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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Pressure-induced structural transformations of the Zintl phase sodium silicide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high-pressure behaviour of NaSi has been studied using Raman spectroscopy and angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction to observe the onset of structural phase transformations and potential oligomerisation into anionic Si nanoclusters with extended dimensionality. Our studies reveal a first structural transformation occurring at 8-10 GPa, followed by irreversible amorphisation above 15 GPa, suggesting the formation of Si-Si bonds with oxidation of the Si{sup -} species and reduction of Na{sup +} to metallic sodium. We have combined our experimental studies with DFT calculations to assist in the analysis of the structural behaviour of NaSi at high pressure. - Abstract: The high-pressure behaviour of NaSi has been studied using Raman spectroscopy and angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Our studies reveal a first structural transformation occurring at 8-10 GPa, followed by irreversible amorphisation, suggesting the formation of Si-Si bonds with oxidation of the Si{sup -} species and reduction of Na{sup +} to metallic sodium. We have combined our experimental studies with DFT calculations to assist in the analysis of the structural behaviour of NaSi at high pressure. Display Omitted

Cabrera, Raul Quesada; Salamat, Ashkan; Barkalov, Oleg I. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Chemistry Centre, Christopher Ingold Laboratories, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Leynaud, Olivier [Department of Crystallography, Birkbeck College, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom); Hutchins, Peter; Daisenberger, Dominik [Department of Chemistry and Materials Chemistry Centre, Christopher Ingold Laboratories, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Machon, Denis [Universite de Lyon, F-69000, France-Univ. Lyon 1, Laboratoire PMCN, CNRS, UMR 5586, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Sella, Andrea; Lewis, Dewi W. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Chemistry Centre, Christopher Ingold Laboratories, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); McMillan, Paul F., E-mail: p.f.mcmillan@ucl.ac.u [Department of Chemistry and Materials Chemistry Centre, Christopher Ingold Laboratories, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Pressure-Induced Structural Transformations of the Zintl Phase Sodium Silicide Ral Quesada Cabreraa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and reduction of Na+ to metallic sodium. We have combined our experimental studies with DFT calculations and germanides belong to the family of Zintl phases, in which polyanionic species, formed of the tetrelide atoms counterbalance the electropositive metal cations [1-3]. These compounds are interesting because the Si and Ge

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

3

Ceramic-silicide composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The area of ceramic-silicide composites represents a merging of structural ceramics and structural silicides. Such ceramic-silicide composites can possess the desirable characteristics of both classes of compounds. Important structural ceramics are materials such as Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, SiC, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and ZrO{sub 2}, which possess covalent, ionic, or mixed covalent-ionic atomic bonding. An important structural silicide is MoSi{sub 2}, which possesses mixed covalent-metallic bonding. The arena of ceramic-silicide composites encompasses both composites where the structural silicide is the matrix and the structural ceramic is the reinforcement, and composites where the structural ceramic is the matrix and the structural silicide is the reinforcement. In the former area, MoSi{sub 2}-SiC, MoSi{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}, and MoSi{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites are discussed. In the latter area, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-MoSi{sub 2} composites are described.

Petrovic, J.J.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Nanoscale contact engineering for Si/Silicide nanowire devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applications of metal silicides …………………………………..……1-3 1.4.Professor Yu Huang, Chair Metal silicides have been used inSummary Nanoscale metal silicides have garnered significant

Lin, Yung-Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Nanoscale contact engineering for Si/Silicide nanowire devices.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Metal silicides have been used in silicon technology as contacts to achieve high device performance and desired device functions. The growth and applications of silicide… (more)

Lin, Yung-Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Silicide/Silicon Heterointerfaces, Reaction Kinetics and Ultra-short Channel Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heights of Transition-Metal Silicides. Applied Physics a-nickel and other metal silicide phases have differentdevices, nickel and other metal silicides have been actively

Tang, Wei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Synthesis and design of silicide intermetallic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to develop structural silicide-based materials with optimum combinations of elevated temperature strength/creep resistance, low temperature fracture toughness, and high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance for applications of importance to the U.S. processing industry. A further objective is to develop silicide-based prototype industrial components. The ultimate aim of the program is to work with industry to transfer the structural silicide materials technology to the private sector in order to promote international competitiveness in the area of advanced high temperature materials and important applications in major energy-intensive U.S. processing industries.

Petrovic, J.J.; Castro, R.G.; Butt, D.P.; Park, Y.; Hollis, K.J.; Kung, H.H.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Simultaneous synthesis and densication of niobium silicide/niobium composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sintering; Self-propagating high-tempera- ture synthesis Introduction Refractory metal silicidesSimultaneous synthesis and densi®cation of niobium silicide/niobium composites E.M. Carrillo is a serious drawback. There are three silicides of niobium: Nb3Si, which is only stable between 1765°C

Paulino, Glaucio H.

9

Irradiation behavior of miniature experimental uranium silicide fuel plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium silicides, because of their relatively high uranium density, were selected as candidate dispersion fuels for the higher fuel densities required in the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program. Irradiation experience with this type of fuel, however, was limited to relatively modest fission densities in the bulk from, on the order of 7 x 10/sup 20/ cm/sup -3/, far short of the approximately 20 x 10/sup 20/ cm/sup -3/ goal established for the RERTR program. The purpose of the irradiation experiments on silicide fuels on the ORR, therefore, was to investigate the intrinsic irradiation behavior of uranium silicide as a dispersion fuel. Of particular interest was the interaction between the silicide particles and the aluminum matrix, the swelling behavior of the silicide particles, and the maximum volume fraction of silicide particles that could be contained in the aluminum matrix.

Hofman, G.L.; Neimark, L.A.; Mattas, R.F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

The Effect of Processing Parameters on the Thermoelectric Properties of Magnesium Silicide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bulk nanostructured magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) compounds,”physical metallurgy of magnesium and its alloys. Pergamonthe Thermoelectric Properties of Magnesium Silicide A Thesis

Fong, Anthony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Nanoscale contact engineering for Si/Silicide nanowire devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

metal source was assuming, the growth rate of germanide NWmetals (Fe, Co) on silicon or germanium usually form a non-magnetic dead layer, nonmagnetic silicide, germanide

Lin, Yung-Chen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Is there a future for semiconducting silicides? (invited)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Keywords: &bgr;FeSi2, Ru2Si3, electroluminescence, ion beam synthesis, semiconducting silicides, silicon-based light-emitting diode

Karen J. Reeson; Jane Sharpe; Milton Harry; Daniel Leong; Colin McKinty; Adrian Kewell; Manon Lourenço; Yan Ling Chen; G. Shao; Kevin P. Homewood

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Photoelectron Imaging Spectroscopic Investigations of Transition Metal Silicides and Oxides.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This dissertation presents the experimental progress in the use of photoelectron imaging spectroscopy to probe the electronic structure of negatively charged transition metal silicides and… (more)

Gunaratne, K. Don

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

High-Performance Thermoelectric Devices Based on Abundant Silicide...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Reports of methods to synthesize single-crystal and poly or nano- crystalline p- and n-type higher manganese silicides to reduce lattice thermal conductivity...

15

Thickness measurement of aluminum, titanium, titanium silicide, and tungsten silicide films by x-ray fluorescence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray fluorescence (XRF) has received a great deal of attention in the last few years as a quantitative means of determining both the stoichiometry and thickness of many different kinds of films. Examples include Ag and Cu films on mica substrates, Sn-Pb alloys on steel substrates, Al-Ti multilayers on Cu substrates and oxide films on silicon substrates. In XRF the sample is irradiated with x-rays which in turn cause x-rays to be given off by the sample. These x-rays that are given off by the sample can then be analyzed both for energy and intensity. The energy of the x-rays is characteristic of the elemental makeup of the sample and the intensity of the x-rays is dependent on how much of the particular element is present. The intensity then can be related to the thickness of a film if the stoichiometry of the film can be assumed constant. With the increased interest in silicides and more recently, the self-aligned silicide (salicide) process (8-10) for VLSI applications, in-line process monitoring of silicide film thickness has become important to integrated circuit manufacturing. In this study, the number of x-ray photons given of by Al, Ti, titanium silicide, and tungsten silicide films on silicon-based substrates was quantified so that a film thickness for an unknown sample could then be determined easily. In addition, XRF is a more accurate technique, limited principally by the accuracy technique, limited principally by the accuracy of the reference used and the amount of time the x-ray photons are counted.

Ernst, S.; Lee, C.O.; Lee, J.J. (Motorola, Inc., Advanced Products Research and Development Lab., Austin, TX (US))

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Carbon or boron modified titanium silicide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A titanium silicide material based on Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} intermetallic compound exhibits substantially improved oxidative stability at elevated temperatures. In particular, carbon is added to a Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} base material in an amount (e.g. about 0.3 to about 3.6 weight % C) effective to impart substantially improved oxidative stability at elevated temperatures, such as about 1000 C. Boron is added to a Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} base material in an amount (e.g. about 0.3 to about 3.3 weight % B) to this same end. 3 figs.

Thom, A.J.; Akinc, M.

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

17

IR permittivities for silicides and doped silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The complex permittivity for Pt, Pd, Ni, and Ti-silicide films as well as heavily doped p- and n-type silicon were determined by ellipsometry over the energy range 0.031 eV to 4.0 eV. Fits to the Drude model gave bulk plasma and relaxation frequencies. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and four-point probe measurements complemented the optical characterization. Calculations from measured permittivities of waveguide loss and mode confinement suggest that the considered materials are better suited for long-wavelength surface-plasmon-polariton waveguide applications than metal films.

Cleary, J. W.; Peale, R. E.; Smith, C. W.; Ishigami, M. [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Shelton, D. J.; Boreman, G. D. [College of Optics (CREOL), University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Soref, R.; Drehman, A.; Buchwald, W. R. [Sensors Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts 01731 (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Structure and epitaxy studies of cobalt silicide/silicon heterostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When considering transition metal silicides for use in integrated circuit technology, CoSi{sub 2} stands out as a silicide possessing an excellent combination of properties. However, the detrimental effects of CoSi{sub 2} pinhole formation seriously restricts the applicability of this silicide system. This study examines the structure/processing/property relationship of thin film cobalt silicide/silicon heterostructures grown on Si(111). The two primary objectives were: (1) identify the basic mechanisms associated with pinhole formation and cobalt silicide thin film growth; and (2) characterization of cobalt silicides grown by Si{sub a}/Co/Si{sub c} multilayer deposition and reaction and the effect this deposition technique has on the microstructure of cobalt silicide thin films. Interfacial pinhole formation was identified at the CoSi/Si interface and involves several active mechanisms. Epitaxial pinhole free CoSi{sub 2} films were grown by single-step annealing Si{sub a}/Co/Si{sub c} multilayer structures. Two step annealing Si{sub a}/Co/Si{sub c} multilayer thin films results in polycrystalline CoSi{sub 2}.

Zaluzec, M.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Boron modified molybdenum silicide and products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A boron-modified molybdenum silicide material is disclosed having the composition comprising about 80 to about 90 weight % Mo, about 10 to about 20 weight % Si, and about 0.1 to about 2 weight % B and a multiphase microstructure including Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} phase as at least one microstructural component effective to impart good high temperature creep resistance. The boron-modified molybdenum silicide material is fabricated into such products as electrical components, such as resistors and interconnects, that exhibit oxidation resistance to withstand high temperatures in service in air as a result of electrical power dissipation, electrical resistance heating elements that can withstand high temperatures in service in air and other oxygen-bearing atmospheres and can span greater distances than MoSi{sub 2} heating elements due to improved creep resistance, and high temperature structural members and other fabricated components that can withstand high temperatures in service in air or other oxygen-bearing atmospheres while retaining creep resistance associated with Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} for structural integrity. 7 figs.

Meyer, M.K.; Akinc, M.

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

20

Boron modified molybdenum silicide and products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A boron-modified molybdenum silicide material having the composition comprising about 80 to about 90 weight % Mo, about 10 to about 20 weight % Si, and about 0.1 to about 2 weight % B and a multiphase microstructure including Mo.sub.5 Si.sub.3 phase as at least one microstructural component effective to impart good high temperature creep resistance. The boron-modified molybdenum silicide material is fabricated into such products as electrical components, such as resistors and interconnects, that exhibit oxidation resistance to withstand high temperatures in service in air as a result of electrical power dissipation, electrical resistance heating elements that can withstand high temperatures in service in air and other oxygen-bearing atmospheres and can span greater distances than MoSi.sub.2 heating elements due to improved creep resistance, and high temperature structural members and other fabricated components that can withstand high temperatures in service in air or other oxygen-bearing atmospheres while retaining creep resistance associated with Mo.sub.5 Si.sub.3 for structural integrity.

Meyer, Mitchell K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Akinc, Mufit (Ames, IA)

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Metal silicide/poly-Si Schottky diodes for uncooled microbolometers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nickel silicide Schottky diodes formed on polycrystalline Si films are proposed as temperature sensors of monolithic uncooled microbolometer IR focal plane arrays. Structure and composition of nickel silicide/polycrystalline silicon films synthesized in a low-temperature process are examined by transmission electron microscopy. The Ni silicide has been identified as two-phase compound with the volume fraction of Ni_2Si:NiSi>~4:1. Two potential barriers (~0.74 and ~0.51 meV) are registered by photo-emf spectroscopy at 80K and attributed to Ni/Si and Ni-silicide/Si interfaces. I-V characteristics of the diodes studied at different temperatures demonstrate temperature coefficients of voltage and current to vary in absolute value from 0.3 to 0.6%/K for forward biased structures and around 2.5%/K for reverse biased ones.

Chizh, K V; Kalinushkin, V P; Resnik, V Ya; Storozhevykh, M S; Yuryev, V A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Application of Pd silicide in the process of silicon detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new technology called a self-aligned metal-silicide process is described in the fabrication of silicon detectors. It has been found that this technology improves both detector yield and leakage current. The use of a metal silicide also gives a lower contact resistance and, depending on the thermal process, a controllable junction depth, which may be essential in the integration of detectors and their electronics. 15 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

Li, Zheng; Chen, Wei; Kraner, H.W.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Application of Pd silicide in the process of silicon detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new technology called a self-aligned metal-silicide process is described in the fabrication of silicon detectors. It has been found that this technology improves both detector yield and leakage current. The use of a metal silicide also gives a lower contact resistance and, depending on the thermal process, a controllable junction depth, which may be essential in the integration of detectors and their electronics.

Li, Z.; Chen, W.; Kraner, H.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

In Situ, Real-Time Characterization of Silicide Nanostructure Coarsening Dynamics by Photo-Electron Emission Microscopy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Photo-electron emission microscopy (PEEM) was used to observe the growth and coarsening dynamics of transition metal (TM) silicide and rare earth (RE) silicide nanostructures on… (more)

Zeman, Matthew Casimir

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

E-Print Network 3.0 - americium silicides Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

behavior of Ti implanted into SiO2. However, the silicide gate leads to the occurrence of heavy... films of 50 and 90 nm in 0 2 silicide gates were prepared by e-gun coevaporation...

26

Metallic to insulating transition in disordered pulsed laser deposited silicide thin films.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A metal-to-insulating transition has been observed in iron, iron oxide, iron silicide and cobalt silicide thin films when deposited on Si substrate with a native… (more)

Abou Mourad, Houssam

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Unidirectional Pt silicide nanowires grown on vicinal Si,,100... Do Kyung Lim,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this limitation, we focused on noble metal silicide NWs be- cause noble metals rarely form insulating metal oxideUnidirectional Pt silicide nanowires grown on vicinal Si,,100... Do Kyung Lim,1 Sung-Soo Bae,1. In particular, rare-earth silicide NWs on silicon surfaces have attracted in- terest as candidate nanostructures

Kim, Sehun

28

Surface Science 419 (1999) 134143 Morphology of ultrathin manganese silicide on Si(111)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

after room temperature deposition. Mn adsorption and silicide formation of some noble metal precovered epitaxially on Si(111) epitaxial growth of noble metal silicides or refrac- by RHEED (reflection-high-energy electron tory metal silicides have attracted much interest diffraction) and STM (scanning tunneling micro

Hasegawa, Shuji

29

Self-assembly of silicide quantum dot arrays on stepped silicon surfaces by reactive epitaxy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigated on the epitaxy and self- organization of laterally nanostructured transition metal TM silicideSelf-assembly of silicide quantum dot arrays on stepped silicon surfaces by reactive epitaxy L to be a flexible and a convenient method for the preparation of dense arrays of Co silicide quantum dots

Ortega, Enrique

30

High Current Effects in Silicide Films for Sub-0.25 pm VLSI Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the increased use of silicided metalization schemes for low-resistivity gates, interconnections and contacts between the metal and Si. Currently, self aligned silicide (salicide) processes are widely usedHigh Current Effects in Silicide Films for Sub-0.25 pm VLSI Technologies Kaustav Banerjee

31

Low resistivity of Pt silicide nanowires measured using double-scanning-probe tunneling microscope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experimentally shown to be conductive.8­10 However, RE metal silicide NWs are easily oxidized, so that inert NWs similarly to RE metal silicide NWs.11 It is essential to study the electrical properties, especiallyLow resistivity of Pt silicide nanowires measured using double-scanning- probe tunneling microscope

Kim, Sehun

32

Surface application of molybdenum silicide onto gated poly-Si emitters for enhanced field emission performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the merits of molybdenum Mo silicide formation on gated polycrystalline silicon poly-Si field emitters. Metal, any metal silicide can be adopted without reSurface application of molybdenum silicide onto gated poly-Si emitters for enhanced field emission

Lee, Jong Duk

33

Formation of Nickel Silicide from Direct-Liquid-Injection Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Nickel Nitride Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Published April 28, 2010. Metal silicides such as TiSi2 and CoSi2 have been commonly used as the contactsFormation of Nickel Silicide from Direct-Liquid-Injection Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Nickel Nitride as the intermediate for subsequent conversion into nickel silicide NiSi , which is a key material for source, drain

34

Reflectivity and electronic structures of Ni-silicides A. Humbert and A. Cros  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.65 - 71.20 Metal silicides have interesting applications in devices technologies [1]. Considerable impetus is that the metal silicides have well defined stoichiometry and crystallography, so that the influence of Si incorporation in the metal matrix can be precisely monitored. Moreover the increased applications of silicide

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

35

Epitaxial silicide formation on recoil-implanted substrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An epitaxy-on-recoil-implanted-substrate (ERIS) technique is presented. A disordered surface layer, generated by forward recoil implantation of {approx}0.7-3x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} of oxygen during Ar plasma etching of surface oxide, is shown to facilitate the subsequent epitaxial growth of {approx}25-35-nm-thick CoSi{sub 2} layers on Si(100). The dependence of the epitaxial fraction of the silicide on the recoil-implantation parameters is studied in detail. A reduction in the silicide reaction rate due to recoil-implanted oxygen is shown to be responsible for the observed epitaxial formation, similar to mechanisms previously observed for interlayer-mediated growth techniques. Oxygen is found to remain inside the fully reacted CoSi{sub 2} layer, likely in the form of oxide precipitates. The presence of these oxide precipitates, with only a minor effect on the sheet resistance of the silicide layer, has a surprisingly beneficial effect on the thermal stability of the silicide layers. The agglomeration of ERIS-grown silicide layers on polycrystalline Si is significantly suppressed, likely from a reduced diffusivity due to oxygen in the grain boundaries. The implications of the present technique for the processing of deep submicron devices are discussed.

Hashimoto, Shin; Egashira, Kyoko; Tanaka, Tomoya; Etoh, Ryuji; Hata, Yoshifumi; Tung, R. T. [Corporate Manufacturing and Development Division, Semiconductor Company, Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., Kyoto 617-8520 (Japan); Department of Physics, Brooklyn College, City University of New York, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States)

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Hafnium silicide formation on Si(100) upon annealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High dielectric constant materials, such as HfO{sub 2}, have been extensively studied as alternatives to SiO{sub 2} in new generations of Si based devices. Hf silicate/silicide formation has been reported in almost all literature studies of Hf based oxides on Si, using different methods of preparation. A silicate interface resembles close to the traditional Si/SiO{sub 2}. The silicate very likely forms a very sharp interface between the Si substrate and the metal oxide, and would be suitable for device applications. However, the thermal instability of the interfacial silicate/oxide film leads to silicidation, causing a dramatic loss of the gate oxide integrity. Despite the importance of the Hf silicide surface and interface with Si, only a few studies of this surface are present in the literature, and a structural determination of the surface has not been reported. This paper reports a study of the Hf silicide formation upon annealing by using a combination of XPS, LEED, and x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) analyses. Our results clearly indicate the formation of a unique ordered Hf silicide phase (HfSi{sub 2}), which starts to crystallize when the annealing temperature is higher than 550 deg. C.

Siervo, A. de [Experimentelle Physik 1, Universitaet Dortmund, Otto-Hahn-Str. 4, D 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, Caixa Postal 6192, 13084-971, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Fluechter, C. R.; Weier, D.; Schuermann, M.; Dreiner, S.; Westphal, C. [Experimentelle Physik 1, Universitaet Dortmund, Otto-Hahn-Str. 4, D 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Carazzolle, M. F.; Pancotti, A.; Landers, R.; Kleiman, G. G. [Instituto de Fisica 'Gleb Wataghin', Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Caixa Postal 6165, 13083-970, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Cavity ringdown laser absorption spectroscopy and time-of-flight mass spectroscopy of jet-cooled gold silicides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bonding trends for the three coinage metal silicide diatoms. © 1995 American Institute of Physics. I. INTRODUCTION As is the case for the other coinage metal silicides, cur- rent research on gold­silicides has-cooled gold silicides J. J. Scherer,a) J. B. Paul, C. P. Collier, A. O'Keefe,b) and R. J. Saykally Department

Cohen, Ronald C.

38

Oxidation resistance of composite silicide coatings on niobium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the oxidation of NbSi/sub 2/-MoSi/sub 2/ composite silicide coatings produced by diffusive siliconizing of molybdenum films on a niobium surface. Molybdenum-coated niobium was siliconized and an x-ray microspectral analysis of the composite silicide coating showed the phase composition to be an ca 80-um-thick outer molybdenum disilicide film with a characteristic coarsely crystalline columnar structure, and inner ca 20-um film of niobium disilicide consisting of the tiny columnar crystals, and a substrate/coating interface comprising a thin, 2-3 um film of lower silicide, i.e., Nb/sub 5/Si/sub 3/. The average grain sizes, unit cell parameters, and x-ray determined densities of the Mo films obtained by various methods are shown.

Gloshko, P.I.; Kurtsev, N.F.; Lisichenko, V.I.; Nadtoka, V.N.; Petrenko, M.I.; Zmii, V.I.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Sequential-ion-implantation synthesis of ternary metal silicides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By implanting two different metals in sequence into Si(100), we find that new ternary silicides can by synthesized with simple binary silicide structures. The synthesis of CoSi[sub 2]-type (Co,Fe)Si[sub 2], and CoSi-type (Co,Fe)Si and (Fe,Ni)Si is demonstrated. The structure is largely determined by the first implanted metal and the total dose of the two metals, allowing one to design the structure of the ternary silicide. The two implanted species occupy equivalent positions in the same structure and the metal composition may be continuously varied in a given structure. This opens new possibilities for the synthesis of ternary and multinary compounds and alloys.

Tan, Z. (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)); Namavar, F. (Spire Corporation, Bedford, Massachusetts 01730-2396 (United States)); Heald, S.M. (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)); Budnick, J.I. (Physics Department and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-3046 (United States))

1993-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

40

Oxidation of boron silicide and materials based on it  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boron silicide and compounds based on its containing titanium, chromium, nickel, and yttrium and scandium oxides are studied for their oxidation in air from room temperature to 1300{degrees}C. It is shown that chromium boride markedly improves the heat resistance of B{sub 4}Si over a wide temperature range (700-1300{degrees}C) probably as a result chromium-oxide dissolution in borosilicate glass and alteration of its structure. A favorable effect of yttrium and scandium oxides as well of nickel silicide appears at above 1000{degrees}C as a result of forming complex oxide compounds in the scale.

Golovko, E.I.; Makarenko, G.N.; Voitovich, R.F.; Fedorus, V.B. [Institute of Materials Science, Kiev (Russian Federation)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Template structure at the silicon/amorphous-silicide interface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface x-ray diffraction was used to monitor the reaction of Ni on Si(111) at room temperature. Intensity oscillations during deposition signify that a layerwise reaction occurs for the first 30 A of metal deposited, forming a silicide overlayer with stoichiometry Ni{sub 2}Si. Structural analysis of the interfacial layers detects an epitaxial and commensurate phase, Ni{sub 2}Si-{theta}, with long range order imposed by the substrate but with very large local atomic displacements. This epitaxial structure remains at the interface as amorphous silicide forms above it.

Bennett, P.A.; Lee, M.Y.; Yang, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Arizona State University, Box 871504, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Arizona State University, Box 871504, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504 (United States); Schuster, R.; Eng, P.J.; Robinson, I.K. [Physics Department, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

1995-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

42

Electronic properties of semiconducting silicides: fundamentals and recent predictions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review emphasizes progress in theoretical simulation and experiments that have been performed in the past years for semiconducting silicides. New fundamental electronic and optical properties of Ca2Si and BaSi2, recently found RuSi2 phase, ternaries in Fe–Os–Si and Ru–Os–Si systems, ?-FeSi2, Mg2Si and CrSi2 with stretched and compressed lattices as well as transport properties of ?-FeSi2, ReSi1.75, Ru2Si3 are presented. Prospects for practical applications of semiconducting silicides are discussed.

L.I Ivanenko; V.L Shaposhnikov; A.B Filonov; A.V Krivosheeva; V.E Borisenko; D.B Migas; L Miglio; G Behr; J Schumann

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Silicide Schottky Contacts to Silicon: Screened Pinning at Defect Levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicide Schottky contacts can be as large as 0.955 eV (E{sub v} + 0.165 eV) on n-type silicon and as large as 1.05 eV (E{sub c} {minus} 0.07 eV) on p-type silicon. Current models of Schottky barrier formation do not provide a satisfactory explanation of occurrence of this wide variation. A model for understanding Schottky contacts via screened pinning at defect levels is presented. In the present paper it is shown that most transition metal silicides are pinned approximately 0.48 eV above the valence band by interstitial Si clusters. Rare earth disilicides pin close to the divacancy acceptor level 0.41 eV below the conduction band edge while high work function silicides of Ir and Pt pin close to the divacancy donor level 0.21 eV above the valence band edge. Selection of a particular defect pinning level depends strongly on the relative positions of the silicide work function and the defect energy level on an absolute energy scale.

Drummond, T.J.

1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

44

Analysis of Nickel Silicides by SIMS and LEAP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ni-silicides formed by a variety of processing techniques were studied with secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and local electrode atom probe (LEAP registered ) analysis. SIMS provided 1-D chemical analysis over an approximately 60 micron diameter area. LEAP provided 3-D atom identities and locations over an approximately 100-150 nm diameter area. It was determined that the 200 deg. C drive-in anneal results in a Ni{sub 3}Si{sub 2} phase, which is converted to NiSi at temperatures between 360 deg. C-400 deg. C. LEAP detects no As or Pt segregation after the 200 deg. C drive-in anneal, but did quantify As segregation of up to 7% of the material composition just inside the NiSi-Si interface after the phase-formation anneal. The presence of oxygen at the interface results in a silicide chemical surface roughness of up to 3.5 nm as compared to 0.5 nm with a clean, non-oxidized surface. Silicide stability was demonstrated over the phase-formation-temperature range of 360 deg. C - 400 deg. C including when a second rapid thermal anneal step was used. LEAP analysis was also able to quantify the surface roughness of the interface as a function of anneal temperature and the non-uniform Pt and As distribution across the silicide surface as viewed in 2-D surface projection.

Ronsheim, Paul; McMurray, Jeff; Flaitz, Philip; Parks, Christopher [IBM, STSM--Process/Materials Characterization, Hopewell Junction, NY 12533 (United States); Thompson, Keith; Larson, David; Kelly, Thomas F. [Imago Scientific Instruments Corporation, 5500 Nobel Drive, Madison, WI 53711 (United States)

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

45

High-Performance Thermoelectric Devices Based on Abundant Silicide Materials for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Reports of methods to synthesize single-crystal and poly or nano- crystalline p- and n-type higher manganese silicides to reduce lattice thermal conductivity

46

Silicide-matrix materials for high-temperature applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intermetallic-matrix composites are attractive alternatives to carbon/carbon and ceramic/ceramic composities for applications up to 1,600 C. Recent work on the intermetallic compounds MoSi2 and Ti5Si3 has included determination of their mechanical properties and deformation behavior, selection of thermodynamically compatible high-strength and ductile reinforcements, and strengthening and toughening mechanisms in silicide-matrix composites for high-temperature service. 11 refs.

Meschter, P.J.; Schwartz, D.S. (McDonnell Douglas Research Laboratories, Saint Louis, MO (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Formation of Cobalt Silicide Films by Ion Beam Deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin films of cobalt silicide are widely used as metallization in very large-scale integrated electronic circuits. In this study, Co ions were deposited on Si (111) wafers by a high beam current filter metal vacuum arc deposition (FMEVAD) system. Surface silicide films were formed after annealing from 500 to 700 C for 30 minutes. Cobalt depth profiles and contaminations were determined using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and time-of-flight energy elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF-E ERDA). The polycrystalline cobalt silicide phases formed were characterized by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD). The surface topography development and interfaces have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that a thin CoSi2 surface layer with both a smooth surface topography and sharp interface can be achieved by annealing at 700 C. The CoSi phase and O contamination were observed in the samples that were annealed at lower temperatures.

Zhang, Yanwen; McCready, David E.; Wang, Chong M.; Young, James S.; Mckinley, Mathew I.; Whitlow, Harry J.; Razpet, Alenka; Possnert, Göran; Zhang, Tonghe; Wu, Yuguang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Processing, Microstructure, and Properties of Multiphase Mo Silicide Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiphase Mo silicide alloys containing T2 (Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}), Mo{sub 3}Si and Mo phases where prepared by both melting and casting (M and C) and powder metallurgical (PM) processes. Glassy phases are observed in PM materials but not in M and C materials. Microstructural studies indicate that the primary phase is Mo-rich solid solution in alloys containing {le}(9.4Si+13.8B, at. %) and T2 in alloys with {ge}(9.8Si+14.6B). An eutectic composition is estimated to be close to Mo-9.6Si-14.2B. The mechanical properties of multiphase silicide alloys were determined by hardness, tensile and bending tests at room temperature. The multiphase alloy MSB-18 (Mo-9.4Si-13.8B) possesses a flexure strength distinctly higher than that of MoSi{sub 2} and other Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} silicide alloys containing no Mo particles. Also, MSB-18 is tougher than MoSi{sub 2} by a factor of 4.

Heatherly, L.; Liu, C.T.; Schneibel, J.H.

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

49

Structural observation of Pd silicide islands on Si (111) surfaces with UHV-TEM/STM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......silicide islands on Si (111) surfaces with UHV-TEMSTM Miyoko Tanaka Masaki Takeguchi...microscopyscanning tunnelling microscopy (UHV-TEMSTM) combined system to clarify the...silicide islands on Si (111) surfaces with UHV-TEM/STM Miyoko Tanaka * , Masaki Takeguchi......

Miyoko Tanaka; Masaki Takeguchi; Hidehiro Yasuda; Kazuo Furuya

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Photoemission study of the Si(111)/Gd interface: A comparison with the bulk silicides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synchrotron-radiation photoemission data from the Si(111)/Gd interface (Si 2p/Gd 4 f core levels and valence states) are compared with those from all of the silicides in the Si--Gd phase diagram (Gd/sub 3/Si/sub 5/, GdSi, Gd/sub 5/Si/sub 3/) measured in strictly comparable conditions. It is shown that the first silicide-like reaction product is formed for a Gd coverage of about 2 monolayers and that this interface silicide-like product is correlated with GdSi. These results are also discussed in connection with the Si(111)/Yb interface where the same experimental approach shows a correlation between the first silicide-like interface product and the metal-rich silicide.

Puppin, E.; Nogami, J.; Carbone, C.; Shen, Z.X.; Lindau, I.; Pate, B.B.; Abbati, I.; Braicovich, L.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Elemental composition of nickel silicide layers using thermal and fast neutrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal silicides are important contact materials used in the manufacture of semiconductor devices. The presence of impurities has been observed to alter or control the formation of the silicide during fabrication and to influence critically the thermal and electrical performance characteristics of the metal-semiconductor interface. The purpose of this investigation has been to use neutron activation analysis (NAAA), relying on both thermal and fast neutrons, to determine relative concentrations of nickel and impurity elements in nickel silicide/silicon systems. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

McGuire, S.C.; Wong, K.; Silcox, J. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Process for stabilization of titanium silicide particulates within titanium aluminide containing metal matrix composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a method for forming a final composite material comprising titanium silicide particles within a titanium aluminide containing matrix. It comprises: contacting titanium, silicon and aluminum at a temperature sufficient to initiate a reaction between the titanium and silicon to thereby form a first composite comprising titanium silicide particles dispersed within an aluminum matrix; admixing the first composite with titanium and zirconium to form a mixture; heating the mixture to a temperature sufficient to convert at least a portion of the aluminum matrix to titanium aluminide; and recovering a final composite material comprising titanium silicide particles dispersed within a titanium aluminide containing matrix.

Christodoulou, L.; Williams, J.C.; Riley, M.A.

1990-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

53

Electrical characterization of metal-to-insulator transition in iron silicide thin films on sillicone substrates.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Iron Silicide (FeSi) films deposited on silicon substrates with the native SiO2 layer have shown a Metal-to-Insulator Transition (MIT) of more than four order of… (more)

Weerasinghe, Hasitha C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Measuring Low Dimensional Schottky Barriers of Rare Earth Silicide-Silicon Interfaces.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The focus of this study is the measurement of low dimensional Schottky barrier heights of metal silicide-silicon interfaces and the challenges of current-voltage (I/V) curve… (more)

Vick, Andrew J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Effects of temperature dependent pre-amorphization implantation on NiPt silicide formation and thermal stability on Si(100)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using temperature controlled Si and C ion implantation, we studied the effects of pre-amorphization implantation on NiPt alloy silicide phase formation. In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction and resistance measurements were used to monitor phase and morphology evolution in silicide films. Results show that substrate amorphization strongly modulate the nucleation of silicide phases, regardless of implant species. However, morphological stability of the thin films is mainly enhanced by C addition, independently of the amorphization depth.

Ozcan, Ahmet S.; Wall, Donald [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center, 2070 Route 52, Hopewell Junction, New York 12533 (United States)] [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center, 2070 Route 52, Hopewell Junction, New York 12533 (United States); Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Lavoie, Christian [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)] [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

56

Control of silicidation in HfO2/Si,,100... interfaces Deok-Yong Cho, Kee-Shik Park, B.-H. Choi,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

like nitrogen.6,7 Among these, Hf-silicide is probably most detrimental since it is metallic and degrades the capacitor performance. Metal- lic Hf-silicide formation has been reported in the interfaceControl of silicidation in HfO2/Si,,100... interfaces Deok-Yong Cho, Kee-Shik Park, B.-H. Choi

Oh, Se-Jung

57

Slow positron annihilation spectroscopy and electron microscopy of electron beam evaporated cobalt and nickel silicides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal silicide thin films on single-crystal silicon substrates are the subject of much research, due to their applications as electrical contacts and interconnects, diffusion barriers, low resistance gates, and field-assisted positron moderators, among others. Defects within the silicide layer and/or at the silicide/silicon interface are detrimental to device performance, since they can act as traps for charge carriers, as well as positrons. Pinholes penetrating the film are another detriment particularly for cobalt silicide films, since they allow electrons to permeate the film, rather than travel ballistically, in addition to greatly increasing surface area for recombination events. A series of epitaxial cobalt and nickel silicide thin films, deposited via electron-beam evaporation and annealed at various temperatures, have been grown on single-crystal silicon (111) substrates, in an effort to establish a relationship between deposition and processing parameters and film quality. The films have been analyzed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, sputter depth profile Auger, and slow positron annihilation spectroscopy. The latter has been shown to both correlate and complement the traditional electron microscopy results.

Frost, R.L.; DeWald, A.B. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (USA)); Zaluzec, M.; Rigsbee, J.M. (University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (USA)); Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G. (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Effect of Pt addition on Ni silicide formation at low temperature: Growth, redistribution, and solubility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of Ni silicide during the reaction between Ni(5% Pt) and a Si(100) substrate has been analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), in situ x-ray diffraction (XRD), cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and {sup 4}He{sup +} Rutherford backscattering. The DSC measurements show evidence of the Ni{sub 2}Si nucleation followed by lateral growth formation. In situ XRD and TEM have been used to investigate the sequence of formation of the silicides. These experiments show that the formations of Ni{sub 2}Si and NiSi occur simultaneously in the presence of the Pt alloy. The redistribution of platinum at different stages of the Ni silicide growth has been determined. We have estimated the solubility limit of platinum (1 at. % at 573 K) in the Ni{sub 2}Si phase by extrapolation from a measured value at 1073 K. This redistribution is explained in terms of the solubility limits and the diffusion of Pt in the Ni{sub 2}Si and NiSi phases. Pt is more likely to reside at the silicide grain boundaries and the interfaces where it can slow down the silicide growth kinetics.

Hoummada, K.; Perrin-Pellegrino, C.; Mangelinck, D. [Aix-Marseille Universite, IM2NP, Campus de Saint-Jerome, Avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen-Case 142, F-13397 Marseille Cedex (France); CNRS, IM2NP (UMR 6242), Case 142, Faculte de Saint-Jerome, F-13397 Marseille Cedex (France)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Role of step roughening in the formation of Ce silicide H.G. Lee a,b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Role of step roughening in the formation of Ce silicide on Si(111) H.G. Lee a,b , D. Lee a , S. Kim, and then diffuse toward the step edges whilst forming a more stable Ce silicide. The step roughening at the step at the same temperature. Ã? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Step roughening; STM; XPS

Kim, Sehun

60

Exploitation of a Self-limiting Process for Reproducible Formation of Ultrathin Ni(1-x)Pt(x) Silicide Films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This letter reports on a process scheme to obtain highly reproducible Ni{sub 1-x}Pt{sub x} silicide films of 3-6 nm thickness formed on a Si(100) substrate. Such ultrathin silicide films are readily attained by sputter deposition of metal films, metal stripping in wet chemicals, and final silicidation by rapid thermal processing. This process sequence warrants an invariant amount of metal intermixed with Si in the substrate surface region independent of the initial metal thickness, thereby leading to a self-limiting formation of ultrathin silicide films. The crystallographic structure, thickness, uniformity, and morphological stability of the final silicide films depend sensitively on the initial Pt fraction.

Z Zhang; B Yang; Y Zhu; S Gaudet; S Rossnagel; A Kellock; A Ozcan; C Murray; P Desjardins; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Thermoelectric figure of merit of silicide two-dimensional quantum wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The calculation was made to estimate thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT, of quantum well structured films made of Transition Metal (TM) silicide, alloys of silicon and germanium, etc. 1-dimensional quantum confinement of charge carrier with quantum well structure were assumed in the calculation model. Transport properties parallel to the layer were estimated as a function of well width. Full account was made of Fermi statistics, and thermal conduction in the barrier layer was taken into account. Results of the calculation indicate that moderate increase in ZT is possible in modulated doping superlattice structure of TM silicides. But ZT decreases with decreasing well width in combinations of silicon and TM silicides. This is due to the larger thermal conductivity of silicon used as a barrier material.

Yamamoto, Z.; Ohta, T. [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

62

Method for forming metallic silicide films on silicon substrates by ion beam deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes metallic silicide films formed on silicon substrates by contacting the substrates with a low-energy ion beam of metal ions while moderately heating the substrate. The heating of the substrate provides for the diffusion of silicon atoms through the film as it is being formed to the surface of the film for interaction with the metal ions as they contact the diffused silicon. The metallic silicide films provided by the invention are contaminant free, of uniform stoichiometry, large grain size, and exhibit low resistivity values which are of particular usefulness for integrated circuit production.

Zuhr, R.A.; Holland, O.W.

1990-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

Method for forming metallic silicide films on silicon substrates by ion beam deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Metallic silicide films are formed on silicon substrates by contacting the substrates with a low-energy ion beam of metal ions while moderately heating the substrate. The heating of the substrate provides for the diffusion of silicon atoms through the film as it is being formed to the surface of the film for interaction with the metal ions as they contact the diffused silicon. The metallic silicide films provided by the present invention are contaminant free, of uniform stoichiometry, large grain size, and exhibit low resistivity values which are of particular usefulness for integrated circuit production.

Zuhr, Raymond A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Holland, Orin W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Progress in alkaline peroxide dissolution of low-enriched uranium metal and silicide targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports recent progress on two alkaline peroxide dissolution processes: the dissolution of low-enriched uranium metal and silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) targets. These processes are being developed to substitute low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in targets used for production of fission-product {sup 99}Mo. Issues that are addressed include (1) dissolution kinetics of silicide targets, (2) {sup 99}Mo lost during aluminum dissolution, (3) modeling of hydrogen peroxide consumption, (4) optimization of the uranium foil dissolution process, and (5) selection of uranium foil barrier materials. Future work associated with these two processes is also briefly discussed.

Chen, L.; Dong, D.; Buchholz, B.A.; Vandegrift, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Wu, D. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Method for forming metallic silicide films on silicon substrates by ion beam deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic silicide films are formed on silicon substrates by contacting the substrates with a low-energy ion beam of metal ions while moderately heating the substrate. The heating of the substrate provides for the diffusion of silicon atoms through the film as it is being formed to the surface of the film for interaction with the metal ions as they contact the diffused silicon. The metallic silicide films provided by the present invention are contaminant free, of uniform stoichiometry, large grain size, and exhibit low resistivity values which are of particular usefulness for integrated circuit production.

Zuhr, R.A.; Holland, O.W.

1989-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

66

Endohedral silicon nanotubes as thinnest silicide wires Traian Dumitric, Ming Hua, and Boris I. Yakobson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Endohedral silicon nanotubes as thinnest silicide wires Traian Dumitric, Ming Hua, and Boris I are stabilized by the axially placed metal atoms, to form nearly one-dimensional structures with substantial cohesive energy, mechanical stiffness, and metallic density of electronic states. Their further recon

Dumitrica,Traian

67

High-temperature stress measurement on chemical-vapor-deposited tungsten silicide and tungsten films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stresses in chemical-vapor-deposited tungsten silicide and tungsten films at high temperatures were measured. Tungsten silicide films were formed from WF/sub 6/ and SiH/sub 4/ or Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/. Tungsten films were formed from WF/sub 6/ and H/sub 2/. The stress in tungsten silicide films is tensile and in the order of 10/sup 9/--10/sup 10/ dynes/cm/sup 2/. For a composition ratio of Si/Wless than or equal to2.6, the stress of a film of more than 1000 A has a maximum at about 500 /sup 0/C. On the other hand, for a composition Si/W>2.9, the stress has no maximum. The maximum of the stress is caused by crystallization of the film. The stress has two components. One component is related to the difference of the thermal expansion coefficients between the film and the Si substrate. Another is related to the film crystallization. It was found that the stress concentrates in the portion of the film nearest the substrate. The stress in tungsten films also reaches a maximum at 550 /sup 0/C, similar to the tungsten silicide films. However, the cause of this behavior is not clear.

Shioya, Y.; Ikegami, K.; Maeda, M.; Yanagida, K.

1987-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Transition-metal silicides as materials for magnet-semiconductor heterostructures*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transition-metal silicides as materials for magnet-semiconductor heterostructures* Peter Kratzer as of binary late transition metal monosilicides, in contact with the Si surface. For the Heusler alloy Co2MnSi, we could show that the 001 surface retains the half-metallic character of the bulk if a fully Mn

69

"Ceramics and high-temperature composites, silicides" Oxidation of Stainless Steel Powder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Powder, stainless steel, oxidation INTRODUCTION Ceramic matrix composites dispersed with metal particles"Ceramics and high-temperature composites, silicides" CHTC9 Oxidation of Stainless Steel Powder. To understand the corrosion behavior of a model 304L(p)-ZrO2(s) composite, a 304L stainless steel powder has

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

70

Recycling of sodium waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling of sodium waste ... Methods for handling and recycling a dangerous and costly chemical. ...

Bettina Hubler-Blank; Michael Witt; Herbert W. Roesky

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

The effect of oxygen in the Si substrate on Mo, W, Ti, and Co silicide growth by infrared laser heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study of the effect of implanted oxygen in the Si substrate was accomplished using an IR heating method and a combination of different materials analysis techniques. Principally, Auger electron spectroscopy combined with depth profiling was implemented to investigate the composition of the reacted metal-Si systems as well as the relative movement of the oxygen during silicide formation. The authors systematic study of these four metal-Si systems yielded some interesting results. First, for the three metals Mo, W, and Ti, we observed basically inhibited metal-Si reactions at laser processing conditions that yielded completely reacted metal silicides without implanted oxygen. Second, the evolution from inhibited reactions through partial, metal-rich silicides and finally to completely reacted metal silicide formation at high temperatures was observed and characterized. Last, a distinctly response to the presence of oxygen was observed for the Ti samples as compared to the Mo and W samples.

Lee, H.S.; Wolga, G.J. (School of Electrical Engineering, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (US))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Silicide precipitation in a {gamma}-based Ti-47Al-2W-0.5Si alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although some work on microstructure of silicides in {gamma}-TiAl alloys has been done, it is restricted to the alloys containing high content of silicon ({approximately}3at.%). Furthermore, to the authors` knowledge, the crystal orientation relation between silicide and {beta} matrix that is stabilized to room temperature in the alloys containing transition elements (such as Nb, V, W, Cr), has not been reported yet. The present investigation was undertaken /to study the silicides in a {gamma}-TiAl base alloy with 2 at.% W addition containing 0.28--0.59 at.% Si after different heat treatments, to understand the effects of silicon content and heat treatment on the formation and morphology of silicides.

Yin, W.M. [CNR-ITM, Cinisello Balsamo (Italy)] [CNR-ITM, Cinisello Balsamo (Italy); [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang (China). Inst. of Metal Research; Lupinc, V. [CNR-ITM, Cinisello Balsamo (Italy)] [CNR-ITM, Cinisello Balsamo (Italy)

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Growth, structure and electrical properties of epitaxial thulium silicide thin films on silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thulium silicide thin films were grown on (100) and (111) Si by evaporation of Tm metal and Si layers and annealing in a vacuum. Electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction results showed that the TmSi{sub 2{minus}x} layers are of high crystalline quality grown epitaxially on Si. Electrical resistivity measurements showed that TmSi{sub 2{minus}x} layers are metallic exhibiting magnetic ordering below 3 K. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Travlos, A.; Salamouras, N.; Boukos, N. [Institute of Materials Science, National Centre for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens, (Greece) 15310] [Institute of Materials Science, National Centre for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens, (Greece) 15310

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Self-assembled rare-earth silicide nanowires on Si(001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents scanning tunneling microscope images of several rare-earth metal silicides grown on silicon (001). For certain of the metals studied (Dy, Ho), an anisotropy in lattice match with the substrate results in the formation of nanowires. These nanowires have desirable properties such as nanometer lateral dimension, crystalline structure with a low density of defects, and micrometer scale length. Tunneling spectroscopy on the nanowires indicates that they are metallic.

Nogami, J.; Liu, B. Z.; Katkov, M. V.; Ohbuchi, C.; Birge, Norman O.

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

In situ Study of the Formation of Silicide Phases in Amorphous Ni-Si Mixed Layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigated Ni silicide phase formation when Si is added within an as deposited 50 nm Ni film. A series of 22 samples with a Si content varying from 0 to 50 at.% was prepared and systematically investigated with in situ x-ray diffraction. The inert oxide substrate was used to identify the phases which first crystallize in an amorphous Ni-Si mixture of a given concentration. The noncongruent silicides Ni{sub 3}Si and Ni{sub 3}Si{sub 2} are never observed to crystallize readily out of the mixture. A remarkable observation is the initial crystallization at low temperature of a hexagonal Ni-silicide, observed over a broad mixed layer composition [35-49%Si]; this hexagonal phase nucleates readily as a single phase [39-47%Si] or together with Ni{sub 2}Si [35-38%Si] or NiSi [49%Si]. This low-temperature phase is related to the high temperature {theta}-phase, but covers a wide composition range up to 47%Si. For the same Ni-Si films deposited on Si(100), the initial nucleation of the Ni(Si) mixture is similar as for the samples deposited on SiO{sub 2}, such that the complex sequence of metal-rich Ni-silicide phases typically observed during Ni/Si reactions is modified. For samples containing more than 21%Si, a simpler sequential phase formation was observed upon annealing. From pole figures, the phase formation sequence was observed to have a significant influence on the texture of the technologically relevant NiSi phase. For mixture composition ranging from 38% to 43%Si, the initial transient {theta}-phase appears extremely textured on Si(100). The observed transient appearance of a hexagonal phase is of importance in understanding the phase formation mechanisms in the Ni-Si system.

Van Bockstael, C.; Detavernier, C; Van Meirhaeghe, R; Jordan-Sweet, J; Lavoie, C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Structural and electrochemical properties of nanostructured nickel silicides by reduction and silicification of high-surface-area nickel oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Nanostructured nickel silicides have been synthesized by reduction and silification of high-surface-area nickel oxide, and exhibited remarkably like-noble metal property, lower electric resistivity, and ferromagnetism at room temperature. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiSi{sub x} have been prepared by reduction and silification of high-surface-area NiO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure of nickel silicides changed with increasing reaction temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Si doping into nickel changed the magnetic properties of metallic nickel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiSi{sub x} have remarkably lower electric resistivity and like-noble metal property. -- Abstract: Nanostructured nickel silicides have been prepared by reduction and silicification of high-surface-area nickel oxide (145 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) produced via precipitation. The prepared materials were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, magnetic and electrochemical measurements. The nickel silicide formation involves the following sequence: NiO (cubic) {yields} Ni (cubic) {yields} Ni{sub 2}Si (orthorhombic) {yields} NiSi (orthorhombic) {yields} NiSi{sub 2} (cubic), with particles growing from 13.7 to 21.3 nm. The nickel silicides are ferromagnetic at room temperature, and their saturation magnetization values change drastically with the increase of Si content. Nickel silicides have remarkably low electrical resistivity and noble metal-like properties because of a constriction of the Ni d band and an increase of the electronic density of states. The results suggest that such silicides are promising candidates as inexpensive yet functional materials for applications in electrochemistry as well as catalysis.

Chen, Xiao [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, Bingsen [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany); Li, Chuang; Shao, Zhengfeng [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Su, Dangsheng [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany); Williams, Christopher T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Swearingen Engineering Center, University of South Carolina (United States)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, Swearingen Engineering Center, University of South Carolina (United States); Liang, Changhai, E-mail: changhai@dlut.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Catalytic Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Thin Ni silicide formation by low temperature-induced metal atom reaction with ion implanted amorphous silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have extended our recent work on buried silicide formation by Ni diffusion into a buried amorphous silicon layer to the case where silicide formation is at lower temperatures on silicon substrates which have been preamorphized. The reaction of metal atoms from a 12 nm Ni film evaporated on top of a 65 nm thick surface amorphous layer formed by 35 keV Si{sup +} ion implantation has been investigated at temperature {le}400C. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) with channeling, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM), x-ray diffraction and four-point-probe measurements were used to determine structure, interfacial morphology, composition and resistivity of the silicide films. It has been found that an increased rate of silicidation occurs for amorphous silicon with respect to crystalline areas permitting a selective control of the silicon area to be contacted during silicide growth. Vacuum furnace annealing at 360C for 8 hours followed by an additional step at 400C for one hour produces a continuos NiSi{sub 2} layer with a resistivity 44 {mu}{Omega} cm.

Erokhin, Yu.N.; Pramanick, S.; Hong, F.; Rozgonyi, G.A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Patnaik, B.K. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Process for the production of hydrogen and carbonyl sulfide from hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide using a metal boride, nitride, carbide and/or silicide catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen and carbonyl sulfide are produced by a process comprising contacting gaseous hydrogen sulfide with gaseous carbon monoxide in the presence of a metal boride, carbide, nitride and/or silicide catalyst, such as titanium carbide, vanadium boride, manganese nitride or molybdenum silicide.

McGuiggan, M.F.; Kuch, P.L.

1984-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

79

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 83, 165409 (2011) Coverage-dependent self-organized ordering of Co-and Ti-silicide nanoislands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICAL REVIEW B 83, 165409 (2011) Coverage-dependent self-organized ordering of Co- and Ti-silicide; published 11 April 2011) We report on self-organized solid-phase epitaxially grown Ti- and Co-silicide nanoislands ordered along step-bunch edges of a vicinal Si(111) surface, as a function of the initial metal

Rabani, Eran

80

Exploitation of a self-limiting process for reproducible formation of ultrathin Ni{sub 1-x}Pt{sub x} silicide films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This letter reports on a process scheme to obtain highly reproducible Ni{sub 1-x}Pt{sub x} silicide films of 3-6 nm thickness formed on a Si(100) substrate. Such ultrathin silicide films are readily attained by sputter deposition of metal films, metal stripping in wet chemicals, and final silicidation by rapid thermal processing. This process sequence warrants an invariant amount of metal intermixed with Si in the substrate surface region independent of the initial metal thickness, thereby leading to a self-limiting formation of ultrathin silicide films. The crystallographic structure, thickness, uniformity, and morphological stability of the final silicide films depend sensitively on the initial Pt fraction.

Zhang Zhen; Zhu Yu; Rossnagel, Steve; Murray, Conal; Jordan-Sweet, Jean [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Yang, Bin [GlobalFoundries, Inc., T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Gaudet, Simon; Desjardins, Patrick [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3A7 (Canada); Kellock, Andrew J. [IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Ozcan, Ahmet [IBM Microelectronics, Hopewell Junction, New York 12533 (United States); Zhang Shili [Solid-State Electronics, The Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Lavoie, Christian [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3A7 (Canada)

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Morphological Stability and Specific Resistivity of sub-10 nm Silicide Films of Ni1 xPtx on Si Substrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This letter studies the morphological stability and specific resistivity of sub-10 nm silicide films of Ni, Ni{sub 0.95}Pt{sub 0.05}, and Ni{sub 0.9}Pt{sub 0.1} formed on Si(100) substrate. When the deposited metal films are below 1 to 4 nm in thickness depending on the Pt content, the resultant silicide films tend to become epitaxially aligned to the Si substrate and hence exhibit an extraordinary morphological stability up to 800 C. The presence of Pt in the silicides increases the film resistivity through alloy scattering, but alleviates, owing to a reduced electron mean free path, the frequently encountered sharp increase in resistivity in the sub-10 nm regime.

Zhang, Z.; Zhang, S; Yang, B; Zhu, Y; Rossnagel, S; Gaudet, S; Kellock, A; Jordan-Sweet, J; Lavoie, C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

X-ray photoemission spectromicroscopy of titanium silicide formation in patterned microstructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Titanium silicide has the lowest resistivity of all the refractory metal silicides and has good thermal stability as well as excellent compatibility with Al metallization. It is used as an intermediate buffer layer between W vias and the Si substrate to provide good electrical contact in ULSI technology, whose submicron patterned features form the basis of the integrated circuits of today and tomorrow, in the self aligned silicide (salicide) formation process. TiSi{sub 2} exists in two phases: a metastable C49 base-centered orthorhombic phase with specific resistivity of 60-90 {mu}{Omega}-cm that is formed at a lower temperature (formation anneal) and the stable 12-15 {mu}{Omega}-cm resistivity face-centered orthorhombic C54 phase into which C49 is transformed with a higher temperature (conversion anneal) step. C54 is clearly the target for low resistivity VLSI interconnects. However, it has been observed that when dimensions shrink below 1/mic (or when the Ti thickness drops below several hundred angstroms), the transformation of C49 into C54 is inhibited and agglomeration often occurs in fine lines at high temperatures. This results in a rise in resistivity due to incomplete transformation to C54 and because of discontinuities in the interconnect line resulting from agglomeration. Spectromicroscopy is an appropriate tool to study the evolution of the TiSi2 formation process because of its high resolution chemical imaging ability which can detect bonding changes even in the absence of changes in the relative amounts of species and because of the capability of studying thick {open_quotes}as is{close_quotes} industrial samples.

Singh, S.; Solak, H.; Cerrina, F. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Stoughton, WI (United States)] [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Microalloying of transition metal silicides by mechanical activation and field-activated reaction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Alloys of transition metal suicides that contain one or more alloying elements are fabricated by a two-stage process involving mechanical activation as the first stage and densification and field-activated reaction as the second stage. Mechanical activation, preferably performed by high-energy planetary milling, results in the incorporation of atoms of the alloying element(s) into the crystal lattice of the transition metal, while the densification and field-activated reaction, preferably performed by spark plasma sintering, result in the formation of the alloyed transition metal silicide. Among the many advantages of the process are its ability to accommodate materials that are incompatible in other alloying methods.

Munir, Zuhair A. (Davis, CA); Woolman, Joseph N. (Davis, CA); Petrovic, John J. (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

84

Portraits of some representatives of metal boride carbide and boride silicide compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Different ternary alkaline-earth and rare-earth metal boron carbide and silicide compounds are examined using the solid-state language of Zintl-Klemm concept, band structures, and density of states, in order to show that the topology of the non-metal sub-lattice is highly dependent on the electron count. It is also shown that the chemistry of rare-earth metal-boron-silicon does not parallel that of rare-earth metal-boron-carbon. B-C bonds are easily formed in the latter, leading to a large variety of different structural arrangements, whereas Si-B bonds are hardly observed in the former, except in insertion compounds. - Graphical abstract: Some ternary alkaline-earth and rare-earth metal boron carbide and silicide compounds are examined using the solid-state language of Zintl-Klemm concept, band structures, and density of states, in order to show that the topology of the non-metal sub-lattice is highly dependent on the electron count.

Ben Yahia, Mouna [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide et Inorganique Moleculaire, UMR 6511 CNRS-Universite de Rennes 1-ENSC Rennes, Institut de Chimie de Rennes, F-35042 Rennes (France); Roger, Jerome [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide et Inorganique Moleculaire, UMR 6511 CNRS-Universite de Rennes 1-ENSC Rennes, Institut de Chimie de Rennes, F-35042 Rennes (France); Rocquefelte, Xavier [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide et Inorganique Moleculaire, UMR 6511 CNRS-Universite de Rennes 1-ENSC Rennes, Institut de Chimie de Rennes, F-35042 Rennes (France); Gautier, Regis [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide et Inorganique Moleculaire, UMR 6511 CNRS-Universite de Rennes 1-ENSC Rennes, Institut de Chimie de Rennes, F-35042 Rennes (France); Bauer, Joseph [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide et Inorganique Moleculaire, UMR 6511 CNRS-Universite de Rennes 1-ENSC Rennes, Institut de Chimie de Rennes, F-35042 Rennes (France); Guerin, Roland [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide et Inorganique Moleculaire, UMR 6511 CNRS-Universite de Rennes 1-ENSC Rennes, Institut de Chimie de Rennes, F-35042 Rennes (France); Saillard, Jean-Yves [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide et Inorganique Moleculaire, UMR 6511 CNRS-Universite de Rennes 1-ENSC Rennes, Institut de Chimie de Rennes, F-35042 Rennes (France); Halet, Jean-Francois [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide et Inorganique Moleculaire, UMR 6511 CNRS-Universite de Rennes 1-ENSC Rennes, Institut de Chimie de Rennes, F-35042 Rennes (France)]. E-mail: halet@univ-rennes1.fr

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Submersible sodium pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electromagnetic submerged pump has an outer cylindrical stator with an inner cylindrical conductive core for the submerged pumping of sodium in the cylindrical interstitial volume defined between the stator and core. The cylindrical interstitial volume is typically vertically oriented, and defines an inlet at the bottom and an outlet at the top. The outer stator generates upwardly conveyed toroidal magnetic fields, which fields convey preferably from the bottom of the pump to the top of the pump liquid sodium in the cold leg of a sodium cooled nuclear reactor. The outer cylindrical stator has a vertically disposed duct surrounded by alternately stacked layers of coil units and laminates. 14 figs.

Brynsvold, G.V.; Lopez, J.T.; Olich, E.E.; West, C.W.

1989-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

86

Properties of chemical vapor deposited tungsten silicide films using reaction of WF/sub 6/ and Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tungsten silicide films were formed by the chemical vapor deposition method using the reaction WF/sub 6/ and Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/. The deposition rate, resistivity, composition, stress, crystal structure, and content of impurities were studied and compared with tungsten silicide films deposited by reaction of WF/sub 6/ and SiH/sub 4/. The tungsten silicide films made using Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/ have a higher deposition rate and higher Si concentration than those made by using SiH/sub 4/ at the same substrate temperature. For these reasons, the tungsten silicide films made by using Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/ were found to have a resistivity that is a little higher and, after annealing, a stress that is smaller than that made by SiH/sub 4/.

Shioya, Y.; Ikegami, K.; Kobayashi, I.; Maeda, M.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Metal gettering by boron-silicide precipitates in boron-implanted silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that Fe, Co, Cu, and Au impurities in Si are strongly gettered to boron-silicide precipitates formed by supersaturation B implantation and annealing. Effective binding free energies relative to interstitial solution range form somewhat above 1 to more than 2 eV. The B-Si precipitates formed at temperatures {le}1100{degrees}C lack long range structural order but closely resemble and icosahedral B{sub 3}Si phase in composition, local bonding, and chemical potential. Evidence indicates that the metal atoms go into solution in the B-Si phase, and this is interpreted in terms of the novel bonding and structural characteristics of B-rich icosahedral compounds.

Myers, S.M.; Petersen, G.A.; Headley, T.J.; Michael, J.R.; Aselage, T.A.; Seager, C.H.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: New York | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

November 23, 2009 November 23, 2009 CX-000091: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cheektowaga's Installation of Photovoltaic Solar Panels CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/23/2009 Location(s): Cheektowaga, New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy November 23, 2009 CX-000207: Categorical Exclusion Determination NaSi (Sodium Silicide) and Na-SG (Sodium Silica Gell) Powder Hydrogen Fuel Cells CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/23/2009 Location(s): New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office November 23, 2009 CX-000097: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mount Vernon's Energy Efficiency Retrofits and Programs CX(s) Applied: B5.1, B1.32, A1, A9, A11 Date: 11/23/2009 Location(s): Mount Vernon, New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

89

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

23, 2009 23, 2009 CX-000208: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act - PEM (Polymer Electrolyte Membrane) Fuel Cell Systems Providing Emergency Reserve and Backup Power CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/23/2009 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office November 23, 2009 CX-000207: Categorical Exclusion Determination NaSi (Sodium Silicide) and Na-SG (Sodium Silica Gell) Powder Hydrogen Fuel Cells CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/23/2009 Location(s): New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office November 23, 2009 CX-000206: Categorical Exclusion Determination Michigan Biogas Center of Excellence CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 11/23/2009 Location(s): Flint, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

90

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3, 2009 3, 2009 CX-000207: Categorical Exclusion Determination NaSi (Sodium Silicide) and Na-SG (Sodium Silica Gell) Powder Hydrogen Fuel Cells CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/23/2009 Location(s): New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office November 23, 2009 CX-000445: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sulfur Dioxide resistant Immobilized Amine Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1 Date: 11/23/2009 Location(s): Akron, Ohio Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory November 23, 2009 CX-000206: Categorical Exclusion Determination Michigan Biogas Center of Excellence CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 11/23/2009 Location(s): Flint, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

91

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

11 - 4820 of 29,416 results. 11 - 4820 of 29,416 results. Download CX-000207: Categorical Exclusion Determination NaSi (Sodium Silicide) and Na-SG (Sodium Silica Gell) Powder Hydrogen Fuel Cells CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/23/2009 Location(s): New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000207-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001522: Categorical Exclusion Determination Activity 8 CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/01/2010 Location(s): Sacramento County, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001522-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010683: Categorical Exclusion Determination Glen Canyon Substation Stage 09- 50MVA 230/69KV Transformer addition

92

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

24, 2009 24, 2009 CX-000549: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solubility Testing of Boron and Gadolinium in Nitric Acid CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/24/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office November 23, 2009 CX-000207: Categorical Exclusion Determination NaSi (Sodium Silicide) and Na-SG (Sodium Silica Gell) Powder Hydrogen Fuel Cells CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/23/2009 Location(s): New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office November 23, 2009 CX-000206: Categorical Exclusion Determination Michigan Biogas Center of Excellence CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 11/23/2009 Location(s): Flint, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

93

New York | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

November 23, 2009 November 23, 2009 CX-000091: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cheektowaga's Installation of Photovoltaic Solar Panels CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/23/2009 Location(s): Cheektowaga, New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy November 23, 2009 CX-000207: Categorical Exclusion Determination NaSi (Sodium Silicide) and Na-SG (Sodium Silica Gell) Powder Hydrogen Fuel Cells CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/23/2009 Location(s): New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office November 23, 2009 CX-000097: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mount Vernon's Energy Efficiency Retrofits and Programs CX(s) Applied: B5.1, B1.32, A1, A9, A11 Date: 11/23/2009 Location(s): Mount Vernon, New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

94

Silicide/strained Si[sub 1[minus]x]Ge[sub x] Schottky-barrier infrared detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By employing a thin silicon sacrificial cap layer for silicide formation the authors have successfully demonstrated Pd[sub 2]Si/ strained Si[sub 1[minus]x]Ge[sub x] Schottky-barrier infrared detectors with extended cutoff wavelengths. The sacrificial silicon eliminates the segregation effects and Fermi level pinning which occur if the metal reacts directly with the Si[sub 1[minus]x]Ge[sub x] alloy. The Schottky barrier height of the silicide/strained Si[sub 1[minus]x]Ge[sub x] detector decreases with increasing Ge fraction, allowing for tuning of the detector's cutoff wavelength. The cutoff wavelength has been extended beyond 8[mu]m in PtSi/Si[sub 0.85]Ge[sub 0.15] detectors. The authors have shown that high quantum efficiency and near-ideal dark current can be obtained from these detectors.

Xiao, X.; Sturm, J.C.; Parihar, S.R.; Lyon, S.A. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)); Meyerhofer, D.; Palfrey, S.; Shallcross, F.V. (David Sarnoff Research Center, Princeton, NJ (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Phase formation and morphological stability of ultrathin Ni-Co-Pt silicide films formed on Si(100)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultrathin Ni, Co, and Pt films, each no more than 4?nm in thickness, as well as their various combinations are employed to investigate the competing growth of epitaxial Co{sub 1-y}Ni{sub y}Si{sub 2} films against polycrystalline Pt{sub 1-z}Ni{sub z}Si. The phase formation critically affects the morphological stability of the resulting silicide films, with the epitaxial films being superior to the polycrystalline ones. Any combination of those metals improves the morphological stability with reference to their parent individual metal silicide films. When Ni, Co, and Pt are all included, the precise initial location of Pt does little to affect the final phase formation in the silicide films and the epitaxial growth of Co{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}Si{sub 2} films is always perturbed, in accordance to thermodynamics that shows a preferential formation of Pt{sub 1-z}Ni{sub z}Si over that of Co{sub 1-y}Ni{sub y}Si{sub 2}.

Xu, Peng; Wu, Dongping, E-mail: dongpingwu@fudan.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of ASIC and System, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Kubart, Tomas; Gao, Xindong [Solid-State Electronics, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, 75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Zhang, Shi-Li, E-mail: shili.zhang@angstrom.uu.se [State Key Laboratory of ASIC and System, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China and Solid-State Electronics, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, 75121 Uppsala (Sweden)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Nanopatterning of metal-coated silicon surfaces via ion beam irradiation: Real time x-ray studies reveal the effect of silicide bonding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the effect of silicide formation on ion-induced nanopatterning of silicon with various ultrathin metal coatings. Silicon substrates coated with 10 nm Ni, Fe, and Cu were irradiated with 200 eV argon ions at normal incidence. Real time grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) were performed during the irradiation process and real time measurements revealed threshold conditions for nanopatterning of silicon at normal incidence irradiation. Three main stages of the nanopatterning process were identified. The real time GISAXS intensity of the correlated peaks in conjunction with XRF revealed that the nanostructures remain for a time period after the removal of the all the metal atoms from the sample depending on the binding energy of the metal silicides formed. Ex-situ XPS confirmed the removal of all metal impurities. In-situ XPS during the irradiation of Ni, Fe, and Cu coated silicon substrates at normal incidence demonstrated phase separation and the formation of different silicide phases that occur upon metal-silicon mixing. Silicide formation leads to nanostructure formation due the preferential erosion of the non-silicide regions and the weakening of the ion induced mass redistribution.

El-Atwani, Osman [School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Gonderman, Sean; Suslova, Anastassiya; Fowler, Justin; El-Atwani, Mohamad [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); DeMasi, Alexander; Ludwig, Karl [Physics Department, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Paul Allain, Jean [School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

97

Status of core conversion with LEU silicide fuel in JRR-4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Japan Research Reactor No.4 (JRR-4) is a light water moderated and cooled, 93% enriched uranium ETR-type fuel used and swimming pool type reactor with thermal output of 3.5MW. Since the first criticality was achieved on January 28, 1965, JRR-4 has been used for shielding experiments, radioisotope production, neutron activation analyses, training for reactor engineers and so on for about 30 years. Within the framework of the RERTR Program, the works for conversion to LEU fuel are now under way, and neutronic and thermal-hydraulic calculations emphasizing on safety and performance aspects are being carried out. The design and evaluation for the core conversion are based on the Guides for Safety Design and Evaluation of research and testing reactor facilities in Japan. These results show that the JRR-4 will be able to convert to use LEU fuel without any major design change of core and size of fuel element. LEU silicide fuel (19.75%) will be used and maximum neutron flux in irradiation hole would be slightly decreased from present neutron flux value of 7x10{sup 13}(n/cm{sup 2}/s). The conversion works are scheduled to complete in 1998, including with upgrade of the reactor building and utilization facilities.

Nakajima, Teruo; Ohnishi, Nobuaki; Shirai, Eiji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Field emission from gadolinium silicide prepared by ion implantation with electron beam annealing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A silicon-based field emission cathode, the rare earth silicide GdSi{sub 2} was prepared by implanting Gd ions into silicon using a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source and subsequently annealed by electron beam. For as-implanted samples, turn-on field was about 21 V/{mu}m at a current density of 1 {mu}A/cm{sup 2} and a field emission current density of 1 mA/cm{sup 2} was reached at an applied field of 34 V/{mu}m. After annealing, the turn-on field could be as low as 9 V/{mu}m and the current density of 1 mA/cm{sup 2} can be reached at an applied field of 14 V/{mu}m. X-ray diffraction with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses and atomic force microscopy were used to characterize microstructure changes of the samples. The results showed that these excellent field emission characteristics were attributed to the GdSi{sub 2} compounds formed in the samples. The field emission mechanism was discussed in terms of Fowler-Nordheim (FN) theory. It was found that FN plots could be divided into two segments obviously, and this was perhaps because of the thermal effect in the process of field emission.

Duan, H. G.; Xie, E. Q.; Ye, F. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Titanium Silicide Islands on Atomically Clean Si(100): Identifying Single Electron Tunneling Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Titanium silicide islands have been formed by the ultrahigh vacuum deposition of thin films of titanium (< 2 nm) on atomically clean Si(100) substrates followed by annealing to ~800 degrees C. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy have been performed on these islands to record current-voltage (I-V) curves. Because each island forms a double barrier tunnel junction (DBTJ) structure with the STM tip and the substrate, they would be expected to exhibit single electron tunneling (SET) according to the orthodox model of SET. Some of the islands formed are small enough (diameter < 10 nm) to exhibit SET at room temperature and evidence of SET has been identified in some of the I-V curves recorded from these small islands. Those curves are analyzed within the framework of the orthodox model and are found to be consistent with that model, except for slight discrepancies of the shape of the I-V curves at current steps. However, most islands that were expected to exhibit SET did not do so, and the reasons for the absence of observable SET are evaluated. The most likely reasons for the absence of SET are determined to be a wide depletion region in the substrate and Schottky barrier lowering due to Fermi level pinning by surface states of the clean silicon near the islands. The results establish that although the Schottky barrier can act as an effective tunnel junction in a DBTJ structure, the islands may be unreliable in future nanoelectronic devices. Therefore, methods are discussed to improve the reliability of future devices.

Joseph L. Tedesco; J. E. Rowe; Robert J. Nemanich

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

100

Fuel loading and homogeneity analysis of HFIR design fuel plates loaded with uranium silicide fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twelve nuclear reactor fuel plates were analyzed for fuel loading and fuel loading homogeneity by measuring the attenuation of a collimated X-ray beam as it passed through the plates. The plates were identical to those used by the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) but were loaded with uranium silicide rather than with HFIR`s uranium oxide fuel. Systematic deviations from nominal fuel loading were observed as higher loading near the center of the plates and underloading near the radial edges. These deviations were within those allowed by HFIR specifications. The report begins with a brief background on the thermal-hydraulic uncertainty analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor that motivated a statistical description of fuel loading and homogeneity. The body of the report addresses the homogeneity measurement techniques employed, the numerical correction required to account for a difference in fuel types, and the statistical analysis of the resulting data. This statistical analysis pertains to local variation in fuel loading, as well as to ``hot segment`` analysis of narrow axial regions along the plate and ``hot streak`` analysis, the cumulative effect of hot segment loading variation. The data for all twelve plates were compiled and divided into 20 regions for analysis, with each region represented by a mean and a standard deviation to report percent deviation from nominal fuel loading. The central regions of the plates showed mean values of about +3% deviation, while the edge regions showed mean values of about {minus}7% deviation. The data within these regions roughly approximated random samplings from normal distributions, although the chi-square ({chi}{sup 2}) test for goodness of fit to normal distributions was not satisfied.

Blumenfeld, P.E.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Formation of Nickel Silicide from Direct-liquid-injection Chemical-vapor-deposited Nickel Nitride Films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Smooth, continuous, and highly conformal nickel nitride (NiN{sub x}) films were deposited by direct liquid injection (DLI)-chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using a solution of bis(N,N{prime}-di-tert-butylacetamidinato)nickel(II) in tetrahydronaphthalene as the nickel (Ni) source and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the coreactant gas. The DLI-CVD NiNx films grown on HF-last (100) silicon and on highly doped polysilicon substrates served as the intermediate for subsequent conversion into nickel silicide (NiSi), which is a key material for source, drain, and gate contacts in microelectronic devices. Rapid thermal annealing in the forming gas of DLI-CVD NiNx films formed continuous NiSi films at temperatures above 400 C. The resistivity of the NiSi films was 15{mu}{Omega} cm, close to the value for bulk crystals. The NiSi films have remarkably smooth and sharp interfaces with underlying Si substrates, thereby producing contacts for transistors with a higher drive current and a lower junction leakage. Resistivity and synchrotron X-ray diffraction in real-time during annealing of NiNx films showed the formation of a NiSi film at about 440 C, which is morphologically stable up to about 650 C. These NiSi films could find applications in future nanoscale complementary metal oxide semiconductor devices or three-dimensional metal-oxide-semiconductor devices such as Fin-type field effect transistors for the 22 nm technology node and beyond.

Li, Z.; Gordon, R; Li, H; Shenai, D; Lavoie, C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

It's Elemental - The Element Sodium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Neon Neon Previous Element (Neon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Magnesium) Magnesium The Element Sodium [Click for Isotope Data] 11 Na Sodium 22.98976928 Atomic Number: 11 Atomic Weight: 22.98976928 Melting Point: 370.95 K (97.80°C or 208.04°F) Boiling Point: 1156 K (883°C or 1621°F) Density: 0.97 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 1 Group Name: Alkali Metal What's in a name? From the English word soda and from the Medieval Latin word sodanum, which means "headache remedy." Sodium's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for sodium carbonate, natrium. Say what? Sodium is pronounced as SO-dee-em. History and Uses: Although sodium is the sixth most abundant element on earth and comprises

103

Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride Thermophysical Properties of Sodium Nitrate and Sodium Chloride Solutions and Their Effects on Fluid Flow in Unsaturated Media Tianfu Xu and Karsten Pruess Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 ABSTRACT. Understanding movement of saline sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) waste solutions is important for assessing the contaminant migration near leaking waste storage tanks in the unsaturated zone at the Hanford site (Washington, USA). The purpose of this study is to contribute a basic understanding of effects of the thermophysical behavior of NaNO 3 solutions on fluid flow in unsaturated media. We first present mathematical expressions for the dependence of density, viscosity, solubility and vapor pressure of

104

Micromechanisms of creep-fatigue crack growth in a silicide-matrix composite with SiC particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study has been conducted to examine the cyclic fatigue crack growth characteristics in 1,200 C air of a MoSi[sub 2]-50 mol% WSi[sub 2] alloy in the unreinforced condition and with 30 vol% SiC particles. For comparison purposes, crack growth experiments under sustained loads were also carried out in the silicide-matrix composite. Particular attention is devoted to developing an understanding of the micromechanism of subcritical crack growth by recourse to optical and electron microscopy, including transmission electron microscopy of crack-tip damage. The results indicate that enhanced viscous flow of glass films along interfaces and grain boundaries imparts pronounced levels of subcritical crack growth in the composite material; the composite exhibits a higher fatigue fracture threshold and a more extended range of stable fracture than the unreinforced alloy. The effects of glass phase in influencing fatigue crack growth in the silicide-based material are compared to the influence of in situ-formed and preexisting glass films on high-temperature cyclic fatigue crack growth in ceramics and ceramic composites. The paper concludes with a comparison of present results with the high-temperature damage tolerance of a variety of intermetallic alloys and ceramic materials.

Ramamurty, U.; Kim, A.S.; Suresh, S. (Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)); Petrovic, J.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Electronic structure of the Nowotny chimney-ladder silicide Ru{sub 2}Si{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report {ital ab initio} calculations for the electronic structure of the Nowotny chimney-ladder silicide Ru{sub 2}Si{sub 3} in the orthorhombic low-temperature phase. We find Ru{sub 2}Si{sub 3} to be a semiconductor with a direct band gap of about 0.45 eV. Since this gap is a p-d gap, the oscillator strength for a direct transition is expected to be of sizable magnitude. Also, the calculated effective masses of hole and electron states suggest that Ru{sub 2}Si{sub 3} is a very promising material for various applications in semiconductor technology. The electronic structure is controlled by the hybridization of Si p states with Ru d states and shows similarities to the group-IV transition-metal disilicides (CrSi{sub 2}, MoSi{sub 2}, WSi{sub 2}) and to transition-metal-rich silicides. The calculations are based on the density-functional theory in local-density approximation and are performed by means of the full-potential linearized-augmented-plane-wave method. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Wolf, W. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie der Universitaet Wien, Liechtensteinstrae 22a, A-1090 Wien (Austria)] [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie der Universitaet Wien, Liechtensteinstrae 22a, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Bihlmayer, G.; Bluegel, S. [Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)] [Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Transient behaviour of 4.8 g/cc silicide fuel-(I) abnormal withdrawal of control rod during a start-up of JMTR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) loaded the 4.8 g/cc silicide fuel for the core conversion from the high to the low enrichment (94°C). The safety margin of the JMTR against the accident induced by the abnormal withdrawal of control rod was assured.

Kazuaki Yanagisawa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

[1] P. Schwarzkopf, R. Kieffer, Refractory Hard Metals: Borides, Car-bides, Nitrides and Silicides, MacMillan, New York 1953.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

± [1] P. Schwarzkopf, R. Kieffer, Refractory Hard Metals: Borides, Car- bides, Nitrides and Silicides, MacMillan, New York 1953. [2] E. Fryt, Solid State Ionics 1997, 101±103, 437. [3] N. Durlu, J. Metal catalysts, such as gold[1,4,8] and tin[5,9,10] have been employed in the synthesis to align

Wang, Zhong L.

108

Ultra low-resistance palladium silicide Ohmic contacts to lightly doped n-J. D. Yearsley, J. C. Lin, E. Hwang, S. Datta, and S. E. Mohney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultra low-resistance palladium silicide Ohmic contacts to lightly doped n- InGaAs J. D. Yearsley, J at the metal-germanium interface by the formation of epitaxial nickel digermanide NiGe2 using pulsed laser resistivity of metals on nitrogen-doped cuprous oxide (Cu2O) thin-films J. Appl. Phys. 112, 084508 (2012

Yener, Aylin

109

First-principles study of thin magnetic transition-metal silicide films on Si(001) Hua Wu, Peter Kratzer, and Matthias Scheffler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First-principles study of thin magnetic transition-metal silicide films on Si(001) Hua Wu, Peter of ferromag- netic FM materials have been suggested for the fabrication of metal/semiconductor heterojunctions s : 75.70. i, 73.20.At, 68.35.Md I. INTRODUCTION Metal-semiconductor heterojunctions have received much

110

Sodium loop framework structural analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the structural analysis of the Sodium Loop framework in a drop condition. The drop is similar to the US Department of Transportation non-bulk, performance-oriented packaging (Packaging Group I) drop test. The drop height evaluated for the Sodium Loop framework is 5.9 ft.

Nguyen, P.M.

1995-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

111

Tables of thermodynamic properties of sodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermodynamic properties of saturated sodium, superheated sodium, and subcooled sodium are tabulated as a function of temperature. The temperature ranges are 380 to 2508 K for saturated sodium, 500 to 2500 K for subcooled sodium, and 400 to 1600 K for superheated sodium. Tabulated thermodynamic properties are enthalpy, heat capacity, pressure, entropy, density, instantaneous thermal expansion coefficient, compressibility, and thermal pressure coefficient. Tables are given in SI units and cgs units.

Fink, J.K.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Federal - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Federal - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -...

113

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Contractor - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Contractor - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project...

114

Simulation of sodium boiling experiments with THERMIT sodium version  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural and forced convection experiments(SBTF and French) are simulated with the sodium version of the thermal-hydraulic computer code THERMIT. Simulation is done for the test secti- -on with the pressure-velocity boundary ...

Huh, Kang Yul

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Ground beef shelf life assessment as influenced by sodium lactate, sodium propionate, sodium diacetate, and soy protein concentrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In phase I all-beef and soy-added ground beef patties containing sodium lactate, sodium propionate, and sodium diacetate at various levels and combinations were stored for nine months at -10°C. Upon cooking, the addition of sodium lactate increased...

Grones, Kelly Leann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Sodium-Restricted Diet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The value of salt has long been known. Feuds and wars were waged for the possession of salt during man's early development. The common expressions "salt of the earth" and "worth his weight in salt" all show the high value placed on salt. Taxes were... collected for possession of salt. Even the word "salary" is connected with salt. Salt remains valuable to us as a source of sodium, an essential nutrient needed by our body to function properly. The body needs sodium to form tissue - to aid a child...

Anonymous,

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Surface-Driven Sodium Ion Energy Storage in Nanocellular Carbon...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface-Driven Sodium Ion Energy Storage in Nanocellular Carbon Foams. Surface-Driven Sodium Ion Energy Storage in Nanocellular Carbon Foams. Abstract: Sodium ion (Na+) batteries...

118

High-temperature phase stability and tribological properties of laser clad Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si/NiSi metal silicide coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si/NiSi wear-resistant metal silicide composite coatings consisting of Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si primary dendrite and interdendritic Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si/NiSi eutectic were fabricated on substrate of an austenitic stainless steel AISI321 by laser cladding using Ni-Mo-Si elemental powder blends. The high-temperature structural stability of the coating was evaluated by aging at 800 deg. C for 1-50 h. High-temperature sliding wear resistance of the as-laser clad and aged coatings was evaluated at 600 deg. C. Results indicate that the Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si/NiSi metal silicides coating has excellent high temperature phase stability. No phase transformation except the dissolution of the eutectic Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si and the corresponding growth of the Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si primary dendrite and no elemental diffusion from the coating into the substrate were detected after aging the coating at 800 deg. C for 50 h. Aging of the coating at 800 deg. C leads to gradual dissolution of the interdendritic eutectic Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si and subsequent formation of a dual-phase structure with equiaxed Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si primary grains distributed in the NiSi single-phase matrix. Because of the strong covalent-dominated atomic bonds and high volume fraction of the ternary metal silicide Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si, both the original and the aged Mo{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si/NiSi coating has excellent wear resistance under pin-on-disc high-temperature sliding wear test conditions, although hardness of the aged coating is slightly lower than that of the as-clad coating.

Lu, X.D. [Laboratory of Laser Materials Processing and Surface Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University (China); Wang, H.M. [Laboratory of Laser Materials Processing and Surface Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University (China)]. E-mail: wanghuaming@263.net

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

119

M5Si3(M=Ti, Nb, Mo) Based Transition-Metal Silicides for High Temperature Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transition metal silicides are being considered for future engine turbine components at temperatures up to 1600 C. Although significant improvement in high temperature strength, room temperature fracture toughness has been realized in the past decade, further improvement in oxidation resistance is needed. Oxidation mechanism of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-based alloys was investigated. Oxidation behavior of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-based alloy strongly depends on the atmosphere. Presence of Nitrogen alters the oxidation behavior of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} by nucleation and growth of nitride subscale. Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3.2} and Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}C{sub 0.5} alloys exhibited an excellent oxidation resistance in nitrogen bearing atmosphere due to limited dissolution of nitrogen and increased Si/Ti activity ratio. MoSi{sub 2} coating developed by pack cementation to protect Mo-based Mo-Si-B composites was found to be effective up to 1500 C. Shifting coating composition to T1+T2+Mo{sub 3}Si region showed the possibility to extend the coating lifetime above 1500 C by more than ten times via formation of slow growing Mo{sub 3}Si or T2 interlayer without sacrificing the oxidation resistance of the coating. The phase equilibria in the Nb-rich portion of Nb-B system has been evaluated experimentally using metallographic analysis and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). It was shown that Nb{sub ss} (solid solution) and NbB are the only two primary phases in the 0-40 at.% B composition range, and the eutectic reaction L {leftrightarrow} Nb{sub SS} + NbB was determined to occur at 2104 {+-} 5 C by DTA.

Zhihong Tang

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project This...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Viscosity of Liquid Sodium and Potassium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

2 November 1936 research-article Viscosity of Liquid Sodium and Potassium Y. S. Chiong The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend...

1936-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Sodium sulfide leaching of low-grade jamesonite concentrate in production of sodium pyroantimoniate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sodium sulfide leaching of a low-grade jamesonite concentrate in the production of sodium pyroantimoniate through the air oxidation process and the influencing factors on the leaching rate of antimony were...

Tian-zu Yang PhD; Ming-xi Jiang…

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Recovery of acids and sodium hydroxide from solutions of sodium sulfate and sodium chloride with the use of bipolar membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors examined the kinetic laws governing the electrodialysis recovery of hydrochloric acid and sulfuric acid, as well as sodium hydroxide, from 1M sodium chloride and 0.5 M sodium sulfate solutions and from a mixture of these salts with the use of the MB-1, MB-2, and MB-3 bipolar membranes. Kinetic plots of the current density and the concentration of the acid and the base in the chambers next to the bipolar membranes during the electrodialysis treatment of 1M sodium chloride, 0.5 M sodium sulfate, and solutions are presented. It was established that it is better to use the MB-3 membrane for the electrodialysis conversion of sodium chloride and sodium sulfate into acids and sodium hydroxide owing to the high rate and current efficiency and low expenditure of electrical energy and degree of contamination of the products obtained by the salts. It was also established that the resistance of the MB-1 and MB-2 bipolar membranes is almost an order of magnitude higher than that of the MB-3 membrane.

Bobrinskaya, G.A.; Pavlova, T.V.; Shatalov, A.Ya.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Atlas Sodium Automated Batch Synthesis System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atlas Sodium Automated Batch Synthesis System (Syrris) June 2013 #12;Introduction to the system · The Atlas Sodium system consists of an Atlas base equipped with a 400ºC hotplate, a stacking dry bath systemL) for automated addition and/or removal of solution. · The system is computer controlled by the Atlas software

Subramanian, Venkat

125

Sodium Heat Engine Development Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sodium Heat Engine (SHE) is an efficient thermoelectric conversion device which directly generates electricity from a thermally regenerative electrochemical cell that relies on the unique conduction properties of {beta}{double prime}-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE). Laboratory models of a variety of SHE devices have demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of the system, engineering development of large prototype devices has been slowed by a series of materials and fabrication problems. Failure of the electrolyte tubes has been a recurring problem and a number of possible causes have been postulated. To address these issues, a two-phase engineering development program was undertaken. This report summarizes the final results of the first phase of the program, which included extensive materials characterization activities, a study of applicable nondestructive evaluation methods, an investigation of possible stress states that would contribute to fracture, and certain operational issues associated with the electromagnetic pumps used in the SHE prototype. Mechanical and microstructural evaluation of commercially obtained BASE tubes revealed that they should be adequate for SHE applications and that sodium exposure produced no appreciable deleterious strength effects. Processing activities to produce a more uniform and smaller grain size for the BASE tubes were completed using isostatic pressing, extrusion, and slip casting. Green tubes were sintered by conventional and microwave plasma methods. Of particular interest is the residual stress state in the BASE tubes, and both analysis and nondestructive evaluation methods were employed to evaluate these stresses. X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments were performed to determine the bulk residual stresses in commercially fabricated BASE tubes; however, tube-to-tube variations and variations among the various methods employed did not allow formulation of a definitive definition of the as-fabricated stress state.

Singh, J.P.; Kupperman, D.S.; Majumdar, S.; Dorris, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Dieckman, S.L.; Jaross, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.; Gregar, J.S.; Poeppel, R.B.; Raptis, A.C.; Valentin, R.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

In-Situ Method for Treating Residual Sodium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R.; Henslee, S. Paul

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

127

In-situ method for treating residual sodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Henslee, S. Paul (Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

128

Hydrogen embrittlement of type 410 stainless steel in sodium chloride, sodium sulfate, and sodium hydroxide environments at 90 C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Susceptibility of martensitic type 410 (UNS S41000) stainless steel (SS) to environmental cracking was evaluated at 90 C in concentrated sodium chloride, sodium sulfate and sodium hydroxide solutions, all of which are environments related to steam turbine conditions, using the slow strain rate testing (SSRT) technique. In NaCl, the effects of solution pH, concentration, and anodic and cathodic polarization were investigated. Tests were supplemented by detailed electron fractography and hydrogen permeation measurements. A clear correlation was found between the degree of embrittlement and the amount of hydrogen permeating the steel, suggesting a hydrogen-induced cracking mechanism.

Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.G.; Salinas-Bravo, V.M. [Inst. de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico). Dept. Fisico Quimica Aplicada; Martinez-Villafane, A. [Centro de Investigaciones en Materiales Avanzados Leon Tolstoi, Chihuahua (Mexico)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

SciTech Connect: Thermodynamic and transport properties of sodium...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

on thermophysical properties of sodium have been included in this critical assessment. Thermodynamic properties of sodium liquid and vapor that have been assessed...

130

High-capacity hydrogen storage in lithium and sodium amidoboranes...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

capacity hydrogen storage in lithium and sodium amidoboranes. High-capacity hydrogen storage in lithium and sodium amidoboranes. Abstract: A substantial effort worldwide has been...

131

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 ``Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core`` problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core'' problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated.

Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Sodium Alanate Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Preparation and characterization of sodium alanate (NaAlH4) based hydrogen storage materials are described in this book. The effect of the NaAlH4 particle size, particularly in… (more)

Baldé, C.P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

The Sodium Process Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) has approximately 680,000 liters of raw sodium stored in facilities on site. As mandated by the State of Idaho and the US Department of Energy (DOE), this sodium must be transformed into a stable condition for land disposal. To comply with this mandate, ANL-W designed and built the Sodium Process Facility (SPF) for the processing of this sodium into a dry, sodium carbonate powder. The major portion of the sodium stored at ANL-W is radioactively contaminated. The sodium will be processed in three separate and distinct campaigns: the 290,000 liters of Fermi-1 primary sodium, the 50,000 liters of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) secondary sodium, and the 330,000 liters of the EBR-II primary sodium. The Fermi-1 and the EBR-II secondary sodium contain only low-level of radiation, while the EBR-II primary sodium has radiation levels up to 0.5 mSv (50 mrem) per hour at 1 meter. The EBR-II primary sodium will be processed last, allowing the operating experience to be gained with the less radioactive sodium prior to reacting the most radioactive sodium. The sodium carbonate will be disposed of in 270 liter barrels, four to a pallet. These barrels are square in cross-section, allowing for maximum utilization of the space on a pallet, minimizing the required landfill space required for disposal.

Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P. McDermott, M.D.; Price, J.R.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Wells, P.B.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Reaction of Sodium Borohydride with Wool  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... It has recently been found that sodium borohydride in alkaline solution rapidly dissolves wool under conditions of temperature and pH milder than many in current use. The reaction ... in current use. The reaction has been studied as follows: 1 gm. of solvent-scoured Merino ...

J. M. GILLESPIE

1959-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

In sodium tests of ultrasonic transducers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultrasonic techniques are seen as suitable candidates for the in-service inspection and for the continuous surveillance of sodium cooled reactors (SFR). These techniques need the development and the qualification of immersed ultrasonic transducers, and materials. This paper presents some developments performed by CEA (DTN and LIST) and AREVA (NDE Solutions), and some results. (authors)

Lhuillier, C.; Descombin, O.; Baque, F. [CEA, DTN, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Marchand, B. [CEA, LIST, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Saillant, J. F. [AREVA/NDE Solutions, 4 rue Thomas Dumorey, 71109 Chalon sur Saone Cedex (France); Augem, J. M. [EDF, 12-14 avenue Dutrievoz, 69628 Villeurbanne (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Inhibition Of Washed Sludge With Sodium Nitrite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of electrochemical tests used to determine the relationship between the concentration of the aggressive anions in washed sludge and the minimum effective inhibitor concentration. Sodium nitrate was added as the inhibitor because of its compatibility with the DWPF process. A minimum of 0.05M nitrite is required to inhibit the washed sludge simulant solution used in this study. When the worst case compositions and safety margins are considered, it is expected that a minimum operating limit of nearly 0.1M nitrite will be specified. The validity of this limit is dependent on the accuracy of the concentrations and solubility splits previously reported. Sodium nitrite additions to obtain 0.1M nitrite concentrations in washed sludge will necessitate the additional washing of washed precipitate in order to decrease its sodium nitrite inhibitor requirements sufficiently to remain below the sodium limits in the feed to the DWPF. Nitrite will be the controlling anion in "fresh" washed sludge unless the soluble chloride concentration is about ten times higher than predicted by the solubility splits. Inhibition of "aged" washed sludge will not be a problem unless significant chloride dissolution occurs during storage. It will be very important tomonitor the composition of washed sludge during processing and storage.

Congdon, J. W.; Lozier, J. S.

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

139

Analytical electron microscopy investigation of elemental composition and bonding structure at the Sb-doped Ni-fully-silicide/SiO{sub 2} interface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is very important to control the elemental composition and bonding structure at the gate electrode/gate dielectrics interface in metal-oxide-semiconductor transistor devices because this determines the threshold voltage of the gate electrode. In this study, we investigated the structure at the interface between the antimony (Sb)-doped nickel-fully-silicide gate electrode and SiO{sub 2} dielectrics by employing high-spatial resolution techniques such as energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy using a scanning transmission electron microscope. In one region, we found a thin nickel layer at the NiSi/SiO{sub 2} interface originating from the migration of native oxide at the face of the poly-silicon. In another region, a Sb pileup was detected at the NiSi/SiO{sub 2} interface where the Ni L{sub 3}-edge spectrum showed Ni-Sb bonding, then it was suggested that Sb atoms exist at the bottom of NiSi, substituting for Si atoms in NiSi.

Kawasaki, Naohiko; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Otsuka, Yuji; Hashimoto, Hideki [Morphological Research Laboratory, Toray Research Center Inc., Otsu, Shiga (Japan); Kurata, Hiroki; Isoda, Seiji [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Fabrication of magnesium silicide thin films by pulsed ion beam ablation in a 1.6 kJ plasma focus device  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The production of magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) thin films on silicon (1 0 0) at room temperature using a low energy (1.6 kJ) plasma focus device is reported. The conventional hollow copper anode is replaced by anode fitted with solid magnesium top and the deposition is done using different numbers of deposition shots (5, 10, 15 and 20). The interaction of the high energy magnesium ion beams with silicon (1 0 0) substrates using different number of deposition shots, result in the formation of surface coatings, with different characteristic structures and morphologies. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis reveals that crystal structure characteristics of obtained thin films strongly depend on number of deposition shots. The structure growth and variation in surface smoothness with increasing of deposition shots is revealed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs and atomic force microscopy (AFM) images. Moreover, AFM results revealed that the distribution of grain sizes on the surface of samples and surface roughness of deposited thin films increase with the number of deposition shots. Also the average thickness of deposited samples tested with surface profiler.

M.T. Hosseinnejad; Mahmood Ghoranneviss; G. Reza Etaati; Farhad Shahgoli

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Gypsum and Polyacrylamide Soil Amendments Used With High Sodium Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using wastewater for irrigation of crops represents an attractive alternative to disposal. Typically, municipal wastewaters are high in sodium, and the resulting high sodium absorption ratio (SAR) alters the soil structure making it more impermeable...

Gardiner, Duane

142

Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leachability indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the l

Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

143

Filtration of Sludge and Sodium Nonatitanate Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed facility designs for the ion exchange and solvent extraction flowsheets under development to treat high level waste at the Savannah River Site use crossflow filtration to remove entrained sludge and monosodium titanate (MST). Bench-scale and pilot-scale testing performed with simulated feed streams showed much lower filtration rates than desired for the process. This report documents an investigation of the impact on filtration of using Honeywell sodium nonatitanate (ST), rather than MST, for strontium and actinide removal.

Poirier, M.R.

2000-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

144

Sodium Plugging Test Loop - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sodium Plugging Test Loop Sodium Plugging Test Loop Sodium Plugging Test Loop Overview Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Sodium Plugging Test Loop This experimental setup is part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Fuel Cycle R&D work carried out at Argonne on advanced sodium component technology. Bookmark and Share For long range sodium technology research and development, employing supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion technology as an advanced balance of plant technology is being considered. The component that provides the interface between the sodium and supercritical CO2 is a compact heat exchanger known as a printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE). This heat exchanger has very small coolant flow passages that may foul or

145

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. Piping in the east boiler basement of the sodium processing building was color coded for easy identification. Orange indicates sodium and green identifies cooling water.

146

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics August 16, 2013 - 10:17am Addthis Low-pressure sodium lighting provides more energy-efficient outdoor lighting than high-intensity discharge lighting, but it has very poor color rendition. Typical applications include highway and security lighting, where color is not important. Low-pressure sodium lamps work somewhat like fluorescent lamps. Like high-intensity discharge lighting, low-pressure sodium lamps require up to 10 minutes to start and have to cool before they can restart. Therefore, they are most suitable for applications in which they stay on for hours at a time. They are not suitable for use with motion detectors. The chart below compares low-pressure sodium lamps and high-intensity

147

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. Piping in the east boiler basement of the sodium processing building was color coded for easy identification. Orange indicates sodium and green identifies cooling water.

148

Recent Sodium Technology Development for the Decommissioning of the Rapsodie and Superphenix Reactors and the Management of Sodium Wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) has recently developed and/or conducted experiments on several processes in support of the decommissioning of two French liquid-metal fast reactors (LMFRs), Rapsodie and Superphenix, as well as on the treatment of CEA sodium wastes. CEA has demonstrated that it is possible to define appropriate and efficient processes to meet the different situations encountered in decommissioning LMFRs. Mechanical techniques derived from standard technologies have been successfully applied to fast reactor decommissioning to complete primary vessel draining from sodium. In addition, specific chemical processes have been developed to deal safely with metallic sodium reactivity. Sodium-contaminated equipment has been successfully cleaned by reacting sodium with water mist in an atmosphere with carbon dioxide to form inert sodium carbonate. Bulk sodium has been successfully converted into aqueous caustic soda by injection of liquid-metallic sodium into sodium hydroxide solution. Several processes were also defined to deal with specific sodium wastes. In all cases the principle is based on a sodium/water chemical reaction where the released hydrogen and heat are controlled. With the development of a wide variety of processes, all steps in the decommissioning of LMFRs are assumed to be now properly mastered.

Rodriguez, G.; Gastaldi, O.; Baque, F. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique Cadarache (France)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Factors contributing to the breakdown of sodium beta-alumina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clarification of the breakdown process occurring during charge transfer in sodium beta alumina solid electrolytes was derived from: (1) studying the effects of molten sodium contact at 350/sup 0/C on single crystal sodium beta alumina and polycrystalline sodium beta alumina; (2) determination of critical current density by monitoring acoustic emissions accompanying crack growth in sodium/sodium beta alumina/sodium cells subjected to linear current ramping at 1 mA cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/; (3) failure analysis conducted on cycled electrolytes, some from commercial sodium/sulfur cells, which had been subjected to up to 703 Ahr cm/sup -2/ of charge transfer. Gray coloration developing in beta aluminas in contact with molten sodium was found to be a consequence of formation, through reduction by sodium, of oxygen vacancies charge compensated by electrons. Electronic conductivity of the electrolyte increases as a result. No second phase formation was detected. Colored electrolytes from sodium/sulfur cells show evidence of a newly recognized degradation mechanism in which fracture occurs when sodium is reduced and deposited internally under pressure as metal in regions where an electronic conductivity gradient exists. Heating colored beta aluminas in air produces reoxidation and bleaching. Kinetics and other properties of the coloration and bleaching processes were determined. Critical current density was found to bear an inverse relation to average electrolyte grain size. Evidence was found in the cycled electrolytes for a slow crack growth mechanism and a progressive mode of degradation advancing from the sulfur electrode interface. Implications of the findings for the construction and operation of sodium/sulfur battery systems are discussed.

Buechele, A.C.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Fact Sheet: Sodium-Beta Batteries (October 2012)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sodium-Beta Batteries Sodium-Beta Batteries Improving the performance and reducing the cost of sodium-beta batteries for large-scale energy storage Sodium-beta batteries (Na-beta batteries or NBBs) use a solid beta-alumina (ß˝-Al 2 O 3 ) electrolyte membrane that selectively allows sodium ion transport between a positive electrode (e.g., a metal halide) and a negative sodium electrode. NBBs typically operate at temperatures near 350˚C. They are increasingly used in renewable storage and utility applications due to their high round-trip efficiency, high energy densities, and energy storage capacities ranging from a few kilowatt-hours to multiple megawatt-hours. In fact, U.S. utilities

151

Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells II. Phase Equilibria  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II. Phase Equilibria II. Phase Equilibria Title Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells II. Phase Equilibria Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 1996 Authors Ridgway, Paul L., Frank R. McLarnon, and John S. Newman Journal Journal of the Electrochemistry Society Volume 143 Issue 2 Pagination 412-417 Keywords 25 ENERGY STORAGE, 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE, ALUMINIUM OXIDES, equilibrium, performance, PHASE DIAGRAMS, PHOSPHIDES, PHOSPHORUS ADDITIONS, SODIUM COMPOUNDS, SODIUM SULFIDES, SODIUM-SULFUR BATTERIES Abstract Equilibrium open-circuit cell voltage data from a sodium/{beta}{double_prime}-alumina/phosphorus-sulfur cell utilizing P/S ratios of 0, 0.143, and 0.332 and a sodium atom fraction ranging from 0 to 0.4 were interpreted to construct ternary phase diagrams of the Na-P-S ternary system at 350 and 400 C.

152

Review of Chemical Processes for the Synthesis of Sodium Borohydride  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Review of Chemical Processes for the Synthesis of Sodium Borohydride Review of Chemical Processes for the Synthesis of Sodium Borohydride Millennium Cell Inc. Prepared by Ying Wu Michael T. Kelly Jeffrey V. Ortega Under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-04GO14008 August 2004 Table of Contents Introduction..................................................................................................................................... 1 Section 1: Commercially Practiced Sodium Borohydride Synthesis Process ............................... 2 The Brown-Schlesinger Process ................................................................................................. 2 The Bayer Process.......................................................................................................................

153

Sodium cobalt bronze batteries and a method for making same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid state secondary battery utilizing a low cost, environmentally sound, sodium cobalt bronze electrode. A method is provided for producing same.

Doeff, Marca M. (Hayward, CA); Ma, Yanping (Berkeley, CA); Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); DeJonghe, Lutgard (Lafayette, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Internal temperatures of neutral sodium clusters: a “PIE-thermometer”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Distinct temperature effects could be observed in the threshold regions of photoionisation efficiency (PIE) measurements of sodium clusters. Simulations of the PIE thresholds at various temperatures were carried ...

U. Röthlisberger; M. Schär; E. Schumacher

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Function and Regulation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ENA Sodium ATPase System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sodium when sodium is present in excess in the external medium relies...of sensitivity to sodium and lithium cations (31, 36, 70, 77...confer distinct sodium and lithium tolerances, with the former...The accumulation of sodium or lithium cations in calcineurin-deficient...

Amparo Ruiz; Joaquín Ariño

2007-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

156

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Sodium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Neon Neon Previous Element (Neon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Magnesium) Magnesium Isotopes of the Element Sodium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 23 100% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 18 1.3×10-21 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% 19 < 40 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 20 447.9 milliseconds Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 20.05% Electron Capture 100.00% 21 22.49 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 22 2.6027 years Electron Capture 100.00% 23 STABLE - - 24 14.997 hours Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

157

Mercury exosphere I. Global circulation model of its sodium component  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury exosphere I. Global circulation model of its sodium component Francois Leblanc a,*, R 2010 Accepted 27 April 2010 Available online 5 May 2010 Keywords: Mercury, Atmosphere Aeronomy a b s t r a c t Our understanding of Mercury's sodium exosphere has improved considerably in the last 5

Johnson, Robert E.

158

RESEARCH Open Access Half-molar sodium lactate infusion improves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH Open Access Half-molar sodium lactate infusion improves cardiac performance in acute heart for the myocardium at rest and during stress. We tested the effects of half-molar sodium lactate infusion on cardiac by 1 ml/kg/h continuous infusion for 24 hours. The control group received only a 3 ml/kg bolus

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

159

Sol–gel synthesis of sodium and lithium based materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sodium and lithium cobaltates are important materials for thermoelectric and ... the sol–gel synthesis of sodium- and lithium-based materials by using acetate precursors. The produced Na2/3CoO2, Li(Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/...

Sandra Hildebrandt; Andreas Eva…

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Alternatives for sodium-potassium alloy treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) is currently treated at the Y-12 Plant by open burning. Due to uncertainties with future permits for this process alternative treatment methods were investigated, revealing that two treatment processes are feasible. One process reacts the NaK with water in a highly concentrated molten caustic solution (sodium and potassium hydroxide). The final waste is a caustic that may be used elsewhere in the plant. This process has two safety concerns: Hot corrosive materials used throughout the process present handling difficulties and the process must be carefully controlled (temperature and water content) to avoid explosive NaK reactions. To avoid these problems a second process was developed that dissolves NaK in a mixture of propylene glycol and water at room temperature. While this process is safer, it generates more waste than the caustic process. The waste may possibly be used as a carbon food source in biological waste treatment operations at the Y-12 Plant. Experiments were conducted to demonstrate both processes, and they showed that both processes are feasible alternatives for NaK treatment. Process flow sheets with mass balances were generated for both processes and compared. While the caustic process generates less waste, the propylene glycol process is safer in several ways (temperature, material handling, and reaction control). The authors recommend that the propylene glycol alternative be pursued further as an alternative for NaK treatment. To optimize this process for a larger scale several experiments should be conducted. The amount of NaK dissolved in propylene glycol and subsequent waste generated should be optimized. The offgas processes should be optimized. The viability of using this waste as a carbon food source at one of the Y-12 Plant treatment facilities should be investigated. If the state accepts this process as an alternative, design and construction of a pilot-scale treatment system should begin.

Takacs, T.J.; Johnson, M.E.

1993-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Contractor - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Contractor - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Contractor Operational Readiness Review This report documents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), independent review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project-Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (SBWTP-IWTU) contractor Operational Readiness Review (C-ORR). The review was conducted at the Idaho Site from February 27 to March 6, 2012. This report discusses the background, scope, results, and conclusions of the review, as well as

162

Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - November 2012 November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent assessment of nuclear safety culture at the DOE Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project (SBWTP). The primary objective of the evaluation was to provide information regarding the status of the safety culture at SBWTP. The data collection phase of the assessment occurred in April and May 2012. SBWTP is one of DOE's largest nuclear

163

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Federal - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Federal - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Federal Operational Readiness Review This report documents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), independent review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project-Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (SBWTP-IWTU) DOE (Federal) Operational Readiness Review (D-ORR). The review was performed by the HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations and was intended to assess the effectiveness of the CORR process as implemented for

164

EIS-0287: Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology EIS-0287: Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology Idaho High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition In October 2002, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) issued the Final Idaho High-Level Waste (HLW) and Facilities Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0287 (Final EIS)). The Final EIS contains an evaluation of reasonable alternatives for the management of mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW),1 mixed HLW calcine, and associated low-level waste (LLW), as well as disposition alternatives for HLW facilities when their missions are completed. DOE/EIS-0287, Notice of Preferred Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Technology, Office of Environmental Management, Idaho, 70 FR 44598 (August

165

Production of sodium-22 from proton irradiated aluminum  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for selective separation of sodium-22 from a proton irradiated minum target including dissolving a proton irradiated aluminum target in hydrochloric acid to form a first solution including aluminum ions and sodium ions, separating a portion of the aluminum ions from the first solution by crystallization of an aluminum salt, contacting the remaining first solution with an anion exchange resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of iron and copper are selectively absorbed by the anion exchange resin while aluminum ions and sodium ions remain in solution, contacting the solution with an cation exchange resin whereby aluminum ions and sodium ions are adsorbed by the cation exchange resin, and, contacting the cation exchange resin with an acid solution capable of selectively separating the adsorbed sodium ions from the cation exchange resin while aluminum ions remain adsorbed on the cation exchange resin is disclosed.

Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, David J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Theoretical Adiabatic Temperature and Chemical Composition of Sodium Combustion Flame  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium fire safety analysis requires fundamental combustion properties, e.g., heat of combustion, flame temperature, and composition. We developed the GENESYS code for a theoretical investigation of sodium combustion flame.Our principle conclusions on sodium combustion under atmospheric air conditions are (a) the maximum theoretical flame temperature is 1950 K, and it is not affected by the presence of moisture; the uppermost limiting factor is the chemical instability of the condensed sodium-oxide products under high temperature; (b) the main combustion product is liquid Na{sub 2}O in dry air condition and liquid Na{sub 2}O with gaseous NaOH in moist air; and (c) the chemical equilibrium prediction of the residual gaseous reactants in the flame is indispensable for sodium combustion modeling.

Okano, Yasushi; Yamaguchi, Akira [O-arai Engineering Center (Japan)

2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

E-Print Network 3.0 - acetate sodium lactate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sodium-high lactate infusion'. Of course, it is easy to demonstrate that high lactate infusion... . Also, sodium-lactate infusion in humans ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre...

168

High-resolution lidar observations of mesospheric sodium and implications for adaptive optics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations of sodium density variability in the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere, obtained using a high-resolution lidar system, show rapid fluctuations in the sodium centroid...

Pfrommer, Thomas; Hickson, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Risk Management for Sodium Fast Reactors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accident management is an important component to maintaining risk at acceptable levels for all complex systems, such as nuclear power plants. With the introduction of self - correcting, or inherently safe, reactor designs the focus has shifted from management by operators to allowing the syste m's design to manage the accident. While inherently and passively safe designs are laudable, extreme boundary conditions can interfere with the design attributes which facilitate inherent safety , thus resulting in unanticipated and undesirable end states. This report examines an inherently safe and small sodium fast reactor experiencing a beyond design basis seismic event with the intend of exploring two issues : (1) can human intervention either improve or worsen the potential end states and (2) can a Bayes ian Network be constructed to infer the state of the reactor to inform (1). ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author s would like to acknowledge the U.S. Department of E nergy's Office of Nuclear Energy for funding this research through Work Package SR - 14SN100303 under the Advanced Reactor Concepts program. The authors also acknowledge the PRA teams at A rgonne N ational L aborator y , O ak R idge N ational L aborator y , and I daho N ational L aborator y for their continue d contributions to the advanced reactor PRA mission area.

Denman, Matthew R; Groth, Katrina; Cardoni, Jeffrey N; Wheeler, Timothy A.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Pulse radiolysis of solutions of sodium tetraphenylborate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pulse radiolysis of solutions of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaBPh/sub 4/) indicates that the absorption observed in organic amides with lambda/sub max/ in the range 650-724 nm is not due to Na/sup -/, an electron adduct to BPh/sub 4//sup -/, a triplet excited state, or a proton-donating solvent cation. Experiments in aqueous solution are described in which the reactions of selected radicals with NaBPh/sub 4/ are studied. One-electron oxidation of NaBPh/sub 4/ by N/sub 3//sup .-/ radicals yields a species, assumed to be NaBPh/sub 4//sup ./, with absorption maxima at 335 and 800 nm. A similar spectrum is observed on pulse radiolysis of solutions of NaBPh/sub 4/ in tetramethylurea (TMU), but the long-wavelength absorption is shifted to 725 nm. The formation of an oxidizing radical in irradiated TMU was confirmed by the observation of I/sub 2//sup .-/ on pulse radiolysis of solutions of KI in this solvent. Pulse radiolysis of solution of NaBPh/sub 4/ and KI in TMU demonstrated that these solutes compete for the oxidizing intermediate.

Liu, K.J.; Langan, J.R.; Salmon, G.A.; Holton, D.M.; Edwards, P.P.

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

171

Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Internal structure, hygroscopic and Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium methanesulfonate-sodium chloride particles Internal structure, hygroscopic and reactive properties of mixed sodium methanesulfonate-sodium chloride particles Print Friday, 13 May 2011 00:00 Scientists recently combined experimental approaches and molecular dynamics modeling to gain new insights into the internal structure of sea salt particles and relate it to their fundamental chemical reactivity in the atmosphere. This research shows that surface enhancement or depletion of chemical components in marine particles can occur because of the difference in the chemical nature of the species. Because the atmospheric chemistry of the salt particles takes place at the gas-particle interface, understanding their complex surfaces provides new insights about their effect on the environment and climate change. Article Link.

172

Loop simulation capability for sodium-cooled systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A one-dimensional loop simulation capability has been implemented in the thermal-hydraulic analysis code, THERMIT-4E. This code had been used to simulate and investigate flow in test sections of experimental sodium loops ...

Adekugbe, Oluwole A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Neutron Activation Analysis of Manganese and Sodium in Bacterial Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Metabolism and Products Neutron Activation Analysis of Manganese and Sodium...Columbus, Ohio 43210. The application of neutron activation analysis for mineral determinations...two elements. The results indicate that neutron activation analysis is readily applicable...

Woodrow B. Krueger; Walter E. Carey; Bruno J. Kolodzeij

1970-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The Salt or Sodium Chloride Content of Feeds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 EXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS W. B. BIZZELL, Preeident BULLETIN NO. 271 OCTOBER, 1920 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY THE SALT OR SODIUM CHLORIDE CONTENT OF FEEDS B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOK COLLEGE.... ............... Salt content of feecls.. ......... Salt content of mixed feeds.. ................... Summary ancl conclusions. Page. l1 [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] BULLETIN XO. 271. OCTOBE- '"On THE SALT OR SODIUM CHLORIDE CONTENT OF FEI The Texas feed...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Lomanitz, S. (Sebastian)

1920-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

Yunker, Wayne H. (Richland, WA); Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Sodium removal process development for LMFBR fuel subassemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two 37-pin scale models of Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant fuel subassemblies were designed, fabricated and used at Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division in the development and proof-testing of a rapid water-based sodium removal process for the ORNL Hot Experimental Facility, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Cycle. Through a series of development tests on one of the models, including five (5) sodium wettings and three (3) high temperature sodium removal operations, optimum process parameters for a rapid water vapor-argon-water rinse process were identified and successfully proof-tested on a second model containing argon-pressurized, sodium-corroded model fuel pins simulating the gas plenum and cladding conditions expected for spent fuel pins in full scale subassemblies. Based on extrapolations of model proof test data, preliminary process parameters for a water vapor-nitrogen-water rinse process were calculated and recommended for use in processing full scale fuel subassemblies in the Sodium Removal Facility of the Fuel Receiving Cell, ORNL HEF.

Simmons, C.R.; Taylor, G.R.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Development of under sodium inspection techniques for FBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reactor vessel of a fast breeder reactor (FBR) is filled with opaque liquid sodium and ultrasonic inspection techniques are effective and useful for observing the in-vessel structures under sodium. Firstly, in the development of the under sodium visual inspection technique, the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) and cross-correlation processing have been applied to realize ultrasonic 3-dimensional cross-correlation image processing with high resolution. Cross-correlation processing improves the S/N ratio of the ultrasonic echoes which are deteriorated by sodium wetting, and realizes high-density integration of the matrix arrayed transducer. Matrix arrayed transducer, in which 100 piezoelectric elements are arranged as a 10 x 10 matrix array, has been manufactured for the in-water visualizing test. Secondly, in the development of the under sodium volumetric inspection technique, a prototype electric scanning UT sensor has been developed for the volumetric test of the core support structures in the reactor vessel. The UT sensor consists of 60 arrayed piezoelectric elements, non-organic materials such as ceramic backing. Ultrasonic echoes transmitted from the elements is scanned electronically and real-time B-scope images of the structures can be realized. A prototype UT sensor has been tested to evaluate the acoustic characteristics in water and confirm the heat-proof performance under high temperature silicon oil. The performance of the UT sensor satisfied the requirements.

Karasawa, H.; Suzuki, T.; Nagai, S.; Izumi, M.; Kobayashi, T. [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Sasaki, S.; Ota, S.; Kai, M. [Japan Atomic Power Co., Tokyo (Japan)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Sodium-based Battery Development - Dave Ingersoll, SNL  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sodium-based Battery Development Sodium-based Battery Development A Family of Batteries for Large Scale Energy Storage D. Ingersoll, C. Apblett, E. Spoerke, K. Zavadil, R. Cygan, J. Ihlefeld, F. Delnick, & T. Anderson Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM Prof. E. Wachsman University of Maryland, College Park, MD Profs. R. Kee & J. Porter, Dr. H. Zhu Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO S. Bhavaraju & M. Robins Ceramatec, Inc, Salt Lake City, UT D. Beeaff CoorsTek, Inc, Golden, CO J. Martin Boulder Ionics, Golden CO US DOE Energy Storage Systems Research Program Peer Review, Washington, DC, Sept. 26-28, 2012 Sodium-based batteries  Purpose  Demonstrate a family of sodium-based battery chemistries  sodium-iodine, sodium-bromine, sodium-air, sodium insertion, sodium-metal, etc

179

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contractor - June 2012 Contractor - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Contractor - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Contractor Operational Readiness Review This report documents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), independent review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project-Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (SBWTP-IWTU) contractor Operational Readiness Review (C-ORR). The review was conducted at the Idaho Site from February 27 to March 6, 2012. This report discusses the background, scope, results, and conclusions of the review, as well as opportunities for improvement (OFIs) and items identified for further

180

Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors February 17, 2006 - 11:58am Addthis FUKUI , JAPAN - The Department of Energy today announced that the United States signed a sodium-cooled fast reactor systems arrangement with France and Japan, providing the framework for collaboration among these countries on the research and development of these advanced nuclear reactors. The signing of the agreement took place on February 16, 2006. This arrangement will support the development of technologies associated with the U.S.-led Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), announced earlier this month by Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman. GNEP is a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal - June 2012 Federal - June 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Federal - June 2012 June 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Federal Operational Readiness Review This report documents the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), independent review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project-Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (SBWTP-IWTU) DOE (Federal) Operational Readiness Review (D-ORR). The review was performed by the HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations and was intended to assess the effectiveness of the CORR process as implemented for the SBWTP-IWTU. This review also provides additional data regarding

182

Numerical Methodology to Evaluate Fast Reactor Sodium Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present study, a numerical methodology for sodium combustion has been developed for the safety evaluation of a liquid-metal-cooled fast reactor. The methodology includes a fast-running zone model computer program for safety evaluation, a field model program for multidimensional thermal hydraulics, and a chemical reaction analysis program based on chemical equilibrium theory. Two recently performed experiments have been analyzed using the computer programs, and the numerical results are in good agreement with the experiments. Although sodium combustion is a complex phenomenon, use of these computer programs gives better understanding of the coupled thermal hydraulics and chemical reaction.

Yamaguchi, Akira; Takata, Takashi; Okano, Yasushi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (Japan)

2001-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

The magnesium nutrition of cotton as influenced by sodium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1964 Major Subject. Plant Physic logy THE MAGNESIUM NUTRITION OF COTTON AS INFLUENCED BY SODIUM A Thesis By MERVYN M. THENABADU Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Commi. e Nun Head of Department Member Mem, er Member Member... REVIEW OF LITERATURE (a) Sodium as a plant nutrient (b) I'he role of magnesium in plant nutrition MATERIALS AND METHODS RESUL:S DISCUSSION 13 21 24 (a) The effect of treatments on grcwth and reproduction (b) The effect of treatments on the ccr...

Thenabadu, Mervyn Wellesly

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

184

Aluminum Zintl anion moieties within sodium aluminum clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have established that aluminum moieties within selected sodium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Sodium–aluminum cluster anions, Na{sub m}Al{sub n}{sup ?}, were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on a select sub-set of stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for both cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra), and fragment molecular orbital based correlation diagrams.

Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Grubisic, Andrej; Li, Xiang; Ganteför, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Schnöckel, Hansgeorg [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Eichhorn, Bryan W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Maryland at College Park, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Maryland at College Park, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Lee, Mal-Soon; Jena, P. [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Kandalam, Anil K., E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Physics, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 (United States); Kiran, Boggavarapu, E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States)

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

185

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research has focused on new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to separation of major sodium salts from alkaline tank waste. It was the overall goal to provide the scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of liquid-liquid extraction chemistry for bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated. Sodium hydroxide represented the initial test case and primary focus. It is a primary component of the waste1 and has the most value for recycle. A full explanation of the relevance of this research to USDOE Environmental Management needs will be given in the Relevance, Impact, and Technology Transfer section below. It should be noted that this effort was predicated on the need for sodium removal primarily from low-activity waste, whereas evolving needs have shifted attention to volume reduction of the high-activity waste. The results of the research to date apply to both applications, though treatment of high-activity wastes raises new questions that will be addressed in the renewal period. Toward understanding the extractive chemistry of sodium hydroxide and other sodium salts, it was the intent to identify candidate extractants and determine their applicable basic properties regarding selectivity, efficiency, speciation, and structure. A hierarchical strategy was to be employed in which the type of liquid-liquid-extraction system varied in sophistication from simple, single-component solvents to solvents containing designer host molecules. As an aid in directing this investigation toward addressing the fundamental questions having the most value, a conceptualization of an ideal process was advanced. Accordingly, achieving adequate selectivity for sodium hydroxide represented a primary goal, but this result is worthwhile for waste applications only if certain conditions are met.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Bryan, Jeffrey C.; Haverlock, Tamara J.

2002-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

186

The ternary silicide ZrPd{sub 3}Si{sub 3}, a stacking variant of the {alpha}-FeSi{sub 2} and Re{sub 3}B structure types  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ternary zirconium palladium silicide ZrPd{sub 3}Si{sub 3} has been synthesized by arc-melting of the elemental components. It adopts a new structure type and crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Cmcm with a = 3.8127(4){angstrom}, b = 15.551(1){angstrom}, c = 7.0390(5){angstrom}, and Z = 4 (Pearson symbol oC28). The structure can be regarded as being built up of Re{sub 3}B-type slabs of composition Pd{sub 3}Si alternating with {alpha}-FeSi{sub 2} slabs of composition ZrSi{sub 2}. Notable features include the presence of Si{sub 2} pairs, square pyramidal and tetrahedral coordination of Pd centers by Si atoms, an unusual distorted cubic coordination of the Zr atoms by the Si{sub 2} pairs, and an extensive network of Zr-Zr, Zr-Pd, and Pd-Pd metal-metal bonds. ZrPd{sub 3}Si{sub 3} is weakly metallic with a room-temperature resistivity of 1.7 x 10{sup {minus}3} {Omega} cm. Extended Hueckel band structure calculations confirm the metallic behavior; support the simultaneous existence of strong metal-metal, metal-nonmetal, and nonmetal-nonmetal bonding; and suggest a reduced state for the Pd atoms resulting from electron transfer from the Si atoms.

Wang, M.; Mar, A.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Unsteady aspects of sodium–water–air reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One important issue for the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) concept is the reactivity of metallic sodium and its exothermal reaction with water. In particular during equipments washing operations, sodium needs to be firstly converted (‘destroyed’) into non reactive species via a chemical reaction with water. Today, such operations are performed in tanks that confine the system and mitigate the consequences of any possible abnormal condition. Some data were obtained from experiments run by the French Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA) and were used as a basis for modelling. Among the principal phenomena identified so far are rapid water vaporization, hydrogen emission and explosion in air. High explosive-like pressure waves are generated from which sodium fragmentation and dispersion in water may ensue increasing the overall reactivity. It is extremely important to clarify the phenomenology to allow realistic extrapolation to full scale plants. A state of the art is proposed in this paper, starting from available experimental data and present perception of the physics. A comparison with present modelling strategy is also performed, underlining the necessity to improve a different and more physical approach aimed to well represent dynamic aspects of reaction.

Sofia Carnevali; Christophe Proust; Michel Soucille

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Multiple reheat helium Brayton cycles for sodium fast reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium fast reactors (SFR) traditionally adopt the steam Rankine cycle for power conversion. The resulting potential for water-sodium reaction remains a continuing concern which at least partly delays the SFR technology commercialization and is a contributor to higher capital cost. Supercritical CO2 provides an alternative, but is also capable of sustaining energetic chemical reactions with sodium. Recent development on advanced inert-gas Brayton cycles could potentially solve this compatibility issue, increase thermal efficiency, and bring down the capital cost close to light water reactors. In this paper, helium Brayton cycles with multiple reheat and intercooling states are presented for SFRs with reactor outlet temperatures in the range of 510°C to 650°C. The resulting thermal efficiencies range from 39% and 47%, which is comparable with supercritical recompression CO2 cycles (SCO2 cycle). A systematic comparison between multiple reheat helium Brayton cycle and the SCO2 cycle is given, considering compatibility issues, plant site cooling temperature effect on plant efficiency, full plant cost optimization, and other important factors. The study indicates that the multiple reheat helium cycle is the preferred choice over SCO2 cycle for sodium fast reactors.

Haihua Zhao; Per F. Peterson

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

FATE OF INGESTED SODIUM BICARBONATE IN THE FOWL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 100 calcium while rations 3 and4contained 3.85 p. 100 calcium. Sodium bicarbonate was added at a level. The duodenum was entered at the top of the loop and the electrode tip immersed its full length down the posterior side of the loop. The #12;mid-intestinal reading was taken with the incision at approximately

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

190

Process for making boron nitride using sodium cyanide and boron  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This a very simple process for making boron nitride by mixing sodium cyanide and boron phosphate and heating the mixture in an inert atmosphere until a reaction takes place. The product is a white powder of boron nitride that can be used in applications that require compounds that are stable at high temperatures and that exhibit high electrical resistance.

Bamberger, Carlos E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Method of Manufacturing Micro-Disperse Particles of Sodium Borohydride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM); Hecht, Andrew M. (Sandia Park, NM); Sylwester. Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM); Bell, Nelson S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

192

Method of generating hydrogen gas from sodium borohydride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM); Hecht, Andrew M. (Sandia Park, NM); Sylwester, Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM); Bell, Nelson S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

193

Chemistry of Petroleum Crude Oil Deposits: Sodium Naphthenates 2009 NHMFL Science Highlight for NSF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry of Petroleum Crude Oil Deposits: Sodium Naphthenates 2009 NHMFL Science Highlight for NSF-355. Chemistry of Petroleum Crude Oil Deposits: Sodium Naphthenates 2009 NHMFL Science Highlight for NSF DMR

Weston, Ken

194

Structural basis for the transformation pathways of the sodium naproxen anhydrate-hydrate system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Relationships between the crystal structures of two polymorphs of sodium naproxen dihydrate and its monohydrate and anhydrate phases provide a basis to rationalize the observed transformation pathways in the sodium (S)-naproxen anhydrate-hydrate system.

Bond, A.D.

2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

195

SnSb@carbon nanocable anchored on graphene sheets for sodium ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of materials with unique nanostructures is an effective strategy for the improvement of sodium storage in sodium ion batteries to achieve stable cycling performance and good ... , SnSbcore/carbon-...

Li Li; Kuok Hau Seng; Dan Li; Yongyao Xia; Hua Kun Liu; Zaiping Guo

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Discovery of Sodium and Potassium Vapor in the Atmosphere of the Moon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...lunar atmosphere: Solar-wind implantation and subsequent release of sodium, solar wind-driven sputtering of sodium...internal release. Solar-wind implantation can only supply...near the south pole at large local solar zenith angles suggests...

A. E. Potter; T. H. Morgan

1988-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

197

Go No-Go Recommendation for Sodium Borohydride for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Independent review panel recommendation for go/no go decision on use of hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen storage.

198

Effect of sodium montmorillonite nanoclay on the water absorbency and cationic dye removal of carrageenan-based nanocomposite superabsorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanocomposite superabsorbents were synthesized by simultaneously solution copolymerization of acrylamide (AAm) and sodium acrylate (Na-AA) in the presence of carrageenan biopolymer and sodium montmorillonite (Na-...

Gholam Reza Mahdavinia; Bakhshali Massoumi; Karim Jalili…

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Microsoft Word - EC Sodium coolant removal.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 SECTION A. Project Title: MFC - EBR-II Sodium Removal/RCRA Closure Activities SECTION B . Project Description The proposed action will remove the sodium from the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR)-II piping system and tanks to achieve clean-closure for eventual decommissioning, deactivation and demolition (DD&D). The clean-closure will be completed in compliance with the EBR-II Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Storage and Treatment Permit PER-120, which includes the closure plan. EBR-II is located at the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory. The EBR-II DD&D actions will be addressed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act, specifically, the Engineering Evaluation/Cost

200

Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment, Applied Technology Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho mandates treatment of sodium-bearing waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is to complete treatment of sodium-bearing waste by December 31, 2012. Applied technology activities are required to provide the data necessary to complete conceptual design of four identified alternative processes and to select the preferred alternative. To provide a technically defensible path forward for the selection of a treatment process and for the collection of needed data, an applied technology plan is required. This document presents that plan, identifying key elements of the decision process and the steps necessary to obtain the required data in support of both the decision and the conceptual design. The Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Applied Technology Plan has been prepared to provide a description/roadmap of the treatment alternative selection process. The plan details the results of risk analyzes and the resulting prioritized uncertainties. It presents a high-level flow diagram governing the technology decision process, as well as detailed roadmaps for each technology. The roadmaps describe the technical steps necessary in obtaining data to quantify and reduce the technical uncertainties associated with each alternative treatment process. This plan also describes the final products that will be delivered to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office in support of the office's selection of the final treatment technology.

Lance Lauerhass; Vince C. Maio; S. Kenneth Merrill; Arlin L. Olson; Keith J. Perry

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Sodium boiling dryout correlation for LMFBR fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under certain postulated accident conditions for a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR), such as the failure of the shutdown heat removal system (SHRS), sodium boiling and clad dryout might occur in the fuel assemblies. It is important to predict the time from boiling inception to dryout, since sustained clad dryout will result in core damage. In this paper a dryout correlation is presented. This correlation is based on 21 boiling tests which resulted in dryout from the THORS BUNDLE 6A, a 19-pin full-length simulated LMFBR fuel assembly and from the THORS Bundle 9, a 61-pin full-length simulated LMFBR fuel assembly. All these tests were performed as follows: for each specified bundle power, an initial steady-state high sodium flow was established, for which sodium boiling did not occur in the bundle. The temperature at the outlet of the test section was approx. 700/sup 0/C. Then, using a programmable pump control system, the flow was reduced to a low value and boiling occurred.

Carbajo, J.J.; Rose, S.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

EIS-0306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear 306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel EIS-0306: Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel Summary This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the proposed electrometallurgical treatment of DOE-owned sodium bonded spent nuclear fuel in the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download September 19, 2000 EIS-0306: Record of Decision Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel July 1, 2000 EIS-0306: Final Environmental Impact Statement Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel July 1, 1999 EIS-0306: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Treatment of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel

203

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of high-level nuclear waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Treatment processes themselves can exacerbate the problem by adding further volume to the waste. Waste retrieval and sludge washing, for example, will require copious amounts of sodium hydroxide. If the needed sodium hydroxide could be separated from the waste and recycled, however, the addition of fresh sodium hydroxide could be avoided, ultimately reducing the final waste volume and associated disposal costs. The major objective of this research is to explore new liquid-liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of sodium hydroxide from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Consideration is also given to separating potassium and abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of high- level waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Treatment processes themselves can exacerbate the problem by adding further volume to the waste. Waste retrieval and sludge washing, for example, will require copious amounts of sodium hydroxide. If the needed sodium hydroxide could be separated from the waste and recycled, however, the addition of fresh sodium hydroxide could be avoided, ultimately reducing the final waste volume and associated disposal costs. The major objective of this research is to explore new liquid- liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of sodium hydroxide from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Consideration is also given to separating potassium and abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Dynamic stability experiments in sodium-heated steam generators. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seventy-two dynamic stability tests were performed in the sodium-heated boiling-water test facility at Argonne National Laboratory. A full-scale LMFBR steam generator tube was employed as the test section operating over the water parameter ranges of 6.9 to 15.9 MPa pressure and 170 to 800 kg/m/sup 2/.s mass flux. The stability thresholds from the test compared well to the predictions of a modified version of a correlation equation recently published by other investigators. Typical experimental data and the modified correlation equation are presented.

France, D.M.; Roy, R.; Carlson, R.D.; Chiang, T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Effects of the mycotoxin penicillic acid on electrogenic sodium transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Maximal 1nh1- bition of sodium transport (89. 7%) by PA was achieved after 40 minutes reaction time. The addition of d1thiothreitol to the test med1a prevented short-c1rc1ut current inhibition 1ndicating that the mode of PA action on sod1um flux may..., and 45 minutes . 47 15 C-PA binding to 1ntact toad urigry bladder with and without addit1on of DTT to the C-PA before bladder app1 i cati on. . . 48 Relationship of radiotoxin binding to intact bladder with respect to inhibition of the sod1um pump...

Wilczynski, Teresa Anne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

207

United States, France and Japan Increase Cooperation on Sodium-Cooled Fast  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

United States, France and Japan Increase Cooperation on United States, France and Japan Increase Cooperation on Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Prototypes United States, France and Japan Increase Cooperation on Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Prototypes February 1, 2008 - 11:13am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S Department of Energy (DOE), the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) today expanded cooperation to coordinate Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Prototype development through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed by DOE Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Dennis R. Spurgeon, CEA Chairman Alain Bugat and JAEA President Toshio Okazaki. The MOU establishes a collaborative framework with the ultimate goal of deploying sodium-cooled fast reactor prototypes. A sodium-cooled fast reactor uses liquid sodium

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous sodium chloride Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cholate... by the addition of sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate salt and then resuspension of the SWNTs... peroxidase (HRP) on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using...

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous sodium sulfate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: by the addition of sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate salt and then resuspension of the SWNTs... peroxidase (HRP) on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using...

210

LOW FLAMMABILITY FOAM-LIKE MATERIALS BASED ON EPOXY, TANNIC ACID, SODIUM MONTMORILLONITE CLAY.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Aerogels based on sodium montmorillonite clay, epoxy polymer, and tannic acid as a flame retardant additive were fabricated through a simple environmentally-friendly freeze drying process… (more)

Lang, Xiaolong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

ELECTROCHEMICAL RESEARCH IN CHEMICAL HYDROGEN STORAGE MATERIALS: SODIUM BOROHYDRIDE AND ORGANOTIN HYDRIDES.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane… (more)

McLafferty, Jason

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Low Temperature Sodium-Sulfur Grid Storage and EV Battery - Energy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and a conductive polymer, while the solid electrolyte - based on cross-linked polyethylene oxide - forms a stable but ion-conducting barrier separating the liquid sodium...

213

A study of phase transitions in sodium stearate by means of nuclear magnetic resonance.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The mesomorphic phase transitions of sodium stearate occurring between 23°C. and 200°C. were investigated by means of the nuclear magnetic resonance of the hydrogen nuclei… (more)

Grant, Rowland Frederick

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Coherent population trapping on the sodium D1 line in high magnetic fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the coherent-population-trapping (CPT) phenomenon in a sodium atomic vapor. The experiment leading to the first observation of CPT is revisited with an improved...

Höller, R; Renzoni, F; Windholz, L; Xu, J H

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting sodium hypochlorite Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Workshop Summary: equipment, vehicles Sodium hypochlorite (bleach) 200-500 ppm Nets, boots, clothing. Surfaces must be clean... hypochlorite solution.Note: Bleach is 5.25%...

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline sodium borohydride Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aardahl, PNNL) The most critical hurdle for the use of sodium ... Source: DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure...

217

E-Print Network 3.0 - aged sodium borophosphate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is a pool-type, sodium- cooled fast reactor that uses a large core of depleted uranium and a "sparkplug Source: Los Alamos National Laboratory, Theoretical Division,...

218

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum sodium chloride Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

agents Water Acetyl chloride, alkaline and alkaline... hypochlorite, all oxidizing agents Carbon tetrachloride Sodium ... Source: Hall, Sharon J. - School of Life Sciences, Arizona...

219

TRUEX partitioning studies applied to ICPP sodium-bearing waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located in southeast Idaho at the USDOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, formerly reprocessed highly enriched spent nuclear fuel to recover fissionable uranium. The HLW raffinates from the combined PUREX/REDOX type uranium recovery process were converted to solid oxides (calcine) in a high temperature fluidized bed. Liquid effluents from the calcination process were combined with liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW) generated primarily in conjunction with decontamination activities. Due to the high sodium content in the SBW, this secondary waste stream is not directly amenable to solidification via calcination. Currently, approximately 1.5 millon gallons of liquid SBW are stored at the ICPP in large tanks. Several treatment options for the SBW are currently being considered, including the TRansUranic EXtraction (TRUEX) process developed by Horwitz and co-workers at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in preparation for the final disposition of SBW. Herein described are experimental results of radionuclide tracer studies with simulated SBW using the TRUEX process solvent.

Herbst, R.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Law, J.D.; Tranter, T.J.; Todd, T.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Preliminary engineering design of sodium-cooled CANDLE core  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The CANDLE burning process is characterized by the autonomous shifting of burning region with constant reactivity and constant spacial power distribution. Evaluations of such critical burning process by using widely used neutron diffusion and burning codes under some realistic engineering constraints are valuable to confirm the technical feasibility of the CANDLE concept and to put the idea into concrete core design. In the first part of this paper it is discussed that whether the sustainable and stable CANDLE burning process can be reproduced even by using conventional core analysis tools such as SLAROM and CITATION-FBR. As a result it is certainly possible to demonstrate it if the proper core configuration and initial fuel composition required as CANDLE core are applied to the analysis. In the latter part an example of a concrete image of sodium cooled metal fuel 2000MWt rating CANDLE core has been presented by assuming an emerging inevitable technology of recladding. The core satisfies engineering design criteria including cladding temperature pressure drop linear heat rate and cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of cladding fast neutron fluence and sodium void reactivity which are defined in the Japanese FBR design project. It can be concluded that it is feasible to design CADLE core by using conventional codes while satisfying some realistic engineering design constraints assuming that recladding at certain time interval is technically feasible.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Remedial Action Certification Docket - Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

c~-?i-- c~-?i-- I ,3-l Remedial Action Certification Docket - Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) .Complex and the Hot Cave Facility (Bldg. 003), Santa Susana ,Fie!d Laboratory, Chatsworth, California ..:'..~::Yerlette Gatl in, MA-232 I am attaching for entry into the Public Document Room, one copy of the N -23 subject documentat ion. These documents are the backup data for the certification that the facilfties are radiologically acceptable for b- unrestricted use as noted in the certification statement published in the &aney Federal Register. Inasmuch as the certification for unrestricted use is 9/2(/85 being published in the Federal Register, it is prudent that the attached documentation also be available to the public. These documents should be retained In accordance with DOE Order 1324.2--disposal schedule 25.

222

Feasibility Study for Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated under a Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is the complete calcination (i.e., treatment) of all SBW by December 31, 2012. One of the proposed options for treatment of SBW is vitrification. This study will examine the viability of SBW vitrification. This study describes the process and facilities to treat the SBW, from beginning waste input from INTEC Tank Farm to the final waste forms. Schedules and cost estimates for construction and operation of a Vitrification Facility are included. The study includes a facility layout with drawings, process description and flow diagrams, and preliminary equipment requirements and layouts.

J. J. Quigley; B. D. Raivo; S. O. Bates; S. M. Berry; D. N. Nishioka; P. J. Bunnell

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment Alternatives Implementation Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to discuss issues related to the implementation of each of the five down-selected INEEL/INTEC radioactive liquid waste (sodium-bearing waste - SBW) treatment alternatives and summarize information in three main areas of concern: process/technical, environmental permitting, and schedule. Major implementation options for each treatment alternative are also identified and briefly discussed. This report may touch upon, but purposely does not address in detail, issues that are programmatic in nature. Examples of these include how the SBW will be classified with respect to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), status of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) permits and waste storage availability, available funding for implementation, stakeholder issues, and State of Idaho Settlement Agreement milestones. It is assumed in this report that the SBW would be classified as a transuranic (TRU) waste suitable for disposal at WIPP, located in New Mexico, after appropriate treatment to meet transportation requirements and waste acceptance criteria (WAC).

Charles M. Barnes; James B. Bosley; Clifford W. Olsen

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Hybrid sodium heat pipe receivers for dish/Stirling systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of a hybrid solar/gas heat pipe receiver for the SBP 9 kW dish/Stirling system using a United Stirling AB V160 Stirling engine and the results of on-sun testing in alternative and parallel mode will be reported. The receiver is designed to transfer a thermal power of 35 kW. The heat pipe operates at around 800 C, working fluid is sodium. Operational options are solar-only, gas augmented and gas-only mode. Also the design of a second generation hybrid heat pipe receiver currently developed under a EU-funded project, based on the experience gained with the first hybrid receiver, will be reported. This receiver is designed for the improved SPB/L. and C.-10 kW dish/Stirling system with the reworked SOLO V161 Stirling engine.

Laing, D.; Reusch, M. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Thermodynamik

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Screening Evaluation of Sodium Nonatitanate for Strontium and Actinide Removal from Alkaline Salt Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes results from screening tests evaluating strontium and actinide removal characteristics of a sodium titanate material developed by Clearfield and coworkers at Texas A and M University and offered commercially by Honeywell. Sodium nonatitanate may exhibit improved actinide removal kinetics and filtration characteristics compared to MST and thus merit testing.

Hobbs, D.T.

2001-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

226

Adsorption of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate on Functionalized Graphene Measured by Conductometric Titration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applications, including graphene-metal oxide nano- composites for Li-ion battery electrodes,4,5 grapheneAdsorption of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate on Functionalized Graphene Measured by Conductometric States ABSTRACT: We report on the adsorption of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) onto functionalized graphene

Aksay, Ilhan A.

227

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to explore new liquid-liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of major sodium salts from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge sites. Disposal of high level waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Since the residual bulk chemicals must still undergo expensive treatment and disposal after most of the hazardous radionuclides have been removed, large cost savings will result from processes that reduce the overall waste volume. It is proposed that major cost savings can be expected if sodium hydroxide needed for sludge washing can be obtained from the waste itself, thus avoiding the addition of yet another bulk chemical to the waste and still further increase of the waste volume and disposal cost. Secondary priority is given to separating potassium an d abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Bryan, Jeffrey C.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Mercury's sodium exosphere: Magnetospheric ion recycling Service d'Aeronomie du CNRS/IPSL, Verrie`res-Le-Buisson, France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury's sodium exosphere: Magnetospheric ion recycling F. Leblanc Service d'Ae´ronomie du CNRS December 2003. [1] A three-dimensional Monte Carlo model of Mercury's neutral sodium exosphere was used in the surface concentration of sodium along Mercury's motion around the Sun [Leblanc and Johnson, 2003]. Four

Johnson, Robert E.

229

Analysis and methodology for measuring oxygen concentration in liquid sodium with a plugging meter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxygen concentration in liquid sodium is a critical measurement in assessing the potential for corrosion damage in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). There has been little recent work on sodium reactors and oxygen detection. Thus, the technical expertise dealing with oxygen measurements within sodium is no longer readily available in the U.S. Two methods of oxygen detection that have been investigated are the plugging meter and the galvanic cell. One of the overall goals of the Univ. of Wisconsin's sodium research program is to develop an affordable, reliable galvanic cell oxygen sensor. Accordingly, attention must first be dedicated to a well-known standard known as a plugging meter. Therefore, a sodium loop has been constructed on campus in effort to develop the plugging meter technique and gain experience working with liquid metal. The loop contains both a galvanic cell test section and a plugging meter test section. Consistent plugging results have been achieved below 20 [wppm], and a detailed process for achieving effective plugging has been developed. This paper will focus both on an accurate methodology to obtain oxygen concentrations from a plugging meter, and on how to easily control the oxygen concentration of sodium in a test loop. Details of the design, materials, manufacturing, and operation will be presented. Data interpretation will also be discussed, since a modern discussion of plugging data interpretation does not currently exist. (authors)

Nollet, B. K.; Hvasta, M.; Anderson, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Fiber optic sensors for monitoring sodium circuits and power grid cables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At Kalpakkam, India, a programme on development of Raman Distributed Temperature sensor (RDTS) for Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR) application is undertaken. Leak detection in sodium circuits of FBR is critical for the safety and performance of the reactors. It is demonstrated that RDTS can be usefully employed in monitoring sodium circuits and in tracking the percolating sodium in case of any leak. Aluminum Conductor Steel Reinforced (ACSR) cable is commonly used as overhead power transmission cable in power grid. A second application demonstrates the suitability of using RDTS to monitor this transmission cable for any defect. (authors)

Kasinathan, M.; Sosamma, S.; Pandian, C.; Vijayakumar, V.; Chandramouli, S.; Nashine, B. K.; Rao, C. B.; Murali, N.; Rajan, K. K.; Jayakumar, T. [IGCAR, Kalpakkam (India)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Sodium-bearing Waste Treatment Technology Evaluation Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium-bearing waste (SBW) disposition is one of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operation Office’s (NE-ID) and State of Idaho’s top priorities at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL has been working over the past several years to identify a treatment technology that meets NE-ID and regulatory treatment requirements, including consideration of stakeholder input. Many studies, including the High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), have resulted in the identification of five treatment alternatives that form a short list of perhaps the most appropriate technologies for the DOE to select from. The alternatives are (a) calcination with maximum achievable control technology (MACT) upgrade, (b) steam reforming, (c) cesium ion exchange (CsIX) with immobilization, (d) direct evaporation, and (e) vitrification. Each alternative has undergone some degree of applied technical development and preliminary process design over the past four years. This report presents a summary of the applied technology and process design activities performed through February 2004. The SBW issue and the five alternatives are described in Sections 2 and 3, respectively. Details of preliminary process design activities for three of the alternatives (steam reforming, CsIX, and direct evaporation) are presented in three appendices. A recent feasibility study provides the details for calcination. There have been no recent activities performed with regard to vitrification; that section summarizes and references previous work.

Charles M. Barnes; Arlin L. Olson; Dean D. Taylor

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

EXAFS studies of sodium silicate glasses containing dissolved actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium silicate glasses containing dissolved Th, U, Np, and Pu have been studied using the EXAFS technique. Th/sup 4 +/, U/sup 4 +/, Np/sup 4 +/, and Pu/sup 4 +/ ions in the silicate glasses are 8-fold coordinated to oxygen neighbors. The higher valent U/sup 6 +/ and Np/sup 5 +/ ions have complex local symmetries. The U/sup 6 +/ ions appear in a uranyl configuration with 2 oxygen atoms at 1.85A and 4 at 2.25A from the U ion. The Np/sup 5 +/ local symmetry is more complex and difficult to determine uniquely. The U/sup 6 +/ glasses show substantial clustering of the uranium atoms. A structural model, with nearly planar uranyl sheets sandwiched between alkali and silica layers, is used to explain the U/sup 6 +/ EXAFS data. This model allows us to understand why U/sup 6 +/ ions are much more soluble in the glasses than the actinide 4/sup +/ ions. 4 references, 2 figures.

Knapp, G.S.; Veal, B.W.; Paulikas, A.P.; Mitchell, A.W.; Lam, D.J.; Klippert, T.E.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Tolerance Test of Eisenia Fetida for Sodium Chloride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Saltwater spills that make soil excessively saline often occur at petroleum exploration and production (E&P) sites and are ecologically damaging. Brine scars appear when produced water from an E&P site is spilled onto surrounding soil, causing loss of vegetation and subsequent soil erosion. Revegetating lands damaged by brine water can be difficult. The research reported here considers earthworms as a bioremedial treatment for increasing the salt mobility in this soil and encouraging plant growth and a healthy balance of soil nutrients. To determine the practical application of earthworms to remediate brine-contaminated soil, a 17-d test was conducted to establish salt tolerance levels for the common compost earthworm (Eisenia fetida) and relate those levels to soil salinity at brine-spill sites. Soil samples were amended with sodium chloride in concentrations ranging from 1 to 15 g/kg, which represent contamination levels at some spill sites. The survival rate of the earthworms was near 90% in all tested concentrations. Also, reproduction was noted in a number of the lower-concentration test replicates but absent above the 3-g/kg concentrations. Information gathered in this investigation can be used as reference in further studies of the tolerance of earthworms to salty soils, as results suggest that E. fetida is a good candidate to enhance remediation at brine-damaged sites.

Kerr, M.; Stewart, A.J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Development of high performance sodium/metal chloride cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium/metal chloride (MCl{sub 2}) cells and batteries are being studied at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for stationary energy storage and transportation applications. The work is being directed toward (1) development of thin, high-capacity density electrodes and inexpensive {beta}{double prime}-alumina-glass composite electrolyte materials to replace {beta}{double prime}-alumina and (2) the development of models to project MCl{sub 2} system performances. In our NiCl{sub 2} electrode work, the effects of charge/discharge rates, temperature, electrode porosity, and sulfur content on electrode performance were determined using annular electrodes fabricated in the uncharged state. Of all electrode design parameters mentioned, electrode porosity, sulfur content, and charge rates have the greatest effect on utilization and on the area-specific impedance. The {beta}{double prime}-alumina-glass composite electrolyte work has led to the development of a highly conductive (3.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}2}S/cm at 250{degree}C) composite material. Preliminary modeling studies indicate that the performance of the MCl{sub 2} electrodes can be fitted by a mathematic model very successfully and that cell electrolyte configurations of either multiple tubes joined at a header or compartmented flat structures of either {beta}{double prime}-alumina or of the composite material would result in high-performance batteries with power-to-energy ratios of about 5. 15 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

Vissers, D.R.; Bloom, I.D.; Hash, M.C.; Redey, L.; Hammer, C.L.; Dees, D.W.; Nelson, P.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Structure of rhenium-containing sodium borosilicate glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of sodium borosilicate glasses were synthesized with increasing fractions of KReO4 or Re2O7, to 10000 ppm (1 mass%) target Re in glass, to assess the effects of large concentrations of rhenium on glass structure and to estimate the solubility of technetium, a radioactive component in typical low active waste nuclear waste glasses. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were performed to characterize the glasses as a function of Re source additions. In general, silicon was found coordinated in a mixture of Q2 and Q3 structural units, while Al was 4-coordinated and B was largely 3-coordinate and partially 4-coordinated. The rhenium source did not appear to have significant effects on the glass structure. Thus, at the up to the concentrations that remain in dissolved in glass, ~3000 ppm Re by mass maximum. , the Re appeared to be neither a glass-former nor a strong glass modifier., Rhenium likely exists in isolated ReO4- anions in the interstices of the glass network, as evidenced by the polarized Raman spectrum of the Re glass in the absence of sulfate. Analogous to SO42-¬ in similar glasses, ReO4- is likely a network modifier and forms alkali salt phases on the surface and in the bulk glass above solubility.

Goel, Ashutosh; McCloy, John S.; Windisch, Charles F.; Riley, Brian J.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Ferreira, Jose M.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Small-angle neutron scattering study of poly(methyl methacrylate-block-sodium acrylate-block-methyl methacrylate) and poly(sodium acrylate-block-methyl methacrylate-block-sodium acrylate) triblock copolymers in aqueous solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?Small-angle neutron scattering experiments were made on poly(methyl methacrylate-block-sodium acrylate-block-methyl methacrylate) [p(MMA-b-NaA-b-MMA)] and p(NaA-b-MMA-b...-NaA) solutions by varying the compositi...

Szabolcs Vass; Kristina Haimer; Gerhard Meier…

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Process Flow Chart for Immobilizing of Radioactive High Concentration Sodium Hydroxide Product from the Sodium Processing Facility at the BN-350 Nuclear power plant in Aktau, Kazakhstan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of a joint research investigations carried out by the group of Kazakhstan, British and American specialists in development of a new material for immobilization of radioactive 35% sodium hydroxide solutions from the sodium coolant processing facility of the BN-350 nuclear power plant. The resulting solid matrix product, termed geo-cement stone, is capable of isolating long lived radionuclides from the environment. The physico-mechanical properties of geo-cement stone have been investigated and the flow chart for its production verified in a full scale experiments. (author)

Burkitbayev, M.; Omarova, K.; Tolebayev, T. [Ai-Farabi Kazakh National University, Chemical Faculty, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Galkin, A. [KATEP Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Bachilova, N. [NIISTROMPROEKT Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Blynskiy, A. [Nuclear Technology Safety Centre, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Maev, V. [MAEK-Kazatomprom Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Wells, D. [NUKEM Limited- a member of the Freyssinet Group, Winfrith Technology Centre, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom); Herrick, A. [NUKEM Limited- a member of the Freyssinet Group, Caithness (United Kingdom); Michelbacher, J. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells I. Cell Performance Paul L. Ridgway,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells Sodium/Phosphorus-Sulfur Cells I. Cell Performance Paul L. Ridgway, Frank R. McLarnon, and Elton J. Cairns* Energy and Environment Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA ABSTRACT Sodium/°-alumina/phosphorus-sulfur cells utilizing P/S ratios of 0, 0.143, 0.332, and 1.17 at temperatures from 350 to 500°C were studied by measurement of the equilibrium cell voltages at open circuit, and the steady-state cell voltages at current densities up to 70 mA/cm2. States of charge, represented by sodium atom fraction in the P-S electrode, ranged from 0 to 0.4. Open-circuit voltages up to 2.65 V were measured. Theoretical specific energies up to 825 Wh/kg were cal-

239

Thermal-hydraulic analysis of innovative fuel configurations for the sodium fast reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sodium fast reactor (SFR) is currently being reconsidered as an instrument for actinide management throughout the world, thanks in part to international programs such as the Generation-IV and especially the Global ...

Memmott, Matthew J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

The role of sodium bicarbonate in the nucleation of noctilucent clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the sublimation of H2O to bulk ice. A 1-dimensional model of sodium chemistry was then employed to show and particles; cloud physics and chemistry; middle atmosphere ± composition and chemistry) Introduction

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

SYNTHESIS OF HYDROCARBON STANDARDS Tetrahydrofuran (THF) was distilled from sodium/benzophenone under argon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYNTHESIS OF HYDROCARBON STANDARDS Tetrahydrofuran (THF) was distilled from sodium Synthesis (Pelham, NH, USA). Other phosphonium salts were synthesized as follows. A solution, USA). Synthesis of Straight-chain Z-alkenes. Aldehydes needed for Wittig reactions that were

Hanks, Lawrence M.

242

Materials issues in high temperature ultrasonic transducers for under-sodium viewing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid sodium is used as the coolant in some fast spectrum nuclear reactors. This material is optically opaque. To facilitate operations and maintenance activities, an ultrasonic under-sodium viewing system has been developed. In the USA, the technology was successfully demonstrated in the 1970s and, over the intervening 30+ years, the capability was lost. This paper reports materials challenges encountered in developing both single-element and linear phased-array 2-MHz transducers that must operate at temperatures up to 260 deg. C. The critical issues are fundamentally material selection: the ability of a transducer to be immersed into liquid sodium and function at 260 deg. C, to achieve wetting and transmission of ultrasound into the sodium, and to be able to be removed and re-used.

Bond, L. J.; Griffin, J. W.; Posakony, G. J.; Harris, R. V.; Baldwin, D. L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

243

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced fast sodium Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in HaleBopp M. E. Brown and A. H. Bouchez Summary: Sodium Velocities and Sources in Hale-Bopp M. E. Brown and A. H. Bouchez Division of Geological... resolved high-resolution...

244

Population strategies to decrease sodium intake : a global cost-effectiveness analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Excessive sodium consumption is both prevalent and very costly in many countries around the world. Recent research has found that more than 90% of the world's adult population live in countries with mean intakes exceeding ...

Webb, Michael William, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Development of a model to predict flow oscillations in low-flow sodium boiling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental and analytical program has been carried out in order to better understand the cause and effect of flow oscillations in boiling sodium systems. These oscillations have been noted in previous experiments with ...

Levin, Alan Edward

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Comparison of Nanocomposites Prepared from Sodium, Zinc, and Lithium Ionomers of Ethylene/Methacrylic Acid Copolymers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Morphology and mechanical properties of nanocomposites prepared by melt mixing a montmorillonite-based organoclay with lithium, sodium, and zinc ionomers of poly(ethylene-co-methacrylic acid) are presented here. The effect of the type of neutralizing ...

Rhutesh K. Shah; D. R. Paul

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Development of an improved sodium exposure test cell experiment for characterization of AMTEC electrode performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An investigation into sources of inconsistencies in sodium exposure test cell (SETC) measurements, used to characterize AMTEC electrode performance, was conducted. Development of modifications to the SETC setup and operation was also accomplished...

Fiebig, Bradley Nelson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

248

Development of Novel Nanomaterials for Lithium-Air and Sodium-Air Batteries.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Lithium-air and sodium-air batteries are promising energy storage systems for future smart grids and electric vehicles due to their extremely high theoretical energy densities. However,… (more)

Li, Yongliang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Narrowband sodium lidar for the measurements of mesopause region temperature and wind  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report here a narrowband high-spectral resolution sodium temperature/wind lidar recently developed at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) in Hefei, China...

Li, Tao; Fang, Xin; Liu, Wei; Gu, Sheng-Yang; Dou, Xiankang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Brain Tolerance in Dogs to Boron Neutron Capture Therapy with Borocaptate Sodium (BSH) or Boronophenylalanine (BPA)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Research programs investigating the potential use of BNCT for brain tumors have been initiated in Europe and in the U.S. using epithermal neutron beams and either borocaptate sodium (BSH) or boronophenylalanine (

R. Huiskamp; P. R. Gavin; J. A. Coderre; K. H. I. Philipp…

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

The Safe Use of Sodium Hydride on Scale: The Process Development of a Chloropyrimidine Displacement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Safe Use of Sodium Hydride on Scale: The Process Development of a Chloropyrimidine Displacement ... Global Pharmaceutical Commercialization, Merck Manufacturing Division, Rahway, New Jersey, 07065 ... This article is part of the Safety of Chemical Processes 11 special issue. ...

Jamie M. McCabe Dunn; Alicia Duran-Capece; Brendan Meehan; James Ulis; Tetsuo Iwama; Guy Gloor; George Wong; Evan Bekos

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

COST-EFFECTIVENESS OF INTRAVENOUS NICARDIPINE VERSUS SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE FOR POSTOPERATIVE HYPERTENSION AFTER CARDIAC SURGERY.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Postoperative hypertension after cardiac surgery is common and associated with substantial morbidity. Both sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and nicardipine (NIC) are effective in its management. SNP is inexpensive, but associated ...

Barnes, Brian Joseph

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

253

Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate. The copper exchange capacity (CuEC) and Na-Cu exchange reactions on Wyoming montmo- rillonite were studied

Sparks, Donald L.

254

Pilot scale gasification of spent cooking liquor from sodium sulfite based delignification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a pilot scale high pressure entrained flow gasification experiment with spent cooking liquor from a sodium sulfite based delignification process in the DP-1 black liquor gasifier in Piteå, Sweden. Approximately 92 tons of sulfite ...

Erik Furusjö; Ragnar Stare; Ingvar Landälv; Patrik Löwnertz

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

255

Evaporation of water from sodium chloride solutions under controlled climatic conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVAPORATION OF WATER FROM SODIUM CELORIDE SOLUTIONS UNDER CONTROLLED CLIMATIC CONDITIONS A Thesis by Jaroy Moore Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE January 1967 Haj or Subject: Soil Physics EVAPORATION OF WATER FROM SODIUM CHLORIDE SOLUTIONS UNDER CONTROLLED CLIMATIC CONDITIONS A Thesis by Jaroy Moore Approved as to style and content by: (Ch+jman of Committee) (Member) (, j. (Head...

Moore, Jaroy

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

256

Transport parameter determination and modeling of sodium and strontium plumes at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. , 1974] . . 7. Generalized plume with centerline 8. Strontium-90 distribution, 1970 [after Robertson et aL, 1974]. . . . 20 . 22 9. The sodium plume transverse dispersivity-Rnite source size in y iteration diagram. 10. The calculat. ed sodium plume.... There is flow there which picks up the contaminant ions dispersing them through the complex network of fractures and interconnected pore space of the saturated porous medium, the aquifer. Being able to model this spread of contaminant in the subsurface...

Londergan, John Thomas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

257

Evolution of Sodium Technology R and D Actions Supporting French Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the evolution of sodium technology research and development in parallel to sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor (FBR) developments in France and provides information concerning operating plants and existing projects. This paper also discusses how supporting research has adapted to the decline in FBR activities since the decommissioning of Superphenix, while capitalizing on knowledge acquired over more than four decades to be passed down to future generations.

Rodriguez, G.; Baque, F.; Astegiano, J.C. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Cadarache (France)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Characterization of the liquid sodium spray generated by a pipework hole  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to its advantageous thermodynamic characteristics at high temperature (550 deg. C), liquid sodium is the main candidate to be the cooling fluid for Generation TV nuclear reactors SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors). Now, sodium reacts very violently, both with the water and the oxygen of the air. Only few data were known about the liquid sodium behaviour when spread in the environment through micro defects. These are often present in a cooling circuit in welded or sealed joints and more rarely in the pipes. Micro defects, on the other hand, can be also generated in a cooling circuit because of the vibrations always present in a circuit into which a fluid runs. A new set-up, named LISOF, was built for testing high temperature liquid sodium when passing through micro defects and generating sprays or jets. Sprays and jets were generated by means of nozzles embedding sub milli-metric holes the diameter of which was: 0.2 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.5 mm. Tests were performed by pressurizing liquid sodium (550 deg. C) at: 3, 6 and 9 barg. Normal and high speed cinematography were used for the direct observation of the liquid sodium sprays while Phase Doppler Interferometry was used for the measurement of the droplets characteristics and velocity. Tests concerning the behaviour of the high temperature liquid sodium firing in air or in contact with the cement cover applied to a scaled down core catcher simulacrum were also performed. The paper presents the built set-up and the collected results. (authors)

Torsello, G.; Parozzi, F.; Nericcio, L. [RSE - Nuclear and Industrial Plant Safety Team, Power Generation System Dept., via Rubattino 54, 20134 Milano (Italy); Araneo, L.; Cozzi, F. [Politecnico di Milano, Energy Dept., via Lambruschini 4, 20156 Milano (Italy); Carcassi, M.; Mattei, N. [Universita di Pisa-Facolta d'Ingegneria DIMNP-Mechanical, Nuclear and Production Dep., Largo L. Lazzarino 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Proper use of sodium bisulfite with minimal salt penetration during brine immersion freezing of shrimp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROPER USE OF SODIUM BISULFITE WITH MINIMAL SALT PENETRATION DURING BRINE IMMERSION FREEZING OF SHRIMP A Thesis by SUZANNE RENE BROUSSARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the reguirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE MAY 1988 OC o Z m Z IJ III s Z Major Subject: Food Science and Technology PROPER USE OF SODIUM BISULFITE WITH MINIMAL SALT PENETRATION DURING BRINE IMMERSION FREEZING OF SHRIMP A Thesis by SUZANNE RENE...

Broussard, Suzanne Rene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

260

The electrochemical analysis of sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate in solutions containing oilfield impurities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE ELECTROCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF SODIUM DODECYLBENZENESULFONATE IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING OILFIELD IMPURITIES A Thesis by MICHAEL CARL BECKER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering THE ELECTROCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF SODIUM DODECYLBENZENESULFONATE IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING OILFIELD IMPURITIES A Thesis by MICHAEL CARL BECKER Approved as to style...

Becker, Michael Carl

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Sodium and potassium levels in the serum of acutely irradiated and non-irradiated rats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SODIUM AND POTASSIUM LEVELS IN THE SERUM OF ACUTELY IRRADIATED AND NON-IRRADIATED RATS A Thesis By DAVID PRESTON SHEPHERD Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1967 Major Subject: Zoology SODIUM AND POTASSIUM LEVELS IN THE SERUM OF ACUTELY IRRADIATED AND NON-IRRADIATED RATS A Thesis By DAVID PRESTON SHEPHERD Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head...

Shepherd, David Preston

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

Growth and bone development in weanling quarter horses fed diets supplemented with sodium zeolite-A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GROWTH AND BONE DEVELOPMENT IN WEANLING QUARTER HORSES FED DIETS SUPPLEMENTED WITH SODIUM ZEOLITE-A A Thesis by KIMBERLY SUZANNE FREY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... in Weanling Quarter Horses Fed Diets Supplemented with Sodium Zeolite-A. (December 1991) Kimberly Suzanne Frey, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Gary D. Potter Sixty Quarter Horse weanlings were used in a study to determine...

Frey, Kimberly Suzanne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

263

A Novel Low-Cost Sodium-Zinc Chloride Battery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) battery has been considered as one of the most attractive energy storage systems for stationary and transportation applications. Even though Na-NiCl2 battery has been widely investigated, there is still a need to develop a more economical system to make this technology more attractive for commercialization. In the present work, a novel low-cost Na-ZnCl2 battery with a thin planar ??-Al2O3 solid electrolyte (BASE) was proposed, and its electrochemical reactions and battery performance were investigated. Compared to the Na-NiCl2 chemistry, the ZnCl2-based chemistry was more complicated, in which multiple electrochemical reactions including liquid-phase formation occurred at temperatures above 253°C. During the first stage of charge, NaCl reacted with Zn to form Na in the anode and Na2ZnCl4 in the cathode. Once all the residual NaCl was consumed, further charging led to the formation of a NaCl-ZnCl2 liquid phase. At the end of charge, the liquid phase reacted with Zn to produce solid ZnCl2. To identify the effects of liquid-phase formation on electrochemical performance, button cells were assembled and tested at 280°C and 240°C. At 280°C where the liquid phase formed during cycling, cells revealed quite stable cyclability. On the other hand, more rapid increase in polarization was observed at 240°C where only solid-state electrochemical reactions occurred. SEM analysis indicated that the stable performance at 280°C was due to the suppressed growth of Zn and NaCl particles, which were generated from the liquid phase during discharge of each cycle.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

264

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Custelcean, Radu; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Engle, Nancy L.; Kang, Hyun-Ah; Keever, Tamara J.; Marchand, Alan P.; Gadthula, Srinivas; Gore, Vinayak K.; Huang, Zilin; Sivappa, Rasapalli; Tirunahari, Pavan K.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

265

An evaluation of neutralization for processing sodium-bearing liquid waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses an alternative concept for potentially managing the sodium-bearing liquid waste generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from the current method of calcining a blend of sodium waste and high-level liquid waste. The concept is based on removing the radioactive components from sodium-bearing waste by neutralization and grouting the resulting low-level waste for on-site near-surface disposal. Solidifying the sodium waste as a remote-handled transuranic waste is not considered to be practical because of excessive costs and inability to dispose of the waste in a timely fashion. Although neutralization can remove most radioactive components to provide feed for a solidified low-level waste, and can reduce liquid inventories four to nine years more rapidly than the current practice of blending sodium-bearing liquid waste with first-cycle raffinite, the alternative will require major new facilities and will generate large volumes of low-level waste. Additional facility and operating costs are estimated to be at least $500 million above the current practice of blending and calcining. On-site, low-level waste disposal may be technically difficult and conflict which national and state policies. Therefore, it is recommended that the current practice of calcining a blend of sodium-bearing liquid waste and high-level liquid waste be continued to minimize overall cost and process complexities. 17 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs.

Chipman, N.A.; Engelgau, G.O.; Berreth, J.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Sustained Recycle in Light Water and Sodium-Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain recycle of used fuel in either thermal or fast reactors. This paper examines multi-recycle potential performance by considering three recycling approaches and calculating several fuel cycle parameters, including heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; radiotoxicity of waste; and uranium utilization. The first recycle approach is homogeneous mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in a light water reactor (LWR). The transuranic portion of the MOX was varied among Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. (All-TRU means all isotopes through Cf-252.) The Pu case was allowed to go to 10% Pu in fresh fuel, but when the minor actinides were included, the transuranic enrichment was kept below 8% to satisfy the expected void reactivity constraint. The uranium portion of the MOX was enriched uranium. That enrichment was increased (to as much as 6.5%) to keep the fuel critical for a typical LWR irradiation. The second approach uses heterogeneous inert matrix fuel (IMF) assemblies in an LWR - a mix of IMF and traditional UOX pins. The uranium-free IMF fuel pins were Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. The UOX pins were limited to 4.95% U-235 enrichment. The number of IMF pins was set so that the amount of TRU in discharged fuel from recycle N (from both IMF and UOX pins) was made into the new IMF pins for recycle N+1. Up to 60 of the 264 pins in a fuel assembly were IMF. The assembly-average TRU content was 1-6%. The third approach uses fast reactor oxide fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor with transuranic conversion ratio of 0.50 and 1.00. The transuranic conversion ratio is the production of transuranics divided by destruction of transuranics. The FR at CR=0.50 is similar to the CR for the MOX case. The fast reactor cases had a transuranic content of 33-38%, higher than IMF or MOX.

Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Michael A. Pope; Gilles J. Youinou

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Preparation of polyaniline/sodium alanate hybrid using a spray-drying process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nowadays, hydrogen is highly interesting as an energy source, in particular in the automotive field. In fact, hydrogen is attractive as a fuel because it prevents air pollution and greenhouse emissions. One of the main problems with the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel is its on-board storage. The purpouse of this work was to develop a new hybrid material consisting of a polyaniline matrix with sodium alanate (NaAlH{sub 4}) using a spray-drying process. The polyaniline used for this experiment was synthesized by following a well-established method for the synthesis of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline using dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid as dopant. Micro particles of polyaniline/sodium alanate hybrids with 30 and 50 wt% of sodium alanate were prepared by using a spray-drying technique. Dilute solutions of polyaniline/sodium alanate were first prepared, 10g of the solid materials were mixed with 350 ml of toluene under stirring at room temperature for 24h and the solutions were dried using spray-dryer (Büchi, Switzerland) with 115°C of an inlet temperature. The hybrids were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry, FT-IR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The addition of sodium alanate decreased the glass transition temperature of the hybrids when compared to neat polyaniline. FT-IR spectrum analysis was performed to identify the bonding environment of the synthesized material and was observed that simply physically mixture occurred between polyaniline and sodium alanate. The SEM images of the hybrids showed the formation of microspheres with sodium alanate dispersed in the polymer matrix.

Moreira, B. R., E-mail: bru-rms@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com, E-mail: pessan@ufscar.br; Passador, F. R., E-mail: bru-rms@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com, E-mail: pessan@ufscar.br; Pessan, L. A., E-mail: bru-rms@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: fabiopassador@gmail.com, E-mail: pessan@ufscar.br [Dep. de Engenharia de Materiais, Federal University of São Carlos (Brazil)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, now completing its third year of its second renewal period, a collaborative project involving Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the University of North Texas has been addressing outstanding questions regarding the separation of the bulk sodium constituents of alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit of this research is a major reduction in the volume of radioactive tank waste, obviating the building of expensive new tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. As a general approach, principles of ion recognition are being explored toward discovery and basic understanding of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium salts from waste-like matrices. Questions being addressed pertain to applicable extraction equilibria and how extraction properties relate to extractant structure. Progress has included the elucidation of the promising concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction (PHE), demonstration of crown-ether synergized PHE, demonstration of combined sodium hydroxide/sodium nitrate separation, and synthesis of novel ditopic receptors for ditopic PHE. In future efforts (pending renewal), a thermochemical study of PHE relating extractant acidity to extraction strength is proposed, and this study will be extended to systems containing crown ethers, including proton-ionizable ones. A series of crown ethers will be synthesized for this purpose and to investigate the extraction of bulk sodium salts (e.g., nitrate, nitrite, and sulfate), possibly in combination with sodium hydroxide. Simple proof-of-principle tests with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent designs that have desirable properties. In view of the upcoming milestone of completion of the second renewal period, this report will, in addition to providing a summary of the past year's progress, summarize all of the work completed since the start of this project.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Synthesis and single crystal structure refinement of the one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sodium brittle mica with the ideal composition [Na{sub 4}]{sup inter}[Mg{sub 6}]{sup oct}[Si{sub 4}Al{sub 4}]{sup tet}O{sub 20}F{sub 4} was synthesized via melt synthesis in a gas tight crucible. This mica is unusual inasmuch as the known mica structure holds only room for two interlayer cations per unit cell and inasmuch as it readily hydrates despite the high layer charge while ordinary micas and brittle micas are non-swelling. The crystal structure of one-layer hydrate sodium brittle mica was determined and refined from single crystal X-ray data. Interlayer cations reside at the center of the distorted hexagonal cavities and are coordinated by the three inner basal oxygen atoms. The coordination of the interlayer cation is completed by three interlayer water molecules residing at the center of the interlayer region. The relative position of adjacent 2:1-layers thus is fixed by these octahedrally coordinated interlayer cations. Pseudo-symmetry leads to extensive twinning. In total five twin operations generate the same environment for the interlayer species and are energetically degenerate. - Graphical abstract: The sodium brittle mica has been successfully synthesized by melt synthesis and the crystal structure of the one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica was determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Melt synthesis yielded coarse grained sodium brittle mica which showed little disorder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium brittle mica hydrated completely to the state of one-layer hydrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of one-layer hydrate of sodium brittle mica could therefore be determined and refined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arrangement of upper and lower tetrahedral sheet encompassing interlayer cation were clarified.

Kalo, Hussein; Milius, Wolfgang [Lehrstuhl fuer Anorganische Chemie I, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)] [Lehrstuhl fuer Anorganische Chemie I, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Braeu, Michael [BASF Construction Chemicals GmbH, 83308 Trostberg (Germany)] [BASF Construction Chemicals GmbH, 83308 Trostberg (Germany); Breu, Josef, E-mail: Josef.Breu@uni-bayreuth.de [Lehrstuhl fuer Anorganische Chemie I, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)] [Lehrstuhl fuer Anorganische Chemie I, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

SNAKE Sodium S-CO2 Interactions Experiment - Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SNAKE Sodium S-CO2 Interactions Experiment SNAKE Sodium S-CO2 Interactions Experiment Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis Overview Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments MAX NSTF SNAKE Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr SNAKE Sodium S-CO2 Interactions Experiment 1 2 The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO2) Brayton cycle, coupled with a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), has been identified as a new and innovative energy conversion technology that could contribute to improving the economics of advanced nuclear energy. For these reactors, a new generation of compact, highly-efficient heat exchangers (HXs) will be employed that show great promise in improving the safety and cost of SFRs; however, small HX leaks could still occur. SNAKE is designed to study S-CO2 leakage into sodium.

271

Nanocomposite hydrogel from grafting of acrylamide onto HPMC using sodium montmorillonite nanoclay and removal of crystal violet dye  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogel nanocomposites were synthesized from grafting of acrylamide onto hydroxypropyl methylcellulose using methylenebisacrylamide crosslinker and sodium montmorillonite (Na-MMt) nanoclay. The effect of nanoclay

Gholam Reza Mahdavinia; Javad Hasanpour; Zeinab Rahmani; Shiva Karami…

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Combined Utilization of Cation Exchanger and Neutral Receptor to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, novel approaches to the selective liquid-liquid extraction separation of sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from high-level alkaline tank waste will be discussed. Sodium hydroxide can be successfully separated from alkaline tank-waste supernatants by weakly acidic lipophilic hydroxy compounds via a cation-exchange mechanism referred to as pseudo hydroxide extraction. In a multi-cycle process, as sodium hydroxide in the aqueous phase becomes depleted, it is helpful to have a neutral sodium receptor in the extraction system to exploit the high nitrate concentration in the waste solution to promote sodium removal by an ion-pair extraction process. Simultaneous utilization of an ionizable organic hydroxy compound and a neutral extractant (crown ether) in an organic phase results in the synergistic enhancement of ion exchange and improved separation selectivity due to the receptor's strong and selective sodium binding. Moreover, combination of the hydroxy compound and the crown ether provides for mutually increased solubility, even in a non-polar organic solvent. Accordingly, application of Isopar{reg_sign} L, a kerosene-like alkane solvent, becomes feasible. This investigation involves examination of such dual-mechanism extraction phases for sodium extraction from simulated and actual salt cake waste solutions. Sodium salts can be regenerated upon the contact of the loaded extraction phases with water. Finally, conditions of potential extraction/strip cycling will be discussed.

Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

273

Sensory and physical characteristics of reduced sodium, chunked and formed hams from hot-processed, electrically stimulated pork carcasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

treatment, were subdivided into two equal groups, deboned and injected with brine containing sodium nitrite (0. 1X), dextrose (1. 25X), sodium erythorbate (0. 42K), sodium phosphate (0. 5X), and chloride salt (15. 0X) consisting of either sodium chloride... (NaC1) or equivalent amounts of NaC1 and potassium chloride (KC1). Within each salt treatment, hams were tumbled for 1, 2 or 3 hr and vacuum stuffed into pre-stuck fibrous casings. All hams were cooked to an internal temperature of 65 C, chilled...

Bohac, Joseph John

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

274

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Sodium Intercalation Battery for Stationary Storage - David Ofer, Tiax  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sodium Intercalation Battery for Sodium Intercalation Battery for Stationary Storage Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) Peer Review and Update Meeting 2012 David Ofer Ofer.david@tiaxllc.com Washington DC, September 27, 2012 Sodium Intercalation Battery for Stationary Storage Background and Purpose 2 Large-scale stationary energy storage for integration with renewables and for off-peak energy capture is a new application requiring new rechargeable batteries. * New combination of requirements - Long cycle life under deep cycling use profile - High cycling efficiency - Moderate rate capability - Very low cost - No requirement for particularly high specific energy or energy density * TIAX is developing a novel Na-ion battery - Leverages teachings of Li-ion technology - Targets novel low-cost chemistry and cell design

275

Cost Transfers at the Department's Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Facility Construction Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Audit Report Cost Transfers at the Department's Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Facility Construction Project OAS-M-13-03 August 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 August 8, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SENIOR ADVISOR FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Cost Transfers at the Department's Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Facility Construction Project" BACKGROUND In 2005, the Department of Energy (Department) awarded the Idaho Cleanup Project contract to CH2M ♦ WG Idaho, LLC (CWI) to remediate the Idaho National Laboratory. The Sodium

276

Fact Sheet: Sodium-Beta Batteries (October 2012) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Beta Batteries (October 2012) Beta Batteries (October 2012) Fact Sheet: Sodium-Beta Batteries (October 2012) DOE's Energy Storage Program is funding research to further develop a novel planar design for sodium-beta batteries (Na-beta batteries or NBBs) that will improve energy and power densities and simplify manufacturing. This project will demonstrate a planar prototype that operates at <300 degrees Celsius and will scale up the storage capacity to 5 kW, improving on the performance levels being pursued in related battery research projects. Fact Sheet: Sodium-Beta Batteries (October 2012) More Documents & Publications Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 1 (Day 1): ARPA-E Projects Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review and Update Meeting Advanced Materials and Devices for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage

277

Two-dimensional computational modeling of sodium boiling in simulated LMFBR fuel-pin bundles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive sodium boiling tests have been carried out in two simulated LMFBR fuel pin bundles in the Thermal-Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety (THORS) Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Experimental results from a 19-pin bundle (THORS Bundle 6A) have been previously reported, and experimental results from a 61-pin bundle (THORS Bundle 9) will be reported soon. The results discussed here are from the 19-pin bundle. Preliminary analysis has shown that the computational methods used and conclusions reached are equally valid for the 61-pin bundle, as well as the 19-pin in-reactor Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) W-1 experiment. The main result of THORS sodium boiling experimentation is that boiling behavior is determined by two-dimensional effects, i.e., the rates of mass, momentum and energy transfer in the direction perpendicular to the axes of the fuel pins.

Dearing, J.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Development and application of modeling tools for sodium fast reactor inspection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support the development of in-service inspection methods for the Advanced Sodium Test Reactor for Industrial Demonstration (ASTRID) project led by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), several tools that allow situations specific to Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) to be modeled have been implemented in the CIVA software and exploited. This paper details specific applications and results obtained. For instance, a new specular reflection model allows the calculation of complex echoes from scattering structures inside the reactor vessel. EMAT transducer simulation models have been implemented to develop new transducers for sodium visualization and imaging. Guided wave analysis tools have been developed to permit defect detection in the vessel shell. Application examples and comparisons with experimental data are presented.

Le Bourdais, Florian; Marchand, Benoît; Baronian, Vahan [CEA LIST, Centre de Saclay F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

279

Design and development of a high-temperature sodium compatibility testing facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of advanced alloys within sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) has been identified as a means of increasing plant efficiency and reducing construction costs. In particular, alloys such as NF-616, NF-709 and HT-UPS are promising because they exhibit greater strength than traditional structural materials such as 316-SS. However, almost nothing is known about the sodium compatibility of these new alloys. Therefore, research taking place at the Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison is focused on studying the effects of sodium corrosion on these materials under prototypic SFR operating conditions (600 [ deg. C], V Na=10 [m/s], C 0{approx} 1 [wppm]). This paper focuses on the design and construction of the testing facility with an emphasis on moving magnet pumps (MMPs). Corrosion data from a preliminary 500 [hr] natural convection test will also be presented. (authors)

Hvasta, M. G.; Nolet, B. K.; Anderson, M. H. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison - ERB 841, WI 53705 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Sodium sulfate–diatomite composite materials for high temperature thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work explores the use of sodium sulfate and diatomite to formulate composite materials for high temperature thermal energy storage applications. Sodium sulfate in the composite functions as a phase change material (PCM) and diatomite as a structural skeleton for shape stabilization. It is found that sodium sulfate and diatomite have an excellent chemical compatibility with the PCM melting temperature at around 880 °C. It is shown that the composite containing 45% diatomite gives an optimal formulation in terms of energy density, salt leakage and mechanical strength. The results also suggest that the composite with the optimal formulation has an application window of 890–980 °C. Failures occur to the composite materials at temperatures above 1000 °C.

Yue Qin; Guanghui Leng; Xiang Yu; Hui Cao; Geng Qiao; Yunfeng Dai; Yelong Zhang; Yulong Ding

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Surface-Driven Sodium Ion Energy Storage in Nanocellular Carbon Foams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium ion (Na+) batteries have attracted increased attention for energy storage due to the natural abundance of sodium, but their development is hindered by the poor intercalation property of Na+ in electrodes. This paper reports a detailed study of high capacity, high rate sodium ion energy storage in high-surface-area nanocellular carbon foams (NCCF). The energy storage mechanism is surface-driven reactions between Na+ and oxygen-containing functional groups on the surface of NCCF. The surface reaction, rather than a Na+ bulk intercalation reaction, leads to high rate performance and cycling stability due to the enhanced reaction kinetics and the absence of electrode structure change. The NCCF makes more surface area and surface functional groups available for the Na+ reaction. It delivers 152 mAh/g capacity at the rate of 0.1 A/g and a capacity retention of 90% for over 1600 cycles.

Shao, Yuyan; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Wei; Engelhard, Mark H.; Chen, Xilin; Nie, Zimin; Gu, Meng; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

282

Method of making a current collector for a sodium/sulfur battery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This specification is directed to a method of making a current collector for a sodium/sulfur battery. The current collector so-made is electronically conductive and resistant to corrosive attack by sulfur/polysulfide melts. The method includes the step of forming the current collector for the sodium/sulfur battery from a composite material formed of aluminum filled with electronically conductive fibers selected from the group of fibers consisting essentially of graphite fibers having a diameter up to 10 microns and silicon carbide fibers having a diameter in a range of 500--1,000 angstroms. 2 figs.

Tischer, R.P.; Winterbottom, W.L.; Wroblowa, H.S.

1987-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

283

Characterization of Sodium Emulsion Soaps Formed from Production Fluids of Kutei Basin, Indonesia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Kutei Basin soap emulsions are resolved by heating and treatment with relatively high dosages of acid demulsifiers. ... Two main types of soaps can form in production fluids:1 calcium naphthenate scales, which can manifest as in situ sticky or hardened deposits, and sodium emulsion soaps, which can create severe oil dehydration problems and lead to excessive slop oil/sludge volumes at crude-oil terminals. ... Similar sodium carboxylate soaps are also common to other basins around Borneo (e.g., Sarawak, Brunei, and Sabah)2 and in other parts of southeast Asia (e.g., the South China Sea, Malaysia, offshore Vietnam, Bohai Bay in China, and elsewhere in Indonesia). ...

Darrell L. Gallup; Joseph A. Curiale; P. Colin Smith

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

284

Simplified modeling of liquid sodium medium with temperature and velocity gradient using real thermal-hydraulic data. Application to ultrasonic thermometry in sodium fast reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the framework of the French R and D program for the Generation IV reactors and specifically for the sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR), studies are carried out on innovative instrumentation methods in order to improve safety and to simplify the monitoring of fundamental physical parameters during reactor operation. The aim of the present work is to develop an acoustic thermometry method to follow up the sodium temperature at the outlet of subassemblies. The medium is a turbulent flow of liquid sodium at 550 Degree-Sign C with temperature inhomogeneities. To understand the effect of disturbance created by this medium, numerical simulations are proposed. A ray tracing code has been developed with Matlab Copyright-Sign in order to predict acoustic paths in this medium. This complex medium is accurately described by thermal-hydraulic data which are issued from a simulation of a real experiment in Japan. The analysis of these results allows understanding the effects of medium inhomogeneities on the further thermometric acoustic measurement.

Massacret, N.; Jeannot, J. P. [DEN/DTN/STPA/LIET, CEA Cadarache, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Moysan, J.; Ploix, M. A.; Corneloup, G. [Aix-Marseille Univ, LMA UPR 7051 CNRS, site LCND, 13625 Aix-en-Provence (France)

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

285

Continuous-wave sodium D2 resonance radiation generated in single-pass sum-frequency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-frequency generation. The demonstrated conversion efficiency is 3.2% W-1 cm-1 . This compact solid-state light source applications involving the high- resolution sodium spectrum, including laser remote sensing, biology, communications, display technology [1], and Bose­Einstein condensation [2]. A narrow- band solid-state source

286

indirect study, coal was oxidatively de-graded with sodium dichromate and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cleaning Technology (Noyes Data Corporation, Park Ridge, N.J., 1981). 10. Z. Hussain, E. Umbach, D. Aindirect study, coal was oxidatively de- graded with sodium dichromate and the esterified products- vestigators concluded (17, p. 380) that "thiophene derivatives must be indige- nous to coal." The direct XANES

Howat, Ian M.

287

Synthesis of highly ordered mesoporous silica materials using sodium silicate and amphiphilic block copolymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis of highly ordered mesoporous silica materials using sodium silicate and amphiphilic block. Pinnavaia and coworkers6 have reported the synthesis of MSU-X mesoporous materials with several non- ionic and cowork- ers7 have reported the synthesis of SBA mesoporous silica materials, which have well

Kim, Ji Man

288

Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Sodium in 7-Pin LMFBR Bundle Under Hypothetical Accident Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the frame of safety analysis of liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) under hypothetical Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF) conditions two-phase flow of sodium is simulated in a 7-pin bundle, with hexagonal lattice. Molecular dynamics, with the application of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, and a macroscopic model describing rewetting sequences due to the flow of a sodium liquid film along the pin surfaces, are applied to simulate the coolant in the bundle. The pin surfaces and the inner surface of the hexagonal canning are treated in the Monte Carlo simulation as diffusively reflecting surfaces. Collisions of sodium molecules are computed with the 'hard-sphere' model. With respect to previous work the following improvements of the computational code were made: i) The full bundle is simulated, thus allowing for asymmetries, like a skewed power distribution, to be accounted for; ii) A pin model calculates detailed temperature distributions in the pins, so that temperature boundary conditions are computed and not imposed; iii) Post processing visualisation of computed results was developed. An out of pile sodium boiling experiment run at the Nuclear Research Center of Karlsruhe, Germany, is simulated and conclusions are drawn about the applicability of the methodology in computer codes dedicated to breeder reactors safety analysis. (authors)

Bottoni, Maurizio [University of Ferrara, Physics Department, Via Paradiso 12, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy); Bottoni, Claudio; Scanu, John [University of Pisa, Lungarno Pacinotti, 43 - 56126 Pisa (Italy)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

NACOM code for analysis of postulated sodium spray fires in LMFBRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis of potential sodium spills and fires in liquid metal fast breeder reactors has been made to assess the maximum equipment cell loading conditions. A computer code called NACOM (sodium combustion) has been developed at Brookhaven National Laobratory (BNL) to analyze sodium spray fires. This report contains a detailed description of physical models used in this code as well as programming aspects. The single droplet combustion model and the model describing the droplets' motion are verified. Comparisons between NACOM predictions and SPRAY-3A predictions of the Atomics International (AI) LTV Jet Tests are made. Good agreement is found between the NACOM predictions and the experimental data. NACOM predictions of the pressure rise are more accurate than SPRAY-3A predictions for most of the cases studied. The code has been verified for oxygen concentrations ranging from 0 to 21%. NACOM utilizes more realistic single droplet and spray combustion models than SPRAY-3A. Moreover, NACOM does not utilize adjustable parameters for the burning rate equations, contrary to the approach taken with SPRAY-3A. Thus, the NACOM code is a more reliable code for use in the analysis of large-scale sodium spray fires in LMFBR containment cells. 24 refs., 32 figs.

Tsai, S.S.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A simple Markov model of sodium channels with a dynamic threshold  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characteristics of action potential generation are important to understanding brain functioning and, thus, must be understood and modeled. It is still an open question what model can describe concurrently the phenomena of sharp spike shape, the spike ... Keywords: Conductance-based neurons, Divisive effect, Dynamic patch-clamp, Sodium channels, Spike shape, Spike threshold

A. V. Chizhov; E. Yu. Smirnova; K. Kh. Kim; A. V. Zaitsev

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Deficiencies of sodium and iodine in grazing sheep in northern China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deficiencies of sodium and iodine in grazing sheep in northern China DG Masters JR Lindsay SX Yu DX of Traditional Veterinary Medicine, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Science, Xiaoxihu, Lanzhou, Gansu, China An examination of the mineral status of grazing sheep at 3 sites in northern China has provided evidence

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

292

Bonding in Sodium Chloride Nanotubes: A New Analysis via Madelung Constants and Cohesive Energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Bonding in Sodium Chloride Nanotubes: A New Analysis via Madelung Constants and Cohesive Energies is introduced which employs a linear relationship between nanotube cohesive energies determined via Density between ionic and cohesive bonding energies indicate that, as the nanotubes become longer, ionic bonding

Hanusa, Christopher

293

Sodium-Silicate Route to Submicrometer Hybrid PEG@Silica Particles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sodium-Silicate Route to Submicrometer Hybrid PEG@Silica Particles ... Supported by the Nano Functional Materials (NFM) MAGNET Program of the Israel Ministry of Trade and Industry, by the Infrastructure (Tashtiot) Program of the Israel Ministry of Science, and by the European Functionalized Advanced Materials and Engineering Hybrids and Ceramic (FAME) Network of Excellence (NOE). ...

Hila Elimelech; David Avnir

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

294

Advanced Materials for Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries: Status, Challenges and Perspectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing penetration of renewable energy and the trend toward clean, efficient transportation have spurred growing interests in sodium-beta alumina batteries that store electrical energy via sodium ion transport across a ?"-Al2O3 solid electrolyte at elevated temperatures (typically 300~350°C). Currently, the negative electrode or anode is metallic sodium in molten state during battery operation; the positive electrode or cathode can be molten sulfur (Na-S battery) or solid transition metal halides plus a liquid phase secondary electrolyte (e.g., ZEBRA battery). Since the groundbreaking works in the sodium-beta alumina batteries a few decades ago, encouraging progress has been achieved in improving battery performance, along with cost reduction. However there remain issues that hinder broad applications and market penetration of the technologies. To better the Na-beta alumina technologies require further advancement in materials along with component and system design and engineering. This paper offers a comprehensive review on materials of electrodes and electrolytes for the Na-beta alumina batteries and discusses the challenges ahead for further technology improvement.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Xia, Guanguang; Lemmon, John P.; Yang, Zhenguo

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Effects of Sodium Chloride Particles, Ozone, UV, and Relative Humidity on Atmospheric Corrosion of Silver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Sodium Chloride Particles, Ozone, UV, and Relative Humidity on Atmospheric Corrosion The corrosion of Ag contaminated with NaCl particles in gaseous environments containing humidity and ozone analyzed using a coulometric reduction technique. The atmospheric corrosion of Ag was greatly accelerated

296

Original article Increased late sodium current in myocytes from a canine heart failure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Increased late sodium current in myocytes from a canine heart failure model and from failing human heart Carmen R. Valdivia, William W. Chu, Jielin Pu 1 , Jason D. Foell, Robert A December 2004 Abstract Electrophysiological remodeling of ion channels in heart failure causes action

Kamp, Tim

297

Room-temperature stationary sodium-ion batteries for large-scale electric energy storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy and utility applications, such as pump hydro, compressed air, y-wheel and electrochemicalRoom-temperature stationary sodium-ion batteries for large-scale electric energy storage Huilin Pan attention particularly in large- scale electric energy storage applications for renewable energy and smart

Wang, Wei Hua

298

Evaluation of a sodium/Hastelloy-X heat pipe for wing leading edge cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers assembly of a sodium heat pipe, testing to verify performance during start-up and under steady-state conditions with stagnation point heat loads to about 80 W/cm{sup 2}, performance analysis and evaluation. Evaluation of this leading edge cooling concept is offered and recommendations for further research discussed.

Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Glass, D.E. [Analytical Services and Materials, Hampton, VA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Physical and functional links between anion exchanger-1 and sodium pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pressure cooker containing 0.1 M sodium citrate buffer, pH 6.0 for 2 min. Following blocking with 10% FBS in PBST-1 (Blocking buffer), primary antibodies at 1:50 dilution in blocking buffer were applied and sections incubated at 4(C overnight. Fluorochrome...

Su, Ya; Al-Lamki, Rafia S.; Blake-Palmer, Katherine G.; Best, Alison; Golder, Zoe J.; Zhou, Aiwu; Karet Frankl, Fiona E.

2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

300

Liquid-Metal Electrode to Enable Ultra-Low Temperature Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries for Renewable Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal electrodes have a high capacity for energy storage but have found limited applications in batteries because of dendrite formation and other problems. In this paper, we report a new alloying strategy that can significantly reduce the melting temperature and improve wetting with the electrolyte to allow the use of liquid metal as anode in sodium-beta alumina batteries (NBBs) at much lower temperatures (e.g., 95 to 175°C). Commercial NBBs such as sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery and sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) batteries typically operate at relatively high temperatures (e.g., 300-350°C) due to poor wettability of sodium on the surface of ?"-Al2O3. Our combined experimental and computational studies suggest that Na-Cs alloy can replace pure sodium as the anode material, which provides a significant improvement in wettability, particularly at lower temperatures (i.e., <200°C). Single cells with the Na-Cs alloy anode exhibit excellent cycling life over those with pure sodium anode at 175 and 150°C. The cells can even operate at 95°C, which is below the melting temperature of pure sodium. These results demonstrate that NBB can be operated at ultra lower temperatures with successfully solving the wetting issue. This work also suggests a new strategy to use liquid metal as the electrode materials for advanced batteries that can avoid the intrinsic safety issues associated with dendrite formation on the anode.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Mei, Donghai; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Liu, Jun

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Advanced Sodium Battery - Joonho Koh, Materials & Systems Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sodium Battery Sodium Battery Joonho Koh (jkoh@msrihome.com), Greg Tao (gtao@msrihome.com), Neill Weber, and Anil V. Virkar Materials & Systems Research, Inc., 5395 W 700 S, Salt Lake City, UT 84104 Company Introduction History  Founded in 1990 by Dr. Dinesh K. Shetty and Dr. Anil V. Virkar  Currently 11 employees including 5 PhDs  10,000 ft² research facility in Salt Lake City, Utah MSRI's Experience of Na Batteries Status of the Na Batteries Overall Project Description Goal Develop advanced Na battery technology for enhanced safety, reduced fabrication cost, and high-power performance Approach  Innovative cell design using stronger structural materials  Reduction of the fabrication cost using a simple and reliable processing technique

302

Fact Sheet: Sodium-Ion Batteries for Grid-Level Applications (October 2012)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Aquion Energy, Inc. Aquion Energy, Inc. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Sodium-Ion Batteries for Grid-Level Applications Demonstrating low-cost, grid-scale, ambient temperature sodium-ion batteries In June 2012, Aquion Energy, Inc. completed the testing and demonstration requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy's program with its low-cost, grid-scale, ambient temperature Aqueous Hybrid Ion (AHI) energy storage device. During the three-year project, Aquion manufactured hundreds of batteries and assemble them into high-voltage, grid-scale systems. This project helped them move their aqueous electrochemical energy storage device from bench-scale testing to pilot-scale manufacturing. The testing successfully demonstrated a grid-connected, high voltage (>1,000 V), 13.5 kWh system with a 4-hour discharge.

303

Two-dimensional modeling of sodium boiling in a simulated LMFBR loss-of-flow test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Loss-of-flow (LOF) accidents are of major importance in LMFBR safety. Tests have been performed to simulate the simultaneous failure of all primary pumps and reactor shutdown systems in a 37-pin electrically heated test bundle installed in the KNS sodium boiling loop at the Institute of Reactor Development, Karlsruhe. The tests simulated LOF conditions of the German prototype LMFBR, the SNR 300. The main objectives of these tests were to characterize the transient boiling development to cladding dryout and to provide data for validation of sodium boiling codes. One particular LOF test, designated L22, at full power was selected as a benchmark exercise for comparison of several codes at the Eleventh Meeting of the Liquid Metal Boiling Working Group (LMBWG) held in Grenoble, France, in October 1984. In this paper, the results of the calculations performed at ORNL with the two-dimensional (2-D) boiling code THORAX are presented.

Rose, S.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Chapter 3 - Potential of Sodium-Sulfur Battery Energy Storage to Enable Further Integration of Wind  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Wind generation is the leading alternative for environmentally responsible power generation and for energy independence in the future. However, wind power output cannot be controlled same as conventional generation, and wind is not necessarily available to serve peak load. In this chapter, the use of a Sodium Sulfur battery directly coupled with a wind farm to provide generation shifting for serving peak demand and for limiting the wind farm power output ramp-rate is discussed. Results from field operation of a 1 MW, 7.2 \\{MWh\\} Sodium Sulfur battery coupled with an 11.55 MW wind farm were provided to validate the battery’s ability to successfully carry out both the tasks. It is shown that the two tasks could be combined to achieve maximum benefit. Value addition from shifting wind generation to on-peak is calculated and the optimal ratio storage to wind ratio is discussed.

Saurabh Tewari

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

?-Conotoxin KIIIA Derivatives with Divergent Affinities versus Efficacies in Blocking Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of their facile chemical synthesis, KIIIA analogues that had as a core structure the disulfide-depleted KIIIA[C1A,C2U,C9A,C15U] (where U is selenocysteine) or ddKIIIA were used. ... Abbreviations: dap, diaminoproprionate; ddKIIIA, disulfide-depleted ?-conotoxin KIIIA, i.e., KIIIA[C1A,C2U,C9A,C5U], where U is selenocysteine; ddKIIIA[K7X], ddKIIIA with residue X in position 7; ddKIIIA·NaV, binary complex of ddKIIIA and NaV; ddKIIIA[K7X]·NaV, binary complex of ddKIIIA[K7X] and NaV; ddKIIIA[K7X]·TTX·NaV, ternary complex of ddKIIIA[K7X], TTX, and NaV; GIIIA, ?-conotoxin GIIIA; INa, sodium current; KIIIA, ?-conotoxin KIIIA; KIIIA[K7A], ?-conotoxin KIIIA[K7A]; NaV, ?-subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel; rINa, residual sodium current; TTX, tetrodotoxin; TTX·NaV, binary complex of TTX and NaV; VGSC, voltage-gated sodium channel. ... The long moniker of ddKIIIA[K7X] is KIIIA[C1A,C2U,K7X,C9A,C15U], where residue X at position 7 was either Ala, Asp, Gly, Leu, Lys (i.e., ddKIIIA), Phe, Ser, Thr, Val, or diaminoproprionate (dap). ...

Min-Min Zhang; Tiffany S. Han; Baldomero M. Olivera; Grzegorz Bulaj; Doju Yoshikami

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

306

The tolerance of two varieties of cotton to relatively high levels of sodium and magnesium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of MASTER OP SCIENCE August 1969 Major Subject Plant ~ph ~siolo THE TOLERANCE OF TvJO VARIETIES OF COTTON TO RELATIVELY HIGH LEVELS OF SODIUN AND NAGNESIUN A Thesis by Nanhar C. Parekh Approved as to style and content by: (Head of Department...) (Nember) (Nemb ) August 1969 ABSTRACT The Tolerance of Two Varieties of Cotton to Relatively High Levels of Sodium and Magnesium. (August 1969) Masher C. Parekh, B. S. , Gujarat University, Directed by: Dr. H. E. Joham An experiment was conducted...

Parekh, Manhar C

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

307

The influence of dikegulac sodium on growth of Syngonium podophyllum 'White Butterfly'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

facing producers of Syngonium podophy11um 'White Butterfly' along with the characteristics and potential of dikegulac sodium (Atrimmec, Maag Agrochemicals Inc. , Vera Beach, Fl) allowed for consideration of the following research objectives: 1... III DIKEGULAC CONCENTRATION, APPLICATION FREQUENCY AND MANUAL PINCHING STUDY ON TISSUE CULTURE PRODUCED LINERS Introduction Dikegulac (Atrimmec, Maag Agrochemicals Inc. , Vera Beach, Fl. ) is a carbohydrate derivative with plant growth regulative...

Womack, William Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

308

Comparative effects of sodium channel blockers in short term rat whole embryo culture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to examine the effect on the rat embryonic heart of two experimental drugs (AZA and AZB) which are known to block the sodium channel Nav1.5, the hERG potassium channel and the L-type calcium channel. The sodium channel blockers bupivacaine, lidocaine, and the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine were used as reference substances. The experimental model was the gestational day (GD) 13 rat embryo cultured in vitro. In this model the embryonic heart activity can be directly observed, recorded and analyzed using computer assisted image analysis as it responds to the addition of test drugs. The effect on the heart was studied for a range of concentrations and for a duration up to 3 h. The results showed that AZA and AZB caused a concentration-dependent bradycardia of the embryonic heart and at high concentrations heart block. These effects were reversible on washout. In terms of potency to cause bradycardia the compounds were ranked AZB > bupivacaine > AZA > lidocaine > nifedipine. Comparison with results from previous studies with more specific ion channel blockers suggests that the primary effect of AZA and AZB was sodium channel blockage. The study shows that the short-term rat whole embryo culture (WEC) is a suitable system to detect substances hazardous to the embryonic heart. - Highlights: • Study of the effect of sodium channel blocking drugs on embryonic heart function • We used a modified method rat whole embryo culture with image analysis. • The drugs tested caused a concentration dependent bradycardia and heart block. • The effect of drugs acting on multiple ion channels is difficult to predict. • This method may be used to detect cardiotoxicity in prenatal development.

Nilsson, Mats F, E-mail: Mats.Nilsson@farmbio.uu.se [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Uppsala University (Sweden); Sköld, Anna-Carin; Ericson, Ann-Christin; Annas, Anita; Villar, Rodrigo Palma [AstraZeneca R and D Södertälje (Sweden); Cebers, Gvido [AstraZeneca R and D, iMed, 141 Portland Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hellmold, Heike; Gustafson, Anne-Lee [AstraZeneca R and D Södertälje (Sweden); Webster, William S [Department of Anatomy and Histology, University of Sydney (Australia)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Phase 2 THOR Steam Reforming Tests for Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste is stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Steam reforming is a candidate technology being investigated for converting the waste into a road ready waste form that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico for interment. A steam reforming technology patented by Studsvik, Inc., and licensed to THOR Treatment Technologies has been tested in two phases using a Department of Energy-owned fluidized bed test system located at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research Center located in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Phase 1 tests were reported earlier in 2003. The Phase 2 tests are reported here. For Phase 2, the process feed rate, stoichiometry, and chemistry were varied to identify and demonstrate process operation and product characteristics under different operating conditions. Two test series were performed. During the first series, the process chemistry was designed to produce a sodium carbonate product. The second series was designed to produce a more leach-resistant, mineralized sodium aluminosilicate product. The tests also demonstrated the performance of a MACT-compliant off-gas system.

Nicholas R. Soelberg

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Development of models for the two-dimensional, two-fluid code for sodium boiling NATOF-2D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several features were incorporated into NATOF-2D, a twodimensional, two fluid code developed at M.I.T. for the purpose of analysis of sodium boiling transients under LMFBR conditions. They include improved interfacial mass, ...

Zielinski, R. G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Modelling of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of metallic and oxide fuels for sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A robust and reliable code to model the irradiation behavior of metal and oxide fuels in sodium cooled fast reactors is developed. Modeling capability was enhanced by adopting a non-empirical mechanistic approach to the ...

Karahan, Aydin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

A four-equation two-phase flow model for sodium boiling simulation of LMFBR fuel assemblies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A three-dimensional numerical model for the simulation of sodium boiling transients has been developed. The model uses mixture mass and energy equations, while employing a separate momentum equation for each phase. Thermal ...

Schor, Andrei L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Ruthenium(VI) catalyzed oxidation of sodium salts of lactic, tartaric and glycolic acid by alkaline hexacyanoferrate(III)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The kinetics of ruthenium(VI) catalyzed oxidation of sodium salts of lactic, tartaric and glycolic acid by hexacyanoferrate(III) in aqueous alkaline medium have been studied at constant ionic strength. The rea...

P. Kumar; K. C. Gupta; K. Vehari

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Mechanical relaxation behavior of polyurethanes reinforced with the in situ-generated sodium silica-polyphosphate nanophase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Further exploration of hybrid organic/inorganic composites (polyurethane based with inorganic material sodium silica polyphosphate) properties with mechanical relaxometer gives ability to analyze microstructure of such materials in terms of chain reptation tubes filler's fractal aggregates and stress amplification.

V. O. Dupanov; S. M. Ponomarenko

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

Integrated fuel performance and thermal-hydraulic sub-channel models for analysis of sodium fast reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR) show promise as an effective way to produce clean safe nuclear power while properly managing the fuel cycle. Accurate computer modeling is an important step in the design and eventual licensing ...

Fricano, Joseph William

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 2: Application to EBR-II Primary Sodium System and Related Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decontamination and decomissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidifed carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, USA. This report is Part 2 of a two-part report. This second report provides a supplement to the first report and describes the application of the humdidified carbon dioxide technique ("carbonation") to the EBR-II primary tank, primary cover gas systems, and the intermediate heat exchanger. Future treatment plans are also provided.

Steven R. Sherman; Collin J. Knight

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project, November 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Idaho Cleanup Project Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project May 2011 November 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction........................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope and Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 2

318

Thermochemical cyclic system for decomposing H/sub 2/O and/or CO/sub 2/ by means of cerium-titanium-sodium-oxygen compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermochemical closed cyclic process for the decomposition of water and/or carbon dioxide to hydrogen and/or carbon monoxide begins with the reaction of ceric oxide (CeO/sub 2/), titanium dioxide (TiO/sub 2/) and sodium titanate (Na/sub 2/TiO/sub 3/) to form sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi/sub 2/O/sub 6/) and oxygen. Sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi/sub 2/O/sub 6/) reacted with sodium carbonate (Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) in the presence of steam, produces hydrogen. The same reaction, in the absence of steam, produces carbon monoxide. The products, ceric oxide and sodium titanate, obtained in either case, are treated with carbon dioxide and water to produce ceric oxide, titanium dioxide, sodium titanate, and sodium bicarbonate. After dissolving sodium bicarbonate from the mixture in water, the remaining insoluble compounds are used as starting materials for a subsequent cycle. The sodium bicarbonate can be converted to sodium carbonate by heating and returned to the cycle.

Bamberger, C.E.

1980-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

319

Thermochemical cyclic system for decomposing H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2 by means of cerium-titanium-sodium-oxygen compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermochemical closed cyclic process for the decomposition of water and/or carbon dioxide to hydrogen and/or carbon monoxide begins with the reaction of ceric oxide (CeO.sub.2), titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) and sodium titanate (Na.sub.2 TiO.sub.3) to form sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi.sub.2 O.sub.6) and oxygen. Sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi.sub.2 O.sub.6) reacted with sodium carbonate (Na.sub.2 CO.sub.3) in the presence of steam, produces hydrogen. The same reaction, in the absence of steam, produces carbon monoxide. The products, ceric oxide and sodium titanate, obtained in either case, are treated with carbon dioxide and water to produce ceric oxide, titanium dioxide, sodium titanate, and sodium bicarbonate. After dissolving sodium bicarbonate from the mixture in water, the remaining insoluble compounds are used as starting materials for a subsequent cycle. The sodium bicarbonate can be converted to sodium carbonate by heating and returned to the cycle.

Bamberger, Carlos E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Evaluation of lithium as a toxicant and the modifying effect of sodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Routine compliance tests conducted for a groundwater treatment facility at the Y-12 Plant on the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), TN, showed that the effluent was acutely toxic to Ceriodaphnia dubia and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larvae. An evaluation of suspected contaminants revealed that increased toxicity coincided with increased concentrations of lithium. Lithium is a light, strong metal that is used in DOE operations, including fusion weapons and fission reactors. Little has been published about lithium toxicity. Toxicity tests were conducted with fathead minnows and C. dubia using lithium chloride and lithium tetraborate. Dilute mineral water (DMW) or the receiving stream water (East Fork Poplar Creek) was used as the dilution water in the toxicity evaluation. A concentration of 1 mg Li/L in DMW reduced the survival of both test species; 0.5 mg Li/L in DMW reduced C. dubia reproduction and minnow growth. Sodium appears to influence the toxicity of Li; the metal was six times more toxic in the low-sodium DMW than in stream water containing 30 mg Na/L. Tests with LiCl in combination with NaCl and NA{sub 2}SO{sub 4} demonstrated that the presence of sodium reduced the toxicity of Li to C. dubia. In laboratory tests with a snail (Elimia clavaeformis) common on the ORR, the feeding rate declined in 0.15 mg Li/L. Because Li has also been demonstrated to be toxic to several plant species, tests with LiCi were also conducted using buttercrunch lettuce (Lactuca saliva). The EC{sub 50} for seed growth after 8 d incubation was 37.5 mg Li/L. These findings are significant because of widespread industrial use and potential accumulation of Li in soils.

Kszos, L.A.; Stewart, A.J.; O`Reilly, S.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Tracers for monitoring the activity of sodium/glucose cotransporters in health and disease  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiolabeled tracers for sodium/glucose cotransporters (SGLTs), their synthesis, and their use are provided. The tracers are methyl or ethyl pyranosides having an equatorial hydroxyl group at carbon-2 and a C 1 preferred conformation, radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, or .sup.124I, or free hexoses radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, or .sup.124. Also provided are in vivo and in vitro techniques for using these and other tracers as analytical and diagnostic tools to study glucose transport, in health and disease, and to evaluate therapeutic interventions.

Wright, Ernest M; Barrio, Jorge R; Hirayama, Bruce A; Kepe, Vladimir

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

322

Sodium-sulfur battery development. Phase VB final report, October 1, 1981--February 28, 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the technical progress made under Contract No. DE-AM04-79CH10012 between the U.S. Department of Energy, Ford Aerospace & Communications Corporations and Ford Motor Company, for the period 1 October 1981 through 28 February 1985, which is designated as Phase VB of the Sodium-Sulfur Battery Development Program. During this period, Ford Aerospace held prime technical responsibility and Ford Motor Company carried out supporting research. Ceramatec, Inc., was a major subcontractor to Ford Aerospace for electrolyte development and production.

NONE

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Measurement of Conduction-Electron-Spin Relaxation in Sodium, 14-20 K  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conduction-electron-spin relaxation in sodium has been measured in the liquid-hydrogen-temperature range 14-20 K. We believe we have successfully separated the contributions to the measured relaxation rate from the impurity, surface, and electron-phonon (intrinsic) mechanisms by working with samples of controlled geometry at low rf frequency (10 MHz). The temperature dependence of the intrinsic relaxation time agrees reasonably well with the Debye-model calculations of Yafet. In our samples the probability of relaxation per surface collision for an electron spin is on the order of 10-3.

S. -K. Wang and R. T. Schumacher

1973-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

SWAAM-LT: The long-term, sodium/water reaction analysis method computer code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SWAAM-LT Code, developed for analysis of long-term effects of sodium/water reactions, is discussed. The theoretical formulation of the code is described, including the introduction of system matrices for ease of computer programming as a general system code. Also, some typical results of the code predictions for available large scale tests are presented. Test data for the steam generator design with the cover-gas feature and without the cover-gas feature are available and analyzed. The capabilities and limitations of the code are then discussed in light of the comparison between the code prediction and the test data.

Shin, Y.W.; Chung, H.H.; Wiedermann, A.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Tanabe, H. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Structure of Dense Sodium Di-2-Ethylsulfosuccinate/D2O/Decane Microemulsions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Small-angle neutron scattering is used to investigate the structure of single-phase AOT (sodium di-2-ethylsulfosuccinate)/D2O/decane microemulsions containing equal volumes of water and oil and a variable concentration of surfactant. Each scattered-neutron spectrum exhibits a pronounced interaction peak. As the volume fraction of AOT is increased from 0.18 to 0.42, the peak position shifts to larger values of Q, and the peak height diminishes. The spectra are consistent with an ordered droplet phase, as opposed to a bicontinuous structure.

Michael Kotlarchyk; Sow-Hsin Chen; John S. Huang; Mahn Won Kim

1984-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

326

Galvanic corrosion of structural aluminum coupled with mild steel in a dilute sodium dichromate electrolyte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or the requirement for' the deqr, e of MASTER OF SCIl-NCI= Jaruary IgiO Major Sub ect: Civii I. ngineering GALVANIC CORROSION GF STRUCTURAI. ALUMINUM COUPLED WITH MILD STI:EL IN A DILUTE SODIUii DICIIROMA1'E ELECTROLTTE A Thesis ROBERT FRANKLIN FORD, JR.... Approved as to style and content by: + ~J Co-Chairman of Commii:t C Co-Chair n of Committe~e Member+ I Head of D=p rtm t) Januar; IDIO ABSTRACT Calvanic Corrosion of Structural Aluminum Coup'led with Mild Steel in a Dilute Sodium Dichromate...

Ford, Robert Franklin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

327

Under-Sodium Viewing: A Review of Ultrasonic Imaging Technology for Liquid Metal Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This current report is a summary of information obtained in the "Information Capture" task of the U.S. DOE-funded "Under Sodium Viewing (USV) Project." The goal of the multi-year USV project is to design, build, and demonstrate a state-of-the-art prototype ultrasonic viewing system tailored for periodic reactor core in-service monitoring and maintenance inspections. The study seeks to optimize system parameters, improve performance, and re-establish this key technology area which will be required to support any new U.S. liquid-metal cooled fast reactors.

Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Peters, Timothy J.; Posakony, Gerald J.; Chien, Hual-Te; Bond, Leonard J.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Raptis, Paul

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

328

Thermal analysis for fuel handling system for sodium cooled reactor considering minor actinide-bearing metal fuel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) is one of the components of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) used to close the fuel cycle. ABR is a sodium-cooled fast reactor that is used to consume transuranic elements resulting from the reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel. ABR-1000 [1000 MW(thermal)] is a fast reactor concept created at Argonne National Laboratory to be used as a reference concept for various future trade-offs. ABR-1000 meets the GNEP goals although it uses what is considered base sodium fast reactor technology for its systems and components. One of the considerations of any fast reactor plant concept is the ability to perform fuel-handling operations with new and spent fast reactor fuel. The transmutation fuel proposed as the ABR fuel has a very little experience base, and thus, this paper investigates a fuel-handling concept and potential issues of handling fast reactor fuel containing minor actinides. In this study, two thermal analyses supporting a conceptual design study on the ABR-1000 fuel-handling system were carried out. One analysis investigated passive dry spent fuel storage, and the other analysis investigated a fresh fuel shipping cask. Passive dry storage can be made suitable for the ABR-1000 spent fuel storage with sodium-bonded metal fuel. The thermal analysis shows that spent fast reactor fuel with a decay heat of 2 kW or less can be stored passively in a helium atmosphere. The 2-kW value seems to be a reasonable and practical level, and a combination of reasonably-sized in-sodium storage followed by passive dry storage could be a candidate for spent fuel storage for the next-generation sodium-cooled reactor with sodium-bonded metal fuel. Requirements for the shipping casks for minor actinide-bearing fuel with a high decay heat level are also discussed in this paper. The shipping cask for fresh sodium-cooled-reactor fuel should be a dry type to reduce the reaction between residual moisture on fresh fuel and the sodium coolant. The cladding temperature requirement is maintained below the creep temperature limit to avoid any damage before core installation. The thermal analysis shows that a helium gas-filled cask can accommodate ABR-1000 fresh minor actinide-bearing fuel with 700-W decay heat. The above analysis results revealed the overall requirement for minor actinide-bearing metal fuel handling. The information is thought to be helpful in the design of the ABR-1000 and future sodium-cooled-reactor fuel-handling system.

Chikazawa, Y.; Grandy, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Enhancement of the inherent self-protection of the fast sodium reactor cores with oxide fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the development and research into the generation IV fast sodium reactors, great attention is paid to the enhancement of the core inherent self-protection characteristics. One of the problems dealt here is connected with the reduction of the reactivity margin so that the control rods running should not result in the core overheating and melting. In this paper we consider the possibilities of improving the core of BN-1200 with oxide fuel by a known method of introducing an axial fertile layer into the core. But unlike earlier studies this paper looks at the possibility of using such a layer not only for improving breeding, but also for reducing sodium void reactivity effect (SVRE). This proposed improvement of the BN-1200 core does not solve the problem of strong interference in control and protection system (CPS) rods of BN-1200, but they reduce significantly the reactivity margin for burn-up compensation. This helps compensate all the reactivity balances in the improved core configurations without violating constraints on SVRE value.

Eliseev, V.A.; Malisheva, I.V.; Matveev, V.I.; Egorov, A.V.; Maslov, P.A. [SSC RF - IPPE, Obninsk, Kaluga region (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Further Investigations of the Effect of Replacing Lithium by Sodium on Lithium Silicate Scintillating Glass Efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ce3+ doped lithium (6Li) silicate glasses are thermal neutron detectors. Prior work showed that when sodium (Na) is substituted for Li the scintillation efficiency, under beta particle stimulation, increased and then decreased as the sodium (Na) content was increased [1]. When all the 6Li was replaced by Na no scintillation was observed. Raman spectra, acquired using a visible excitation source provided no evidence of anomalous behavior. SEM microscopy did show some phase separation, but there was no obvious correlation with the scintillation efficiency. We have reexamined these glass samples using deep UV Raman excitation which reduces fluorescence interference. The newly acquired spectra show evidence of phase separation in the glasses. Specifically we see a peak at 800 cm-1 Raman shift which can be assigned to a vitreous silica moiety that results from phase separation. There is a strong correlation between this peak's area, the scintillation efficiency, and the Na content. The observed trend suggests that phase separation enhances scintillation and addition of Na reduces the amount of phase separation. We also see evidence of at least two defect structures that can be tentatively assigned to a three-membered ring structure and an oxygen vacancy. The latter is fairly strongly correlated with enhanced scintillation efficiency.

Bliss, Mary; Aker, Pamela M.; Windisch, Charles F.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Neutronic Assessment of Transmutation Target Compositions in Heterogeneous Sodium Fast Reactor Geometries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sodium fast reactor is under consideration for consuming the transuranic waste in the spent nuclear fuel generated by light water reactors. This work is concerned with specialized target assemblies for an oxide-fueled sodium fast reactor that are designed exclusively for burning the americium and higher mass actinide component of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The associated gamma and neutron radioactivity, as well as thermal heat, associated with decay of these actinides may significantly complicate fuel handling and fabrication of recycled fast reactor fuel. The objective of using targets is to isolate in a smaller number of assemblies these concentrations of higher actinides, thus reducing the volume of fuel having more rigorous handling requirements or a more complicated fabrication process. This is in contrast to homogeneous recycle where all recycled actinides are distributed among all fuel assemblies. Several heterogeneous core geometries were evaluated to determine the fewest target assemblies required to burn these actinides without violating a set of established fuel performance criteria. The DIF3D/REBUS code from Argonne National Laboratory was used to perform the core physics and accompanying fuel cycle calculations in support of this work. Using the REBUS code, each core design was evaluated at the equilibrium cycle condition.

Samuel E. Bays; Rodolfo M. Ferrer; Michael A. Pope; Benoit Forget; Mehdi Asgari

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Calcium-Mediated Regulation of Proton-Coupled Sodium Transport - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long-term goal of our experiments was to understand mechanisms that regulate energy coupling by ion currents in plants. Activities of living organisms require chemical, mechanical, osmotic or electrical work, the energy for which is supplied by metabolism. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has long been recognized as the universal energy currency, with metabolism supporting the synthesis of ATP and the hydrolysis of ATP being used for the subsequent work. However, ATP is not the only energy currency in living organisms. A second and very different energy currency links metabolism to work by the movement of ions passing from one side of a membrane to the other. These ion currents play a major role in energy capture and they support a range of physiological processes from the active transport of nutrients to the spatial control of growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), the activity of a plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger, SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), is essential for regulation of sodium ion homeostasis during plant growth in saline conditions. Mutations in SOS1 result in severely reduced seedling growth in the presence of salt compared to the growth of wild type. SOS1 is a secondary active transporter coupling movement of sodium ions out of the cell using energy stored in the transplasma membrane proton gradient, thereby preventing the build-up of toxic levels of sodium in the cytosol. SOS1 is regulated by complexes containing the SOS2 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) or SOS3 proteins. CBL10 and SOS3 (also identified as CBL4) encode EF-hand calcium sensors that interact physically with and activate SOS2, a serine/threonine protein kinase. The CBL10/SOS2 or SOS3/SOS2 complexes then activate SOS1 Na+/H+ exchange activity. We completed our studies to understand how SOS1 activity is regulated. Specifically, we asked: (1) how does CBL10 regulate SOS1 activity? (2) What role do two putative CBL10-interacting proteins play in SOS1 regulation? (3) Are there differences in the regulation and/or activity of SOS1 in plants differing in their adaptation to salinity?

Schumaker, Karen S [Professor] [Professor

2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

333

Go/No-Go Recommendation for Sodium Borohydride for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MP-150-42220 MP-150-42220 U. S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program Go/No-Go Recommendation for Sodium Borohydride for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a U. S. Department of Energy Laboratory operated by Midwest Research Institute and Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-98-GO10337 I I n n d d e e p p e e n n d d e e n n t t R R e e v v i i e e w w November 2007 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

334

Sodium Loop Safety Facility W-2 experiment fuel pin rupture detection system. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) W-2 experiment is to characterize the combined effects of a preconditioned full-length fuel column and slow transient overpower (TOP) conditions on breeder reactor (BR) fuel pin cladding failures. The W-2 experiment will meet this objective by providing data in two technological areas: (1) time and location of cladding failure, and (2) early post-failure test fuel behavior. The test involves a seven pin, prototypic full-length fast test reactor (FTR) fuel pin bundle which will be subjected to a simulated unprotected 5 cents/s reactivity transient overpower event. The outer six pins will provide the necessary prototypic thermal-hydraulic environment for the center pin.

Hoffman, M.A.; Kirchner, T.L.; Meyers, S.C.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

W-1 Sodium Loop Safety Facility experiment centerline fuel thermocouple performance. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The W-1 Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) experiment is the fifth in a series of experiments sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the National Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) Safety Assurance Program. The experiments are being conducted under the direction of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). The irradiation phase of the W-1 SLSF experiment was conducted between May 27 and July 20, 1979, and terminated with incipient fuel pin cladding failure during the final boiling transient. Experimental hardware and facility performed as designed, allowing completion of all planned tests and test objectives. This paper focuses on high temperature in-fuel thermocouples and discusses their development, fabrication, and performance in the W-1 experiment.

Meyers, S.C.; Henderson, J.M.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Preparation and humidity controlling behaviors of sepiolite/polyacrylic acid (sodium) composite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sepiolite/polyacrylic acid (sodium) nanocomposite was synthesized using inverse suspension polymerization method under different sepiolite content, dispersant content and neutralization degree with orthogonal experiments. The surface morphology and structure of sepiolite/polyacrylic acid composite were observed and analyzed, and the humidity controlling properties of composites were determined by absorption and desorption testing. The results showed that sepiolite/polyacrylic acid composite was in a fine particle with rough surface. During the polymerization process, acrylic acid monomer was grafted with hydroxyl on the surface of sepiolite and then intercalated successfully into the tetrahedral silica layers of sepiolite. With the increasing of sepiolite content, dispersant conten, neutralization degree and the humidity controlling behaviors of composite rose initially and then dropped down. The impact of three factors on the humidity controlling behavior of composites increased by the order of sepiolite content, dispersant content and neutralization degree. The optimum preparation parameters are sepiolite content of 4%, dispersant content of 15% and neutralization degree of 90%.

Jihui Wang; Shuping Ren; Mengjie Guo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Two-dimensional modeling of sodium boiling transients in simulated LMFBR fuel bundles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-dimensional code for analysis of sodium boiling in LMFBR fuel assemblies has been developed at ORNL. This code, THORAX, has been used to analyze tests in 19- and 61-pin electrically-heated, simulated LMFBR fuel assemblies in the THORS facility. THORAX has simulated well the transient growth of the two-dimensional boiling region and the resulting static flow instability leading to dryout. Extrapolation of results to a full size fuel pin bundle shows that two-dimensional effects are reduced but still significant. The code will be extended to include a loop model in support of forthcoming tests in the THORS-SHRS Assembly 1 loop, which will include two parallel 19-pin simulated driver bundles.

Rose, S.D.; Dearing, J.F; Carbajo, J.J.; Levin, A.E.; Montgomery, B.H.; Wantland, J.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

RELY: A reliability modeling system for analysis of sodium-sulfur battery configurations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the Office of Energy Storage and Distribution of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has produced a microcomputer-based software package, called RELY, to assess the impact of sodium-sulfur cell reliability on constant current discharge battery performance. The Fortran-based software operates on IBM microcomputers and IBM-compatibles that have a minimum of 512K of internal memory. The software package has three models that provide the following: (1) a description of the failure distribution parameters used to model cell failure, (2) a Monte Carlo simulation of battery life, and (3) a detailed discharge model for a user-specified battery discharge cycle. 6 refs., 31 figs., 4 tabs.

Hostick, C.J.; Huber, H.D.; Doggett, W.H.; Dirks, J.A.; Dovey, J.F.; Grinde, R.B.; Littlefield, J.S.; Cuta, F.M.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Sodium pumps adapt spike bursting to stimulus Sara Arganda1,2,4, Raul Guantes1,3,4 & Gonzalo G de Polavieja1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sodium pumps adapt spike bursting to stimulus statistics Sara Arganda1,2,4, Rau´l Guantes1,3,4 & Gonzalo G de Polavieja1,2 Pump activity is a homeostatic mechanism that maintains ionic gradients. Here we examined whether the slow reduction in excitability induced by sodium-pump activity that has been seen

Guantes, Raúl

340

Computer Simulation of Diffusion of Pb-Bi Eutectic in Liquid Sodium by Molecular Dynamics Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lead-bismuth eutectic is a potential candidate for coolant of secondary loops of sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors (FBR). The studies on the diffusion of liquid Pb-Bi in liquid Na are carried out corresponding to the case that liquid Pb-Bi leaks to liquid Na by accident. As the diffusion processes are the results of atomic motions, molecular dynamics method has been used to study the diffusion process. The self-diffusion coefficients of pure liquid Pb and Na, and liquid Pb-Bi are calculated and compared with ones by the empirical equations. The discrepancy between them could be eliminated by changing the densities of the liquids. The diffusion of lead-bismuth in sodium is simulated based on the changed densities under which the self-diffusion coefficients of individual liquid metals are close to those by the empirical equations. The simulation results show that the diffusion process of liquid Pb-Bi in liquid Na is a heat releasing process and the density of ternary liquid Na-Pb-Bi is higher than the average value of the densities of liquid Na and liquid Pb-Bi. It is also found that the diffusion coefficients of liquid Pb-Bi in liquid Na are much higher than their self-diffusion coefficients, indicating that liquid Pb-Bi are easy and quickly to diffuse in liquid Na. However, the diffusion coefficient of liquid Na is decreased due to the existence of liquid Pb-Bi, implying that liquid Na-Pb-Bi have a higher viscosity than that of pure liquid Na. (authors)

Yingxia Qi; Minoru Takahashi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver on-sun test results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficient operation of a Stirling engine requires the application of a high heat flux to the relatively small area occupied by the heater head tubes. Previous attempts to couple solar energy to Stirling engines generally involved directly illuminating the heater head tubes with concentrated sunlight. In this study, operation of a 75-kW{sub t} sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver has been demonstrated and its performance characterized on Sandia's nominal 75-kW{sub t} parabolic-dish concentrator, using a cold-water gas-gap calorimeter to simulate Stirling engine operation. The pool boiler (and more generally liquid-metal reflux receivers) supplies heat to the engine in the form of latent heat released from condensation of the metal vapor on the heater head tubes. The advantages of the pool boiler include uniform tube temperature, leading to longer life and higher temperature available to the engine, and decoupling of the design of the solar absorber from the engine heater head. The two-phase system allows high input thermal flux, reducing the receiver size and losses, therefore improving system efficiency. The receiver thermal efficiency was about 90% when operated at full power and 800{degree}C. Stable sodium boiling was promoted by the addition of 35 equally spaced artificial cavities in the wetted absorber surface. High incipient boiling superheats following cloud transients were suppressed passively by the addition of small amounts of xenon gas to the receiver volume. Stable boiling without excessive incipient boiling superheats was observed under all operating conditions. The receiver developed a leak during performance evaluation, terminating the testing after accumulating about 50 hours on sun. The receiver design is reported here along with test results including transient operations, steady-state performance evaluation, operation at various temperatures, infrared thermography, x-ray studies of the boiling behavior, and a postmortem analysis.

Andraka, C E; Moreno, J B; Diver, R B; Moss, T A [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Crystallization of Sodium Phosphate Dodecahydrate and Re-Crystallization to Natrophosphate in Simulated Hanford Nuclear Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear waste at the Hanford site near Richland, WA, has large concentrations of phosphate in the form of the phosphate ion, sodium phosphate dodecahydrate (Na3PO4.12H2O.(1/4)NaOH) and natrophosphate (Na7F(PO4)3.19H2O). Sodium phosphate dodecahydrate can form a gel and natrophosphate can crystallize large particles, complicating the processing of slurries of both salts. The gel is regarded as more problematic, so natrophosphate has historically been crystallized to prevent phosphate gelling. This study determined that natrophosphate crystals can grow to large size in short time periods (a few weeks), time periods relevant to short process shutdowns. Solutions of NaOH and NaAl(OH)4 were blended at different ratios with stock solutions containing NaOH, NaF, and Na3PO4 at 50 °C. The mixtures were allowed to cool to 22 °C, and the crystal growth was monitored by Polarized Light Microscopy (PLM) for 17 days. Four of the six blends investigated gelled rapidly due to Na3PO4.12H2O.(1/4)NaOH precipitation. The gel slowly dissipated over time as the solids recrystallized into natrophosphate. In one case, the natrophosphate reached sizes of greater than 1000 microns in diameter in just 4 days. This rapid gelling and crystallization kinetics is important to engineers trying to manage nuclear wastes high in phosphates. Hanford tank farm engineers are developing sampling plans to support temperature and process control strategies for preventing the formation of solid phosphates. They are also developing methods of suspending large natrophosphate crystals.

Reynolds, J. G.

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

343

A High Temperature Electrochemical Energy Storage System Based on Sodium Beta-Alumina Solid Electrolyte (Base)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work done during the period September 1, 2005 and March 31, 2008. Work was conducted in the following areas: (1) Fabrication of sodium beta{double_prime} alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) using a vapor phase process. (2) Mechanistic studies on the conversion of {alpha}-alumina + zirconia into beta{double_prime}-alumina + zirconia by the vapor phase process. (3) Characterization of BASE by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and conductivity measurements. (4) Design, construction and electrochemical testing of a symmetric cell containing BASE as the electrolyte and NaCl + ZnCl{sub 2} as the electrodes. (5) Design, construction, and electrochemical evaluation of Na/BASE/ZnCl{sub 2} electrochemical cells. (6) Stability studies in ZnCl{sub 2}, SnCl{sub 2}, and SnI{sub 4} (7) Design, assembly and testing of planar stacks. (8) Investigation of the effect of porous surface layers on BASE on cell resistance. The conventional process for the fabrication of sodium ion conducting beta{double_prime}-alumina involves calcination of {alpha}-alumina + Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} + LiNO{sub 3} at 1250 C, followed by sintering powder compacts in sealed containers (platinum or MgO) at {approx}1600 C. The novel vapor phase process involves first sintering a mixture of {alpha}-alumina + yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) into a dense ceramic followed by exposure to soda vapor at {approx}1450 C to convert {alpha}-alumina into beta{double_prime}-alumina. The vapor phase process leads to a high strength BASE, which is also resistant to moisture attack, unlike BASE made by the conventional process. The PI is the lead inventor of the process. Discs and tubes of BASE were fabricated in the present work. In the conventional process, sintering of BASE is accomplished by a transient liquid phase mechanism wherein the liquid phase contains NaAlO{sub 2}. Some NaAlO{sub 2} continues to remain at grain boundaries; and is the root cause of its water sensitivity. In the vapor phase process, NaAlO{sub 2} is never formed. Conversion occurs by a coupled transport of Na{sup +} through BASE formed and of O{sup 2-} through YSZ to the reaction front. Transport to the reaction front is described in terms of a chemical diffusion coefficient of Na{sub 2}O. The conversion kinetics as a function of microstructure is under investigation. The mechanism of conversion is described in this report. A number of discs and tubes of BASE have been fabricated by the vapor phase process. The material was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), before and after conversion. Conductivity (which is almost exclusively due to sodium ion transport at the temperatures of interest) was measured. Conductivity was measured using sodium-sodium tests as well as by impedance spectroscopy. Various types of both planar and tubular electrochemical cells were assembled and tested. In some cases the objective was to determine if there was any interaction between the salt and BASE. The interaction of interest was mainly ion exchange (possible replacement of sodium ion by the salt cation). It was noted that Zn{sup 2+} did not replace Na+ over the conditions of interest. For this reason much of the work was conducted with ZnCl{sub 2} as the cathode salt. In the case of Sn-based, Sn{sup 2+} did ion exchange, but Sn{sup 4+} did not. This suggests that Sn{sup 4+} salts are viable candidates. These results and implications are discussed in the report. Cells made with Na as the anode and ZnCl{sub 2} as the cathode were successfully charged/discharged numerous times. The key advantages of the batteries under investigation here over the Na-S batteries are: (1) Steel wool can be used in the cathode compartment unlike Na-S batteries which require expensive graphite. (2) Planar cells can be constructed in addition to tubular, allowing for greater design flexibility and integration with other devices such as planar SOFC. (3) Comparable or higher open circuit voltage (OCV) than the Na-S battery. (4) Wider operating temperature range and higher temper

Anil Virkar

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium vapor lamps, ultraviolet and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium vapor lamps, ultraviolet and HID (high-intensity discharge) lamps and all other mercury containing labeled for shipment to a recycling plant for mercury, glass and aluminum recovery. The beneficial re

Baker, Chris I.

345

F POWER MEASUREMENT FOR GENERATION IV SODIUM FAST R. COULON, S. NORMAND, M. MICHEL, L. BARBOT, T. DOMENECH,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.F-84500 Bollène, France. ABSTRACT The Phénix nuclear power plant has been a French Sodium Fast Reactor. Drift between the measured ex-core neutron flux and the instant released thermal power (fission rate the research of power tagging agents. Then, simulation study has been done to evaluate measurability using high

Boyer, Edmond

346

Tetrodotoxin binding sites in human heart and human brain sodium channels. Final report, 28 June 1991-27 June 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) are potent and lethal threats to exposed soldiers. The development of an antidote or site-specific antibodies for low affinity TTX/STX cardiac sodium channels and high affinity TTX/STX brain and peripheral nerve sodium channels requires a data base not only of the primary structure of the toxin receptor site(s) but also insight into the secondary structures of these site(s). Five goals or tasks were attempted and the first three were completed. Full-length human cardiac and brain sodium channel cDNAs have been cloned and expressed as functional proteins in Xenopus oocytes. Silent restriction sites have been introduced around the pore or P-region of the Na+ channel repeats. Site-directed mutagenesis has identified critical residues in the pore from the primary structure involved in sensitivity to TTX and STX and other pore properties. Chemical modification of cysteine mutants of these initial residues by methanethiosulfonate compounds produces an expanded data base of the secondary structure of the toxins` receptors. Specific peptides which mimic these receptors will be made to compete with the natural receptor for the toxins. We have successfully cloned the cDNAs for both human heart and brain sodium channels and expressed functional proteins. The initial chemical modification data suggests file receptor sites for TTX/STX are not interchangeable and are not the same site.

Brown, A.M.; Hartmann, H.A.

1994-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

347

Aluminium alloy based hydrogen storage tank operated with sodium aluminium hexahydride Na3AlH6  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Here we present the development of an aluminium alloy based hydrogen storage tank, charged with Ti-doped sodium aluminium hexahydride Na3AlH6. This hydride has a theoretical hydrogen storage capacity of 3 mass-% and can be operated at lower pressure compared to sodium alanate NaAlH4. The tank was made of aluminium alloy EN AW 6082 T6. The heat transfer was realised through an oil flow in a bayonet heat exchanger, manufactured by extrusion moulding from aluminium alloy EN AW 6060 T6. Na3AlH6 is prepared from 4 mol-% TiCl3 doped sodium aluminium tetrahydride NaAlH4 by addition of two moles of sodium hydride NaH in ball milling process. The hydrogen storage tank was filled with 213 g of doped Na3AlH6 in dehydrogenated state. Maximum of 3.6 g (1.7 mass-% of the hydride mass) of hydrogen was released from the hydride at approximately 450 K and the same hydrogen mass was consumed at 2.5 MPa hydrogenation pressure. 45 cycle tests (rehydrogenation and dehydrogenation) were carried out without any failure of the tank or its components. Operation of the tank under real conditions indicated the possibility for applications with stationary HT-PEM fuel cell systems.

R. Urbanczyk; K. Peinecke; M. Felderhoff; K. Hauschild; W. Kersten; S. Peil; D. Bathen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Small angle neutron scattering study of deuterated sodium dodecylsulfate micellization in dilute poly((2edimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Small angle neutron scattering study of deuterated sodium dodecylsulfate micellization in dilute 2010 Keywords: Poly((2edimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) Micelle Small angle neutron scattering a b angle neutron scattering. We found three transitions of the poly ((2edimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate

Kofinas, Peter

349

Sodium-dependent transport of neutral amino acids by whole cells and membrane vesicles of Streptococcus bovis, a ruminal bacterium.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...diluted into either lithium or choline chloride...was inhibited by an excess of threonine, but...diluted into either lithium or choline chloride...was inhibited by an excess of threonine, but...choline chloride, lithium chloride, or sodium...presence of a 70-fold excess of nonlabeled L-threonine...

J B Russell; H J Strobel; A J Driessen; W N Konings

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Differential effects of sodium on hydrogen- and glucose-dependent growth of the acetogenic bacterium Acetogenium kivui.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...0.012i FIG. 3. Effects of sodium, lithium, and potassium on the H2d dependent growth...represent the amount of biomass formed in excess of the inoculum. d Growth after a 3-day...represent the amount of biomass formed in excess of the inoculum. c Acetate (millimolar...

H C Yang; H L Drake

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Second harmonic signal detection on Poly[µ2-L-alanine-µ3-nitrato-sodium (I)] crystals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crystals of poly (L-alanine sodium nitrate) have been grown by the slow evaporation at room temperature method. Crystal sizes of 500mm and 10 mm were obtained. UV-vis spectrum shows a wide transparent window where lake of absorption around the 532 nm. ... Keywords: L- alanine, NLO, SHG, alanine, semiorganic

E. Gallegos-Loya; E. Alvarez Ramos; E. Regalado; A. Duarte-Moller

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Physiological responses to training and racing in two year-old Quarter Horses fed Sodium Zeolite A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Table 82A Page Packed cell volume ('/0) at recovery 10 minutes in two- year-old Quarter Horses fed varying amounts of Sodium Zeolite A Table 83A. Packed cell volume (/o) at recovery 20 minutes in two- year-old Quarter Horses fed varying amounts...

Reynolds, Judith Amy Lundgren

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

353

Partial Pressure of Saturated Sodium Nitrite Vapor over the System NaNO2-NaNO3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The partial pressure of sodium nitrite was measured in the system NaNO2-NaNO3...at temperatures of 798, 823, and 848 K and the logarithm of the NaNO2 pressure was obtained as a function of inverse temperature. Th...

V. I. Glazov; G. P. Dukhanin; M. Kh. Dkhaibe…

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Ni-Pt Silicide Formation Through Ti Mediating Layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With Ni1-xPtxSi, the variation in queue time between the final surface cleaning and Ni-Pt deposition represents a significant manufacturability issue. A short queue time is often difficult to maintain, leading to the formation of an oxide layer on the Si substrate prior to Ni-Pt deposition that can affect the formation of Ni1-xPtxSi and its texture. In this manuscript, it will be shown that an extended queue time prior to Ni-Pt deposition leads to morphological changes in the Ni1-xPtxSi formation sequence. A layer of Ti deposited between Ni-Pt and Si reduces the native oxide and may facilitate Ni1-xPtxSi formation. With increasing Ti thickness, the presence of metal-rich phases is gradually reduced and the formation temperature of Ni1-xPtxSi increases, suggesting a direct formation of Ni1-xPtxSi from Ni-Pt. In the presence of an interfacial oxide, an increase in formation temperature is also observed with increasing Ti interlayer thickness. When the Ti layer is sufficiently thick, the phase formation sequence becomes relatively insensitive to the presence of an interfacial oxide or extended queue time.

Besser,P.; Lavoie, C.; Ozcan, A.; Murray, C.; Strane, J.; Wong, K.; Gribelyuk, M.; Wang, Y.; Parks, C.; Jordan-Sweet, J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Effect of Oxygen on Ni-Silicided FUSI Metal Gate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Continual evolution of the CMOS technology requires thinner gate dielectric to maintain high performance. However, when moving into the sub-65 nm CMOS generation, the traditional poly-Si gate approach cannot effectively ...

Yu, H.P.

356

Metal silicide nanoelectromechanical relays for low power applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??ABSTRACT Scaling down the metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) has continuously brought lower cost, higher density and increased performance since the 1960s. However, as MOS… (more)

Stanford University, Dept. of Electrical; Engineering

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Development of nickel silicide for integrated circuit technology.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Continuous advancements in devices, materials and processes have resulted in integrated circuits with smaller device dimensions, higher functionality and higher speed. The complementary metal… (more)

Do, Phu H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Synthesis of silicide nanomaterials using chemical vapour deposition method.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Recent research has evidenced that nanotechnology may bring about a material revolution which sweeps through different scientific fields and leads to dramatic changes in the… (more)

Norouzi Banis, Hamid

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

High-Performance Thermoelectric Devices Based on Abundant Silicide...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Development of high-performance thermoelectric devices for vehicle waste heat recovery will include fundamental research to use abundant promising low-cost thermoelectric...

360

Sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate-assisted synthesis through a hydrothermal reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Reaction of a SeCl{sub 4} aqueous solution with a NiCl{sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O aqueous solution in presence of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) as capping agent and hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O) as reductant, produces nanosized nickel selenide through a hydrothermal method. The effect of temperature, reaction time and amounts of reductant on the morphology, particle sizes of NiSe nanostructures has been investigated. Highlights: ? NiSe nanostructures were synthesized by hydrothermal method. ? A novel Se source was used to synthesize NiSe. ? SDBS as capping agent plays a crucial role on the morphology of products. ? A mixture of Ni{sub 3}Se{sub 2} and NiSe was prepared in the presence of 2 ml hydrazine. ? A pure phase of NiSe was prepared in the presence of 4 or 6 ml hydrazine. -- Abstract: The effects of the anionic surfactant on the morphology, size and crystallization of NiSe precipitated from NiCl{sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O and SeCl{sub 4} in presence of hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O) as reductant were investigated. The products have been successfully synthesized in presence of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) as surfactant via an improved hydrothermal route. A variety of synthesis parameters, such as reaction time and temperature, capping agent and amount of reducing agent have a significant effect on the particle size, phase purity and morphology of the obtained products. The sample size became bigger with decreasing reaction temperature and increasing reaction time. In the presence of 2 ml hydrazine, the samples were found to be the mixture of Ni{sub 3}Se{sub 2} and NiSe. With increasing the reaction time and amount of hydrazine a pure phase of hexagonal NiSe was obtained. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images indicate phase, particle size and morphology of the products. Chemical composition and purity of the products were characterized by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Photoluminescence (PL) was used to study the optical properties of NiSe samples.

Sobhani, Azam [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317–51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317–51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317–51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317–51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317–51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Roderick MacKinnon and Ion Channels - Potassium Channels and Sodium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Roderick MacKinnon and Ion Channels Roderick MacKinnon and Ion Channels Resources with Additional Information · Patents Roderick MacKinnon Courtesy of The Rockefeller University Roderick MacKinnon, M.D., a visiting researcher at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, is a recipient of the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry 'for structural and mechanistic studies of ion channels.' His research explains "how a class of proteins helps to generate nerve impulses - the electrical activity that underlies all movement, sensation, and perhaps even thought. The work leading to the prize was done primarily at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source [CHESS] and the National Synchrotron Light Source [NSLS] at Brookhaven. The proteins, called ion channels, are tiny pores that stud the surface of all of our cells. These channels allow the passage of potassium, calcium, sodium, and chloride molecules called ions. Rapid-fire opening and closing of these channels releases ions, moving electrical impulses from the brain in a wave to their destination in the body."1

362

Phase 2 TWR Steam Reforming Test for Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste (SBW) is stored in stainless steel tanks a the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Steam reforming is a candidate technology being investigated for converting the SBW into a road ready waste form that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico for interment. Fluidized bed steam reforming technology, licensed to ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC (TWR) by Manufacturing Technology Conversion International, was tested in two phases using an INEEL (Department of Energy) fluidized bed test system located at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research Center in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Phase 1 tests were reported earlier. The Phase 2 tests are reported here. For Phase 2, the process feed rate, reductant stoichiometry, and process temperature were varied to identify and demonstrate how the process might be optimized to improve operation and product characteristics. The first week of testing was devoted primarily to process chemistry and the second week was devoted more toward bed stability and particle size control.

Nicholas R. Soelberg; Doug Marshall; Dean Taylor; Steven Bates

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Status of advanced fuel candidates for Sodium Fast Reactor within the Generation IV International Forum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main challenge for fuels for future Sodium Fast Reactor systems is the development and qualification of a nuclear fuel sub-assembly which meets the Generation IV International Forum goals. The Advanced Fuel project investigates high burn-up minor actinide bearing fuels as well as claddings and wrappers to withstand high neutron doses and temperatures. The R&D outcome of national and collaborative programs has been collected and shared between the AF project members in order to review the capability of sub-assembly material and fuel candidates, to identify the issues and select the viable options. Based on historical experience and knowledge, both oxide and metal fuels emerge as primary options to meet the performance and the reliability goals of Generation IV SFR systems. There is a significant positive experience on carbide fuels but major issues remain to be overcome: strong in-pile swelling, atmosphere required for fabrication as well as Pu and Am losses. The irradiation performance database for nitride fuels is limited with longer term R&D activities still required. The promising core material candidates are Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) and Oxide Dispersed Strengthened (ODS) steels.

F. Delage; J. Carmack; C. B. Lee; T. Mizuno; M. Pelletier; J. Somers

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

On the Criticality Safety of Transuranic Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Transport Casks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work addresses the neutronic performance and criticality safety issues of transport casks for fuel pertaining to low conversion ratio sodium cooled fast reactors, conventionally known as Advanced Burner Reactors. The criticality of a one, three, seven and 19-assembly cask capacity is presented. Both dry “helium” and flooded “water” filled casks are considered. No credit for fuel burnup or fission products was assumed. As many as possible of the conservatisms used in licensing light water reactor universal transport casks were incorporated into this SFR cask criticality design and analysis. It was found that at 7-assemblies or more, adding moderator to the SFR cask increases criticality margin. Also, removal of MAs from the fuel increases criticality margin of dry casks and takes a slight amount of margin away for wet casks. Assuming credit for borated fuel tube liners, this design analysis suggests that as many as 19 assemblies can be loaded in a cask if limited purely by criticality safety. If no credit for boron is assumed, the cask could possibly hold seven assemblies if low conversion ratio fast reactor grade fuel and not breeder reactor grade fuel is assumed. The analysis showed that there is a need for new cask designs for fast reactors spent fuel transportation. There is a potential of modifying existing transportation cask design as the starting point for fast reactor spent fuel transportation.

Samuel Bays; Ayodeji Alajo

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The case for endurance testing of sodium-heated steam generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is generally believed that a nuclear power comeback before the end of the century will be through the vehicle of the light water reactor (LWR). The newer designs, with their important technical and economic advances, should attract wide interest and result in commercial success for the manufacturers and their utility customers. To develop the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), approximately $30 billion has been spent worldwide, a third of which has been spent in the US. As a result of this considerable investment, most of the technical obstacles to deployment of the LMFBR have been removed with a few exceptions, one of which is the long-term performance of sodium-heated steam generators. Of the difficulties that have beset the current vintage of nuclear power plants, the performance of steam generators in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) was the most egregious. There was very little development testing and no model testing of PWR steam generators. Development occurred in the plants themselves resulting in many outages and more than $5 billion in lost revenue and replacement power costs. As a result, the electric utility industry is certain to exercise caution regarding acquisition of the LMFBR and will demand strong objective evidence of steam generator reliability. Only long-term endurance testing of prototypic models under prototypic conditions will satisfy this demand.

Onesto, A.T.; Zweig, H.R.; Gibbs, D.C. (Energy Technology Engineering Center, Canoga Park, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Sodium bromide electron-extraction layers for polymer bulk-heterojunction solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inexpensive and non-toxic sodium bromide (NaBr) was introduced into polymer solar cells (PSCs) as the cathode buffer layer (CBL) and the electron extraction characteristics of the NaBr CBL were investigated in detail. The PSCs based on NaBr CBL with different thicknesses (i.e., 0?nm, 0.5?nm, 1?nm, and 1.5?nm) were prepared and studied. The optimal thickness of NaBr was 1?nm according to the photovoltaic data of PSCs. The open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}), short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}), fill factor (FF), and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the PSC with 1?nm NaBr were evaluated to be 0.58?V, 7.36?mA/cm{sup 2}, 0.63, and 2.70%, respectively, which were comparable to those of the reference device with the commonly used LiF. The optimized photovoltaic performance of PSC with 1?nm NaBr was ascribed to the improved electron transport and extraction capability of 1?nm NaBr in PSCs. In addition, the NaBr CBL could prevent the diffusion of oxygen and water vapor into the active layer and prolong the lifetime of the devices to some extent. Therefore, NaBr layer could be considered as a promising non-toxic CBL for PSCs in future.

Gao, Zhi; Qu, Bo, E-mail: bqu@pku.edu.cn; Xiao, Lixin; Chen, Zhijian [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructures and Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructures and Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); New Display Device and System Integration Collaborative Innovation Center of the West Coast of the Taiwan Strait, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Zhang, Lipei [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructures and Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructures and Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Gong, Qihuang [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructures and Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Artificial Microstructures and Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100871 (China)

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

367

Experimental Investigation on Density Wave Instability of Sodium Boiling Two-Phase Flow in an Annulus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments of density wave instability in a liquid sodium boiling two-phase flow experiments in an annulus were carried out in the following parameters range: heat flux from 80 kW/m{sup 2} to 976 kW/m{sup 2}, inlet subcooling from 25.6 deg. C to 226.8 deg. C, mass flow rate from 7.92 kg/h to 68.9 kg/h, system pressure from 2600 Pa to 0.12 Mpa. Not only the mechanism of the instability, critical conditions and oscillation period, but also the effects of pressure, mass flow rate and inlet subcooling on the density wave instability were explored experimentally and theoretically. From the experimental data, it was found that the lower the inlet temperature was, the higher the system pressure and the mass flow rate that could result in a more stable boiling two-phase flow were. A correlation for the density wave instability was obtained on from the dimensional analysis for the conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy. (authors)

Suizheng Qiu; Dounan Jia [Xi'an Jiaotong University, No.28, Xianning West Road, Xi'an, Shaanxi, 710049 (China); Minoru Takahashi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152 (Japan)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Steam Reforming Application for Treatment of DOE Sodium Bearing Tank Wastes at INL for ICP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The patented THOR® steam reforming waste treatment technology has been selected as the technology of choice for treatment of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP). SBW is an acidic tank waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at INL. It consists primarily of waste from decontamination activities and laboratory wastes. SBW contains high concentrations of nitric acid, alkali and aluminum nitrates, with minor amounts of many inorganic compounds including radionuclides, mainly cesium and strontium. The THOR® steam reforming process will convert the SBW tank waste feed into a dry, solid, granular product. The THOR® technology was selected to treat SBW, in part, because it can provide flexible disposal options to accommodate the final disposition path selected for SBW. THOR® can produce a final end-product that will meet anticipated requirements for disposal as Remote-Handled TRU (RH-TRU) waste; and, with modifications, THOR® can also produce a final endproduct that could be qualified for disposal as High Level Waste (HLW). SBW treatment will be take place within the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU), a new facility that will be located at the INTEC. This paper provides an overview of the THOR® process chemistry and process equipment being designed for the IWTU.

J. Bradley Mason; Kevin Ryan; Scott Roesener; Michael Cowen; Duane Schmoker; Pat Bacala; Bill Landman

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Membrane formation by preferential solvation of ions in mixture of water, 3-methylpyridine, and sodium tetraphenylborate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structure and dynamics of a ternary system composed of deuterium oxide (D{sub 2}O), 3-methylpyridine (3MP), and sodium tetraphenylborate (NaBPh{sub 4}) are investigated by means of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron spin echo (NSE) techniques. In the SANS experiments, a structural phase transition is confirmed between a disordered-phase and an ordered-lamellar-phase upon variation of the composition and/or temperature of the mixture. The characteristic lengths of the structures is on the sub-micrometer scale. A dispersion relation of the structure is measured through NSE experiments, which shows that the relaxation rate follows a cubic relation with momentum transfer. This implies that the dynamics of the system are determined predominantly by membrane fluctuations. The present results indicate that 3MP-rich domains are microscopically separated from bulk water in the presence of NaBPh{sub 4}, and that the layers behave as membranes. These results are interpreted that preferential solvation of salt in each solvent induces a microphase separation between the solvents, and the periodic structure of 3MP-rich domains is stabilized by the long-range electrostatic interaction arising from Na{sup +} ions in D{sub 2}O-rich domains.

Sadakane, Koichiro, E-mail: sadakane@fc.ritsumei.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Ritsumeikan University, Noji-Higashi 1-1-1, Kusatsu 525-8577 (Japan)] [Department of Physics, Ritsumeikan University, Noji-Higashi 1-1-1, Kusatsu 525-8577 (Japan); Nagao, Michihiro [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-6102 (United States) [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-6102 (United States); Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47408-1398 (United States); Endo, Hitoshi; Seto, Hideki [KENS and CMRC, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)] [KENS and CMRC, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

370

Removal of ash from Indian Assam coking coal using sodium hydroxide and acid solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mineral matter (ash) removal from Assam coking coal by leaching with different concentrations of sodium hydroxide and acid (HCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, HNO{sub 3}, and HF) solutions has been investigated at a temperature of 75 C. The parameters tested were concentration of NaOH, type of acid, concentration of acids, and number of acid leaching steps. Total ash removed increased with increase of NaOH and acid concentrations up to the range studied. For the same experimental conditions, treatment of caustic leached coal in HCl acid resulted in better demineralization than in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or HNO{sub 3} acid. In the NaOH-HNO{sub 3} leaching method, a higher concentration (>20%) of HNO{sub 3} acid had an adverse effect on the de-ashing of coal. The NaOH-HF leaching process has been found to be the most effective method of coal de-ashing. The two acid treatment steps (HCl-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/HCl-HNO{sub 3}) after caustic leaching are the next most effective methods of coal de-ashing. The removal of mineral matter (including S) from coal is expected to decrease the graphite reactivity and thus the atmospheric pollution (due to the generation of smaller quantities of CO and SO{sub 2} gases).

Kumar, M.; Shankar, R.H.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The corrosion behavior of molybdenum and Hastelloy B in sulfur and sodium polysulfides at 623 K  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study was completed to determine the corrosion behavior of molybdenum and Hastelloy B, a nickel-based alloy with high molybdenum content, in sulfur and sodium polysulfides (Na/sub 2/S/sub 3/,Na/sub 2/S/sub 4/, Na/sub 2/S/sub 5/) at 623 K. In sulfur, molybdenum corrodes very slowly, with a parabolic rate constant of 3.6 x 10/sup -9/ cm s/sup -1/2/. Hastelloy B shows no measurable corrosion after 100h of exposure to sulfur. The corrosion reaction of molybdenum in Na/sub 2/S/sub 3/ is characterized by the formation of a protective film that effectively eliminates further corrosion after the first 100h of exposure. Hastelloy B, however, corrodes rapidly in Na/sub 2/S/sub 3/, with corrosion rates approaching those of pure nickel under the same conditions. After the first 4h of exposure, the kinetics for the corrosion of Hastelloy B in Na/sub 2/S/sub 3/ follows a linear rate law. The scale morphology has multiple spalled layers of NiS/sub 2/, with some crystallites of NiS/sub 2/ appearing on the leading face of the scale and between the individual scale layers. This spalling causes smaller coupons of the Hastelloy B to corrode faster than larger coupons.

Brown, A.P.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Interactions between mica surfaces in sodium polyacrylate solutions containing calcium ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polyacrylic acid (PAA) and its salts find use in a number of different applications, such as in fluids for secondary oil recovery, as dispersing agents for mineral suspensions in, for example, ceramic and paper coating applications, and as flocculants for waste-water treatment. The forces acting between negatively charged muscovite mica surfaces immersed in solutions containing sodium polyacrylate (NaPAA) have been studied. No evidence for PAA adsorption in the absence of calcium ions in the solution was found. However, at a CaCl[sub 2] concentration of about 3 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] M a layer of PAA adsorbed on each surface. At large separations, the forces between the PAA-coated surfaces were dominated by repulsive double-layer forces. At separations below 50--80 [angstrom], depending on the solution conditions, an attractive force in excess of the van der Waals attraction was observed. The adhesion force between the layers was 7-8 mN / m at pH 6 and increased somewhat with increasing pH to about 9 mN/m at pH 10. The authors argue that both the long-range attraction and the adhesion force primarily are due to COO[sup [minus

Berg, J.M.; Claesson, P.M. (Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept of Physical Chemistry); Neuman, R.D. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Development and Testing of an Americium/Lanthanide Separation Flowsheet Using Sodium Bismuthate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The separation of Am from the lanthanides and curium is a key step in proposed advanced fuel cycle scenarios. The partitioning and transmutation of Am is desirable to minimize the long-term heat load of material interred in a future high-level waste repository. A separation process amenable to process scale-up remains elusive. Given only subtle chemistry differences within and between the ions of the trivalent actinide and lanthanide series this separation is challenging ; however, higher oxidation states of americium can be prepared using sodium bismuthate and separated via solvent extraction using diamylamylphosphonate (DAAP) extraction. Among the other trivalent metals only Ce is also oxidized and extracted. Due to the long-term instability of Am(VI) , the loaded organic phase is readily selectively stripped to partition the actinide to a new acidic aqueous phase. Batch extraction distribution ratio measurements were used to design a flowsheet to accomplish this separation. Additionally, crossflow filtration was investigated as a method to filter the bismuthate solids from the feed solution prior to extraction. Results of the filtration studies, flowsheet development work and flowsheet performance testing using a centrifugal contactor are detailed.

Jack Law; Bruce Mincher; Troy Garn; Mitchell Greenhalgh; Nicholas Schmitt; Veronica Rutledge

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

A Reliable Steam Generator That Will Allow the Elimination of the Secondary Sodium Circuit in an LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A particular weakness of the commercial liquid-metal fast breeder reactor is the design of the steam generator (SG). Any small leak in the SG allows the hot sodium (Na) to come into contact with the water/steam, and this results in a violent reaction and SG damage. A secondary circuit is normally used to prevent such reactions causing damage to the reactor core and primary vessel.NNC Ltd. has developed a copper (Cu)-bonded SG system, the objective of which is to provide three separate solid boundaries (two steel and one Cu) between the primary sodium coolant and the water/steam and hence eliminate the possibility of contact between Na and water/steam. The design uses a hot isostatic pressure method of construction to bond all three barriers to aid heat transfer. This highly reliable system allows the elimination of the secondary circuit, greatly reducing the cost of the reactor system and increasing availability.

Sherwood, D.V.; Chikazawa, Y

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

High magnetic shear gain in a liquid sodium stable couette flow experiment A prelude to an alpha - omega dynamo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The {Omega}-phase of the liquid sodium {alpha}-{Omega} dynamo experiment at NMIMT in cooperation with LANL has successfully demonstrated the production of a high toroidal field, B{sub {phi}} {approx_equal} 8 x B{sub r} from the radial component of an applied poloidal magnetic field, B{sub r}. This enhanced toroidal field is produced by rotational shear in stable Couette Row within liquid sodium at Rm {approx_equal} 120. The small turbulence in stable Taylor-Couette Row is caused by Ekman Row where ({delta}v/v){sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -3}. This high {Omega}-gain in low turbulence flow contrasts with a smaller {Omega}-gain in higher turbulence, Helmholtz-unstable shear flows. This result supports the ansatz that large scale astrophysical magnetic fields are created within semi-coherent large scale motions in which turbulence plays a diffusive role that enables magnetic flux linkage.

Colgate, Stirling [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Jui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Finn, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pariev, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Beckley, Howard [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH; Si, Jiahe [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Martinic, Joe [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Westpfahl, David [NM INSTIT. OF TECH.; Slutz, James [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.; Westrom, Zeb [NM INSTIT. OF TECH.; Klein, Brianna [NM INSTIT. OF MINING AND TECH.

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

376

Design, fabrication, and testing of a sodium evaporator for the STM4-120 kinematic Stirling engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development and testing of a compact heat-pipe heat exchanger kW(e) designed to transfer thermal energy from hot combustion gases to the heater tubes of a 25-kW(e) Stirling engine. In this system, sodium evaporates from a surface that is heated by a stream of hot gases. The liquid metal then condenses on the heater tubes of a Stirling engine, where energy is transferred to the engine`s helium working fluid. Tests on a prototype unit illustrated that a compact (8 cm {times} 13 cm {times} 16 cm) sodium evaporator can routinely transfer 15 kW(t) of energy at an operating vapor temperature of 760 C. Four of these prototype units were eventually used to power a 25-kW(e) Stirling engine system. Design details and test results from the prototype unit are presented in this report.

Rawlinson, K.S.; Adkins, D.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Role of Surfactants in Photogalvanics: Solar Energy Conversion and Storage in the Sodium Lauryl Sulphate–Thymol Blue–Mannose System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) was used as a surfactant, thymol blue as a photosensitizer and mannose as a reductant in a photogalvanic cell to improve the conversion efficiency and storage capacity of such cell...

Prem Prakash Solanki; K. M. Gangotri

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Phase separation of quaternary solubilized solutions or micro emulsion of hydrocarbons containing sodium oleate + phenol + benzene + water by freezing point measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The depressions in freezing point measurements in quaternary solubilized solutions or micro-emulsion in sodium oleate + phenol + benzene + water are measured. Maxima and minima were observed, Gibbs' phase rule...

Dr. Bhagwan Swaroop

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Workers' Compensation Costs Rising Across the Nation | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

the stock market was booming. The full NASI report is available from the academy's Web site at www.nasi.org. Story link: http:www.occupationalhazards.comfullstory.php?WID7397...

380

Bench-scale screening tests for a boiling sodium-potassium alloy solar receiver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bench-scale tests were carried out in support of the design of a second-generation 75-kW{sub t} reflux pool-boiler solar receiver. The receiver will be made from Haynes Alloy 230 and will contain the sodium-potassium alloy NaK-78. The bench-scale tests used quartz-lamp-heated boilers to screen candidate boiling-stabilization materials and methods at temperatures up to 750{degree}C. Candidates that provided stable boiling were tested for hot-restart behavior. Poor stability was obtained with single 1/4-inch diameter patches of powdered metal hot-press-sintered onto the wetted side of the heat-input area. Laser-drilled and electric-discharge-machined cavities in the heated surface also performed poorly. Small additions of xenon, and heated-surface tilt out of the vertical dramatically improved poor boiling stability; additions of helium or oxygen did not. The most stable boiling was obtained when the entire heat-input area was covered by a powdered-metal coating. The effect of heated-area size was assessed for one coating: at low incident fluxes, when even this coating performed poorly, increasing the heated-area size markedly improved boiling stability. Good hot-restart behavior was not observed with any candidate, although results were significantly better with added xenon in a boiler shortened from 3 to 2 feet. In addition to the screening tests, flash-radiography imaging of metal-vapor bubbles during boiling was attempted. Contrary to the Cole-Rohsenow correlation, these bubble-size estimates did not vary with pressure; instead they were constant, consistent with the only other alkali metal measurements, but about 1/2 their size.

Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Probing the Failure Mechanism of SnO{sub 2} Nanowires for Sodium-Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonlithium metals such as sodium have attracted wide attention as a potential charge carrying ion for rechargeable batteries. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy in combination with density functional theory calculations, we probed the structural and chemical evolution of SnO{sub 2} nanowire anodes in Na-ion batteries and compared them quantitatively with results from Li-ion batteries (Huang, J. Y.; et al. Science 2010, 330, 1515-1520). Upon Na insertion into SnO{sub 2}, a displacement reaction occurs, leading to the formation of amorphous Na{sub x}Sn nanoparticles dispersed in Na{sub 2}O matrix. With further Na insertion, the Na{sub x}Sn crystallized into Na{sub 15}Sn{sub 4} (x = 3.75). Upon extraction of Na (desodiation), the Na{sub x}Sn transforms to Sn nanoparticles. Associated with the dealloying, pores are found to form, leading to a structure of Sn particles confined in a hollow matrix of Na{sub 2}O. These pores greatly increase electrical impedance, therefore accounting for the poor cyclability of SnO{sub 2}. DFT calculations indicate that Na{sup +} diffuses 30 times slower than Li{sup +} in SnO{sub 2}, in agreement with in situ TEM measurement. Insertion of Na can chemomechanically soften the reaction product to a greater extent than in lithiation. Therefore, in contrast to the lithiation of SnO{sub 2} significantly less dislocation plasticity was seen ahead of the sodiation front. This direct comparison of the results from Na and Li highlights the critical role of ionic size and electronic structure of different ionic species on the charge/discharge rate and failure mechanisms in these batteries.

Gu, Meng; Kushima, Akihiro; Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Browning, Nigel D; Li, Ju; Wang, Chongmin

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

382

Characterization of Tank WM-189 Sodium-bearing Waste at INTEC, Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center 300,000-gallon vessel WM-189 was filled in late 2001 with concentrated sodium bearing waste (SBW). Three airlifted liquid samples and a steam jetted slurry sample were obtained for quantitative analysis and characterization of WM-189 liquid phase SBW and tank heel sludge. Estimates were provided for most of the reported data values, based on the greater of (a) analytical uncertainty, and (b) variation of analytical results between nominally similar samples. A consistency check on the data was performed by comparing the total mass of dissolved solids in the liquid, as measured gravimetrically from a dried sample, with the corresponding value obtained by summing the masses of cations and anions in the liquid, based on the reported analytical data. After reasonable adjustments to the nitrate and oxygen concentrations, satisfactory consistency between the two results was obtained. A similar consistency check was performed on the reported compositional data for sludge solids from the steam jetted sample. In addition to the compositional data, various other analyses were performed: particle size distribution was measured for the sludge solids, sludge settling tests were performed, and viscosity measurements were made. WM-189 characterization results were compared with those for WM-180, and other Tank Farm Facility tank characterization data. A 2-liter batch of WM-189 simulant was prepared and a clear, stable solution was obtained, based on a general procedure for mixing SBW simulant that was develop by Dr. Jerry Christian. This WM-189 SBW simulant is considered suitable for laboratory testing for process development.

Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Taylor, Dean Dalton

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this research conducted under the auspices of the USDOE Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated. Disposal of high-level nuclear waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 10,000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Quite simply, if the radioactive matter and bulk inorganic chemicals could be separated into separate streams, large cost savings would accrue, because the latter stream is much cheaper to dispose of. In principle, one could remove the radionuclides from the waste, leaving behind the bulk of the waste; or one could remove certain bulk chemicals from the waste, leaving behind the radionuclides. The preponderance of effort over the past two decades has focused on the former approach, which produces a high-level stream for vitrification and a low-activity stream for either vitrification (Hanford) or grout (Savannah River). At Hanford, a particular concern arises in that vitrification of a large volume of low-activity waste will be unacceptably expensive. To make matters worse, a projected future deficit of tank space may necessitate construction of expensive new tanks. These problems have raised questions as to whether a solution could be devised based on separation of sodium from the waste, resulting in the reduction of the total volume of waste that must be vitrified.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Marchand, Alan P.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this research conducted under the auspices of the USDOE Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid- liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated. Disposal of high- level nuclear waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 10,000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals.1 Quite simply, if the radioactive matter and bulk inorganic chemicals could be separated into separate streams, large cost savings would accrue, because the latter stream is much cheaper to dispose of. In principle, one could remove the radionuclides from the waste, leaving behind the bulk of the waste; or one could remove certain bulk chemicals from the waste, leaving behind a mixture of radionuclides and minor inorganic salts. The preponderance of effort over the past two decades has focused on the former approach, which produces a high- level stream for vitrification and a low-activity stream for either vitrification (Hanford) or grout (Savannah River). At Hanford, a particular concern arises in that vitrification of a large volume of low-activity waste will be unacceptably expensive. To make matters worse, a projected future deficit of tank space may necessitate construction of expensive new tanks. These problems have raised questions as to whether a solution could be devised based on separation of sodium from the waste, resulting in the reduction of the total volume of waste that must be vitrified.

Moyer, Bruce A; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Marchand, Alan P.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Comparative expression of candidate genes involved in sodium transport and compartmentation in citrus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Plants possess a number of mechanisms to cope with sodium (Na+) under salt stress conditions that include minimizing Na+ influx, maximizing efflux back to the growth medium or to apoplastic spaces via Na+/H+ antiporters in the plasma membrane, intracellular compartmentation of Na+ into the vacuole, as well as recirculation of Na+ out of the shoot via the phloem. Na+ transport in plants constitutes a complex system, in which different Na+ transporters are closely related and their functions are matched tightly. The fact that in citrus under salt stress does chloride appear to be the more toxic ion has led to little attention being paid to Na+ uptake and transport mechanisms in citrus. The aim of this study was to provide insight into the links between the expression levels of candidate Na+ transporter genes (SOS1, NHX1, HKT1), as well as tonoplast proton pumps (V-ATPase, V-PPiase), and Na+ tolerance in two citrus rootstocks, Cleopatra mandarin and trifoliate orange, differing in their Na+ exclusion capacity under salt stress. According to the results of this preliminary study, we hypothesize that higher root Na+ concentration in trifoliate orange genotype, and thus lower allocation of this ion in the shoots, is the result of an enhanced retrieval of Na+ from xylem stream, and an impaired translocation to the shoot tissues, probably as a consequence of the overexpression of putative SOS1 (in roots) and HKT1 (both in roots and shoots). Moreover, the higher transcriptional levels of putative NHX1 found in roots and shoots of trifoliate orange plantlets compared to those of Cleopatra mandarin, together with the enhanced activity of the tonoplast proton pumps in the former, might reveal the preferential sequestration into vacuole of retrieved Na+ from xylem mainly in roots.

B. Martínez-Alcántara; M.R. Martínez-Cuenca; A. Quiñones; D.J. Iglesias; E. Primo-Millo; M.A. Forner-Giner

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Start-up fuel and power flattening of sodium-cooled candle core  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hard neutron spectrum and unique power shape of CANDLE enable its distinctive performances such as achieving high burnup more than 30% and exempting necessity of both enrichment and reprocessing. On the other hand, they also cause several challenging problems. One is how the initial fuel can be prepared to start up the first CANDLE reactor because the equilibrium fuel composition that enables stable CANDLE burning is complex both in axial and radial directions. Another prominent problem is high radial power peaking factor that worsens averaged burnup, namely resource utilization factor in once-through mode and shorten the life time of structure materials. The purposes of this study are to solve these two problems. Several ideas for core configurations and startup fuel using single enrichment uranium and iron as a substitute of fission products are studied. As a result, it is found that low enriched uranium is applicable to ignite the core but all concepts examined here exceeded heat limits. Adjustment in enrichment and height of active and burnt zone is opened for future work. Sodium duct assemblies and thorium fuel assemblies loaded in the center region are studied as measures to reduce radial power peaking factor. Replacing 37 fuels by thorium fuel assemblies in the zeroth to third row provides well-balanced performance with flattened radial power distribution. The CANDLE core loaded with natural uranium in the outer and thorium in the center region achieved 35.6% of averaged burnup and 7.0 years of cladding life time owing to mitigated local fast neutron irradiation at the center. Using thorium with natural or depleted uranium in CANDLE reactor is also beneficial to diversifying fission resource and extending available term of fission energy without expansion of needs for enrichment and reprocessing.

Takaki, Naoyuki; Sagawa, Yu; Umino, Akitake [Department of Nuclear Safety Engineering, Tokyo City University 1-28-1 Tamazutsumi, Setagaya, Tokyo 158-8557 (Japan); Sekimoto, Hiroshi [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Calmodulin and calcium differentially regulate the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-dependent sodium channel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: {yields} Both Ca{sup ++}-Calmodulin (CaM) and Ca{sup ++}-free CaM bind to the C-terminal region of Nav1.1. {yields} Ca{sup ++} and CaM have both opposite and convergent effects on I{sub Nav1.1}. {yields} Ca{sup ++}-CaM modulates I{sub Nav1.1} amplitude. {yields} CaM hyperpolarizes the voltage-dependence of activation, and increases the inactivation rate. {yields} Ca{sup ++} alone antagonizes CaM for both effects, and depolarizes the voltage-dependence of inactivation. -- Abstract: Mutations in the neuronal Nav1.1 voltage-gated sodium channel are responsible for mild to severe epileptic syndromes. The ubiquitous calcium sensor calmodulin (CaM) bound to rat brain Nav1.1 and to the human Nav1.1 channel expressed by a stably transfected HEK-293 cell line. The C-terminal region of the channel, as a fusion protein or in the yeast two-hybrid system, interacted with CaM via a consensus C-terminal motif, the IQ domain. Patch clamp experiments on HEK1.1 cells showed that CaM overexpression increased peak current in a calcium-dependent way. CaM had no effect on the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation, and accelerated the inactivation kinetics. Elevating Ca{sup ++} depolarized the voltage-dependence of fast inactivation and slowed down the fast inactivation kinetics, and for high concentrations this effect competed with the acceleration induced by CaM alone. Similarly, the depolarizing action of calcium antagonized the hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage-dependence of activation due to CaM overexpression. Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements suggested that Ca{sup ++} could bind the Nav1.1 C-terminal region with micromolar affinity.

Gaudioso, Christelle; Carlier, Edmond; Youssouf, Fahamoe [INSERM U641, Institut Jean Roche, Marseille F-13344 (France) [INSERM U641, Institut Jean Roche, Marseille F-13344 (France); Universite de la Mediterranee, Faculte de Medecine Secteur Nord, IFR 11, Marseille F-13344 (France); Clare, Jeffrey J. [Eaton Pharma Consulting, Eaton Socon, Cambridgeshire PE19 8EF (United Kingdom)] [Eaton Pharma Consulting, Eaton Socon, Cambridgeshire PE19 8EF (United Kingdom); Debanne, Dominique [INSERM U641, Institut Jean Roche, Marseille F-13344 (France) [INSERM U641, Institut Jean Roche, Marseille F-13344 (France); Universite de la Mediterranee, Faculte de Medecine Secteur Nord, IFR 11, Marseille F-13344 (France); Alcaraz, Gisele, E-mail: gisele.alcaraz@univmed.fr [INSERM U641, Institut Jean Roche, Marseille F-13344 (France) [INSERM U641, Institut Jean Roche, Marseille F-13344 (France); Universite de la Mediterranee, Faculte de Medecine Secteur Nord, IFR 11, Marseille F-13344 (France)

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

388

Resonant multiwave-mixing spectra of gas-phase sodium: Nonperturbative calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We perform nonperturbative calculations of resonant multiwave mixing of two high-intensity laser beams of different frequencies both for a general three-level system and for the 3 2S1/2–3 2P1/2 electronic resonance of the sodium atom. Our calculations proceed by direct numerical integration of the density-matrix equations and subsequent Fourier analysis of the calculated time-dependent density-matrix elements. We examine the case where two nearly degenerate input beams are each detuned many collisional linewidths from electronic resonance, and the frequency difference between the input beams is tuned through a ground-state resonance. Unlike previous high-intensity analyses, each input beam can be resonant with numerous transitions simultaneously; for a three-level system, we refer to this as an ‘‘M-type’’ system, in analogy with ?- and V-type systems. Calculated four-, six-, and eight-wave-mixing spectra exhibit subharmonic resonances of the type observed experimentally by Trebino and Rahn [Opt. Lett. 12, 912 (1987)]. The three-level system is studied to gain insight into the physics of these subharmonic resonances. For more quantitative comparison with experiment, we use a model that includes the 16 Zeeman and hyperfine states in the 3 2S1/2 and the 3 2P1/2 levels, and accounts for arbitrary linear polarization of the input laser radiation. The relative intensities of the resonance features in the calculated multiwave-mixing spectra show good agreement with experiment. These resonance features broaden and shift as laser intensity increases, as predicted for four-wave-mixing processes in previous, less general high-intensity analyses. Both theory and experiment also show additional resonant features in the eight-wave-mixing spectra that appear at very high intensity.

Robert P. Lucht; Rick Trebino; Larry A. Rahn

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Minor Actinide Transmutation Physics for Low Conversion Ratio Sodium Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of varying the reprocessing strategy used in the closed cycle of a Sodium Fast Reactor (SNF) prototype are presented in this paper. The isotopic vector from the aqueous separation of transuranic (TRU) elements in Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is assumed to also vary according to the reprocessing strategy of the closed fuel cycle. The decay heat, gamma energy, and neutron emission of the fuel discharge at equilibrium are found to vary depending on the separation strategy. The SFR core used in this study corresponds to a burner configuration with a conversion ratio of ~0.5 based on the Super-PRISM design. The reprocessing strategies stemming from the choice of either metal or oxide fuel for the SFR are found to have a large impact on the equilibrium discharge decay heat, gamma energy, and neutron emission. Specifically, metal fuel SFR with pyroprocessing of the discharge produces the largest amount of TRU consumption (166 kg per Effective Full Power Year or EFPY), but also the highest decay heat, gamma energy, and neutron emission. On the other hand, an oxide fuel SFR with PUREX reprocessing minimizes the decay heat and related parameters of interest to a minimum, even when compared to thermal Mixed Oxide (MOX) or Inert Matrix Fuel (IMF) on a per mass basis. On an assembly basis, however, the metal SFR discharge has a lower decay heat than an equivalent oxide SFR assembly for similar minor actinide consumptions (~160 kg/EFPY.) Another disadvantage in the oxide PUREX reprocessing scenario is that there is no consumption of americium and curium, since PUREX reprocessing separates these minor actinides (MA) and requires them to be disposed of externally.

Mehdi Asgari; Samuel E. Bays; Benoit Forget; Rodolfo Ferrer

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

The technical and economic impact of minor actinide transmutation in a sodium fast reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the frame work of the French National Act of June 28, 2006 pertaining to the management of high activity, long-lived radioactive waste, one of the proposed processes consists in transmuting the Minor Actinides (MA) in the radial blankets of a Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). With this option, we may assess the additional cost of the reactor by comparing two SFR designs, one with no Minor Actinides, and the other involving their transmutation. To perform this exercise, we define a reference design called SFRref, of 1500 MWe that is considered to be representative of the Reactor System. The SFRref mainly features a pool architecture with three pumps, six loops with one steam generator per loop. The reference core is the V2B core that was defined by the CEA a few years ago for the Reactor System. This architecture is designed to meet current safety requirements. In the case of transmutation, for this exercise we consider that the fertile blanket is replaced by two rows of assemblies having either 20% of Minor Actinides or 20% of Americium. The assessment work is performed in two phases. - The first consists in identifying and quantifying the technical differences between the two designs: the reference design without Minor Actinides and the design with Minor Actinides. The main differences are located in the reactor vessel, in the fuel handling system and in the intermediate storage area for spent fuel. An assessment of the availability is also performed so that the impact of the transmutation can be known. - The second consists in making an economic appraisal of the two designs. This work is performed using the CEA's SEMER code. The economic results are shown in relative values. For a transmutation of 20% of MA in the assemblies (S/As) and a hypothesis of 4 kW allowable for the washing device, there is a large external storage demanding a very long cooling time of the S/As. In this case, the economic impact may reach 5% on the capital part of the Levelized Unit Electricity Cost (LUEC). A diminished concentration at 10% of MA, reduces the size of the external storage and the cooling time of the assemblies becomes compatible with the management of the irradiated fuel. Even with a low allowable power for the washing device, the economic impact on the capital cost is less than 2.5%. (authors)

Gautier, G. M.; Morin, F. [Alternative Energy and Atomic Energy Commission, CEA, DEN, F - 13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Dechelette, F.; Sanseigne, E. [Alternative Energy and Atomic Energy Commission, CEA, DEN DTN, F - 13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Chabert, C. [Alternative Energy and Atomic Energy Commission, CEA, DEN, F - 13108 St Paul lez Durance (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Detection of slow modulation wave diffusion in incommensurate barium sodium niobate by 93Nb two-dimensional exchange NMR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

93Nb two-dimensional (2D) exchange NMR was used to study ultraslow motions in incommensurate barium sodium niobate (BSN) in the temperature range 500–560 K. These 2D exchange data provide strong evidence for diffusionlike motion of the modulation wave in BSN. Such motions in BSN had been previously detected by using a complementary NMR experiment, the Hahn spin-echo decay. However, since the Hahn spin-echo decay technique cannot always distinguish unambiguously between different motional mechanisms, this 2D experiment provides definitive confirmation of modulation wave diffusion and rules out other possible motional mechanisms for the Hahn spin-echo decay in this system.

Ligia Muntean and David C. Ailion

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

392

Thermal response evaluation of austenitic stainless steels due to random sodium temperature fluctuations using BEMSET and DINUS-3 codes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The BEMSET code was developed for the thermal striping evaluation and was designed to deal with linear elastic strain mechanics in various reactor geometries. Then a combined thermal striping analysis was carried out for the flow guide tube of a Japanese prototype LMFBR using the BEMSET code and a thermohydraulics direct numerical simulation code DINUS-3. Calculational results simulated characteristics of the thermal striping phenomena reported in the past studies. An applicability of the combined method to the thermal striping analysis was assessed based on the discussions and the method can replace conventional experimental approaches using large scale sodium experiments in LMFBR designs.

Muramatsu, Toshiharu [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., O-arai, Ibaraki (Japan). O-arai Engineering Center

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Analysis of long-term flows resulting from large-scale sodium-water reactions in an LMFBR secondary system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leaks in LMFBR steam generators cannot entirely be prevented; thus the steam generators and the intermediate heat transport system (IHTS) of an LMFBR must be designed to withstand the effects of the leaks. A large-scale leak which might result from a sudden break of a steam generator tube, and the resulting sodium-water reaction (SWR) can generate large pressure pulses that propagate through the IHTS and exert large forces on the piping supports. This paper discusses computer programs for analyzing long-term flow and thermal effects in an LMFBR secondary system resulting from large-scale steam generator leaks, and the status of the development of the codes.

Shin, Y.W.; Chung, H.; Choi, U.S.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Ockert, C.E.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Interactions between trace metals, sodium and sorbents in combustion. Quarterly report No. 3, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed research is directed at an understanding of how to exploit interactions between sodium, toxic metals and sorbents, in order to optimize sorbents injection procedures, which can be used to capture and transform these metals into environmentally benign forms. The research will use a 17kW downflow, laboratory combustor, to yield data that can be interpreted in terms of fundamental kinetic mechanisms. Metals to be considered are lead, cadmium, and arsenic. Sorbents will be kaolinite, bauxite, and limestone. The role of sulfur will also be determined.

Wendt, J.O.L.

1995-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

395

Investigations on interactions of sodium dodecyl sulfate and polyacryloamide molecules on calcium carbonate surface using radiotracer technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From the studies of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) adsorption on nonflocculated and flocculated CaCO/sub 3/ precipitate it was found that on a CaCO/sub 3/ surface on which a polymer (polyacryloamide (PAA)) was previously adsorbed PAA and SDS complexes were formed. Studies of adsorption carried out on the function of the surface charge, SDS concentration, as well as flocculant concentration allowed a probable mechanism of SDS binding on flocculated CaCO/sub 3/ precipitate to be defined. In these studies a radiotracer technique was applied using SDS labeled with radioactive /sup 35/S for measurements of adsorption. 19 references.

Chibowski, S.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Development of one-dimensional computer code DESOPT for thermal hydraulic design of sodium-heated once through steam generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Once-through Steam Generator (SG) is a critical component of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) plant. It is a counter current heat exchanger, in which heat is transferred from the hot sodium flowing on the shell side to water/steam in tube side. High pressure subcooled water enters the SG tube from bottom, gets heated up to saturation, goes through nucleate boiling, dry out and post dry out heat transfer, getting converted to saturated steam and finally gets superheated. For this the process design needs to be carried out accurately. A computer code DESOPT has been developed for the process design of straight vertical, serpentine and helical geometries and validated against reported designs in literature. Recently a test facility to test a 5.5 MWt sodium heated steam generator has been commissioned. The predictions of the code have been compared with the measurements and found satisfactory. This paper brings out different heat transfer mechanisms in SG and describes the one-dimensional code, its validation based on literature and in-house tests and presents the results of comparison between predicted and actual operation at different part loads.

G. Vaidyanathan; A.L. Kothandaraman; L.S. Siva Kumar; V. Vinod; I.B. Noushad; K.K. Rajan; P. Kalyanasundaram

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Laboratory performance testing of an extruded bitumen containing a surrogate, sodium nitrate-based, low-level aqueous waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory results of a comprehensive, regulatory performance test program, utilizing an extruded bitumen and a surrogate, sodium nitrate-based waste, have been compiled at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Using a 53 millimeter, Werner and Pfleiderer extruder, operated by personnel of WasteChem Corporation of Paramus, New Jersey, laboratory-scale, molded samples of type three, air blown bitumen were prepared for laboratory performance testing. A surrogate, low-level, mixed liquid waste, formulated to represent an actual on-site waste at ORNL, containing about 30 wt % sodium nitrate, in addition to eight heavy metals, cold cesium and strontium was utilized. Samples tested contained three levels of waste loading: that is, forty, fifty and sixty wt % salt. Performance test results include the ninety day ANS 16.1 leach test, with leach indices reported for all cations and anions, in addition to the EP Toxicity test, at all levels of waste loading. Additionally, test results presented also include the unconfined compressive strength and surface morphology utilizing scanning electron microscopy. Data presented include correlations between waste form loading and test results, in addition to their relationship to regulatory performance requirements.

Mattus, A.J.; Kaczmarsky, M.M.

1986-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Applicability of RELAP5-3D for Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of a Sodium-Cooled Actinide Burner Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Actinide Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) is envisioned as a sodium-cooled, fast reactor that will burn the actinides generated in light water reactors to reduce nuclear waste and ease proliferation concerns. The RELAP5-3D computer code is being considered as the thermal-hydraulic system code to support the development of the ABTR. An evaluation was performed to determine the applicability of RELAP5-3D for the analysis of a sodium-cooled fast reactor. The applicability evaluation consisted of several steps, including identifying the important transients and phenomena expected in the ABTR, identifying the models and correlations that affect the code’s calculation of the important phenomena, and evaluating the applicability of the important models and correlations for calculating the important phenomena expected in the ABTR. The applicability evaluation identified code improvements and additional models needed to simulate the ABTR. The accuracy of the calculated thermodynamic and transport properties for sodium was also evaluated.

C. B. Davis

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Investigation of the influence of. cap alpha. irradiation on the valence states of the actinides. IX. Behavior of curium, americium, and plutonium in solutions of sodium perchlorate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It was shown that during prolong intense ..cap alpha.. irradiation of concentrated weakly acid solutions of sodium perchlorate, containing curium(III), americium(III), and plutonium(IV), two types of precipitates are formed: amorphous and crystalline. It was established that in this case there is a substantial decrease in the acidity of the solution. It was found that the crystalline precipitate represents sodium chloride, while the amorphous precipitate consists of hydroxides of the actinides. In the amorphous precipitate neptunium is in the hexavalent state and americium in the tri- and pentavalent states.

Frolov, A.A.; Kornilov, A.S.; Vasil'ev, V.Ya.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Post-test analysis of dryout test 7B' of the W-1 Sodium Loop Safety Facility Experiment with the SABRE-2P code. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An understanding of conditions that may cause sodium boiling and boiling propagation that may lead to dryout and fuel failure is crucial in liquid-metal fast-breeder reactor safety. In this study, the SABRE-2P subchannel analysis code has been used to analyze the ultimate transient of the in-core W-1 Sodium Loop Safety Facility experiment. This code has a 3-D simple nondynamic boiling model which is able to predict the flow instability which caused dryout. In other analyses dryout has been predicted for out-of-core test bundles and so this study provides additional confirmation of the model.

Rose, S.D.; Dearing, J.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Water-Soluble Complexes from Random Copolymer and Oppositely Charged Surfactant. 1. Complexes of Poly(ethylene glycol)-Based Cationic Random Copolymer and Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water-Soluble Complexes from Random Copolymer and Oppositely Charged Surfactant. 1. Complexes of Poly(ethylene glycol)-Based Cationic Random Copolymer and Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate ... Preliminary studies on the solubility of the complexes by turbidity measurements with one of the most studied anionic surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), demonstrate that complexes of the polymer with 68 mol % PEG content are insoluble in water. ... (angles are measured with respect to the direction of the laser beam) equipped with a 30 mW (GaAs, gallium arsenide) laser emitting vertically polarized light at wavelength ? = 690 nm. ...

C. K. Nisha; Pratyay Basak; Sunkara V. Manorama; Souvik Maiti; Kizhakkedathu N. Jayachandran

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

402

ALUMINUM READINESS EVALUATION FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE REGENRATION FROM HANFORD TANK WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Technology Readiness Evaluation (TRE) performed by AREV A Federal Services, LLC (AFS) for Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) shows the lithium hydrotalcite (LiHT) process invented and patented (pending) by AFS has reached an overall Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 3. The LiHT process removes aluminum and regenerates sodium hydroxide. The evaluation used test results obtained with a 2-L laboratory-scale system to validate the process and its critical technology elements (CTEs) on Hanford tank waste simulants. The testing included detailed definition and evaluation for parameters of interest and validation by comparison to analytical predictions and data quality objectives for critical subsystems. The results of the TRE would support the development of strategies to further mature the design and implementation of the LiHT process as a supplemental pretreatment option for Hanford tank waste.

SAMS TL; MASSIE HL

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

403

Sorbent selection and design considerations for uranium trapping. [H-151 alumina, XF-100 alumina, F-1 alumina, sodium fluoride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficient removal of UF/sub 6/ from effluent streams can be accomplished through the selection of the best solid sorbent and the implementation of good design principles. Pressure losses, sorbent capacity, reaction kinetics, sorbent regeneration/uranium recovery requirements and the effects of other system components are the performance factors which are summarized. The commonly used uranium trapping materials highlighted are sodium fluoride, H-151 alumina, XF-100 alumina, and F-1 alumina. Sorbent selection and trap design have to be made on a case-by-case basis but the theoretical modeling studies and the evaluation of the performance factors presented can be used as a guide for other chemical trap applications.

Schultz, R.M.; Hobbs, W.E.; Norton, J.L.; Stephenson, M.J.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

An Analysis of Methanol and Hydrogen Production via High-Temperature Electrolysis Using the Sodium Cooled Advanced Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integration of an advanced, sodium-cooled fast spectrum reactor into nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) architectures is the focus of the present study. A techno-economic evaluation of several conceptual system designs was performed for the integration of a sodium-cooled Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR) with the electric grid in conjunction with wind-generated electricity. Cases in which excess thermal and electrical energy would be reapportioned within an integrated energy system to a chemical plant are presented. The process applications evaluated include hydrogen production via high temperature steam electrolysis and methanol production via steam methane reforming to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen which feed a methanol synthesis reactor. Three power cycles were considered for integration with the AFR, including subcritical and supercritical Rankine cycles and a modified supercritical carbon dioxide modified Brayton cycle. The thermal efficiencies of all of the modeled power conversions units were greater than 40%. A thermal efficiency of 42% was adopted in economic studies because two of the cycles either performed at that level or could potentially do so (subcritical Rankine and S-CO2 Brayton). Each of the evaluated hybrid architectures would be technically feasible but would demonstrate a different internal rate of return (IRR) as a function of multiple parameters; all evaluated configurations showed a positive IRR. As expected, integration of an AFR with a chemical plant increases the IRR when “must-take” wind-generated electricity is added to the energy system. Additional dynamic system analyses are recommended to draw detailed conclusions on the feasibility and economic benefits associated with AFR-hybrid energy system operation.

Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Richard D. Boardman; Robert S. Cherry; Wesley R. Deason; Michael G. McKellar

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

[alpha]-Decay damage effects in curium-doped titanate ceramic containing sodium-free high-level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A polyphase titanate ceramic incorporating sodium-free simulated high-level nuclear waste was doped with 0.91 wt% of [sup 224]Cm to accelerate the effects of long-term self-irradiation arising from [alpha] decays. The ceramic included three main constituent minerals: hollandite, perovskite, and zirconolite, with some minor phases. Although hollandite showed the broadening of its X-ray diffraction lines and small lattice parameter changes during damage in growth, the unit cell was substantially unaltered. Perovskite and zirconolite, which are the primary hosts of curium, showed 2.7% and 2.6% expansions, respectively, of their unit cell volumes after a dose of 12 [times] 10[sup 17] [alpha] decays[center dot]g[sup [minus]1]. Volume swelling due to damage in growth caused an exponential (almost linear) decrease in density, which reached 1.7% after a dose of 12.4 [times] 10[sup 17] [alpha] decays[center dot]g[sup [minus]1]. Leach tests on samples that had incurred doses of 2.0 [times] 10[sup 17] and 4.5 [times] 10[sup 17] [alpha] decays[center dot]g[sup [minus]1] showed that the rates of dissolution of cesium and barium were similar to analogous leach rates from the equivalent cold ceramic, while strontium and calcium leach rates were 2--15 times higher. Although the cerium, molybdenum, strontium, and calcium leach rates in the present material were similar to those in the curium-doped sodium-bearing titanate ceramic reported previously, the cesium leach rate was 3--8 times lower.

Mitamura, Hisayoshi; Matsumoto, Seiichiro; Tsuboi, Takashi; Hashimoto, Masaaki; Togashi, Yoshihiro; Kanazawa, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan)); Stewart, M.W.A.; Vance, E.R.; Hart, K.P.; Ball, C.J. (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Lucas Heights, New South Wales (Australia). Lucas Heights Research Labs.); White, T.J.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Formation of Quantum-Degenerate Sodium Molecules A current frontier in the field of ultracold gases is the study of ultracold molecules. In  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a Feshbach resonance [1]. More than 105 molecules were generated with a conversion efficiency of ~4%. High sodium molecules from an atomic Bose- Einstein condensate by ramping an applied magnetic field across trap. The small expansion velocity corresponds to a temperature of about 30 nK, characteristic of high

407

Isotope loss from exhaled moisture and correlation of multifrequency bioelectrical impedance to body fluid compartments measured by intravenous deuterium oxide and sodium bromide dilution in dogs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for this route of isotope loss was necessary. Sodium bromide concentrations at 90 minutes and 180 minutes were tested for statistical equivalency to determine if NaBr had equilibrated by 90 minutes. Finally, impedance measured with electrodes separated by 2...

Witten, Tiffani Tipton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

408

The aqueous phase in the interfacial synthesis of polycarbonates. Part 1. Ionic equilibria and experimental solubilities in the BPA-sodium hydroxide-water system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Part 1. Ionic equilibria and experimental solubilities in the BPA-sodium hydroxide-water system ... The effect of physicochemical properties of organic micropollutants on removal efficiencies over iron-tetrasulfophthalocyanine (FeTsPc)-immobilized Amberlite was investigated with one endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC), bisphenol-A (BPA), and three ... ...

Philip G. Kosky; James M. Silva; Elizabeth A. Guggenheim

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Nuclear spin relaxation of sodium cations in bacteriophage Pf1 solutions D. N. Sobieski, N. R. Krueger, S. Vyas,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear spin relaxation of sodium cations in bacteriophage Pf1 solutions D. N. Sobieski, N. R The nuclear magnetic resonance NMR spectra for the I=3/2 23 Na cation dissolved into filamentous bacteriophage the 23 Na nuclear quadrupole moment and the electric field gradient produced by the negatively charged Pf

Augustine, Mathew P.

410

Pyroprocessing of oxidized sodium-bonded fast reactor fuel - An experimental study of treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to assess pyrochemical treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel. As oxidized material, the degraded fuel would need to be converted back to metal to enable electrorefining within an existing electro-metallurgical treatment process. A lithium-based electrolytic reduction process was studied to assess the efficacy of converting oxide materials to metal with a particular focus on the impact of zirconium oxide and sodium oxide on this process. Bench-scale electrolytic reduction experiments were performed in LiCl-Li{sub 2}O at 650 C. degrees with combinations of manganese oxide (used as a surrogate for uranium oxide), zirconium oxide, and sodium oxide. In the absence of zirconium or sodium oxide, the electrolytic reduction of MnO showed nearly complete conversion to metal. The electrolytic reduction of a blend of MnO-ZrO{sub 2} in LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O showed substantial reduction of manganese, but only 8.5% of the zirconium was found in the metal phase. The electrolytic reduction of the same blend of MnO-ZrO{sub 2} in LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O - 6.2 wt% Na{sub 2}O showed substantial reduction of manganese, but zirconium reduction was even less at 2.4%. This study concluded that ZrO{sub 2} cannot be substantially reduced to metal in an electrolytic reduction system with LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O at 650 C. degrees due to the perceived preferential formation of lithium zirconate. This study also identified a possible interference that sodium oxide may have on the same system by introducing a parasitic and cyclic reaction of dissolved sodium metal between oxidation at the anode and reduction at the cathode. When applied to oxidized sodium-bonded EBR-II fuel (e.g., U-10Zr), the prescribed electrolytic reduction system would not be expected to substantially reduce zirconium oxide, and the accumulation of sodium in the electrolyte could interfere with the reduction of uranium oxide, or at least render it less efficient.

Hermann, S.D.; Gese, N.J. [Separations Department, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Wurth, L.A. [Zinc Air Inc., 5314-A US Hwy 2 West, Columbia Falls, MT 59912 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Sodium to sodium carbonate conversion process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of converting radioactive alkali metal into a low level disposable solid waste material. The radioactive alkali metal is atomized and introduced into an aqueous caustic solution having caustic present in the range of from about 20 wt % to about 70 wt % to convert the radioactive alkali metal to a radioactive alkali metal hydroxide. The aqueous caustic containing radioactive alkali metal hydroxide and CO.sub.2 are introduced into a thin film evaporator with the CO.sub.2 present in an amount greater than required to convert the alkali metal hydroxide to a radioactive alkali metal carbonate, and thereafter the radioactive alkali metal carbonate is separated from the thin film evaporator as a dry powder. Hydroxide solutions containing toxic metal hydroxide including one or more metal ions of Sb, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Ni, Se, Ag and T1 can be converted into a low level non-hazardous waste using the thin film evaporator of the invention.

Herrmann, Steven D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Sodium to sodium carbonate conversion process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for converting radioactive alkali metal into a low level disposable solid waste material. The radioactive alkali metal is atomized and introduced into an aqueous caustic solution having caustic present in the range of from about 20 wt % to about 70 wt % to convert the radioactive alkali metal to a radioactive alkali metal hydroxide. The aqueous caustic containing radioactive alkali metal hydroxide and CO{sub 2} are introduced into a thin film evaporator with the CO{sub 2} present in an amount greater than required to convert the alkali metal hydroxide to a radioactive alkali metal carbonate, and thereafter the radioactive alkali metal carbonate is separated from the thin film evaporator as a dry powder. Hydroxide solutions containing toxic metal hydroxide including one or more metal ions of Sb, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Ni, Se, Ag and Tl can be converted into a low level non-hazardous waste using the thin film evaporator of the invention. 3 figs.

Herrmann, S.D.

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

413

Investigation of plant control strategies for the supercritical C0{sub 2}Brayton cycle for a sodium-cooled fast reactor using the plant dynamics code.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a control strategy for the supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle has been extended to the investigation of alternate control strategies for a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) nuclear power plant incorporating a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle power converter. The SFR assumed is the 400 MWe (1000 MWt) ABR-1000 preconceptual design incorporating metallic fuel. Three alternative idealized schemes for controlling the reactor side of the plant in combination with the existing automatic control strategy for the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle are explored using the ANL Plant Dynamics Code together with the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) Analysis Code System coupled together using the iterative coupling formulation previously developed and implemented into the Plant Dynamics Code. The first option assumes that the reactor side can be ideally controlled through movement of control rods and changing the speeds of both the primary and intermediate coolant system sodium pumps such that the intermediate sodium flow rate and inlet temperature to the sodium-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchanger (RHX) remain unvarying while the intermediate sodium outlet temperature changes as the load demand from the electric grid changes and the S-CO{sub 2} cycle conditions adjust according to the S-CO{sub 2} cycle control strategy. For this option, the reactor plant follows an assumed change in load demand from 100 to 0 % nominal at 5 % reduction per minute in a suitable fashion. The second option allows the reactor core power and primary and intermediate coolant system sodium pump flow rates to change autonomously in response to the strong reactivity feedbacks of the metallic fueled core and assumed constant pump torques representing unchanging output from the pump electric motors. The plant behavior to the assumed load demand reduction is surprising close to that calculated for the first option. The only negative result observed is a slight increase in the intermediate inlet sodium temperatures by about 10 C. This temperature rise could presumably be precluded or significantly reduced through fine adjustment of the control rods and pump motors. The third option assumes that the reactor core power and primary and intermediate system flow rates are ideally reduced linearly in a programmed fashion that instantaneously matches the prescribed load demand. The calculated behavior of this idealized case reveals a number of difficulties because the control strategy for the S-CO{sub 2} cycle overcools the reactor potentially resulting in the calculation of sodium bulk freezing and the onset of sodium boiling. The results show that autonomous SFR operation may be viable for the particular assumed load change transient and deserves further investigation for other transients and postulated accidents.

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

414

Degradation of yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings by vanadium pentoxide, phosphorous pentoxide, and sodium sulfate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence of vanadium, phosphorus, and sodium impurities in petcoke and coal/petcoke blends used in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants warrants a clear understanding of high-temperature material degradation for the development of fuel-flexible gas turbines. In this study, degradation reactions of free-standing air plasma-sprayed (APS) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) in contact with V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} were investigated at temperatures up to 1200{sup o}C. Phase transformations and microstructural development were examined using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Molten V{sub 2}O{sub 5} reacted with solid YSZ to form ZrV{sub 2}O{sub 7} at temperatures below 747{sup o}C. However, at temperatures above 747{sup o}C, molten V{sub 2}O{sub 5} reacted with YSZ to form yttrium vanadate (YVO{sub 4}). The formation of YVO{sub 4} led to the depletion of the Y2O{sub 3} stabilizer and deleterious transformation to the monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} phase. In addition, studies on YSZ degradation by Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and a Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}+V{sub 2}O{sub 5} mixture (50-50 mol%) showed that Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} itself had no effect on the degradation of YSZ. However, in the presence of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} at high temperatures, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} forms vanadate compounds having a lower melting point such as sodium metavanadate (610{sup o}C), which was found to degrade YSZ by the formation of YVO{sub 4} at a relatively lower temperature of 700{sup o}C. P{sub 2}O{sub 5} was found to react with APS YSZ by the formation of ZrP{sub 2}O{sub 7} at all the temperatures studied. At temperatures as low as 200{sup o}C and as high as 1200{sup o}C, molten P{sub 2}O{sub 5} was observed to react with solid YSZ to yield ZrP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, which led to the depletion of ZrO{sub 2} in YSZ that promoted the formation of the fluorite-cubic ZrO{sub 2} phase.

Mohan, P.; Yuan, B.; Patterson, T.; Desai, V.H.; Sohn, Y.H. [University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Water Content and Buildup of Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)/ Poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) and Poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/ Poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) Polyelectrolyte Multilayers Studied by an in Situ Combination of a Quartz Crystal Micr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT: The buildup of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs), fabricated by the layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly, was followed in situ by the combination of a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and spectroscopic ellipsometry in a single device. PEMs composed of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) polyelectrolyte pairs and of poly-(diallyldimethyl ammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) and PSS were built up to 17 layers. The combination of ellipsometry andQCM-D allowed simultaneous determination of the acousticmass, which comprises both the mass of the polymer and solvent, and the optical mass which corresponds to the polymer mass alone. From these parameters, the hydration of the PEMwas calculated layer by layer. The linearly growing PAH/ PSS PEMs showed a constant absolute content of water throughout the assembly, while the relative contribution of water to the PEM mass content approached zero, when grown in 0.5 M NaCl. Rinses with water between polyelectrolyte deposition steps resulted in a hydration of approximately 40%. The supralinearly growing PDADMAC/PSS PEMs exhibited a remarkable dependence of the hydration on the polyelectrolyte that was deposited last. Implications for the mechanism of assembly of the PEMs are discussed.

Jagoba J. Iturri Ramos; Stefan Stahl; Ralf P. Richter; Sergio E. Moya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Baseline Flowsheet Generation for the Treatment and Disposal of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Sodium Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High-Level Waste (HLW) Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) must implement technologies and processes to treat and qualify radioactive wastes located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) for permanent disposal. This paper describes the approach and accomplishments to date for completing development of a baseline vitrification treatment flowsheet for sodium-bearing waste (SBW), including development of a relational database used to manage the associated process assumptions. A process baseline has been developed that includes process requirements, basis and assumptions, process flow diagrams, a process description, and a mass balance. In the absence of actual process or experimental results, mass and energy balance data for certain process steps are based on assumptions. Identification, documentation, validation, and overall management of the flowsheet assumptions are critical to ensuring an integrated, focused program. The INEEL HLW Program initially used a roadmapping methodology, developed through the INEEL Environmental Management Integration Program, to identify, document, and assess the uncertainty and risk associated with the SBW flowsheet process assumptions. However, the mass balance assumptions, process configuration and requirements should be accessible to all program participants. This need resulted in the creation of a relational database that provides formal documentation and tracking of the programmatic uncertainties related to the SBW flowsheet.

Barnes, Charles Marshall; Lauerhass, Lance; Olson, Arlin Leland; Taylor, Dean Dalton; Valentine, James Henry; Lockie, Keith Andrew

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Baseline Flowsheet Generation for the Treatment and Disposal of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Sodium Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High-Level Waste (HLW) Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) must implement technologies and processes to treat and qualify radioactive wastes located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) for permanent disposal. This paper describes the approach and accomplishments to date for completing development of a baseline vitrification treatment flowsheet for sodium-bearing waste (SBW), including development of a relational database used to manage the associated process assumptions. A process baseline has been developed that includes process requirements, basis and assumptions, process flow diagrams, a process description, and a mass balance. In the absence of actual process or experimental results, mass and energy balance data for certain process steps are based on assumptions. Identification, documentation, validation, and overall management of the flowsheet assumptions are critical to ensuring an integrated, focused program. The INEEL HLW Program initially used a roadmapping methodology, developed through the INEEL Environmental Management Integration Program, to identify, document, and assess the uncertainty and risk associated with the SBW flowsheet process assumptions. However, the mass balance assumptions, process configuration and requirements should be accessible to all program participants. This need resulted in the creation of a relational database that provides formal documentation and tracking of the programmatic uncertainties related to the SBW flowsheet.

Barnes, C.M.; Lauerhass, L.; Olson, A.L.; Taylor, D.D.; Valentine, J.H.; Lockie, K.A. (DOE- ID)

2002-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

418

D10 experiment: coolability of UO/sub 2/ debris in sodium with downward heat removal. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LMFBR Debris Coolability Program at Sandia National Laboratories investigates the coolability of particle beds which may form following a severe accident involving core disassembly in a nuclear reactor. The D series experiments utilize fission heating of fully enriched UO/sub 2/ particles submerged in sodium to realistically simulate decay heating. The D10 experiment is the first in the series to study the effects of bottom cooling of the debris that could be provided in an actual accident condition by structural materials onto which the debris might settle. Additionally, the D10 experiment was designed to achieve maximum temperatures in the debris approaching the melting point of UO/sub 2/. The experiment was successfully operated for over 50 hours and investigated downward heat removal in a packed bed at specific powers of 0.16 to 0.58 W/g. Dryout in the debris was achieved at powers from 0.42 to 0.58 W/g. Channels were induced in the bed and channeled bed dryout was achieved at powers of 1.06 to 1.77 W/g. Maximum temperatures in excess of 2500/sup 0/C were attained.

Mitchell, G.W.; Ottinger, C.A.; Meister, H.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

CHARACTERIZATION OF THE LOCAL TITANIUM ENVIRONMENT IN DOPED SODIUM ALUMINUM HYDRIDE USING X-RAY ADSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ti K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to explore the local titanium environment and valence in 2-4 mol% Ti-doped sodium alanate. An estimate of the oxidation state of the dopant, based upon known standards, revealed a zero-valent titanium atom. An analysis of the near-edge and extended fine structures indicates that the Ti does not enter substitutional or interstitial sites in the NaAlH{sub 4} lattice. Rather, the Ti is located on/near the surface and is coordinated by 10.2 {+-} 1 aluminum atoms with an interatomic distance of 2.82 {+-} 0.01 {angstrom}, similar to that of TiAl{sub 3}. The Fourier transformed EXAFS spectra reveals a lack of long-range order around the Ti dopant indicating that the Ti forms nano-clusters of TiAl{sub 3}. The similarity of the spectra in the hydrided and dehydrided samples suggests that the local Ti environment is nearly invariant during hydrogen cycling.

GRAETZ, J.; IGNATOV, A. YU; TYSON, T.A.; REILLY, J.J.; JOHNSON, J.

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

420

Self-irradiation damage of a curium-doped titanate ceramic containing sodium-rich high level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the polyphase titanate ceramic containing sodium-rich simulated high-level nuclear waste doped with 0.69 wt% of {sup 244}Cm to accelerate long-term self-irradiation due to {alpha} decays. {alpha} autoradiography showed that {alpha} emissions were almost uniformly distributed throughout the curium-doped samples on a {gt} 20{mu}m scale although micropore surfaces and titanium oxide agglomerates were free of {alpha} emitting nuclides. The phase assemblage of the curium-doped titanate ceramic included freudenbergite and loveringite in addition to the more abundant oxide phases: hollandite, perovskite, and zirconolite. Accumulation of {alpha} decays was accompanied by a gradual decrease in density. The increment of density was {minus}1% after an equivalent age of 5000 yr. Leach tests showed a slight rend toward higher total release of curium with equivalent age. The release of soluble nonradioactive elements (e.g., Na, Cs, Sr, and Ca) in the oldest specimens (equivalent age, 2000 yr) varied from specimen to specimen but, on average, were higher than specimens that had suffered a lower radiation dose.

Miyazaki, T. (Second Dept. of Nuclear Business, Ibaraki Center, Chiyoda Maintenance Ltd., Asahi, Kashima, Ibaraki 314-14 (JP)); White, T.J. (Electron Microscope Centre, Univ. of Queensland, St. Lucia, Brisbane 4067 (AU)); Mitamura, H.; Matsumoto, S.; Nukaga, K.; Togashi, Y.; Sagawa, T.; Tashiro, S. (Dept. of Environmental Safety Research, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-11 (JP)); Levins, D.M. (Environmental Science Program, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights Research Lab., Lucas Heights, New South Wales (AU)); Kikuchi, A. (Dept. of Reactor Fuel Examination, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-11 (JP))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

X-ray Absorption Measurements on Nickel Cathode of Sodium-beta Alumina batteries: Fe-Ni-CI Chemical Associations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sections of Na-Al-NiCl2 cathodes from sodium-beta alumina ZEBRA batteries have been characterized with X-ray fluorescence mapping, and XANES measurements to probe the microstructure, elemental correlation, and chemical speciation after voltage cycling. Cycling was performed under identical load conditions at either 240 or 280 °C operating temperature and subsequently quenched in either the charged or discharged state. X-ray fluorescence mapping and XANES measurements were made adjacent to the current collector and ?"-Al2O3 solid electrolyte interfaces to detect possible gradients in chemical properties across the cathode. An FeS additive, introduced during battery synthesis, was found to be present as either Fe metal or an Fe(II) chloride in all cathode samples. X-ray fluorescence mapping reveals an operating temperature and charge-state dependent spatial correlation between Fe, Ni, and Cl concentration. XANES measurements indicate that both Ni and Fe are chemically reactive and shift between metallic and chloride phases in the charged and discharged states, respectively. However the percentage of chemically active Ni and Fe is significantly less in the cell operated at lower temperature. Additionally, the cathode appeared chemically homogeneous at the scale of our X-ray measurements.

Bowden, Mark E.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Fulton, John L.; Lemmon, John P.; Lu, Xiaochuan; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Heald, Steve M.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Mortensen, Devon R.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Hess, Nancy J.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Ultrafine tin oxide on reduced graphene oxide as high-performance anode for sodium-ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Na-ion Battery is attractive alternative to Li-ion battery due to the natural abundance of sodium resource. Searching for suitable anode materials is one of the critical issues for Na-ion battery due to the low Na-storage activity of carbon materials. In this work, we synthesized a nanohybrid anode consisting of ultrafine SnO2 anchored on few-layered reduced graphene oxide (rGO) by a facile hydrothermal route. The SnO2/rGO hybrid exhibits a high capacity, long cycle life and good rate capability. The hybrid can deliver a high charge capacity of 324 mAh gSnO2?1 at 50 mA g?1. At 1600 mA g?1 (2.4C), it can still yield a charge capacity of 200 mAh gSnO2?1. After 100 cycles at 100 mA g?1, the hybrid can retain a high charge capacity of 369 mAh gSnO2?1. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ex situ transmission electron microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to investigate the origin of the excellent electrochemical Na-storage properties of SnO2/rGO.

Yandong Zhang; Jian Xie; Shichao Zhang; Peiyi Zhu; Gaoshao Cao; Xinbing Zhao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Impact of Fission Products Impurity on the Plutonium Content of Metal- and Oxide- Fuels in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This short report presents the neutronic analysis to evaluate the impact of fission product impurity on the Pu content of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) metal- and oxide- fuel fabrication. The similar work has been previously done for PWR MOX fuel [1]. The analysis will be performed based on the assumption that the separation of the fission products (FP) during the reprocessing of UOX spent nuclear fuel assemblies is not perfect and that, consequently, a certain amount of FP goes into the Pu stream used to fabricate SFR fuels. Only non-gaseous FPs have been considered (see the list of 176 isotopes considered in the calculations in Appendix 1 of Reference 1). Throughout of this report, we define the mixture of Pu and FPs as PuFP. The main objective of this analysis is to quantify the increase of the Pu content of SFR fuels necessary to maintain the same average burnup at discharge independently of the amount of FP in the Pu stream, i.e. independently of the PuFP composition. The FP losses are considered element-independent, i.e., for example, 1% of FP losses mean that 1% of all non-gaseous FP leak into the Pu stream.

Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Thermo-physical and structural studies of sodium zinc borovanadate glasses in the region of high concentration of modifier oxides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? Highly modified sodium zinc borovanadate glasses. ? Structural model for borovanadate glasses. ? Network forming tendency of ZnO in borovanadate glasses. ? Fragility can be limited to NBO concentration in borovanadate glasses. -- Abstract: This paper reports investigation of Na{sub 2}O and ZnO modified borovanadate glasses in the highly modified regime of compositions. These glasses have been prepared by microwave route. Ultraviolet (UV) and visible, infrared (IR), Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopies have been used to characterize the speciation in the glasses. Together with the variation of properties such as molar volume and glass transition temperatures, spectroscopic data indicate that at high levels of modification, ZnO tends to behave like network former. It is proposed that the observed variation of all the properties can be reasonably well understood with a structural model. The model considers that the modification and speciation in glasses are strongly determined by the hierarchy of group electronegativities. Further, it is proposed that the width of the transitions of glasses obtained under same condition reflects the fragility of the glasses. An empirical expression has been suggested to quantify fragility on the basis of width of the transition regions.

Chethana, B.K. [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)] [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Reddy, C. Narayana [Maharani's Science College for Women, Bangalore 560 001 (India)] [Maharani's Science College for Women, Bangalore 560 001 (India); Rao, K.J., E-mail: kalyajrao@yahoo.co.in [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Radiological transportation risk assessment of the shipment of sodium-bonded fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document was written in support of Environmental Assessment: Shutdown of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. It analyzes the potential radiological risks associated with the transportation of sodium-bonded metal alloy and mixed carbide fuel from the FFTF on the Hanford Site in Washington State to the Idaho Engineering Laboratory in Idaho in the T-3 Cask. RADTRAN 4 is used for the analysis which addresses potential risk from normal transportation and hypothetical accident scenarios.

Green, J.R.

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Free-Standing Na2/3Fe1/2Mn1/2O2@Graphene Film for a Sodium-Ion Battery Cathode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Free-Standing Na2/3Fe1/2Mn1/2O2@Graphene Film for a Sodium-Ion Battery Cathode ... Graphene is a well-known material endowed with numerous advantages that have led to its extensive use as a conductive additive in Li-ion batteries, including superior electronic conductivity, a large surface area, and excellent mechanical strength. ...

Hongli Zhu; Kang Taek Lee; Gregory Thomas Hitz; Xiaogang Han; Yuanyuan Li; Jiayu Wan; Steven Lacey; Arthur von Wald Cresce; Kang Xu; Eric Wachsman; Liangbing Hu

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

427

ALUMINUM REMOVAL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE REGENERATION FROM HANFORD TANK WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION SUMMARY OF PRIOR LAB-SCALE TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scoping laboratory scale tests were performed at the Chemical Engineering Department of the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), and the Hanford 222-S Laboratory, involving double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) Hanford waste simulants. These tests established the viability of the Lithium Hydrotalcite precipitation process as a solution to remove aluminum and recycle sodium hydroxide from the Hanford tank waste, and set the basis of a validation test campaign to demonstrate a Technology Readiness Level of 3.

SAMS TL; GUILLOT S

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

428

Multi-scale approach to the modeling of fission gas discharge during hypothetical loss-of-flow accident in gen-IV sodium fast reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The required technological and safety standards for future Gen IV Reactors can only be achieved if advanced simulation capabilities become available, which combine high performance computing with the necessary level of modeling detail and high accuracy of predictions. The purpose of this paper is to present new results of multi-scale three-dimensional (3D) simulations of the inter-related phenomena, which occur as a result of fuel element heat-up and cladding failure, including the injection of a jet of gaseous fission products into a partially blocked Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) coolant channel, and gas/molten sodium transport along the coolant channels. The computational approach to the analysis of the overall accident scenario is based on using two different inter-communicating computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) codes: a CFD code, PHASTA, and a RANS code, NPHASE-CMFD. Using the geometry and time history of cladding failure and the gas injection rate, direct numerical simulations (DNS), combined with the Level Set method, of two-phase turbulent flow have been performed by the PHASTA code. The model allows one to track the evolution of gas/liquid interfaces at a centimeter scale. The simulated phenomena include the formation and breakup of the jet of fission products injected into the liquid sodium coolant. The PHASTA outflow has been averaged over time to obtain mean phasic velocities and volumetric concentrations, as well as the liquid turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence dissipation rate, all of which have served as the input to the core-scale simulations using the NPHASE-CMFD code. A sliding window time averaging has been used to capture mean flow parameters for transient cases. The results presented in the paper include testing and validation of the proposed models, as well the predictions of fission-gas/liquid-sodium transport along a multi-rod fuel assembly of SFR during a partial loss-of-flow accident. (authors)

Behafarid, F.; Shaver, D. R. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Bolotnov, I. A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Jansen, K. E. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Antal, S. P.; Podowski, M. Z. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Functional Analysis of the Mouse Scn8a Sodium Channel Marianne R. Smith,1 Raymond D. Smith,1 Nicholas W. Plummer,2 Miriam H. Meisler,2 and Alan L. Goldin1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Functional Analysis of the Mouse Scn8a Sodium Channel Marianne R. Smith,1 Raymond D. Smith,1 modulate the electrophysiological properties of the channels (Isom et al., 1992, 1995; Smith and Goldin

Goldin, Alan L.

430

Work Domain Analysis of a Predecessor Sodium-cooled Reactor as Baseline for AdvSMR Operational Concepts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Work Domain Analysis for the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II). This is part of the phase of the research designed to incorporate Cognitive Work Analysis in the development of a framework for the formalization of an Operational Concept (OpsCon) for Advanced Small Modular Reactors (AdvSMRs). For a new AdvSMR design, information obtained through Cognitive Work Analysis, combined with human performance criteria, can and should be used in during the operational phase of a plant to assess the crew performance aspects associated with identified AdvSMR operational concepts. The main objective of this phase was to develop an analytical and descriptive framework that will help systems and human factors engineers to understand the design and operational requirements of the emerging generation of small, advanced, multi-modular reactors. Using EBR-II as a predecessor to emerging sodium-cooled reactor designs required the application of a method suitable to the structured and systematic analysis of the plant to assist in identifying key features of the work associated with it and to clarify the operational and other constraints. The analysis included the identification and description of operating scenarios that were considered characteristic of this type of nuclear power plant. This is an invaluable aspect of Operational Concept development since it typically reveals aspects of future plant configurations that will have an impact on operations. These include, for example, the effect of core design, different coolants, reactor-to-power conversion unit ratios, modular plant layout, modular versus central control rooms, plant siting, and many more. Multi-modular plants in particular are expected to have a significant impact on overall OpsCon in general, and human performance in particular. To support unconventional modes of operation, the modern control room of a multi-module plant would typically require advanced HSIs that would provide sophisticated operational information visualization, coupled with adaptive automation schemes and operator support systems to reduce complexity. These all have to be mapped at some point to human performance requirements. The EBR-II results will be used as a baseline that will be extrapolated in the extended Cognitive Work Analysis phase to the analysis of a selected advanced sodium-cooled SMR design as a way to establish non-conventional operational concepts. The Work Domain Analysis results achieved during this phase have not only established an organizing and analytical framework for describing existing sociotechnical systems, but have also indicated that the method is particularly suited to the analysis of prospective and immature designs. The results of the EBR-II Work Domain Analysis have indicated that the methodology is scientifically sound and generalizable to any operating environment.

Ronald Farris; David Gertman; Jacques Hugo

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

A High Temperature (400 to 650oC) Secondary Storage Battery Based on Liquid Sodium and Potassium Anodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This STTR Phase I research program was on the development of high temperature (400 to 650 C), secondary batteries with roundtrip efficiency > 90% for integration with a 3 to 10 kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. In fulfillment of this objective, advanced planar high temperature rechargeable batteries, comprised of an alkali metal ion conducting, highly refractory, beta'' alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) sandwiched between liquid sodium (or potassium) anode and liquid metal salt cathode, were developed at MSRI. The batteries have been successfully demonstrated at a working temperature as high as 600 C. To our knowledge, so far no work has been reported in the literature on planar rechargeable batteries based on BASE, and results obtained in Phase I for the very first time demonstrated the viability of planar batteries, though relatively low temperature tubular-based sodium-sulfur batteries and ZEBRA batteries have been actively developed by very limited non U.S. companies. The results of this Phase I work have fulfilled all the goals and stated objectives, and the achievements showed much promise for further, substantial improvements in battery design and performance. The important results of Phase I are briefly described in what follows: (1) Both Na-BASE and K-BASE discs and tubes have been successfully fabricated using MSRI's patented vapor phase process. Ionic conductivity measurements showed that Na-BASE had higher ionic conductivity than K-BASE, consistence with the literature. At 500 C, Na-BASE conductivity is 0.36 S/cm, which is more than 20 times higher than 8YSZ electrolyte used for SOFC at 800 C. The activation energy is 22.58 kJ/mol. (2) CuCl{sub 2}, FeCl{sub 2}, ZnCl{sub 2}, and AgCl were identified as suitable salts for Na/metal salt or K/metal salt electrochemical couples based on thermochemical data. Further open circuit voltage measurements matched those deduced from the thermochemical data. (3) Tubular cells with CuCl{sub 2} as the cathode and Na as the anode were constructed. However, it was discovered that CuCl{sub 2} was somewhat corrosive and dissolved iron, an element of the cathode compartment. Since protective coating technology was beyond this Phase I work scope, no further work on the CuCl{sub 2} cathode was pursued in Phase I. Notwithstanding, due to its very high OCV and high specific energy, CuCl{sub 2} cathode is a very attractive possibility for a battery capable of delivering higher specific energy with higher voltage. Further investigation of the Na-CuCl{sub 2} battery can be done by using suitable metal coating technologies developed at MSRI for high temperature applications. (4) In Phase I, FeCl{sub 2} and ZnCl{sub 2} were finalized as the potential cathodes for Na-metal salt batteries for delivering high specific energies. Planar Na-FeCl{sub 2} and Na-ZnCl{sub 2} cells were designed, constructed, and tested between 350 and 600 C. Investigation of charge/discharge characteristics showed they were the most promising batteries. Charge/discharge cycles were performed as many as 27 times, and charge/discharge current was as high as 500 mA. No failure was detected after 50 hours testing. (5) Three-cell planar stacks were designed, constructed, and evaluated. Preliminary tests showed further investigation was needed for optimization. (6) Freeze-thaw survival was remarkably good for planar BASE discs fabricated by MSRI's patented vapor phase process.

Tao, Greg; Weber, Neill

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fuel Cycle System Analysis Implications of Sodium-Cooled Metal-Fueled Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If advanced fuel cycles are to include a large number of fast reactors (FRs), what should be the transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR)? The nuclear energy era started with the assumption that they should be breeder reactors (CR > 1), but the full range of possible CRs eventually received attention. For example, during the recent U.S. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program, the proposal was burner reactors (CR < 1). Yet, more recently, Massachusetts Institute of Technology's "Future of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle" proposed CR [approximately] 1. Meanwhile, the French company EDF remains focused on breeders. At least one of the reasons for the differences of approach is different fuel cycle objectives. To clarify matters, this paper analyzes the impact of TRU CR on many parameters relevant to fuel cycle systems and therefore spans a broad range of topic areas. The analyses are based on a FR physics parameter scan of TRU CR from 0 to [approximately]1.8 in a sodium-cooled metal-fueled FR (SMFR), in which the fuel from uranium-oxide-fueled light water reactors (LWRs) is recycled directly to FRs and FRs displace LWRs in the fleet. In this instance, the FRs are sodium cooled and metal fueled. Generally, it is assumed that all TRU elements are recycled, which maximizes uranium ore utilization for a given TRU CR and waste radiotoxicity reduction and is consistent with the assumption of used metal fuel separated by electrochemical means. In these analyses, the fuel burnup was constrained by imposing a neutron fluence limit to fuel cladding to the same constant value. This paper first presents static, time-independent measures of performance for the LWR [right arrow] FR fuel cycle, including mass, heat, gamma emission, radiotoxicity, and the two figures of merit for materials for weapon attractiveness developed by C. Bathke et al. No new fuel cycle will achieve a static equilibrium in the foreseeable future. Therefore, additional analyses are shown with dynamic, time-dependent measures of performance including uranium usage, TRU inventory, and radiotoxicity to evaluate the complex impacts of transition from the current uranium-fueled LWR system, and other more realistic impacts that may not be intuited from the time-independent steady-state conditions of the end-state fuel cycle. These analyses were performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model VISION. Compared with static calculations, dynamic results paint a different picture of option space and the urgency of starting a FR fleet. For example, in a static analysis, there is a sharp increase in uranium utilization as CR exceeds 1.0 (burner versus breeder). However, in dynamic analyses that examine uranium use over the next 1 to 2 centuries, behavior as CR crosses the 1.0 threshold is smooth, and other parameters such as the time required outside of reactors to recycle fuel become important. Overall, we find that there is no unambiguously superior value of TRU CR; preferences depend on the relative importance of different fuel cycle system objectives.

Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays; Gretchen E. Matthern; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ryan Clement; David W. Gerts

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Novel Nonvolatile Memories With Engineered Nanocrystal Floating Gate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

synthesis, such as metals and silicides. Basically, PVD isThe incorporation of metal silicides in MOS devices has abe improved by replacing metal with silicide nanocrystals.

Li, Bei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Novel Nanocrystal Floating Gate Memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and experiment for metal silicide nanocrystal MOSFETmaterials such as metal, silicide and even hetero-structureand experiment for metal silicide nanocrystal MOSFET

Zhou, Huimei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Tetrides and Pnictides for Fast-Ion Conductors, Phosphor-Hosts, Structural Materials and Improved Thermoelectrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

state metathesis synthesis of metal silicides; reactions of497-501. Properties of Metal Silicides, in EMIS Datareview,and magnesium silicide with metal oxides. Polyhedron, 2002.

Hick, Sandra Marie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Advanced Source/Drain and Contact Design for Nanoscale CMOS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Barrier Modeling of Metal and Silicide Contacts,” IEEE Elec.Redistributions in Metal and Silicide Contacts,” IEEE Trans.Redistributions in Metal and Silicide Contacts,” IEEE Trans.

Vega, Reinaldo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Influence of the State of Polysilicon/SiliconDioxide Interface on MOS Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MOSdevicescontaininga silicide-polysilicon gate structure with the metal silicide produced by sputteringandsintering the anomalousbehavioroftenobservedin MOS capacitorswith silicide/polysilicon gates. The sublayer depletion activates traps due tothe

Luryi, Serge

438

SMALL AREA SILICON DIFFUSED JUNCTION X-RAY DETECTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ion implantation and metal silicide formation. ^ Deviceion implantation or metal silicides to form this P contact.BORON IMPLANTATION OR METAL SILICIDE Fig. 1. Simple diode (

Walton, J.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Magnetometry with mesospheric sodium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mesosphere and the significant technological infrastructure developed for astronomical laser guide...lasers and detectors on a few 100-km grid, a simultaneous map of magnetic...entirely ground-based apparatus, such a hybrid approach has the potential of extremely...

James M. Higbie; Simon M. Rochester; Brian Patton; Ronald Holzlöhner; Domenico Bonaccini Calia; Dmitry Budker

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Magnetometry with mesospheric sodium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...94720-7300; c Laser Systems Department, European...outer mantle, the solar quiet dynamo in the...due to diffusion or wind). A velocity-changing...nanotesla range for the solar quiet dynamo (1...apparatus, such a hybrid approach has the...laser projection system and working to implement this...

James M. Higbie; Simon M. Rochester; Brian Patton; Ronald Holzlöhner; Domenico Bonaccini Calia; Dmitry Budker

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

MembFac -Scoring Sheet 1. 12% MPD, 0.1 M Na Acetate pH 4.6, 0.1 M Sodium Chloride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phosphate, 0.1 M Na Acetate pH 4.6, 0.1 M Lithium Sulfate 10. 12% PEG 6000, 0.1 M Na Acetate pH 4.6, 0.1 MMembFac - Scoring Sheet 1. 12% MPD, 0.1 M Na Acetate pH 4.6, 0.1 M Sodium Chloride 2. 12% PEG 4000, 0.1 M Na Acetate pH 4.6, 0.1 M Zinc Acetate 3. 10% PEG 4000, 0.1 M Na Acetate pH 4.6, 0.2 M Ammonium

Hill, Chris

442

Effects of sodium lactate on the microbiological, chemical and color attributes of cooked, vacuum-packaged beef stored at various temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and storage. Top rounds were injected with one of four leveli of L-iodium lactate (0, 2, 3. 4%), cooked to an internal temperature of 63'C and chilled to 4'C. Cooked top rounds were randomly assigned to four storage temperatures (0", 4', 10', l (i'C 1..., and four storage periods (0. 7, 14, 21 days). Processing was divided over four d;iyi with equal numbers of treatments processed each day. Cook yield miproved with increasing levels of sodium lactate (p&. 01). Microbial values and TBA valuei were...

Bigner, Marnie Elizabeth

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

High-Q Low-Impedance MEMS Resonators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rossum, Properties of Metal Silicides, IN-SPEC Publication,here are the refractory metal silicides formed in the self-Silicon (a) (b) Unreacted Metal Silicide Silicide Gate Gate

Hung, Li-Wen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Evaluation of plasma melter technology for verification of high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid wastes: Demonstration test No. 4 preliminary test report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a preliminary report of plasma arc vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System Low-Level Waste (LLW) Vitrification Program. Phase I test conduct included 26 hours (24 hours steady state) of melting of simulated high-sodium low-level radioactive liquid waste. Average processing rate was 4.9 kg/min (peak rate 6.2 kg/min), producing 7330 kg glass product. Free-flowing glass pour point was 1250 C, and power input averaged 1530 kW(e), for a total energy consumption of 19,800 kJ/kg glass. Restart capability was demonstrated following a 40-min outage involving the scrubber liquor heat exchanger, and glass production was continued for another 2 hours. Some volatility losses were apparent, probably in the form of sodium borates. Roughly 275 samples were collected and forwarded for analysis. Sufficient process data were collected for heat/material balances. Recommendations for future work include lower boron contents and improved tuyere design/operation.

McLaughlin, D.F.; Gass, W.R.; Dighe, S.V.; D`Amico, N.; Swensrud, R.L.; Darr, M.F.

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

445

Application of RCC-MR for the structural design of tube sheet of intermediate heat exchanger for a sodium cooled fast reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The structural mechanics behavior of tube sheets of a sodium to sodium heat exchanger for a fast reactor, with circular tube holes pattern, less addressed subject in the literature, is investigated in detail. The tube sheet design rules recommended in the French design code RCC-MR-2007 and the associated solid mechanics basis are explained. A finite element analysis of tube sheets of intermediate heat exchanger of a typical 500 MWe pool type fast reactor is presented to study the effects of some specific parameters viz., (i) small solid rim portion with connecting shell and (ii) grooves on rim area. For the analysis, the distribution of holes on the last row is assumed to be symmetric and axial stiffening of tubes on tube sheet is included toward realistic estimation of stresses in the tube sheets. The effects are studied on the primary and secondary stresses induced along the interface between solid to perforated region. The aspects covered include linearization of radial and circumferential stress components, thereby deriving primary membrane and bending stress intensities along the radial directions with particular focus at the interfaces between solid portions and perforated portions including the effect of filet radius at the junction of tube sheet and shell. These investigations thus help to optimize the design of IHX tube sheets with high confidence. The analysis has been carried out by CAST3M, a structure analysis software granted by CEA, France.

Suman Gupta; P. Chellapandi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

The three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded structures in the ammonium and sodium salt hydrates of 4-amino­phenyl­arsonic acid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the hydrated ammonium salt of 4-amino­phenyl­arsonic acid (p-arsanilic acid), the ammonium cations, arsonate anions and water mol­ecules inter­act through inter-species N-HO hydrogen bonds to arsonate and water, and water O-HO hydrogen bonds, giving the common two-dimensional layers lying parallel to (010), which are expanded into three-dimensions through the amine group. The sodium salt is a one-dimensional coordination polymer with water bridges generating chains extending along c and extensive inter-chain O-HO and N-HO hydrogen-bonding inter­actions linking these chains, giving an overall three-dimensional structure.

Smith, G.

2014-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

447

Brownleeite: A new manganese silicide mineral in an interplanetary dust particle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...NASA has been routinely collecting IDPs and has maintained the Cosmic Dust Curatorial Facility (containing a class 10-100 cleanroom) at Johnson Space Center (Warren and Zolensky 1993). The particles described here were individually removed from the collectors...

Keiko Nakamura-Messenger; Lindsay P. Keller; Simon J. Clemett; Scott Messenger; John H. Jones; Russell L. Palma; Robert O. Pepin; Wolfgang Klöck; Michael E. Zolensky; Hirokazu Tatsuoka

448

Silicide/Silicon Heterointerfaces, Reaction Kinetics and Ultra-short Channel Devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

metal/semiconductor interface, reproducible electronic characteristics), they (or their counterpart germanide

Tang, Wei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

The magnesium silicide germanide stannide alloy: A new concept in ocean thermal energy conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In devices hitherto used for the direct conversion of heat into electricity, commonly known as ''thermoelectric energy converters'', the efficiency of conversion is appreciably lower than that of conventional reciprocating or rotary heat engines. This low efficiency is brought about by the physical properties of the materials selected for the manufacture of these devices. The materials that are currently being used for this purpose are either simple elements and alloys thereof, such as silicon and germanium, or intermetallic compounds, either simple or alloys and solid solutions thereof. Of the latter, mention may be made of bismuth telluride, antimony telluride, lead telluride, antimony silver telluride, lead selenide, bismuth selenide, antimony selenide, etc., as well as mixtures and solid solutions of these and other compounds. A search in respect of these materials carried out in the U.S. Patent literature indicates indeed a quite substantial and impressive record.

Nicolaou, M.C.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Progress on Searching Optimal Thermal Spray Parameters for Magnesium Silicide Gaosheng Fu1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coatings prepared by Atmospheric Plasma Spray (APS), and Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) are presented. Seebeck, including Atmospheric Plasma Spray (APS) and Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) were applied to fabricate Mg2Si] and Tani[8] used spark plasma sintering and got maximum ZT of 0.86 at 862K with Bi doped Mg2Si

Zuo, Lei

451

High-Performance Thermoelectric Devices Based on Abundant Silicide Materials for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Development of high-performance thermoelectric devices for vehicle waste heat recovery will include fundamental research to use abundant promising low-cost thermoelectric materials, thermal management and interfaces design, and metrology

452

Formation of cobalt silicide from filter metal vacuum arc deposited films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal reaction of Co film deposited on Si (111) surfaces by a high current filter metal vacuum arc (FMEVAD) system has been studied. After deposition the films were annealed over the 400-900 C temperature range for 30 min. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was used to characterize the elemental depth distributions in the films subjected to different annealing temperatures. Ordered chemical phases were determined by glancing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and the morphology was determined by cross section transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that the phases formed are Co2Si at 400 C, CoSi + CoO at 500 C, CoSi + CoSi2 at 600 C, and CoSi2 at (700-800 C). At 900 C, CoSi2 was formed with a mixture of cubic cobalt and probably an amorphous cobalt oxide surface layer. The interface morphology was a rough cusp-like crenellation at 600 C which became less pronounced after annealing at 800 C.

Whitlow, Harry J.; Zhang, Yanwen; Wang, Chong M.; McCready, David E.; Zhang, Tonghe; Wu, Yuguang

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

ADVANCED SILICIDE-BASED MATERIALS FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE GLASS PROCESSING SENSORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials research is needed to improve the performance of high temperature materials that must withstand the hostile environment of the glassmaking process and to improve the operating efficiency. Advances in materials used for sensors and controls is perhaps one of the most important requirements for improving the efficiency of the glass production process. The use of molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) based materials, which are corrosion resistant in glass, are being investigated for improving the performance of advance temperature sensors. Using advanced plasma spray forming techniques, laminate and functionally graded composite tubes of MoSi{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are being developed to protect advanced temperature sensors from the hostile environment of the glassmaking process.

Castro, R. G. (Richard G.); Peters, M. I. (Maria I.); Mendoza, D. (Daniel); Vaidya, R. U. (Rajendra U.); Petrovic, J. J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Subcell Structure and Two Different Superstructures of the Rare Earth Metal Silicide Carbides Y  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The title compounds crystallize with a very pronounced subcell structure that has been determined from single-crystal X-ray diffractometer data of all four compounds. Only subcell (and no superstructure) reflections have been observed for Pr{sub 3}Si{sub 2}C{sub 2}: space group Cmmm, a=396.7(1) pm, b=1645.2(3) pm, c=439.9(1) pm, R=0.019 for 309 structure factors and 20 variable parameters. In this subcell structure there are C{sub 2} pairs with split atomic positions. This structure may be considered the thermodynamically stable forms of these compounds at high temperatures. Two different superstructures with doubled a or c axes, respectively, of the subcell have been observed, where the C{sub 2} pairs have different orientations. In the structure of Tb{sub 3}Si{sub 2}C{sub 2} the a axis of the subcell is doubled. The resulting superstructure in the standard setting has the space group Pbcm: a=423.6(1) pm, b=770.7(1) pm, c=1570.2(3) pm, R=0.031 f or 1437 structure factors and 22 variable parameters. Dy{sub 3}Si{sub 2}C{sub 2} has the same superstructure: a=420.3(1) pm, b=767.5(1) pm, c=1561.1(3) pm, R=0.045, 801 F values, 22 variables. In the structure of Y{sub 3}Si{sub 2}C{sub 2} the c axis of the subcell is doubled, resulting in a body-centered space group with the standard setting Imma: a=842.6(2) pm, b=1563.4(2) pm, c=384.6(1) pm, R=0.035, 681 F values, 15 variables. In all of these structures the rare earth atoms form two-dimensionally infinite sheets of edge-sharing octahedra that contain the C{sub 2} pairs. In between these sheets there are zig-zag chains of silicon atoms with Si-Si distances varying between 246.2(3) and 253.6(3) pm, somewhat longer than the two-electron bonds of 235 pm in elemental silicon, suggesting a bond order of 0.5 for the Si-Si bonds. The C-C distances in the C{sub 2} pairs vary between 127(1) and 131(1) pm, corresponding to a bond order of approximately 2. 5. Hence, using oxidation numbers, the compounds may to a first approximation be represented by the formula (R{sup +3}){sub 3}(Si{sup {minus}3}){sub 2}(C{sub 2}){sup {minus}3}. A more detailed analysis of the interatomic distances showed that the shortest R-R distances are comparable with the R-R distances in the structures of the rare earth elements, thus indicating some R-R bonding. Therefore, the oxidation numbers of the rare earth atoms are slightly lower than +3, in agreement with the metallic conductivity of these compounds. As a consequence, considering the relatively short Si-Si bonds, the absolute value of the oxidation number of the silicon atoms may be lower than 3, resulting in a Si-Si bond order somewhat higher than 0.5.

Jeitschko, Wolfgang; Gerdes, Martin H.; Witte, Anne M.; Rodewald, Ute Ch.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Electrical Characterization of Transition Metal Silicide Nanostructures Using Variable Temperature Scanning Probe Microscopy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cobalt disilicide (CoSi2) islands have been formed on Si(111) and Si(100) through UHV deposition and annealing. Current-voltage (I-V) and temperature-dependent current-voltage (I-V-T) curves have been… (more)

Tedesco, Joseph Leo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Scanning RHEED Studies of Silicide Formation in a UHV-SEM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A variety of techniques for studying surfaces have been developed or adapted to UHV recently, including TEM, REM, SEM and ... yet it is seldom used or exploited in UHV microprobe instruments, primarily due to the...

P. A. Bennett; A. P. Johnson

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

The Effect of Processing Parameters on the Thermoelectric Properties of Magnesium Silicide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W. Engelmann. J. C. A. Peltier, “Nouvelles expériences surmaterials: the Seebeck, Peltier, and Thomson effects. Theof thermoelectrics is called the Peltier effect named after

Fong, Anthony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Unique composition niobium-silicide alloy, plasma melted for the Air Force as part of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

numerically controlled/ electric discharge machining (CNC/EDM); casting, rolling and forging; hydroforming to improve production quality and efficiencies. Our unique machining capabilities are routinely used Team, the Foundry-Machining Team, the Welding and Joining Team, and the Corrosion and Electrochemistry

459

Silicide Nanopowders as Low-Cost and High-Performance Thermoelectric Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermoelectric devices directly convert heat into electricity and are very attractive for waste heat recovery and solar energy utilization. If thermoelectric devices can be made sufficiently efficient and inex...

Renkun Chen

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Comparison of irradiation behavior of different uranium silicide dispersion fuel element designs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculations of fuel swelling of U{sub 3}SiAl-Al and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} were performed for various dispersion fuel element designs. Breakaway swelling criteria in the form of critical fuel volume fractions were derived with data obtained from U{sub 3}SiAl-Al plate irradiations. The results of the analysis show that rod-type elements remain well below the pillowing threshold. However, tubular fuel elements, which behave essentially like plates, will likely develop pillows or blisters at around 90% {sup 235}U burnup. The U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al compounds demonstrate stable swelling behavior throughout the entire burnup range for all fuel element designs.

Hofman, G.L.; Rest, J.; Snelgrove, J.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "nasi sodium silicide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomized uranium silicide Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Science 11 geology and Ranger 1 open-pit uranium mine in Australia Summary: Uranium geology and mining Ranger 1 open-pit uranium mine in Australia Mikael Hk UHDSG...

462

Abbreviations: IEF, isoelectric focussing; NEPHGE, non-equilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis; PAGE, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis; pI, isoelectric point; SDS, sodium dodecyl sulphate; SI, self-incompatibility; 1-D, 1 dimensional; 2-D, 2 dimensional  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; PAGE, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis; pI, isoelectric point; SDS, sodium dodecyl sulphate; SI, self-incompatibility@yorku.ca Keywords: cysteine protease, -expansin, mass spectrometry, self-incompatibility ABSTRACT Distylous species of Turnera are strongly self-incompatible, therefore they provide an excellent system for investigations

Shore, Joel S.

463

Effects of the iron content and redox state on the structure of sodium borosilicate glasses: A Raman, Moessbauer and boron K-edge XANES spectroscopy study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structure of iron-bearing sodium borosilicate glasses with up to 10 mol% FeO has been investigated in the range 0.15 ? Fe{sup 3+}/SFe ? 0.95. According to Moessbauer spectroscopy, Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+} are mainly in tetrahedral and octahedral coordination, respectively, although other coordination states exist for both cations. From XANES experiments, we conclude that increasing Fe content and varying redox states have only a minor effect on the relative proportions of BO{sub 3} and BO{sub 4} units. In Raman spectra, a decrease of the proportion of BO{sub 4} species present in danburite-like units (Na{sub 2}O.B{sub 2}O{sub 3}.2SiO{sub 2}) is found upon increasing iron content and oxidizing state. Whereas the insensitivity of the overall boron speciation to iron content and redox state points to weak interactions between boron and iron, the changes affecting BO{sub 4} species do indicate a more subtle interplay between Fe{sup 3+} and the other tetrahedrally coordinated cations (Si,B) because of the competition between tetrahedral Fe{sup 3+} and B{sup 3+} for charge compensation by Na{sup +}. (authors)

Cochain, B. [CEA, DEN, SECM, LDMC, Bagnols Sur Ceze, (France); IPGP-CNRS, Universite Paris 7, Sorbonne Paris Cite Paris, (France); Geology Department, University of Toronto, Toronto, (Canada); Neuville, D.R.; Richet, P. [Univ Paris 07, IPGP CNRS, Paris, (France); Henderson, G.S. [Univ Toronto, Dept Geol, Toronto, ON, (Canada); McCammon, C.A. [Univ Bayreuth, Bayer Geoinst, Bayreuth, (Germany)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

Vapour pressures, densities, and viscosities of the (water + lithium bromide + potassium acetate) system and (water + lithium bromide + sodium lactate) system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of thermophysical properties (vapour pressure, density, and viscosity) of the (water + lithium bromide + potassium acetate) system LiBr:CH3COOK = 2:1 by mass ratio and the (water + lithium bromide + sodium lactate) system LiBr:CH3CH(OH)COONa = 2:1 by mass ratio were measured. The system, a possible new working fluid for absorption heat pump, consists of absorbent (LiBr + CH3COOK) or (LiBr + CH3CH(OH)COONa) and refrigerant H2O. The vapour pressures were measured in the ranges of temperature and absorbent concentration from T = (293.15 to 333.15) K and from mass fraction 0.20 to 0.50, densities and viscosities were measured from T = (293.15 to 323.15) K and from mass fraction 0.20 to 0.40. The experimental data were correlated with an Antoine-type equation. Densities and viscosities were measured in the same range of temperature and absorbent concentration as that of the vapour pressure. Regression equations for densities and viscosities were obtained with a minimum mean square error criterion.

Antonio de Lucas; Marina Donate; Juan F. Rodríguez

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

The Distribution Coefficients and Gasification Ratios of [1,2-{sup 14}C] Sodium Acetate for Various Paddy Soils in Japan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For appropriate safety assessment of the disposal of TRU waste, distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) and gasification ratios of {sup 14}C labeled [1, 2-{sup 14}C] sodium acetate ({sup 14}C-NaOAc) were determined by batch sorption tests for 85 Japanese paddy soil samples. The soil studied were from four soil types: Andsol; Gley; Gray lowland; and Yellow. The range of K{sub d} values for all soil samples was from 7.5 to 295.2 mL g{sup -1}, and the mean value was 105.6 mL g{sup -1}. This mean value was higher than that of previous study (1). The high K{sub d} values of the present study could be a result of the properties of the paddy soils. The comparison of K{sub d} values by each soil type revealed statistically significant difference between Andsol and Gray lowland soils (P < 0.05). The soil type was one of the factors affecting partitioning of {sup 14}C-NaOAc. Gasification ratios ranged from 29.1% to 83.3%, and its mean value was 66.4% of the total {sup 14}C-NaOAc added. These results suggest that most of the radiocarbon in {sup 14}C-NaOAc will be released from soil into the air as gases. The gasification ratio between soil types was also compared, but no statistically significant difference was found. Gas production may be controlled by other than physicochemical properties of soil, for example by factors such as bacterial community. In addition, both the K{sub d} values and the gasification ratios for Gley soil were decreased according to the increase in pH although the underlaying mechanisms for this observation are not clear. (authors)

Ishii, N.; Takeda, H.; Uchida, S. [Office of Biospheric Assessment for Waste Disposal, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi (Japan)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Effect of bicarbonate ion additives on pitting corrosion of type 316L stainless steel in aqueous 0.5 M sodium chloride solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of bicarbonate ions (HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) on pitting corrosion of type 316L stainless steel (SS, UNS S3 1603) was investigated in aqueous 0.5 M sodium chloride (NaCl) solution using potentiodynamic polarization, the abrading electrode technique, alternating current (AC) impedance spectroscopy combined with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Addition of HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ions to NaCl solutions extended the passive potential region in width and, at the same time, raised the pitting potential in value on the potentiodynamic polarization curve. Potentiostatic current transients obtained from the moment just after interrupting the abrading action showed the repassivation rate of propagating pits increased and that the pit growth rate decreased with increasing HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ion concentration. Over the whole applied potential, the oxide film resistance was higher in the presence of HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ions. The pit number density decreased with increasing HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ion concentration. Moreover, addition of HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ions to NaCl solutions retarded lateral pit growth, while promoting downward pit growth from the surface. The bare surface of the specimen repassivated preferentially along the pit mouth and walls, compared to the pit bottom, as a result of formation of a surface film with a high content of protective mixed ferrous-chromous carbonate ([Fe,Cr]CO{sub 3}) that formed from preferential adsorption of HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ions.

Park, J.J.; Pyun, S.I.; Lee, W.J. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Kim, H.P. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Environmental, health, and safety issues of sodium-sulfur batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Volume 1, Cell and battery safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the first of four volumes that identify and assess the environmental, health, and safety issues involved in using sodium-sulfur (Na/S) battery technology as the energy source in electric and hybrid vehicles that may affect the commercialization of Na/S batteries. This and the other reports on recycling, shipping, and vehicle safety are intended to help the Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division of the Office of Transportation Technologies in the US Department of Energy (DOE/EHP) determine the direction of its research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program for Na/S battery technology. The reports review the status of Na/S battery RD&D and identify potential hazards and risks that may require additional research or that may affect the design and use of Na/S batteries. This volume covers cell design and engineering as the basis of safety for Na/S batteries and describes and assesses the potential chemical, electrical, and thermal hazards and risks of Na/S cells and batteries as well as the RD&D performed, under way, or to address these hazards and risks. The report is based on a review of the literature and on discussions with experts at DOE, national laboratories and agencies, universities, and private industry. Subsequent volumes will address environmental, health, and safety issues involved in shipping cells and batteries, using batteries to propel electric vehicles, and recycling and disposing of spent batteries. The remainder of this volume is divided into two major sections on safety at the cell and battery levels. The section on Na/S cells describes major component and potential failure modes, design, life testing and failure testing, thermal cycling, and the safety status of Na/S cells. The section on batteries describes battery design, testing, and safety status. Additional EH&S information on Na/S batteries is provided in the appendices.

Ohi, J.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Physicochemical study of the system sodium superoxide —sodium oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1. It was shown that NaO2 begins to decompose at about 120° in an atmosphere of dry oxygen and at about 80–90° i...

T. V. Rode; G. A. Golder

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z