National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for natchez trace elec

  1. Natchez, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Natchez is a city in Adams County, Mississippi. It falls under Mississippi's 3rd congressional district.12...

  2. Withlacoochee River Elec Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Withlacoochee River Elec Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name: Withlacoochee River Elec Coop Place: Florida Phone Number: 352-567-5133 Website: www.wrec.net Twitter: https:...

  3. Choctawhatche Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Choctawhatche Elec Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Choctawhatche Elec Coop, Inc Place: Florida Phone Number: (850) 892-2111 Website: www.chelco.com Twitter: https:...

  4. Washington Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Elec Member Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Washington Elec Member Corp Place: Georgia Phone Number: 478-552-2577; 1-800-552-2577 Website: washingtonemc.com...

  5. Intermountain Rural Elec Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rural Elec Assn Place: Colorado Website: www.irea.coop Twitter: @IREAColorado Facebook: https:www.facebook.comIntermountainREA Outage Hotline: 1-800-332-9540 References:...

  6. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Delaware) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Delaware) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Delaware References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  7. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Connecticut) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 212-997-8500...

  8. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (District of Columbia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (District of Columbia) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: District of Columbia References:...

  9. Public Service Elec & Gas Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elec & Gas Co (Redirected from PSEG) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Public Service Elec & Gas Co Abbreviation: PSEG Place: New Jersey Year Founded: 1903 Phone Number:...

  10. Mountrail-Williams Elec Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mountrail-Williams Elec Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mountrail-Williams Elec Coop Place: North Dakota Phone Number: Williston Office- 701-577-3765 -- Stanley Office-...

  11. Northern Virginia Elec Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NOVEC) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Northern Virginia Elec Coop Place: Manassas, Virginia References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 SGIC2 EIA Form...

  12. Northern Virginia Elec Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northern Virginia Elec Coop Place: Manassas, Virginia References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 SGIC2 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 13640 Utility Location...

  13. Upson Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Upson Elec Member Corp Place: Georgia Website: www.upsonemc.comUpson%20EMC%2 Facebook: https:www.facebook.comupson.emc Outage Hotline: 706-647-5475 References: EIA...

  14. Barrow Utils & Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Utils & Elec Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Barrow Utils & Elec Coop, Inc Place: Alaska Phone Number: 907-852-6166 Website: www.bueci.org Outage Hotline: After Hours:...

  15. Wayne-White Counties Elec Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wayne-White Counties Elec Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wayne-White Counties Elec Coop Place: Illinois Phone Number: (618) 842-2196 Website: waynewhitecoop.com Facebook:...

  16. HHH FEC Cooperation Mach Elec Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    HHH FEC Cooperation Mach Elec Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: HHH-FEC Cooperation Mach.&Elec. Co., Ltd Place: Weihai, Shanghai Municipality, China Zip: 264209 Sector:...

  17. Harrison County Rrl Elec Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Harrison County Rrl Elec Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name: Harrison County Rrl Elec Coop Place: Iowa Phone Number: 712-647-2727 Website: www.hcrec.coop Outage Hotline:...

  18. Harrison Rural Elec Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Harrison Rural Elec Assn, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Harrison Rural Elec Assn, Inc Place: West Virginia Phone Number: 304.624.6365 Website: www.harrisonrea.com...

  19. Panola-Harrison Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Panola-Harrison Elec Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Panola-Harrison Elec Coop, Inc Place: Texas Phone Number: (903) 935-7936 Website: www.phec.us Facebook: https:...

  20. Brown County Rural Elec Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rural Elec Assn Jump to: navigation, search Name: Brown County Rural Elec Assn Place: Minnesota Phone Number: 1-800-658-2368 Website: www.browncountyrea.coop Outage Hotline:...

  1. Deep East Texas Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Deep East Texas Elec Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Deep East Texas Elec Coop Inc Place: Texas Phone Number: 1-800-392-5986 Website: www.deepeast.com Facebook: https:...

  2. Rich Mountain Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rich Mountain Elec Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Rich Mountain Elec Coop, Inc Place: Arkansas Phone Number: 1-877-828-4074 Website: www.rmec.com Outage Hotline:...

  3. Central Hudson Gas & Elec Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas & Elec Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Central Hudson Gas & Elec Corp Place: New York Phone Number: 845-452-2700 or 1-800-527-2714 Website: www.centralhudson.com...

  4. Joe Wheeler Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Joe Wheeler Elec Member Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Joe Wheeler Elec Member Corp Place: Alabama Phone Number: (256) 552-2300 Website: www.jwemc.org Twitter: @jwemc...

  5. East End Mutual Elec Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    End Mutual Elec Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: East End Mutual Elec Co Ltd Place: Idaho Phone Number: (208) 436-9357 Website: www.electricunion.orgcompany- Outage...

  6. Virginia Mun Elec Assn No 1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elec Assn No 1 Jump to: navigation, search Name: Virginia Mun Elec Assn No 1 Place: Virginia Website: www.mepav.org References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -...

  7. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maine) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maine) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Maine Phone Number: 1-800-437-7645 Website:...

  8. South River Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River Elec Member Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: South River Elec Member Corp Place: North Carolina Phone Number: (910) 892-8071 Website: www.sremc.com Twitter: https:...

  9. Red River Valley Rrl Elec Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elec Assn Jump to: navigation, search Name: Red River Valley Rrl Elec Assn Place: Oklahoma Phone Number: 1-800-749-3364 or 580-564-1800 Website: www.rrvrea.com Twitter:...

  10. Clearwater-Polk Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clearwater-Polk Elec Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Clearwater-Polk Elec Coop Inc Place: Minnesota Phone Number: 218-694-6241 Website: www.clearwater-polk.com Outage...

  11. Big Horn County Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County Elec Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Big Horn County Elec Coop, Inc Place: Montana Phone Number: (406) 665-2830 Website: www.bhcec.com Outage Hotline: (406)...

  12. Public Service Elec & Gas Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elec & Gas Co Jump to: navigation, search Name: Public Service Elec & Gas Co Abbreviation: PSEG Place: New Jersey Year Founded: 1903 Phone Number: 1-800-436-7734 Website:...

  13. Mora-San Miguel Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mora-San Miguel Elec Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mora-San Miguel Elec Coop, Inc Place: New Mexico Phone Number: 575-387-2205 (Mora) -- 505-757-6490 (Pecos) Website:...

  14. Copper Valley Elec Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Valley Elec Assn, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Copper Valley Elec Assn, Inc Place: Alaska Phone Number: Copper Basin: 907-822-3211 or Valdez: 907-835-4301 Website:...

  15. New England Hydro-Tran Elec Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New England Hydro-Tran Elec Co Jump to: navigation, search Name: New England Hydro-Tran Elec Co Place: Massachusetts Phone Number: 860 729 9767 Website: www.nehydropower.com...

  16. Cavalier Rural Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rural Elec Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cavalier Rural Elec Coop, Inc Place: North Dakota Phone Number: 701-256-5511 Facebook: https:www.facebook.compages...

  17. Sioux Valley SW Elec Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SW Elec Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sioux Valley SW Elec Coop Place: Colman, South Dakota References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 SGIC2 EIA...

  18. Nelson Lagoon Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lagoon Elec Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Nelson Lagoon Elec Coop Inc Place: Alaska Phone Number: (907) 989-2204 Website: www.swamc.orghtmlsouthwest-a Outage...

  19. Denton County Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County Elec Coop, Inc Place: Texas Service Territory: Texas Website: www.coserv.com Outage Hotline: (800) 274-4014 Outage Map: outagemap.coserv.comexternal References: EIA...

  20. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Pennsylvania) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pennsylvania) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Pennsylvania References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

  1. Tipmont Rural Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Tipmont Rural Elec Member Corp Abbreviation: Tipmont REMC Address: 403 S Main St Place: Linden, Indiana Zip: 47955 Phone Number: 800-726-3953 Website:...

  2. Paulding-Putman Elec Coop, Inc (Indiana) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Paulding-Putman Elec Coop, Inc Address: 401 McDonald Pike Place: Paulding, Ohio Zip: 45879-9270 Service Territory: Indiana, Ohio Phone Number:...

  3. Panola-Harrison Elec Coop, Inc (Louisiana) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Louisiana) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Panola-Harrison Elec Coop, Inc Place: Louisiana Phone Number: (318) 933-5096 Outage Hotline: (318) 933-5096 References: EIA Form...

  4. Rich Mountain Elec Coop, Inc (Oklahoma) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc (Oklahoma) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Rich Mountain Elec Coop, Inc Place: Oklahoma Phone Number: 1-877-828-4074 Website: www.rmec.com Outage Hotline: 1-877-828-4074...

  5. North Georgia Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: North Georgia Elec Member Corp Place: Georgia Phone Number: Dalton: (706) 259-9441; Fort Oglethorpe: (706) 866-2231; Calhoun: (706) 629-3160; Trion:...

  6. Grundy County Rural Elec Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elec Coop Place: Iowa Phone Number: 319-824-5251 Website: www.grundycountyrecia.com Outage Hotline: 1-800-390-7605 Outage Map: www.iowarec.orgoutages References: EIA Form...

  7. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maryland) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maryland) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Maryland References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form...

  8. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Massachusetts) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Massachusetts Phone Number: 212-997-8500 Website: www.hess.com Twitter: @HessCorporation Facebook: https:www.facebook.com...

  9. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Rhode Island) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rhode Island) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Rhode Island References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

  10. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (New Hampshire) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: New Hampshire Phone Number: 1-800-437-7645 Website: www.hess.com Twitter: @HessCorporation Facebook: https:www.facebook.com...

  11. Oliver-Mercer Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oliver-Mercer Elec Coop Inc Place: North Dakota References: Energy Information Administration.1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 14088 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI...

  12. Blue Ridge Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Ridge Elec Member Corp Place: North Carolina Phone Number: 1-800-448-2383 Website: www.blueridgeemc.com Twitter: @blueridgeemc Facebook: https:www.facebook.comBlueRidgeEMC...

  13. Southern Pine Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Southern Pine Elec Coop, Inc Place: Alabama Phone Number: Atmore Office: 251.368.4842; Brewton Office: 251.867.5415; Evergreen Office: 251.578.3460; Frisco...

  14. East Mississippi Elec Pwr Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: East Mississippi Elec Pwr Assn Place: Mississippi Phone Number: Meridian Office: 601-581-8600 -- Quitman Office: 601-776-6271 -- DeKalb Office: 601-743-2641 --...

  15. South Louisiana Elec Coop Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: South Louisiana Elec Coop Assn Place: Louisiana Phone Number: Houma Office: (985) 876-6880 or Amelia Office: (985) 631-3605 Website: www.sleca.com Facebook:...

  16. French Broad Elec Member Corp (Tennessee) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    French Broad Elec Member Corp Place: Tennessee Phone Number: (828)649-2051 or (828)688-4815 or (800)222-6190 or (828)682-6121 Website: www.frenchbroademc.com Twitter:...

  17. French Broad Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    French Broad Elec Member Corp Place: North Carolina Phone Number: (828)649-2051 or (828)688-4815 or (800)222-6190 or (828)682-6121 Website: www.frenchbroademc.com Twitter:...

  18. Morgan County Rural Elec Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Morgan County Rural Elec Assn Place: Colorado Website: www.mcrea.org Twitter: @MorganCountyREA Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesMorgan-County-Rural-Ele...

  19. Heartland Rural Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elec Coop, Inc Place: Kansas Phone Number: (800) 835-9586 Website: www.heartland-rec.com Twitter: @HeartlandREC Facebook: https:www.facebook.comHeartlandREC Outage Hotline:...

  20. Central Valley Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Central Valley Elec Coop, Inc Place: New Mexico Phone Number: (575) 746-3571 Website: cvecoop.org Outage Hotline: (575) 746-3571...

  1. New England Elec Transm'n Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Transm'n Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: New England Elec Transm'n Corp Place: New Hampshire References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861...

  2. North Central Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Elec Coop, Inc Place: Ohio Website: www.ncelec.org Twitter: @NorthCentralEC Facebook: https:www.facebook.comNorthCentralElectric Outage Hotline: 419-426-3072 ...

  3. Buckeye Rural Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Buckeye Rural Elec Coop, Inc Place: Ohio Website: www.buckeyerec.commain Facebook: https:www.facebook.combuckeyerec Outage Hotline: 1-800-282-7204 References: EIA Form EIA-861...

  4. Bailey County Elec Coop Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elec Coop Assn Place: Texas Phone Number: (806) 272-4504 Website: www.bcecoop.com Facebook: https:www.facebook.combcecoop Outage Hotline: (806) 272-4504 References: EIA Form...

  5. Comanche County Elec Coop Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Comanche County Elec Coop Assn Place: Texas Website: www.ceca.coophome.aspx Facebook: https:www.facebook.comCECA.coop Outage Hotline: 1-800-915-2533 References: EIA Form...

  6. Elec District No. 5 Maricopa C | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    District No. 5 Maricopa C Jump to: navigation, search Name: Elec District No. 5 Maricopa C Place: Arizona Phone Number: (480) 610-8741 Outage Hotline: (480) 610-8741 References:...

  7. Delaware County Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Delaware County Elec Coop Inc Place: New York Phone Number: (607) 746-9283 or Toll Free at (866) 436-1223 Website: www.dce.coop Facebook: https:www.facebook.compages...

  8. Raft River Rural Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raft River Rural Elec Coop Inc Place: Idaho Service Territory: Idaho, Utah, Nevada Phone Number: 208-645-2211 Website: rrelectric.com Facebook: https:www.facebook.compages...

  9. Sam Rayburn G&T Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sam Rayburn G&T Elec Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sam Rayburn G&T Elec Coop Inc Place: Texas Phone Number: (936) 560-9532 Outage Hotline: (936) 560-9532 References:...

  10. A Resource assessment protocol for GEO-ELEC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource assessment protocol for GEO-ELEC Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: A Resource assessment protocol for GEO-ELEC Authors...

  11. Steuben Rural Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Steuben Rural Elec Coop, Inc Place: New York Phone Number: 607-776-4161 or 800-843-3414 or 716-296-5651 or 800-883-8236 Website: www.steubenrec.coop Outage Hotline: 1-866-430-4293...

  12. MHK Projects/Homeowner Tidal Power Elec Gen | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Homeowner Tidal Power Elec Gen < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","typ...

  13. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (New York) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: New York References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 22509 This article is a...

  14. The RenewElec Project: Variable Renewable Energy and the Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apt, Jay

    2014-02-14

    Variable energy resources, such as wind power, now produce about 4% of U.S. electricity. They can play a significantly expanded role if the U.S. adopts a systems approach that considers affordability, security and reliability. Reaching a 20-30% renewable portfolio standard goal is possible, but not without changes in the management and regulation of the power system, including accurately assessing and preparing for the operational effects of renewable generation. The RenewElec project will help the nation make the transition to the use of significant amounts of electric generation from variable and intermittent sources of renewable power.

  15. Lakes_Elec_You

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Lakes, Electricity & You Why It's So Important That Lakes Are Used To Generate Electricity Why We Can Thank Our Lakes For Electricity Because lakes were made to generate electricity. Back in the mid-1940s, Congress recognized the need for better flood control and navigation. To pay for these services, Congress passed laws that started the building of federal hydroelectric dams, and sold the power from the dams under long-term contracts. Today these dams provide efficient, environmentally

  16. Trace Holdings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Holdings Jump to: navigation, search Name: Trace Holdings Product: Trace Holdings is now fully integrated in Xantrex Technologies Inc following a 2000 merger. References: Trace...

  17. Stack Trace Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-01-16

    STAT is a light weight debugging tool that gathers and merges stack traces from all of the processes in a parallel application. STAT uses the MRNet free based overlay network to broadcast commands from the tool front-end to the STAT daemons and for the front-end to gather the traces from the STAT daemons. As the traces propagate through the MRNet network tree, they are merged across all tasks to form a single call prefix tree.more » The call prefix tree can be examined to identify tasks with similar function call patterns and to delineate a small set of equivalence classes. A representative task from each of these classes can then be fed into a full feature debugger like TotalView for root cause analysis.« less

  18. Stack Trace Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-02-19

    STAT is a light weight debugging tool that gathers and merges stack traces from all of the processes in a parallell application. STAT uses the MRNet tree based overlay network to broadcast commands from the tool front-end to the STAT daemons and for the front-end to gather the traces from the STAT daemons. As the traces propagate through the MRNet network tree, they are merged across all tasks to from a single call prefix tree.more » The call prefix tree can be examined to identify tasks with similar function call patterns and to delineate a small set of equivalence slasses. A representative task from each of these classes can then be fed into a full feature debugger like TotalView for root cause analysis.« less

  19. Carbon Bearing Trace Gases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Bearing Trace Gases A critical scientific and policy oriented question is what are the present day sources and sinks of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the natural environment and how will these sinks evolve under rising CO2 concentrations and expected climate change and ecosystem response. Sources and sinks of carbon dioxide impart their signature on the distribution, concentration, and isotopic composition of CO2. Spatial and temporal trends (variability) provide information on the net surface

  20. Trace 700 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Trace 700 AgencyCompany Organization: Trane Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics: Technology characterizations...

  1. Concealed wire tracing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method that combines a signal generator and a passive signal receiver to detect and record the path of partially or completely concealed electrical wiring without disturbing the concealing surface. The signal generator applies a series of electrical pulses to the selected wiring of interest. The applied pulses create a magnetic field about the wiring that can be detected by a coil contained within the signal receiver. An audible output connected to the receiver and driven by the coil reflects the receivers position with respect to the wiring. The receivers audible signal is strongest when the receiver is directly above the wiring and the long axis of the receivers coil is parallel to the wiring. A marking means is mounted on the receiver to mark the location of the wiring as the receiver is directed over the wiring's concealing surface. Numerous marks made on various locations of the concealing surface will trace the path of the wiring of interest.

  2. Concealed wire tracing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    An apparatus and method that combines a signal generator and a passive signal receiver to detect and record the path of partially or completely concealed electrical wiring without disturbing the concealing surface is disclosed. The signal generator applies a series of electrical pulses to the selected wiring of interest. The applied pulses create a magnetic field about the wiring that can be detected by a coil contained within the signal receiver. An audible output connected to the receiver and driven by the coil reflects the receivers position with respect to the wiring. The receivers audible signal is strongest when the receiver is directly above the wiring and the long axis of the receivers coil is parallel to the wiring. A marking means is mounted on the receiver to mark the location of the wiring as the receiver is directed over the wiring's concealing surface. Numerous marks made on various locations of the concealing surface will trace the path of the wiring of interest. 4 figs.

  3. ARM - Measurement - Trace gas concentration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govMeasurementsTrace gas concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement...

  4. Illinois Municipal Elec Agency | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility...

  5. Northwestern Wisconsin Elec Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate...

  6. Cumberland Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 Energy Information Administration Form 8262 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 4624 Utility Location Yes Ownership C...

  7. Central Wisconsin Elec Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    https:www.facebook.compagesCentral-Wisconsin-Electric-Cooperative268841143249085?refaymthomepagepanel Outage Hotline: 800-377-2932 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  8. Northern Virginia Elec Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 13640 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes This...

  9. Rutherford Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1-800-521-0920 or 1-800-228-9756 or 1-800-228-5331 Outage Map: www.remc.comstorm-centerouta References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 Energy...

  10. Western Massachusetts Elec Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Green Button Access: Implemented Green Button Landing Page: www.wmeco.comResidential Green Button Reference Page: www.wmeco.comResidential References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  11. Cumberland Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Schedules Grid-background.png Average Rates Residential: 0.1060kWh Commercial: 0.1120kWh Industrial: 0.0733kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data...

  12. Infrared trace element detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.; Matthew, M.W.

    1988-11-15

    An infrared trace element detection system includes an optical cell into which the sample fluid to be examined is introduced and removed. Also introduced into the optical cell is a sample beam of infrared radiation in a first wavelength band which is significantly absorbed by the trace element and a second wavelength band which is not significantly absorbed by the trace element for passage through the optical cell through the sample fluid. The output intensities of the sample beam of radiation are selectively detected in the first and second wavelength bands. The intensities of a reference beam of the radiation are similarly detected in the first and second wavelength bands. The sensed output intensity of the sample beam in one of the first and second wavelength bands is normalized with respect to the other and similarly, the intensity of the reference beam of radiation in one of the first and second wavelength bands is normalized with respect to the other. The normalized sample beam intensity and normalized reference beam intensity are then compared to provide a signal from which the amount of trace element in the sample fluid can be determined. 11 figs.

  13. Distributed trace using central performance counter memory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satterfield, David L.; Sexton, James C.

    2013-01-22

    A plurality of processing cores, are central storage unit having at least memory connected in a daisy chain manner, forming a daisy chain ring layout on an integrated chip. At least one of the plurality of processing cores places trace data on the daisy chain connection for transmitting the trace data to the central storage unit, and the central storage unit detects the trace data and stores the trace data in the memory co-located in with the central storage unit.

  14. Distributed trace using central performance counter memory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satterfield, David L; Sexton, James C

    2013-10-22

    A plurality of processing cores, are central storage unit having at least memory connected in a daisy chain manner, forming a daisy chain ring layout on an integrated chip. At least one of the plurality of processing cores places trace data on the daisy chain connection for transmitting the trace data to the central storage unit, and the central storage unit detects the trace data and stores the trace data in the memory co-located in with the central storage unit.

  15. Trace Replay and Network Simulation Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-03-23

    TraceR is a trace reply tool built upon the ROSS-based CODES simulation framework. TraceR can be used for predicting network performances and understanding network behavior by simulating messaging in High Performance Computing applications on interconnection networks.

  16. Trace Element Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Trace Element Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region...

  17. Easy system call tracing for Plan 9.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minnich, Ronald G.

    2010-09-01

    Tracing system calls makes debugging easy and fast. On Plan 9, traditionally, system call tracing has been implemented with acid. New systems do not always implement all the capabilities needed for Acid, particularly the ability to rewrite the process code space to insert breakpoints. Architecture support libraries are not always available for Acid, or may not work even on a supported architecture. The requirement that Acid's libraries be available can be a problem on systems with a very small memory footprint, such as High Performance Computing systems where every Kbyte counts. Finally, Acid tracing is inconvenient in the presence of forks, which means tracing shell pipelines is particularly troublesome. The strace program available on most Unix systems is far more convenient to use and more capable than Acid for system call tracing. A similar system on Plan 9 can simplify troubleshooting. We have built a system calling tracing capability into the Plan 9 kernel. It has proven to be more convenient than strace in programming effort. One can write a shell script to implement tracing, and the C code to implement an strace equivalent is several orders of magnitude smaller.

  18. Method for remote detection of trace contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simonson, Robert J.; Hance, Bradley G.

    2003-09-09

    A method for remote detection of trace contaminants in a target area comprises applying sensor particles that preconcentrate the trace contaminant to the target area and detecting the contaminant-sensitive fluorescence from the sensor particles. The sensor particles can have contaminant-sensitive and contaminant-insensitive fluorescent compounds to enable the determination of the amount of trace contaminant present in the target are by relative comparison of the emission of the fluorescent compounds by a local or remote fluorescence detector. The method can be used to remotely detect buried minefields.

  19. SolTrace Optical Analysis Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-12-31

    SolTrace is a software package that models solar power optical systems and analyzes their performance. SolTrace can model parabolic trough collectors, point-focus concentrating systems, and power towers. It rapidly displays and saves data as scatter plots, flux maps, and performance graphs. SolTrace can model optical geometry as a series of stages, composed of optical elements that possess attributes such as shape, contour, and optical quality. It can also model any number of stages containing anymore » number of different elements, and it features an extensive variety of available shapes and contours.« less

  20. TRACE ELEMENT ANALYSES OF URANIUM MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beals, D; Charles Shick, C

    2008-06-09

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed an analytical method to measure many trace elements in a variety of uranium materials at the high part-per-billion (ppb) to low part-per-million (ppm) levels using matrix removal and analysis by quadrapole ICP-MS. Over 35 elements were measured in uranium oxides, acetate, ore and metal. Replicate analyses of samples did provide precise results however none of the materials was certified for trace element content thus no measure of the accuracy could be made. The DOE New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) does provide a Certified Reference Material (CRM) that has provisional values for a series of trace elements. The NBL CRM were purchased and analyzed to determine the accuracy of the method for the analysis of trace elements in uranium oxide. These results are presented and discussed in the following paper.

  1. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

    1983-08-15

    A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  2. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, Milton (Palos Park, IL); Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Nagy, Zoltan (Woodridge, IL)

    1984-01-01

    A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  3. Trace anomaly on a quantum spacetime manifold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spallucci, Euro; Smailagic, Anais; Nicolini, Piero

    2006-04-15

    In this paper we investigate the trace anomaly in a space-time where single events are delocalized as a consequence of short distance quantum coordinate fluctuations. We obtain a modified form of heat kernel asymptotic expansion which does not suffer from short distance divergences. Calculation of the trace anomaly is performed using an IR regulator in order to circumvent the absence of UV infinities. The explicit form of the trace anomaly is presented and the corresponding 2D Polyakov effective action and energy-momentum tensor are obtained. The vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor in the Boulware, Hartle-Hawking and Unruh vacua is explicitly calculated in a rt section of a recently found, noncommutative inspired, Schwarzschild-like solution of the Einstein equations. The standard short distance divergences in the vacuum expectation values are regularized in agreement with the absence of UV infinities removed by quantum coordinate fluctuations.

  4. Analyzing PICL trace data with MEDEA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merlo, A.P.; Worley, P.H.

    1993-11-01

    Execution traces and performance statistics can be collected for parallel applications on a variety of multiprocessor platforms by using the Portable Instrumented Communication Library (PICL). The static and dynamic performance characteristics of performance data can be analyzed easily and effectively with the facilities provided within the MEasurements Description Evaluation and Analysis tool (MEDEA). This report describes the integration of the PICL trace file format into MEDEA. A case study is then outlined that uses PICL and MEDEA to characterize the performance of a parallel benchmark code executed on different hardware platforms and using different parallel algorithms and communication protocols.

  5. Spent fuel pool analysis using TRACE code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez-Saez, F.; Carlos, S.; Villanueva, J. F.; Martorell, S.

    2012-07-01

    The storage requirements of Spent Fuel Pools have been analyzed with the purpose to increase their rack capacities. In the past, the thermal limits have been mainly evaluated with conservative codes developed for this purpose, although some works can be found in which a best estimate code is used. The use of best estimate codes is interesting as they provide more realistic calculations and they have the capability of analyzing a wide range of transients that could affect the Spent Fuel Pool. Two of the most representative thermal-hydraulic codes are RELAP-5 and TRAC. Nowadays, TRACE code is being developed to make use of the more favorable characteristics of RELAP-5 and TRAC codes. Among the components coded in TRACE that can be used to construct the model, it is interesting to use the VESSEL component, which has the capacity of reproducing three dimensional phenomena. In this work, a thermal-hydraulic model of the Maine Yankee spent fuel pool using the TRACE code is developed. Such model has been used to perform a licensing calculation and the results obtained have been compared with experimental measurements made at the pool, showing a good agreement between the calculations predicted by TRACE and the experimental data. (authors)

  6. Ambient methods and apparatus for rapid laser trace constituent analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, Stuart C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Partin, Judy K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grandy, Jon D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jeffery, Charles L. (Blackfoot, ID)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for measuring trace amounts of constituents in samples by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence under ambient conditions. The laser induced fluorescence is performed at a selected wavelength corresponding to an absorption state of a selected trace constituent. The intensity value of the emission decay signal which is generated by the trace constituent is compared to calibrated emission intensity decay values to determine the amount of trace constituent present.

  7. Gaseous trace impurity analyzer and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jr., David (Bellport, NY); Schneider, William (Setauket, NY)

    1980-01-01

    Simple apparatus for analyzing trace impurities in a gas, such as helium or hydrogen, comprises means for drawing a measured volume of the gas as sample into a heated zone. A segregable portion of the zone is then chilled to condense trace impurities in the gas in the chilled portion. The gas sample is evacuated from the heated zone including the chilled portion. Finally, the chilled portion is warmed to vaporize the condensed impurities in the order of their boiling points. As the temperature of the chilled portion rises, pressure will develop in the evacuated, heated zone by the vaporization of an impurity. The temperature at which the pressure increase occurs identifies that impurity and the pressure increase attained until the vaporization of the next impurity causes a further pressure increase is a measure of the quantity of the preceding impurity.

  8. Plumas-Sierra Rural Elec Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PlumasSierraREC Outage Hotline: (800) 555-2207 Outage Map: www.psrec.coopservice-area.ph References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data...

  9. Golden Valley Elec Assn Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    36,891 1,877.823 13,175.914 6,327 8,171.591 69,159.555 448 14,556.482 111,832.096 43,666 2009-01 5,677.62 38,170.143 36,902 2,140.742 15,217.149 6,337 8,864.82 76,857.948 449...

  10. New York State Elec & Gas Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    76,528 8,823 123,751 1,276 219 2,550 4 97,366 787,691 737,183 2008-01 71,181 538,900 666,439 24,517 211,875 77,744 4,058 66,989 1,321 204 2,341 4 99,960 820,105 745,508...

  11. Navasota Valley Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Website: www.navasotavalley.com Facebook: https:www.facebook.comnavasotavalley Outage Hotline: 1-800-443-9462 Outage Map: outages.navasotavalley.com:85 References: EIA...

  12. Central Florida Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Place: Florida Phone Number: 1-800-227-1302 or 352-493-2511 Website: www.cfec.com Outage Hotline: 1-800-227-1302 or 352-493-2511 Outage Map: www.cfec.comoutage-mapsite...

  13. Fall River Rural Elec Coop Inc (Wyoming) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Website: www.fallriverelectric.com Facebook: https:www.facebook.comFallRiverREC Outage Hotline: 1.866.887.8442 (After Hours) Outage Map: outage.fallriverelectric.como...

  14. Mountain View Elec Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Place: Colorado Website: www.mvea.coop Facebook: https:www.facebook.comMVEAInc Outage Hotline: (800) 388-9881 Outage Map: outage.mvea.org References: EIA Form EIA-861...

  15. Columbia Basin Elec Cooperative, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 4005 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  16. Guadalupe Valley Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 7752 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes...

  17. Houston County Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 8898 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity...

  18. Southern Indiana Gas & Elec Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 Energy Information Administration Form 8262 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 17633 Utility Location Yes Ownership I...

  19. Calhoun County Elec Coop Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesCalhoun-County-REC173498466069004?skwall Outage Hotline: 800-821-4879 Outage Map: www.iowarec.orgoutages References: EIA Form...

  20. Maquoketa Valley Rrl Elec Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Iowa Phone Number: 319-462-3542 or 800-927-6068 Website: mvec.com Twitter: @mvecia Facebook: https:www.facebook.comMaquoketaValleyElectricCooperative Outage Hotline:...

  1. Wright-Hennepin Coop Elec Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3,398.952 34,434.725 40,549 1,975.209 23,239.907 4,920 388.083 5,035.346 51 5,762.244 62,709.978 45,520 2008-04 3,544.862 38,665.009 40,564 1,688.916 21,647.519 4,965 376.604...

  2. Arkansas Valley Elec Coop Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3,460 776 15,071 13 7,532 101,140 52,031 2009-01 5,376 71,871 48,524 794 11,779 3,462 709 14,853 13 6,879 98,503 51,999 2008-12 4,441 59,651 48,487 736 11,437 3,460 541 15,069...

  3. East River Elec Pwr Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesEd-the-Energy-Expert431620883566287?refts&frefts Outage Hotline: (605) 256-8057 or (605) 256-8056 or (605) 256-8059...

  4. Central Texas Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    https:www.facebook.compagesCentral-Texas-Electric-Cooperative520773011297941?reftntnmn Outage Hotline: 1-800-900-2832 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for...

  5. Southwest Iowa Rural Elec Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    888-220-4869 Website: www.swiarec.coop Facebook: https:www.facebook.comswiarec?refhl Outage Hotline: (888) 220-4869 Outage Map: www.iowarec.orgoutages References: EIA...

  6. Four County Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.facebook.compagesFour-County-Electric-Membership-Corporation188316197857616?reftntnmn Outage Hotline: (888)368-7289 Outage Map: gis.fourcty.orgpubmap.html...

  7. Paulding-Putman Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 14599 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  8. Northeast Texas Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 13670 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying...

  9. Pioneer Rural Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 15054 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  10. Northern Neck Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 13762 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  11. Cookson Hills Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 4296 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  12. Western Farmers Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 20447 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes...

  13. Upshur Rural Elec Coop Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 19579 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  14. Jefferson Davis Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 9682 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  15. Big Sandy Rural Elec Coop Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.bigsandyrecc.com Twitter: @bigsandycoop Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesBig-Sandy-RECC142216049157162 Outage Hotline: 888-789-7322 Outage Map:...

  16. Butler County Rural Elec Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Iowa Phone Number: 888-267-2726 Website: www.butlerrec.coop Twitter: @ButlerCountyREC Facebook: https:www.facebook.combcrec Outage Hotline: 888-267-2726 Outage Map:...

  17. Osage Valley Elec Coop Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Outage Hotline: 660-679-3131 or 800-889-6832 Outage Map: ebill.osagevalley.comomsouta References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861...

  18. Canadian Valley Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    anadianValleyElectric Outage Hotline: (855)875-7166 Outage Map: ebill.canadianvalley.orgomso References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data...

  19. Claverack Rural Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Outage Hotline: 1-800-326-9799 or 570-265-2167 Outage Map: ebill.claverack.comomsoutage References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861...

  20. Monroe County Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hours (618) 939-7171 or (800) 757-7433 or (866) 567-2759 Outage Map: ebill.mcec.orgomsoutageMap References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form...

  1. Roosevelt County Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3,749 3,650 146 1,178 965 1,478 13,978 1,594 2,017 18,905 6,209 2008-06 357 3,560 3,638 132 1,092 961 1,347 13,188 1,579 1,836 17,840 6,178 2008-05 292 2,856 3,639 128 1,070 964...

  2. Southern Pine Elec Power Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    87,734 60,157 3,222 30,360 4,536 5,087 63,820 24 18,195 181,914 64,717 2008-05 6,897 62,132 60,058 2,887 27,862 4,522 4,430 56,228 24 14,214 146,222 64,604 2008-04 6,581 59,423...

  3. Singing River Elec Pwr Assn (Mississippi) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    9,647.445 93,322.028 60,225 3,117.42 30,825.248 8,207 692.763 8,259.846 11 13,457.628 132,407.122 68,443 2008-06 9,059.584 86,892.462 60,106 3,046.146 30,089.083 8,193 709.428...

  4. Duck River Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    10,355 1,290 21,368 18 13,312 170,739 70,025 2008-01 8,728 110,789 59,691 2,848 31,132 10,373 1,150 18,079 18 12,726 160,000 70,082 References "EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  5. Dakota Valley Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1,101.081 16,334.085 5,106 390.564 6,162.524 588 1,168.972 25,110.935 332 2,660.617 47,607.544 6,026 2008-12 1,130.851 17,821.033 5,108 429.98 6,905.622 589 861.853 26,018.826...

  6. Verdigris Valley Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS 2009-03 3,334 39,732 29,287 620 6,280 4,308 487 5,668 607 4,441 51,680 34,202 2009-02 3,065 36,726 29,285 456 4,469 4,299 405 4,606 607 3,926...

  7. Southern Indiana Gas & Elec Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    104,006.182 18,545 11,514.897 200,402.234 101 33,244.465 421,608.6 146,543 2008-02 12,607.003 129,571.861 128,066 9,445.235 104,704.602 18,561 11,374.157 198,519.29 100...

  8. Jones-Onslow Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    56,736 2,076 24,111 4,679 10,879 107,097 61,415 2008-07 8,471 79,614 56,654 1,971 22,607 4,668 10,442 102,221 61,322 2008-06 6,356 61,755 56,244 1,774 20,036 4,651 8,130 81,791...

  9. RegIntlElecTrade_Eng_final.PDF

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    North America Regulation of International Electricity Trade prepared by North American Energy Working Group December 2002 2 The North American Energy Working Group The North American Energy Working Group (NAEW G) was established in spring of 2001 by the Canadian Minister of Natural Resources, the Mexican Secretary of Energy and the U.S. Secretary of Energy, to enhance North American energy cooperation. The Group is led by officials from Natural Resources Canada, the Mexican Secretariat of

  10. Analyzing PICL trace data with MEDEA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merlo, A.P.; Worley, P.H.

    1994-04-01

    Execution traces and performance statistics can be collected for parallel applications on a variety of multiprocessor platforms by using the Portable Instrumented Communication Library (PICL). The static and dynamic performance characteristics of performance characteristics of performance data can be analyzed easily and effectively with the facilities provided within the MEasurements Description Evaluation and Analysis tool (MEDEA). A case study is then outlined that uses PICL and MEDEA to characterize the performance of a parallel benchmark code executed on different hardware platforms and using different parallel algorithms and communication protocols.

  11. Method for detecting trace impurities in gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Freund, Samuel M. (Santa Fe, NM); Maier, II, William B. (Los Alamos, NM); Holland, Redus F. (Los Alamos, NM); Beattie, Willard H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01

    A technique for considerably improving the sensitivity and specificity of infrared spectrometry as applied to quantitative determination of trace impurities in various carrier or solvent gases is presented. A gas to be examined for impurities is liquefied and infrared absorption spectra of the liquid are obtained. Spectral simplification and number densities of impurities in the optical path are substantially higher than are obtainable in similar gas-phase analyses. Carbon dioxide impurity (.about.2 ppm) present in commercial Xe and ppm levels of Freon 12 and vinyl chloride added to liquefied air are used to illustrate the method.

  12. Magnetic Field Line Tracing Calculations for Conceptual PFC Design...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Magnetic Field Line Tracing Calculations for Conceptual PFC Design in the National Compact Stellarator Experiment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic...

  13. Magnetic Field Line Tracing Calculations for Conceptual PFC Design...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PFC Design in the National Compact Stellarator Experiment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic Field Line Tracing Calculations for Conceptual PFC Design in the ...

  14. Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters- Lessons Learned From Mammoth Mountain, USA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  15. Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Journal Article: Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters- Lessons Learned From Mammoth Mountain, Usa Abstract A major campaign to quantify the...

  16. Trace Element Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Christensen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    release has occurred. References Odin D. Christensen, Regina A. Capuano, Joseph N. Moore (1983) Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot...

  17. Potential trace element emissions from the gasification of Illinois...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the gasification of Illinois coals. Duplicate determinations of 34 elements in coal and ash samples Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Potential trace element emissions...

  18. Spark discharge trace element detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler-Golden, S.; Bernstein, L.S.; Bien, F.

    1988-08-23

    A spark discharge trace element detection system is provided which includes a spark chamber including a pair of electrodes for receiving a sample of gas to be analyzed at no greater than atmospheric pressure. A voltage is provided across the electrodes for generating a spark in the sample. The intensity of the emitted radiation in at least one primary selected narrow band of the radiation is detected. Each primary band corresponds to an element to be detected in the gas. The intensity of the emission in each detected primary band is integrated during the afterglow time interval of the spark emission and a signal representative of the integrated intensity of the emission in each selected primary bond is utilized to determine the concentration of the corresponding element in the gas. 12 figs.

  19. Trace Assessment for BWR ATWS Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, L.Y.; Diamond, D.; Arantxa Cuadra, Gilad Raitses, Arnold Aronson

    2010-04-22

    A TRACE/PARCS input model has been developed in order to be able to analyze anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) in a boiling water reactor. The model is based on one developed previously for the Browns Ferry reactor for doing loss-of-coolant accident analysis. This model was updated by adding the control systems needed for ATWS and a core model using PARCS. The control systems were based on models previously developed for the TRAC-B code. The PARCS model is based on information (e.g., exposure and moderator density (void) history distributions) obtained from General Electric Hitachi and cross sections for GE14 fuel obtained from an independent source. The model is able to calculate an ATWS, initiated by the closure of main steam isolation valves, with recirculation pump trip, water level control, injection of borated water from the standby liquid control system and actuation of the automatic depres-surization system. The model is not considered complete and recommendations are made on how it should be improved.

  20. Trace elements in oil shale. Progress report, 1979-1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chappell, W R

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this research program is to understand the potential impact of an oil shale industry on environmental levels of trace contaminants in the region. The program involves a comprehensive study of the sources, release mechanisms, transport, fate, and effects of toxic trace chemicals, principally the trace elements, in an oil shale industry. The overall objective of the program is to evaluate the environmental and health consequences of the release of toxic trace elements by shale and oil production and use. The baseline geochemical survey shows that stable trace elements maps can be constructed for numerous elements and that the trends observed are related to geologic and climatic factors. Shale retorted by above-ground processes tends to be very homogeneous (both in space and in time) in trace element content. Leachate studies show that significant amounts of B, F, and Mo are released from retorted shales and while B and Mo are rapidly flushed out, F is not. On the other hand, As, Se, and most other trace elements are not present in significant quantities. Significant amounts of F and B are also found in leachates of raw shales. Very large concentrations of reduced sulfur species are found in leachates of processed shale. Very high levels of B and Mo are taken up in some plants growing on processed shale with and without soil cover. There is a tendency for some trace elements to associate with specific organic fractions, indicating that organic chelation or complexation may play an important role. Many of the so-called standard methods for analyzing trace elements in oil shale-related materials are inadequate. A sampling manual is being written for the environmental scientist and practicing engineer. A new combination of methods is developed for separating the minerals in oil shale into different density fractions. Microbial investigations have tentatively identified the existence of thiobacilli in oil shale materials such as leachates. (DC)

  1. Tax Deduction Qualified Software: TRACE Version 6.3.2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that the TRACE version 6.3.2 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D (c)(1) and (d) Regulations Notice 2006-52, Section 6 requirements as amplified by Notice 2008-40, Section 4 requirements.

  2. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer An important risk at CO2 storage sites is the potential for groundwater quality impacts. As

  3. Technique for identifying, tracing, or tracking objects in image data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Robert J. (Albuquerque, NM); Rothganger, Fredrick (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-08-28

    A technique for computer vision uses a polygon contour to trace an object. The technique includes rendering a polygon contour superimposed over a first frame of image data. The polygon contour is iteratively refined to more accurately trace the object within the first frame after each iteration. The refinement includes computing image energies along lengths of contour lines of the polygon contour and adjusting positions of the contour lines based at least in part on the image energies.

  4. Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy

  5. NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - SolTrace Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SolTrace Concentrating Solar Power Research SolTrace is a software tool developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to model concentrating solar power (CSP) systems and analyze their optical performance. Although ideally suited for solar applications, the code can also be used to model and characterize many general optical systems. The creation of the code evolved out of a need to model more complex solar optical systems than could be modeled with existing tools. The code

  6. NAS Report and Microsite Trace SSL Evolution and Future Promise |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy NAS Report and Microsite Trace SSL Evolution and Future Promise NAS Report and Microsite Trace SSL Evolution and Future Promise February 10, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) has added a new microsite to complement its 2013 report, Assessment of Advanced Solid State Lighting. The report explores the history of public policy on lighting, evaluates costs and consumer acceptance issues, assesses the development of LED and OLED technologies, and

  7. AN OVERVIEW OF TOOL FOR RESPONSE ACTION COST ESTIMATING (TRACE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FERRIES SR; KLINK KL; OSTAPKOWICZ B

    2012-01-30

    Tools and techniques that provide improved performance and reduced costs are important to government programs, particularly in current times. An opportunity for improvement was identified for preparation of cost estimates used to support the evaluation of response action alternatives. As a result, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company has developed Tool for Response Action Cost Estimating (TRACE). TRACE is a multi-page Microsoft Excel{reg_sign} workbook developed to introduce efficiencies into the timely and consistent production of cost estimates for response action alternatives. This tool combines costs derived from extensive site-specific runs of commercially available remediation cost models with site-specific and estimator-researched and derived costs, providing the best estimating sources available. TRACE also provides for common quantity and key parameter links across multiple alternatives, maximizing ease of updating estimates and performing sensitivity analyses, and ensuring consistency.

  8. Trace metal levels and partitioning in Wisconsin rivers: Results of background trace metals study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, M.M.; Overdier, J.T.; Armstrong, D.E.; Hurley, J.P.; Webb, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    Levels of total and filtrable Ag, Al, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in 41 Wisconsin rivers draining watersheds of distinct homogeneous characteristics (land use/cover, soil type, surficial geology) were quantified. Levels, fluxes, and yields of trace metals are interpreted in terms of principal geochemical controls. The study samples were also used to evaluate the capability of modern ICP-MS techniques for ``background`` level quantification of metals. Order-of-magnitude variations in levels of a given metal between sites was measured. This large natural variance reflects influences of soil type, dissolved organic matter (DOC), ionic strength, and suspended particulate matter (SPM) on metal levels. Significant positive correlations between DOC levels and filtrable metal concentrations were observed, demonstrating the important role that DOC plays in metal speciation and behavior. Systematic, chemically consistent, differences in behavior between the metals is evident with partition coefficients (K,) and fraction in particulate forms ranking in the order: Al > Pb > Zn > Cr >Cd > Cu. Total metal yields correlate well with SPM yields, especially for highly partitioned elements, whereas filtrable metal yields reflect the interplay of partitioning and water yield. The State of Wisconsin will use these data in a re-evaluation of regulatory limits and in the development of water effects ratio criteria.

  9. Dynamic ray tracing and traveltime corrections for global seismic tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian Yue Hung, S.-H.; Nolet, Guust; Montelli, Raffaella; Dahlen, F.A.

    2007-09-10

    We present a dynamic ray tracing program for a spherically symmetric Earth that may be used to compute Frechet kernels for traveltime and amplitude anomalies at finite frequency. The program works for arbitrarily defined phases and background models. The numerical precisions of kinematic and dynamic ray tracing are optimized to produce traveltime errors under 0.1 s, which is well below the data uncertainty in global seismology. This tolerance level is obtained for an integration step size of about 20 km for the most common seismic phases. We also give software to compute ellipticity, crustal and topographic corrections and attenuation.

  10. Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith Traps Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be

  11. Method for removing trace pollutants from aqueous solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, Gary L. (Centerville, OH)

    1986-01-01

    A method of substantially removing a trace metallic contaminant from a liquid containing the same comprises, adding an oxidizing agent to a liquid containing a trace amount of a metallic contaminant of a concentration of up to about 10.sup.-1 ppm, the oxidizing agent being one which oxidizes the contaminant to form an oxidized product which is insoluble in the liquid and precipitates therefrom, and the conditions of the addition being selected to ensure that the precipitation of the oxidized product is homogeneous, and separating the homogeneously precipitated product from the liquid.

  12. Automated Tracing of Horizontal Neuron Processes During Retinal Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerekes, Ryan A [ORNL; Martins, Rodrigo [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital; Dyer, Michael A [ORNL; Gleason, Shaun Scott [ORNL; Karakaya, Mahmut [ORNL; Davis, Denise [St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

    2011-01-01

    In the developing mammalian retina, horizontal neurons undergo a dramatic reorganization oftheir processes shortly after they migrate to their appropriate laminar position. This is an importantprocess because it is now understood that the apical processes are important for establishing theregular mosaic of horizontal cells in the retina and proper reorganization during lamination isrequired for synaptogenesis with photoreceptors and bipolar neurons. However, this process isdifficult to study because the analysis of horizontal neuron anatomy is labor intensive and time-consuming. In this paper, we present a computational method for automatically tracing the three-dimensional (3-D) dendritic structure of horizontal retinal neurons in two-photon laser scanningmicroscope (TPLSM) imagery. Our method is based on 3-D skeletonization and is thus able topreserve the complex structure of the dendritic arbor of these cells. We demonstrate theeffectiveness of our approach by comparing our tracing results against two sets of semi-automatedtraces over a set of 10 horizontal neurons ranging in age from P1 to P5. We observe an averageagreement level of 81% between our automated trace and the manual traces. This automatedmethod will serve as an important starting point for further refinement and optimization.

  13. Trace Metal Source Terms in Carbon Sequestration Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karamalidis, Athanasios; Torres, Sharon G.; Hakala, Jacqueline A.; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Carroll, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising; however, possible CO2 or CO2-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define to provide a range of concentrations that can be used as the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations. Storage source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from cements and sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, and basalts from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin, Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands, and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution was tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g., pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments because of the presence of CO2. Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rocks exceed the MCLs byan order of magnitude, while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality.

  14. Trace metal levels in sediments of Pearl Harbor (Hawaii)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashwood, T.L.; Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L.; Tamura, T.

    1986-09-01

    This study was conducted to measure the distribution of lead and other trace metals in the sediments of Pearl Harbon (Hawaii) to determine whether paint chips from vessels of the US Navy's Inactive Fleet have affected the environmental quality of Middle Loch. Sediment cores (ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 m long) were collected from Middle Loch near the Naval Inactive Ships Maintenance Facility and in an area of West Loch that is relatively isolated and unaffected by naval operations. Concentrations of copper, lead, and zinc averaged 180 ..mu..g/g, 49 ..mu..g/g, and 272 ..mu..g/g, respectively, in recent Middle Loch sediments. These concentrations are significantly higher than those in either historical Middle Loch sediments or recent West Loch sediments. However, except for lead, the concentrations in recent Middle Loch sediments are similar to those of older Middle Loch sediments, which indicates that the increase in trace metal contamination began before the onset of Inactive Fleet operations (about 1946). Increased trace metal levels in recent Middle Loch sediments might be expected to result from two potential sources: (1) sewage discharges and (2) paint from inactive vessels. Since paint contains elevated levels of lead and zinc but little copper, the elevated copper levels in Middle Loch sediments tend to implicate sewage as the source of trace metal contamination. Moreover, the lead:zinc ratio of recent Middle Loch sediments (0.18:1) is a factor of 10 lower than that measured in paint (2.1:1), and the Middle Loch lead:zinc ratio is not significantly greater than that measured in recent West Loch sediments (0.21:1). Hence, we suggest that sewage rather than paint is the major source of trace metal contamination of Middle Loch. This is consistent with the findings of a previous study by US navy personnel.

  15. Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte Additive Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte ...

  16. Matrix Optimization for the MALDI-TOF-MS Analysis of Trace Biodiesel Components (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAlpin, C. R.; Voorhees, K. J.; Alleman, T. L.; McCormick, R. L.

    2009-01-01

    Trace biodiesel components that could reduce the fuel's operability in cold weather are analyzed using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

  17. Ray tracing a three dimensional scene using a grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wald, Ingo; Ize, Santiago; Parker, Steven G; Knoll, Aaron

    2013-02-26

    Ray tracing a three-dimensional scene using a grid. One example embodiment is a method for ray tracing a three-dimensional scene using a grid. In this example method, the three-dimensional scene is made up of objects that are spatially partitioned into a plurality of cells that make up the grid. The method includes a first act of computing a bounding frustum of a packet of rays, and a second act of traversing the grid slice by slice along a major traversal axis. Each slice traversal includes a first act of determining one or more cells in the slice that are overlapped by the frustum and a second act of testing the rays in the packet for intersection with any objects at least partially bounded by the one or more cells overlapped by the frustum.

  18. Fast stereoscopic images with ray-traced volume rendering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adelson, S.J.; Hansen, C.D.

    1994-05-01

    One of the drawbacks of standard volume rendering techniques is that is it often difficult to comprehend the three-dimensional structure of the volume from a single frame; this is especially true in cases where there is no solid surface. Generally, several frames must be generated and viewed sequentially, using motion parallax to relay depth. Another option is to generate a single spectroscopic pair, resulting in clear and unambiguous depth information in both static and moving images. Methods have been developed which take advantage of the coherence between the two halves of a stereo pair for polygon rendering and ray-tracing, generating the second half of the pair in significantly less time than that required to completely render a single image. This paper reports the results of implementing these techniques with parallel ray-traced volume rendering. In tests with different data types, the time savings is in the range of 70--80%.

  19. Trace Metal Source Terms in Carbon Sequestration Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karamalidis, Athanasios K.; Torres, Sharon G.; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Carroll, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising, however, possible CO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2}-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define trace metal source terms from the reaction of supercritical CO{sub 2}, storage reservoir brines, reservoir and cap rocks. Storage reservoir source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, basalts and cements from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution is tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g. pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments due to the presence of CO{sub 2}. Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rock exceed the MCLs by an order of magnitude while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the reservoir and caprock source term to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality.

  20. Monitoring Trace Radionuclides by ICP Mass Spectrometry with Femtosecond

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Ablation | The Ames Laboratory Monitoring Trace Radionuclides by ICP Mass Spectrometry with Femtosecond Laser Ablation FWP/Project Description: This project will develop analytical methodology for the use of femtosecond laser ablation sampling and analysis techniques for the rapid screening of samples derived from detection of clandestine nuclear operations, and nuclear non-proliferation and safeguards activities. A state-of-the-art femtosecond laser ablation system in conjunction with

  1. Trace elements in coal by glow discharge mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, M.L.; Wilson, C.R.; Pestovich, J. Jr.

    1995-08-01

    A need and a demand exist for determining trace elements in coal and coal related by-products, especially those elements which may potentially be a health hazard. The provisions of the 1990 clean air act require that the EPA evaluate the emissions of electric utilities for trace elements and other potentially hazardous organic compounds. The coal fired electric utility industry supplies roughly 60% of the total generating capacity of 2,882,525 million kilowatt hours (nearly 3 trillion kilowatt hours) generated in the U.S. This is accomplished by 414 power plants scattered across the country that burned 813,508,000 short tons of coal in 1993. The relative volatility of some inorganic constituents in coal makes them more prone to be emitted to the atmosphere following combustion. The production of analytical data for trace elements is known to be a difficult task in coal and by-products of coal combustion (fly ash, bottom ash, gas streams, etc.), in terms of both sample collection and analytical determinations. There are several common analytical methods available to the analyst to determine trace elements in coal and coal by-products. In general analytical germs, the material to be analyzed can be totally solubilized (or extracted), or the elements analytes can be determined in the material as a solid. A relatively new elemental technique, Glow Discharge Mass Spectrometry (GDMS) can be used with solids as well. This new analytical technique had never before been applied directly to coal. The radio frequency-glow discharge quadropole mass spectrometer was used to analyze coal directly for the first time ever by rf-GDMS. The rf-GDMS technique is described.

  2. Trace detection of analytes using portable raman systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alam, M. Kathleen; Hotchkiss, Peter J.; Martin, Laura E.; Jones, David Alexander

    2015-11-24

    Apparatuses and methods for in situ detection of a trace amount of an analyte are disclosed herein. In a general embodiment, the present disclosure provides a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) insert including a passageway therethrough, where the passageway has a SERS surface positioned therein. The SERS surface is configured to adsorb molecules of an analyte of interest. A concentrated sample is caused to flow over the SERS surface. The SERS insert is then provided to a portable Raman spectroscopy system, where it is analyzed for the analyte of interest.

  3. Trace-element zoning in garnets from sheared mantle xenoliths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, W.L.; Cousens, D.R.; Ryan, C.G.; Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F. ); Smith, D. ); Boyd, F.R. )

    1989-02-01

    Proton-microprobe analyses of garnets from sheared high-temperature ultramafic xenoliths reveal marked zonation of trace elements, paralleling trends in major and minor elements. Garnet rims (600-1,000 {mu}m wide) are enriched in Fe, Ti, Zr, Y and Ga, and either enriched or depleted in Cr, relative to cores. Zoning profiles for Ti and Zr are S-shaped and extend further into the grains than the Cr and Ga gradients. The profiles are consistent with the formation of Ti, Zr, Y-enriched garnet overgrowths, followed by diffusive equilibration between rim and core over years to hundreds of years. This enrichment in Fe, Ca, Al and incompatible elements is ascribed to melt infiltration and consequent melt-crystal exchange and garnet growth, shortly before eruption. Zr/Y is 1 to 2 in garnet cores but 4 to 5 in rims, and so the infiltrating melt may have been relatively alkalic. Major and trace element concentrations in such high-temperature sheared xenoliths are not likely to resemble those of primitive mantle or of residual mantle depleted by melt extraction.

  4. Atom Trap Trace Analysis at ANL | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Atom Trap Trace Analysis at ANL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear ...

  5. LineVISAR. A fringe-trace data analysis program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furnish, Michael D.

    2014-02-01

    The line-imaging ORVIS or VISAR provides velocity as a function of position and time for a line on an experimental setup via a streak camera record of interference fringes. This document describes a Matlab-based program which guides the user through the process of converting these fringe data to a velocity surface. The data reduction is of the "fringe trace" type, wherein the changes in velocity at a given position on the line are calculated based on fringe motion past that point. The analyst must establish the fringe behavior up front, aided by peak-finding routines in the program. However, the later work of using fringe jumps to compensate for phase problems in other analysis techniques is greatly reduced. This program is not a standard GUI construction, and is prescriptive. At various points it saves the progress, allowing later restarts from those points.

  6. Micro-PIXE Analysis of Trace Elements in Sulfides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickmott, D.D.; Wetteland, C.; Stimac, J.; Larocque, A.C.L.; Brearley, A.

    2003-08-26

    Micro-scale Proton-induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) of trace elements (TE) in sulfides provides insights into geologic processes including magmatic system evolution, ore forming events, and fluid-flow processes. The Los Alamos nuclear microprobe was used to determine TE concentrations and ratios in sulfides from diverse geologic environments including hydrothermal ore deposits, coal seams, and metamorphic rocks. Pyrrhotite (Po) from silicic volcanics contains high Cu and Ni; Po from the Clear Lake volcanic field has higher Mo than does Po from other volcanic fields. Coal pyrites contain high Cu, As, Se, Mo and Pb, and show high As/Se and Mo/Se in marine influenced sulfides from the Lower Kittanning coal, but not in other marine-influenced coals. Sulfides are amenable to micro-PIXE studies because of the difficulties in obtaining the homogeneous standards required for many other TE microanalytical techniques.

  7. TRACE3D. Interactive Beam-Dynamics Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, L.; Yao, C.Y.

    1993-12-01

    TRACE3D is an interactive program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined system. The transport system may consist of the following elements: drift, thin lens, quadrupole, permanent magnet quadrupole, solenoid, doublet, triplet, bending magnet, edge angle (for bend), RF gap, radio-frequency-quadrupole cell, RF cavity, coupled-cavity tank, user-desired element, coordinate rotation, and identical element. The beam is represented by a 6X6 matrix defining a hyper-ellipsoid in six-dimensional phase space. The projection of this hyperellipsoid on any two-dimensional plane is an ellipse that defines the boundary of the beam in that plane.

  8. Plasmonic trace sensing below the photon shot noise limit

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pooser, Raphael C.; Lawrie, Benjamin J.

    2015-12-09

    Plasmonic sensors are important detectors of biochemical trace compounds, but those that utilize optical readout are approaching their absolute limits of detection as defined by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle in both differential intensity and phase readout. However, the use of more general minimum uncertainty states in the form of squeezed light can push the noise floor in these sensors below the shot noise limit (SNL) in one analysis variable at the expense of another. Here, we demonstrate a quantum plasmonic sensor whose noise floor is reduced below the SNL in order to perform index of refraction measurements with sensitivities unobtainablemore » with classical plasmonic sensors. The increased signal-to-noise ratio can result in faster detection of analyte concentrations that were previously lost in the noise. As a result, these benefits are the hallmarks of a sensor exploiting quantum readout fields in order to manipulate the limits of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle.« less

  9. Comparative assessment of the trace-element composition of coals, crude oils, and oil shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.Y. Shpirt; S.A. Punanova

    2007-10-15

    A comparative analysis of the amounts of 42 trace elements in coals, crude oils, and oil and black shales was performed. The degree of concentration of trace elements by caustobioliths and their ashes relative to their abundance in argillaceous rocks and the Earth's crust was calculated. Typomorphic trace elements were distinguished, of which many turned out to be common for the different kinds of caustobioliths in question. The trace elements were classified according to their concentration factors in different caustobioliths. The ash of crude oils is enriched in trace elements (Cs, V, Mo, Cu, Ag, Au, Zn, Hg, Se, Cr, Co, Ni, U) to the greatest extent (concentration factor above 3.5) and that of oil shales is enriched to the least extent (Re, Cs, Hg, Se). The ratios between typomorphic trace elements in general strongly differ from those in the Earth's crust and argillaceous rocks and are not identical in different caustobioliths. Quantitative parameters that make it possible to calculate a change in these ratios on passing from one caustobiolith type to another were proposed and the relative trace-element affinity of different caustobioliths was estimated.

  10. Determination of Method Detection Limits for Trace 232-Thorium and 238-Uranium in Copper using Ion Exchange and ICPMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, Eric W.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Maiti, Tapas C.; Soin, Aleksandr

    2014-04-15

    Determination of Method Detection Limits for Trace 232-Thorium and 238-Uranium in Copper using Ion Exchange and ICPMS

  11. A review of trace element emissions from the combustion of refuse-derived fuel with coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, G.A. )

    1992-05-01

    The effects of cocombusting refuse-derived fuel (RDF) with coal on stack emissions of trace elements in the ash stream were reviewed. The large number of variables and uncertainties involved precluded drawing definitive conclusions regarding many of the trace elements. However, it is evident that cocombustion resulted in increased emissions of Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn. Emissions of As and Ni tended to decrease when RDF was fired with coal. Modeling studies indicated that ambient levels of trace elements during cocombustion should be within acceptable limits. However, periodic monitoring of Cd, Hg, and Pb may be warranted in some instances.

  12. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.4 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  13. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.8

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.8 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  14. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.7

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.7 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  15. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.6

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.6 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  16. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.5

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.5 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  17. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.9

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.9 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  18. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.1.2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.1.2 meets Internal Revenue Code 179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  19. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.1.1.0

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.1.1.0 meets Internal Revenue Code 179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  20. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.1.0.0

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.1.0.0 meets Internal Revenue Code 179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  1. Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility The calculation for the optics of the synchrotron radiation small and

  2. Magnetic Field Line Tracing Calculations for Conceptual PFC Design in the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    National Compact Stellarator Experiment (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Magnetic Field Line Tracing Calculations for Conceptual PFC Design in the National Compact Stellarator Experiment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic Field Line Tracing Calculations for Conceptual PFC Design in the National Compact Stellarator Experiment The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is a three-field period compact stellarator presently in the construction phase at

  3. Trace element emissions. Semi-annual report, October 1994--February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigeaud, A.; Maru, H.; Wilemski, G.; Helble, J.

    1995-02-01

    Many trace elements can exist in raw coal gas either in the form of metallic vapors or gaseous compounds which, besides their action on potentially ``very clean`` advanced power generating systems such as fuel cells and gas turbines, can also be detrimental to plant and animal life when released into the atmosphere. Therefore, volatile trace contaminants from coal which can also be toxic must be removed before they become detrimental to both power plant performance/endurance and the environment. Five trace elements were selected in this project based on: abundance in solid coal, volatility during gasification, effects on downstream systems and toxicity to plant and animal life. An understanding was sought in this investigation of the interactions of these five trace elements (and their high temperature species) with the different components in integrated cleanup and power generating systems, as well as the ultimate effects with respect to atmospheric emissions. Utilizing thermodynamic calculations and various experimental techniques, it was determined that a number of trace contaminants that exist in coal may be substantially removed by flyash, and after that by different sorbent systems. High temperature cleanup of contaminants by sorbents such as zinc titanate, primarily to remove sulfur, can also absorb some metallic contaminants such as cadmium and antimony. Further polishing will be required, however, to eliminate trace contaminant species incorporating the elements arsenic, selemium, lead, and mercury.

  4. Long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste stabilized by trace elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Lei; Jahng, Deokjin

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Korean food waste was found to contain low level of trace elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable anaerobic digestion of food waste was achieved by adding trace elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron played an important role in anaerobic digestion of food waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt addition further enhanced the process performance in the presence of iron. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine if long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste in a semi-continuous single-stage reactor could be stabilized by supplementing trace elements. Contrary to the failure of anaerobic digestion of food waste alone, stable anaerobic digestion of food waste was achieved for 368 days by supplementing trace elements. Under the conditions of OLR (organic loading rates) of 2.19-6.64 g VS (volatile solid)/L day and 20-30 days of HRT (hydraulic retention time), a high methane yield (352-450 mL CH{sub 4}/g VS{sub added}) was obtained, and no significant accumulation of volatile fatty acids was observed. The subsequent investigation on effects of individual trace elements (Co, Fe, Mo and Ni) showed that iron was essential for maintaining stable methane production. These results proved that the food waste used in this study was deficient in trace elements.

  5. ADVANCED GASIFICATION MERCURY/TRACE METAL CONTROL WITH MONOLITH TRAPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark A. Musich; Michael L. Swanson; Grant E. Dunham; Joshua J. Stanislowski

    2010-07-31

    Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-?g/m3 (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-?g/m3 (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most effective arsine and hydrogen selenide sorbents. The noncarbon sorbent was able to reduce the concentration to 0 ppb from a starting concentration of 120 ppb. This compares to the target value of 5 ppb (~17?g/m3). The EERC-prepared metal-based pellet and coprecipitate sorbents exhibited arsine reductions of 90% or greater, being below 10 ppb. Corning SR Liquid monoliths exhibited brief periods (<1 hour) of attaining 90% arsine reduction but were able to achieve greater than 80% reduction for several hours. With respect to hydrogen selenide, all Group IB and IIB metal-based sorbents tested exhibited 100% reduction from an inlet concentration of approximately 400 ppb. Corning SR Liquid monoliths exhibited an 82% reduction when two monoliths were tested simultaneously in series.

  6. Trace element analysis of soil type collected from the Manjung and central Perak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azman, Muhammad Azfar Hamzah, Suhaimi; Rahman, Shamsiah Abdul; Elias, Md Suhaimi; Abdullah, Nazaratul Ashifa; Hashim, Azian; Shukor, Shakirah Abd; Kamaruddin, Ahmad Hasnulhadi Che

    2015-04-29

    Trace elements in soils primarily originated from their parent materials. Parents material is the underlying geological material that has been undergone different types of chemical weathering and leaching processes. Soil trace elements concentrations may be increases as a result of continuous input from various human activities, including power generation, agriculture, mining and manufacturing. This paper describes the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) method used for the determination of trace elements concentrations in part per million (ppm) present in the terrestrial environment soil in Perak. The data may indicate any contamination of trace elements contributed from human activities in the area. The enrichment factors were used to check if there any contamination due to the human activities (power plants, agricultural, mining, etc.) otherwise the values would serve as a baseline data for future study. The samples were collected from 27 locations of different soil series in the area at two different depths: the top soil (0-15cm) and the sub soil (15-30cm). The collected soil samples were air dried at 60C and passed through 2 m sieve. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) has been used for the determination of trace elements. Samples were activated in the Nuclear Malaysia TRIGA Mark II reactor followed by gamma spectrometric analysis. By activating the stable elements in the samples, the elements can be determined from the intensities of gamma energies emitted by the respected radionuclides.

  7. Trace-element geochemistry of coal resource development related to environmental quality and health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This report assesses for decision makers and those involved in coal resource development the environmental and health impacts of trace-element effects arising from significant increases in the use of coal, unless unusual precautions are invoked. Increasing demands for energy and the pressing need for decreased dependence of the United States on imported oil require greater use of coal to meet the nation's energy needs during the next decade. If coal production and consumption are increased at a greatly accelerated rate, concern arises over the release, mobilization, transportation, distribution, and assimilation of certain trace elements, with possible adverse effects on the environment and human health. It is, therefore, important to understand their geochemical pathways from coal and rocks via air, water, and soil to plants, animals, and ultimately humans, and their relation to health and disease. To address this problem, the Panel on Trace Element Geochemistry of Coal Resource Development Related to Health (PECH) was established. Certain assumptions were made by the Panel to highlight the central issues of trace elements and health and to avoid unwarranted duplication of other studies. Based on the charge to the Panel and these assumptions, this report describes the amounts and distribution of trace elements related to the coal source; the various methods of coal extraction, preparation, transportation, and use; and the disposal or recycling of the remaining residues or wastes. The known or projected health effects are discussed at the end of each section.

  8. Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process: trace elements. Volume III. Pilot plant development work. Part 6. Fate of trace elements in the SRC process. [Ph. D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, C.S.

    1980-09-01

    A study of the forms of trace elements occurring in Solvent Refined Coal has been performed by chemical separation of the Solvent Refined Coal based on differences in the functionality and molecular weight of the organic matrix. Analysis of the fractions separated for various trace elements has revealed associations of certain elements with other elements as well as with certain fractions. The analysis of Solvent Refined Coal I by these methods provided data on the distribution of Ti, V, Ca, S, Al, Mn, As, Se, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, Sc, and Ga in the fractions generated. Because of the low trace element content of Solvent Refined Coal II only As, Se, and Cr could be detected in the silica fractions. Based on the distributions three different groups of elements have been based on the association of elements with each other and with certain fractions. The first group is composed of As, Se, and Cr associated with silica fractions of relatively low functionality; these elements have a high percent solubility in the starting Solvent Refined Coal II oil. The second group composed of Ti, V, and to a lesser extent a second form of Cr, is associated with fractions that have a high concentration of phenolic material and is probably present as phenoxide complexes. The third group composed of Fe, Ca, K, Al, and Mg is associated with the most functional fractions and is possibly present as humic acid type complexes or as submicron size particulates. The integration of chromatographic methods with trace element analysis of the fractions generated is capable of discerning the presence of different forms of the elements. The methods used are applicable to other important geologically occurring organic matter.

  9. Trace fossils of Marnoso-Arenacea Formation (Miocene), northern Italy: preliminary data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBride, E.F.; Picard, M.D.

    1988-02-01

    Many horizons in the Marnoso-arenacea Formation contain rare to abundant trace fossils at numerous localities. Slope, fan, and basin-plain deposits have trace fossils dominated by the Nereites ichnofacies but include taxa from the Zoophycos ichnofacies plus Ohphiomorpha and Thalassinoides. Slope deposits contain Chondrites, Cosmorhaphe, Desmograpton, Helminthoida, Neonereites, Paleodictyon, Pelecypodichnus, Planolites, Punctorhaphe, and Scolicia; fan-channel deposits contain Chondrites and Planolites; fan-lobe deposits contain Chondrites, Ophiomorpha, Thalassinoides, Scolicia, and Zoophycos; and basin-plain deposits contain Chondrites, Helminthoida, Planolites, and Zoophycos. The distribution of hypichnial taxa may be in part the result of selective preservation (i.e., dependent on the depth of erosion by turbidity currents).

  10. Ray tracing a three-dimensional scene using a hierarchical data structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wald, Ingo; Boulos, Solomon; Shirley, Peter

    2012-09-04

    Ray tracing a three-dimensional scene made up of geometric primitives that are spatially partitioned into a hierarchical data structure. One example embodiment is a method for ray tracing a three-dimensional scene made up of geometric primitives that are spatially partitioned into a hierarchical data structure. In this example embodiment, the hierarchical data structure includes at least a parent node and a corresponding plurality of child nodes. The method includes a first act of determining that a first active ray in the packet hits the parent node and a second act of descending to each of the plurality of child nodes.

  11. Batch methods for enriching trace impurities in hydrogen gas for their further analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Lee, Sheldon H.D.; Kumar, Romesh; Papdias, Dionissios D.

    2014-07-15

    Provided herein are batch methods and devices for enriching trace quantities of impurities in gaseous mixtures, such as hydrogen fuel. The methods and devices rely on concentrating impurities using hydrogen transport membranes wherein the time period for concentrating the sample is calculated on the basis of optimized membrane characteristics, comprising its thickness and permeance, with optimization of temperature, and wherein the enrichment of trace impurities is proportional to the pressure ratio P.sub.hi/P.sub.lo and the volume ratio V.sub.1/V.sub.2, with following detection of the impurities using commonly-available detection methods.

  12. Atmospheric Trace Gases from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication, Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. The collections under the CDIAC heading of Atmospheric Trace Gases include: Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide, Atmospheric Methane, Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide, Atmospheric Hydrogen, Isotopes in Greenhouse Gases, Radionuclides, Aerosols, and Other Trace Gases.

  13. Runtime Tracing of The Community Earth System Model: Feasibility and Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Dali [ORNL] [ORNL; Domke, Jens [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Community Earth System Models (CESM) is one of US's leading earth system modeling systems, which has over decades of development history and embraced by large, active user communities. In this paper, we first review the history of CESM software development and layout the general objectives of performance analysis. Then we present an offline global community land model simulation within the CESM framework to demonstrate the procedure of runtime tracing of CESM using the Vampir toolset. Finally, we explain the benefits of runtime tracing to the general earth system modeling community. We hope those considerations can also be beneficial to many other modeling research programs involving legacy high-performance computing applications.

  14. Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additive (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte Additive Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte Additive Residual water presents in nonaqueous electrolytes has been widely regarded as a detrimental factor for lithium (Li) batteries. This is because water is highly reactive with the commonly used LiPF6 salt and leads to the formation of HF that

  15. The Effects of Trace Contaminants on Catalytic Processing of Biomass-Derived Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Peterson, Keith L.; Muzatko, Danielle S.; Alderson, Eric V.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.

    2004-03-25

    Trace components in biomass feedstocks are potential catalyst poisons when catalytically processing these materials to value-added chemical products. Trace components include inorganic elements such as alkali metals and alkaline earths, phosphorus or sulfur, aluminum or silicon, chloride, or transition metals. Protein components in biomass feedstocks can lead to formation of peptide fractions (from hydrolysis) or ammonium ions (from more severe breakdown) both of which might interfere with catalysis. The effects of these components on catalytic hydrogenation processing has been studied in batch reactor processing tests

  16. TRACE/PARCS Core Modeling of a BWR/5 for Accident Analysis of ATWS Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuadra A.; Baek J.; Cheng, L.; Aronson, A.; Diamond, D.; Yarsky, P.

    2013-11-10

    The TRACE/PARCS computational package [1, 2] isdesigned to be applicable to the analysis of light water reactor operational transients and accidents where the coupling between the neutron kinetics (PARCS) and the thermal-hydraulics and thermal-mechanics (TRACE) is important. TRACE/PARCS has been assessed for itsapplicability to anticipated transients without scram(ATWS) [3]. The challenge, addressed in this study, is to develop a sufficiently rigorous input model that would be acceptable for use in ATWS analysis. Two types of ATWS events were of interest, a turbine trip and a closure of main steam isolation valves (MSIVs). In the first type, initiated by turbine trip, the concern is that the core will become unstable and large power oscillations will occur. In the second type,initiated by MSIV closure,, the concern is the amount of energy being placed into containment and the resulting emergency depressurization. Two separate TRACE/PARCS models of a BWR/5 were developed to analyze these ATWS events at MELLLA+ (maximum extended load line limit plus)operating conditions. One model [4] was used for analysis of ATWS events leading to instability (ATWS-I);the other [5] for ATWS events leading to emergency depressurization (ATWS-ED). Both models included a large portion of the nuclear steam supply system and controls, and a detailed core model, presented henceforth.

  17. Paraxial ray-tracing approach for the simulation of ultrasonic inspection of welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardahaut, Audrey; Jezzine, Karim [CEA, LIST, Digiteo Labs, Bt 565, PC 120, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Cassereau, Didier [CNRS, UMR 7623, LIP, 15 rue de l'cole de mdecine, 75006 Paris, France and ESPCI ParisTech, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France)

    2014-02-18

    On-site inspection of bimetallic or austenitic welds can be very difficult to interpret owing to their internal structures. Skewing and splitting of the ultrasonic beam may occur due to the anisotropic and inhomogeneous properties of the welding material. In this paper, we present a ray-based method to simulate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such structures. The formalism is based on dynamic ray tracing system in Cartesian coordinates along a reference ray. Standard ray tracing consists in the solution of a system of linear ordinary differential equations of the first order and is used to determine the trajectory of the ray. Likewise, dynamic ray tracing (DRT) also called paraxial ray tracing consists in the solution of an additional system of linear ordinary differential equations along the ray allowing paraxial quantities to be computed. It is used to evaluate the geometrical spreading and amplitude along the ray and in its vicinity. DRT is applied on a smooth representation of the elastic properties of the weld obtained thanks to an image processing technique applied on a macrograph of the weld. Simulation results are presented and compared to finite elements and experimental results.

  18. An Energy Conservative Ray-Tracing Method With a Time Interpolation of the Force Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, Jin

    2015-02-10

    A new algorithm that constructs a continuous force field interpolated in time is proposed for resolving existing difficulties in numerical methods for ray-tracing. This new method has improved accuracy, but with the same degree of algebraic complexity compared to Kaisers method.

  19. Behavior of trace and companion elements of ULC-IF steel grades during RH-treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jungreithmeier, A.; Viertauer, A.; Presslinger, H.

    1996-12-31

    A large number of metallurgical reactions are caused by lowering the partial pressure during vacuum treatment. One of these reactions is the volatilization of elements with high vapor pressure. The concentration of trace and companion elements during RH-treatment mostly changes because of cooling scrap, deoxidation agents and ferro-alloy additions, slag/metal reactions, vaporization and also because of reactions with the RH-vessel lining. These changes in the concentration of trace and companion elements during RH-treatment are exemplified for ULC-IF (ultra low carbon--interstitial free) steel grades. The elements which are considered are chromium, nickel, molybdenum, copper, vanadium, tin, zinc, lead, phosphorus, sulfur and nitrogen. Calculations of the theoretical equilibrium solubility using thermodynamic data--in dependence of pressure and temperature--correspond well with the values obtained during steel production operations. 67 refs.

  20. Integration of stable isotope and trace contaminant concentration for enhanced forensic acetone discrimination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, James J.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Wahl, Jon H.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2013-07-18

    We analyzed 21 neat acetone samples from 15 different suppliers to demonstrate the utility of a coupled stable isotope and trace contaminant strategy for distinguishing forensically-relevant samples. By combining these two pieces of orthogonal data we could discriminate all of the acetones that were produced by the 15 different suppliers. Using stable isotope ratios alone, we were able to distinguish 9 acetone samples, while the remaining 12 fell into four clusters with highly similar signatures. Adding trace chemical contaminant information enhanced discrimination to 13 individual acetones with three residual clusters. The acetones within each cluster shared a common manufacturer and might, therefore, not be expected to be resolved. The data presented here demonstrates the power of combining orthogonal data sets to enhance sample fingerprinting and highlights the role disparate data could play in future forensic investigations.

  1. Sensitive Multi-Species Emissions Monitoring: Infrared Laser-Based Detection of Trace-Level Contaminants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steill, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes our development of spectroscopic chemical analysis techniques and spectral modeling for trace-gas measurements of highly-regulated low-concentration species present in flue gas emissions from utility coal boilers such as HCl under conditions of high humidity. Detailed spectral modeling of the spectroscopy of HCl and other important combustion and atmospheric species such as H 2 O, CO 2 , N 2 O, NO 2 , SO 2 , and CH 4 demonstrates that IR-laser spectroscopy is a sensitive multi-component analysis strategy. Experimental measurements from techniques based on IR laser spectroscopy are presented that demonstrate sub-ppm sensitivity levels to these species. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy is used to detect and quantify HCl at ppm levels with extremely high signal-to-noise even under conditions of high relative humidity. Additionally, cavity ring-down IR spectroscopy is used to achieve an extremely high sensitivity to combustion trace gases in this spectral region; ppm level CH 4 is one demonstrated example. The importance of spectral resolution in the sensitivity of a trace-gas measurement is examined by spectral modeling in the mid- and near-IR, and efforts to improve measurement resolution through novel instrument development are described. While previous project reports focused on benefits and complexities of the dual-etalon cavity ring-down infrared spectrometer, here details on steps taken to implement this unique and potentially revolutionary instrument are described. This report also illustrates and critiques the general strategy of IR- laser photodetection of trace gases leading to the conclusion that mid-IR laser spectroscopy techniques provide a promising basis for further instrument development and implementation that will enable cost-effective sensitive detection of multiple key contaminant species simultaneously.

  2. Atom Trap Trace Analysis at ANL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Atom Trap Trace Analysis at ANL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation / Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E:

  3. TRACE Model for Simulation of Anticipated Transients Without Scram in a BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng L. Y.; Baek J.; Cuadra,A.; Aronson, A.; Diamond, D.; Yarsky, P.

    2013-11-10

    A TRACE model has been developed for using theTRACE/PARCS computational package [1, 2] to simulate anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) events in a boiling water reactor (BWR). The model represents a BWR/5 housed in a Mark II containment. The reactor and the balance of plant systems are modeled in sufficient detail to enable the evaluation of plant responses and theeffectiveness of automatic and operator actions tomitigate this beyond design basis accident.The TRACE model implements features thatfacilitate the simulation of ATWS events initiated by turbine trip and closure of the main steam isolation valves (MSIV). It also incorporates control logic to initiate actions to mitigate the ATWS events, such as water levelcontrol, emergency depressurization, and injection of boron via the standby liquid control system (SLCS). Two different approaches have been used to model boron mixing in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel: modulate coolant flow in the lower plenum by a flow valve, and use control logic to modular.

  4. Computational and experimental research on infrared trace by human being contact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong Zonglong; Yang Kuntao; Ding Wenxiu; Zhang Nanyangsheng; Zheng Wenheng

    2010-06-20

    The indoor detection of the human body's thermal trace plays an important role in the fields of infrared detecting, scouting, infrared camouflage, and infrared rescuing and tracking. Currently, quantitative description and analysis for this technology are lacking due to the absence of human infrared radiation analysis. To solve this problem, we study the heating and cooling process by observing body contact and removal on an object, respectively. Through finite-element simulation and carefully designed experiments, an analytical model of the infrared trace of body contact is developed based on infrared physics and heat transfer theory. Using this model, the impact of body temperature on material thermal parameters is investigated. The sensitivity of material thermal parameters, the thermal distribution, and the changes of the thermograph's contrast are then found and analyzed. Excellent matching results achieved between the simulation and the experiments demonstrate the strong impact of temperature on material thermal parameters. Conclusively, the new model, simulation, and experimental results are beneficial to the future development and implementation of infrared trace technology.

  5. Trace-gas sensing using the compliance voltage of an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.

    2013-06-04

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are increasingly being used to detect, identify, and measure levels of trace gases in the air. External cavity QCLs (ECQCLs) provide a broadly-tunable infrared source to measure absorption spectra of chemicals and provide high detection sensitivity and identification confidence. Applications include detecting chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals, monitoring building air quality, measuring greenhouse gases for atmospheric research, monitoring and controlling industrial processes, analyzing chemicals in exhaled breath for medical diagnostics, and many more. Compact, portable trace gas sensors enable in-field operation in a wide range of platforms, including handheld units for use by first responders, fixed installations for monitoring air quality, and lightweight sensors for deployment in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). We present experimental demonstration of a new chemical sensing technique based on intracavity absorption in an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL). This new technique eliminates the need for an infrared photodetector and gas cell by detecting the intracavity absorption spectrum in the compliance voltage of the laser device itself. To demonstrate and characterize the technique, we measure infrared absorption spectra of chemicals including water vapor and Freon-134a. Sub-ppm detection limits in one second are achieved, with the potential for increased sensitivity after further optimization. The technique enables development of handheld, high-sensitivity, and high-accuracy trace gas sensors for in-field use.

  6. Empowering Minority Communities with Health Information - ASU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMurray, L. and W. Templin-Branner

    2010-11-12

    Training Manual updated for United Negro College Fund Special Programs Corporation/National Library of Medicine - HBCU ACCESS Project for Alcorn State University, Natchez, Mississippi, November 12, 2010

  7. An Efficient Format for Nearly Constant-Time Access to Arbitrary Time Intervals in Large Trace Files

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chan, Anthony; Gropp, William; Lusk, Ewing

    2008-01-01

    A powerful method to aid in understanding the performance of parallel applications uses log or trace files containing time-stamped events and states (pairs of events). These trace files can be very large, often hundreds or even thousands of megabytes. Because of the cost of accessing and displaying such files, other methods are often used that reduce the size of the tracefiles at the cost of sacrificing detail or other information. This paper describes a hierarchical trace file format that provides for display of an arbitrary time window in a time independent of the total size of the file andmore » roughly proportional to the number of events within the time window. This format eliminates the need to sacrifice data to achieve a smaller trace file size (since storage is inexpensive, it is necessary only to make efficient use of bandwidth to that storage). The format can be used to organize a trace file or to create a separate file of annotations that may be used with conventional trace files. We present an analysis of the time to access all of the events relevant to an interval of time and we describe experiments demonstrating the performance of this file format.« less

  8. Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte Additive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Jiangfeng; Xu, Wu; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Engelhard, Mark H.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Zhang, Yaohui; Zhang, Jiguang

    2015-07-01

    Residual water presents in nonaqueous electrolytes has been widely regarded as a detrimental factor for lithium (Li) batteries. This is because water is highly reactive with the commonly used LiPF6 salt and leads to the formation of HF that corrodes battery materials. In this work, we demonstrate that a controlled trace-amount of water (25-100 ppm) can be an effective electrolyte additive for achieving dendrite-free Li metal deposition in LiPF6-based electrolytes and avoid its detrimental effect at the same time. Detailed analyses reveal that the trace amount of HF formed by the decomposition reaction of LiPF6 with water will be electrochemically reduced during initial Li deposition process to form a uniform and dense LiF-rich SEI layer on the surface of the substrate. This LiF-rich SEI layer leads to a uniform distribution of the electric field on the substrate surface and enables uniform and dendrite-free Li deposition. Meanwhile the detrimental effect of HF is diminished due to the consumption of HF in the LiF formation process. Microscopic analysis reveals that the as-deposited dendrite-free Li films exhibit a self-aligned and highly-compacted Li nanorods structure which is consistent with their charming blue color or known as structure color. These findings clearly demonstrate a novel approach to control the nucleation and grow process of Li metal films using well-controlled trace-amount of water. They also shine the light on the effect of water on other electrodeposition processes.

  9. Sub-microradian Surface Slope Metrology with the ALS Developmental Long Trace Profiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Barber, Samuel; Domning, Edward E.; Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas; Geckeler, Ralf; Just, Andreas

    2009-09-11

    A new low budget slope measuring instrument, the Developmental Long Trace Profiler (DLTP), was recently brought to operation at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory. The design, instrumental control and data acquisition system, initial alignment and calibration procedures, as well as the developed experimental precautions and procedures are described in detail. The capability of the DLTP to achieve sub-microradian surface slope metrology is verified via cross-comparison measurements with other high performance slope measuring instruments when measuring the same high quality test optics. The directions of future work to develop a surface slope measuring profiler with nano-radian performance are also discussed.

  10. Trace Gas Emissions Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, and models and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Collections under the broad heading of Trace Gas Emissions are organized as Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions, Land-Use CO2 Emissions, Soil CO2 Emissions, and Methane.

  11. DOE's Ed Synakowski traces key discoveries in the quest for fusion energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab DOE's Ed Synakowski traces key discoveries in the quest for fusion energy By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe March 9, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The DOE's Associate Director of Science for Fusion Energy Sciences Ed Synakowski discusses the "aha" moments in the development of fusion energy at a March 5 Ronald E. Hatcher Science on Saturday lecture. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) The DOE's Associate Director of

  12. COLLOQUIUM: On Tracing the Origins of the Solar Wind | Princeton Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Lab January 8, 2014, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: On Tracing the Origins of the Solar Wind Dr. Sarah McGregor Boston University Presentation: PDF icon Presentation The Sun emits a constant flow of particles from its surface. Mainly composed of Protons and electrons, and dragging with it magnetic fields, this Solar Wind expands outwards from the sun, interacting with planets and spacecraft alike. Since the 1960s, in situ observations have shown that the solar

  13. DOE's Ed Synakowski traces key discoveries in the quest for fusion energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab DOE's Ed Synakowski traces key discoveries in the quest for fusion energy By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe March 9, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The DOE's Associate Director of Science for Fusion Energy Sciences Ed Synakowski discusses the "aha" moments in the development of fusion energy at a March 5 Ronald E. Hatcher Science on Saturday lecture. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) The DOE's Associate Director of

  14. Laser ray tracing in a parallel arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian adaptive mesh refi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser ray tracing in a parallel arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement hydrocode This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article. 2010 J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 244 032022 (http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/244/3/032022) Download details: IP Address: 50.136.219.251 The article was downloaded on 18/04/2013 at 01:39 Please note that terms and conditions apply. View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for

  15. Characteristic emission enhancement in the atmosphere with Rn trace using metal assisted LIBS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashemi, M. M.; Parvin, P. Moosakhani, A.; Mortazavi, S. Z.; Reyhani, A.; Majdabadi, A.; Abachi, S.

    2014-06-15

    Several characteristic emission lines from the metal targets (Cu, Zn and Pb) were investigated in trace presence of radon gas in the atmospheric air, using Q-SW Nd:YAG laser induced plasma inside a control chamber. The emission lines of metal species are noticeably enhanced in (Rn+air), relative to those in the synthetic air alone. Similar spectra were also taken in various sub-atmospheric environments in order to determine the optimum pressure for enhancement. Solid-state nuclear track detectors were also employed to count the tracks due to alpha particles for the activity assessment.

  16. Bioturbating animals control the mobility of redox-sensitive trace elements in organic-rich mudstone

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Harazim, Dario; McIlroy, Duncan; Edwards, Nicholas P.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Manning, Phillip L.; Poduska, Kristin M.; Layne, Graham D.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Bergmann, Uwe

    2015-10-07

    Bioturbating animals modify the original mineralogy, porosity, organic content, and fabric of mud, thus affecting the burial diagenetic pathways of potential hydrocarbon source, seal, and reservoir rocks. High-sensitivity, synchrotron rapid scanning X-ray fluorescence elemental mapping reveals that producers of phycosiphoniform burrows systematically partition redox-sensitive trace elements (i.e., Fe, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, and As) in fine-grained siliciclastic rocks. Systematic differences in organic carbon content (total organic carbon >1.5 wt%) and quality (Δ13Corg~0.6‰) are measured between the burrow core and host sediment. The relative enrichment of redox-sensitive elements in the burrow core does not correlate with significant neo-formation ofmore » early diagenetic pyrite (via trace metal pyritization), but is best explained by physical concentration of clay- and silt-sized components. A measured loss (~–15%) of the large-ionic-radius elements Sr and Ba from both burrow halo and core is most likely associated with the release of Sr and Ba to pore waters during biological (in vivo) weathering of silt- to clay-sized lithic components and feldspar. In conclusion, this newly documented effect has significant potential to inform the interpretation of geochemical proxy and rock property data, particularly from shales, where elemental analyses are commonly employed to predict reservoir quality and support paleoenvironmental analysis.« less

  17. Trace Elements in Hair from Tanzanian Children: Effect of Dietary Factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammed, Najat K.; Spyrou, Nicholas M.

    2009-04-19

    Trace elements in certain amounts are essential for childrens' health, because they are present in tissues participating in metabolic reactions of organisms. Deficiency of the essential elements may result in malnutrition, impaired body immunity, and poor resistance to disease. These conditions might be enhanced against a background of additional adverse environmental factors such as toxic elements. The analysis of elements in childrens' hair will give information on the deficiency of essential elements and excess of toxic elements in relation to their diet. In this study, 141 hair samples from children (girls and boys) living in two regions of Tanzanian mainland (Dar es Salaam and Moshi) and the island of Zanzibar have been analysed for trace elements in relation to food consumption habits. The analysis was carried out using long and short irradiation instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) of the Nuclear Physics Institute at Rez, Czech Republic. Arithmetic and geometric means with their respective standard deviations are presented for 19 elements. Subgroups were formed according to age, gender, and geographic regions from which the samples were collected. Differences in concentrations for the groups and with other childhood populations were explored and discussed.

  18. Bioturbating animals control the mobility of redox-sensitive trace elements in organic-rich mudstone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harazim, Dario; McIlroy, Duncan; Edwards, Nicholas P.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Manning, Phillip L.; Poduska, Kristin M.; Layne, Graham D.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Bergmann, Uwe

    2015-10-07

    Bioturbating animals modify the original mineralogy, porosity, organic content, and fabric of mud, thus affecting the burial diagenetic pathways of potential hydrocarbon source, seal, and reservoir rocks. High-sensitivity, synchrotron rapid scanning X-ray fluorescence elemental mapping reveals that producers of phycosiphoniform burrows systematically partition redox-sensitive trace elements (i.e., Fe, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, and As) in fine-grained siliciclastic rocks. Systematic differences in organic carbon content (total organic carbon >1.5 wt%) and quality (?13Corg~0.6) are measured between the burrow core and host sediment. The relative enrichment of redox-sensitive elements in the burrow core does not correlate with significant neo-formation of early diagenetic pyrite (via trace metal pyritization), but is best explained by physical concentration of clay- and silt-sized components. A measured loss (~15%) of the large-ionic-radius elements Sr and Ba from both burrow halo and core is most likely associated with the release of Sr and Ba to pore waters during biological (in vivo) weathering of silt- to clay-sized lithic components and feldspar. In conclusion, this newly documented effect has significant potential to inform the interpretation of geochemical proxy and rock property data, particularly from shales, where elemental analyses are commonly employed to predict reservoir quality and support paleoenvironmental analysis.

  19. MCViNE- An object oriented Monte Carlo neutron ray tracing simulation package

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, J. Y. Y.; Smith, Hillary L.; Granroth, Garrett E.; Abernathy, Douglas L.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Winn, Barry L.; Aczel, Adam A.; Aivazis, Michael; Fultz, Brent

    2015-11-28

    MCViNE (Monte-Carlo VIrtual Neutron Experiment) is an open-source Monte Carlo (MC) neutron ray-tracing software for performing computer modeling and simulations that mirror real neutron scattering experiments. We exploited the close similarity between how instrument components are designed and operated and how such components can be modeled in software. For example we used object oriented programming concepts for representing neutron scatterers and detector systems, and recursive algorithms for implementing multiple scattering. Combining these features together in MCViNE allows one to handle sophisticated neutron scattering problems in modern instruments, including, for example, neutron detection by complex detector systems, and single and multiplemore » scattering events in a variety of samples and sample environments. In addition, MCViNE can use simulation components from linear-chain-based MC ray tracing packages which facilitates porting instrument models from those codes. Furthermore it allows for components written solely in Python, which expedites prototyping of new components. These developments have enabled detailed simulations of neutron scattering experiments, with non-trivial samples, for time-of-flight inelastic instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source. Examples of such simulations for powder and single-crystal samples with various scattering kernels, including kernels for phonon and magnon scattering, are presented. As a result, with simulations that closely reproduce experimental results, scattering mechanisms can be turned on and off to determine how they contribute to the measured scattering intensities, improving our understanding of the underlying physics.« less

  20. Coal quality trends and distribution of Title III trace elements in Eastern Kentucky coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eble, C.F.; Hower, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    The quality characteristics of eastern Kentucky coal beds vary both spatially and stratigraphically. Average total sulfur contents are lowest, and calorific values highest, in the Big Sandy and Upper Cumberland Reserve Districts. Average coal thickness is greatest in these two districts as well. Conversely, the thinnest coal with the highest total sulfur content, and lowest calorific value, on average, occurs in the Princess and Southwest Reserve Districts. Several Title III trace elements, notably arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, and nickel, mirror this distribution (lower average concentrations in the Big Sandy and Upper Cumberland Districts, higher average concentrations in the Princess and Southwest Districts), probably because these elements are primarily associated with sulfide minerals in coal. Ash yields and total sulfur contents are observed to increase in a stratigraphically older to younger direction. Several Title III elements, notably cadmium, chromium, lead, and selenium follow this trend, with average concentrations being higher in younger coals. Average chlorine concentration shows a reciprocal distribution, being more abundant in older coals. Some elements, such as arsenic, manganese, mercury, cobalt, and, to a lesser extent, phosphorus show concentration spikes in coal beds directly above, or below, major marine zones. With a few exceptions, average Title III trace element concentrations for eastern Kentucky coals are comparable with element distributions in other Appalachian coal-producing states.

  1. Novel Sorbent-Based Process for High Temperature Trace Metal Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gokhan Alptekin

    2008-09-30

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the efficacy of a novel sorbent can effectively remove trace metal contaminants (Hg, As, Se and Cd) from actual coal-derived synthesis gas streams at high temperature (above the dew point of the gas). The performance of TDA's sorbent has been evaluated in several field demonstrations using synthesis gas generated by laboratory and pilot-scale coal gasifiers in a state-of-the-art test skid that houses the absorbent and all auxiliary equipment for monitoring and data logging of critical operating parameters. The test skid was originally designed to treat 10,000 SCFH gas at 250 psig and 350 C, however, because of the limited gas handling capabilities of the test sites, the capacity was downsized to 500 SCFH gas flow. As part of the test program, we carried out four demonstrations at two different sites using the synthesis gas generated by the gasification of various lignites and a bituminous coal. Two of these tests were conducted at the Power Systems Demonstration Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Alabama; a Falkirk (North Dakota) lignite and a high sodium lignite (the PSDF operator Southern Company did not disclose the source of this lignite) were used as the feedstock. We also carried out two other demonstrations in collaboration with the University of North Dakota Energy Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC) using synthesis gas slipstreams generated by the gasification of Sufco (Utah) bituminous coal and Oak Hills (Texas) lignite. In the PSDF tests, we showed successful operation of the test system at the conditions of interest and showed the efficacy of sorbent in removing the mercury from synthesis gas. In Test Campaign No.1, TDA sorbent reduced Hg concentration of the synthesis gas to less than 5 {micro}g/m{sup 3} and achieved over 99% Hg removal efficiency for the entire test duration. Unfortunately, due to the relatively low concentration of the trace metals in the lignite feed and as a result of the intermittent operation of the PSDF gasifier (due to the difficulties in the handling of the low quality lignite), only a small fraction of the sorbent capacity was utilized (we measured a mercury capacity of 3.27 mg/kg, which is only a fraction of the 680 mg/kg Hg capacity measured for the same sorbent used at our bench-scale evaluations at TDA). Post reaction examination of the sorbent by chemical analysis also indicated some removal As and Se (we did not detect any significant amounts of Cd in the synthesis gas or over the sorbent). The tests at UNDEERC was more successful and showed clearly that the TDA sorbent can effectively remove Hg and other trace metals (As and Se) at high temperature. The on-line gas measurements carried out by TDA and UNDEERC separately showed that TDA sorbent can achieve greater than 95% Hg removal efficiency at 260 C ({approx}200g sorbent treated more than 15,000 SCF synthesis gas). Chemical analysis conducted following the tests also showed modest amounts of As and Se accumulation in the sorbent bed (the test durations were still short to show higher capacities to these contaminants). We also evaluated the stability of the sorbent and the fate of mercury (the most volatile and unstable of the trace metal compounds). The Synthetic Ground Water Leaching Procedure Test carried out by an independent environmental laboratory showed that the mercury will remain on the sorbent once the sorbent is disposed. Based on a preliminary engineering and cost analysis, TDA estimated the cost of mercury removal from coal-derived synthesis gas as $2,995/lb (this analysis assumes that this cost also includes the cost of removal of all other trace metal contaminants). The projected cost will result in a small increase (less than 1%) in the cost of energy.

  2. {sup 39}Ar Detection at the 10{sup -16} Isotopic Abundance Level with Atom Trap Trace Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, W.; Williams, W.; Bailey, K.; O'Connor, T. P.; Mueller, P.; Davis, A. M.; Hu, S.-M.; Sun, Y. R.; Lu, Z.-T.; Purtschert, R.; Sturchio, N. C.

    2011-03-11

    Atom trap trace analysis, a laser-based atom counting method, has been applied to analyze atmospheric {sup 39}Ar (half-life=269 yr), a cosmogenic isotope with an isotopic abundance of 8x10{sup -16}. In addition to the superior selectivity demonstrated in this work, the counting rate and efficiency of atom trap trace analysis have been improved by 2 orders of magnitude over prior results. The significant applications of this new analytical capability lie in radioisotope dating of ice and water samples and in the development of dark matter detectors.

  3. Simulation of radiation damping in rings, using stepwise ray-tracing methods

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meot, F.

    2015-06-26

    The ray-tracing code Zgoubi computes particle trajectories in arbitrary magnetic and/or electric field maps or analytical field models. It includes a built-in fitting procedure, spin tracking many Monte Carlo processes. The accuracy of the integration method makes it an efficient tool for multi-turn tracking in periodic machines. Energy loss by synchrotron radiation, based on Monte Carlo techniques, had been introduced in Zgoubi in the early 2000s for studies regarding the linear collider beam delivery system. However, only recently has this Monte Carlo tool been used for systematic beam dynamics and spin diffusion studies in rings, including eRHIC electron-ion collider projectmore » at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Some beam dynamics aspects of this recent use of Zgoubi capabilities, including considerations of accuracy as well as further benchmarking in the presence of synchrotron radiation in rings, are reported here.« less

  4. Analyzing health risks due to trace substance emissions from utility fossil-fired plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    EPRI has undertaken a number of project addressing a range of issues on the potential health effects due to long-term inhalation exposure to trace substances emitted from utility stacks. This report describes particular studies conducted to assess the health risks due to emissions from groups of power plants operated by individual utility companies. Researchers conducted specialized risk assessments for each of the power plants involved by incorporating utility-specific data into a modeling framework developed as part of EPRI`s Comprehensive Risk Evaluation (CORE) project to tailor the analysis for the individual utility. The results indicated the value of using more up-to-date, precise data in conducting risk assessments, rather than default assumptions. The report also describes CRAFT, the Comprehensive Risk Assessment Framework for Toxics software package, developed to perform these utility-wide air toxics risk assessments.

  5. Introducing GAMER: A fast and accurate method for ray-tracing galaxies using procedural noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groeneboom, N. E.; Dahle, H.

    2014-03-10

    We developed a novel approach for fast and accurate ray-tracing of galaxies using procedural noise fields. Our method allows for efficient and realistic rendering of synthetic galaxy morphologies, where individual components such as the bulge, disk, stars, and dust can be synthesized in different wavelengths. These components follow empirically motivated overall intensity profiles but contain an additional procedural noise component that gives rise to complex natural patterns that mimic interstellar dust and star-forming regions. These patterns produce more realistic-looking galaxy images than using analytical expressions alone. The method is fully parallelized and creates accurate high- and low- resolution images that can be used, for example, in codes simulating strong and weak gravitational lensing. In addition to having a user-friendly graphical user interface, the C++ software package GAMER is easy to implement into an existing code.

  6. Determination of ultra-trace amounts of uranium by ICP-AES technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, A.G.; Godbole, S.V.; Nadraswala, K.H.; Kulkarni, M.J.; Mallapurkar, V.S.; Joshi, B.D.

    1983-09-01

    An atomic emission spectrometric method based on the use of Inductively coupled argon plasma source has been developed for the determination of ultra trace concentrations of uranium in aqueous solutions. Using the optimized experimental conditions for the ICP source, uranium can be determined at 0.05 ..mu..g/ml concentration in 0.3M HNO/sub 3/ solutions with either of the two analytical lines viz. 3859.6 A/sup 0/ or 4090.1 A/sup 0/. The precision of determinations at the lowest detection limit is better than 2% R.S.D. The uranium estimation has been corrected for the interference due to the presence of eighteen metallic elements using an inter-element correction procedure. A number of spiked samples and NBL reference samples with concomitant impurities have been analysed using the standardised procedure and good agreement has been observed with their certified values.

  7. (Relative mobilities and transport mechanisms of trace elements during contact metamorphism of carbonate rocks). Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the relative mobilities and transport mechanisms of major, minor, and trace elements during the contact metamorphism of carbonate rocks. The large contrasts in chemical potentials of SiO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and CaO across a granitic pluton-limestone contact may induce metasomatism. In addition, rare earth and transition metal elements may act as tracers, and their redistribution during metamorphism may record convective cooling processes. The results of this study may have an application toward the problem of radioactive waste disposal and the degree to which radioactive nuclides may be expected to migrate during geologically significant periods of time.

  8. Simulation of radiation damping in rings, using stepwise ray-tracing methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meot, F.

    2015-06-26

    The ray-tracing code Zgoubi computes particle trajectories in arbitrary magnetic and/or electric field maps or analytical field models. It includes a built-in fitting procedure, spin tracking many Monte Carlo processes. The accuracy of the integration method makes it an efficient tool for multi-turn tracking in periodic machines. Energy loss by synchrotron radiation, based on Monte Carlo techniques, had been introduced in Zgoubi in the early 2000s for studies regarding the linear collider beam delivery system. However, only recently has this Monte Carlo tool been used for systematic beam dynamics and spin diffusion studies in rings, including eRHIC electron-ion collider project at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Some beam dynamics aspects of this recent use of Zgoubi capabilities, including considerations of accuracy as well as further benchmarking in the presence of synchrotron radiation in rings, are reported here.

  9. Tracing explosive in solvent using quantum cascade laser with pulsed electric discharge system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Seong-Wook; Tian, Chao; Martini, Rainer; Chen, Gang; Chen, I-chun Anderson

    2014-11-03

    We demonstrated highly sensitive detection of explosive dissolved in solvent with a portable spectroscopy system (Q-MACS) by tracing the explosive byproduct, N{sub 2}O, in combination with a pulsed electric discharge system for safe explosive decomposition. Using Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), the gas was monitored and analyzed by Q-MACS and the presence of the dissolved explosive clearly detected. While HMX presence could be identified directly in the air above the solutions even without plasma, much better results were achieved under the decomposition. The experiment results give an estimated detection limit of 10?ppb, which corresponds to a 15?pg of HMX.

  10. Determination of trace elements in soils with an axial sequential ICP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shkolnik, J.; Flajnik, C.

    1995-12-31

    Over the past few years the popularity of axial viewed ICP has increased greatly. The major claimed advantage of axial ICP is improvement in detection limits by an order of magnitude over radial viewed plasmas. It has also been noted however, that axial ICP suffers from greater chemical and ionization interferences than radial ICP, making it less desirable for samples with a {open_quotes}matrix{close_quotes}. In this paper we will describe the determination of a number of trace paper elements in soil samples by axial ICP. The chemical and ionization interferences will be examined and the accuracy and precision will be evaluated. Comparisons to the same determinations done on a radial ICP with ultrasonic nebulizer will also be discussed.

  11. Surface Cleaning Techniques: Ultra-Trace ICP-MS Sample Preparation and Assay of HDPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overman, Nicole R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2013-06-01

    The worlds most sensitive radiation detection and assay systems depend upon ultra-low background (ULB) materials to reduce unwanted radiological backgrounds. Herein, we evaluate methods to clean HDPE, a material of interest to ULB systems and the means to provide rapid assay of surface and bulk contamination. ULB level material and ultra-trace level detection of actinide elements is difficult to attain, due to the introduction of contamination from sample preparation equipment such as pipette tips, sample vials, forceps, etc. and airborne particulate. To date, literature available on the cleaning of such polymeric materials and equipment for ULB applications and ultra-trace analyses is limited. For these reasons, a study has been performed to identify an effective way to remove surface contamination from polymers in an effort to provide improved instrumental detection limits. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) was utilized to assess the effectiveness of a variety of leachate solutions for removal of inorganic uranium and thorium surface contamination from polymers, specifically high density polyethylene (HDPE). HDPE leaching procedures were tested to optimize contaminant removal of thorium and uranium. Calibration curves for thorium and uranium ranged from 15 ppq (fg/mL) to 1 ppt (pg/mL). Detection limits were calculated at 6 ppq for uranium and 7 ppq for thorium. Results showed the most effective leaching reagent to be clean 6 M nitric acid for 72 hour exposures. Contamination levels for uranium and thorium found in the leachate solutions were significant for ultralow level radiation detection applications.

  12. Incorporation of trace elements in Portland cement clinker: Thresholds limits for Cu, Ni, Sn or Zn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gineys, N.; Aouad, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Damidot, D.

    2011-11-15

    This paper aims at defining precisely, the threshold limits for several trace elements (Cu, Ni, Sn or Zn) which correspond to the maximum amount that could be incorporated into a standard clinker whilst reaching the limit of solid solution of its four major phases (C{sub 3}S, C{sub 2}S, C{sub 3}A and C{sub 4}AF). These threshold limits were investigated through laboratory synthesised clinkers that were mainly studied by X-ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The reference clinker was close to a typical Portland clinker (65% C{sub 3}S, 18% C{sub 2}S, 8% C{sub 3}A and 8% C{sub 4}AF). The threshold limits for Cu, Ni, Zn and Sn are quite high with respect to the current contents in clinker and were respectively equal to 0.35, 0.5, 0.7 and 1 wt.%. It appeared that beyond the defined threshold limits, trace elements had different behaviours. Ni was associated with Mg as a magnesium nickel oxide (MgNiO{sub 2}) and Sn reacted with lime to form a calcium stannate (Ca{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}). Cu changed the crystallisation process and affected therefore the formation of C{sub 3}S. Indeed a high content of Cu in clinker led to the decomposition of C{sub 3}S into C{sub 2}S and of free lime. Zn, in turn, affected the formation of C{sub 3}A. Ca{sub 6}Zn{sub 3}Al{sub 4}O{sub 15} was formed whilst a tremendous reduction of C{sub 3}A content was identified. The reactivity of cements made with the clinkers at the threshold limits was followed by calorimetry and compressive strength measurements on cement paste. The results revealed that the doped cements were at least as reactive as the reference cement.

  13. Use of external cavity quantum cascade laser compliance voltage in real-time trace gas sensing of multiple chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Kriesel, Jason M.

    2015-02-08

    We describe a prototype trace gas sensor designed for real-time detection of multiple chemicals. The sensor uses an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) swept over its tuning range of 940-1075 cm-1 (9.30-10.7 µm) at a 10 Hz repetition rate.

  14. Carbon dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center: A for Atmospheric trace gases. Annual progress report, FY 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burtis, M.D.; Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.; Nelson, T.R.; Stoss, F.W.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments made by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases during the fiscal year 1994. Topics discussed in this report include; organization and staff, user services, systems, communications, Collaborative efforts with China, networking, ocean data and activities of the World Data Center-A.

  15. Exploring Light's Interactions with Bubbles and Light Absorbers in Photoelectrochemical Devices using Ray Tracing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, John

    2013-12-31

    Ray tracing was used to perform optical optimization of arrays of photovoltaic microrods and explore the interaction between light and bubbles of oxygen gas on the surface of the microrods. The incident angle of light was varied over a wide range. The percent of incident light absorbed by the microrods and reflected by the bubbles was computed over this range. It was found that, for the 10 μm diameter, 100 μm tall SrTiO{sub 3} microrods simulated in the model, the optimal center-­‐to-­‐center spacing was 14 μm for a square grid. This geometry produced 75% average and 90% maximum absorbance. For a triangular grid using the same microrods, the optimal center-­‐to-­‐center spacing was 14 μm. This geometry produced 67% average and 85% maximum absorbance. For a randomly laid out grid of 5 μm diameter, 100 μm tall SrTiO! microrods with an average center-­‐to-­‐center spacing of 20 μm, the average absorption was 23% and the maximum absorption was 43%. For a 50% areal coverage fraction of bubbles on the absorber surface, between 2%-­‐20% of the incident light energy was reflected away from the rods by the bubbles, depending upon incident angle and bubble morphology.

  16. Trace species detection: Spectroscopy and molecular energy transfer at high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, J.A.

    1993-12-01

    Monitoring the concentration of trace species such as atomic and molecular free radicals is essential in forming predictive models of combustion processes. LIF-based techniques have the necessary sensitivity for concentration and temperature measurements but have limited accuracy due to collisional quenching in combustion applications. The goal of this program is to use spectroscopic and kinetic measurements to quantify nonradiative and collisional effects on LIF signals and to develop new background-free alternatives to LIF. The authors have measured the natural linewidth of several OH A-X (3,0) rotational transitions to determine predissociation lifetimes in the upper state, which were presumed to be short compared to quenching lifetimes, and as a result, quantitative predictions about the applicability of predissociation fluorescence methods at high pressures are made. The authors are investigating collisional energy transfer in the A-state of NO. Quenching rates which enable direct corrections to NO LIF quantum yields at high temperature were calculations. These quenching rates are now being used in studies of turbulence/chemistry interactions. The authors have measured the electric dipole moment {mu} of excited-state NO using Stark quantum-beat spectroscopy. {mu} is an essential input to a harpoon model which predicts quenching efficiencies for NO (A) by a variety of combustion-related species. The authors are developing new coherent multiphoton techniques for measurements of atomic hydrogen concentration in laboratory flames to avoid the quenching problems associated with previous multiphoton LIF schemes.

  17. The role of trace impurities in classification of in-core reactor components. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luksic, A.T.; Pauley, K.A.; Reid, B.d.

    1993-08-01

    Low-level radioactive waste is classified into three distinct categories under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61 (10CFR61). These categories, Class A, B, and C, are determined by the concentrations of specified radionuclides, with Class C being the most restrictive. Waste which is determined to exceed the Class C limits is referred to as Greater Than Class C (GTCC) and is generally deemed to be unacceptable for disposal in a shallow land burial site. Under the Low-Level Waste Policy Act Amendments of 1985 (Public Law 99-240), the responsibility for disposal of waste classified as GTCC rests with the US government. To provide a better understanding of the elemental constituents that are present in nuclear fuel related materials, 41 samples of unirradiated materials used in the manufacture of fuel assembly hardware and nonfuel assembly components were obtained and analyzed. Particular emphasis was placed on evaluating the concentration of niobium in Zircaloy. The results of this work indicate that insignificant amounts of niobium are found in the current generation of Zircaloy. However, the reason for the inconsistency between the trace amounts of elemental niobium (<10 ppM) observed in the current analysis and the significant amounts (>100 ppM) that were observed in the previous analysis has not been identified.

  18. Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Reaction and Transformation of Hg and Trace Metals in Combustion Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Helble; Clara Smith; David Miller

    2009-08-31

    The overall goal of this project was to produce a working dynamic model to predict the transformation and partitioning of trace metals resulting from combustion of a broad range of fuels. The information provided from this model will be instrumental in efforts to identify fuels and conditions that can be varied to reduce metal emissions. Through the course of this project, it was determined that mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As) would be the focus of the experimental investigation. Experiments were therefore conducted to examine homogeneous and heterogeneous mercury oxidation pathways, and to assess potential interactions between arsenic and calcium. As described in this report, results indicated that the role of SO{sub 2} on Hg oxidation was complex and depended upon overall gas phase chemistry, that iron oxide (hematite) particles contributed directly to heterogeneous Hg oxidation, and that As-Ca interactions occurred through both gas-solid and within-char reaction pathways. Modeling based on this study indicated that, depending upon coal type and fly ash particle size, vaporization-condensation, vaporization-surface reaction, and As-CaO in-char reaction all play a role in arsenic transformations under combustion conditions.

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF BENZENE AS A TRACE REACTANT IN TITAN AEROSOL ANALOGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trainer, Melissa G.; Sebree, Joshua A.; Heidi Yoon, Y.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2013-03-20

    Benzene has been detected in Titan's atmosphere by Cassini instruments, with concentrations ranging from sub-ppb in the stratosphere to ppm in the ionosphere. Sustained levels of benzene in the haze formation region could signify that it is an important reactant in the formation of Titan's organic aerosol. To date, there have not been laboratory investigations to assess the influence of benzene on aerosol properties. We report a laboratory study on the chemical composition of organic aerosol formed from C{sub 6}H{sub 6}/CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} via far ultraviolet irradiation (120-200 nm). The compositional results are compared to those from aerosol generated by a more ''traditional Titan'' mixture of CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2}. Our results show that even a trace amount of C{sub 6}H{sub 6} (10 ppm) has significant impact on the chemical composition and production rates of organic aerosol. There are several pathways by which photolyzed benzene may react to form larger molecules, both with and without the presence of CH{sub 4}, but many of these reaction mechanisms are only beginning to be explored for the conditions at Titan. Continued work investigating the influence of benzene in aerosol growth will advance understanding of this previously unstudied reaction system.

  20. How individual traces and interactive timelines could support outage execution - Toward an outage historian concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parfouru, S.; De-Beler, N.

    2012-07-01

    In the context of a project that is designing innovative ICT-based solutions for the organizational concept of outage management, we focus on the informational process of the OCR (Outage Control Room) underlying the execution of the outages. Informational process are based on structured and unstructured documents that have a key role in the collaborative processes and management of the outage. We especially track the structured and unstructured documents, electronically or not, from creation to sharing. Our analysis allows us to consider that the individual traces produced by an individual participant with a specific role could be multi-purpose and support sharing between participants without creating duplication of work. The ultimate goal is to be able to generate an outage historian, that is not just focused on highly structured information, which could be useful to improve the continuity of information between participants. We study the implementation of this approach through web technologies and social media tools to address this issue. We also investigate the issue of data access through interactive visualization timelines coupled with other modality's to assist users in the navigation and exploration of the proposed historian. (authors)

  1. Modified Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld gravity with a trace term

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Che -Yu; Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Chen, Pisin

    2016-01-22

    In this study, a modified Eddington-inspired-Born-Infeld (EiBI) theory with a pure trace term gμνR being added to the determinantal action is analysed from a cosmological point of view. It corresponds to the most general action constructed from a rank two tensor that contains up to first order terms in curvature. This term can equally be seen as a conformal factor multiplying the metric gμν . This very interesting type of amendment has not been considered within the Palatini formalism despite the large amount of works on the Born-Infeld-inspired theory of gravity. This model can provide smooth bouncing solutions which weremore » not allowed in the EiBI model for the same EiBI coupling. Most interestingly, for a radiation filled universe there are some regions of the parameter space that can naturally lead to a de Sitter inflationary stage without the need of any exotic matter field. Finally, in this model we discover a new type of cosmic “quasi-sudden” singularity, where the cosmic time derivative of the Hubble rate becomes very large but finite at a finite cosmic time.« less

  2. Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlosser, Courtney Adam; Walter-Anthony, Katey; Zhuang, Qianlai; Melillo, Jerry

    2013-04-26

    Our overall goal was to quantify the potential for threshold changes in natural emission rates of trace gases, particularly methane and carbon dioxide, from pan-arctic terrestrial systems under the spectrum of anthropogenically forced climate warming, and the extent to which these emissions provide a strong feedback mechanism to global climate warming. This goal is motivated under the premise that polar amplification of global climate warming will induce widespread thaw and degradation of the permafrost, and would thus cause substantial changes in the extent of wetlands and lakes, especially thermokarst (thaw) lakes, over the Arctic. Through a coordinated effort of field measurements, model development, and numerical experimentation with an integrated assessment model framework, we have investigated the following hypothesis: There exists a climate-warming threshold beyond which permafrost degradation becomes widespread and thus instigates strong and/or sharp increases in methane emissions (via thermokarst lakes and wetland expansion). These would outweigh any increased uptake of carbon (e.g. from peatlands) and would result in a strong, positive feedback to global climate warming.

  3. Appending High-Resolution Elevation Data to GPS Speed Traces for Vehicle Energy Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, E.; Burton, E.; Duran, A.; Gonder, J.

    2014-06-01

    Accurate and reliable global positioning system (GPS)-based vehicle use data are highly valuable for many transportation, analysis, and automotive considerations. Model-based design, real-world fuel economy analysis, and the growing field of autonomous and connected technologies (including predictive powertrain control and self-driving cars) all have a vested interest in high-fidelity estimation of powertrain loads and vehicle usage profiles. Unfortunately, road grade can be a difficult property to extract from GPS data with consistency. In this report, we present a methodology for appending high-resolution elevation data to GPS speed traces via a static digital elevation model. Anomalous data points in the digital elevation model are addressed during a filtration/smoothing routine, resulting in an elevation profile that can be used to calculate road grade. This process is evaluated against a large, commercially available height/slope dataset from the Navteq/Nokia/HERE Advanced Driver Assistance Systems product. Results will show good agreement with the Advanced Driver Assistance Systems data in the ability to estimate road grade between any two consecutive points in the contiguous United States.

  4. Effect of landfill leachate organic acids on trace metal adsorption by kaolinite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroth, B.; Garrison, Sposito

    1997-02-01

    Hexanoic (hex) and fulvic acid (FA), representing early and later stages of landfill leachate evolution, were examined for influence on trace metal adsorption by a poorly crystallized kaolinite (KGa-2). Our experiments represented a model approach to examine possible reaction mechanisms in an environmentally important ternary metal-ligand-mineral surface system. Batch experiments were conducted in 0.01 mol kg(-1) NaClO4 at pH 3-8. Concentrations of metals (Cu, Cd, and Pb) and ligands were representative of those found typically in groundwater immediately downgradient of a landfill. The presence of FA resulted in enhancement of metal adsorption below pH 5, whereas the presence of hex produced no significant net change in metal uptake. Measured surface charge properties of KGa-2 were combined with binary and ternary system data in constructing a quantitative model of the system. The simple combination of binary system results was not effective in predicting the observed ternary system behavior. In both ternary systems, the addition of ternary surface complexes (TSCs) to the models resulted in a satisfactory fit to the data. Our work suggests the strong possibility that TSC involvement in surface reactions of natural adsorbents may be a useful concept.

  5. Mineral formation and redox-sensitive trace elements in a near-surface hydrothermal alteration system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehring, A.U.; Schosseler, P.M.; Weidler, P.G.

    1999-07-01

    A recent hydrothermal mudpool at the southwestern slope of the Rincon de la Vieja volcano in Northwest Costa Rica exhibits an argillic alteration system formed by intense interaction of sulfuric acidic fluids with wall rock materials. Detailed mineralogical analysis revealed an assemblage with kaolinite, alunite, and opal-C as the major mineral phases. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) showed 3 different redox-sensitive cations associated with the mineral phases, Cu{sup +} is structure-bound in opal-C, whereas VO{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} are located in the kaolinite structure. The location of the redox-sensitive cations in different minerals of the assemblage is indicative of different chemical conditions. The formation of the alteration products can be described schematically as a 2-step process. In a first step alunite and opal-C were precipitated in a fluid with slightly reducing conditions and a low chloride availability. The second step is characterized by a decrease in K{sup +} activity and subsequent formation of kaolinite under weakly oxidizing to oxidizing redox conditions as indicated by structure-bound VO{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}. The detection of paramagnetic trace elements structure-bound in mineral phases by EPR provide direct information about the prevailing redox conditions during alteration and can, therefore, be used as additional insight into the genesis of the hydrothermal, near-surface system.

  6. Tracing the HIV-1 subtype B mobility in Europe: a phylogeographic approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, Thomas; Paraskevis, D; Pybus, O; Magiorkinis, G; Hatzakis, A

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence and the origin of HIV-1 subtype B, the most prevalent circulating clade among the long-term residents in Europe, have been studied extensively. However the spatial diffusion of the epidemic from the perspective of the virus has not previously been traced. In the current study we inferred the migration history of HIV-1 subtype B by way of a phylogeography of viral sequences sampled from 16 European countries and Israel. Migration events were inferred from viral phylogenies by character reconstruction using parsimony. With regard to the spatial dispersal of the HIV subtype B sequences across viral phylogenies, in most of the countries in Europe the epidemic was introduced by multiple sources and subsequently spread within local networks. Poland provides an exception where most of the infections were the result of a single point introduction. According to the significant migratory pathways, we show that there are considerable differences across Europe. Specifically, Greece, Portugal, Serbia and Spain, provide sources shedding HIV-1; Austria, Belgium and Luxembourg, on the other hand, are migratory targets, while for Denmark, Germany, Italy, Israel, Norway, the Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland and the UK we inferred significant bidirectional migration. For Poland no significant migratory pathways were inferred. Subtype B phylogeographies provide a new insight about the geographical distribution of viral lineages, as well as the significant pathways of virus dispersal across Europe, suggesting that intervention strategies should also address tourists, travellers and migrants.

  7. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Dai, Zhenxue; Zheng, Liange

    2014-12-31

    An important risk at CO2 storage sites is the potential for groundwater quality impacts. As part of a system to assess the potential for these impacts a geochemical scaling function has been developed, based on a detailed reactive transport model of CO2 and brine leakage into an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer. Stochastic simulations varying a number of geochemical parameters were used to generate a response surface predicting the volume of aquifer that would be impacted with respect to regulated contaminants. The brine was assumed to contain several trace metals and organic contaminants. Aquifer pH and TDS were influenced by CO2more » leakage, while trace metal concentrations were most influenced by the brine concentrations rather than adsorption or desorption on calcite. Organic plume sizes were found to be strongly influenced by biodegradation.« less

  8. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    3 (2014) 4684 - 4707 Energy Procedia GHGT-12 Geochemical impacts of carbon dioxide, brine, trace metal and organic leakage into an unconfined, oxidizing limestone aquifer Diana H. Bacon3'* *, Zhenxue Daib, Liange Zhengc "Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington, USA bLos Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA cLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, USA Abstract An important risk at CO2 storage sites is the potential for groundwater

  9. Modeling the global emission, transport and deposition of trace elements associated with mineral dust

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Y.; Mahowald, N.; Scanza, R.; Journet, E.; Desboeufs, K.; Albani, S.; Kok, J.; Zhuang, G.; Chen, Y.; Cohen, D. D.; et al

    2014-12-17

    Trace element deposition from desert dust has important impacts on ocean primary productivity. In this study, emission inventories for 8 elements, which are primarily of soil origin, Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, K, Al, and Si were determined based on a global mineral dataset and a soils dataset. Datasets of elemental fractions were used to drive the desert dust model in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) in order to simulate the elemental concentrations of atmospheric dust. Spatial variability of mineral dust elemental fractions was evident on a global scale, particularly for Ca. Simulations of global variations in the Camore » / Al ratio, which typically ranged from around 0.1 to 5.0 in soil sources, were consistent with observations, suggesting this ratio to be a good signature for dust source regions. The simulated variable fractions of chemical elements are sufficiently different that estimates of deposition should include elemental variations, especially for Ca, Al and Fe. The model results have been evaluated with observational elemental aerosol concentration data from desert regions and dust events in non-dust regions, providing insights into uncertainties in the modeling approach. The ratios between modeled and observed elemental fractions ranged from 0.7 to 1.6 except for 3.4 and 3.5 for Mg and Mn, respectivly. Using the soil data base improved the correspondence of the spatial hetereogeneity in the modeling of several elements (Ca, Al and Fe) compared to observations. Total and soluble dust associated element fluxes into different ocean basins and ice sheets regions have been estimated, based on the model results. Annual inputs of soluble Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe and K associated with dust using mineral dataset were 0.28 Tg, 16.89 Gg, 1.32 Tg, 22.84 Gg, 0.068 Tg, and 0.15 Tg to global oceans and ice sheets.« less

  10. The trace of the CNO cycle in the ring nebula NGC 6888

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mesa-Delgado, A.; Esteban, C.; Garca-Rojas, J.; Reyes-Prez, J.; Morisset, C.; Bresolin, F.

    2014-04-20

    We present new results on the chemical composition of the Galactic ring nebula NGC 6888 surrounding the WN6(h) star WR136. The data are based on deep spectroscopical observations taken with the High Dispersion Spectrograph at the 8.2 m Subaru Telescope. The spectra cover the optical range from 3700 to 7400 . The effect of the CNO cycle is well-identified in the abundances of He, N, and O, while elements not involved in the synthesis such as Ar, S, and Fe present values consistent with the solar vicinity and the ambient gas. The major achievement of this work is the first detection of the faint C II ?4267 recombination line in a Wolf-Rayet nebula. This allows us to estimate the C abundance in NGC 6888 and therefore investigate for the first time the trace of the CNO cycle in a ring nebula around a Wolf-Rayet star. Although the detection of the C II line has a low signal-to-noise ratio, the C abundance seems to be higher than the predictions of recent stellar evolution models of massive stars. The Ne abundance also shows a puzzling pattern with an abundance of about 0.5 dex lower than the solar vicinity, which may be related to the action of the NeNa cycle. Attending to the constraints imposed by the dynamical timescale and the He/H and N/O ratios of the nebula, the comparison with stellar evolution models indicates that the initial mass of the stellar progenitor of NGC 6888 is between 25 M {sub ?} and 40 M {sub ?}.

  11. RHESSI AND TRACE OBSERVATIONS OF MULTIPLE FLARE ACTIVITY IN AR 10656 AND ASSOCIATED FILAMENT ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, Bhuwan; Kushwaha, Upendra; Cho, K.-S.; Veronig, Astrid M.

    2013-07-01

    We present Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) observations of multiple flare activity that occurred in the NOAA active region 10656 over a period of 2 hr on 2004 August 18. Out of four successive flares, three were class C events, and the final event was a major X1.8 solar eruptive flare. The activities during the pre-eruption phase, i.e., before the X1.8 flare, are characterized by three localized episodes of energy release occurring in the vicinity of a filament that produces intense heating along with non-thermal emission. A few minutes before the eruption, the filament undergoes an activation phase during which it slowly rises with a speed of {approx}12 km s{sup -1}. The filament eruption is accompanied by an X1.8 flare, during which multiple hard X-ray (HXR) bursts are observed up to 100-300 keV energies. We observe a bright and elongated coronal structure simultaneously in E(UV) and 50-100 keV HXR images underneath the expanding filament during the period of HXR bursts, which provides strong evidence for ongoing magnetic reconnection. This phase is accompanied by very high plasma temperatures of {approx}31 MK, followed by the detachment of the prominence from the solar source region. From the location, timing, strength, and spectrum of HXR emission, we conclude that the prominence eruption is driven by the distinct events of magnetic reconnection occurring in the current sheet below the erupting prominence. These multi-wavelength observations also suggest that the localized magnetic reconnections associated with different evolutionary stages of the filament in the pre-eruption phase play an important role in destabilizing the active-region filament through the tether-cutting process, leading to large-scale eruption and X-class flare.

  12. Recoil-Implantation Of Multiple Radioisotopes Towards Wear Rate Measurements And Particle Tracing In Prosthetic Joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, Jacob A.; Timmers, Heiko; Smith, Paul N.; Scarvell, Jennifer M.; Gladkis, Laura

    2011-06-01

    This study demonstrates a new method of radioisotope labeling of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene inserts in prosthetic joints for wear studies. The radioisotopes {sup 97}Ru, {sup 100}Pd, {sup 100}Rh, and {sup 101m}Rh are produced in fusion evaporation reactions induced by {sup 12}C ions in a {sup 92}Zr target foil. The fusion products recoil-implant into ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene plugs, machined to fit into the surface of the inserts. During laboratory simulations of the joint motion, a wear rate of the labeled polyethylene may be measured and the pathways of wear debris particles can be traced by detecting characteristic gamma-rays. The concentration profiles of the radioisotopes extend effectively uniformly from the polyethylene surface to a depth of about 4 {mu}m. The multiplicity of labeling and the use of several gamma-ray lines aids with avoiding systematic measurement uncertainties. Two polyethylene plugs were labeled and one was fitted into the surface of the tibial insert of a knee prosthesis, which had been worn in. Actuation over close to 100,000 cycles with a 900 N axial load and a 24 deg. flexion angle removed (14{+-}1)% of the gamma-ray activity from the plug. Most of this activity dispersed into the serum lubricant identifying this as the important debris pathway. Less than 1% activity was transferred to the femoral component of the prosthesis and the measured activity on the tibial tray was insignificant. Assuming uniform wear across the superior surface of the insert, a wear rate of (12{+-}3) mm{sup 3}/Megacycle was determined. This is consistent with wear rate measurements under similar conditions using other techniques.

  13. Trace element and isotope geochemistry of geothermal fluids, East Rift Zone, Kilauea, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, H.B.; Delanoy, G.A.; Thomas, D.M. . Hawaii Inst. of Geophysics); Gerlach, D.C. ); Chen, B.; Takahashi, P.; Thomas, D.M. Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA )

    1992-01-01

    A research program has been undertaken in an effort to better characterize the composition and the precipitation characteristic of the geothermal fluids produced by the HGP-A geothermal well located on the Kilauea East Rift Zone on the Island of Hawaii. The results of these studies have shown that the chemical composition of the fluids changed over the production life of the well and that the fluids produced were the result of mixing of at least two, and possibly three, source fluids. These source fluids were recognized as: a sea water composition modified by high temperature water-rock reactions; meteoric recharge; and a hydrothermal fluid that had been equilibrated with high temperature reservoir rocks and magmatic volatiles. Although the major alkali and halide elements show clearly increasing trends with time, only a few of the trace transition metals show a similar trend. The rare earth elements, were typically found at low concentrations and appeared to be highly variable with time. Studies of the precipitation characteristics of silica showed that amorphous silica deposition rates were highly sensitive to fluid pH and that increases in fluid pH above about 8.5 could flocculate more than 80% of the suspended colloidal silica in excess of its solubility. Addition of transition metal salts were also found to enhance the recovery fractions of silica from solution. The amorphous silica precipitate was also found to strongly scavenge the alkaline earth and transition metal ions naturally present in the brines; mild acid treatments were shown to be capable of removing substantial fractions of the scavenged metals from the silica flocs yielding a moderately pure gelatinous by-product. Further work on the silica precipitation process is recommended to improve our ability to control silica scaling from high temperature geothermal fluids or to recover a marketable silica by-product from these fluids prior to reinjection.

  14. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Sources (more than one may apply) Elec- tricity Natural Gas District Chilled Water Elec- tricity Natural Gas District Chilled Water All Buildings* ......

  15. Kotzebue Wind Project I | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Status In Service Owner Kotzebue Elec. Assoc. Developer Kotzebue Electric Association Energy Purchaser Kotzebue Elec. Assoc. Location Kotzebue AK Coordinates 66.836485,...

  16. Alaska Village Cooperative Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In Service Owner Alaska Village Elec Coop Developer Kotzebue Electric Association Energy Purchaser Alaska Village Elec Coop Location Toksook Bay AK Coordinates 60.5315,...

  17. Long-term Operation of an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser-based Trace-gas Sensor for Building Air Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Craig, Ian M.

    2013-11-03

    We analyze the long-term performance and stability of a trace-gas sensor based on an external cavity quantum cascade laser using data collected over a one-year period in a building air monitoring application.

  18. Nutrient dynamics and nitrogen trace gas flux during ecosystem development in montane rain forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, R.H.; Vitousek, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    Patterns of nitrogen trace gas emissions, soil nitrogen flux, and nutrient availability were evaluated at five sites that form a chronosequence in Hawaiian montane rain forest. The estimated age of basaltic parent material from which soils developed at the Kilauea site was 200 yr, 6000 yr at the Puu Makaala site, 185000 yr at the Kohala site, 1.65 x 10{sup 6} yr at the Molokai site, and 4.5 x 10{sup 6} yr at the Kauai site. Peak net N mineralization and nitrification values were found in soils from the 185000-yr-old Kohala site. Nitrogen content of foliage and leaf litter was highest in the intermediate age sites (Puu Makaala and Kohala) and N and P retranslocation was lowest at the Puu Makaala site. Soil cores fertilized with nitrogen had significantly higher rates of root ingrowth than control cores at the two youngest sites (200 and 6000 yr old) but not in older sites (185000 and 4.5 x 10{sup 6}-yr-old sites) and total fine root growth into control cores was greatest at the Kohala site. The highest N{sub 2}O emissions were found at the 185000-yr-old Kohala site, while the highest combined flux of N{sub 2}O + NO was observed at the 4.5 x 10{sup 6}-yr-old Kauai site. While overall N{sub 2}O emission rates were correlated with rates of N transformations, soil water content appeared to influence the magnitude of emissions of N{sub 2}O and the ratios of emissions of NO vs. N{sub 2}O. N{sub 2}O emissions occurred when water-filled pore space (WFPS) values were >40%, with highest emissions in at least two sites observed at WFPS values of 75%. Among sites, high N{sub 2}O emissions were associated with high soil N transformation rates. Large NO fluxes were observed only at the Kauai site when WFPS values were <60%. 50 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Modeling the global emission, transport and deposition of trace elements associated with mineral dust

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Y.; Mahowald, N.; Scanza, R. A.; Journet, E.; Desboeufs, K.; Albani, S.; Kok, J. F.; Zhuang, G.; Chen, Y.; Cohen, D. D.; et al

    2015-10-12

    Trace element deposition from desert dust has important impacts on ocean primary productivity, the quantification of which could be useful in determining the magnitude and sign of the biogeochemical feedback on radiative forcing. However, the impact of elemental deposition to remote ocean regions is not well understood and is not currently included in global climate models. In this study, emission inventories for eight elements primarily of soil origin, Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, K, Al, and Si are determined based on a global mineral data set and a soil data set. The resulting elemental fractions are used to drive themore » desert dust model in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) in order to simulate the elemental concentrations of atmospheric dust. Spatial variability of mineral dust elemental fractions is evident on a global scale, particularly for Ca. Simulations of global variations in the Ca / Al ratio, which typically range from around 0.1 to 5.0 in soils, are consistent with observations, suggesting that this ratio is a good signature for dust source regions. The simulated variable fractions of chemical elements are sufficiently different; estimates of deposition should include elemental variations, especially for Ca, Al and Fe. The model results have been evaluated with observations of elemental aerosol concentrations from desert regions and dust events in non-dust regions, providing insights into uncertainties in the modeling approach. The ratios between modeled and observed elemental fractions range from 0.7 to 1.6, except for Mg and Mn (3.4 and 3.5, respectively). Using the soil database improves the correspondence of the spatial heterogeneity in the modeling of several elements (Ca, Al and Fe) compared to observations. Total and soluble dust element fluxes to different ocean basins and ice sheet regions have been estimated, based on the model results. The annual inputs of soluble Mg, P, Ca, Mn, Fe and K associated with dust using the mineral data set are 0.30 Tg, 16.89 Gg, 1.32 Tg, 22.84 Gg, 0.068 Tg, and 0.15 Tg to global oceans and ice sheets.« less

  20. Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process: trace elements. Research and development report No. 53, interim report No. 31, August 1976-July 1977. Volume III. Pilot plant development work. Part 6. [Fate of 36 trace elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-03-01

    Results are presented on a study of the distribution and fate of 34 trace elements in the Solvent Refined Coal Process at the pilot plant located at Fort Lewis, Washington, and operated by The Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co. under contract with the US Department of Energy. Neutron activation analysis was used to determine Ti, V, Ca, Mg, Al, Cl, Mn, As, Sb, Se, Hg, Br, Co, Ni, Cr, Fe, Na, Rb, Cs, K, Sc, Tb, Eu, Sm, Ce, La, Sr, Ba, Th, Hf, Ta, Ga, Zr, and Cu in feed coals, process solvent, Solvent Refined Coal (SRC), mineral residues, wet filter cake, by-product solvents, process and effluent waters and by-product sulfur. The sample points were chosen such that the major process streams were adequately described and that the major input and output materials were included. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to measure the toxic elements Pb, Cd, Be in plant-derived solvents, effluent water and Hamer Marsh water. Specific methods were developed for analysis of a wide range of material compositions. The neutron activation analysis procedures were divided into short and long irradiation procedures for elements with short half lives (less than 3 hours) and intermediate to long half lives ( 8 hours to 5.2 years). Data are presented for a third equilibrium set of samples from the SRC-I process and compared to two similar sets analyzed previously. A material balance (or budget) was calculated for each element from the concentration data and the yields of each process fraction. Data are also presented on a study of carbon monoxide addition to the hydrogen stream and its effect on trace elements, and trace element data on a study of thirty-six plant effluent water samples taken during an SRC-I production run.

  1. Geochemical, metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into trace metal utilization by methane-oxidizing microbial consortia in sulfidic marine sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, DR. Jennifer; Yu, DR. Hang; Steele, Joshua; Dawson, Katherine; Sun, S; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Orphan, V

    2014-01-01

    Microbes have obligate requirements for trace metals in metalloenzymes that catalyze important biogeochemical reactions. In anoxic methane- and sulfide-rich environments, microbes may have unique adaptations for metal acquisition and utilization due to decreased bioavailability as a result of metal sulfide precipitation. However, micronutrient cycling is largely unexplored in cold ( 10 C) and sulfidic (>1 mM H2S) deep-sea methane seep ecosystems. We investigated trace metal geochemistry and microbial metal utilization in methane seeps offshore Oregon and California, USA, and report dissolved concentrations of nickel (0.5-270 nM), cobalt (0.5-6 nM), molybdenum (10-5,600 nM) and tungsten (0.3-8 nM) in Hydrate Ridge sediment porewaters. Despite low levels of cobalt and tungsten, metagenomic and metaproteomic data suggest that microbial consortia catalyzing anaerobic oxidation of methane utilize both scarce micronutrients in addition to nickel and molybdenum. Genetic machinery for cobalt-containing vitamin B12 biosynthesis was present in both anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Proteins affiliated with the tungsten-containing form of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase were expressed in ANME from two seep ecosystems, the first evidence for expression of a tungstoenzyme in psychrotolerant microorganisms. Finally, our data suggest that chemical speciation of metals in highly sulfidic porewaters may exert a stronger influence on microbial bioavailability than total concentration

  2. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2000 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2001-11-15

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels.

  3. Geochemical, metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into trace metal utilization by methane-oxidizing microbial consortia in sulphidic marine sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, DR. Jennifer; Yu, DR. Hang; Steele, Joshua; Dawson, Katherine; Sun, S; Chourey, Karuna; Pan, Chongle; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Orphan, V

    2013-01-01

    Microbes have obligate requirements for trace metals in metalloenzymes that catalyse important biogeochemical reactions. In anoxic methane- and sulphiderich environments, microbes may have unique adaptations for metal acquisition and utilization because of decreased bioavailability as a result of metal sulphide precipitation. However, micronutrient cycling is largely unexplored in cold ( 10 C) and sulphidic (> 1 mM H2S) deep-sea methane seep ecosystems. We investigated trace metal geochemistry and microbial metal utilization in methane seeps offshore Oregon and California, USA, and report dissolved concentrations of nickel (0.5 270 nM), cobalt (0.5 6 nM), molybdenum (10 5600 nM) and tungsten (0.3 8 nM) in Hydrate Ridge sediment porewaters. Despite low levels of cobalt and tungsten, metagenomic and metaproteomic data suggest that microbial consortia catalysing anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) utilize both scarce micronutrients in addition to nickel and molybdenum. Genetic machinery for cobalt-containing vitamin B12 biosynthesis was present in both anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulphate-reducing bacteria. Proteins affiliated with the tungsten-containing form of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase were expressed in ANME from two seep ecosystems, the first evidence for expression of a tungstoenzyme in psychrophilic microorganisms. Overall, our data suggest that AOM consortia use specialized biochemical strategies to overcome the challenges of metal availability in sulphidic environments.

  4. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for atmospheric trace gases: FY 1993 activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W. |

    1994-01-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC`s staff also provide technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC (including World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases) during the period October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of NDPS, CMPS, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints are provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also presented.

  5. Concentrations of 23 trace elements in ground water and surface water at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1988--91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liszewski, M.J.; Mann, L.J.

    1993-12-31

    Analytical data for 23 trace elements are reported for ground- and surface-water samples collected at and near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory during 1988--91. Water samples were collected from 148 wells completed in the Snake River Plain aquifer, 18 wells completed in discontinuous deep perched-water zones, and 1 well completed in an alluvial aquifer. Surface-water samples also were collected from three streams, two springs, two ponds, and one lake. Data are categorized by concentrations of total recoverable of dissolved trace elements. Concentrations of total recoverable trace elements are reported for unfiltered water samples and include results for one or more of the following: aluminum, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, selenium, silver, and zinc. Concentrations of dissolved trace elements are reported for water samples filtered through a nominal 0.45-micron filter and may also include bromide, fluoride, lithium, molybdenum, strontium, thallium, and vanadium. Concentrations of dissolved hexavalent chromium also are reported for many samples. The water samples were analyzed at the US Geological Survey`s National Water Quality Laboratory in Arvada, Colorado. Methods used to collect the water samples and quality assurance instituted for the sampling program are described. Concentrations of chromium equaled or exceeded the maximum contaminant level at 12 ground-water quality monitoring wells. Other trace elements did not exceed their respective maximum contaminant levels.

  6. Oceanic Trace Gases Numeric Data Packages from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Most data sets or packages, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. CDIAC lists the following numeric data packages under the broad heading of Oceanic Trace Gases: Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16S_2005 ( 01/11/05 - 022405) • Determination of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Parameters during the R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer Cruise in the Southern Indian Ocean (WOCE Section S04I, 050396 - 070496) • Inorganic Carbon, Nutrient, and Oxygen Data from the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16N_2003a (060403 – 081103) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Maurice Ewing Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A17, 010494 - 032194) • Global Ocean Data Analysis Project GLODAP: Results and Data • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruises in the North Atlantic Ocean on WOCE Sections AR24 (1102 – 120596) and A24, A20, and A22 (053097 – 090397) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic and Chemical Data Obtained During the Nine R/V Knorr Cruises Comprising the Indian Ocean CO2 Survey (WOCE Sections I8SI9S, I9N, I8NI5E, I3, I5WI4, I7N, I1, I10, and I2; 120 194 – 012296) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 28/1 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A8, 032994 - 051294) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruise 138-3, -4, and -5 in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P6E, P6C, and P6W, 050292 - 073092) • Global Distribution of Total Inorganic Carbon and Total Alkalinity below the deepest winter mixed layer depths • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V John V. Vickers Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P13, NOAA CGC92 Cruise, 080492 – 102192) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Hesperides Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A5, 071492 - 081592) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas G. Thompson Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P10, 100593 – 111093) • The International Intercomparison Exercise of Underway fCO2 Systems during the R/V Meteor Cruise 36/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A10, Dec. 1992-Jan, 1993) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C, R/V Knorr , Oct. 1992-April 1993) • Surface Water and Atmospheric Underway Carbon Data Obtained During the World Ocean Circulation Experiment Indian Ocean Survey Cruises (R/V Knorr, Dec. 1994 – Jan, 1996) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Akademik Ioffe Cruise in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section S4P, Feb.-April 1992) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-1 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P17C) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-3 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P16C) • Carbon-14 Measurements in Surface Water CO2 from the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans, 1965-1994 • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During R/V Meteor Cruise 18/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A1E) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the Central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P17S and P16S) during the TUNES-2 Expedition of the R/V Thomas Washington, July-August, 1991 • Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the Southwest Pacific during Austral Autumn, 1990: Results from NOAA/PMEL CGC-90 Cruise • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 15/3 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A9, February March 1991) • Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in Surface Water and the Atmosphere During 1986-1989 NOAA/PMEL Cruises in the Pacific and Indian Oceans • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 11/5 in the South Atlantic and Northern Weddell Sea Areas (WOCE sections A-12 and A-21) • Surface Water and Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Nitrous Oxide Observations by Shipboard Automated Gas Chromatography: Results from Expeditions Between 1977 and 1990 • Indian Ocean Radiocarbon: Data from the INDIGO 1, 2, and 3 Cruises • Carbonate Chemistry of the North Pacific Ocean • Carbonate Chemistry of the Weddell Sea • GEOSECS Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, and Mediterranean Radiocarbon Data •\tTransient Tracers in the Oceans (TTO) - Hydrographic Data and Carbon Dioxide Systems with Revised Carbon Chemistry Data.

  7. Oceanic Trace Gases Numeric Data Packages from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Most data sets or packages, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. CDIAC lists the following numeric data packages under the broad heading of Oceanic Trace Gases: Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16S_2005 ( 01/11/05 - 022405) Determination of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Parameters during the R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer Cruise in the Southern Indian Ocean (WOCE Section S04I, 050396 - 070496) Inorganic Carbon, Nutrient, and Oxygen Data from the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16N_2003a (060403 081103) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Maurice Ewing Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A17, 010494 - 032194) Global Ocean Data Analysis Project GLODAP: Results and Data Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruises in the North Atlantic Ocean on WOCE Sections AR24 (1102 120596) and A24, A20, and A22 (053097 090397) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic and Chemical Data Obtained During the Nine R/V Knorr Cruises Comprising the Indian Ocean CO2 Survey (WOCE Sections I8SI9S, I9N, I8NI5E, I3, I5WI4, I7N, I1, I10, and I2; 120 194 012296) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 28/1 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A8, 032994 - 051294) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruise 138-3, -4, and -5 in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P6E, P6C, and P6W, 050292 - 073092) Global Distribution of Total Inorganic Carbon and Total Alkalinity below the deepest winter mixed layer depths Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V John V. Vickers Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P13, NOAA CGC92 Cruise, 080492 102192) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Hesperides Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A5, 071492 - 081592) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas G. Thompson Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P10, 100593 111093) The International Intercomparison Exercise of Underway fCO2 Systems during the R/V Meteor Cruise 36/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A10, Dec. 1992-Jan, 1993) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C, R/V Knorr , Oct. 1992-April 1993) Surface Water and Atmospheric Underway Carbon Data Obtained During the World Ocean Circulation Experiment Indian Ocean Survey Cruises (R/V Knorr, Dec. 1994 Jan, 1996) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Akademik Ioffe Cruise in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section S4P, Feb.-April 1992) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-1 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P17C) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-3 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P16C) Carbon-14 Measurements in Surface Water CO2 from the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans, 1965-1994 Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During R/V Meteor Cruise 18/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A1E) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the Central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P17S and P16S) during the TUNES-2 Expedition of the R/V Th

  8. Measurements of reactive trace gases and variable O3 formation rates in some South Carolina biomass burning plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akagi, Sheryl; Yokelson, Robert J.; Burling, Ian R.; Meinardi, S.; Simpson, I.; Blake, D. R.; McMeeking, Gavin; Sullivan, Amy; Lee, Taehyoung; Kredenweis, Sonia; Urbanski, Shawn; Reardon, James; Griffith, David WT; Johnson, Timothy J.; Weise, David

    2013-02-01

    In October-November 2011 we measured the trace gas emission factors from 7 prescribed fires in South Carolina, U.S. using two Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) systems and whole air sampling (WAS) into canisters followed by gas-chromatographic analyses. The fires were intended to emulate high-intensity burns as they were lit during the dry season and in most cases represented stands that had not been treated with prescribed burns in 10+ years, if at all. A total of 97 trace gas species are reported here from both airborne and ground-based platforms making this one of the most detailed field studies of fire emissions to date. The measurements included the first data for a suite of monoterpene compounds emitted via distillation of plant tissues during real fires. The known chemistry of the monoterpenes and their measured abundance of ~0.40% of CO (molar basis), ~3.9% of NMOC (molar basis), and ~21% of organic aerosol (mass basis), suggests that they impacted post-emission formation of ozone, aerosol, and small organic trace gases such as methanol and formaldehyde in the sampled plumes. The variability in the terpene emissions in South Carolina (SC) fire plumes was high and, in general, the speciation of the emitted gas-phase non-methane organic compounds was surprisingly different from that observed in a similar study in nominally similar pine forests in North Carolina ~20 months earlier. It is likely that the slightly different ecosystems, time of year and the precursor variability all contributed to the variability in plume chemistry observed in this study and in the literature. The ?HCN/?CO emission ratio, however, is fairly consistent at 0.9 0.06 % for airborne fire measurements in coniferous-dominated ecosystems further confirming the value of HCN as a good biomass burning indicator/tracer. The SC results also support an earlier finding that C3-C4 alkynes may be of use as biomass burning indicators on the time-scale of hours to a day. It was possible to measure the chemical evolution of the plume on four of the fires and significant ozone (O3) formation (?O3/?CO from 10-90%) occurred in all of these plumes. Slower O3 production was observed on a cloudy day with low co-emissions of NOx and the fastest O3 production was observed on a sunny day when the plume almost certainly incorporated significant additional NOx by passing over the Columbia, SC metropolitian area. Due to rapid plume dilution, it was only possible to acquire high quality downwind data for two other species (formaldehyde and methanol) on two of the fires. In all four cases significant increases were observed. This is likely the first direct observation of post-emission methanol production in biomass burning plumes and the precursors likely included terpenes.

  9. Trace element content and magnetic properties of commercial HOPG samples studied by ion beam microscopy and SQUID magnetometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spemann, D. Esquinazi, P. Setzer, A.; Bhlmann, W.

    2014-10-15

    In this study, the impurity concentration and magnetic response of nine highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples with different grades and from different providers were determined using ion beam microscopy and SQUID magnetometry. Apart from sideface contaminations in the as-received state, bulk contamination of the samples in most cases consists of disk-shaped micron-sized particles made of Ti and V with an additional Fe contamination around the grain perimeter. The saturation magnetization typically increases with Fe concentration, however, there is no simple correlation between Fe content and magnetic moment. The saturation magnetization of one, respectively six, out of nine samples clearly exceeds the maximum contribution from pure Fe or Fe{sub 3}C. For most samples the temperature dependence of the remanence decreases linearly with T a dependence found previously for defect-induced magnetism (DIM) in HOPG. We conclude that apart from magnetic impurities, additional contribution to the ferromagnetic magnetization exists in pristine HOPG in agreement with previous studies. A comparative study between the results of ion beam microscopy and the commonly used EDX analysis shows clearly that EDX is not a reliable method for quantitative trace elemental analysis in graphite, clarifying weaknesses and discrepancies in the element concentrations given in the recent literature.

  10. Oil and gas exploration system and method for detecting trace amounts of hydrocarbon gases in the atmosphere

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wamsley, Paula R. (Littleton, CO); Weimer, Carl S. (Littleton, CO); Nelson, Loren D. (Evergreen, CO); O'Brien, Martin J. (Pine, CO)

    2003-01-01

    An oil and gas exploration system and method for land and airborne operations, the system and method used for locating subsurface hydrocarbon deposits based upon a remote detection of trace amounts of gases in the atmosphere. The detection of one or more target gases in the atmosphere is used to indicate a possible subsurface oil and gas deposit. By mapping a plurality of gas targets over a selected survey area, the survey area can be analyzed for measurable concentration anomalies. The anomalies are interpreted along with other exploration data to evaluate the value of an underground deposit. The system includes a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system with a spectroscopic grade laser light and a light detector. The laser light is continuously tunable in a mid-infrared range, 2 to 5 micrometers, for choosing appropriate wavelengths to measure different gases and avoid absorption bands of interference gases. The laser light has sufficient optical energy to measure atmospheric concentrations of a gas over a path as long as a mile and greater. The detection of the gas is based on optical absorption measurements at specific wavelengths in the open atmosphere. Light that is detected using the light detector contains an absorption signature acquired as the light travels through the atmosphere from the laser source and back to the light detector. The absorption signature of each gas is processed and then analyzed to determine if a potential anomaly exists.

  11. Using Monte Carlo ray tracing simulations to model the quantum harmonic oscillator modes observed in uranium nitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, J. Y. Y. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Aczel, Adam A [ORNL] [ORNL; Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL] [ORNL; Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL] [ORNL; Buyers, W. J. L. [National Research Council of Canada] [National Research Council of Canada; Granroth, Garrett E [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Recently an extended series of equally spaced vibrational modes was observed in uranium nitride (UN) by performing neutron spectroscopy measurements using the ARCS and SEQUOIA time-of- flight chopper spectrometers [A.A. Aczel et al, Nature Communications 3, 1124 (2012)]. These modes are well described by 3D isotropic quantum harmonic oscillator (QHO) behavior of the nitrogen atoms, but there are additional contributions to the scattering that complicate the measured response. In an effort to better characterize the observed neutron scattering spectrum of UN, we have performed Monte Carlo ray tracing simulations of the ARCS and SEQUOIA experiments with various sample kernels, accounting for the nitrogen QHO scattering, contributions that arise from the acoustic portion of the partial phonon density of states (PDOS), and multiple scattering. These simulations demonstrate that the U and N motions can be treated independently, and show that multiple scattering contributes an approximate Q-independent background to the spectrum at the oscillator mode positions. Temperature dependent studies of the lowest few oscillator modes have also been made with SEQUOIA, and our simulations indicate that the T-dependence of the scattering from these modes is strongly influenced by the uranium lattice.

  12. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process: trace elements research and development report no. 53, interim report no. 34. Volume III. Pilot plant development work part 6: the fate of trace elements in the SRC process for the period, August 1, 1977 - February 28, 1979. [36 elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filby, R.H.; Khalil, S.R.; Grimm, C.A.; Ekabaram, V.; Hunt, M.L.

    1980-12-01

    This work reports the results of neutron activation analysis determination of the fate of trace elements in the SRC II process. Six coals were studied for their behavior in material balance runs carried out at the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant. The distribution of trace elements among products and input streams was determined by thermal neutron activation analysis using thermal neutron flux of 8 x 10/sup 12/ neutrons cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ followed by Ge(Li) gamma ray spectroscopy. National Bureau of Standards Standard Reference Materials (SRM) were used to evaluate the analytical precision and accuracy of the methods used. For each material balance study the trace element input stream was taken as ground coal and the output streams were vacuum bottoms, SRC II product oil, and process water. In addition to these major components, oils, sludges and waters from liquid-liquid separators, effluent waters, biosludges, and by-product sulfur were also analyzed. Concerning the distribution of trace elements in the SRC II process, it was found that the vacuum bottoms was the major sink for all trace element studied, with the exception of Hg. Much lower trace element concentrations (except for Hg) were found in the SRC II product oil relative to the vacuum bottoms or the feed coal, irrespective of coal type. The results indicate excellent balances for the elements studied, except for Hg. Except for Hg, Se, and C1, the SRC II product and process waters contributed less than 1% of the elemental balances for light oil fractions and process waters indicates that Hg, and to a lesser degree As, Se, and Sb, exhibited volatile behavior in the SRC II process but that the degree of volatility is strongly dependent on conditions or coal type.

  13. Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) process: trace elements. Research and development report No. 53, interim report No. 30. Volume III. Pilot plant development work. Part 6. The fate of trace elements in the SRC process. [111 references

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, S. R.

    1980-02-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to study the distribution and fate of up to 36 elements in the Solvent Refined Coal Process Pilot Plant located at Fort Lewis, Washington. The elements Ti, V, Mg, Ca, Al, Cl, Mn, As, Br, Na, K, Sm, La, Ga, Cu, Sb, Se, Hg, Ni, Co, Cr, Fe, Rb, Cs, Sc, Tb, Eu, Ce, Sr, Ba, Th, U, Hf, Ta, Zr and Zn were measured in feed coal, insoluble residues, process solvent, process and effluent waters, by-product sulfur, SRC-I solid product, liquid-liquid separator oils and SRC-II liquid products. The material balance was calculated for each element from the concentration data and yields of each process fraction for both the SRC-I and SRC-II processes. Except for Ti, Cl and Br in the SRC-I mode and Hg in the SRC-II mode, each element was substantially lower in the SRC products than in the original feed coal. Residues from the process contained more than 80% of the trace element content found in the coal, except for Hg. More than 98.5% of the total contents of K and Fe in coal were retained in the insoluble residues. Elements such as Hg, Se, As and Sb can form volatile compounds (such as Hg/sup 0/, H/sub 2/Se, AsH/sub 3/ and SbH/sub 3/) stable under the process conditions. The high enhancement factors of Se (957), As (202) and Sb (27.4) in the aqueous phase of the separator water compared to that of the oil are evidence for the formation of volatile species which are more soluble in water than in the oil phase.

  14. Validation of the U.S. NRC coupled code system TRITON/TRACE/PARCS with the special power excursion reactor test III (SPERT III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, R. C.; Xu, Y.; Downar, T.; Hudson, N.

    2012-07-01

    The Special Power Excursion Reactor Test III (SPERT III) was a series of reactivity insertion experiments conducted in the 1950's. This paper describes the validation of the U.S. NRC Coupled Code system TRITON/PARCS/TRACE to simulate reactivity insertion accidents (RIA) by using several of the SPERT III tests. The work here used the SPERT III E-core configuration tests in which the RIA was initiated by ejecting a control rod. The resulting super-prompt reactivity excursion and negative reactivity feedback produced the familiar bell shaped power increase and decrease. The energy deposition during such a power peak has important safety consequences and provides validation basis for core coupled multi-physics codes. The transients of five separate tests are used to benchmark the PARCS/TRACE coupled code. The models were thoroughly validated using the original experiment documentation. (authors)

  15. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2001 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2002-10-15

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels. CDIAC is located within the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. CDIAC is co-located with ESD researchers investigating global-change topics, such as the global carbon cycle and the effects of carbon dioxide on climate and vegetation. CDIAC staff are also connected with current ORNL research on related topics, such as renewable energy and supercomputing technologies. CDIAC is supported by the Environmental Sciences Division (Jerry Elwood, Director) of DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. CDIAC represents DOE in the multi-agency Global Change Data and Information System (GCDIS). Wanda Ferrell is DOE's Program Manager with overall responsibility for CDIAC. Roger Dahlman is responsible for CDIAC's AmeriFlux tasks, and Anna Palmisano for CDIAC's Ocean Data tasks. CDIAC is made up of three groups: Data Systems, Information Services, and Computer Systems, with nineteen full-time or part-time staff. The following section provides details on CDIAC's staff and organization. The Data Systems Group identifies and obtains databases important to global-change research; analyzes data; compiles needed databases; provides data management and support to specific programs [e.g., NARSTO, Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE), AmeriFlux, Oceans]; and prepares documentation to ensure the long-term utility of CDIAC's data holdings. The Information Services Group responds to data and information requests; maintains records of all request activities; analyzes user statistics; assists in Web development and maintenance; and produces CDIAC's newsletter (CDIAC Communications), the fiscal year annual reports, and various information materials. The Computer Systems Group provides computer system support for all CDIAC and WDC activities; designs and maintains CDIAC's computing system network; ensures compliance with ORNL/DOE computing security regulations; ensures long-term preservation of CDIAC data holdings through systematic backups; evaluates, develops, and implements software; ensures standards compliance; generates user statistics; provides Web design, development, and oversight; and provides systems analysis and programming assistance for scientific data projects.

  16. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 1999 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2000-03-31

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global-change data and information analysis center of the Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has--since its inception in 1982--enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea level. CDIAC is located within the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. CDIAC is co-located with ESD researchers investigating global-change topics, such as the global carbon cycle and the effects of carbon dioxide on vegetation. CDIAC staff are also connected with current ORNL research on related topics, such as renewable energy and supercomputing technologies. CDIAC is supported by the Environmental Sciences Division (Jerry Elwood, Acting Director) of DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. CDIAC's FY 1999 budget was 2.2M dollars. CDIAC represents the DOE in the multi-agency Global Change Data and Information System. Bobbi Parra, and Wanda Ferrell on an interim basis, is DOE's Program Manager with responsibility for CDIAC. CDIAC comprises three groups, Global Change Data, Computer Systems, and Information Services, with seventeen full-time and part-time staff. The Global Change Data group is responsible for identifying and obtaining databases important to global-change research, analyzing data, compiling needed databases, providing data management support to specific programs (e.g., NARSTO), and preparing documentation to ensure the long-term utility of CDIAC's data holdings. The Computer Systems group provides computer system support for all CDIAC and WDC activities, including designing and maintaining CDIAC's computing system network; ensuring compliance with ORNL/DOE computing security regulations; ensuring long-term preservation of CDIAC data holdings through systematic backups; evaluating, developing, and implementing software; ensuring standards compliance; generating user statistics; providing Web design, development, and oversight; and providing systems analysis and programming assistance for scientific data projects. The Information Services group responds to data and information requests; maintains records of all request activities; assists in Web development and maintenance; and produces CDIAC's newsletter, CDIAC Communications, catalog, glossary, and educational materials. The following section provides further details on CDIAC's organization.

  17. DISCOVERY OF A LARGE NUMBER OF CANDIDATE PROTOCLUSTERS TRACED BY ?15 Mpc-SCALE GALAXY OVERDENSITIES IN COSMOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, Yi-Kuan; Gebhardt, Karl; Overzier, Roderik

    2014-02-10

    To demonstrate the feasibility of studying the epoch of massive galaxy cluster formation in a more systematic manner using current and future galaxy surveys, we report the discovery of a large sample of protocluster candidates in the 1.62deg{sup 2} COSMOS/UltraVISTA field traced by optical/infrared selected galaxies using photometric redshifts. By comparing properly smoothed three-dimensional galaxy density maps of the observations and a set of matched simulations incorporating the dominant observational effects (galaxy selection and photometric redshift uncertainties), we first confirm that the observed ?15 comoving Mpc-scale galaxy clustering is consistent with ?CDM models. Using further the relation between high-z overdensity and the present day cluster mass calibrated in these matched simulations, we found 36 candidate structures at 1.6 < z < 3.1, showing overdensities consistent with the progenitors of M{sub z} {sub =} {sub 0} ? 10{sup 15} M {sub ?} clusters. Taking into account the significant upward scattering of lower mass structures, the probabilities for the candidates to have at least M{sub z=} {sub 0} ? 10{sup 14} M {sub ?} are ?70%. For each structure, about 15%-40% of photometric galaxy candidates are expected to be true protocluster members that will merge into a cluster-scale halo by z = 0. With solely photometric redshifts, we successfully rediscover two spectroscopically confirmed structures in this field, suggesting that our algorithm is robust. This work generates a large sample of uniformly selected protocluster candidates, providing rich targets for spectroscopic follow-up and subsequent studies of cluster formation. Meanwhile, it demonstrates the potential for probing early cluster formation with upcoming redshift surveys such as the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment and the Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph survey.

  18. Airborne and ground-based measurements of the trace gases and particles emitted from prescribed fires in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burling, Ian; Yokelson, Robert J.; Akagi, Sheryl; Urbanski, Shawn; Wold, Cyle E.; Griffith, David WT; Johnson, Timothy J.; Reardon, James; Weise, David

    2011-12-07

    We measured the emission factors for 19 trace gas species and particulate matter (PM2.5) from 14 prescribed fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as pine forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. These are likely the most extensive emission factor field measurements for temperate biomass burning to date and the only published emission factors for temperate oak savanna fuels. This study helps close the gap in emissions data available for temperate zone fires relative to tropical biomass burning. We present the first field measurements of the biomass burning emissions of glycolaldehyde, a possible precursor for aqueous phase secondary organic aerosol formation. We also measured the emissions of phenol, another aqueous phase secondary organic aerosol precursor. Our data confirm previous suggestions that urban deposition can impact the NOx emission factors and thus subsequent plume chemistry. For two fires, we measured the emissions in the convective smoke plume from our airborne platform at the same time the unlofted residual smoldering combustion emissions were measured with our ground-based platform after the flame front passed through. The smoke from residual smoldering combustion was characterized by emission factors for hydrocarbon and oxygenated organic species that were up to ten times higher than in the lofted plume, including significant 1,3-butadiene and isoprene concentrations which were not observed in the lofted plume. This should be considered in modeling the air quality impacts of smoke that disperses at ground level, and we show that the normally-ignored unlofted emissions can also significantly impact estimates of total emissions. Preliminary evidence of large emissions of monoterpenes was seen in the residual smoldering spectra, but we have not yet quantified these emissions. These data should lead to an improved capacity to model the impacts of biomass burning in similar ecosystems.

  19. Design and application of a mobile ground-based observatory for continuous measurements of atmospheric trace-gas and criteria pollutant species

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bush, S. E.; Hopkins, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Lai, C.-T.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2015-01-06

    Ground-based measurements of atmospheric trace gas species and criteria pollutants are essential for understanding emissions dynamics across space and time. Gas composition in the surface 50 m has the greatest direct impacts on human health as well as ecosystem processes, hence data at this level is necessary for addressing carbon cycle and public health related questions. However, such surface data are generally associated with stationary measurement towers, where spatial representation is limited due to the high cost of establishing and maintaining an extensive network of measurement stations. We describe here a compact mobile laboratory equipped to provide high-precision, high-frequency, continuous,more » on-road synchronous measurements of CO2, CO, CH4, H2O, NOx, O3, aerosol, meteorological, and geospatial position data. The mobile laboratory has been deployed across the western USA. In addition to describing the vehicle and its capacity, we present data that illustrate the use of the laboratory as a powerful tool for investigating the spatial structure of urban trace gas emissions and criteria pollutants at spatial scales ranging from single streets to whole ecosystem and regional scales. We identify fugitive urban CH4 emissions and assess the magnitude of CH4 emissions from known point sources. We illustrate how such a mobile laboratory can be used to better understand emissions dynamics and quantify emissions ratios associated with trace gas emissions from wildfire incidents. Lastly, we discuss additional mobile laboratory applications in health and urban metabolism.« less

  20. In-Depth and ion image analysis of minor and trace constituents in V{endash}Cr{endash}Ti alloy welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odom, R.W.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes application of dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to the study of the chemistry of welds in V{endash}Cr{endash}Ti alloys and presents preliminary data on the distribution of minor and trace elements (H, C, N, O, P, S, and Cl) in welds produced by gas tungsten arc (GTA) and electron beam techniques. The motivation for this research is to develop techniques that determine correlations between the concentration and distribution of trace elements in alloy metal welds and the physical properties of the weld. To this end, quantitative SIMS techniques were developed for N, O, and S analysis in vanadium alloy welds using an ion implantation/relative sensitivity factor methodology. The data presented in this paper demonstrates that trace compositions and distributions of selected welds correlate, at least qualitatively, with such properties as microhardness and tensile elongation. This data support continuing these investigations to develop microanalysis methods which quantitatively correlate weld composition with mechanical properties. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  1. Thermodynamic analysis of interactions between Ni-based solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) anodes and trace species in a survey of coal syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Martinez; Kirk Gerdes; Randall Gemmen; James Postona

    2010-03-20

    A thermodynamic analysis was conducted to characterize the effects of trace contaminants in syngas derived from coal gasification on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material. The effluents from 15 different gasification facilities were considered to assess the impact of fuel composition on anode susceptibility to contamination. For each syngas case, the study considers the magnitude of contaminant exposure resulting from operation of a warm gas cleanup unit at two different temperatures and operation of a nickel-based SOFC at three different temperatures. Contaminant elements arsenic (As), phosphorous (P), and antimony (Sb) are predicted to be present in warm gas cleanup effluent and will interact with the nickel (Ni) components of a SOFC anode. Phosphorous is the trace element found in the largest concentration of the three contaminants and is potentially the most detrimental. Poisoning was found to depend on the composition of the syngas as well as system operating conditions. Results for all trace elements tended to show invariance with cleanup operating temperature, but results were sensitive to syngas bulk composition. Synthesis gas with high steam content tended to resist poisoning.

  2. Coupling field and laboratory measurements to estimate the emission factors of identified and unidentified trace gases for prescribed fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokelson, Robert J.; Burling, Ian R.; Gilman, Jessica; Warneke, Carsten; Stockwell, Chelsea E.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Akagi, Sheryl; Urbanski, Shawn; Veres, Patrick; Roberts, James M.; Kuster, W. C.; Reardon, James; Griffith, David WT; Johnson, Timothy J.; Hosseini, SeyedEhsan; Miller, J. Wayne; Cocker, David R.; Jung, H.; Weise, David

    2013-01-07

    Vegetative fuels commonly consumed in prescribed fires were collected from five locations in the southeastern and southwestern U.S. and burned in a series of 77 fires at the U.S. Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions were measured by gravimetric filter sampling with subsequent analysis for elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and 38 elements. The trace gas emissions were measured with a large suite of state-of-the-art instrumentation including an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP FTIR) spectrometer, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS), negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS), and gas chromatography with MS detection (GC-MS). 204 trace gas species (mostly non-methane organic compounds (NMOC)) were identified and quantified with the above instruments. An additional 152 significant peaks in the unit mass resolution mass spectra were quantified, but either could not be identified or most of the signal at that molecular mass was unaccounted for by identifiable species. As phase II of this study, we conducted airborne and ground-based sampling of the emissions from real prescribed fires mostly in the same land management units where the fuels for the lab fires were collected. A broad variety, but smaller number of species (21 trace gas species and PM2.5) was measured on 14 fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as pine forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. These extensive field measurements of emission factors (EF) for temperate biomass burning are useful both for modeling and to examine the representativeness of our lab fire EF. The lab/field EF ratio for the pine understory fuels was not statistically different from one, on average. However, our lab EF for smoldering compounds emitted by burning the semi-arid SW fuels should likely be increased by about a factor of 2.7 to better represent field fires. Based on the lab/field comparison, we present a table with emission factors for 365 pyrogenic species (including unidentified species) for 4 broad fuel types: pine understory, semi-arid shrublands, evergreen canopy, and duff. To our knowledge this is the most complete measurement of biomass burning emissions to date and it should enable improved representation of smoke in atmospheric models. The results provide important insights into the nature of smoke. For example, ~35% (range from 16-71%) of the mass of gas-phase NMOC species was attributed to the species that we could not identify. These unidentified species are likely not represented in most models, but some provision should be made for the fact that they will react in the atmosphere. In addition, the total mass of gas-phase NMOC divided by the mass of co-emitted PM2.5 averaged ~2.6 for the main fire types with a range from ~1.8-8.8. About 36-63% of the NMOC were likely semivolatile or of intermediate volatility. Thus, the gas-phase NMOC represent a large reservoir of potential precursors for secondary formation of organic aerosol. For the one fire in organic soil (Alaskan duff) about 28% of the emitted carbon was present as gas-phase NMOC in contrast to the other fuels for which NMOC accounted for only ~1-3% of emitted carbon. 71% of the mass of NMOC emitted by the smoldering duff was un-identified. The duff results highlight the need to learn more about the emissions from smoldering organic soils. The ?NMOC/NOx-as-NO ratio was consistently about ten for the main fire types when accounting for all NMOC, indicating strongly NOx-limited O3 production conditions. Finally, the fuel consumption per unit area was measured on 6 of the 14 prescribed fires and averaged 7.08 2.09 (1?) Mg ha-1.

  3. HFE-TRACE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003281IBMPC00 An Integrated Tool for Functional Requirements Analysis, Function Allocation and Task Analysis

  4. Design and application of a mobile ground-based observatory for continuous measurements of atmospheric trace gas and criteria pollutant species

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bush, S. E.; Hopkins, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Lai, C.-T.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2015-08-26

    Ground-based measurements of atmospheric trace gas species and criteria pollutants are essential for understanding emissions dynamics across space and time. Gas composition in the lower 50 m of the atmosphere has the greatest direct impacts on human health as well as ecosystem processes; hence data at this level are necessary for addressing carbon-cycle- and public-health-related questions. However, such surface data are generally associated with stationary measurement towers, where spatial representation is limited due to the high cost of establishing and maintaining an extensive network of measurement stations. We describe here a compact mobile laboratory equipped to provide high-precision, high-frequency, continuous,more » on-road synchronous measurements of CO2, CO, CH4, H2O, NOx, O3, aerosol, meteorological, and geospatial position data. The mobile laboratory has been deployed across the western USA. In addition to describing the vehicle and its capacity, we present data that illustrate the use of the laboratory as a powerful tool for investigating the spatial structure of urban trace gas emissions and criteria pollutants at spatial scales ranging from single streets to whole ecosystem and regional scales. We assess the magnitude of known point sources of CH4 and also identify fugitive urban CH4 emissions. We illustrate how such a mobile laboratory can be used to better understand emissions dynamics and quantify emissions ratios associated with trace gas emissions from wildfire incidents. Lastly, we discuss additional mobile laboratory applications in health and urban metabolism.« less

  5. EDDY RESOLVING NUTRIENT ECODYNAMICS IN THE GLOBAL PARALLEL OCEAN PROGRAM AND CONNECTIONS WITH TRACE GASES IN THE SULFUR, HALOGEN AND NMHC CYCLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. CHU; S. ELLIOTT

    2000-08-01

    Ecodynamics and the sea-air transfer of climate relevant trace gases are intimately coupled in the oceanic mixed layer. Ventilation of species such as dimethyl sulfide and methyl bromide constitutes a key linkage within the earth system. We are creating a research tool for the study of marine trace gas distributions by implementing coupled ecology-gas chemistry in the high resolution Parallel Ocean Program (POP). The fundamental circulation model is eddy resolving, with cell sizes averaging 0.15 degree (lat/long). Here we describe ecochemistry integration. Density dependent mortality and iron geochemistry have enhanced agreement with chlorophyll measurements. Indications are that dimethyl sulfide production rates must be adjusted for latitude dependence to match recent compilations. This may reflect the need for phytoplankton to conserve nitrogen by favoring sulfurous osmolytes. Global simulations are also available for carbonyl sulfide, the methyl halides and for nonmethane hydrocarbons. We discuss future applications including interaction with atmospheric chemistry models, high resolution biogeochemical snapshots and the study of open ocean fertilization.

  6. Table 2.5 Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures by End...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Space Heating Air Conditioning Water Heating Appliances, 2 Electronics, and Lighting Natural Gas Elec- tricity 3 Fuel Oil 4 LPG 5 Total Electricity 3 Natural Gas Elec- tricity ...

  7. Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salah, Wa'el; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Hoorani, H.

    2009-09-15

    The calculation for the optics of the synchrotron radiation small and wide angle x-ray scattering beamline, currently under construction at SESAME is described. This beamline is based on a cylindrically bent germanium (111) single crystal with an asymmetric cut of 10.5 deg., followed by a 1.2 m long rhodium coated plane mirror bent into a cylindrical form. The focusing properties of bent asymmetrically cut crystals have not yet been studied in depth. The present paper is devoted to study of a particular application of a bent asymmetrically cut crystal using ray tracing simulations with the SHADOW code. These simulations show that photon fluxes of order of 1.09x10{sup 11} photons/s will be available at the experimental focus at 8.79 keV. The focused beam dimensions will be 2.2 mm horizontal full width at half maximum (FWHM) by 0.12 mm vertical (FWHM).

  8. Method for quantitative determination and separation of trace amounts of chemical elements in the presence of large quantities of other elements having the same atomic mass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, C.M.; Nogar, N.S.

    1982-09-02

    Photoionization via autoionizing atomic levels combined with conventional mass spectroscopy provides a technique for quantitative analysis of trace quantities of chemical elements in the presence of much larger amounts of other elements with substantially the same atomic mass. Ytterbium samples smaller than 10 ng have been detected using an ArF* excimer laser which provides the atomic ions for a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Elemental selectivity of greater than 5:1 with respect to lutetium impurity has been obtained. Autoionization via a single photon process permits greater photon utilization efficiency because of its greater absorption cross section than bound-free transitions, while maintaining sufficient spectroscopic structure to allow significant photoionization selectivity between different atomic species. Separation of atomic species from others of substantially the same atomic mass is also described.

  9. Solvent-refined-coal (SRC) process. Determination of trace hydrocarbon, sulfur, and nitrogen compounds in SRC-II process development Unit P-99 gas streams. [Impure hydrogen in recycle gas and low pressure gas processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, J.A.; Galli, R.D.; McCracken, J.H.

    1982-02-01

    A knowledge of the identity and concentration of trace hydrocarbon, sulfur, and nitrogen compounds in the various gas streams of the SRC-II Coal Liquefaction Process is needed in order to design the recycle gas purification and low pressure gas processing systems in large-scale plants. This report discusses the results of an experimental study to identify and quantify trace compounds in the various high and low pressure gas streams of SRC-II Process Development Unit P-99. A capillary column trace hydrocarbon analysis has been developed which can quantify 41 hydrocarbons from methane to xylenes in SRC-II gas streams. With more work a number of other hydrocarbons could be quantified. A fixed gas analysis was also developed which can be integrated with the hydrocarbon analysis to yield a complete stream analysis. A gas chromatographic procedure using a flame photometric detector was developed for trace sulfur compounds, and six sulfur compounds were identified and quantified. A chemiluminescence method was developed for determination of NO and NO/sub 2/ down to 10 ppB in concentration. A gas chromatographic procedure using an electron capture detector was developed for HCN analysis down to 5 ppM. Drager tube analyses gave semiquantitative data on HCl and NH/sub 3/ content of the gas streams.

  10. A new WRF-Chem treatment for studying regional-scale impacts of cloud processes on aerosol and trace gases in parameterized cumuli

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, L. K.; Shrivastava, M.; Easter, R. C.; Fast, J. D.; Chapman, E. G.; Liu, Y.; Ferrare, R. A.

    2015-02-24

    A new treatment of cloud effects on aerosol and trace gases within parameterized shallow and deep convection, and aerosol effects on cloud droplet number, has been implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) version 3.2.1 that can be used to better understand the aerosol life cycle over regional to synoptic scales. The modifications to the model include treatment of the cloud droplet number mixing ratio; key cloud microphysical and macrophysical parameters (including the updraft fractional area, updraft and downdraft mass fluxes, and entrainment) averaged over the population of shallow clouds, or a single deep convective cloud; and vertical transport, activation/resuspension, aqueous chemistry, and wet removal of aerosol and trace gases in warm clouds. These changes have been implemented in both the WRF-Chem chemistry packages as well as the Kain–Fritsch (KF) cumulus parameterization that has been modified to better represent shallow convective clouds. Testing of the modified WRF-Chem has been completed using observations from the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS). The simulation results are used to investigate the impact of cloud–aerosol interactions on regional-scale transport of black carbon (BC), organic aerosol (OA), and sulfate aerosol. Based on the simulations presented here, changes in the column-integrated BC can be as large as –50% when cloud–aerosol interactions are considered (due largely to wet removal), or as large as +40% for sulfate under non-precipitating conditions due to sulfate production in the parameterized clouds. The modifications to WRF-Chem are found to account for changes in the cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and changes in the chemical composition of cloud droplet residuals in a way that is consistent with observations collected during CHAPS. Efforts are currently underway to port the changes described here to the latest version of WRF-Chem, and it is anticipated that they will be included in a future public release of WRF-Chem.

  11. A new WRF-Chem treatment for studying regional-scale impacts of cloud processes on aerosol and trace gases in parameterized cumuli

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Berg, L. K.; Shrivastava, M.; Easter, R. C.; Fast, J. D.; Chapman, E. G.; Liu, Y.; Ferrare, R. A.

    2015-02-24

    A new treatment of cloud effects on aerosol and trace gases within parameterized shallow and deep convection, and aerosol effects on cloud droplet number, has been implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) version 3.2.1 that can be used to better understand the aerosol life cycle over regional to synoptic scales. The modifications to the model include treatment of the cloud droplet number mixing ratio; key cloud microphysical and macrophysical parameters (including the updraft fractional area, updraft and downdraft mass fluxes, and entrainment) averaged over the population of shallow clouds, or a single deep convectivemore » cloud; and vertical transport, activation/resuspension, aqueous chemistry, and wet removal of aerosol and trace gases in warm clouds. These changes have been implemented in both the WRF-Chem chemistry packages as well as the Kain–Fritsch (KF) cumulus parameterization that has been modified to better represent shallow convective clouds. Testing of the modified WRF-Chem has been completed using observations from the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS). The simulation results are used to investigate the impact of cloud–aerosol interactions on regional-scale transport of black carbon (BC), organic aerosol (OA), and sulfate aerosol. Based on the simulations presented here, changes in the column-integrated BC can be as large as –50% when cloud–aerosol interactions are considered (due largely to wet removal), or as large as +40% for sulfate under non-precipitating conditions due to sulfate production in the parameterized clouds. The modifications to WRF-Chem are found to account for changes in the cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and changes in the chemical composition of cloud droplet residuals in a way that is consistent with observations collected during CHAPS. Efforts are currently underway to port the changes described here to the latest version of WRF-Chem, and it is anticipated that they will be included in a future public release of WRF-Chem.« less

  12. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity and stability of Pd3V/C nanoparticles with a trace amount of Pt decoration for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Sufen; Han, Lili; Zhu, Jing; Xiao, Weiping; Wang, Jie; Liu, Hongfang; Xin, Huolin; Wang, Deli

    2015-09-14

    In this study, carbon supported Pd3V bimetallic alloy nanoparticles (Pd3V/C) have been successfully synthesized via a simple impregnation–reduction method, followed by high temperature treatment under a H2 atmosphere. Electrochemical tests reveal that the half-wave potential of Pd3V/C-500 shifts positively 40 mV compared with Pd/C. However, the catalytic activity of Pd3V/C-500 suffers from serious degradation after 1k cycles. By a spontaneous displacement reaction or co-reduction method, a trace amount of Pt was decorated on the surface or inside of the Pd3V/C nanoparticles. The catalytic activity and stability of the Pd3V@Pt/C and Pt-Pd3V/C catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are enhancedmore » significantly, and are comparable to commercial Pt/C. In addition, the Pt mass activity of Pd3V@Pt/C and Pt-Pd3V/C improves by factors of 10.9 and 6.5 at 0.80 V relative to Pt/C. Moreover, Pt-decorated Pd3V/C nanoparticles show almost no obvious morphology change after durability tests, because the Pt-rich shell plays an important role in preventing degradation.« less

  13. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity and stability of Pd3V/C nanoparticles with a trace amount of Pt decoration for the oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Sufen; Han, Lili; Zhu, Jing; Xiao, Weiping; Wang, Jie; Liu, Hongfang; Xin, Huolin; Wang, Deli

    2015-09-14

    In this study, carbon supported Pd3V bimetallic alloy nanoparticles (Pd3V/C) have been successfully synthesized via a simple impregnationreduction method, followed by high temperature treatment under a H2 atmosphere. Electrochemical tests reveal that the half-wave potential of Pd3V/C-500 shifts positively 40 mV compared with Pd/C. However, the catalytic activity of Pd3V/C-500 suffers from serious degradation after 1k cycles. By a spontaneous displacement reaction or co-reduction method, a trace amount of Pt was decorated on the surface or inside of the Pd3V/C nanoparticles. The catalytic activity and stability of the Pd3V@Pt/C and Pt-Pd3V/C catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are enhanced significantly, and are comparable to commercial Pt/C. In addition, the Pt mass activity of Pd3V@Pt/C and Pt-Pd3V/C improves by factors of 10.9 and 6.5 at 0.80 V relative to Pt/C. Moreover, Pt-decorated Pd3V/C nanoparticles show almost no obvious morphology change after durability tests, because the Pt-rich shell plays an important role in preventing degradation.

  14. Leaching characteristics of selected South African fly ashes: Effect of pH on the release of major and trace species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gitari, W.M.; Fatoba, O.O.; Petrik, L.F.; Vadapalli, V.R.K.

    2009-07-01

    Fly ash samples from two South African coal-fired power stations were subjected to different leaching tests under alkaline and acidic conditions in an attempt to assess the effect of pH on the leachability of species from the fly ashes and also assess the potential impact of the fly ashes disposal on groundwater and the receiving environment. To achieve this, German Standard leaching (DIN-S4) and Acid Neutralization Capacity (ANC) tests were employed. Ca, Mg, Na, K and SO{sub 4} were significantly leached into solution under the two leaching conditions with the total amounts in ANC leachates higher than that of DIN-S4. This indicates that a large fraction of the soluble salts in unweathered fly ash are easily leached. These species represents the fraction that can be flushed off initially from the surface of ash particles on contacting the ash with water. The amounts of toxic trace elements such as As, Se, Cd, Cr and Pb leached out of the fly ashes when in contact with de-mineralized water (DIN-S4 test) were low and below the Target Water Quality Range (TWQR) of South Africa. This is explained by their low concentrations in the fly ashes and their solubility dependence on the pH of the leaching solution. However the amounts of some minor elements such as B, Mn, Fe, As and Se leached out at lower pH ranging between 10 to 4 (ANC test) were slightly higher than the TWQR, an indication that the pH of the leaching solution plays a significant role on the leaching of species in fly ash. The high concentrations of the toxic elements released from the fly ashes at lower pH gives an indication that the disposal of the fly ash could have adverse effects on the receiving environment if the pH of the solution contacting the ashes is not properly monitored.

  15. SU-E-T-587: Monte Carlo Versus Ray-Tracing for Treatment Planning Involving CNS Tumors On the MultiPlan System for CyberKnife Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forbang, R Teboh

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: MultiPlan, the treatment planning system for the CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery system offers two approaches to dose computation, namely Ray-Tracing (RT), the default technique and Monte Carlo (MC), an option. RT is deterministic, however it accounts for primary heterogeneity only. MC on the other hand has an uncertainty associated with the calculation results. The advantage is that in addition, it accounts for heterogeneity effects on the scattered dose. Not all sites will benefit from MC. The goal of this work was to focus on central nervous system (CNS) tumors and compare dosimetrically, treatment plans computed with RT versus MC. Methods: Treatment plans were computed using both RT and MC for sites covering (a) the brain (b) C-spine (c) upper T-spine (d) lower T-spine (e) L-spine and (f) sacrum. RT was first used to compute clinically valid treatment plans. Then the same treatment parameters, monitor units, beam weights, etc., were used in the MC algorithm to compute the dose distribution. The plans were then compared for tumor coverage to illustrate the difference if any. All MC calculations were performed at a 1% uncertainty. Results: Using the RT technique, the tumor coverage for the brain, C-spine (C3–C7), upper T-spine (T4–T6), lower T-spine (T10), Lspine (L2) and sacrum were 96.8%, 93.1%, 97.2%, 87.3%, 91.1%, and 95.3%. The corresponding tumor coverage based on the MC approach was 98.2%, 95.3%, 87.55%, 88.2%, 92.5%, and 95.3%. It should be noted that the acceptable planning target coverage for our clinical practice is >95%. The coverage can be compromised for spine tumors to spare normal tissues such as the spinal cord. Conclusion: For treatment planning involving the CNS, RT and MC appear to be similar for most sites but for the T-spine area where most of the beams traverse lung tissue. In this case, MC is highly recommended.

  16. Laboratory scale studies of Pd/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbents for the removal of trace contaminants from coal-derived fuel gas at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rupp, Erik C.; Granite, Evan J.; Stanko, Dennis C.

    2013-01-01

    The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is a promising technology for the use of coal in a clean and efficient manner. In order to maintain the overall efficiency of the IGCC process, it is necessary to clean the fuel gas of contaminants (sulfur, trace compounds) at warm (150–540 °C) to hot (>540 °C) temperatures. Current technologies for trace contaminant (such as mercury) removal, primarily activated carbon based sorbents, begin to lose effectiveness above 100 °C, creating the need to develop sorbents effective at elevated temperatures. As trace elements are of particular environmental concern, previous work by this group has focused on the development of a Pd/γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbent for Hg removal. This paper extends the research to Se (as hydrogen selenide, H{sub 2}Se), As (as arsine, AsH{sub 3}), and P (as phosphine, PH{sub 3}) which thermodynamic studies indicate are present as gaseous species under gasification conditions. Experiments performed under ambient conditions in He on 20 wt.% Pd/γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} indicate the sorbent can remove the target contaminants. Further work is performed using a 5 wt.% Pd/γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbent in a simulated fuel gas (H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) in both single and multiple contaminant atmospheres to gauge sorbent performance characteristics. The impact of H{sub 2}O, Hg and temperature on sorbent performance is explored.

  17. Property:EIA/861/NercMro | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + true + Brainerd Public Utilities + true + Brodhead Water & Lighting Comm + true + Brown County Rural Elec Assn + true + Burke-Divide Electric Coop Inc + true + Butler County...

  18. Kotzebue Wind Project III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kotzebue Wind Project III Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Kotzebue Elec. Assoc. Developer Kotzebue...

  19. Cimarron Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Twitter: @CimarronElec Facebook: https:www.facebook.comprofile.php?refname&id100000678310273 Outage Hotline: (800) 375-4121 References: EIA Form EIA-861...

  20. District of Columbia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (District of Columbia) Glacial Energy Holdings (District of Columbia) Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (District of Columbia) Integrys Energy Services, Inc. (District...

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    (B20 and above) CNG Compressed Natural Gas E85 Ethanol (E85) ELEC Electric HY Hydrogen LNG Liquefied Natural Gas LPG Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Propane) stationname Type:...

  2. Callaway Electric Cooperative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Missouri Phone Number: (573) 642-3326 Website: www.callawayelectric.com Twitter: @CallawayElec Facebook: http:www.facebook.comCallawayElectric Outage Hotline:...

  3. Awardee AwardeeHeadquarters RecoveryFunding TotalValue Tech Inc...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    City South Dakota Black Hills Colorado Elec Utility Co LP Pueblo Colorado City of Burbank Water and Power California Utility Company Burbank California Center for the...

  4. Effects of Feedback on Residential Electricity Consumption: A...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    none of which were elec- trically heated; each had an electric stove, dryer, dishwasher, and water heater. The researchers installed 24-h chart recorders in each residence...

  5. Colman, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc. Smart Grid Project Utility Companies in Colman, South Dakota Sioux Valley SW Elec Coop References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil division...

  6. Traces of natural radionuclides in animal food

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merli, Isabella Desan; Guazzelli da Silveira, Marcilei A.; Medina, Nilberto H.

    2014-11-11

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials are present everywhere, e.g., in soil, air, housing materials, food, etc. Therefore, human beings and animals receive internal exposure from radioactive elements inside their bodies through breathing and alimentation. Gamma radiation has enough energy to remove an electron from the atom and compromise the rearrangement of electrons in the search for a more stable configuration which can disturb molecule chemical bonding. Food ingestion is one of the most common forms of radioisotopes absorption. The goal of this work is the measurement of natural gamma radiation rates from natural radioisotopes present in animal food. To determine the concentration of natural radionuclides present in animal food gamma-ray spectrometry was applied. We have prepared animal food samples for poultry, fish, dogs, cats and cattle. The two highest total ingestion effective doses observed refers to a sample of mineral salt cattle, 95.3(15) ?Sv/year, rabbit chow, with a value of 48(5) ?Sv/year, and cattle mineral salt, with a value of 69(7) ?Sv/year, while the annual total dose value from terrestrial intake radionuclide is of the order of 290 ?Sv/year.

  7. Scalable Analysis of Distributed Workflow Traces (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    important in both the scientific research and business domains. Science and commerce have both experienced an explosion in the sheer amount of data that must be analyzed....

  8. Trace Explosive Detection using Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krause, Adam R; Van Neste, Charles W; Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George; Finot, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Satisfying the conditions of high sensitivity and high selectivity using portable sensors that are also reversible is a challenge. Miniature sensors such as microcantilevers offer high sensitivity but suffer from poor selectivity due to the lack of sufficiently selective receptors. Although many of the mass deployable spectroscopic techniques provide high selectivity, they do not have high sensitivity. Here, we show that this challenge can be overcome by combining photothermal spectroscopy on a bimaterial microcantilever with the mass induced change in the cantilever's resonance frequency. Detection using adsorption-induced resonant frequency shift together with photothermal deflection spectroscopy shows extremely high selectivity with a subnanogram limit of detection for vapor phase adsorbed explosives, such as pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  9. Amplification of trace amounts of nucleic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, George M.; Zhang, Kun

    2008-06-17

    Methods of reducing background during amplification of small amounts of nucleic acids employ careful analysis of sources of low level contamination. Ultraviolet light can be used to reduce nucleic acid contaminants in reagents and equipment. "Primer-dimer" background can be reduced by judicious design of primers. We have shown clean signal-to-noise with as little as starting material as one single human cell (.about.6 picogram), E. coli cell (.about.5 femtogram) or Prochlorococcus cell (.about.3 femtogram).

  10. Scalable Analysis of Distributed Workflow Traces (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cycle. Transcriptional regulation of the dissimilatory nitric oxides metabolism in bacteria is Large-scale workflows are becoming increasingly important in both the scientific...

  11. Isotopic abundance in atom trap trace analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Zheng-Tian; Hu, Shiu-Ming; Jiang, Wei; Mueller, Peter

    2014-03-18

    A method and system for detecting ratios and amounts of isotopes of noble gases. The method and system is constructed to be able to measure noble gas isotopes in water and ice, which helps reveal the geological age of the samples and understand their movements. The method and system uses a combination of a cooled discharge source, a beam collimator, a beam slower and magneto-optic trap with a laser to apply resonance frequency energy to the noble gas to be quenched and detected.

  12. Full particle orbit tracing with RIO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SB RAS and Novosibirsk State University, 630090, Novosibirsk, Russia E-mail: jareusch@wisc.edu Received 15 November 2013, revised 29 March 2014 Accepted for publication 2 April...

  13. Demonstration Results From Greenhouse Heating with Liquified Wood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, Philip; Parish, Don; Cooper, Jerome

    2011-07-01

    A boiler fuel known as Lignocellulosic Boiler Fuel (LBF) was developed at the Department of Forest Products, Mississippi State University for potential application for heating agricultural buildings. LBF was field tested to heat green houses in cooperation with Natchez Trace Greenhouses (NTG) located in Kosciusko, Mississippi. MSU modified an idled natural gas boiler located at NTG to combust the LBF. Thirty gallons of bio-oil were produced at the MSU Bio-oil Research Laboratory. The bio-oil was produced from the fast-pyrolysis of southern pine (15 gal) and white oak (15 gal) feedstocks and subsequently upgraded by a proprietary process. Preliminary field testing was conducted at (NTG). The LBF was produced from each wood species was tested separately and co-fed with diesel fuel to yield three fuel formulations: (1) 100% diesel; (2) 87.5% LBF from southern pine bio-oil co-fed with 12.5% diesel and (3) 87.5% LBF from white oak co-fed with 12.5% diesel fuel formulations. Each fuel formulation was combusted in a retrofit NTG boiler. Fuel consumption and water temperature were measured periodically. Flue gas from the boiler was analyzed by gas chromatograph. The 100% diesel fuel increased water temperature at a rate of 4 ???°F per min. for 35 min. to achieve the target 140 ???°F water temperature increase. The 87.5% pine LBF fuel cofed with 12.5%) diesel attained the 140 ???°F water temperature increase in 62 min. at a rate of 2.3 ???°F per min. The 87.5% white oak LBF fuel co-fed with 12.5% diesel reached the 140 ???°F water temperature increase in 85 min. at a rate of 1.6 ???°F per min. Fuel that contained 87.5% pine LBF co-fed with 12.5% diesel yielded nitrogen and oxygen at a ratio of 5.3 and carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide at a ratio of 22.2. Fuel formulations that contained 87.5% white oak LBF co-fed with 12.5% diesel yielded nitrogen and oxygen at a ratio of 4.9 and carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide at a ratio of 16.4. Neither the pine LBF nor the white oak LBF fuel showed any measureable methane emissions from the NTG boiler flue gas. These results indicate a viable potential for mildly upgraded bio-oil to become an alternative fuel source for greenhouse operations.

  14. Final report for DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64404 - Field Investigations of Microbially Facilitated Calcite Precipitation for Immobilization of Strontium-90 and Other Trace Metals in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Robert W; Fujita, Yoshiko; Ginn, Timothy R; Hubbard, Susan S

    2012-10-12

    Subsurface radionuclide and metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE?¢????s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide 90Sr, is co-precipitation in calcite. We have previously found that that nutrient addition can stimulate microbial ureolytic activity that this activity accelerates calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of Sr, and that higher calcite precipitation rates can result in increased Sr partitioning. We have conducted integrated field, laboratory, and computational research to evaluate the relationships between ureolysis and calcite precipitation rates and trace metal partitioning under environmentally relevant conditions, and investigated the coupling between flow/flux manipulations and precipitate distribution. A field experimental campaign conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site located at Rifle, CO was based on a continuous recirculation design; water extracted from a down-gradient well was amended with urea and molasses (a carbon and electron donor) and re-injected into an up-gradient well. The goal of the recirculation design and simultaneous injection of urea and molasses was to uniformly accelerate the hydrolysis of urea and calcite precipitation over the entire inter-wellbore zone. The urea-molasses recirculation phase lasted, with brief interruptions for geophysical surveys, for 12 days followed by long-term monitoring which continued for 13 months. Following the recirculation phase we found persistent increases in urease activity (as determined from 14C labeled laboratory urea hydrolysis rates) in the upper portion of the inter-wellbore zone. We also observed an initial increase (approximately 2 weeks) in urea concentration associated with injection activities followed by decreasing urea concentration and associated increases in ammonium and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) following the termination of injection. Based on the loss of urea and the appearance of ammonium, a first order rate constant for urea hydrolysis of 0.18 day-1 rate with an associate Rf for ammonium of 11 were estimated. This rate constant is approximately 6 times higher than estimated for previous field experiments conducted in eastern Idaho. Additionally, DIC carbon isotope ratios were measured for the groundwater. Injected urea had a ???´13C of 40.7???±0.4 ?¢???° compared to background groundwater DIC of ???´13C of -16.6???±0.2?¢???°. Observed decreases in groundwater DIC ???´13C of up to -19.8?¢???° followed temporal trends similar to those observed for ammonium and suggest that both the increase in ammonium and the sift in ???´13C are the result of urea hydrolysis. Although direct observation of calcite precipitation was not possible because of the high pre-existing calcite content in the site sediments, an observed ???´13C decrease for solid carbonates from sediment samples collect following urea injection (compared to pre-injection values) is likely the result of the incorporation of inorganic carbon derived from urea hydrolysis into newly formed solid carbonates.

  15. Chapter 39 - Acquisition of Information Technology | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 - Acquisition of Information Technology Chapter 39 - Acquisition of Information Technology PDF icon 39.1AcquisitionofInformationResources0.pdf PDF icon 39.2GuidanceonElec...

  16. Category:Elkins, WV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Elkins WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 59 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant...

  17. Cass County Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Twitter: @CassCountyElec Facebook: https:www.facebook.comCassCountyElectric Outage Hotline: 701-356-4499 or 1-888-277-4424 Outage Map: outage.kwh.com References: EIA...

  18. doi:10.1016/j.cpc.2008.02.011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a region interspersed with a magnetic field, an elec- tromotive force (EMF) is induced. ... The driving term F models the counter-rotating impellers as they are used in the ...

  19. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    than one may apply) Elec- tricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat District Chilled Water Propane Other a All Buildings* ... 4,645 4,414 4,404 2,391...

  20. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    than one may apply) Elec- tricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat District Chilled Water Propane Other a All Buildings* ... 64,783 63,343 63,307...

  1. CarBen_Operators_Manual_-_9-27-10_Final_Draft

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Source Data o ER: Emissions Reduction Case o Ref: Reference Case o Res: Residential Module o Com: Commercial Module o Ind: Industrial Module o Elec: Electricity Module o Trans:...

  2. Waste Heat Utilization System Income Tax Deduction (Personal)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Waste heat utilization system means facilities and equipment for the recovery of waste heat generated in the process of generating electricity and the use of such heat to generate additional elec...

  3. Waste Heat Utilization System Income Tax Deduction (Corporate)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Waste heat utilization system means facilities and equipment for the recovery of waste heat generated in the process of generating electricity and the use of such heat to generate additional elec...

  4. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    task to migrate the Joint Nuclear Weapons Publications Sys- tem (JNWPS) from paper media to interactive elec- THE PEN-X PROJECT explored two aspects of a conceptual cruise...

  5. Oklahoma Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Coop Inc Place: Oklahoma Phone Number: 1-405-321-2024 Website: www.okcoop.org Twitter: @okcoop Facebook: https:www.facebook.comOklaElec Outage Hotline: 405-321-2024...

  6. Category:Atlantic City, NJ | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Atlantic City NJ Public Service Elec & Gas Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 63 KB SVMidriseApartment...

  7. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wheeler Elec Member Corp","Cooperative",1562763,588686,292390,681687,0 5,"Baldwin County El Member Corp","Cooperative",1271089,833798,437291,0,0 " ","Total sales, top five...

  8. Property:Awardee | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Utility Co. Smart Grid Project + Black HillsColorado Elec.Utility Co. LP + Burbank Water and Power Smart Grid Project + City of Burbank Water and Power, California (Utility...

  9. Buying an Energy-Efficient Electric Motor

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of Electrical and Elec- tronics Engineers (IEEE ) 112 Method B, which uses a dynamometer ... uses bands of efficiency values based on IEEE 112 testing. 4. When should I consider ...

  10. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    123 YESNO. PHOTVL8 Photovoltaic cells used to generate elec 125- 125 YESNO. FUELCL8 Fuel cells used to generate electricity 127- 127 YESNO. MCROTB8 Microturbines used to...

  11. Macroporous monoliths for trace metal extraction from seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, Yanfeng; Mayes, Richard; Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li -Jung; Wood, Jordana R.; Binder, Andrew; Brown, Suree; Dai, Sheng

    2015-05-29

    The viability of seawater-based uranium recovery depends on the uranium adsorption rate and capacity, since the concentration of uranium in the oceans is relatively low (3.3 ?gL?). An important consideration for a fast adsorption is to maximize the adsorption properties of adsorbents such as surface areas and pore structures, which can greatly improve the kinetics of uranium extraction and the adsorption capacity simultaneously. Following this consideration, macroporous monolith adsorbents were prepared from the copolymerization of acrylonitrile (AN) and N,N-methylenebis(acrylamide) (MBAAm) based on a cryogel method using both hydrophobic and hydrophilic monomers. The monolithic sorbents were tested with simulated seawater containing a high uranyl concentration (6 ppm) and the uranium adsorption results showed that the adsorption capacities are strongly influenced by the ratio of monomer to the crosslinker, i.e., the density of the amidoxime groups. The preliminary seawater testing indicates the high salinity content of seawater does not hinder the adsorption of uranium.

  12. Potential trace element emissions from the gasification of Illinois...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GASIFICATION PLANTS; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; ACTIVATION ANALYSIS; AIR POLLUTION; BERYLLIUM; COAL GASIFICATION; ELEMENTS; FLOWSHEETS; FLUORESCENCE...

  13. Trace Element Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    importance of aspect. The samples were analyzed for their Hg contents, as well as for pH, hydrous Fe and Mn, and organic carbon, all of which are known to have influence on Hg...

  14. Tracing ram-pressure stripping with warm molecular hydrogen emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivanandam, Suresh; Rieke, Marcia J.; Rieke, George H.

    2014-12-01

    We use the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph to study four infalling cluster galaxies with signatures of ongoing ram-pressure stripping. H{sub 2} emission is detected in all four, and two show extraplanar H{sub 2} emission. The emission usually has a warm (T ? 115-160 K) and a hot (T ? 400-600 K) component that is approximately two orders of magnitude less massive than the warm one. The warm component column densities are typically 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 20} cm{sup 2} with masses of 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 8} M {sub ?}. The warm H{sub 2} is anomalously bright compared with normal star-forming galaxies and therefore may be excited by ram-pressure. In the case of CGCG 97-073, the H{sub 2} is offset from the majority of star formation along the direction of the galaxy's motion in the cluster, suggesting that it is forming in the ram-pressure wake of the galaxy. Another galaxy, NGC 4522, exhibits a warm H{sub 2} tail approximately 4 kpc in length. These results support the hypothesis that H{sub 2} within these galaxies is shock-heated from the interaction with the intracluster medium. Stripping of dust is also a common feature of the galaxies. For NGC 4522, where the distribution of dust at 8 ?m is well resolved, knots and ripples demonstrate the turbulent nature of the stripping process. The H? and 24 ?m luminosities show that most of the galaxies have star-formation rates comparable to similar mass counterparts in the field. Finally, we suggest a possible evolutionary sequence primarily related to the strength of ram-pressure that a galaxy experiences to explain the varied results observed in our sample.

  15. Trace Element Analysis At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Terrasol leach are two such techniques. This method has to datae been mostly applied to oil and mineral deposits. Limited unpulished studies on geothermal systems suggest that...

  16. Trace Element Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring...

  17. Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring...

  18. Trace Element Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring...

  19. Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring...

  20. Identification of open quantum systems from observable time traces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Jun; Sarovar, Mohan

    2015-05-27

    Estimating the parameters that dictate the dynamics of a quantum system is an important task for quantum information processing and quantum metrology, as well as fundamental physics. In our paper we develop a method for parameter estimation for Markovian open quantum systems using a temporal record of measurements on the system. Furthermore, the method is based on system realization theory and is a generalization of our previous work on identification of Hamiltonian parameters.

  1. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 63; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 1876-6102 Publisher: Elsevier Research Org: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), ...

  2. Long gamma-ray bursts trace the star formation history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2014-04-10

    We show that if the broad-line supernova explosions of Type Ic (SNeIc) produce the bulk of the observed long duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), including high- and low-luminosity LGRBs and X-ray flashes, and if the LGRBs have the geometry assumed in the cannonball model of LGRBs, then their rate, measured by Swift, and their redshift distribution are consistent with the star formation rate (SFR) over the entire range of redshifts where the SFR has been measured with sufficient accuracy.

  3. TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Devil's Kitchen fumarole area and from Coso production wells. Authors Lutz, S.J.; Moore, J.N.; Adams, M.C.; Norman and D.I. Published PROCEEDINGS, Twenty-fourth Workshop on...

  4. Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the history of the system. Authors Odin D. Christensen, Regina A. Capuano and Joseph N. Moore Published Journal Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 1983 DOI Not...

  5. Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    this distribution may be a useful solid geothermometer. Authors O.D. Christensen, J.N. Moore and R.M. Capuano Conference GRC Annual Meeting; Salt Lake City, UT; 09091980...

  6. Advanced Gasification Mercury/Trace Metal Control with Monolith...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). ... This compares to the target value of 5 ppb (17gmsup 3). The EERC-prepared ...

  7. Spatial Heterogeneity of Trace Species Distributions in the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Radiative Forcing and Climate Change at GFDL: A Perspective V. Ramaswamy NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Princeton University Climate and Climate Change * Basic...

  8. Assessment of coal cleaning for trace element control. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akers, D.; Arnold, B.

    1998-12-01

    Current methods of cleaning coal already reduce the concentration of most of the elements named as hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) under Title 3 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments because most of these elements are associated with ash-forming or sulfur-bearing minerals. Advanced methods of physical cleaning may prove even more effective than conventional cleaning technologies, in HAPs control, especially if the coal is crushed before cleaning. The most significant disadvantage of conventional or advanced physical cleaning methods for HAPs control is that reductions of 90% or greater from as-fired coal may not be possible. Chemical and biologic methods of cleaning coal can potentially remove greater amounts of at least some HAPs elements than conventional or advanced physical cleaning methods. At least one promising chemical process (HAPs-Rx) has been developed and tested at laboratory scale that has the potential of removing over half of the mercury and arsenic remaining in coal after conventional cleaning. An assessment of the cost and effectiveness of conventional, advanced, and the HAPs-Rx chemical process was performed using laboratory data and computer simulations. The study found that the cost of removing a pound of mercury from coal by cleaning often compared favorably with cost projections by the Environmental Protection Agency for removing a pound of mercury by activated carbon injection.

  9. Appending High-Resolution Elevation Data to GPS Speed Traces...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Vehicles." SAE World Congress, April 2008. Accessed April 21, 2014: http:www.media.gm.comcontentdamMediamicrositesproductvoltdocspaper.pdf 16. Neubauer, J.;...

  10. Solar Tracing Sensors for Maximum Solar Concentrator Efficiency...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publication Market Sheet (1,222 KB) Technology Marketing SummaryConcentrating Solar Power (CSP) relies on thermodynamic processes to convert concentrated light into useful...

  11. Trace Element Analysis (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  12. Tool for Rapid Assessment of City Energy (TRACE) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector: Climate Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways...

  13. Precise trace rare earth analysis by radiochemical neutron activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Lepel, E.A.; Weimer, W.C.; Wogman, N.A.

    1981-06-01

    A rare earth group separation scheme followed by normal Ge(Li), low energy photon detector (LEPD), and Ge(Li)-NaI(Tl) coincidence-noncoincidence spectrometry significantly enhances the detection sensitivity of individual rare earth elements (REE) at or below the ppB level. Based on the selected ..gamma..-ray energies, normal Ge(Li) counting is favored for /sup 140/La, /sup 170/Tb, and /sup 169/Yb; LEPD is favored for low ..gamma..-ray energies of /sup 147/Nd, /sup 153/Sm, /sup 166/Ho, and /sup 169/Yb; and noncoincidence counting is favored for /sup 141/Ce, /sup 143/Ce, /sup 142/Pr, /sup 153/Sm, /sup 171/Er, and /sup 175/Yb. The detection of radionuclides /sup 152m/Eu, /sup 159/Gd, and /sup 177/Lu is equally sensitive by normal Ge(Li) and noncoincidence counting; /sup 152/Eu is equally sensitive by LEPD and normal Ge(Li); and /sup 153/Gd and /sup 170/Tm is equally favored by all the counting modes. Overall, noncoincidence counting is favored for most of the REE. Precise measurements of the REE were made in geological and biological standards.

  14. Trace rare earth element analysis in briny groundwaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Lepel, E.A.; Smith, M.R.

    1986-08-01

    A rare-earth element (REE) group separation scheme has been developed. REE data for two briny groundwaters representing Granite Wash and Wolfcamp Carbonate formations are reported. (DLC)

  15. Monitoring Trace Radionuclides by ICP Mass Spectrometry with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such measurements (from hours to several minutes), while maintaining at least reasonable accuracy (agreement with true ratios +- 3% or better) and precision (1% RSD or better),...

  16. Ultra-Trace Detection of Fluoride Ion and Hydrofluoric Acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy M. Swager

    2005-03-17

    Describes general synthetic strategies developed under this grant to control interchain electronic communications within conjugated polymers (CPs). Novel chemical architectures built on iptycenes, metallorotaxanes, and canopied pyrroles restrict the dimensionality of electronic structures responsible for excition and charge transport. Structure-property relationships emerging from studies of selected systems are discussed, focusing on their implications for the sensitivity of these materials as sensors.

  17. COLLOQUIUM: Atomic Tracings: The History of Radioisotopes in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Angela N. H. Creager Princeton University After detonating the first nuclear weapons in Japan, to devastating effects, the U.S. government turned swiftly to promoting the peaceable...

  18. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Table 2.5 Household 1 Energy Consumption and Expenditures by End Use, Selected Years, 1978-2005 Year Space Heating Air Conditioning Water Heating Appliances, 2 Electronics, and Lighting Natural Gas Elec- tricity 3 Fuel Oil 4 LPG 5 Total Electricity 3 Natural Gas Elec- tricity 3 Fuel Oil 4 LPG 5 Total Natural Gas Elec- tricity 3 LPG 5 Total Consumption (quadrillion Btu) 1978 4.26 0.40 2.05 0.23 6.94 0.31 1.04 0.29 0.14 0.06 1.53 0.28 1.46 0.03 1.77 1980 3.41 .27 1.30 .23 5.21 .36 1.15 .30 .22

  19. Linkages of DOE'S Energy Storage R & D to Batteries and Ultracapacitor...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... U S A B CA b us e T es t P r oc ed ur es Manual T es t s for elec t r oc h emi c al s t ... Merck Patent Gesellschaft Mit Beschrankter Haftung Moltech Power Systems, Inc. Morgan ...

  20. Microsoft Word - PBII Plenary Paper.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... E2.3:25. 3 S. Qin, Y. Zhou, and C. Chan, IEEE Trans. of Plasma Sci. 27 (1999) 766-771. ... Instrum. & Methods B 55 (1991) 898-901. 25 41 C. Yu and N. W. Cheung, IEEE Elec. Dev. ...

  1. Groundwaters of Florence (Italy): Trace element distribution and vulnerability of the aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bencini, A.; Ercolanelli, R.; Sbaragli, A.

    1993-11-01

    Geochemical and hydrogeological research has been carried out in Florence, to evaluate conductivity and main chemistry of groundwaters, the pattern of some possible pollutant chemical species (Fe, Mn, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn, NO{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}), and the vulnerability of the aquifers. The plain is made up of Plio-Quaternary alluvial and lacustrine sediments for a maximum thickness of 600 m. Silts and clays, sometimes with lenses of sandy gravels, are dominant, while considerable deposits of sands, pebbles, and gravels occur along the course of the Arno river and its tributary streams, and represent the most important aquifer of the plain. Most waters show conductivity values around 1000-1200 {mu}S, and almost all of them have an alkaline-earth-bicarbonate chemical character. In western areas higher salt content of the groundwaters is evident. Heavy metal and NO{sub 2}, NO{sub 3} analyses point out that no important pollution phenomena affect the groundwaters; all mean values are below the maximum admissible concentration (MAC) for drinkable waters. Some anomalies of NO{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}, Fe, Mn, and Zn are present. The most plausible causes can be recognized in losses of the sewage system; use of nitrate compounds in agriculture; oxidation of well pipes. All the observations of Cr, Cu, and Pb are below the MAC; the median values of <3, 3.9, and 1.1 {mu}g/l, respectively, could be considered reference concentrations for groundwaters in calcareous lithotypes, under undisturbed natural conditions. Finally, a map of vulnerability shows that the areas near the Arno river are highly vulnerable, for the minimum thickness (or lacking) of sediments covering the aquifer. On the other hand, in the case of pollution, several factors not considered could significantly increase the self-purification capacity of the aquifer, such asdilution of groundwaters, bacteria oxidation of nitrogenous species, and sorption capacity of clay minerals and organic matter. 31 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Tracing the structure of asymmetric molecules from high-order harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Yanjun; Zhang, Bing

    2011-11-15

    We investigate high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from asymmetric molecules exposed to intense laser fields. We show that the emissions of odd and even harmonics depend differently on the orientation angle, the internuclear distance, as well as the effective charge. This difference mainly comes from different roles of intramolecular interference in the HHG of odd and even harmonics. These roles map the structure of the asymmetric molecule to the odd vs even HHG spectra.

  3. Influence of oxygen traces on an atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency capacitive argon plasma discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Shouzhe; Wu Qi; Yan Wen; Wang Dezhen [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion, Electron Beams, Dalian University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China) and School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Uhm, Han S. [Kwangwoon Academy of Advanced Studies, Kwangwoon University, 447-1 Wolgye-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    An atmospheric-pressure capacitive discharge source driven by radio-frequency power supply at 13.56 MHz has been developed experimentally that is capable of producing a homogeneous and cold glow discharge in O{sub 2}/Ar. With respect to the influence of oxygen component when diluted into argon plasma discharge on the discharge characteristics, the measurements of the electrical parameters (impedance, phase angle, resistance, and reactance) are made systematically and the densities of the metastable and resonant state of argon are determined by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES). It is shown that the admixture of oxygen into argon plasma not only changes the electric characteristics but also alters the optical emission spectra greatly due to strong interaction between the oxygen content and the argon in the plasma environment.

  4. Emissions of trace gases and aerosols during the open combustion of biomass in the laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMeeking, Gavin R.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Baker, Stephen; Carrico, Christian M.; Chow, Judith C.; Collett, Jr., Jeffrey L.; Hao, Wei Min; Holden, Amanda S.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Malm, William C.; Moosmuller, Hans; Sullivan, Amy P.; Wold, Cyle E.

    2009-05-15

    We characterized the gas- and speciated aerosol-phase emissions from the open combustion of 33 different plant species during a series of 255 controlled laboratory burns during the Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiments (FLAME). The plant species we tested were chosen to improve the existing database for U.S. domestic fuels: laboratory-based emission factors have not previously been reported for many commonly-burned species that are frequently consumed by fires near populated regions and protected scenic areas. The plants we tested included the chaparral species chamise, manzanita, and ceanothus, and species common to the southeastern US (common reed, hickory, kudzu, needlegrass rush, rhododendron, cord grass, sawgrass, titi, and wax myrtle). Fire-integrated emission factors for gas-phase CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2-4} hydrocarbons, NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}, HNO{sub 3} and particle-phase organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, Cl{sup -}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and NH{sub 4}{sup +} generally varied with both fuel type and with the fire-integrated modified combustion efficiency (MCE), a measure of the relative importance of flaming- and smoldering-phase combustion to the total emissions during the burn. Chaparral fuels tended to emit less particulate OC per unit mass of dry fuel than did other fuel types, whereas southeastern species had some of the largest observed EF for total fine particulate matter. Our measurements often spanned a larger range of MCE than prior studies, and thus help to improve estimates for individual fuels of the variation of emissions with combustion conditions.

  5. Observation of stratospheric trace gases related to ozone depletion in the Antarctic spring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Zafra, R.L.; Parrish, A.; Solomon, P.; Barrett, J.W.; Connor, B.; Jaramillo, M. )

    1987-01-01

    During the first National Ozone Expedition (NOZE I), which ran from 21 August to early November 1986 at McMurdo Station, the authors made frequent measurements of chlorine monoxide (CIO), ozone (O{sub 3}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), and occasional measurements of hydrogen cyanide. Observations were made with a ground-based millimeters wave spectrometer capable of detecting and measuring the pressure broadened rotational emission lines of these molecules in the 260-280 gigahertz frequency range. The spectral bandpass and resolution of the instrument is sufficient to recover altitude distributions over a range of approximately 20-55 kilometers and to detect emission from as low as approximately 13-15 kilometers. Results are given and discussed on the levels of chlorine monoxide, nitrous oxide, and ozone found.

  6. In situ flame chemistry tracing by imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owald, P.; Khler, M.; Hemberger, P.; Bodi, A.; Gerber, T.; Bierkandt, T.; Akyildiz, E.; Kasper, T.

    2014-02-15

    Adaptation of a low-pressure flat flame burner with a flame-sampling interface to the imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectrometer (iPEPICO) of the VUV beamline at the Swiss Light Source is presented. The combination of molecular-beam mass spectrometry and iPEPICO provides a new powerful analytical tool for the detailed investigation of reaction networks in flames. First results demonstrate the applicability of the new instrument to comprehensive flame diagnostics and the potentially high impact for reaction mechanism development for conventional and alternative fuels. Isomer specific identification of stable and radical flame species is demonstrated with unrivaled precision. Radical detection and identification is achieved for the initial H-abstraction products of fuel molecules as well as for the reaction controlling H, O, and OH radicals. Furthermore, quantitative evaluation of changing species concentrations during the combustion process and the applicability of respective results for kinetic model validation are demonstrated. Utilization of mass-selected threshold photoelectron spectra is shown to ensure precise signal assignment and highly reliable spatial profiles.

  7. TRACING THE ORPHAN STREAM TO 55 kpc WITH RR LYRAE STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sesar, Branimir; Cohen, Judith G.; Bellm, Eric C.; Levitan, David; Tang, Sumin; Waszczak, Adam; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Prince, Thomas A.; Grillmair, Carl J.; Laher, Russ R.; Surace, Jason A.; Bhalerao, Varun B.; Ofek, Eran O.

    2013-10-10

    We report positions, velocities, and metallicities of 50 ab-type RR Lyrae (RRab) stars observed in the vicinity of the Orphan stellar stream. Using about 30 RRab stars classified as being likely members of the Orphan stream, we study the metallicity and the spatial extent of the stream. We find that RRab stars in the Orphan stream have a wide range of metallicities, from 1.5 dex to 2.7 dex. The average metallicity of the stream is 2.1 dex, identical to the value obtained by Newberg et al. using blue horizontal branch stars. We find that the most distant parts of the stream (40-50 kpc from the Sun) are about 0.3 dex more metal-poor than the closer parts (within ?30 kpc), suggesting a possible metallicity gradient along the stream's length. We have extended the previous studies and have mapped the stream up to 55 kpc from the Sun. Even after a careful search, we did not identify any more distant RRab stars that could plausibly be members of the Orphan stream. If confirmed with other tracers, this result would indicate a detection of the end of the leading arm of the stream. We have compared the distances of Orphan stream RRab stars with the best-fit orbits obtained by Newberg et al. We find that model 6 of Newberg et al. cannot explain the distances of the most remote Orphan stream RRab stars, and conclude that the best fit to distances of Orphan stream RRab stars and to the local circular velocity is provided by potentials where the total mass of the Galaxy within 60 kpc is M{sub 60} ? 2.7 10{sup 11} M{sub ?}, or about 60% of the mass found by previous studies. More extensive modeling that would consider non-spherical potentials and the possibility of misalignment between the stream and the orbit is highly encouraged.

  8. Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qianlai Zhuang

    2012-11-16

    During the three-year project period, Purdue University has specifically accomplished the following: revised the existing Methane Dynamics Model (MDM) to consider the effects of changes of atmospheric pressure; applied the methane dynamics model (MDM) to Siberian region to demonstrate that ebullition estimates could increase previous estimates of regional terrestrial CH{sub 4} emissions 3- to 7-fold in Siberia; Conducted an analysis of the carbon balance of the Arctic Basin from 1997 to 2006 to show that terrestrial areas of the Arctic were a net source of 41.5 Tg CH{sub 4} yr{sup ??1} that increased by 0.6 Tg CH{sub 4} yr{sup ??1} during the decade of analysis, a magnitude that is comparable with an atmospheric inversion of CH{sub 4}; improved the quantification of CH{sub 4} fluxes in the Arctic with inversion methods; evaluated AIRS CH4 retrieval data with a transport and inversion model and surface flux and aircraft data; to better quantify methane emissions from wetlands, we extended the MDM within a biogeochemistry model, the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM), to include a large-scale hydrology model, the variable infiltration capacity (VIC) model; more recently, we developed a single box atmospheric chemistry model involving atmospheric methane (CH{sub 4}), carbon monoxide (CO) and radical hydroxyl (OH) to analyze atmospheric CH{sub 4} concentrations from 1984 to 2008.

  9. Spatially resolved spectra of the 'teacup' active galactic nucleus: tracing the history of a dying quasar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gagne, J. P.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Fischer, T. C.; Kraemer, S. B.; Schmitt, H. R.; Keel, W. C.; Rafter, S.; Bennert, V. N.; Schawinski, K.

    2014-09-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Galaxy Zoo project has revealed a number of spectacular galaxies possessing extended emission-line regions (EELRs), the most famous being Hanny's Voorwerp galaxy. We present another EELR object discovered in the SDSS endeavor: the Teacup active galactic nucleus (AGN). Nicknamed for its EELR, which has a 'handle'-like structure protruding 15 kpc into the northeast quadrant of the galaxy. We analyze the physical conditions of this galaxy with long-slit, ground-based spectroscopy from the Lowell, Lick, and KPNO observatories. With the Lowell 1.8 m Perkin's telescope we took multiple observations at different offset positions, allowing us to recover spatially resolved spectra across the galaxy. Line diagnostics indicate the ionized gas is photoionized primarily by the AGN. Additionally we are able to derive the hydrogen density from the [S II] ?6716/?6731 ratio. We generated two-component photoionization models for each spatially resolved Lowell spectrum. These models allow us to calculate the AGN bolometric luminosity seen by the gas at different radii from the nuclear center of the Teacup. Our results show a drop in bolometric luminosity by more than two orders of magnitude from the EELR to the nucleus, suggesting that the AGN has decreased in luminosity by this amount in a continuous fashion over 46,000 yr, supporting the case for a dying AGN in this galaxy independent of any IR based evidence. We demonstrate that spatially resolved photoionization modeling could be applied to EELRs to investigate long timescale variability.

  10. DOE's Ed Synakowski traces key discoveries in the quest for fusion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the quest for fusion energy By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe March 9, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The DOE's Associate Director of Science for Fusion Energy ...

  11. T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in Blue Coat Director. A remote user can conduct cross-site scripting attacks.

  12. Vesicle-based method for collecting, manipulating, and chemically processing trace macromolecular species

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davalos, Rafael V. (Oakland, CA); Ellis, Christopher R. B. (Oakland, CA)

    2010-08-17

    Disclosed is an apparatus and method for inserting one or several chemical or biological species into phospholipid containers that are controlled within a microfluidic network, wherein individual containers are tracked and manipulated by electric fields and wherein the contained species may be chemically processed.

  13. Vesicle-based method and apparatus for collecting, manipulating, and chemically processing trace macromolecular species

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davalos, Rafael V. (Oakland, CA); Ellis, Christopher R. B. (Oakland, CA)

    2008-03-04

    Disclosed is an apparatus and method for inserting one or several chemical or biological species into phospholipid containers that are controlled within a microfluidic network, wherein individual containers are tracked and manipulated by electric fields and wherein the contained species may be chemically processed.

  14. Tunable photonic cavities for in-situ spectroscopic trace gas detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Tiziana; Cole, Garrett; Goddard, Lynford

    2012-11-13

    Compact tunable optical cavities are provided for in-situ NIR spectroscopy. MEMS-tunable VCSEL platforms represents a solid foundation for a new class of compact, sensitive and fiber compatible sensors for fieldable, real-time, multiplexed gas detection systems. Detection limits for gases with NIR cross-sections such as O.sub.2, CH.sub.4, CO.sub.x and NO.sub.x have been predicted to approximately span from 10.sup.ths to 10s of parts per million. Exemplary oxygen detection design and a process for 760 nm continuously tunable VCSELS is provided. This technology enables in-situ self-calibrating platforms with adaptive monitoring by exploiting Photonic FPGAs.

  15. Flow injection trace gas analysis method for on-site determination of organoarsenicals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldstadt, J.H. III

    1997-06-24

    A method is described for real-time determination of the concentration of Lewisite in the ambient atmosphere, the method includes separating and collecting a Lewisite sample from the atmosphere in a collection chamber, converting the collected Lewisite to an arsenite ion solution sample, pumping the arsenite ion containing sample to an electrochemical detector connected to the collection chamber, and electrochemically detecting the converted arsenite ions in the sample, whereby the concentration of arsenite ions detected is proportional to the concentration of Lewisite in the atmosphere. 2 figs.

  16. Flow injection trace gas analysis method for on-site determination of organoarsenicals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldstadt, III, Joseph H. (Orland Park, IL)

    1997-01-01

    A method for real-time determination of the concentration of Lewisite in the ambient atmosphere, the method includes separating and collecting a Lewisite sample from the atmosphere in a collection chamber, converting the collected Lewisite to an arsenite ion solution sample, pumping the arsenite ion containing sample to an electrochemical detector connected to the collection chamber, and electrochemically detecting the converted arsenite ions in the sample, whereby the concentration of arsenite ions detected is proportional to the concentration of Lewisite in the atmosphere.

  17. Control of Gas Tungsten Arc welding pool shape by trace element addition to the weld pool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1984-03-13

    An improved process for Gas Tungsten Arc welding maximizes the depth/width ratio of the weld pool by adding a sufficient amount of a surface active element to insure inward fluid flow, resulting in deep, narrow welds. The process is especially useful to eliminate variable weld penetration and shape in GTA welding of steels and stainless steels, particularly by using a sulfur-doped weld wire in a cold wire feed technique.

  18. Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Jordan) European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Bp 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France) Publication Date: 2009-09-15 OSTI Identifier: 22051046 Resource Type: Journal Article ...

  19. Subtask 2.8 - Control of Trace Elements in Gasification Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Swanson

    2009-03-28

    Detailed investigations were carried out to investigate the removal of mercury using a variety of substrates at elevated temperature under reducing conditions. Sorbents tested mainly comprised 6A, 7A, 1B, 2B, and metals from the periodic table. The new high-surface halogen-treated carbon sorbents performed exceptionally well on the bench scale at relatively high temperatures (400 C). The new sorbents could be incorporated into a gas cleanup technology for fuel gas, where the gas is cooled to medium temperatures. Other work in this task focused on halogen-containing sorbents prepared on a carbon support. Similar sorbents had been previously found to be superior for mercury in flue gas. All granular sorbents were conducted in fixed beds heated at 350 and 400 C with 10 vol% hydrogen in a nitrogen stream containing 34.8 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of Hg{sup 0}.

  20. Amplification of trace amounts of nucleic acids (Patent) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    background can be reduced by judicious design of primers. We have shown clean signal-to-noise with as little as starting material as one single human cell (.about.6...

  1. Transient electron heat diffusivity obtained from trace impurity injection on TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kissick, M. W.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Callen, J. D.; Bush, C. E.; Chang, Z. Y.; Efthimion, P. C.; Hulse, R. A.; Mansfield, D. K.; Park, H. K.; Schivell, J.; Scott, S. D.; Synakowski, E. J.; Taylor, G.; Zarnstorff, M. C.

    1993-08-01

    A new method for obtaining a transient (``pulse``) electron heat diffusivity (?ep) in the radial region 0.38 < r/a < 0.56 in TFTR L-mode discharges is presented. Small electron temperature perturbations were caused by single bursts of injected impurities which radiated and cooled the plasma edge. An iron injection case by laser ablation was found to be more definitive than a supporting helium gas puff case. In this new ``cold pulse`` method, we concentrate on modeling just the electron temperature perturbations, tracked with ECE (electron cyclotron emission) diagnostics and on being able to justify separation in space and time from the cooling source. This ?ep is obtained for these two cases to be ?ep = (6.0m/s 35%) ~ 4?e(power balance) which is consistent with, but more definitive than, results from other studies that are more susceptible to ambiguities in the source profile.

  2. Tracing recent star formation of red early-type galaxies out to z ? 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, Jongwan; Lee, Jong Chul; Hwang, Ho Seong; Im, Myungshin; Le Borgne, Damien; Elbaz, David

    2014-08-20

    We study the mid-infrared (IR) excess emission of early-type galaxies (ETGs) on the red sequence at z < 1 using a spectroscopic sample of galaxies in the fields of Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS). In the mass-limited sample of 1025 galaxies with M {sub star} > 10{sup 10.5} M {sub ?} and 0.4 < z < 1.05, we identify 696 Spitzer 24 ?m detected (above the 5?) galaxies and find them to have a wide range of NUV-r and r-[12 ?m] colors despite their red optical u r colors. Even in the sample of very massive ETGs on the red sequence with M {sub star} > 10{sup 11.2} M {sub ?}, more than 18% show excess emission over the photospheric emission in the mid-IR. The combination with the results of red ETGs in the local universe suggests that the recent star formation is not rare among quiescent, red ETGs at least out to z ? 1 if the mid-IR excess emission results from intermediate-age stars or/and from low-level ongoing star formation. Our color-color diagram including near-UV and mid-IR emissions are efficient not only for identifying ETGs with recent star formation, but also for distinguishing quiescent galaxies from dusty star-forming galaxies.

  3. Patterns in the Cosmos Trace Evolution of the Universe | U.S...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Hanson et al., "Detection of B-mode Polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background with Data from the South Pole Telescope." arXiv:1307.5830 astro-ph.CO (http:arxiv.orgabs...

  4. Development of an Ultra-Low Background Liquid Scintillation Counter for Trace Level Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erchinger, Jennifer L.; Orrell, John L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Douglas, Matthew; Finn, Erin C.; Fuller, Erin S.; Keillor, Martin E.; Morley, Shannon M.; Mullen, Crystal A.; Panisko, Mark E.; Shaff, Sarah M.; Warren, Glen A.; Wright, Michael E.

    2015-09-01

    Low-level liquid scintillation counting (LSC) has been established as one of the radiation detection techniques useful in elucidating environmental processes and environmental monitoring around nuclear facilities. The Ultra-Low Background Liquid Scintillation Counter (ULB-LSC) under construction in the Shallow Underground Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory aims to further reduce the MDAs and/or required sample processing. Through layers of passive shielding in conjunction with an active veto and 30 meters water equivalent overburden, the background reduction is expected to be 10 to 100 times below typical analytic low-background liquid scintillation systems. Simulations have shown an expected background of around 14 counts per day. A novel approach to the light collection will use a coated hollow light guide cut into the inner copper shielding. Demonstration LSC measurements will show low-energy detection, spectral deconvolution, and alpha/beta discrimination capabilities, from trials with standards of tritium, strontium-90, and actinium-227, respectively. An overview of the system design and expected demonstration measurements will emphasize the potential applications of the ULB-LSC in environmental monitoring for treaty verification, reach-back sample analysis, and facility inspections.

  5. TRACING THE STAR-FORMATION-DENSITY RELATION TO z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quadri, Ryan F.; Williams, Rik J.; Franx, Marijn; Hildebrandt, Hendrik

    2012-01-10

    Recent work has shown that the star formation (SF) density relation-in which galaxies with low SF rates are preferentially found in dense environments-is still in place at z {approx} 1, but the situation becomes less clear at higher redshifts. We use mass-selected samples drawn from the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey to show that galaxies with quenched SF tend to reside in dense environments out to at least z {approx} 1.8. Over most of this redshift range we are able to demonstrate that this SF-density relation holds even at fixed stellar mass. The environmental quenching of SF appears to operate with similar efficiency on all galaxies regardless of stellar mass. Nevertheless, the environment plays a greater role in the buildup of the red sequence at lower masses, whereas other quenching processes dominate at higher masses. In addition to a statistical analysis of environmental densities, we investigate a cluster at z = 1.6, and show that the central region has an elevated fraction of quiescent objects relative to the field. Although the uncertainties are large, the environmental quenching efficiency in this cluster is consistent with that of galaxy groups and clusters at z {approx} 0. In this work we rely on photometric redshifts and describe some of the pitfalls that large redshift errors can present.

  6. Determination of trace amounts of cerium in paint by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, K.L.

    1981-11-01

    The determination of Ce in paint by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) is described, and the detection limit of ICP-OES of 0.0004 ppM is compared with that of other methods. The effects of the major elemental components of paint, Si, Pb, Cr, and Na on the ICP-OES determination of Ce were studied. The interference of 400 ppM of the other ions on the determination of 10 ppM Ce was small (0 to 3% error). The method is applicable to the range of 0.2 to 700 ppM Ce. (BLM)

  7. The impact of atmospheric aerosols on trace metal chemistry in open ocean surface seawater 3. Lead

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maring, H.B.; Duce, R.A. )

    1990-04-15

    Atmospheric aerosols collected at Enewetak Atoll in the tropical North Pacific were exposed to seawater in laboratory experiments to assess the impact of atmospheric aerosols on lead chemistry in surface seawater. The net atmospheric flux of soluble lead to the ocean is between 16 and 32 pmol cm{sup {minus}2}/yr at Enewetak. The stable lead isotopic composition of soluble aerosol lead indicates that it is of anthropogenic origin. Anthropogenic aerosol lead from Central and North America appears to be less soluble and/or to dissolve less rapidly than that from Asia. Dissolved organic matter and possibly lower pH appear to increase the nonaluminosilicate aerosol lead solubility and/or dissolution rate. The isotopic composition of lead in air, seawater and dry deposition suggests that after deposition in the ocean, nonaluminosilicate particulate lead can be reinjected into the atmosphere during sea salt aerosol production.

  8. appguideformatWeb.pub

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wind energy has been used since the earliest civilization to grind grain, pump water from deep wells, and power sailboats. Wind- mills in pre-industrial Europe were used for many things, including irrigation or drainage pumping, grain-grinding, saw-milling of timber, and the processing of other commodities such as spices, cocoa, paints and dyes, and tobacco. Before the U.S. installed an infrastructure of electricity wires, both water-pumping windmills and small wind elec- tric turbines

  9. Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle Improved Recovery of Waste Heat in Industrial Processes Introduction Waste heat from turbines and engines used in industrial ap- plications along with waste heat from industrial processes are exceptionally abundant sources of energy. If even a fraction of this waste heat could be economically converted to useful elec- tricity, it would have a tangible and very positive impact on the economic health, energy consumption, and carbon

  10. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Co of Colorado","Investor-owned",28861229,9266046,12881189,6652330,61664 2,"City of Colorado Springs - (CO)","Public",4553294,1461825,1106926,1984543,0 3,"Intermountain Rural Elec

  11. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Elec & Gas Co","Investor-owned",19192403,11493325,6936055,763023,0 2,"Jersey Central Power & Lt Co","Investor-owned",9947655,7417321,2298350,231984,0 3,"Direct Energy Business Marketing,

  12. NRELs Energy-Saving Technology for Air Conditioning Cuts Peak Power Loads Without Using Harmful Refrigerants (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DEVAP Slashes Peak Power Loads Desiccant-enhanced evaporative (DEVAP) air-condi- tioning will provide superior comfort for commercial buildings in any climate at a small fraction of the elec- tricity costs of conventional air-conditioning equip- ment, releasing far less carbon dioxide and cutting costly peak electrical demand by an estimated 80%. Air conditioning currently consumes about 15% of the electricity generated in the United States and is a major contributor to peak electrical demand on

  13. Critical Materials Strategy Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Critical Materials Strategy Summary 2010 T he United States is on the cusp of a clean energy rev- olution. In its first Critical Materials Strategy, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) focuses on materials used in four clean energy technologies: wind turbines, elec- tric vehicles, solar cells and energy-efficient lighting (Table 1). The Strategy evaluates the extent to which widespread deployment of these technologies may increase worldwide demand for rare earth elements and certain other

  14. National Electric Transmission Congestion Study 2009 Executive Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Executive Summary In the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), Con- gress directed the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a study every three years on elec- tric transmission congestion and constraints within the Eastern and Western Interconnections. The American Reinvestment and Recovery Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) further directed the Secretary to in- clude in the 2009 Congestion Study an analysis of significant potential sources of renewable energy that are constrained by lack of adequate

  15. Tracing the 4000 year history of organic thin films: From monolayers on liquids to multilayers on solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, J. E.

    2015-03-15

    The recorded history of organic monolayer and multilayer thin films spans approximately 4000 years. Fatty-acid-based monolayers were deposited on water by the ancients for applications ranging from fortune telling in King Hammurabi's time (?1800 BC, Mesopotamia) to stilling choppy waters for sailors and divers as reported by the Roman philosopher Pliny the Elder in ?78 AD, and then much later (1774) by the peripatetic American statesman and natural philosopher Benjamin Franklin, to Japanese floating-ink art (suminagashi) developed ?1000 years ago. The modern science of organic monolayers began in the late-1800s/early-1900s with experiments by Lord Rayleigh and the important development by Agnes Pockels, followed two decades later by Irving Langmuir, of the tools and technology to measure the surface tension of liquids, the surface pressure of organic monolayers deposited on water, interfacial properties, molecular conformation of the organic layers, and phase transitions which occur upon compressing the monolayers. In 1935, Katherine Blodgett published a landmark paper showing that multilayers can be synthesized on solid substrates, with controlled thickness and composition, using an apparatus now known as the Langmuir-Blodgett (L-B) trough. A disadvantage of LB films for some applications is that they form weak physisorbed bonds to the substrate. In 1946, Bigelow, Pickett, and Zisman demonstrated, in another seminal paper, the growth of organic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) via spontaneous adsorption from solution, rather than from the water/air interface, onto SiO{sub 2} and metal substrates. SAMs are close-packed two-dimensional organic crystals which exhibit strong covalent bonding to the substrate. The first multicomponent adsorbed monolayers and multilayer SAMs were produced in the early 1980s. Langmuir monolayers, L-B multilayers, and self-assembled mono- and multilayers have found an extraordinarily broad range of applications including controlled wetting, adhesion, electrochemistry, biocompatibility, molecular recognition, biosensing, cell biology, non-linear optics, molecular electronics, solar cells, read/write/erase memory, and magnetism.

  16. Naked-eye optical flash from gamma-ray burst 080319B: Tracing the decaying neutrons in the outflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan Yizhong; Zhang Bing; Wei Daming

    2009-01-15

    For an unsteady baryonic gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow, the fast and slow proton shells collide with each other and produce energetic soft gamma-ray emission. If the outflow has a significant neutron component, the ultrarelativistic neutrons initially expand freely until decaying at a larger radius. The late-time proton shells ejected from the GRB central engine, after powering the regular internal shocks, will sweep these {beta}-decay products and give rise to very bright UV/optical emission. The naked-eye optical flash from GRB 080319B, an energetic explosion in the distant Universe, can be well explained in this way.

  17. Real-Time Trace Gas Sensing of Fluorocarbons using a Swept-wavelength External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Cannon, Bret D.; Stahl, Robert D.; Schiffern, John T.; Myers, Tanya L.

    2014-05-04

    We present results demonstrating real-time sensing of four different fluorocarbons at low-ppb concentrations using an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) operating in a swept-wavelength configuration. The ECQCL was repeatedly swept over its full tuning range at a 20 Hz rate with a scan rate of 3535 cm-1/s, and a detailed characterization of the ECQCL scan stability and repeatability is presented. The sensor was deployed on a mobile automotive platform to provide spatially resolved detection of fluorocarbons in outdoor experiments. Noise-equivalent detection limits of 800-1000 parts-per-trillion (ppt) are demonstrated for 1 s integration times.

  18. CAB-DWTM for 5 μm trace-width deposition of solar cell metallization top-contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Justin Hoey; Drew Thompson; Matt Robinson; Zakaria Mahmud; Orven F. Swenson; Iskander S. Akhatov; Douglas L. Schulz

    2009-06-08

    This paper reviews methods for creating solar cell grid contacts and explores how cell efficiency can be increased using CAB-DW{trademark}. Specifically, the efficiency of p-i-n structure solar cells built in-house with 90 {micro}m sputtered lines and 5 {micro}m CAB-DW lines were compared. Preliminary results of the comparison show a marked improvement in solar cell efficiency using CAB-DW. In addition to this, a theoretical and experimental analysis of the dynamics of particle impaction on a substrate (i.e. whether particle stick or bounce) will be discussed including how this analysis may lead to further improvement of CAB-DW.

  19. Fiscal Year 1998 Annual Report, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, World Data Center -- A for Atmospheric Trace Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Hook, L.A.; Jones, S.B.; Kaiser, D.P.; Nelson, T.R.

    1999-03-01

    Once again, the most recent fiscal year was a productive one for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), as well as a year for change. The FY 1998 in Review section in this report summarizes quite a few new and updated data and information products, and the ''What's Coming in FY 1999'' section describes our plans for this new fiscal year. During FY 1998, CDIAC began a data-management system for AmeriFlux, a long-term study of carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere of the Western Hemisphere and the atmosphere. The specific objectives of AmeriFlux are to establish an infrastructure for guiding, collecting, synthesizing, and disseminating long-term measurements of CO{sub 2}, water, and energy exchange from a variety of ecosystems; collect critical new information to help define the current global CO{sub 2} budget; enable improved predictions of future concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2}; and enhance understanding of carbon fluxes. Net Ecosystem Production (NEP), and carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere. The data-management system, available from CDIAC'S AmeriFlux home page (http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/programs/ameriflux/ ) is intended to provide consistent, quality-assured, and documented data across all AmeriFlux sites in the US, Canada, Costa Rica, and Brazil. It is being developed by Antoinette Brenkert and Tom Boden, with assistance from Susan Holladay (who joined CDIAC specifically to support the AmeriFlux data-management effort).

  20. Method for ultra-trace cesium isotope ratio measurements from environmental samples using thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, Mathew S.; Snyder, Darin C.; Mann, Nick R.; White, Byron M.

    2015-05-01

    135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios can provide the age, origin and history of environmental Cs contamination. Relatively high precision 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratio measurements from samples containing femtogram quantities of 137Cs are needed to accurately track contamination resuspension and redistribution following environmental 137Cs releases; however, mass spectrometric analyses of environmental samples are limited by the large quantities of ionization inhibitors and isobaric interferences which are present at relatively high concentrations in the environment. We report a new approach for Cs purification from environmental samples. An initial ammonium molybdophosphate-polyacrylonitrile (AMP-PAN) column provides a robust method for extracting Cs under a wide variety of sample matrices and mass loads. Cation exchange separations using a second AMP-PAN column result in more than two orders of magnitude greater Cs/Rb separation factors than commercially available strong cation exchangers. Coupling an AMP-PAN cation exchanging step to a microcation column (AG50W resin) enables consistent 2-4% (2?) measurement errors for samples containing 3-6,000 fg 137Cs, representing the highest precision 135Cs/137Cs ratio measurements currently reported for soil samples at the femtogram level.

  1. Richard Gerber Helen He, Zhengji Zhao, Chris Daley NUG Monthly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gerber Helen He, Zhengji Zhao, Chris Daley NUG Monthly Meeting --- 1 --- NUG M onthly M ee-ng October 2 , 2 014 Agenda * Hopper and Edison Status Updates * ERCAP ( Alloca-ons) U pdate * Queue C ommiIee T opics * NUGEX Elec-ons * NUG 2 015 M ee-ng P lanning * Mini---Seminar: S teps t o i mprove t he p erformance o f a h ydrodynamics a pplica-on o n t he I ntel M IC architecture --- 2 --- Edison Update" Zhengji Zhao, User Services --- 3 --- Edison Updates * 9/25 7 :30 P DT --- 9 /28 1 :30 P

  2. Richard Gerber, Lisa Gerhardt, Harvey Wasserman, Helen He, Scott French, Zhengji

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lisa Gerhardt, Harvey Wasserman, Helen He, Scott French, Zhengji Zhao NUG Monthly Meeting --- 1 --- NUG M onthly M ee-ng September 11, 2014 Agenda * Hopper a nd E dison U -liza-on, B acklog, a nd Q ueue Waits * Edison memory replacement: down-me 9/25/14---9/29/14 * Carver S L6 O S u pgrade a nd C HOS * Hopper apsched e rrors * Update o n t he N ESAP p rogram a nd N ERSC A pplica-on Readiness f or C ori ( NERSC---8) * Dirac a nd C arver r e-rement r eminder * NUGEX Elec-ons * Mini---Seminar: P

  3. Word Pro - S12

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 Table 12.4 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Industrial Sector (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide a ) Coal Coal Coke Net Imports Natural Gas b Petroleum Retail Elec- tricity g Total h Distillate Fuel Oil c Kero- sene LPG d Lubri- cants Motor Gasoline e Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Other f Total 1973 Total .................... 371 -1 536 106 11 44 7 18 52 144 100 483 515 1,904 1975 Total .................... 336 2 440 97 9 39 6 16 51 117 97 431 490 1,697 1980 Total

  4. Word Pro - S12

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review February 2016 Table 12.5 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Transportation Sector (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide a ) Coal Natural Gas b Petroleum Retail Elec- tricity f Total g Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil c Jet Fuel LPG d Lubri- cants Motor Gasoline e Residual Fuel Oil Total 1973 Total ........................ (s) 39 6 163 152 3 6 886 57 1,273 2 1,315 1975 Total ........................ (s) 32 5 155

  5. Word Pro - S2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 Table 2.6 Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumption a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy b Elec- tricity Net Imports e Total Primary Coal Natural Gas c Petro- leum Total Hydro- electric Power d Geo- thermal Solar/ PV Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total ...................... 2,199 651 472 3,322 0 1,346 NA NA NA 5 1,351 6 4,679 1955 Total ...................... 3,458 1,194 471 5,123 0 1,322 NA NA NA 3 1,325 14 6,461 1960 Total

  6. Word Pro - S2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Table 2.3 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumption a Elec- tricity Retail Sales f Electrical System Energy Losses g Total Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy b Total Primary Coal Natural Gas c Petro- leum d Total Hydro- electric Power e Geo- thermal Solar/ PV Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total .................... 1,542 401 872 2,815 NA NA NA NA 19 19 2,834 225 834 3,893 1955 Total .................... 801 651 1,095 2,547 NA NA NA NA 15 15 2,561 350 984 3,895 1960 Total

  7. Word Pro - S2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 Table 2.4 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumption a Elec- tricity Retail Sales g Electrical System Energy Losses h Total e Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy b Total Primary Coal Natural Gas c Petro- leum d Total e Hydro- electric Power f Geo- thermal Solar/ PV Wind Bio- mass Total 1950 Total .................... 5,781 3,546 3,960 13,288 69 NA NA NA 532 602 13,890 500 1,852 16,241 1955 Total .................... 5,620 4,701 5,123 15,434 38 NA NA NA 631 669 16,103 887

  8. 2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Residential

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) Alaska Electric Light&Power Co AK Investor Owned 14,115 141,151 16,728.0 11.85 Alaska Power and Telephone Co AK Investor Owned 5,328 24,116 7,301.0 30.27 Alaska Village Elec Coop, Inc AK Cooperative 7,869 35,665 21,188.0 59.41 Anchorage Municipal Light and Power AK Municipal 24,429 133,411 21,435.0

  9. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 Table 10.5 Estimated Number of Alternative-Fueled Vehicles in Use and Fuel Consumption, 1992-2010 Year Alternative and Replacement Fuels 1 Liquefied Petroleum Gases Compressed Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Methanol, 85 Percent (M85) 3 Methanol, Neat (M100) 4 Ethanol, 85 Percent (E85) 3,5 Ethanol, 95 Percent (E95) 3 Elec- tricity 6 Hydro- gen Other Fuels 7 Subtotal Oxygenates 2 Bio- diesel 10 Total Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether 8 Ethanol in Gasohol 9 Total Alternative-Fueled Vehicles in Use

  10. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Table 11.2c Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Industrial Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1 ) Year Coal Coal Coke Net Imports Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Elec- tricity 8 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Kero- sene LPG 5 Lubri- cants Motor Gasoline 6 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Other 7 Total Wood 9 Waste 10 Fuel Ethanol 11 Total 1949 500 -1 166 41 18 3 3 16 8 95 25 209 120 995 44 NA NA 44 1950 531 (s) 184 51 20 4 3 18 8 110

  11. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 11.2d Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Transportation Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1 ) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Elec- tricity 7 Total 2 Biomass 2 Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Jet Fuel LPG 5 Lubricants Motor Gasoline 6 Residual Fuel Oil Total Fuel Ethanol 8 Biodiesel Total 1949 161 NA 12 30 NA (s) 4 306 91 443 6 611 NA NA NA 1950 146 7

  12. Table 10.5 Estimated Number of Alternative-Fueled Vehicles in Use and Fuel Consumption, 1992-2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Estimated Number of Alternative-Fueled Vehicles in Use and Fuel Consumption, 1992-2010 Year Alternative and Replacement Fuels 1 Liquefied Petroleum Gases Compressed Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Methanol, 85 Percent (M85) 3 Methanol, Neat (M100) 4 Ethanol, 85 Percent (E85) 3,5 Ethanol, 95 Percent (E95) 3 Elec- tricity 6 Hydro- gen Other Fuels 7 Subtotal Oxygenates 2 Bio- diesel 10 Total Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether 8 Ethanol in Gasohol 9 Total Alternative-Fueled Vehicles in Use 11

  13. Table 11.2c Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Industrial Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Industrial Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Coal Coke Net Imports Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Elec- tricity 8 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Kero- sene LPG 5 Lubri- cants Motor Gasoline 6 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Other 7 Total Wood 9 Waste 10 Fuel Ethanol 11 Total 1949 500 -1 166 41 18 3 3 16 8 95 25 209 120 995 44 NA NA 44 1950 531 (s) 184 51 20 4 3 18 8 110 26 239 140 1,095 50 NA NA 50

  14. Table 11.2d Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Transportation Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    d Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Transportation Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Elec- tricity 7 Total 2 Biomass 2 Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Jet Fuel LPG 5 Lubricants Motor Gasoline 6 Residual Fuel Oil Total Fuel Ethanol 8 Biodiesel Total 1949 161 NA 12 30 NA (s) 4 306 91 443 6 611 NA NA NA 1950 146 7 14 35 NA (s) 5 332 95 481 6 640 NA NA NA 1951 129 11 18 42 NA (s) 6 360 102 529 7 675 NA NA NA

  15. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Golden Valley Elec Assn Inc","Cooperative",1253161,286768,133156,833237,0 2,"Chugach Electric Assn Inc","Cooperative",1162364,534522,573447,54395,0 3,"Anchorage Municipal Light and Power","Public",1047470,139733,907737,0,0

  16. Released: June 2006

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Cooling Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Build- ings*","Build- ings with Cooling","Cooling Energy Sources (more than one may apply)",,,"All Build- ings*","Build- ings with Cooling","Cooling Energy Sources (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural

  17. b22.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Elec- tricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat District Chilled Water Propane Other a All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 4,414 4,404 2,391 451 67 33 502 132 Table B22. Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply) All Buildings* Buildings Using Any Energy Source Number of Workers (main shift) Fewer than 5

  18. NUG Teleconference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NUG Teleconference Dec. 2012 --- 1 --- December 4 , 2 012 NUG Teleconference Dec. 2012 * System status update * Edison update * ERCAP / A lloca?ons u pdate * Brief h ello f rom n ew N ERSC D irector Sudip D osanjh * NUGEX elec?ons * Role o f N UGEX m embers * NUG f ace---to---face m ee?ng i n F ebruary * Recap o f H EP r equirements m ee?ng N ov. 2 7---28 - FES M arch 1 9---20, 2 013 --- 2 --- System Status Update * No Hopper outages since scheduled maintenance on Nov. 13 * Only 1 ( 2?) C arver

  19. UTILITYID","UTILNAME","STATE","YEAR","MONTH","RES_REV (Thousand $)","RES_SALES (

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1998,1,4908,24636,4694,29431,1351,11643,1370,5978,12322,71688 213,"Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK",1998,1,1430,14868,354,3934,363,4986,459,6435,2606,30223 599,"Anchorage Mun Light and Power","AK",1998,1,1536,16776,4633,63484,0,0,103,993,6272,81253 3522,"Chugach Electric Assn, Inc.","AK",1998,1,5237,53636,3662,48363,171,2657,110,629,9180,105285 7353,"Golden Valley Elec Assn,

  20. Recent Development of SOFC Metallic Interconnect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu JW, Liu XB

    2010-04-01

    Interest in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) stems from their higher eciencies and lower levels of emitted pollu- tants, compared to traditional power production methods. Interconnects are a critical part in SOFC stacks, which connect cells in series electrically, and also separate air or oxygen at the cathode side from fuel at the anode side. Therefore, the requirements of interconnects are the most demanding, i:e:, to maintain high elec- trical conductivity, good stability in both reducing and oxidizing atmospheres, and close coecient of thermal expansion (CTE) match and good compatibility with other SOFC ceramic components. The paper reviewed the interconnect materials, and coatings for metallic interconnect materials.

  1. Synchrotron micro-scale study of trace metal transport and distribution in Spartina alterniflora root system in Yangtze River intertidal zone

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feng, Huan; Tappero, Ryan; Zhang, Weiguo; Liu, Wenliang; Yu, Lizhong; Qian, Yu; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jia -Jun; Eng, Christopher; Liu, Chang -Jun; et al

    2015-07-26

    This study is focused on micro-scale measurement of metal (Ca, Cl, Fe, K, Mn, Cu, Pb, and Zn) distributions in Spartina alterniflora root system. The root samples were collected in the Yangtze River intertidal zone in July 2013. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF), computed microtomography (CMT), and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) techniques, which provide micro-meter scale analytical resolution, were applied to this study. Although it was found that the metals of interest were distributed in both epidermis and vascular tissue with the varying concentrations, the results showed that Fe plaque was mainly distributed in the root epidermis. Other metals (e.g.,more » Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn) were correlated with Fe in the epidermis possibly due to scavenge by Fe plaque. Relatively high metal concentrations were observed in the root hair tip. As a result, this micro-scale investigation provides insights of understanding the metal uptake and spatial distribution as well as the function of Fe plaque governing metal transport in the root system.« less

  2. The tale of a modern animal plague: Tracing the evolutionary history and determining the time-scale for foot and mouth disease virus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tully, Damien C. Fares, Mario A.

    2008-12-20

    Despite significant advances made in the understanding of its epidemiology, foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) is among the most unexpected agricultural devastating plagues. While the disease manifests itself as seven immunologically distinct strains their origin, population dynamics, migration patterns and divergence times remain unknown. Herein we have assembled a comprehensive data set of gene sequences representing the global diversity of the disease and inferred the time-scale and evolutionary history for FMDV. Serotype-specific rates of evolution and divergence times were estimated using a Bayesian coalescent framework. We report that an ancient precursor FMDV gave rise to two major diversification events spanning a relatively short interval of time. This radiation event is estimated to have taken place towards the end of the 17th and the beginning of the 18th century giving us the present circulating Euro-Asiatic and South African viral strains. Furthermore our results hint that Europe acted as a possible hub for the disease from where it successfully dispersed elsewhere via exploration and trading routes.

  3. Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.

    2013-03-31

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) consists of 5 U.S DOE national laboratories collaborating to develop a framework for predicting the risks associated with carbon sequestration. The approach taken by NRAP is to divide the system into components, including injection target reservoirs, wellbores, natural pathways including faults and fractures, groundwater and the atmosphere. Next, develop a detailed, physics and chemistry-based model of each component. Using the results of the detailed models, develop efficient, simplified models, termed reduced order models (ROM) for each component. Finally, integrate the component ROMs into a system model that calculates risk profiles for the site. This report details the development of the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer at PNNL. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer uses a Wellbore Leakage ROM developed at LANL as input. The detailed model, using the STOMP simulator, covers a 5x8 km area of the Edwards Aquifer near San Antonio, Texas. The model includes heterogeneous hydraulic properties, and equilibrium, kinetic and sorption reactions between groundwater, leaked CO2 gas, brine, and the aquifer carbonate and clay minerals. Latin Hypercube sampling was used to generate 1024 samples of input parameters. For each of these input samples, the STOMP simulator was used to predict the flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, and the volume, length and width of the aquifer where pH was less than the MCL standard, and TDS, arsenic, cadmium and lead exceeded MCL standards. In order to decouple the Wellbore Leakage ROM from the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM, the response surface was transformed to replace Wellbore Leakage ROM input parameters with instantaneous and cumulative CO2 and brine leakage rates. The most sensitive parameters proved to be the CO2 and brine leakage rates from the well, with equilibrium coefficients for calcite and dolomite, as well as the number of illite and kaolinite sorption sites proving to be of secondary importance. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM was developed using nonlinear regression to fit the response surface with a quadratic polynomial. The goodness of fit was excellent for the CO2 flux to the atmosphere, and very good for predicting the volumes of groundwater exceeding the pH, TDS, As, Cd and Pb threshold values.

  4. Synchrotron micro-scale study of trace metal transport and distribution in Spartina alterniflora root system in Yangtze River intertidal zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Huan; Tappero, Ryan; Zhang, Weiguo; Liu, Wenliang; Yu, Lizhong; Qian, Yu; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jia -Jun; Eng, Christopher; Liu, Chang -Jun; Jones, Keith W.

    2015-07-26

    This study is focused on micro-scale measurement of metal (Ca, Cl, Fe, K, Mn, Cu, Pb, and Zn) distributions in Spartina alterniflora root system. The root samples were collected in the Yangtze River intertidal zone in July 2013. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF), computed microtomography (CMT), and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) techniques, which provide micro-meter scale analytical resolution, were applied to this study. Although it was found that the metals of interest were distributed in both epidermis and vascular tissue with the varying concentrations, the results showed that Fe plaque was mainly distributed in the root epidermis. Other metals (e.g., Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn) were correlated with Fe in the epidermis possibly due to scavenge by Fe plaque. Relatively high metal concentrations were observed in the root hair tip. As a result, this micro-scale investigation provides insights of understanding the metal uptake and spatial distribution as well as the function of Fe plaque governing metal transport in the root system.

  5. Trace rare earth element analysis of IAEA hair (HH-1), animal bone (H-5) and other biological standards by radiochemical neutron activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepel, E.A.; Laul, J.C.

    1986-03-01

    A radiochemical neutron activation analysis using a rare earth group separation scheme has been used to measure ultratrace levels of rare earth elements (REE) in IAEA Human Hair (HH-1), IAEA Animal Bone (H-5), NBS Bovine Liver (SRM 1577), and NBS Orchard Leaf (SRM 1571) standards. The REE concentrations in Human Hair and Animal Bone range from 10/sup -8/g/g to 10/sup -11/g/g and their chondritic normalized REE patterns show a negative Eu anomaly and follow as a smooth function of the REE ionic radii. The REE patterns for NBS Bovine Liver and Orchard Leaf are identical except that their concentrations are higher. The similarity among the REE patterns suggest that the REE do not appear to be fractionated during the intake of biological materials by animals or humans. 14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. UNVEILING SOURCES OF HEATING IN THE VICINITY OF THE ORION BN/KL HOT CORE AS TRACED BY HIGHLY EXCITED INVERSION TRANSITIONS OF AMMONIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goddi, C.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Greenhill, L. J.; Chandler, C. J.; Matthews, L. D.

    2011-09-20

    Using the Expanded Very Large Array, we have mapped the vicinity of the Orion BN/KL Hot Core with subarcsecond angular resolution in seven metastable inversion transitions of ammonia (NH{sub 3}): (J, K) = (6,6) to (12,12). This emission comes from levels up to 1500 K above the ground state, enabling identification of source(s) responsible for heating the region. We used this multi-transition data set to produce images of the rotational/kinetic temperature (T {sub rot}/T {sub kin}) and the column density N {sub col} of NH{sub 3} for ortho and para species separately and on a position-by-position basis. We find T {sub rot} and N {sub col} in the range 160-490 K and (1-4) x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}, respectively. Our spatially resolved images show that the highest (column) density and hottest gas is found in a northeast-southwest elongated ridge to the southeast of Source I. We have also measured the ortho-para ratio of ammonia, estimated to vary in the range 0.9-1.6. Enhancement of ortho with respect to para and the offset of hot NH{sub 3} emission peaks from known (proto)stellar sources provide evidence that the NH{sub 3} molecules have been released from dust grains into the gas phase through the passage of shocks and not by stellar radiation. We propose that the combined effect of Source I's proper motion and its low-velocity outflow impinging on a pre-existing dense medium is responsible for the excitation of NH{sub 3} and the Orion Hot Core. Finally, we found for the first time evidence of a slow ({approx}5 km s{sup -1}) and compact ({approx}1000 AU) outflow toward IRc7.

  7. Trace metal characterization and speciation in geothermal effluent by multiple scanning anodic stripping voltammetry and atomic absorpotion analysis. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalski, B R

    1980-01-01

    Only the actual application of the ultratrace metal analysis methods to samples taken from geothermal sites in Washington and Oregon is covered. The in-field sampling equipment constructed for the studies, procedures developed or adapted, and the results obtained on representative samples taken from geothermal sites are described. (MHR)

  8. z {approx} 4 H{alpha} EMITTERS IN THE GREAT OBSERVATORIES ORIGINS DEEP SURVEY: TRACING THE DOMINANT MODE FOR GROWTH OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shim, Hyunjin; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Dickinson, Mark; Lin Lihwai; Yan, Chi-Hung; Spinrad, Hyron; Stern, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    We present evidence for strong H{alpha} emission in galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range of 3.8 < z < 5.0 over the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey fields. Among 74 galaxies detected in the Spitzer IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands, more than 70% of the galaxies show clear excess at 3.6 {mu}m compared to the expected flux density from stellar continuum only. We provide evidence that this 3.6 {mu}m excess is due to H{alpha} emission redshifted into the 3.6 {mu}m band, and classify these 3.6 {mu}m excess galaxies to be H{alpha} emitter (HAE) candidates. The selection of HAE candidates using an excess in broadband filters is sensitive to objects whose rest-frame H{alpha} equivalent width (EW) is larger than 350 A. The H{alpha} inferred star formation rates (SFRs) of the HAEs range between 20 and 500 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and are a factor of {approx}6 larger than SFRs inferred from the UV continuum. The ratio between the H{alpha} luminosity and UV luminosity of HAEs is also on average larger than that of local starbursts. Possible reasons for such strong H{alpha} emission in these galaxies include different dust extinction properties, young stellar population ages, extended star formation histories, low metallicity, and a top-heavy stellar initial mass function. Although the correlation between UV slope {beta} and L{sub H{alpha}}/L{sub UV} raises the possibility that HAEs prefer a dust extinction curve which is steeper in the UV, the most dominant factor that results in strong H{alpha} emission appears to be star formation history. The H{alpha} EWs of HAEs are large despite their relatively old stellar population ages constrained by spectral energy distribution fitting, suggesting that at least 60% of HAEs produce stars at a constant rate. Under the assumption that the gas supply is sustained, HAEs are able to produce {approx}> 50% of the stellar mass density that is encompassed in massive (M{sub *} > 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}) galaxies at z {approx} 3. This 'strong H{alpha} phase' of star formation plays a dominant role in galaxy growth at z {approx} 4, and they are likely progenitors of massive red galaxies at lower redshifts.

  9. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for atomspheric trace gases: Catalog of data bases and reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burtis, M.D.

    1995-04-01

    This document provides information about the many reports and other materials made available by the US Department of Energy`s Global Change Research Program (GCRP). Section A provides information about the activities, scope, and direction of the GCRP; Sections B,C, D, and E contain information about research that has been sponsered by GCRP; Sections F and G contains information about the numeric data packages and computer model pa kages the have been compiled by the GCRP; Section H describes reports about research dealing with the responses of vegetation to carbon dioxide; and Section I conatins reports from various workshops, symposia, and reviews.

  10. LOW-VELOCITY SHOCKS TRACED BY EXTENDED SiO EMISSION ALONG THE W43 RIDGES: WITNESSING THE FORMATION OF YOUNG MASSIVE CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Martin, P. G.; Motte, F.; Louvet, F.; Hill, T.; Hennemann, M.; Didelon, P.; Lesaffre, P.; Gusdorf, A.; Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F.; Bendo, G.; Roussel, H.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bronfman, L.; and others

    2013-10-01

    The formation of high-mass stars is tightly linked to that of their parental clouds. Here, we focus on the high-density parts of W43, a molecular cloud undergoing an efficient event of star formation. Using a column density image derived from Herschel continuum maps, we identify two high-density filamentary clouds, called the W43-MM1 and W43-MM2 ridges. Both have gas masses of 2.1 10{sup 4} M{sub ?} and 3.5 10{sup 4} M{sub ?} above >10{sup 23} cm{sup -2} and within areas of ?6 and ?14 pc{sup 2}, respectively. The W43-MM1 and W43-MM2 ridges are structures that are coherent in velocity and gravitationally bound, despite their large velocity dispersion measured by the N{sub 2}H{sup +} (1-0) lines of the W43-HERO IRAM large program. Another intriguing result is that these ridges harbor widespread (?10 pc{sup 2}) bright SiO (2-1) emission, which we interpret to be the result of low-velocity shocks (?10 km s{sup 1}). We measure a significant relationship between the SiO (2-1) luminosity and velocity extent and show that it distinguishes our observations from the high-velocity shocks associated with outflows. We use state-of-the-art shock models to demonstrate that a small percentage (10%) of Si atoms in low-velocity shocks, observed initially in gas phase or in grain mantles, can explain the observed SiO column density in the W43 ridges. The spatial and velocity overlaps between the ridges of high-density gas and the shocked SiO gas suggest that ridges could be forming via colliding flows driven by gravity and accompanied by low-velocity shocks. This mechanism may be the initial conditions for the formation of young massive clusters.

  11. Improved DC Gun Insulator Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sah, R.; Dudas, A.; Neubauer, M. L.; Poelker, M.; Surles-Law, K. E.L.

    2010-05-23

    Many user facilities such as synchrotron radiation light sources and free electron lasers require accelerating structures that support electric fields of 10-100 MV/m, especially at the start of the accelerator chain where ceramic insulators are used for very high gradient DC guns. These insulators are difficult to manufacture, require long commissioning times, and often exhibit poor reliability. Two technical approaches to solving this problem will be investigated. Firstly, inverted ceramics offer solutions for reduced gradients between the electrodes and ground. An inverted design will be presented for 350 kV, with maximum gradients in the range of 5-10 MV/m. Secondly, novel ceramic manufacturing processes will be studied, in order to protect triple junction locations from emission, by applying a coating with a bulk resistivity. The processes for creating this coating will be optimized to provide protection as well as be used to coat a ceramic with an appropriate gradient in bulk resistivity from the vacuum side to the air side of an HV standoff ceramic cylinder. Example insulator designs are being computer modelled, and insulator samples are being manufactured and tested

  12. 11,23,1,1,,19,10,"BANGOR HYDRO ELECTRIC CO","ELLSWORTH",0,,1179,"0A",1294,,,95,2941,0,0,3518,0,0,4870,0,0,1732,0,0,3252,0,0,2193,0,0,134,0,0,447,0,0,465,0,0,538,0,0,4295,0,0,3601,0,0,1469,6,50159,"WAT","HY"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NAD_UTIL","FILLER","EFFDATE","STATUS","MULTIST","YEAR","GEN01","CON01","STK01","GEN02","CON02","STK02","GEN03","CON03","STK03","GEN04","CON04","STK04","GEN05","CON05","STK05","GEN06","CON06","STK06","GEN07","CON07","STK07","GEN08","CON08","STK08","GEN09","CON09","STK09","GEN10","CON10","STK10","GEN11","CON11","STK11","GEN12","CON12","STK12","PCODE","NERC","UTILCODE","FUELDESC","PMDESC" 11,23,1,1,,19,10,"BANGOR HYDRO ELECTRIC CO","ELLSWORTH",0,,1179,"0A",1294,,,95,2941,0,0,3518,0,0,4870,0,0,1732,0,0,3252,0,0,2193,0,0,134,0,0,447,0,0,465,0,0,538,0,0,4295,0,0,3601,0,0,1469,6,50159,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,19,15,"BANGOR HYDRO ELECTRIC CO","HOWLAND",0,,1179,"0A",1294,,,95,772,0,0,858,0,0,1012,0,0,727,0,0,1061,0,0,917,0,0,385,0,0,118,0,0,0,0,0,657,0,0,905,0,0,820,0,0,1472,6,50159,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,19,30,"BANGOR HYDRO ELECTRIC CO","MEDWAY",0,,1179,"0A",1294,,,95,2116,0,0,1715,0,0,1459,0,0,1821,0,0,1946,0,0,2134,0,0,2157,0,0,1797,0,0,1745,0,0,1829,0,0,2224,0,0,2386,0,0,1474,6,50159,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,3,2,19,30,"BANGOR HYDRO ELECTRIC CO","MEDWAY",0,"LIGHT OIL",1179,"0A",1294,,,95,0,0,553,181,307,419,0,0,593,31,55,538,66,120,418,219,399,383,324,598,481,313,579,614,97,178,575,1,2,573,0,0,608,98,171,611,1474,6,50159,"FO2","IC" 11,23,1,1,,19,35,"BANGOR HYDRO ELECTRIC CO","MILFORD",0,,1179,"0A",1294,,,95,3843,0,0,3348,0,0,4177,0,0,3759,0,0,4855,0,0,4740,0,0,2971,0,0,2432,0,0,1786,0,0,1561,0,0,3510,0,0,4606,0,0,1475,6,50159,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,19,45,"BANGOR HYDRO ELECTRIC CO","ORONO",0,,1179,"0A",1294,,,95,895,0,0,836,0,0,966,0,0,576,0,0,624,0,0,736,0,0,684,0,0,464,0,0,408,0,0,616,0,0,849,0,0,896,0,0,1476,6,50159,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,19,55,"BANGOR HYDRO ELECTRIC CO","STILLWATER",0,,1179,"0A",1294,,,95,1191,0,0,844,0,0,939,0,0,1021,0,0,1114,0,0,1181,0,0,1170,0,0,878,0,0,818,0,0,880,0,0,923,0,0,950,0,0,1478,6,50159,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,19,60,"BANGOR HYDRO ELECTRIC CO","VEAZIE A",0,,1179,"0A",1294,,,95,4314,0,0,3855,0,0,5043,0,0,5153,0,0,6053,0,0,5342,0,0,3542,0,0,2651,0,0,2281,0,0,3932,0,0,5128,0,0,3842,0,0,1479,6,50159,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,19,62,"BANGOR HYDRO ELECTRIC CO","VEAZIE B",0,,1179,"0A",1294,,,95,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,7199,6,50159,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,3,2,19,68,"BANGOR HYDRO ELECTRIC CO","BAR HARBOR",0,"LIGHT OIL",1179,"0A",1294,,,95,42,73,538,379,659,574,0,0,574,73,128,446,69,125,512,225,420,440,312,579,556,449,813,455,32,60,586,49,89,497,6,10,487,152,264,571,1466,6,50159,"FO2","IC" 11,23,1,3,2,19,75,"BANGOR HYDRO ELECTRIC CO","EASTPORT",0,"LIGHT OIL",1179,"0A",1294,,,95,39,70,576,80,139,412,0,0,586,10,18,557,32,58,494,111,204,464,172,317,495,182,334,509,19,36,472,0,0,470,15,29,429,67,117,460,1468,6,50159,"FO2","IC" 11,23,1,1,,37,5,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","ANDROSCOG 3",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,2536,0,0,2573,0,0,2732,0,0,2703,0,0,2639,0,0,2235,0,0,2379,0,0,2201,0,0,1657,0,0,2352,0,0,2282,0,0,2805,0,0,1480,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,10,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","BAR MILLS",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,2420,0,0,1389,0,0,2414,0,0,2364,0,0,2584,0,0,1195,0,0,623,0,0,586,0,0,293,0,0,1310,0,0,2401,0,0,2056,0,0,1481,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,20,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","BONNY EAGLE",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,6041,0,0,3654,0,0,5858,0,0,5255,0,0,4575,0,0,2217,0,0,1233,0,0,1084,0,0,592,0,0,3323,0,0,7098,0,0,4100,0,0,1482,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,40,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","CATARACT",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,5330,0,0,4194,0,0,4953,0,0,4656,0,0,4888,0,0,5331,0,0,818,0,0,662,0,0,102,0,0,2232,0,0,5064,0,0,4090,0,0,1486,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,42,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","CONTINENTAL",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,-14,0,0,-15,0,0,322,0,0,72,0,0,147,0,0,12,0,0,3,0,0,13,0,0,15,0,0,109,0,0,555,0,0,-18,0,0,1487,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,50,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","DEER RIP 1",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,2694,0,0,2434,0,0,4080,0,0,3776,0,0,4034,0,0,2023,0,0,686,0,0,215,0,0,83,0,0,1916,0,0,3984,0,0,3453,0,0,1488,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,60,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","FT HALIFAX",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,959,0,0,424,0,0,1026,0,0,961,0,0,925,0,0,526,0,0,51,0,0,5,0,0,155,0,0,380,0,0,977,0,0,659,0,0,1490,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,75,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","GULF ISLAND",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,10764,0,0,9131,0,0,13512,0,0,13282,0,0,13485,0,0,8299,0,0,5537,0,0,4070,0,0,2892,0,0,9130,0,0,15549,0,0,11464,0,0,1491,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,80,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","HARRIS",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,14325,0,0,24479,0,0,22937,0,0,6538,0,0,5448,0,0,21283,0,0,13285,0,0,11928,0,0,12813,0,0,10770,0,0,19708,0,0,26783,0,0,1492,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,85,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","HIRAM",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,5791,0,0,3447,0,0,5873,0,0,6762,0,0,6516,0,0,2778,0,0,1397,0,0,1182,0,0,155,0,0,2992,0,0,7160,0,0,4285,0,0,1493,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,90,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","MESALONSK 2",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,1280,0,0,585,0,0,1625,0,0,606,0,0,869,0,0,350,0,0,2,0,0,-1,0,0,9,0,0,710,0,0,1668,0,0,745,0,0,1497,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,95,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","MESALONSK 3",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,753,0,0,330,0,0,977,0,0,349,0,0,507,0,0,180,0,0,0,0,0,-6,0,0,0,0,0,414,0,0,1038,0,0,416,0,0,1498,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,100,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","MESALONSK 4",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,405,0,0,183,0,0,451,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1499,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,105,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","MESALONSK 5",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,699,0,0,292,0,0,0,0,0,378,0,0,0,0,0,203,0,0,13,0,0,9,0,0,4,0,0,408,0,0,923,0,0,390,0,0,1500,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,110,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","NO GORHAM",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,1215,0,0,963,0,0,842,0,0,520,0,0,455,0,0,503,0,0,595,0,0,604,0,0,413,0,0,340,0,0,740,0,0,1180,0,0,1501,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,125,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","SHAWMUT",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,5226,0,0,5495,0,0,6547,0,0,5776,0,0,5295,0,0,4910,0,0,3475,0,0,2346,0,0,2571,0,0,3529,0,0,4803,0,0,6066,0,0,1504,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,130,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","SKELTON",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,13276,0,0,8614,0,0,12134,0,0,11304,0,0,11550,0,0,5199,0,0,2833,0,0,2610,0,0,687,0,0,6731,0,0,13037,0,0,9456,0,0,1505,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,145,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","WEST BUXTON",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,4424,0,0,2556,0,0,4381,0,0,3723,0,0,3292,0,0,1602,0,0,798,0,0,745,0,0,418,0,0,1944,0,0,4334,0,0,3045,0,0,1508,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,150,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","WESTON",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,8095,0,0,8443,0,0,9513,0,0,8520,0,0,7843,0,0,7850,0,0,5819,0,0,4618,0,0,4257,0,0,5361,0,0,7925,0,0,9347,0,0,1509,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,155,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","WILLIAMS",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,9171,0,0,9162,0,0,10255,0,0,6585,0,0,7543,0,0,8658,0,0,6098,0,0,5593,0,0,5308,0,0,5891,0,0,8857,0,0,10646,0,0,1510,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,160,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","WYMAN HYDRO",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,30298,0,0,37016,0,0,38382,0,0,18735,0,0,24745,0,0,31774,0,0,20433,0,0,17564,0,0,16353,0,0,19735,0,0,40234,0,0,38504,0,0,1511,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,4,2,37,175,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","CAPE",0,"LIGHT OIL",3266,"0M",1294,,,95,40,282,7937,40,336,7601,-57,44,7557,-40,24,7533,5,162,7371,38,208,7316,611,1872,6581,497,1571,5887,-24,32,5855,-32,27,5828,-45,25,5803,-25,145,5552,1484,6,50491,"FO2","GT" 11,23,1,2,2,37,200,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","WYMAN STEAM",0,"LIGHT OIL",3266,"0M",1294,,,95,707,1587,1149,810,1542,1579,117,264,1534,980,1825,1680,366,883,1468,854,1640,1807,783,1460,2327,653,1307,1677,115,266,1410,20,76,1335,486,1282,2039,604,1177,2212,1507,6,50491,"FO2","ST" 11,23,1,2,3,37,200,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","WYMAN STEAM",0,"HEAVY OIL",3266,"0M",1294,,,95,47051,97029,319010,122493,214459,275338,22777,47240,228098,127804,222606,207728,22560,50003,278752,79660,140051,253816,153893,263859,173676,74046,134076,202289,16596,35140,288543,3258,10955,197963,18538,44437,353526,107031,192190,308382,1507,6,50491,"FO6","ST" 11,23,1,3,2,37,204,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","ISLESBORO",0,"LIGHT OIL",3266,"0M",1294,"S",,95,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1494,6,50491,"FO2","IC" 11,23,1,3,2,37,206,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","PEAK IS",0,"LIGHT OIL",3266,"0M",1294,"S",,95,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1502,6,50491,"FO2","IC" 11,23,1,1,,37,210,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","BRUNSWICK",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,7964,0,0,6898,0,0,11266,0,0,10237,0,0,10095,0,0,6009,0,0,3698,0,0,2974,0,0,2429,0,0,6541,0,0,12216,0,0,8541,0,0,1483,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,215,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","W CHANNEL",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,0,0,0,-33,0,0,-20,0,0,-22,0,0,-1,0,0,-1,0,0,-1,0,0,-21,0,0,-1,0,0,19,0,0,-11,0,0,-22,0,0,695,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,220,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","BATES UPPER",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,-41,0,0,-34,0,0,610,0,0,144,0,0,273,0,0,15,0,0,1,0,0,15,0,0,18,0,0,217,0,0,4223,0,0,-30,0,0,7044,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,225,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","BATES LOWER",0,,3266,"0M",1294,"S",,95,-17,0,0,-16,0,0,-8,0,0,-2,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,-1,0,0,-3,0,0,-17,0,0,7045,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,235,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","ANDRO LOWER",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,23,0,0,-11,0,0,21,0,0,-2,0,0,12,0,0,0,0,0,-1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,5,0,0,38,0,0,-14,0,0,7047,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,240,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","HILL MILL",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,-3,0,0,-2,0,0,183,0,0,-6,0,0,60,0,0,2,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,105,0,0,467,0,0,-6,0,0,7048,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,245,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","C E MONTY",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,11840,0,0,10124,0,0,14280,0,0,13297,0,0,13808,0,0,8324,0,0,5496,0,0,4271,0,0,3199,0,0,9333,0,0,15686,0,0,12247,0,0,805,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,250,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","SMELT HILL",0,,3266,"0M",294,"A",,95,0,0,0,400,0,0,352,0,0,239,0,0,180,0,0,162,0,0,191,0,0,178,0,0,-608,0,0,766,0,0,224,0,0,283,0,0,7514,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,2,"B",37,255,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","AROOSTOOK V",0,"WOOD",3266,"0M",294,"A",,95,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,165,0,0,134,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,7513,6,50491,"WD","ST" 11,23,1,1,,94,5,"MAINE PUBLIC SERVICE CO","CARIBOU",0,,11522,"0M",1294,,,95,454,0,0,469,0,0,519,0,0,451,0,0,454,0,0,410,0,0,48,0,0,1,0,0,-2,0,0,178,0,0,536,0,0,504,0,0,1513,6,51747,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,2,3,94,5,"MAINE PUBLIC SERVICE CO","CARIBOU",0,"HEAVY OIL",11522,"0M",1294,,,95,343,903,9375,592,1410,7984,-32,0,8005,-29,0,7995,-26,6,8015,-27,4,8057,-26,0,8067,222,644,7448,-28,0,7396,-29,0,7390,857,1841,5557,2237,4973,2370,1513,6,51747,"FO6","ST" 11,23,1,3,2,94,5,"MAINE PUBLIC SERVICE CO","CARIBOU",0,"LIGHT OIL",11522,"0M",1294,,,95,50,251,1746,5,143,1693,-65,0,1583,78,225,1932,-18,17,1865,-9,6,1829,38,115,1683,233,500,1802,86,210,1776,-6,65,2071,-56,28,1948,244,599,2098,1513,6,51747,"FO2","IC" 11,23,1,1,,94,10,"MAINE PUBLIC SERVICE CO","SQUA PAN",0,,11522,"0M",1294,,,95,115,0,0,363,0,0,152,0,0,-10,0,0,-7,0,0,-3,0,0,-3,0,0,-4,0,0,-6,0,0,-7,0,0,3,0,0,223,0,0,1516,6,51747,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,3,2,94,23,"MAINE PUBLIC SERVICE CO","FLOS INN",0,"LIGHT OIL",11522,"0M",1294,,,95,27,115,314,19,82,232,-29,0,232,19,79,373,-23,2,371,-16,0,371,13,80,290,124,284,232,74,135,323,-3,51,272,-25,8,264,217,451,388,1514,6,51747,"FO2","IC" 11,23,1,3,2,94,25,"MAINE PUBLIC SERVICE CO","HOULTON",0,"LIGHT OIL",11522,"0M",1294,,,95,6,28,13,-8,1,12,-8,2,10,-8,0,10,-6,0,10,-3,0,10,-2,0,10,-3,0,10,-3,0,10,-4,0,11,-4,2,8,14,34,6,1515,6,51747,"FO2","IC" 11,23,1,2,1,97,1,"MAINE YANKEE ATOMIC PWR C","MAIN YANKEE",0,"NUCLEAR",11525,"0M",1294,,,95,197577,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1517,6,51748,"UR","ST" 11,23,1,3,2,116,10,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","SWANS FALLS",0,"LIGHT OIL",15472,"0M",1294,"R",180,95,-7,0,2,-7,0,2,-6,0,2,-3,0,2,-2,0,2,-1,0,2,-1,0,2,-1,0,2,-1,0,2,-1,0,2,-3,0,2,0,0,0,1518,6,52411,"FO2","IC" 11,23,5,1,,525,1,"LEWISTON (CITY OF)","ANDRO UPPER",0,,10963,"0A",1294,,,95,296,0,0,378,0,0,310,0,0,424,0,0,264,0,0,390,0,0,256,0,0,258,0,0,304,0,0,270,0,0,342,0,0,324,0,0,7046,6,54168,"WAT","HY" 11,23,5,1,,566,1,"MADISON (CITY OF)","NORRIDGEWCK",0,,11477,"0A",1294,,,95,306,0,0,241,0,0,261,0,0,291,0,0,379,0,0,277,0,0,75,0,0,0,0,0,26,0,0,121,0,0,197,0,0,224,0,0,6701,6,51737,"WAT","HY" 11,23,8,3,2,835,5,"EASTERN MAINE ELEC COOP","PORTABLE",0,"LIGHT OIL",5609,"0A",1294,"S",,95,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,6366,6,50848,"FO2","IC" 11,23,8,3,2,940,1,"SWANS ISLAND ELEC COOP","MINTURN",0,"LIGHT OIL",18368,"0A",1294,"S",,95,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1550,6,52863,"FO2","IC" 12,33,1,1,,106,5,"NEW ENGLAND POWER CO","COMERFORD",0,,13433,"0M",1294,,90,95,34273,0,0,19125,0,0,43429,0,0,11874,0,0,22700,0,0,13853,0,0,5565,0,0,11061,0,0,5412,0,0,30636,0,0,45527,0,0,18948,0,0,2349,6,52007,"WAT","HY" 12,33,1,1,,106,10,"NEW ENGLAND POWER CO","MCINDOES",0,,13433,"0M",1294,,90,95,4420,0,0,3434,0,0,6350,0,0,3330,0,0,4648,0,0,2664,0,0,1453,0,0,2497,0,0,1353,0,0,4755,0,0,7050,0,0,3740,0,0,6483,6,52007,"WAT","HY" 12,33,1,1,,106,13,"NEW ENGLAND POWER CO","S C MOORE",0,,13433,"0M",1294,,90,95,29434,0,0,15866,0,0,34014,0,0,9521,0,0,19359,0,0,12124,0,0,4787,0,0,9805,0,0,4357,0,0,27013,0,0,40020,0,0,16551,0,0,2351,6,52007,"WAT","HY" 12,33,1,1,,106,15,"NEW ENGLAND POWER CO","VERNON",0,,13433,"0M",1294,,90,95,7120,0,0,5523,0,0,9186,0,0,7993,0,0,7582,0,0,3197,0,0,1355,0,0,2525,0,0,19,0,0,5912,0,0,9702,0,0,7342,0,0,2352,6,52007,"WAT","HY" 12,33,1,1,,106,20,"NEW ENGLAND POWER CO","WILDER",0,,13433,"0M",1294,,90,95,1974,0,0,3326,0,0,18722,0,0,7773,0,0,8911,0,0,4713,0,0,4047,0,0,5176,0,0,2849,0,0,9330,0,0,12667,0,0,7471,0,0,2353,6,52007,"WAT","HY" 12,33,1,2,1,123,1,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","SEABROOK",0,"NUCLEAR",15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,857441,0,0,778373,0,0,863021,0,0,832472,0,0,865152,0,0,495425,0,0,690261,0,0,805711,0,0,800410,0,0,828658,0,0,60958,0,0,501494,0,0,6115,6,52411,"UR","ST" 12,33,1,1,,123,4,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","AMOSKEAG",0,,15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,10690,0,0,7028,0,0,11425,0,0,749,0,0,15769,0,0,4245,0,0,2251,0,0,3257,0,0,434,0,0,5760,0,0,11044,0,0,6264,0,0,2354,6,52411,"WAT","HY" 12,33,1,1,,123,6,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","AYERS IS",0,,15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,3909,0,0,2249,0,0,4743,0,0,3555,0,0,4487,0,0,1520,0,0,1448,0,0,1727,0,0,380,0,0,3303,0,0,5711,0,0,2632,0,0,2355,6,52411,"WAT","HY" 12,33,1,1,,123,16,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","EASTMAN FLS",0,,15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,2843,0,0,1293,0,0,2781,0,0,2587,0,0,2725,0,0,1214,0,0,1763,0,0,10079,0,0,-9794,0,0,1729,0,0,3266,0,0,1701,0,0,2356,6,52411,"WAT","HY" 12,33,1,1,,123,20,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","GARVIN FLS",0,,15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,5209,0,0,3143,0,0,5693,0,0,4388,0,0,3956,0,0,2019,0,0,755,0,0,1667,0,0,350,0,0,3233,0,0,6336,0,0,3913,0,0,2357,6,52411,"WAT","HY" 12,33,1,1,,123,22,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","GORHAM",0,,15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,989,0,0,1031,0,0,1249,0,0,885,0,0,1193,0,0,756,0,0,568,0,0,530,0,0,580,0,0,864,0,0,1116,0,0,1202,0,0,2358,6,52411,"WAT","HY" 12,33,1,1,,123,28,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","HOOKSETT",0,,15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,787,0,0,865,0,0,912,0,0,1164,0,0,1141,0,0,791,0,0,156,0,0,317,0,0,43,0,0,751,0,0,952,0,0,776,0,0,2359,6,52411,"WAT","HY" 12,33,1,1,,123,30,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","JACKMAN",0,,15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,1997,0,0,535,0,0,1239,0,0,236,0,0,557,0,0,305,0,0,191,0,0,722,0,0,-8,0,0,1339,0,0,2326,0,0,864,0,0,2360,6,52411,"WAT","HY" 12,33,1,1,,123,50,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","SMITH STA",0,,15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,8143,0,0,9737,0,0,11648,0,0,6108,0,0,8349,0,0,6172,0,0,4454,0,0,4871,0,0,3742,0,0,6861,0,0,10860,0,0,10308,0,0,2368,6,52411,"WAT","HY" 12,33,1,4,2,123,57,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","LOST NATION",0,"LIGHT OIL",15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,-15,0,2159,79,306,1853,-15,0,1853,-12,0,1853,42,125,1728,50,140,1587,209,595,1527,275,828,1235,-11,0,1235,-11,0,1235,-10,0,1235,111,338,1076,2362,6,52411,"FO2","GT" 12,33,1,2,2,123,59,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","MERRIMACK",0,"LIGHT OIL",15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,27,45,275,16,29,156,22,38,180,23,38,218,0,0,0,29,52,151,6,14,205,30,55,180,52,96,222,62,108,185,57,96,176,20,35,176,2364,6,52411,"FO2","ST" 12,33,1,2,6,123,59,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","MERRIMACK",0,"BIT COAL",15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,266403,101539,253077,274308,103830,266334,256612,98157,263978,216443,80934,278945,76504,17154,315133,246563,95683,297713,281671,111493,247571,263463,95839,235114,181335,71786,264069,207269,81066,275589,253852,96425,269715,287608,108204,247069,2364,6,52411,"BIT","ST" 12,33,1,4,2,123,59,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","MERRIMACK",0,"LIGHT OIL",15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,-47,0,3032,411,1048,3032,-21,0,1984,-18,0,1984,112,282,1702,122,334,1367,613,1576,1494,582,1554,2033,-14,0,2033,-11,20,2013,-20,0,2013,242,603,1411,2364,6,52411,"FO2","GT" 12,33,1,2,3,123,63,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","SCHILLER",0,"HEAVY OIL",15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,1350,2702,31413,820,1554,92325,2073,4352,187620,1454,2823,184796,1826,3479,189663,2478,4626,184835,4062,7903,176932,2011,4193,53637,1321,2911,170000,1885,4329,165671,5233,10859,154812,3538,6785,118334,2367,6,52411,"FO6","ST" 12,33,1,2,6,123,63,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","SCHILLER",0,"BIT COAL",15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,53534,27148,87087,68779,32692,50318,47008,24972,52027,65230,33724,53967,55312,27020,32185,49976,24400,75043,55074,26887,62380,30313,18396,42154,18241,9931,51974,16092,9642,54786,30357,16856,90418,65541,32424,72200,2367,6,52411,"BIT","ST" 12,33,1,4,2,123,63,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","SCHILLER",0,"LIGHT OIL",15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,-13,0,804,95,260,723,-12,0,723,-9,0,723,57,118,604,-7,0,604,90,262,723,242,963,714,-7,0,714,0,0,714,-9,0,714,120,301,794,2367,6,52411,"FO2","GT" 12,33,1,4,9,123,63,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","SCHILLER",0,"NAT GAS",15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,19,240,0,12,140,0,24,310,0,25,300,0,22,264,0,17,210,0,219,2700,0,121,2803,0,14,190,0,15,220,0,24,320,0,22,260,0,2367,6,52411,"NG","GT" 12,33,1,4,2,123,70,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","WHITE LAKE",0,"LIGHT OIL",15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,-17,0,2383,97,350,2033,-14,4,2029,-7,0,2029,48,94,1935,136,341,1595,147,405,1763,357,924,1410,-3,0,1410,-3,0,1410,-13,0,1410,-6,129,1281,2369,6,52411,"FO2","GT" 12,33,1,2,2,123,72,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","NEWINGTON",0,"LIGHT OIL",15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,2141,4247,1577,1729,3274,1766,1111,2327,1824,1584,4149,1209,1580,3072,1209,1589,3168,1640,1162,2239,1856,1703,3313,1598,1134,2258,1388,173,817,1751,1894,3703,1630,507,3096,1651,8002,6,52411,"FO2","ST" 12,33,1,2,3,123,72,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","NEWINGTON",0,"HEAVY OIL",15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,73391,138116,328850,119485,206586,321529,32827,62816,434361,89003,159420,245596,100291,177704,321055,73382,134661,317462,125529,216497,100965,57182,118647,2305699,45699,82009,405756,1560,6611,399144,100544,177099,222046,136392,231245,388270,8002,6,52411,"FO6","ST" 12,33,1,2,9,123,72,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","NEWINGTON",0,"NAT GAS",15472,"0M",1294,,180,95,1463,17053,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,35353,394385,0,45744,527451,0,57696,624462,0,48968,544320,0,10747,122302,0,57,1545,0,742,8312,0,0,0,0,8002,6,52411,"NG","ST" 13,50,1,1,,22,2,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","ARNOLD FLS",0,,3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,112,0,0,27,0,0,168,0,0,290,0,0,100,0,0,18,0,0,33,0,0,37,0,0,17,0,0,172,0,0,245,0,0,135,0,0,3707,6,50503,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,22,10,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","CAVENDISH",0,,3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,534,0,0,309,0,0,847,0,0,607,0,0,267,0,0,83,0,0,0,0,0,134,0,0,-3,0,0,391,0,0,928,0,0,383,0,0,3710,6,50503,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,22,11,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","CLARKS FLS",0,,3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,1404,0,0,1026,0,0,1689,0,0,1865,0,0,1729,0,0,855,0,0,596,0,0,1076,0,0,567,0,0,1648,0,0,1970,0,0,1412,0,0,3711,6,50503,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,22,15,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","FAIRFAX",0,,3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,1873,0,0,1589,0,0,2321,0,0,2516,0,0,2499,0,0,1241,0,0,878,0,0,1432,0,0,744,0,0,2114,0,0,2573,0,0,2233,0,0,3712,6,50503,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,22,16,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","GAGE",0,,3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,221,0,0,24,0,0,244,0,0,307,0,0,290,0,0,73,0,0,85,0,0,38,0,0,48,0,0,305,0,0,523,0,0,226,0,0,3713,6,50503,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,22,18,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","GLEN",0,,3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,1041,0,0,605,0,0,731,0,0,367,0,0,238,0,0,98,0,0,83,0,0,323,0,0,183,0,0,629,0,0,1307,0,0,401,0,0,3714,6,50503,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,22,22,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","LW MIDLEBRY",0,,3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,725,0,0,534,0,0,1054,0,0,920,0,0,550,0,0,286,0,0,79,0,0,150,0,0,104,0,0,524,0,0,1220,0,0,492,0,0,3716,6,50503,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,22,26,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","MILTON",0,,3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,3538,0,0,2446,0,0,4215,0,0,4336,0,0,3864,0,0,1806,0,0,1204,0,0,2514,0,0,1210,0,0,4046,0,0,4879,0,0,3192,0,0,3717,6,50503,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,22,28,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","PASSUMPSIC",0,,3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,315,0,0,97,0,0,378,0,0,435,0,0,415,0,0,90,0,0,51,0,0,150,0,0,94,0,0,370,0,0,434,0,0,44,0,0,3718,6,50503,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,22,30,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","PATCH",0,,3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,107,0,0,58,0,0,59,0,0,21,0,0,7,0,0,5,0,0,5,0,0,28,0,0,7,0,0,42,0,0,158,0,0,30,0,0,3719,6,50503,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,22,34,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","PIERCE MLS",0,,3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,113,0,0,81,0,0,121,0,0,180,0,0,161,0,0,59,0,0,47,0,0,47,0,0,17,0,0,102,0,0,181,0,0,116,0,0,3721,6,50503,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,22,36,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","PITTSFORD",0,,3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,1275,0,0,941,0,0,158,0,0,47,0,0,-2,0,0,9,0,0,0,0,0,489,0,0,354,0,0,726,0,0,1999,0,0,679,0,0,3722,6,50503,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,22,38,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","SALISBURY",0,,3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,325,0,0,210,0,0,191,0,0,62,0,0,141,0,0,65,0,0,25,0,0,72,0,0,111,0,0,88,0,0,-6,0,0,303,0,0,3724,6,50503,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,22,40,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","SILVER LAKE",0,,3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,800,0,0,508,0,0,722,0,0,405,0,0,402,0,0,227,0,0,103,0,0,275,0,0,84,0,0,500,0,0,973,0,0,535,0,0,3725,6,50503,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,22,41,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","TAFTSVILLE",0,,3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,150,0,0,135,0,0,208,0,0,200,0,0,119,0,0,12,0,0,0,0,0,17,0,0,-1,0,0,55,0,0,175,0,0,162,0,0,3727,6,50503,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,22,44,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","WEYBRIDGE",0,,3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,1391,0,0,616,0,0,1819,0,0,1459,0,0,991,0,0,370,0,0,156,0,0,354,0,0,167,0,0,1042,0,0,2031,0,0,856,0,0,3728,6,50503,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,22,45,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","PETERSON",0,,3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,2522,0,0,1281,0,0,3601,0,0,3092,0,0,2335,0,0,1090,0,0,702,0,0,1605,0,0,681,0,0,2814,0,0,4021,0,0,1742,0,0,3720,6,50503,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,4,2,22,48,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","RUTLAND",0,"LIGHT OIL",3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,13,125,4525,45,327,4198,40,218,3979,19,143,3836,20,127,3709,101,381,3328,272,898,2430,277,932,1498,34,167,3475,-8,46,3429,32,195,3234,152,651,2583,3723,6,50503,"FO2","GT" 13,50,1,4,2,22,49,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","ASCUTNEY",0,"LIGHT OIL",3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,27,136,2572,77,326,2246,69,300,1946,18,96,1851,8,65,1786,41,144,1641,268,895,2175,226,765,1409,-1,38,3277,-15,0,3277,-3,71,3206,88,353,2853,3708,6,50503,"FO2","GT" 13,50,1,3,2,22,60,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","ST ALBANS",0,"LIGHT OIL",3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,-14,0,89,5,38,214,-11,4,210,-10,5,205,7,17,188,21,40,148,72,149,234,59,123,111,-1,2,110,-3,0,110,-6,0,108,9,42,236,3726,6,50503,"FO2","IC" 13,50,1,1,,22,65,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","SMITH",0,,3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,361,0,0,154,0,0,495,0,0,658,0,0,519,0,0,163,0,0,121,0,0,123,0,0,72,0,0,258,0,0,692,0,0,170,0,0,3709,6,50503,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,22,70,"CENTRAL VT PUB SERV CORP","EAST BARNET",0,,3292,"0A",1294,,350,95,595,0,0,399,0,0,900,0,0,1046,0,0,922,0,0,325,0,0,322,0,0,358,0,0,203,0,0,790,0,0,1148,0,0,702,0,0,788,6,50503,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,24,5,"CITIZENS UTILITIES CO","CHARLESTON",0,,3611,"0A",1294,,,95,339,0,0,244,0,0,393,0,0,445,0,0,409,0,0,252,0,0,154,0,0,192,0,0,90,0,0,382,0,0,461,0,0,314,0,0,3729,6,50560,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,24,10,"CITIZENS UTILITIES CO","NEWPORT",0,,3611,"0A",1294,,,95,1625,0,0,946,0,0,1961,0,0,1655,0,0,1645,0,0,917,0,0,474,0,0,1107,0,0,331,0,0,1614,0,0,2652,0,0,1235,0,0,3731,6,50560,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,3,2,24,15,"CITIZENS UTILITIES CO","NEWPORT DSL",0,"LIGHT OIL",3611,"0A",1294,,,95,0,0,377,16,33,290,0,0,259,0,0,229,0,0,206,0,0,206,0,0,206,7,12,194,8,16,177,0,0,177,0,0,137,0,0,85,3730,6,50560,"FO2","IC" 13,50,1,1,,24,20,"CITIZENS UTILITIES CO","TROY",0,,3611,"0A",1294,,,95,150,0,0,72,0,0,150,0,0,267,0,0,209,0,0,71,0,0,28,0,0,30,0,0,3,0,0,74,0,0,244,0,0,128,0,0,3733,6,50560,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,47,10,"GREEN MOUNTAIN POWER CORP","ESSEX 19",0,,7601,"0M",1294,,,95,2888,0,0,2870,0,0,4338,0,0,3931,0,0,3261,0,0,980,0,0,333,0,0,1531,0,0,936,0,0,2161,0,0,3540,0,0,2964,0,0,3737,6,51169,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,3,2,47,10,"GREEN MOUNTAIN POWER CORP","ESSEX 19",0,"LIGHT OIL",7601,"0M",1294,,,95,0,0,311,11,27,284,1,1,283,0,0,283,7,16,267,28,61,385,45,85,300,33,65,235,9,19,394,0,0,394,0,0,394,12,25,369,3737,6,51169,"FO2","IC" 13,50,1,1,,47,15,"GREEN MOUNTAIN POWER CORP","GORGE NO 18",0,,7601,"0M",1294,,,95,901,0,0,986,0,0,1573,0,0,1661,0,0,1125,0,0,122,0,0,113,0,0,692,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,6475,6,51169,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,47,20,"GREEN MOUNTAIN POWER CORP","MARSHFIELD6",0,,7601,"0M",1294,,,95,891,0,0,1188,0,0,245,0,0,107,0,0,0,0,0,3,0,0,2,0,0,54,0,0,53,0,0,604,0,0,1300,0,0,430,0,0,3739,6,51169,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,47,25,"GREEN MOUNTAIN POWER CORP","MIDDLESEX 2",0,,7601,"0M",1294,,,95,1134,0,0,848,0,0,1580,0,0,1697,0,0,1156,0,0,150,0,0,111,0,0,717,0,0,45,0,0,1158,0,0,2061,0,0,1133,0,0,3740,6,51169,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,47,40,"GREEN MOUNTAIN POWER CORP","VERGENNES 9",0,,7601,"0M",1294,,,95,972,0,0,799,0,0,1171,0,0,1224,0,0,968,0,0,441,0,0,247,0,0,499,0,0,318,0,0,590,0,0,1307,0,0,899,0,0,6519,6,51169,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,3,2,47,40,"GREEN MOUNTAIN POWER CORP","VERGENNES 9",0,"LIGHT OIL",7601,"0M",1294,,,95,15,27,282,68,118,164,15,24,319,5,8,311,4,25,465,108,264,200,174,319,417,163,302,294,20,35,437,3,2,436,2,4,432,35,62,370,6519,6,51169,"FO2","IC" 13,50,1,1,,47,53,"GREEN MOUNTAIN POWER CORP","WATRBRY 22",0,,7601,"0M",1294,,,95,2101,0,0,2029,0,0,1441,0,0,318,0,0,823,0,0,444,0,0,464,0,0,1190,0,0,485,0,0,2251,0,0,2609,0,0,1566,0,0,6520,6,51169,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,1,,47,55,"GREEN MOUNTAIN POWER CORP","W DANVIL 15",0,,7601,"0M",1294,,,95,445,0,0,146,0,0,507,0,0,509,0,0,301,0,0,77,0,0,87,0,0,220,0,0,103,0,0,544,0,0,661,0,0,151,0,0,3743,6,51169,"WAT","HY" 13,50,1,4,2,47,58,"GREEN MOUNTAIN

  13. Word Pro - S2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 Table 2.8 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Source, Fiscal Years (Trillion Btu) Fiscal Year a Coal Natural Gas b Petroleum Other Mobility Fuels f Elec- tricity Purchased Steam and Other g Total Aviation Gasoline Fuel Oil c Jet Fuel LPG d Motor Gasoline e Total 1975 .............. 77.9 166.2 22.0 376.0 707.4 5.6 63.2 1,174.2 0.0 141.5 5.1 1,565.0 1976 .............. 71.3 151.8 11.6 329.7 610.0 4.7 60.4 1,016.4 .0 139.3 4.6 1,383.4 1977 .............. 68.4 141.2 8.8 348.5 619.2 4.1 61.4

  14. 2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Commercial

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Commercial (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) Alaska Electric Light&Power Co AK Investor Owned 2,253 125,452 12,449.0 9.92 Alaska Power and Telephone Co AK Investor Owned 2,302 38,952 10,341.0 26.55 Alaska Village Elec Coop, Inc AK Cooperative 2,960 62,209 32,334.0 51.98 Anchorage Municipal Light and Power AK Municipal 6,362 879,373 113,515.6 12.91

  15. 2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) Alaska Electric Light&Power Co AK Investor Owned 16,464 399,492 41,691.0 10.44 Alaska Power and Telephone Co AK Investor Owned 7,630 63,068 17,642.0 27.97 Alaska Village Elec Coop, Inc AK Cooperative 10,829 97,874 53,522.0 54.68 Anchorage Municipal Light and Power AK Municipal 30,791 1,012,784 134,950.6 13.32

  16. NERSC Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Staff Introduction to OpenMP Programming Agenda * Basic i nforma,on - An s elec(ve i ntroduc(on t o t he p rogramming m odel. - Direc(ves f or w ork p aralleliza(on a nd s ynchroniza(on. - Some h ints o n u sage * Hands---on Lab - Wri(ng c ompiling a nd e xecu(ng s imple O penMP programs. * Presenta,on a vailable a t - module load training! - cp $EXAMPLES/NUG/Presentations/ IntroToOpenMP.pptx! Agenda * New stuff - Constructs i ntroduced i n OpenMP 3 .0 * Not t asking * Hands---on Lab What is

  17. b30.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District Chilled Water Elec- tricity Natural Gas District Chilled Water All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 3,625 3,589 17 33 64,783 56,940 54,321 1,018 2,853 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 1,841 1,838 Q Q 6,789 5,007 4,994 Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 732 727 Q Q 6,585 5,408 5,367 Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 629 618 Q Q 11,535 9,922 9,743 Q Q 25,001 to

  18. NUG Monthly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Webinar - January 2015 --- 1 --- NUG M onthly M ee-ng January 1 5, 2 015 Agenda * 2015 S ystem A vailability S chedule - E lizabeth * NUG 2 015 - F eb 2 3---26, B erkeley/Oakland * 2014 U ser S urvey - D ave T urner * NUGEX Elec-ons * Changes f or t he 2 015 A lloca-on Y ear - D ave T urner * System Updates - Edison - Z hengji Z hao/Tina D eclerck - Hopper - H elen H e * New in M yNERSC - J ack Deslippe * NERSC 2 4x7 S ervices - E lizabeth B au-sta --- 2 --- Early AY15 Maintenance * Tuesday J

  19. Comment on "Tunable generation and adsorption of energetic compounds in the vapor phase at trace levels: A tool for testing and developing sensitive and selective substrates for explosive detection"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.

    2013-02-13

    The evaluation of developed technologies and research on new detection approaches require the ability to generate explosive vapors in the gas phase. In this correspondence, the authors comment on a technical note describing a vaopr generator, discuss safety issues associated with explosives for vapor generators, and provide a concise review of vapor generators for explosive compounds. Approaches to measuring or monitoring the output of a vapor generators are also discussed.

  20. Quasiparticle dynamics across the full Brillouin zone of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ traced with ultrafast time and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dakovski, Georgi L.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Riseborough, Peter S.; Gu, Genda; Gilbertson, Steve M.; Taylor, Antoinette; Rodriguez, George

    2015-10-12

    A hallmark in the cuprate family of high-temperature superconductors is the nodal-antinodal dichotomy. In this regard, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has proven especially powerful, providing band structure information directly in energy-momentum space. Time-resolved ARPES (trARPES) holds great promise of adding ultrafast temporal information, in an attempt to identify different interaction channels in the time domain. Previous studies of the cuprates using trARPES were handicapped by the low probing energy which significantly limits the accessible momentum space. Using 20.15eV, 12 fs pulses we show for the first time the evolution of quasiparticles in the antinodal region of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and demonstrate thatmore »nonmonotonic relaxation dynamics dominates above a certain fluence threshold. The dynamics is heavily influenced by transient modification of the electron-phonon interaction and phase space restrictions, in severe contrast to the monotonic relaxation in the nodal and off-nodal regions.« less

  1. Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    He, Wei; Anderson, Roger N.

    1998-01-01

    A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management.

  2. Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    He, W.; Anderson, R.N.

    1998-08-25

    A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management. 20 figs.

  3. Quasiparticle dynamics across the full Brillouin zone of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ traced with ultrafast time and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dakovski, Georgi L.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Riseborough, Peter S.; Gu, Genda; Gilbertson, Steve M.; Taylor, Antoinette; Rodriguez, George

    2015-10-12

    A hallmark in the cuprate family of high-temperature superconductors is the nodal-antinodal dichotomy. In this regard, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has proven especially powerful, providing band structure information directly in energy-momentum space. Time-resolved ARPES (trARPES) holds great promise of adding ultrafast temporal information, in an attempt to identify different interaction channels in the time domain. Previous studies of the cuprates using trARPES were handicapped by the low probing energy which significantly limits the accessible momentum space. Using 20.15eV, 12 fs pulses we show for the first time the evolution of quasiparticles in the antinodal region of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and demonstrate thatmore » nonmonotonic relaxation dynamics dominates above a certain fluence threshold. The dynamics is heavily influenced by transient modification of the electron-phonon interaction and phase space restrictions, in severe contrast to the monotonic relaxation in the nodal and off-nodal regions.« less

  4. Simultaneous cryo x-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    attached therapeutic or diagnostic agents, help elucidate the roles of trace metals in cell development, and further the study of diseases where trace metal misregulation is...

  5. Cluster Team Saffron Amanda Bonnie Zach Fuerst

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a Lustre Cluster Team Saffron Amanda Bonnie Zach Fuerst Thomas Stitt yaaaasss (Improving and Tracing Lustre Metadata) Overview Motivation Configuration Tracing Metadata...

  6. Method for processing seismic data to identify anomalous absorption zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taner, M. Turhan

    2006-01-03

    A method is disclosed for identifying zones anomalously absorptive of seismic energy. The method includes jointly time-frequency decomposing seismic traces, low frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine a general trend of mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces, and high frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine local variations in the mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces. Anomalous zones are determined where there is difference between the general trend and the local variations.

  7. Understanding and controlling low-temperature aging of nanocrystalline materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Boyce, Brad Lee; Brons, Justin G.; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Holm, Elizabeth Ann; Padilla, Henry A.,; Sharon, John Anthony; Thompson, Gregory B.

    2013-10-01

    Nanocrystalline copper lms were created by both repetitive high-energy pulsed power, to produce material without internal nanotwins; and pulsed laser deposition, to produce nan- otwins. Samples of these lms were indented at ambient (298K) and cryogenic temperatures by immersion in liquid nitrogen (77K) and helium (4K). The indented samples were sectioned through the indented regions and imaged in a scanning electron microscope. Extensive grain growth was observed in the lms that contained nanotwins and were indented cryogenically. The lms that either lacked twins, or were indented under ambient conditions, were found to exhibit no substantial grain growth by visual inspection. Precession transmission elec- tron microscopy was used to con rm these ndings quantitatively, and show that 3 and 7 boundaries proliferate during grain growth, implying that these interface types play a key role in governing the extensive grain growth observed here. Molecular dynamics sim- ulations of the motion of individual grain boundaries demonstrate that speci c classes of boundaries - notably 3 and 7 - exhibit anti- or a-thermal migration, meaning that their mobilities either increase or do not change signi cantly with decreasing temperature. An in-situ cryogenic indentation capability was developed and implemented in a transmission electron microscope. Preliminary results do not show extensive cryogenic grain growth in indented copper lms. This discrepancy could arise from the signi cant di erences in con g- uration and loading of the specimen between the two approaches, and further research and development of this capability is needed.

  8. NREL Particle Receiver Will Enable High-Temperature CSP (Fact...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tools based on NREL's SolTrace ray-tracing model for receiver flux simula- tion, ANSYS Fluent thermal model, and mechanical simulation for service life. NREL has also built...

  9. Ravel

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-08-29

    Ravel is a tool for analyzing and visualizing parallel execution traces. It deduces a logical structure of parallel program events from the trace records and calculates comparative metrics. It displays the results of this analysis using multiple views at varying levels of detail to allow interactive exploration of the trace.

  10. Numerical Calculation of Neoclassical Distribution Functions and Current Profiles in Low Collisionality, Axisymmetric Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.C. Lyons, S.C. Jardin, and J.J. Ramos

    2012-06-28

    A new code, the Neoclassical Ion-Electron Solver (NIES), has been written to solve for stationary, axisymmetric distribution functions (f ) in the conventional banana regime for both ions and elec trons using a set of drift-kinetic equations (DKEs) with linearized Fokker-Planck-Landau collision operators. Solvability conditions on the DKEs determine the relevant non-adiabatic pieces of f (called h ). We work in a 4D phase space in which ? defines a flux surface, ? is the poloidal angle, v is the total velocity referenced to the mean flow velocity, and ? is the dimensionless magnetic moment parameter. We expand h in finite elements in both v and ?#21; . The Rosenbluth potentials, ?#8; and ?, which define the integral part of the collision operator, are expanded in Legendre series in cos ? , where #31;? is the pitch angle, Fourier series in cos #18;? , and finite elements in v . At each ? , we solve a block tridiagonal system for hi (independent of fe ), then solve another block tridiagonal system for he (dependent on fi ). We demonstrate that such a formulation can be accurately and efficiently solved. NIES is coupled to the MHD equilibrium code JSOLVER [J. DeLucia, et al., J. Comput. Phys. 37 , pp 183-204 (1980).] allowing us to work with realistic magnetic geometries. The bootstrap current is calculated as a simple moment of the distribution function. Results are benchmarked against the Sauter analytic formulas and can be used as a kinetic closure for an MHD code (e.g., M3D-C1 [S.C. Jardin, et al ., Computational Science & Discovery, 4 (2012).]).

  11. Estimating the maximum potential revenue for grid connected electricity storage : arbitrage and regulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto.

    2012-12-01

    The valuation of an electricity storage device is based on the expected future cash ow generated by the device. Two potential sources of income for an electricity storage system are energy arbitrage and participation in the frequency regulation market. Energy arbitrage refers to purchasing (stor- ing) energy when electricity prices are low, and selling (discharging) energy when electricity prices are high. Frequency regulation is an ancillary service geared towards maintaining system frequency, and is typically procured by the independent system operator in some type of market. This paper outlines the calculations required to estimate the maximum potential revenue from participating in these two activities. First, a mathematical model is presented for the state of charge as a function of the storage device parameters and the quantities of electricity purchased/sold as well as the quantities o ered into the regulation market. Using this mathematical model, we present a linear programming optimization approach to calculating the maximum potential revenue from an elec- tricity storage device. The calculation of the maximum potential revenue is critical in developing an upper bound on the value of storage, as a benchmark for evaluating potential trading strate- gies, and a tool for capital nance risk assessment. Then, we use historical California Independent System Operator (CAISO) data from 2010-2011 to evaluate the maximum potential revenue from the Tehachapi wind energy storage project, an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) energy storage demonstration project. We investigate the maximum potential revenue from two di erent scenarios: arbitrage only and arbitrage combined with the regulation market. Our analysis shows that participation in the regulation market produces four times the revenue compared to arbitrage in the CAISO market using 2010 and 2011 data. Then we evaluate several trading strategies to illustrate how they compare to the maximum potential revenue benchmark. We conclude with a sensitivity analysis with respect to key parameters.

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol and Cloud Experiments in the Eastern...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    horizontal variabilities of aerosol, trace gases, cloud, drizzle, and atmospheric thermodynamics are critically needed for understanding and quantifying the budget of MBL aerosol,...

  13. Tritium Gas Processing for Magnetic Fusion

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Conceptual Design Process Flow Diagram RAMI Value Engineering 16 Design Approach 16 ... Cleanup Storage Trace Tritium Removal Molecular Sieve Train Catalytic Reactor Permeator ...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and fluid inclusion task team. One hundred thirty (130) samples were prepared for trace element and stable isotope analysis, and six samples were submitted for strontium isotope...

  15. JC3 Incident Reporting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    history, and information that can be used to distinguish or trace an individual's identity, such as hisher name, Social Security number, date and place of birth, mother's ...

  16. Validation of TES Temperature and Water Vapor Retrievals with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The primary objective of the TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) instrument on the Aura spacecraft is the retrieval of trace gases, especially water vapor and ozone. The TES...

  17. What is Plutonium? - Fact Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    key role in today's technology. It will safely, effectively, and permanently dispose of trash contaminated with traces of plutonium and other transuranic isotopes that have no...

  18. Taking Care of our Trails

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of weather conditions, hazards, and wildlife. Please leave no trace and pack out your trash. Trail Monitoring LANL trails in the White Rock area (TAs 7071) are actively...

  19. Earned Value Management System (EVMS) Corrective Action Standard...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... procedures review, data integrity, data analysis, and data traces may identify clear ... The factual accuracy review is not a discussion of content, interpretation, or agreement; ...

  20. pftp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    features proxy timeread hfeatures sendport timewrite idle mpget tput image mpput trace lcd pappend type lfappend pget user lfget pput umask lfput put verbose ls pwd ? ftp> help...

  1. November

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    infection history, including contact tracing data for infected individuals. - 111913 John C. Hopkins Former Laboratory scientist discusses his perspective on the Cold War in...

  2. SANDIA CORPORATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the information listed below that can be used to distinguish or trace an individual's identity, is collected and maintained for the purpose of conducting official Sandia...

  3. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... This dependence is traced down to spin-orbital selection rules and the filling of electronic bands with increasing electronic concentration. In conclusion, at the optimal Co ...

  4. SANDIA CORPORATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    criminal history, date of birth or age, place of birth, mother's maiden name, race or ethnicity. Notes: One means of distinguishing or tracing an individual's identity is to...

  5. Cuttings Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Christensen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    useful DOE-funding Unknown References Odin D. Christensen, Regina A. Capuano, Joseph N. Moore (1983) Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot...

  6. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    useful DOE-funding Unknown References Odin D. Christensen, Regina A. Capuano, Joseph N. Moore (1983) Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot...

  7. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reduced Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer Version Bacon Diana H carbon...

  8. Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1 Citation Details...

  9. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1","Bacon, Diana...

  10. Superhydrophobic analyte concentration utilizing colloid-pillar...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    trace components in medicinal and the environmental sample. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a technique that can be utilized to detect molecules at very low absolute...

  11. Miniature modified Faraday cup for micro electron beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA); Elmer, John W. (Danville, CA); Palmer, Todd A. (Livermore, CA); Walton, Chris C. (Berkeley, CA)

    2008-05-27

    A micro beam Faraday cup assembly includes a refractory metal layer with an odd number of thin, radially positioned traces in this refractory metal layer. Some of the radially positioned traces are located at the edge of the micro modified Faraday cup body and some of the radially positioned traces are located in the central portion of the micro modified Faraday cup body. Each set of traces is connected to a separate data acquisition channel to form multiple independent diagnostic networks. The data obtained from the two diagnostic networks are combined and inputted into a computed tomography algorithm to reconstruct the beam shape, size, and power density distribution.

  12. Some aspects of geophagia in Wyoming bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ANIMALS; DIET; ELEMENTS; FORAGE; SELENIUM; SHEEP; SODIUM; SOILS; TRACE AMOUNTS animal nutrition; mineral licks; selenium; sodium Word Cloud More Like This Full Text Journal...

  13. DENSE MEDIA CYCLONE OPTIMIZATION (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    that compares the performance of the density traces to that of different sizes of coal particles is now complete. The experimental results show that the tracer data can...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... with predictions from recent neoclassical theory in the trace limit, nsub zZsup 2... Rotation Reversal Bifurcation and Energy Confinement Saturation in Tokamak Ohmic L -Mode ...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    livermore national laboratory (1) mathematical methods and computing (1) mathematics, ... The Stack Trace Analysis Tool (STAT), a 2011 R&D 100 Award Winner, identifies behavior ...

  16. LPG Electrical, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LPG Electrical, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: ANGWIN Electrical Address: 13833 Wellington Trace Rd. 4 Place: Wellington, Florida Zip: 33414 Sector: Services Product:...

  17. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of naturally occurring major, minor, and trace elements as indicators of sub-surface activity provides an understanding at the mineral and chemical levels of the larger processes...

  18. Linkages from DOE's Vehicle Technologies R&D in Advanced Combustion...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    report uses bibliometric analysis, supported by interview and review of documents and databases, to trace linkages from knowledge outputs resulting from DOE's advances in vehicle...

  19. Thin Silicon MEMS Contact-Stress Sensor (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    thick, has piezoresistive traces doped within a load-sensitive diaphragm. The novel package utilizes several layers of flexible polyimide to mechanically and electrically...

  20. Space Science and Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the data analysis, simulation, and modeling of the natural environment. History and demographics Our group's roots can be traced back to Project Vela, a series of satellites that...