution (following) based on maps constructed using the vehicle's navigation system and onboard map-maker. The system configuration allows a map to be generated and stored during teleoperation of the vehicle, which may then be inverted and autonomously followed to perform ''retrotraverse'' back to the path start point. The system software, hardware, and performance data are discussed. 9 refs.

Klarer, P.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

National radon database documentation. Volume 5. The EPA/state residential radon surveys: Years 5 and 6. Final report 1986-1992  

SciTech Connect

The National Radon Database has been developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to distribute information collected in two recently completed radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys, Years 1 to 6; and The National Residential Radon Survey. The goals of the state radon surveys were twofold. Some measure of the distribution of radon levels among residences was desired for major geographic areas within each state and for each state as a whole. In addition, it was desired that each state survey would be able to identify areas of potentially high residential radon concentrations (hot spots) in the state, enabling the state to focus its attention on areas where indoor radon concentrations might pose a greater health threat. The document discusses year 5, 1990-91. The areas surveyed are: Arkansas; Illinois; Maryland; Eastern Cherokee Nation; Mississippi; Texas; and Washington.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Reliability analysis of steel-containment strength  

SciTech Connect

A best estimate and uncertainty assessment of the resistance of the St. Lucie, Cherokee, Perry, WPPSS and Browns Ferry containment vessels was performed. The Monte Carlo simulation technique and second moment approach were compared as a means of calculating the probability distribution of the containment resistance. A uniform static internal pressure was used and strain ductility was taken as the failure criterion. Approximate methods were developed and calibrated with finite element analysis. Both approximate and finite element analyses were performed on the axisymmetric containment structure. An uncertainty assessment of the containment strength was then performed by the second moment reliability method. Based upon the approximate methods, the cumulative distribution for the resistance of each of the five containments (shell modes only) is presented.

Greimann, L.G.; Fanous, F.; Wold-Tinsae, A.; Ketalaar, D.; Lin, T.; Bluhm, D.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy; November 16-17, 1996; Bartlesville, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Thirty-three Native American tribal members, council members, and other interested parties gathered in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, to attend the Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy on October 16 and 17 1996, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Tribes represented at the workshop included the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Hopi, Jicarilla Apache, Osage, Seminole, and Ute. Representatives of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and the Minerals Management Service (MMS) also attended. BDM-Oklahoma developed and organized the Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy to help meet the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Domestic Gas and Oil Initiative to help Native American Tribes become more self-sufficient in developing and managing petroleum resources.

NONE

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

372

Oil and gas developments in Oklahoma and Panhandle of Texas in 1987  

SciTech Connect

Exploration in 1987 focused on development and extension of existing fields, with development wells out-numbering exploratory wells 13 to 1. Operators completed 4.3% more exploratory wells and 25.7% fewer development wells than in 1986. The success rate for exploratory wells increased 7.7%; the success rate for development wells remained constant. The Cherokee shelf was the most active trend, with 53 exploratory wells completed in 1987. The dominant plays were the Atoka, Morrow, Springer, and Marchand in the Anadarko basin; the Misener in Grant County, Oklahoma, on the Sedgwick shelf; the Viola in the Golden Trend along the Pauls Valley uplift; and the Wapanucka, Cromwell, and Atoka in the Arkoma basin. Nineteen eight-seven was a year of major sales and acquisition of Oklahoma and Panhandle of Texas reserves and leases with more than 20 companies buying or selling out. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Fryklund, R.E.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Oil and gas developments in Oklahoma and panhandle of Texas in 1985  

SciTech Connect

Declining oil prices, curtailed gas sales, and uncertain tax law changes contributed to a 9.1% decrease in drilling, a 25.3% drop in gas production, and a 5% drop in oil production in Oklahoma and the panhandle of Texas (Texas Railroad Commission District 10) in 1985. Exploration focused on development and extension of existing fields, with development wells outnumbering exploratory wells 20 to 1. Operators completed 14.3% fewer exploratory wells and 9.1% fewer development wells. The success rate for exploratory wells declined to 28.9%, and the success rate for development wells dropped to 72.3%. The Cherokee shelf was the most active trend, with 90 exploratory wells completed in 1985. 3 figures, 4 tables.

Fryklund, R.E.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas - near-term. Quarterly report, April 1 - June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites, Stewart Field, and Savonburg Field, operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. General topics to be addressed are: (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation; (2) waterflood optimization; and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. For the Stewart Field project, work is summarized for the last quarter on waterflood operations and reservoir management. For the Savonburg Field project, work on water plant development, and pattern changes and wellbore cleanup are briefly described.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Chemical comminution of coal  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the present research is to study the chemical reactivity of a mixture of methyl alcohol and aqueous sodium hydroxide solution in the temperature range 298 to 363 K, and a caustic concentration of 0 to 10 wt. %, on an Iowa bituminous coal. The sample studied was collected from coal zone 4, equivalent to most historical references to Laddsdale coal. The coals in this zone are typical high-sulfur, high-ash middle Pennsylvania Cherokee group coals. The apparent rank is high-volatile C bituminous coal. The relatively high content of sulfur and 23 other elements in these coals is related to near neutral (6-8) pH conditions in the depositional and early diagenetic environments, and to postdepositional sphalerite/calcite/pyrite/kaolinite/barite mineralization.

Mamaghani, A.H.; Beddow, J.K.; Vetter, A.F.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Research and development of fish passage technology  

SciTech Connect

Any fish passage provided at TVA's John Sevier Fossil Plant (JSF) would involve only warmwater species. Although some anadromous (marine) warmwater species (e.g., American shad, blueback herring) are currently passed upstream and downstream through structures deliberately built for that purpose, effectiveness of this technology for passage of adults and young of potential target species (e.g., paddlefish and sauger/walleye) in Cherokee Reservoir is unproven. Downstream passage is by far the larger and more poorly understood subject of fish migration and should be investigated first. Currently, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is conducting research on downstream fish passage (Project RP 2694). It will ultimately be necessary to adapt this information to the target species and site specificity at JSF.

Hackney, P.A.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1991: Physical and chemical characteristics of water and sediment  

SciTech Connect

In the second year of TVA`s Reservoir Vital signs Monitoring program, physical/chemical measurements of water and sediment were made on fourteen TVA reservoirs (the nine mainstem Tennessee river reservoirs - Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and five tributary reservoirs - Cherokee, Douglas, Norris, Melton Hill and Tellico). In addition in 1991, limited water quality monitoring was initiated on ten tributary storage impoundments. The objective of the Vital Signs monitoring program is to assess the health or integrity of these aquatic ecosystems. Physical/chemical data collected in 1991 showed the water quality of the majority of TVA`s reservoirs to be very good, but pointed out areas for improvement and further investigation.

Meinert, D.L.; Fehring, J.P.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Coalbed methane potential assessed in Forest City basin  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that the Forest City basin is a shallow cratonic depression located in northeastern Kansas, southeastern Nebraska, southern Iowa and northern Missouri. Historically, the Forest City basin in northeastern Kansas has been a shallow oil and gas province with minor coal production. The Iowa and Missouri portion has had minor oil production and moderate coal mining. In recent years there has been little coal mining in the Forest City in Iowa and Kansas and only minor production in Missouri. Before 1940, gas was produced from coal beds and shales in the Kansas portion of the Forest City basin. The Cherokee group (Altokan and Desmoinesian age) includes section containing the largest number of actively mined coals and has the greatest available data for coalbed methane evaluation.

Tedesco, S.A. (CST Oil and Gas Corp., Denver, CO (US))

1992-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

379

A List of Kansas Minerals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that mineral occurs. I t i s a i found associated with A n g l e s i t e t I t i s reported from Cherokee county. C e l e s t i t e (720). Orthorhombic, composition strontium sulphate Sr S0*j. This mineral has been found q u i t e s p a r i n g l y i n...Master Th e s i s Geology Grov e r , C h a r l e s H. 1895 L i s t of Kansas m i n e r a l s * A l i s t of Kansas Minerals with "brief notes on the^cr^stjalogr&phio (form, chemical composition, and the p r i n c i p a l l o c a l i t i e s f...

Grover, Charles H.

1895-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 20450 of 26,764 results. 41 - 20450 of 26,764 results. Download CX-003871: Categorical Exclusion Determination Greenhouse Gas to Energy Project - Wilkes County CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/07/2010 Location(s): Wilkes County, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003871-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003655: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma - Tribe - Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.15, B2.5, B4.12, B5.1 Date: 09/03/2010 Location(s): Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003655-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002195: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install a Test Cover at Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site

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381

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deployment of an Infrared Thermometer Network at the Deployment of an Infrared Thermometer Network at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains Climate Research Facility V.R. Morris and C.N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington D. Nelson Cherokee Nation Distributors Stilwell, Oklahoma Introduction To infer information about vertical distribution and character of cloudiness across the Southern Great Plains (SGP) domain, downwelling infrared thermometers are being deployed at the SGP extended facilities. The sky brightness temperature measurements are sampled at a rate of 5 Hz to capture the inherent variability under cloudy and partly cloudy conditions. Conditional sampling of these data detect periods of clear-sky and opaque clouds. A methodology was produced to account for the

382

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A11 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21, 2010 21, 2010 CX-003190: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cherokee Nation Businesses CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1 Date: 07/21/2010 Location(s): Kay County, Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 20, 2010 CX-003605: Categorical Exclusion Determination Competitive Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Awards CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 07/20/2010 Location(s): Fayette County, Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office July 20, 2010 CX-003603: Categorical Exclusion Determination Competitive Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Awards - Oregon Coast Regional Transit Program CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 07/20/2010 Location(s): Columbia County, Oregon Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

383

CX-000127: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Categorical Exclusion Determination 7: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000127: Categorical Exclusion Determination United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians Energy Efficiency and Conservation Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1, A9 Date: 12/14/2009 Location(s): Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. The tribe would purchase an estimated 4,102 4-count packages of compact fluorescent light bulbs to distribute to tribal members during an annual Celebration held the first weekend in October. The tribe would also distribute energy efficiency flyers at various events over the course of the Celebration. An estimated 2,051 households, would be reached through this effort. Each household would receive 2 packages of compact fluorescent bulbs.

384

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2010 3, 2010 CX-002085: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma-Tribal Energy Program-Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1 Date: 04/13/2010 Location(s): Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy April 13, 2010 CX-002082: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma-Tribal Energy Program-Chickasaw Nation CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 04/13/2010 Location(s): Chickasaw, Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy April 13, 2010 CX-002080: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma-Tribe-Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 04/13/2010 Location(s): Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy April 13, 2010 CX-002078: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Carolina-Tribal Energy Program-Eastern Band of the Cherokee

385

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rio Grande Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Uinta Basin Appa lachia n Basin Utica Marcellus Devonian (Ohio) Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Woodford- Caney Pearsall- Eagle Ford Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Maverick Sub-Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley and Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest City Basin Piceance Basin Shale Gas Plays, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles ± Source: Energy Information Administration based on data from various published studies

386

Detection of a transit of the super-Earth 55 Cnc e with Warm Spitzer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the detection of a transit of the super-Earth 55 Cnc e with Warm Spitzer in IRAC's 4.5-micron band. Our MCMC analysis includes an extensive modeling of the systematic effects affecting Warm Spitzer photometry, and yields a transit depth of 450 +- 50 ppm, which translates to a planetary radius of 2.13 +- 0.14 Earth Radii as measured in IRAC 4.5-micron channel. A planetary mass of 7.98 +- 0.69 Earth Masses is derived from an extensive set of radial-velocity data, yielding a planetary density of 0.83 +- 0.18 Earth density. Interestingly, the derived radius is 1.3 times larger than the one recently reported in the visible by Winn et al. Thanks to the brightness of its host star (V=6, K=4), 55 Cnc e is a unique target for the thorough characterization of a super-Earth orbiting around a solar-type star.

Demory, B -O; Deming, D; Valencia, D; Seager, S; Benneke, B; Lovis, C; Cubillos, P; Harrington, J; Stevenson, K B; Mayor, M; Pepe, F; Queloz, D; Segransan, D; Udry, S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Tectonic history and analysis of structures in eastern Kansas and western Missouri  

SciTech Connect

Orogenic events in and around the midcontinent in Proterozoic time were responsible for the formation of the dominant master set of younger northeast- and older northwest-trending faults that dominate the structure of the area today. Reactivation of these faults throughout geologic time gave rise to tectonic zones consisting of sets of anastomosing faults or other complex patterns. These zones are likely important in helping to determine the configuration of major uplifts and basins that involve the crust. The Nemaha tectonic zone defines the western boundary of both the Forest City and Cherokee basins, while a structural block delineated by the Chesapeake and Bolivar-Mansfield regional faults coincides with the approximate position of the Bourbon Arch, which is reflected in the thickness of Mississippian carbonate rocks. Rocks of the Ozark uplift began to be uplifted by the end of Maquoketa time. The uplift has historically been described as a landform, rather than a geologic structure. Hence, the extent and the boundaries of the uplift are ill-defined. The northeast-trending line forming the contact between Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks is commonly regarded as the western boundary. This boundary coincides with a major tectonic zone, extending northeastward from Oklahoma through Kansas and Missouri into at least southern Iowa. In the Tri-State area of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri the zone is referred to as the Miami trough and features prominently in the localization of major ore deposits. This zone may then also be regarded as the eastern boundary of the Forest City and Cherokee basins.

Berendsen, P.; Wilson, F.W. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Kansas Geological Survey)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Geology of the Trans-Missouri River Tunnel project, Kansas City, Missouri  

SciTech Connect

The geology of the Missouri River Valley at Kansas City is interpreted from the borehole and construction site data along the route of the Trans-Missouri River Tunnel, a 4.4 km long water tunnel constructed at a depth of 90--97.5 m below the floodplain of the Missouri River. The data from the site investigation is used to construct a detailed stratigraphic cross-section of the subsurface units to a depth of 120 m and extending in a north-south direction the length of the tunnel. The rock section is divided into 2 broad categories, (a) alluvium and (b) bedrock. The alluvium (Pleistocene-Holocene) fills the Missouri River Valley to a depth of 38 m along the tunnel route. An exception is a deep narrow channel near the center of the valley, the alluvium is 55 m thick and the lower several meters of the channel is filled with glacial till( ). The alluvium rests unconformably on Pennsylvanian bedrock consisting of thin strata arranged in cyclical sequences or cyclothems and belonging to the following groups in ascending order: Upper Cherokee, Marmaton and Lower Pleasanton. The test drill core data made it possible to conduct a detailed analysis of the subsurface stratigraphy. Of major importance is the stratigraphic position of a thick channel-fill deposit in the Labette Formation, Marmaton Group, a producing horizon in several small oil and gas fields in western Missouri and eastern Kansas. The 327.6 cm dia. bore for the essentially horizontal tunnel is constructed in predominately silty and sandy gray shale located stratigraphically near the Cherokee-Marmaton contact and in younger channel-fill deposits.

Gentile, R.J. (Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City, MO (United States). Dept. of Geosciences)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low-NOx Burners on a Wall-Fired Boiler - Project Brief [PDF-252KB] Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low-NOx Burners on a Wall-Fired Boiler - Project Brief [PDF-252KB] Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Denver, CO PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low NOx Burners on a Wall-Fired Boiler: Performance and Economics Report, Gas Reburning-Low NOx Burner System, Cherokee Station Unit No. 3, Final Report [PDF-17.2MB] (July 1998) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low-NOx Burners on a Wall-Fired Boiler: A DOE Assessment [PDF-309KB] (Feb 2001) Reburning Technologies for the Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers, Topical Report No.14 [PDF-1.2MB] ((May 1999) Reduction of NOx and SO2 Using Gas Reburning, Sorbent Injection, and Integrated Technologies, Topical Report No. 3 [PDF-1MB] ((Sept 1993)

390

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 7840 of 29,416 results. 31 - 7840 of 29,416 results. Download CX-003655: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma - Tribe - Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.15, B2.5, B4.12, B5.1 Date: 09/03/2010 Location(s): Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003655-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006709: Categorical Exclusion Determination Dig ditch from 24-51-STX-1 0 to 24-AX-10 and reinstall electrical wire CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B5.2 Date: 01/13/2011 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006709-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT http://energy.gov/management/downloads/conceptual-design-report Download 10/2008 http://energy.gov/downloads/102008

391

PNE WIND USA II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PNE WIND USA II PNE WIND USA II 1 PNE Wind USA Tribal Energy Partnerships Cherokee & Chilocco Wind Parks Buchholz wind farm, Germany André De Rosa Managing Director Andre.DeRosa@PNEWind.com p. (312) 919-8042 Hot Springs NP M is s i s s i ppi M iss is s i pp i Mis si ss ip p i M ississippi M iss iss ippi M i ss i ss i pp i M is s issippi Missis sip pi M i s s is s ip p i Bonny State Park Bonny State Park Buffalo River State Park Buffalo River State Park Caprock Caprock Canyons Canyons State Park State Park Robbers Cave State Park Robbers Cave State Park Clinton State Park Clinton State Park Hillsdale State Park Hillsdale State Park Indian Cave State Park Indian Cave State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake of Lake of the Ozarks the Ozarks St Park St Park Little River State Park Little River State Park Palo Duro

392

Storm Lake I Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Storm Lake I Wind Farm Storm Lake I Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Storm Lake I Wind Farm Facility Storm Lake I Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Edison Mission Group Developer GE Energy Energy Purchaser MidAmerican Energy Location Buena Vista and Cherokee Counties IA Coordinates 42.57215°, -95.340693° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.57215,"lon":-95.340693,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

393

Evaluation of gas-reburning and low NO{sub x} burners on a wall fired boiler. Technical progress report No. 5, October 1--December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Low NO{sub x} burners operate on the principle of delayed mixing between the coal fuel and burner air, so that less NO{sub x} is formed. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel corresponding to the total heat release in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO{sub x} to molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO{sub x} emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at the lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO{sub x}. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO{sub x} emission reductions of 75 percent or more as a result of combing Low NO{sub x} Burners and Gas Reburning on a utility boiler having the design characteristics mentioned above. A Host Site Agreement has been signed by EER and a utility company in the State of Colorado: Public Service Company of Colorado (Cherokee Unit No. 3, 172 MW{sub e}) front wall fired boiler near Denver.

Not Available

1992-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Correlation method for chemical communication of coal  

SciTech Connect

In spite of many experimental studies of the chemical comminution of coal, there have been only a few reported attempts to correlate experimental data and mathematically model the process. This paper presents a strain energy model based on the thermodynamic analysis. The capillary-imbibition number is proposed as an important parameter for characterization of chemicals used in comminution. The authors discuss the development of a phenomenological model for chemical comminution to study the relative effects of the governing process. Sensitivity studies carried out with this model indicated that the mechanism of chemical transfer into bedding planes and comminution of coal is dominantly a capillary-imbibition-induced flow phenomenon and to a lesser extent a diffusion-controlled process. The authors also tested this hypothesis using experimental data. As reported, the maximum comminution rates for the middle Pennsylvania Cherokee C-bituminous coal with NaOH solutions were within the range of 6-8% caustic concentration. Hence, it is concluded that this contradicts the author's earlier work (1988), which reported that capillary-imbibition number (reciprocal of the surface-tension number) decreases with increasing caustic concentration. This conclusion is misleading because the authors simply present a set of data on capillary-imbibition number vs NaOH concentration, and it alone cannot determine the caustic concentration for the maximum comminution rate.

Civan, F.; Knapp, R.M. (School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering, Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (US))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Physiological responses of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) to organic and inorganic amended heavy-metal contaminated chat tailings  

SciTech Connect

Study plots established at the Galena subsite of the Cherokee County Superfund Site in Southeastern Kansas by the US Bureau of Mines in 1990 were examined during the summer of 1996 to determine whether physiological criteria could be used to determine suitability of switchgrass for remediation of heavy-metal contaminated substrates. Switchgrass was chosen because it was the most frequently encountered species on these plots. Treatment plots included a treatment control, an organic residue treatment of 89.6 Mg Ha{sup {minus}1} composted cattle manure, and two inorganic fertilizer treatments recommended for either native grass or grass/legume mixtures. Plant response variables were photosynthetic rate, leaf conductance to water vapor, internal concentration of carbon dioxide in leaves, foliar transpiration rate, leaf water-use-efficiency, predawn leaf xylem water potential, and midday leaf xylem water potential. Predawn and midday xylem water potentials were higher for grass/legume inorganic treatment than for the other inorganic treatments. Leaf conductances were lower for organically treated plots than those plots not organically amended and both photosynthesis and transpiration were lower for organically treated plots. Leaf conductances and transpiration were higher for grass/legume treated plots than for plots lacking inorganic treatment. Water-use-efficiency was higher for native grass inorganically treated plots than for other inorganic treatments.

Youngman, A.L. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Red Fork sandstone of Oklahoma: depositional history and reservoir distribution  

SciTech Connect

The Middle Pennsylvanian Red Fork sandstone formed as a result of progradation across eastern Kansas and most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork is one of several transgressive-regressive sequences (cyclothems) developed within the Desmoinesian Cherokee Group. Sea level changes, together with varying subsidence, were dominant factors controlling the general stratigraphic (correlative) characteristics of the Red Fork interval. Progradation was episodic, with sand deposition in the more active part of the basin during lower sea level stands and valley-fill deposition in the more stable areas during sea level rises. A map of Red Fork sand trends reveals an alluvial-deltaic complex covering most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork consists primarily of alluvial-valley and plain (fluvial) bodies in the northernmost part of northeastern Oklahoma, alluvial-deltaic bodies in most of the remaining parts of the shelf area, and off-shelf submarine-fan and slope basinal-floor complexes within the deeper part of the Anadarko basin. Determination of reservoir trend and genesis requires integration of rock and log data. Logs need to be calibrated to cores in order to estimate depositional environments accurately and to make a reasonable assessment of diagenetic overprints. Much of the oil and gas has been trapped in stratigraphic traps, and a significant amount of oil is in channel sandstones with trends at high angles to the structural grain. In some areas, secondary clay, in particular chloritic clay, has resulted in microporosity, high water saturation, and correspondingly low resistivities in oil reserves.

Shelton, J.W.; Fritz, R.D.; Johnson, C.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Application of SAFER-PC program to determine turbine rotor boresonic inspection intervals  

SciTech Connect

Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCC) used EPRI`s SAFER-PC Program to evaluate their HP/IP, LP, and generator rotors from Cherokee Station Unit 3, to determine appropriate boresonic re-inspection intervals. The program uses fracture mechanics to calculate critical crack sizes, which could lead to catastrophic failure of the rotors. Conservative stress and fracture mechanics analyses showed negligible fatigue crack growth of assumed bore surface cracks would occur over the proposed inspection interval of eighteen years. The evaluation assumed consistent operational start-up procedures for the inspection interval. If the unit experiences more severe operational procedures, the analysis may not be applicable, with smaller critical crack sizes and accelerated crack growth rates expected. The SAFER-PC analysis resulted in an extension of the previously recommended reinspection interval by eight years. By eliminating just this one inspection, PSCC achieved savings in the range of $100,000. Further savings are anticipated by utilizing the SAFER-PC Program to evaluate these and other PSCC rotors in the future.

Sachse, D.G.; Hellner, R.L.; Dupont, E.J. [Public Service Co., Denver, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-term. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. Progress is described for the Stewart field on the following tasks: design/construct waterflood plant; design/construct injection system; design/construct battery consolidation and gathering system; waterflood operations and reservoir management; and technology transfer. Progress for the Savonburg Field includes: water plant development; profile modification treatments; pattern changes and wellbore cleanup; reservoir development (polymer flooding); field operations; and technology transfer.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; McCune, D.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1998-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Geology of new Springdale gas field in northeastern Kansas  

SciTech Connect

The Springdale gas field in Leavenworth County, Kansas, is east of the old McLouth and north of the old Ackerland/Jarbolo fields, both now used for gas storage. Gas production from McLouth sand bodies and the Burgess sand in the Cherokee Group (Pennsylvanian) ranges from 1350 to 1400 ft and extends to the nearby Great Kansas City area. Gas pressures range from 350 to 500 psi and open-flow tests produced up to 675 MCFGD. Structurally, the better wells are high on the flanks of a paleovalley opening toward the north. This structure is reflected on the erosional surface of the Mississippian rocks below and is preserved in the now-deformed base of the Kansas City Group of rocks. The Springdale field is only one of several new Pennsylvanian gas fields in Leavenworth, Wyandotte, and Johnson Counties, Kansas, that are currently commercial. These fields serve as a good example of opening a new frontier in an old area.

Goebel, E.D.; Dow, V.E.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Geological characterization of a sandstone reservoir in Eastern Kansas: Savonburg NE field, Allen County, Kansas  

SciTech Connect

Production on the Nelson leases of the Savonburg NE oil field in eastern Kansas is from sandstone that is part of the fill of a paleovalley that was eroded after deposition of the Tebo coal but before deposition of the Scammon coal. Sandstone in this interval is called the Chelsea Sandstone; the interval is referred to as the Skinner interval. (That interval is part of the Cabaniss Formation, Cherokee Group, and assigned to the Desmoinesian stage of the Middle Pennsylvanian). In addition to determining the stratigraphic relationships of the reservoir, geological characterization helped to understand the distribution of the most productive areas of the field and led to specific recommendations for abandonment of wells, workovers, well treatments, well conversions from producers to injectors, and drilling of new wells, all with the aim of increasing productivity and decreasing costs for the operator. The reservoir characterization used information routinely gathered in the course of oil field operations in eastern Kansas. Gamma-neutron logs indicated lithology as well as stratigraphy, while core descriptions provided insight into stratigraphic distinctions and depositional processes. Core analysis of porosity, permeability, and fluid saturations permitted depiction of the distribution of such attributes throughout the productive region. Key geological concepts of regional marker intervals and incised valley fills provided the theoretical framework for analyzing the reservoir.

Walton, A.W.; Beaty, D.S.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "natchitoches winn cherokee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Reservoir monitoring: 1990 summary of vital signs and use impairment monitoring on Tennessee Valley Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) initiated a Reservoir Monitoring Program on 12 TVA reservoirs (the nine main stream Tennessee river reservoirs -- Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary storage reservoirs -- Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris) in autumn 1989. The objective of the Reservoir Monitoring Program is to provide basic information on the ``health`` or integrity of the aquatic ecosystem in each TVA reservoir (``Vital Signs``) and to provide screening level information for describing how well each reservoir meets the swimmable and fishable goals of the Clean Water Act (Use Impairments). This is the first time in the history of the agency that a commitment to a long-term, systematic sampling of major TVA reservoirs has been made. The basis of the Vital Signs Monitoring is examination of appropriate physical, chemical, and biological indicators in three areas of each reservoir. These three areas are the forebay immediately upstream of the dam; the transition zone (the mid-reservoir region where the water changes from free flowing to more quiescent, impounded water); and the inflow or headwater region of the reservoir. The Use Impairments monitoring provides screening level information on the suitability of selected areas within TVA reservoirs for water contact activities (swimmable) and suitability of fish from TVA reservoirs for human consumption (fishable).

Dycus, D.L.; Meinert, D.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- Near term. Quarterly report, June 30--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas and in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. General topics to be addressed will be (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation; (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. The reservoir management portion of the project will involve performance evaluation and will include such work as (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (5) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. The waterflood optimization portion of the project involves only the Nelson Lease. It will be based on the performance evaluation and will involve (1) design and implementation of a water cleanup system for the waterflood, (2) application of well remedial work such as polymer gel treatments to improve vertical sweep efficiency, and (3) changes in waterflood patterns to increase sweep efficiency. Finally, it is planned to implement an improved recovery process on both field demonstration sites.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1995-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Depositional framework and reservoir distribution of Red Fork sandstone in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Middle Pennsylvanian Red Fork sandstone formed as a result of southward progradation across most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork is one of several cyclothemic (transgressive-regressive) sequences developed within the Desmoinesian Cherokee Group. Sea level changes and stability of the depositional area were dominant factors in determining the general stratigraphic characteristics of the Red Fork interval. Progradation was episodic, with sand deposition in the distal, more subsident part of the basin during lower sea level stands, and valley-fill deposition in the more stable areas during sea level rises. Red Fork sandstone trends depict an alluvial-deltaic complex covering most of Oklahoma. The Red Fork consists primarily of alluvial-valley and plain (fluvial) bodies in the northern part of northeastern Oklahoma, alluvial-deltaic bodies in most of the remaining parts of the shelf area, and off-shelf submarine-fan and slope/basin-floor complexes within the deeper part of the Anadarko basin. Determination of reservoir trend and genesis requires integration of rock data and log data, with logs calibrated to cores for estimating depositional environments and assessing diagenetic overprints. Much of the oil and gas has been trapped in stratigraphic traps, some of which represent channelized sandstones with trends at high angles to the structural grain. Secondary chlorite, in particular, is associated locally with development of productive reservoirs showing microporosity, high water saturation, and correspondingly low resistivities.

Shelton, J.W.; Fritz, R.D.; Johnson, C. (Masera Corp., Tulsa, OK (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Operation Redwing. Project 2. 52. Neutron-induced soil radioactivity  

SciTech Connect

Soil samples were exposed to neutron radiation from Shot Cherokee to help establish the importance of neutron-induced residual gamma radiation. After exposure and recovery, the samples had no detectable activity because the slant range to the nearest sample was nearly 3.5 miles, due to an error in bomb drop. After this failure, an experiment was designed in the field for Shot Yuma in order that induced-activity data could be obtained for a soil other than Nevada Test Site soil. Samples of sodium, manganese, and coral sand from Site Sally were exposed above and below the surface at a slant range of 120 yards. The difference between the effects of pure fission and fission-fusion neutron spectra on induced activity in soil was not measured, since the soil samples on Shot Cehrokee were not activated. However, a method for predicting neutron-induced gamma-radiation intensities was tested for coral soil on Shot Yuma. Predicted values were within + or - 50% of induced dose rates inferred from field measurements.

Cowan, M.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Evaluation of gas-reburning and low NO sub x burners on a wall fired boiler  

SciTech Connect

Low NO{sub x} burners operate on the principle of delayed mixing between the coal fuel and burner air, so that less NO{sub x} is formed. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel corresponding to the total heat release in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO{sub x} to molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO{sub x} emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at the lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO{sub x}. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO{sub x} emission reductions of 75 percent or more as a result of combing Low NO{sub x} Burners and Gas Reburning on a utility boiler having the design characteristics mentioned above. A Host Site Agreement has been signed by EER and a utility company in the State of Colorado: Public Service Company of Colorado (Cherokee Unit No. 3, 172 MW{sub e}) front wall fired boiler near Denver.

Not Available

1992-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Relationship between rubisco sulfhydryl content and relative sensitivity of potato cultivars to ozone  

SciTech Connect

Ozone (O{sub 3}) induced a reduction in quantity of rubisco in potato foliage. In vitro, O{sub 3} predisposed purified rubisco to elevated proteolysis; reagents which protected sulfhydryl (SH) groups suppressed this effect. We hypothesized that rubisco SH content correlated directly with foliar O{sub 3} sensitivity. Rubisco was purified from Solanum tuberosum L. O{sub 3}-tolerant cv. Superior (SP) and Norgold Russet (NR), and O{sub 3}-susceptible cv. Norland (NL) and Cherokee (CK). When native rubisco was titrated with DTNB, protein of NL contained 1.33 and 1.26 times more SH groups than SP and NR, respectively. Rubisco from CK also contained more SH groups than SP and NR, but the difference was not significant. Rubisco of SP, NR and CK denatured by SDS exhibited identical number of SH groups, however, NL exhibited 1.15 times more SH groups. The greater number of SH groups in rubisco from NL versus SP and NR may explain its relative sensitivity to ozone. The role of SH groups in ozone-sensitivity of CK will require further study.

Enyedi, A.J.; Pell, E.J. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (USA))

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Study of hydrogen mixing within the combustion engineering system 80+ containment  

SciTech Connect

A scoping study is performed to determine how hydrogen distributes throughout an evolutionary, advanced pressurized water reactor (PWR) spherical containment given a variety of hydrogen inflows and delivery locations. The study uses MAAP and a preliminary containment design for the Combustion Engineering (C-E) System 80+{trademark} standard design as the bases for the detailed thermal-hydraulic analyses. Results are compared to applicable design criteria from the Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) Requirements Document. The C-E System 80+ containment design is based on the Cherokee-Perkins System 80{sup R} spherical containment design, revised to accommodate ALWR Requirements Document design criteria. A feature of this design is the 500,000-gal in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST) located in the lower region of the containment building. This tank is the source for the safety injection and containment spray pumps, and the discharge location for the primary system safety and bleed valves. The containment design directs water accumulation on lower floors to the IRWST to preclude its depletion.

Hawley, J.T.; Hammersley, R.J.; Plys, M.G. (Fauske Associates, Inc., Burr Ridge, IL (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Evaluation of gas-reburning and low NO{sub x} burners on a wall fired boiler. Progress report, January 1--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this Clean Coal Technology project is to evaluate the use of Gas Reburning and Low NO{sub x} Burners (GR-LNB) for NO{sub x} emission control from a wall fired boiler. This project is being conducted in three phases at the host site, a 172 MW{sub e} wall fired boiler of Public Service Company of Colorado, Cherokee Unit 3 in Denver, Colorado: Phase I, design and permitting has been completed on June 30, 1992; Phase II, construction and start-up has been completed on September 1991; and Phase III, operation, data collection, reporting and disposition. Phase III activities during this reporting period involved the following: compilation, analysis and assembly of the final report and initiation of restoration activities; restoration of the gas reburning system involving removal of the flue gas recirculation system (permanent Second Generation Gas Reburning); and participants meeting and reburning workshop. Long term testing of the equipment demonstrated an average NO{sub x} reduction of 65% using 18% gas heat input. After removing the flue gas recirculation system, (Second Generation GR), an average NO{sub x} of 64% was achieved using 13% gas heat input. The project goal of 70% reduction was achieved, but no on an average basis due to the load requirements of the utility.

NONE

1996-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Comprehensive report to Congress: Clean Coal Technology program: Evaluation of gas reburning and low-NO sub x burners on a wall-fired boiler  

SciTech Connect

This report briefly describes the Gas Reburning and Low-NO{sub x} Burners technology which is a low-cost technology that can be applied in both retrofit and new applications. This demonstration will be conducted on a utility boiler in Colorado at Cherokee Station {number sign}3; however, the technology is applicable to industrial boilers and other combustion systems. Although this technology is primarily a NO{sub x} reduction technology, some reductions in other emissions will take place. Since 15--20% of the coal is replaced with natural gas, SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions are reduced commensurately. Also the lower carbon-to-hydrogen ratio of natural gas compared to coal reduces CO{sub 2} emissions. The formation of NO{sub x} is controlled by several factors: (1) the amount of nitrogen that is chemically bound in the fuel; (2) the flame temperature; (3) the residence time that combustion products remain at very high temperatures; and (4) the amount of excess oxygen available, especially at the hottest parts of the flame. Decreasing any of these parameters, tends to reduce NO{sub x} formation. 6 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Organic geochemistry and organic petrography  

SciTech Connect

The Vermillion Creek coals and shales contain dominantly humic organic matter originating from woody plant tissues except for one shale unit above the coals, which contains hydrogen-rich kerogen that is mostly remains of filamentous algae, of likely lacustrine origin. The coals have two unusual features - very low inertinite content and high sulfur content compared to mined western coals. However, neither of these features points to the limnic setting reported for the Vermillion Creek sequence. The vitrinite reflectance of Vermillion Creek shales is markedly lower than that of the coals and is inversely proportional to the H/C ratio of the shales. Rock-Eval pyrolysis results, analyses of H, C, and N, petrographic observations, isotope composition of organic carbon, and amounts and compositions of the CHCl/sub 3/-extractable organic matter all suggest mixtures of two types of organic matter in the Vermillion Creek coals and clay shales: (1) isotopically heavy, hydrogen-deficient, terrestrial organic matter, as was found in the coals, and (2) isotopically light, hydrogen-rich organic matter similar to that found in one of the clay-shale samples. The different compositions of the Vermillion Creek coal, the unnamed Williams Fork Formation coals, and coals from the Middle Pennsylvanian Marmaton and Cherokee Groups are apparently caused by differences in original plant composition, alteration of organic matter related to different pH conditions of the peat swamps, and slightly different organic maturation levels.

Bostick, N.H.; Hatch, J.R.; Daws, T.A.; Love, A.H.; Lubeck, S.C.M.; Threlkeld, C.N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

94-A13 Native American Initiative Short Course Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

A training program conducted in Bartlesville by BDM-Oklahoma technical staff, which included geologists, geophysicists, exploration and drilling specialists, and environmental policy experts. The proposed training schedule offered four courses per year and included those coursed identified by the tribes in the survey. The training program was outlined for members of Native American Tribes whose lands have oil and gas resources. The proposed program contributed to meeting the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Domestic Oil and Gas Initiative to help Native American tribes become more self-sufficient in developing and managing their resources through training in cost-effective, improved technologies for hydrocarbon production that will meet environmental regulations. The training program outlined was for adult tribal representatives who are responsible for managing tribal mineral holdings or setting policy, or who work in the oil and gas industry. The course content is in response to a survey that was developed by BDM-Oklahoma and sent in the Spring of 1995 to 26 tribal agencies identified through previous contact with DOE. Tribes were asked to indicate course content needs, levels, preferred time of year, and location. Six tribes responded with specific recommendations and needs. These tribes, were the Creek, Pueblo, Cherokee, St. Regis Mohawk, Northern Arapho, and Ute Mountain Ute.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.; Kokesh, Judith H.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

412

Reservoir monitoring: 1990 summary of vital signs and use impairment monitoring on Tennessee Valley Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) initiated a Reservoir Monitoring Program on 12 TVA reservoirs (the nine main stream Tennessee river reservoirs -- Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary storage reservoirs -- Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris) in autumn 1989. The objective of the Reservoir Monitoring Program is to provide basic information on the health'' or integrity of the aquatic ecosystem in each TVA reservoir ( Vital Signs'') and to provide screening level information for describing how well each reservoir meets the swimmable and fishable goals of the Clean Water Act (Use Impairments). This is the first time in the history of the agency that a commitment to a long-term, systematic sampling of major TVA reservoirs has been made. The basis of the Vital Signs Monitoring is examination of appropriate physical, chemical, and biological indicators in three areas of each reservoir. These three areas are the forebay immediately upstream of the dam; the transition zone (the mid-reservoir region where the water changes from free flowing to more quiescent, impounded water); and the inflow or headwater region of the reservoir. The Use Impairments monitoring provides screening level information on the suitability of selected areas within TVA reservoirs for water contact activities (swimmable) and suitability of fish from TVA reservoirs for human consumption (fishable).

Dycus, D.L.; Meinert, D.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-term. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. Progress in the Stewart field project is described for the following tasks: design/construct waterflood plant; design/construct injection system; design/construct battery consolidation and gathering system; waterflood operations and reservoir management; and technology transfer. Progress in the Savonburg field project is described for the following tasks: profile modification treatments; pattern changes and wellbore cleanup; reservoir development (polymer flooding); and technology transfer.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; McCune, D.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1997-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Oil and gas developments in Oklahoma and Panhandle of Texas in 1986  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, a 46% drop in the price of oil and a 10% drop in the price of gas, coupled with a decrease in demand, forced a 40.4% decrease in drilling, a 67% drop in gas production, and an 11% drop in oil production in Oklahoma and the Panhandle of Texas (Texas Railroad Commission District 10). Exploration focused on development and extension of existing fields, with development wells outnumbering exploratory wells 18 to 1. Operators completed 58.6% fewer exploratory wells and 59.2% fewer development wells in 1986 than in 1985. The 1986 success rate for exploratory wells dropped 0.8%, and the success rate for development wells increased 0.9%. The Cherokee shelf was the most active trend, with 53 exploratory wells completed in 1986. The dominant plays were the Marrow-Springer and granite wash in the Anadarko basin, Misener on the Sedgwick shelf, Viola and Hunton in the Gold Trend along the Pauls Valley uplift, and Wapanucka, Cromwell, and Atoka in the Arkoma basin. 3 figures, 4 tables.

Fryklund, R.E.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Preliminary statistical analysis and provenance trends in Desmoinesian sandstones from central and eastern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Desmoinesian sandstones from the northeast Oklahoma platform and from the Anadarko and McAlester basins record a complex interaction between mid-Pennsylvanian source-area tectonism and cyclic sedimentation patterns associated with transgressions and regressions. Framework grain summaries for 67 thin sections from sandstones of the Cherokee Group (Bartlesville, Red Fork, Skinner, and Prue) were subjected to multivariate statistical analysis to establish regional compositional trends for provenance analysis. R-mode cluster and correspondence analyses were used to determine the contributing effect (total variance) of key framework grains. Fragments of monocrystalline and polycrystalline quartz, chert, metamorphic rock, and limestone contribute most to the variation in the grain population. Q-mode cluster and correspondence analyses were used to identify three distinct petrofacies. Petrofacies I is rich in monocrystalline quartz (86 to 98%) and contains rare mica and rock fragments. Petrofacies II is also rich in monocrystalline quartz (66 to 86%) and contains as much as 15% metamorphic and sedimentary rock fragments. Petrofacies III is compositionally heterogeneous and contains fragments of polycrystalline and monocrystalline quartz, mica, chert, and metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. Quantitative analyses indicate that Desmoinesian sandstones were derived from complex sedimentary and metamorphic source areas. Petrofacies I sandstones are restricted to the southwestern part of the Anadarko basin and the northeast Oklahoma platform, whereas petrofacies II and III sandstones are distributed throughout the study area. The distribution of petrofacies within the region suggests a model of source-area interaction and cratonic sediment recycling.

Dyman, T.S.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Seismic data obtained using. 50-caliber machine gun as high-resolution seismic source  

SciTech Connect

A seismic line across a shoestring sandstone served as a test of a .50-caliber machine gun as a high-resolution seismic source in exploring for shallow sandstones. The line crosses part of the Bronson-Xenia oil field, which produces from the Bartlesville sandstone of the Cherokee Group (Pennsylvanian) in Bourbon County, Kansas, at a depth of 622 ft (190 m). The reservoir, which has a flat base and an irregular top, may represent a superposition of fluvial sandstones. The seismic line clearly depicts a lenticular sandstone that is up to 56 ft (17 m) thick. Both the lateral extent of the sandstone body and a slight velocity pull-up of the underlying layers are evident. In addition to the target sandstone, two additional sandstone bodies may be present at the east end of the line, where well control is not available. Analysis of the seismic data indicates that the frequency of the .50-caliber sources is from 30 to 170 Hz. The high frequencies are retained deep into the section. Two shots per shotpoint are the minimum number necessary for acquiring high-quality data, and 12-fold is the minimum acceptable common-depth-point (CDP) coverage. 11 figures.

Seeber, M.D.; Steeples, D.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

FastMeasure Distance Measuring Tools | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FastMeasure Distance Measuring Tools FastMeasure Distance Measuring Tools Jump to: navigation, search Logo: FastMeasure Distance Measuring Tools Name FastMeasure Distance Measuring Tools Address 2890 Cherokee Lane Place Riverwoods, Illinois Zip 60015 Sector Vehicles Product Distance Measuring Instrument Year founded 2008 Number of employees 11-50 Phone number (888) 876-6050 Website http://www.fast-measure.com Coordinates 42.181686°, -87.898862° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.181686,"lon":-87.898862,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

418

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Midcontinent region (Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma)  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility/constraints of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers a select area of the United States. The Midcontinent (Kansas, Nssouri, Oklahoma) has produced significant oil, but contrary to early reports, the area does not contain the huge volumes of heavy oil that, along with the development of steam and in situ combustion as oil production technologies, sparked the area`s oil boom of the 1960s. Recovery of this heavy oil has proven economically unfeasible for most operators due to the geology of the formations rather than the technology applied to recover the oil. The geology of the southern Midcontinent, as well as results of field projects using thermal enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) methods to produce the heavy oil, was examined based on analysis of data from secondary sources. Analysis of the performance of these projects showed that the technology recovered additional heavy oil above what was produced from primary production from the consolidated, compartmentalized, fluvial dominated deltaic sandstone formations in the Cherokee and Forest City basins. The only projects producing significant economic and environmentally acceptable heavy oil in the Midcontinent are in higher permeability, unconsolidated or friable, thick sands such as those found in south-central Oklahoma. There are domestic heavy oil reservoirs in other sedimentary basins that are in younger formations, are less consolidated, have higher permeability and can be economically produced with current TEOR technology. Heavy oil production from the carbonates of central and wester Kansas has not been adequately tested, but oil production is anticipated to remain low. Significant expansion of Midcontinent heavy oil production is not anticipated because the economics of oil production and processing are not favorable.

Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. Te Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2.

Green, D.W.; McCune, D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite G.P.

1999-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

420

Genetics, phenotype, and natural history of autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis  

SciTech Connect

Cyclic hematopoiesis (CH, or cyclic neutropenia) is a rare disease manifested by transient severe neutropenia that recurs approximately every 21 days. The hematologic profile of families with the autosomal dominant form (ADCH) has not been well characterized, and it is unknown if the phenotype is distinct from the more common sporadic congenital or acquired forms of CH. We studied nine ADCH families whose children displayed typical CH blood patterns. Pedigrees confirmed dominant inheritance without evidence of heterogeneity or decreased penetrance; three pedigrees suggested new mutations. Families were Caucasian with exception of one with a Cherokee Native American founder. A wide spectrum of symptom severity, ranging from asymptomatic to life-threatening illness, was observed within families. The phenotype changed with age. Children displayed typical neutrophil cycles with symptoms of mucosal ulceration, lymphadenopathy, and infections. Adults often had fewer and milder symptoms, sometimes accompanied by mild chronic neutropenia without distinct cycles. While CH is commonly described as {open_quotes}benign{close_quotes}, four children in three of the nine families died of Clostridium or E. coli colitis, documenting the need for urgent evaluation of abdominal pain. Misdiagnosis with other neutropenias was common but can be avoided by serial blood counts in index cases. Genetic counseling requires specific histories and complete blood counts in relatives at risk to assess status regardless of symptoms, especially to determine individuals with new mutations. We propose diagnostic criteria for ADCH in affected children and adults. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment resulted in dramatic improvement of neutropenia and morbidity. The differential diagnosis from other forms of familial neutropenia is reviewed. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Palmer, S.E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)] [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Dale, D.C. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)] [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

1996-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class 1 oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Yearly technical progress report, January 1--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Oklahoma Geological Survey and the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection, evaluation, and distribution of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD oil reservoirs and the recovery technologies that can be applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. To date, the lead geologists have defined the initial geographic extents of Oklahoma`s FDD plays, and compiled known information about those plays. Nine plays have been defined, all of them Pennsylvanian in age and most from the Cherokee Group. A bibliographic database has been developed to record the literature sources and their related plays. Trend maps are being developed to identify the FDD portions of the relevant reservoirs, through accessing current production databases and through compiling the literature results. A reservoir database system also has been developed, to record specific reservoir data elements that are identified through the literature, and through public and private data sources. The project team is working with the Oklahoma Nomenclature Committee of the Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association to update oil field boundary definitions in the project area. Also, team members are working with several private companies to develop demonstration reservoirs for the reservoir characterization and simulation activities. All of the information gathered through these efforts will be transferred to the Oklahoma petroleum industry through a series of publications and workshops. Additionally, plans are being developed, and hardware and software resources are being acquired, in preparation for the opening of a publicly-accessible computer users laboratory, one component of the technology transfer program.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)] [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)] [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1995-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

422

Advanced Light Water Reactor Plants System 80+{trademark} Design Certification Program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+{trademark} during the US government`s 1993 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW{sub t} (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design consists of an essentially complete plant. It is based on evolutionary improvements to the Standardized System 80 nuclear steam supply system in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2, and 3, and the Duke Power Company P-81 balance-of-plant (BOP) that was designed and partially constructed at the Cherokee plant site. The System 80/P-81 original design has been substantially enhanced to increase conformance with the EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD). Some design enhancements incorporated in the System 80+ design are included in the four units currently under construction in the Republic of Korea. These units form the basis of the Korean standardization program. The full System 80+ standard design has been offered to the Republic of China, in response to their recent bid specification. The ABB-CE Standard Safety Analysis Report (CESSAR-DC) was submitted to the NRC and a Draft Safety Evaluation Report was issued by the NRC in October 1992. CESSAR-DC contains the technical basis for compliance with the EPRI URD for simplified emergency planning. The Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) is the standard ABB-Combustion Engineering two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard plant includes a sperical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual containment.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

Regional correlations and reservoir characterization studies of the Pennsylvanian system in the Anadarko Basin area of Western Oklahoma and the Panhandle of Texas  

SciTech Connect

Correlations problems have long existed between the Pennsylvanian marine clastics of the northeastern half of the Anadarko Basin and Shelf and the Pennsylvanian terrigenous washes of the extreme southwestern portion of the Anadarko Basin. These correlation problems have created nomenclature problems resulting in thousands of feet of washes often referred to on completion reports and production records as {open_quotes}granite wash{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}Atoka Wash{close_quotes} when much greater accuracy and specificity is both needed and possible. Few detailed cross-sections are available. Regional and field scale cross-sections were constructed which have been correlated well by well and field by field using nearly every deep well drilled in the basin. This process has provided for a high degree of consistency. These cross-sections have greatly diminished the correlation and nomenclature problems within the Anadarko Basin. Certain markers proved to be regionally persistent from the marine clastics into the terrigenous washes making the subdivision of thousands of feet of washes possible. Those of greatest importance were the top of the Marmaton, the Cherokee Marker, the Pink {open_quotes}Limestone{close_quotes} Interval, the top of the Atoka and the top of the Morrow. Once these and other subdivisions were made, production was allocated on a much more definitive basis. Additionally, detailed reservoir characterization of the reservoirs was conducted to include geologic and engineering data. Finally, a {open_quotes}field-specific{close_quotes} reservoir type log was chosen. A series of regional cross-sections will be presented along with the results of reservoir characterization studies conducted on reservoirs within the fields located along the cross-sections. A type log for each reservoir will also be illustrated.

Hendrickson, W.J.; Smith, P.W.; Williams, C.M. [Dwights Energydata Inc., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

A demonstration of retro-traverse using a semi-autonomous land vehicle  

SciTech Connect

A Jeep Cherokee has been modified by Sandia National Laboratories to allow remote control either by teleoperation or through computer generated commands (autonomy). This vehicle has been used for development of hardware and software and in the demonstration of concepts for computer augmentation of remote controlled vehicles. As part of this activity, a system has been configured which allows an operator to teleoperate the vehicle from one location (home base) to another (destination). At the completion of teleoperation, the operator can instruct the vehicle to return to the starting position. The vehicle then autonomously performs a retro-tranverse, reversing the path by which it reached its destination. During teleoperation, operator commands are given through an operator control interface consisting of a steering wheel, brake and throttle pedals, and a video display. Commands are transmitted to the vehicle and video returned from the vehicle over RF communication links. Periodic way points are automatically recorded for later use by the vehicle system. Navigation during retro-traverse utilizes dead-reckoning inputs from an odometer, compass and steering angle potentiometer. Way points (previously identified during teleoperation of the vehicle) are linked by short, straight line segments. Along each path segment, the control system generates the steering and speed commands necessary to direct the vehicle towards the next way point. Retro-traverse has been demonstrated over open terrain at Sandia National Laboratories. Path following accuracy and final positional control is a function of dead-reckoning system limitations and control system design. These limitations are discussed, and an improved system is proposed. 10 refs., 5 figs.

McGovern, D.E.; Klarer, P.R.; Jones, D.P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas, Near-term. Third quarterly report, January 1, 1994--April 1, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas and in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas in the N.E. Savonburg Field. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas. General topics to be addressed will be (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. The reservoir management portion of the project will involve performance evaluation and will include such work as (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (5) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. The waterflood optimization portion of the project involves only the Nelson Lease. It will be based on the performance evaluation and will involve (1) design and implementation of a water cleanup system for the waterflood, (2) application of well remedial work such as polymer gel treatments to improve vertical sweep efficiency, and (3) changes in waterflood patterns to increase sweep efficiency. Finally, it is planned to implement an improved recovery process, possibly polymer augmented waterflooding on both field demonstration sites. Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: engineering and geological analysis; water plant development; pattern changes and wellbore cleanup; field operations; laboratory testing; and utilization.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1994-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- near-term. Eighth quarterly report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas and in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The Stewart Field (on latter stage of primary production) is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company General topics to be addressed will be (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration, of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. The reservoir management portion of the project will involve performance evaluation and will include such work as (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and 5) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. The waterflood optimization portion of the project involves only the Nelson Lease. It will be based on the performance evaluation and will involve (1) design and implementation of a water cleanup system for the waterflood, (2) application of well remedial work such as polymer gel treatments to improve vertical sweep efficiency, and (3) changes in waterflood patterns to increase sweep efficiency. Finally, it is planned to implement an improved recovery process on both field demonstration sites.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1995-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Principal elements of Ozark uplift during the Pennsylvanian  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvanian history of the Ozark uplift is complex, reflecting major late Mississippian or earliest Pennsylvanian reactivation along prominent NW-trending tectonic zones (TZ), followed by regional baseleveling, repeated phases of regional uplift, and a number of lesser episodes of reactivation along principal tectonic zones and intra-zonal faults. Pre-Pennsylvanian baseleveling resulted in a complex paleogeologic substrate. During the Pennsylvanian, movement along principal tectonic zones defined large elements of Ozark uplift provisionally identified as Trans-Ozark arc; Northeast Missouri graben; Lincoln fold system; St. Francis Mtn. core; and Tri-State platform, incorporating both Spavinaw arch and Arkansas-Missouri shelf/platform. The suggested definitions and nomenclature follow an important concept developed by Searight and Searight (1961) in a little-publicized paper. Lincoln fold system may reflect a tectonic zone with its extension to the southeast offset along Cap-Au-Gres fault. Mississippi River arch served to link the obliquely-faulted northeastern area of the uplift with southwestern elements of Wisconsin uplift. Spavinaw arch, including Seneca fault zone along its axis, is associated with and may in fact dominate the Tri-State platform. Both became clearly defined during early( ) Atokan time and served to define an eastern boundary of early Desmoinesian Cherokee basin. Miami Trough, reflecting a significant NE-trending TZ, bounds Tri-State platform to the west-northwest. Trans-Ozark arch, a horst-dominated feature including the area between Bolivar-Mansfield TZ and Grand River TZ, incorporates Central Missouri TZ as the most important of several associated features. Regional expression of elements of Ozark uplift changed during Pennsylvanian time in the course of successive TR events coupled with the influence of continuing tectonic activity.

Howe, W.B. (Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- near-term. Seventh quarterly report, February 1, 1995--April 1, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas and in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The Stewart Field (on latter stage of primary production) is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by Sharon Resources, Inc. General topics to be addressed will be (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. The reservoir management portion of the project will involve performance evaluation and will include such work as (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (5) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. The waterflood optimization portion of the project involves only the Nelson Lease. It will be based on the performance evaluation and will involve (1) design and implementation of a water cleanup system for the waterflood, (2) application of well remedial work such as polymer gel treatments to improve vertical sweep efficiency, and (3) changes in waterflood patterns to increase sweep efficiency. Finally, it is planned to implement an improved recovery process, possibly polymer augmented waterflood: on both field demonstration sites.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1995-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Coal-bed methane production in eastern Kansas: Its potential and restraints  

SciTech Connect

In 1921 and again in 1988, workers demonstrated that the high volatile A and B coals of the Pennsylvanian Cherokee Group can be produced economically from vertically drilled holes, and that some of these coals have a gas content as high as 200 ft{sup 3}/ton. Detailed subsurface mapping on a county-by-county basis using geophysical logs shows the Weir coal seam to be the thickest (up to 6 ft thick) and to exist in numerous amoeba-shaped pockets covering several thousand acres. Lateral pinch-out into deltaic sands offers a conventional gas source. New attention to geophysical logging shows most coals have a negative SP response, high resistivities, and densities of 1.6 g/cm{sup 3}. Highly permeable coals cause lost circulation during drilling and thief zones during cementing, and they are the source of abundant unwanted salt water. Low-permeability coals can be recognized by their high fracture gradients, which are difficult to explain but are documented to exceed 2.2. Current successful completions use both limited-entry, small-volume nitrogen stimulations or an open hole below production casing. Subsurface coals are at normal Mid-Continent pressures and may be free of water. Initially, some wells flow naturally without pumping. Saltwater disposal is often helped by the need for water in nearby waterflood projects and the easy availability of state-approved saltwater disposal wells in Mississippi and Arbuckle carbonates. Recent attempts to recomplete coal zones in slim-hole completions are having mixed results. The major restraints to coal-bed methane production are restricted to low permeability of the coals and engineering problems, not to the availability or gas content of the coals.

Stoeckinger, B.T.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Pennsylvanian history of the Chautauqua Arch  

SciTech Connect

Westward extension of the Ozark Uplift known as the Chautauqua Arch is concealed by a Pennsylvanian cover. This cover provides an insight into its later tectonic history subsequent to its major Late Devonian uplift and truncation. Part of this arch was episodically uplifted during Pennsylvanian time in an area extending west from southwestern Missouri along the Kansas-Oklahoma border to western Montgomery County. Recent stratigraphic mapping in that county indicates moderate Late Desmoinesian to Missourian tectonism. Some strata present on both flanks of the arch are either comparatively thin or missing owing to unconformity truncation or non-deposition. Stratal loss involves the Lenapah Limestone, the Hepler and Lost Branch formations, the Cherryvale Shale and the Hertha, Drum, Dewey, Stanton and Wyandotte Limestones. Earlier movements also account for the truncation of Morrowan, Atokan and possibly some Early Desmoinesian beds over the arch. Between tectonic episodes along the arch there were periods of relative tectonic quiescence accompanied by shelf-edge carbonate banks, condensed sequences and siliciclastic sedimentation. West of Montgomery County in Chautauqua County, the widespread Late Pennsylvanian Virgilian outcrops show practically no tectonism. Therefore, the name Chautauqua Arch seems inappropriate for this Pennsylvanian arch, and the name Tri-State Arch is proposed. This arch is bounded on the north by the Cherokee Basin and on the south by the northern rise of the Arkoma Basin. Although this arch is commonly omitted on many tectonic maps, it is a stronger gravity feature than the Bourbon Arch about 50 miles northward. Both tectonic and sedimentary structures have produced much oil and gas entrapment along this arch. For example, an east-west fault south of Independence, aligned with buried Proterozoic hills, has been specially productive.

Bennison, A.P.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Evaluation of gas-reburning and low NO{sub x} burners on a wall fired boiler. Technical progress report number 17, October 1--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this CCT project is to evaluate the use of Gas Reburning and Low NO{sub x} Burners (GR-LNB) for NO{sub x} emission control from a wall fired boiler. Low NO{sub x} burners are designed to delay the mixing of the coal fuel with combustion air to minimize the NO{sub x} formation. With GR, about 80--85% of the coal fuel is fired in the main combustion zone. The balance of the fuel is added downstream as natural gas to create a slightly fuel rich environment in which NO{sub x} is converted to N{sub 2}. The combustion process is completed by over fire air addition. SO{sub x} emissions are reduced to the extent that natural gas replaces sulfur-containing coal. The level of NO{sub x} reduction achievable with 15--20% natural gas is on the order of 50--60%. Thus the emission reduction target of the combination of these two developed technologies is about 70%. This project is being conducted in three phases at the host site, a 172 MW wall fired boiler of Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo), Cherokee Unit 3 in Denver, Colorado: Phase 1--Design and Permitting; Phase 2--Construction and Start-up; and Phase 3--Operation, Data Collection, Reporting and Disposition. Phase 3 activities during this reporting period involved initiation of the second generation gas reburning parametric testing. This technology utilizes enhanced natural gas and overfire air injectors with elimination of the flue gas recirculation system. The objective is to demonstrate NO{sub x} reductions similar to that of long term testing but with a reduced capital cost requirement through elimination of the FGR system.

NONE

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

432

Evaluation of gas reburning and low NO{sub x} burners on a wall-fired boiler  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of Gas Reburning (GR) and Low NO{sub x}, Burners (LNB) has been completed at Public Service Company of Colorado`s Cherokee Station Unit 3. The goal of the demonstration, which was carried out in a US DOE Clean Coal Technology Round 3 Program, was to reduce NO{sub x} emissions by 70%. The reduction was to be achieved from the pre-project level, prior to LNB retrofit. The GR system was supplied by Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) and the LNBs were supplied by the Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation. The project was carried out in three phases in which EER designed the GR system and obtained necessary permits (Phase 1), constructed the system and completed start-up tasks (Phase 2), and evaluated its performance with both Optimization Tests and a Long-Term Demonstration (Phase 3). As directed by the cooperative agreement, environmental monitoring was conducted in each phase. Measurements were taken by plant personnel and an EER Field Testing Team and were divided into two types. ``Compliance Monitoring`` was conducted by plant personnel to satisfy requirements of regulatory agencies, while ``Supplemental Monitoring`` was conducted by EER personnel to develop a database of environmental impacts of the technology and to ensure environmental acceptability of the project. This document presents environmental monitoring data obtained during the Long-Term Testing period, April 27, 1993 to January 27, 1995. During this period, ten months of testing of the GR-LNB system was followed by a modification into a ``second-generation`` GR-LNB system, which was evaluated for six months. Compliance Monitoring was conducted primarily in two areas, air emissions and aqueous discharges.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Evaluation of gas reburning and low NO{sub x} burners on a wall-fired boiler  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of Gas Reburning (GR) and Low NO{sub x} Burners (LNB) has been completed at Public Service Company of Colorado`s Cherokee Station Unit 3. The goal of the demonstration was to reduce NO{sub x} emissions by 70%. The reduction was to be achieved from the pre-project level prior to LNB retrofit. The GR system was supplied by Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) and the LNBs were supplied by the Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation. The project was carried out in three phases in which EER designed the GR system and obtained necessary permits (Phase 1), constructed the system and completed start-up tasks (Phase 2), and evaluated its performance with both Optimization Tests and a Long-Term Demonstration (Phase 3). As directed by the Cooperative Agreement, environmental monitoring was conducted in each phase. Measurements were taken by plant personnel and an EER Field Testing Team and were divided into two types. ``Compliance Monitoring`` was conducted by plant personnel to satisfy requirements of regulatory agencies, while ``Supplemental Monitoring`` was conducted by EER personnel to develop a database of environmental impacts of the technology and to ensure environmental acceptability of the project. This document presents environmental monitoring data obtained during the Optimization Testing period, November 11, 1992 to April 23, 1993. Compliance Monitoring was conducted primarily in two areas, air emissions and aqueous discharges. The unit is required to meet an SO{sub 2} limit of 1.2 lb/MBtu and an opacity limit of 20 percent (6 minute average). Therefore, the plant monitors flue gas SO{sub 2} and opacity continuously and submits Excess Emissions Reports to the Colorado Air Pollution Control Division on a quarterly basis. Discharge limits for the aqueous effluent from the plant and monitoring requirements are specified by a permit issued by the Colorado Water Quality Control Division.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Revised fusulinid biostratigraphic zonation and depositional sequence correlation, subsurface Permian basin  

SciTech Connect

Current revisions in fusulinid zonation enable them to subdivide the fossiliferous Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian section in the Permian basin into more biostratigraphic zones than the older scheme of R.V. Hollingsworth, each zone of shorter temporal duration than has previously been recognized. The identification of distinct fusulinid assemblage subzones within the absolute chronology of radiometric dating provides the basis for these stratigraphic subdivisions. The Atoka is divided into five assemblage subzones, each with an approximate duration of 1.0 m.y. In the Strawn, five subzones each of about 0.8 m.y. duration are recognized within the Cherokee; the three subzones in the Marmaton are each of 0.67 m.y. duration. Within Canyon and Cisco shelf carbonate sections are presently recognized seven and six subzones, respectively; the approximate duration of each is 0.33 and 1.03 m.y. The shelf Wolfcamp section is divisible into seven subzones, each of about 2.36 m.y. span. The entire Leonard shelf section comprises six subzones, each of about 1.83 m.y. duration; three subzones are presently recognized in the lower Leonard and three cumulatively in the middle and upper Leonard sections. These biostratigraphic subzones correspond to single or composite sediment packages (parasequences) that can be correlated regionally from shelf into basinal strata, using wireline log and conventional and processed seismic sections. Such packages comprise parts of individual depositional sequences as recognized by seismic-stratigraphic interpretations. Carbonate (various shelf and foreshelf detrital facies) and sandstone reservoirs occur within individual subzones within these sequences and can be readily defined and mapped by subsurface facies studies.

Reid, A.M.; Reid, S.T.; Mazzullo, S.J.; Robbins, S.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Evaluation of gas-reburning and low NO sub x burners on a wall fired boiler  

SciTech Connect

This clean coal technology project will demonstrate a combination of two developed technologies to reduce both NO{sub x} and (to some extent) SO{sub x} emissions: Gas reburning and low NO{sub x} burners. The demonstrations will be conducted on a pre-NSPS utility boiler representative of US boilers that contribute significantly to the inventory of acid rain precursor emissions: a wall fired unit. Low NO{sub x} burners operate on the principle of delayed mixing between the coal fuel and burner air, so that less NO{sub x} is burned. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel corresponding to the total heat release in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO{sub x} to molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO{sub x} emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO{sub x}. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emission reductions of 75 percent or more as a result of combining LNB and GR to a utility boiler having the design characteristics mentioned above. A Host Site Agreement has been signed by EER and a utility company in the State of Colorado: Public Service Company of Colorado (Cherokee Unit No. 3, 172 MW{sub e}) front wall fired boiler near Denver.

Not Available

1991-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

436

Stratigraphy, coal occurrence, and depositional history of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation, Sand Wash basin, northwestern Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Fort Union Formation in the Sand Wash basin is divided into the massive Cretaceous and Tertiary (K/T) sandstone unit, lower coal-bearing unit, gray-green mudstone unit, basin sandy unit, and upper shaly unit. Lithofacies and coal-occurrence maps of the stratigraphic units indicate that sandstone bodies and coal beds occur along south-north oriented, intermontane fluvial systems. Net-sandstone-thickness trends of the massive K/T sandstone unit reveal laterally extensive channel-fill sandstones formed in north-flowing fluvial systems. The massive K/T sandstone unit's dominant source was in the Sawatch Range. Sandstones within the lower coal-bearing unit consist of similar north-flowing fluvial systems, but they are laterally discontinuous and have several tectonically active source areas, including the Uinta and Sierra Madre-Park uplifts, and Sawatch Range. Coal-occurrence maps of the lower coal-bearing unit indicate that maximum coal-bed thicknesses are greatest along the south-north-oriented fluvial axes. Coal beds thin and split to the east and west, confirming a direct relation between the position of thick, fluvial-sandstone bodies, which form a stable platform for peat accumulation, and the location of the thick coal beds. Above the lower coal-bearing unit, the gray-green mudstone unit forms north-trending belts centered R91W and R100W. The gray-green mudstone thins to the north and into the basin center and probably is lacustrine in origin, reflecting tectonic quiescence and cessation of coarse clastic sedimentation. The basin sandy unit is best developed in the central parts of the basin, where its fluvial depositional axis is oriented south-north. The upper shaly unit directly overlies the basin sandy unit and includes a thin Cherokee coal zone. The upper shaly unit has variable thicknesses due to erosion at the base of the Wasatch Formation and lateral facies changes.

Tyler, R. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low-NOx Burners on a Wall-Fired Boiler; a DOE Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The results from the GR-LNB technology demonstrated by EER at Cherokee Station approached, but did not meet, the CCT project's performance objectives. Acceptable unit operability was achieved with both the GR and the LNB components. The gas reburning component of the process appears to be broadly applicable for retrofit NO{sub x} control to most utility boilers and, in particular, to wet-bottom cyclone boilers, which are high NO{sub x} emitters and are difficult to control (LNB technology is not applicable to cyclone boilers). GR-LNB can reduce NO{sub x} to mandated emissions levels under Title IV of the CAAA without significant, adverse boiler impacts. The GR-LNB process may be applicable to boilers significantly larger than the demonstration unit, provided there is adequate dispersion and mixing of injected natural gas. Major results of the demonstration project are summarized as follows: NO{sub x}-emissions reductions averaging 64% were achieved with 12.5% gas heat input in long-term tests on a 158-MWe (net) wall-fired unit. The target reduction level of 70% was achieved only on a short-term basis with higher gas consumption. The thermal performance of coal-fired boilers is not significantly affected by GR-LNB. Convective section steam temperatures can be controlled within acceptable limits. Thermal efficiency is decreased by a small amount (about 0.8%), because of increased dry gas loss and higher moisture in the flue gas as a result of the GR process. Furnace slagging and convective section fouling can be adequately controlled. Because of the higher hydrogen/carbon (H/C) ratio of natural gas compared with coal, use of the GR process results in a modest reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions. SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions are reduced in direct proportion to the fraction of heat supplied by natural gas.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2001-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

438

Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. Te Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) Identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2.

Green, Don W.; McCune, A.D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite, G. Paul

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

439

Native American Initiative Short Course Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

A training program is outlined for members of Native American tribes having an interest in working in the oil and gas industry. Also, the program will assist tribes whose lands have oil and gas resources to become more familiar with the industry and technology necessary to develop their resources. The proposed program will contribute to meeting the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Domestic Oil and Gas Initiative to help Native American tribes become more self-sufficient in developing and managing their resources through training in cost-effective, improved technologies for hydrocarbon production that will meet environmental regulations. The training program outlined is for adult tribal representatives who are responsible for managing tribal mineral holdings or setting policy, or who work in the oil and gas industry. The course content is in response to a survey that was developed by BDM-Oklahoma and sent in the spring of 1995 to 26 tribes or tribal agencies which were identified through previous contact with DOE. Tribes were asked to indicate course content needs, levels, preferred time of year, and location. Six tribes responded with specific recommendations and needs. These tribes include the Osage, Creek, Pueblo, Cherokee, St. Regis Mohawk, Northern Arapaho, and Ute Mountain Ute. The results of the survey are included in a table.The training will be conducted at various locations by BDM-Oklahoma technical staff, which , includes geologists, exploration and drilling specialists, oil and gas production specialists, environmental policy specialists, and contract specialists. The proposed training schedule offers three workshops per year and includes those courses identified in the survey by the tribes. The schedule initially proposed in April 1995 has been modified in order to offer training identified by the tribes in the most cost-effective manner. Participants will be able to take two courses, and travel costs will be minimized. A schedule is included in Table 2-1. Contracts have been initiated with several tribes to schedule a training workshop at various tribal locations. Currently, discussions are underway with the Hopi, Ute, Apache, and Osage tribes. Each of the tribal leaders are presenting the training program to their respective councils. The training offered will be a continuation of the workshop started in October, 1996. Modifications to the course content will be integrated into the presentations to meet specific tribal needs. These special technology needs will be identified through discussions with tribal leaders and council members.

Carroll, H.B.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

440

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler  

SciTech Connect

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NO, reduction (70VO) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Depatiment of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was petformed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NO, emission level of 0.73 lb/1 OG Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50Y0. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NO, in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of' natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NO, emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 18%. The performance goal of 70/40 reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18%.

None

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Gas reburning in tangentially-fired, wall-fired and cyclone-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

Gas Reburning has been successfully demonstrated for over 4,428 hours on three coal fired utility boilers as of March 31, 1994. Typically, NO{sub x} reductions have been above 60% in long-term, load-following operation. The thermal performance of the boilers has been virtually unaffected by Gas Reburning. At Illinois Power`s Hennepin Station, Gas Reburning in a 71 MWe tangentially-fired boiler achieved an average NO{sub x} reduction of 67% from the original baseline NO{sub x} level of 0.75 lb NO{sub x}/10{sup 6} Btu over a one year period. The nominal natural gas input was 18% of total heat input. Even at 10% gas heat input, NO{sub x} reduction of 55% was achieved. At Public Service Company of Colorado`s Cherokee Station, a Gas Reburning-Low NO{sub x} Burner system on a 172 MWe wall-fired boiler has achieved overall NO{sub x} reductions of 60--73% in parametric and long-term testing, based on the original baseline NO{sub x} level of 0.73 lb/10{sup 6} Btu. NO{sub x} reduction is as high as 60--65% even at relatively low natural gas usage (5--10% of total heat input). The NO{sub x} reduction by Low NO{sub x} Burners alone is typically 30--40%. NO{sub x} reduction has been found to be insensitive to changes in recirculated flue gas (2--7% of total flue gas) injected with natural gas. At City Water, Light and Power Company`s Lakeside Station in Springfield, Illinois, Gas Reburning in a 33 MWe cyclone-fired boiler has achieved an average NO{sub x} reduction of 66% (range 52--77%) at gas heat inputs of 20--26% in long-term testing, based on a baseline NO{sub x} level of 1.0 lb/10{sup 6} Btu (430 mg/MJ). This paper presents a summary of the operating experience at each site and discusses the long term impacts of applying this technology to units with tangential, cyclone and wall-fired (with Low NO{sub x} Burner) configurations.

May, T.J. [Illinois Power Co., Decatur, IL (United States); Rindahl, E.G. [Public Service Co. of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States); Booker, T. [City Water Light and Power, Springfield, IL (United States)] [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler  

SciTech Connect

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, especially NOX. The project involved operating gas reburning technology combined with low NO, burner technology (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired utility boiler. Low NOX burners are designed to create less NOX than conventional burners. However, the NO, control achieved is in the range of 30-60-40, and typically 50%. At the higher NO, reduction levels, CO emissions tend to be higher than acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce the level of NO. in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. When combined, GR and LNBs work in harmony to both minimize NOX emissions and maintain an acceptable level of CO emissions. The demonstration was performed at Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit 3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW. wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal and had a pre GR-LNB baseline NOX emission of 0.73 lb/1 Oe Btu. The target for the project was a reduction of 70 percent in NOX emissions. Project sponsors included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER). EER conducted a comprehensive test demonstration program over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved. Intensive measurements were taken to quantify the reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability, and all factors influencing costs. The results showed that GR-LNB technology achieved excellent emission reductions. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was somewhat less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 180A. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at higher gas heat inputs. The impact on boiler equipment was determined to be very minimal. Toward the end of the testing, the flue gas recirculation (used to enhance gas penetration into the furnace) system was removed and new high pressure gas injectors were installed. Further, the low NOX burners were modified and gave better NO. reduction performance. These modifications resulted in a similar NO, reduction performance (64%) at a reduced level of gas heat input (-13Yo). In addition, the OFA injectors were re-designed to provide for better control of CO emissions. Although not a part of this project, the use of natural gas as the primary fuel with gas reburning was also tested. The gas/gas reburning tests demonstrated a reduction in NOX emissions of 43% (0.30 lb/1 OG Btu reduced to 0.17 lb/1 OG Btu) using 7% gas heat input. Economics are a key issue affecting technology development. Application of GR-LNB requires modifications to existing power plant equipment and as a result, the capital and operating costs depend largely on site-specific factors such as: gas availability at the site, gas to coal delivered price differential, sulfur dioxide removal requirements, windbox pressure, existing burner throat diameters, and reburn zone residence time available. Based on the results of this CCT project, EER expects that most GR-LNB installations will achieve at least 60% NOX control when firing 10-15% gas. The capital cost estimate for installing a GR-LNB system on a 300 MW, unit is approximately $25/kW. plus the cost of a gas pipeline (if required). Operating costs are almost entirely related to the differential cost of the natural gas compared to coal.

None

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas Near Term  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period I involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2. Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of the design, construction, and operation of a field-wide waterflood utilizing state-of-the-art, off-the-shelf technologies in an attempt to optimize secondary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period was subdivided into five major tasks. The tasks were (1) design and construction of a waterflood plant, (2) design and construction of a water injection system, (3) design and construction of tank battery consolidation and gathering system, (4) initiation of waterflood operations and reservoir management, and (5) technology transfer. In the Savonburg Project, the reservoir management portion involves performance evaluation. This work included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems such as plugging caused from poor water quality, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (5) preliminary identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process i.e., polymer augmented waterflooding or infill drilling (vertical or horizontal wells). To accomplish this work the initial budget period was subdivided into four major tasks. The tasks included (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) waterplant optimization, (3) wellbore cleanup and pattern changes, and (4) field operations. This work was completed and the project has moved into Budget Period 2. The Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of continual optimization of this mature waterflood in an attempt to optimize secondary and tertiary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period was subdivided into six major tasks. The tasks were (1) waterplant development, (2) profile modification treatments, (3) pattern changes, new wells and wellbore cleanups, (4) reservoir development (polymer flooding), (5) field operations, and (6) technology transfer.

Green, D.W.; Willhlte, C.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are 1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, 2) waterflood optimization, and 3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included 1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, 2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, 3) reservoir modeling, 4) laboratory work, 5) identification of operational problems, 6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and 7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were 1) geological and engineering analysis, 2) laboratory testing, and 3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2. Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of the design, construction, and operation of a field-wide waterflood utilizing state-of-the-art, off-the-shelf technologies in an attempt to optimize secondary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period was subdivided into five major tasks. The tasks were 1) design and construction of a waterflood plant, 2) design and construction of a water injection system, 3) design and construction of tank battery consolidation and gathering system, 4) initiation of waterflood operations and reservoir management, and 5) technology transfer. Tasks 1-3 have been completed and water injection began in October 1995. In the Savonburg Project, the reservoir management portion involves performance evaluation. This work included 1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, 2) identification of operational problems, 3) identification of near wellbore problems such as plugging caused from poor water quality, 4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and 5) preliminary identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process i.e., polymer augmented waterflooding or infill drilling (vertical or horizontal wells). To accomplish this work the initial budget period was subdivided into four major tasks. The tasks included 1) geological and engineering analysis, 2) waterplant optimization, 3) wellbore cleanup and pattern changes, and 4) field operations. This work was completed and the project has moved into Budget Period 2. The Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of continual optimization of this mature waterflood in an attempt to optimize secondary and tertiary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period is subdivided into six major tasks. The tasks were 1) waterplant development, 2) profile modification treatments, 3) pattern changes, new wells and wellbore cleanups, 4) reservoir development (polymer flooding), 5) field operations, and 6) technology transfer.

A. Walton; Don W. Green; G. Paul Whillhite; L. Schoeling; L. Watney; M. Michnick; R. Reynolds

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Miljoforden Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miljoforden Website Miljoforden Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Miljoforden Website Focus Area: Natural Gas Topics: Deployment Data Website: www.miljofordon.se/in-english/this-is-miljofordon-se Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/miljoforden-website Language: "English,Swedish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

446

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Focus Area: Propane Topics: Socio-Economic Website: theicct.org/sites/default/files/publications/Retrosp_final_bilingual.p Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/overview-china's-vehicle-emission-con Language: "English,Chinese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

447

Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Agency/Company /Organization: Solar Energy International Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, - Solar PV Resource Type: Training materials User Interface: Other Website: www.solarenergy.org/bookstore/photovoltaics-design-installation-manual Cost: Paid Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

448

OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal Agency/Company /Organization: Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar Hot Water User Interface: Website Website: www.solarthermalworld.org/ Cost: Free UN Region: Caribbean, South America Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Proven√ßal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√ºk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

449

Freight Best Practice Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Freight Best Practice Website Freight Best Practice Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Freight Best Practice Website Focus Area: Public Transit Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.freightbestpractice.org.uk/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/freight-best-practice-website Language: "English,Welsh" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

450

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Focus Area: Industry Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.unido.org/index.php?id=o3470 Language: "Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

451

Sustainable Logistics Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Logistics Website Sustainable Logistics Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Logistics Website Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Best Practices Website: www.duurzamelogistiek.nl/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/sustainable-logistics-website Language: "English,Dutch" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

452

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/home.cfm?attr=24 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/canadian-national-energy-use-database Language: "English,French" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

453

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Agency/Company /Organization: various Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan, Create Early Successes Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Guide/manual, Presentation, Video User Interface: Website Website: ttp://www.bioenergylists.org/ Cost: Free Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

454

Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.hbefa.net/e/index.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/handbook-emission-factors-road-transp Language: "English,French,German" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

455

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy Impacts Website: toolkits.reeep.org/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/renewable-energy-and-energy-efficienc Language: "English,Chinese,French,Portuguese,Spanish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

456

IGES-Market Mechanism Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IGES-Market Mechanism Group IGES-Market Mechanism Group Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IGES-Market Mechanism Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market analysis Resource Type: Training materials Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/index.html Cost: Free Language: "English, Japanese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

457

Eco TransIT World | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eco TransIT World Eco TransIT World Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Eco TransIT World Focus Area: Low Carbon Communities Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: www.ecotransit.org/index.en.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/eco-transit-world Language: "English,Dutch,French,German,Spanish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

458

CRiSTAL Project Management Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CRiSTAL Project Management Tool CRiSTAL Project Management Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CRiSTAL Project Management Tool Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.iisd.org/cristaltool/ Cost: Free Language: "English, French, Portuguese, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.