National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for narrow body aircraft

  1. Aircraft

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hibbs, B.D.; Lissaman, P.B.S.; Morgan, W.R.; Radkey, R.L.

    1998-09-22

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing`s top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gases for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well. 31 figs.

  2. Aircraft

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hibbs, Bart D.; Lissaman, Peter B. S.; Morgan, Walter R.; Radkey, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    This disclosure provides a solar rechargeable aircraft that is inexpensive to produce, is steerable, and can remain airborne almost indefinitely. The preferred aircraft is a span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Travelling at relatively slow speeds, and having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing's top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn. Each of five sections of the wing has one or more engines and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other sections, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface. The aircraft is capable of a top speed of about ninety miles per hour, which enables the aircraft to attain and can continuously maintain altitudes of up to sixty-five thousand feet. Regenerative fuel cells in the wing store excess electricity for use at night, such that the aircraft can sustain its elevation indefinitely. A main spar of the wing doubles as a pressure vessel that houses hydrogen and oxygen gasses for use in the regenerative fuel cell. The aircraft has a wide variety of applications, which include weather monitoring and atmospheric testing, communications, surveillance, and other applications as well.

  3. Solar thermal aircraft

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2007-09-18

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  4. MHK Projects/Lubec Narrows Tidal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Click here Current Tidal Project Nearest Body of Water Lubec Narrows and Johnson Bay Coordinates 44.8652, -66.9828 Project Phase Phase 1 PermitLicense Buildout...

  5. P-3 B Aircraft

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NASA's P-3B Earth Science Aircraft P-3B Facts The NASA P-3B is a four-engine turboprop ... The aircraft supports scientific investigations by NASA and visiting scientists from ...

  6. ARM - Other Aircraft Campaigns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FacilityOther Aircraft Campaigns AAF Information Proposal Process Baseline Instruments Campaign Instruments AAF Fact Sheet G-1 Fact Sheet Images Science Airborne Instrumentation Needs for Climate and Atmospheric Research The DOE ARM Aerial Facility Field Campaigns AAF Campaigns 2007 - UAV Campaigns 1993 - 2006, 2015 Other Aircraft Campaigns 1993 - 2010 AAF Contacts Rickey Petty DOE AAF Program Director Beat Schmid Technical Director Other Aircraft Campaigns In addition to AAF and UAV field

  7. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  8. Rankline-Brayton engine powered solar thermal aircraft

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2012-03-13

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A Rankine-Brayton hybrid cycle heat engine is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller or other mechanism for enabling sustained free flight. The Rankine-Brayton engine has a thermal battery, preferably containing a lithium-hydride and lithium mixture, operably connected to it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery to a working fluid. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  9. Rankine-Brayton engine powered solar thermal aircraft

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2009-12-29

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A Rankine-Brayton hybrid cycle heat engine is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller or other mechanism for enabling sustained free flight. The Rankine-Brayton engine has a thermal battery, preferably containing a lithium-hydride and lithium mixture, operably connected to it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery to a working fluid. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF AIRCRAFT HAZARDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.L. Ashley

    2005-03-23

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in the ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2004, Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and on crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987, Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. NUREG-0800 is being used here as a reference because some of the same considerations apply. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of the identified aircraft hazards based on the criteria that apply to Category 1 and 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 (see Section 4). The scope of this technical report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the MGR at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (see Section 7).

  11. Identification of Aircraft Hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Ashley

    2006-12-08

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7).

  12. Fuel Cell Council Working Group on Aircraft and Aircraft Ground...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presentation by Robert Wichert, US Fuel Cell Council, at the DOD-DOE Aircraft Petroleum Use Reduction Workshop, September 30, 2010, in Washington, DC. aircraft6wichert.pdf ...

  13. Narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method of sensing a characteristic of an object provide the capability to realize a characteristic of an object such as density, thickness, or presence, for any desired coordinate position on the object. One application is imaging. The sensor can also be used as an obstruction detector or an electronic trip wire with a narrow field without the disadvantages of impaired performance when exposed to dirt, snow, rain, or sunlight. The sensor employs a transmitter for transmitting a sequence of electromagnetic signals in response to a transmit timing signal, a receiver for sampling only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while excluding all other electromagnetic signals in response to a receive timing signal, and a signal processor for processing the sampled direct RF path electromagnetic signal and providing an indication of the characteristic of an object. Usually, the electromagnetic signal is a short RF burst and the obstruction must provide a substantially complete eclipse of the direct RF path. By employing time-of-flight techniques, a timing circuit controls the receiver to sample only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while not sampling indirect path electromagnetic signals. The sensor system also incorporates circuitry for ultra-wideband spread spectrum operation that reduces interference to and from other RF services while allowing co-location of multiple electronic sensors without the need for frequency assignments.

  14. Narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-11-19

    A narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method of sensing a characteristic of an object provide the capability to realize a characteristic of an object such as density, thickness, or presence, for any desired coordinate position on the object. One application is imaging. The sensor can also be used as an obstruction detector or an electronic trip wire with a narrow field without the disadvantages of impaired performance when exposed to dirt, snow, rain, or sunlight. The sensor employs a transmitter for transmitting a sequence of electromagnetic signals in response to a transmit timing signal, a receiver for sampling only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while excluding all other electromagnetic signals in response to a receive timing signal, and a signal processor for processing the sampled direct RF path electromagnetic signal and providing an indication of the characteristic of an object. Usually, the electromagnetic signal is a short RF burst and the obstruction must provide a substantially complete eclipse of the direct RF path. By employing time-of-flight techniques, a timing circuit controls the receiver to sample only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while not sampling indirect path electromagnetic signals. The sensor system also incorporates circuitry for ultra-wideband spread spectrum operation that reduces interference to and from other RF services while allowing co-location of multiple electronic sensors without the need for frequency assignments. 12 figs.

  15. Aircraft Cabin Environmental Quality Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gundel, Lara; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas

    2010-05-06

    The Indoor Environment Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) teamed with seven universities to participate in a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Center of Excellence (COE) for research on environmental quality in aircraft. This report describes research performed at LBNL on selecting and evaluating sensors for monitoring environmental quality in aircraft cabins, as part of Project 7 of the FAA's COE for Airliner Cabin Environmental Research (ACER)1 effort. This part of Project 7 links to the ozone, pesticide, and incident projects for data collection and monitoring and is a component of a broader research effort on sensors by ACER. Results from UCB and LBNL's concurrent research on ozone (ACER Project 1) are found in Weschler et al., 2007; Bhangar et al. 2008; Coleman et al., 2008 and Strom-Tejsen et al., 2008. LBNL's research on pesticides (ACER Project 2) in airliner cabins is described in Maddalena and McKone (2008). This report focused on the sensors needed for normal contaminants and conditions in aircraft. The results are intended to complement and coordinate with results from other ACER members who concentrated primarily on (a) sensors for chemical and biological pollutants that might be released intentionally in aircraft; (b) integration of sensor systems; and (c) optimal location of sensors within aircraft. The parameters and sensors were selected primarily to satisfy routine monitoring needs for contaminants and conditions that commonly occur in aircraft. However, such sensor systems can also be incorporated into research programs on environmental quality in aircraft cabins.

  16. Fuel Cell Council Working Group on Aircraft and Aircraft Ground Support

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Applications | Department of Energy Council Working Group on Aircraft and Aircraft Ground Support Fuel Cell Applications Fuel Cell Council Working Group on Aircraft and Aircraft Ground Support Fuel Cell Applications Presentation by Robert Wichert, US Fuel Cell Council, at the DOD-DOE Aircraft Petroleum Use Reduction Workshop, September 30, 2010, in Washington, DC. aircraft_6_wichert.pdf (628.48 KB) More Documents & Publications U.S. Fuel Cell Council: The Voice of the Fuel Cell

  17. Tunable pulsed narrow bandwidth light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powers, Peter E.; Kulp, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    A tunable pulsed narrow bandwidth light source and a method of operating a light source are provided. The light source includes a pump laser, first and second non-linear optical crystals, a tunable filter, and light pulse directing optics. The method includes the steps of operating the pump laser to generate a pulsed pump beam characterized by a nanosecond pulse duration and arranging the light pulse directing optics so as to (i) split the pulsed pump beam into primary and secondary pump beams; (ii) direct the primary pump beam through an input face of the first non-linear optical crystal such that a primary output beam exits from an output face of the first non-linear optical crystal; (iii) direct the primary output beam through the tunable filter to generate a sculpted seed beam; and direct the sculpted seed beam and the secondary pump beam through an input face of the second non-linear optical crystal such that a secondary output beam characterized by at least one spectral bandwidth on the order of about 0.1 cm.sup.-1 and below exits from an output face of the second non-linear optical crystal.

  18. MHK Projects/Tacoma Narrows Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tacoma Narrows Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3"...

  19. ARM - Field Campaign - Aircraft Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsAircraft Carbon ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Aircraft Carbon 2006.07.01 - 2008.09.30 Lead Scientist : Margaret Torn For data sets, see below. Abstract Airborne trace-gas measurements at ARM-SGP provided valuable data for addressing carbon-cycle questions highlighted by the US Climate Change Research Program and the North American Carbon Program. A set of carbon-cycle

  20. Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dickens, L.M.; Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

    1996-01-16

    Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components. 14 figs.

  1. Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dickens, Larry M.; Haynes, Howard D.; Ayers, Curtis W.

    1996-01-01

    Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components.

  2. Fast, narrow-band computer model for radiation calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Z.; Holmstedt, G.

    1997-01-01

    A fast, narrow-band computer model, FASTNB, which predicts the radiation intensity in a general nonisothermal and nonhomogeneous combustion environment, has been developed. The spectral absorption coefficients of the combustion products, including carbon dioxide, water vapor, and soot, are calculated based on the narrow-band model. FASTNB provides an accurate calculation at reasonably high speed. Compared with Grosshandler`s narrow-band model, RADCAL, which has been verified quite extensively against experimental measurements, FASTNB is more than 20 times faster and gives almost exactly the same results.

  3. Fuel Cell Council Working Group on Aircraft and Aircraft Ground Support Fuel Cell Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Council Working Group on Aircraft and Aircraft Ground Support Fuel Cell Applications Topics * The US Fuel Cell Council Aircraft and Aircraft Support Working Group Establishment Working Group Members Mission Statement Focus moving forward The US Fuel Cell Council US Fuel Cell Council Trade Association for the industry since 1998 Member driven - Market focused Developers, suppliers, customers, nonprofits, government Advocacy Regulations Safety and standardization Education Strategic Alliances Our

  4. ARM Installs Aircraft Detection Radar System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    periods (IOPs) might use higher-power laser beams that point skyward to make ... in an aircraft flying above the instrument, damage to the person's eyesight could result. ...

  5. Wave Energy Prize Narrowed from 92 Teams to Top 20 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wave Energy Prize Narrowed from 92 Teams to Top 20 Wave Energy Prize Narrowed from 92 Teams to Top 20 August 14, 2015 - 2:16pm Addthis Wave Energy Prize Narrowed from 92 Teams to...

  6. Aircraft

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SGP Central Facility - surrounded by wheat felds, the heavily instrumented Central Facility served as the primary source of information about cloud and carbon feedbacks. * Little Washita Watershed - located in a mix of pasture land and winter wheat, three carbon fux towers and associ ated instruments were added at this site. Two additional fux towers were located at Fort Cobb, in nearby croplands, to supplement the data set from this area. * Okmulgee - amid oak forests, the existing fux tower

  7. Emerging NDE Technology for aging aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, D.G.; Perry, R.L.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents an overview of several emerging nondestructive evaluation technologies that are being employed or considered for use to inspect commercial transport, commuter aircraft and military aircraft. An overview of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) is described and how AANC teams with industry, universities, and other federal entities to assess these technologies.

  8. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Liberty Aircraft Manufacturing...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Liberty Aircraft Manufacturing Company - 025 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Liberty Aircraft Manufacturing Company (025) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year:...

  9. Sandia Energy - Unmanned Aircraft Test Flights Completed at Oliktok...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Unmanned Aircraft Test Flights Completed at Oliktok Point Home Climate News News & Events Monitoring Sensing Sensing & Monitoring Unmanned Aircraft Test Flights Completed at...

  10. The electronic structure of heavy fermions: Narrow temperature independent bands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arko, A.J.; Joyce, J.J.; Smith, J.L.; Andrews, A.B.

    1996-08-01

    The electronic structure of both Ce and U heavy fermions appears to consist of extremely narrow temperature independent bands. There is no evidence from photoemission for a collective phenomenon normally referred to as the Kondo resonance. In uranium compounds a small dispersion of the bands is easily measurable.

  11. rigid body

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rigid body - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  12. Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rooney, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes a manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

  13. Emerging nondestructive inspection methods for aging aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beattie, A; Dahlke, L; Gieske, J

    1994-01-01

    This report identifies and describes emerging nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods that can potentially be used to inspect commercial transport and commuter aircraft for structural damage. The nine categories of emerging NDI techniques are: acoustic emission, x-ray computed tomography, backscatter radiation, reverse geometry x-ray, advanced electromagnetics, including magnetooptic imaging and advanced eddy current techniques, coherent optics, advanced ultrasonics, advanced visual, and infrared thermography. The physical principles, generalized performance characteristics, and typical applications associated with each method are described. In addition, aircraft inspection applications are discussed along with the associated technical considerations. Finally, the status of each technique is presented, with a discussion on when it may be available for use in actual aircraft maintenance programs. It should be noted that this is a companion document to DOT/FAA/CT-91/5, Current Nondestructive Inspection Methods for Aging Aircraft.

  14. Photonic bandgap narrowing in conical hollow core Bragg fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozturk, Fahri Emre; Yildirim, Adem; Kanik, Mehmet; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2014-08-18

    We report the photonic bandgap engineering of Bragg fibers by controlling the thickness profile of the fiber during the thermal drawing. Conical hollow core Bragg fibers were produced by thermal drawing under a rapidly alternating load, which was applied by introducing steep changes to the fiber drawing speed. In conventional cylindrical Bragg fibers, light is guided by omnidirectional reflections from interior dielectric mirrors with a single quarter wave stack period. In conical fibers, the diameter reduction introduced a gradient of the quarter wave stack period along the length of the fiber. Therefore, the light guided within the fiber encountered slightly smaller dielectric layer thicknesses at each reflection, resulting in a progressive blueshift of the reflectance spectrum. As the reflectance spectrum shifts, longer wavelengths of the initial bandgap cease to be omnidirectionally reflected and exit through the cladding, which narrows the photonic bandgap. A narrow transmission bandwidth is particularly desirable in hollow waveguide mid-infrared sensing schemes, where broadband light is coupled to the fiber and the analyte vapor is introduced into the hollow core to measure infrared absorption. We carried out sensing simulations using the absorption spectrum of isopropyl alcohol vapor to demonstrate the importance of narrow bandgap fibers in chemical sensing applications.

  15. Aircraft S-HIS Observations during MPACE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aircraft S-HIS Observations during MPACE DeSlover, Daniel University of Wisconsin Holz, Robert University of Wisconsin, CIMMS Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Revercomb, Henry University of Wisconsin-Madison Category: Field Campaigns We will focus on retrieval of cloud optical properties derived from the aircraft-based Scanning-High Resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS) measurements during the 2004 MPACE field campaign. Data will be compared to simultaneous measurements from the

  16. Narrow-band optical transmission of metallic nanoslit arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Zhijun; Yang Ying; Zuo Xiaoliu

    2012-10-22

    Metallic nanoslit arrays usually demonstrate wide transmission bands for transverse-magnetic-polarized incidence light. Here, we show that by introducing multi-dielectric layers underneath the metallic structure layer on the substrate, a narrow peak is formed, whose bandwidth can be down to a few nanometers. Three types of resonance modes in the region under the metal layer are identified responsible for the formation of the peak, i.e., a two-dimensional cavity resonance mode, which supports optical transmission, and two in-plane hybrid surface plasmon resonance modes locating on both sides of the peak that suppresses the transmission. Such structures can be applied in advanced photonic devices.

  17. Distributed seeding for narrow-line width hard x-ray free-electron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for narrow-line width hard x-ray free-electron lasers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Distributed seeding for narrow-line width hard x-ray free-electron lasers We ...

  18. Liquid-hydrogen-fueled passenger aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-03-11

    This Chinese translation discusses the idea that passenger aircraft will eventually use liquid-hydrogen fuel. There is a large reserve of hydrogen and hydrogen poses no danger to the environment. Hydrogen has high calorific value, high specific heat, low density, and low temperature. Aircraft will have to have liquid fuel tanks to carry the hydrogen and will have to be partially redesigned. Lockheed and NASA have considered such designs. A problem remains in the planning--the high cost of large extraction of liquid hydrogen.

  19. Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells GA Whyatt LA Chick April 2012 PNNL-XXXXX Electrical Generation for More- Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells GA Whyatt LA Chick ...

  20. Neutral and positively charged excitons in narrow quantum ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porras Monroy, L. C.; Rodrguez-Prada, F. A.; Mikhailov, I. D.

    2014-05-15

    We study theoretically quantized states of a neutral and a positively charged exciton (trion X{sup +}) confined in a heterostructure with the ring-like geometry. In order to assess the experimentally relevant domain of parameters, we adopt a simple model of a narrow ring when 3D wave equations for the neutral and positively charged excitons can be separated. By using the Fourier series method, we have calculated the energy spectra of excitons complexes in a quantum ring as a function of the electron-to-hole mass ratio, the ring radius, and the magnetic field strength. The quantum-size effect and the size-dependent magnetic oscillations of energy levels of excitons' complexes spectra have been revealed.

  1. Narrow Field of View Zenith Radiometer (NFOV) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, C; Marshak, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, JC; Schmelzer, J

    2008-11-01

    The two-channel narrow field-of-view radiometer (NFOV2) is a ground-based radiometer that looks straight up and measures radiance directly above the instrument at wavelengths of 673 and 870 nm. The field-of-view of the instrument is 1.2 degrees, and the sampling time resolution is one second. Measurements of the NFOV2 have been used to retrieve optical properties for overhead clouds that range from patchy to overcast. With a one-second sampling rate of the NFOV2, faster than almost any other ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrument, we are able, for the first time, to capture changes in cloud optical properties at the natural time scale of cloud evolution.

  2. Long-pulse-width narrow-bandwidth solid state laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd A.

    1997-01-01

    A long pulse laser system emits 500-1000 ns quasi-rectangular pulses at 527 nm with near diffraction-limited divergence and near transform-limited bandwidth. The system consists of one or more flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass zig-zag amplifiers, a very low threshold stimulated-Brillouin-scattering (SBS) phase conjugator system, and a free-running single frequency Nd:YLF master oscillator. Completely passive polarization switching provides eight amplifier gain passes. Multiple frequency output can be generated by using SBS cells having different pressures of a gaseous SBS medium or different SBS materials. This long pulse, low divergence, narrow-bandwidth, multi-frequency output laser system is ideally suited for use as an illuminator for long range speckle imaging applications. Because of its high average power and high beam quality, this system has application in any process which would benefit from a long pulse format, including material processing and medical applications.

  3. Damping, motional narrowing, and chaos in rotational nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, F. S.; Deleplanque, M. A.; Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Fallon, P.; Diamond, R. M.; Ward, D.; Clark, R. M.; Cromaz, M.

    2008-09-15

    We have studied the unresolved {gamma}-ray spectrum of three ytterbium nuclei produced in heavy-ion fusion reactions and measured the two damping widths, {gamma}{sub {mu}}, the spreading (compound-damping) width, and {gamma}{sub rot}, the rotational damping width, together with P{sub nar}, the probability that the population enters and leaves a given state via the same component of the wave function. Our results for {gamma}{sub {mu}} and {gamma}{sub rot} are in good agreement with theoretical expectations, as well as with those of other groups using different methods. Our results for P{sub nar} lead to a new method for quantitative evaluation of the full order-to-chaos transition in these Yb nuclei. Finally, we provide the first evidence for the motional narrowing of {gamma}{sub rot} in nuclei. The basic physics occurring in this region is level mixing, which our simulation technique reproduces surprisingly well.

  4. Long-pulse-width narrow-bandwidth solid state laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.

    1997-11-18

    A long pulse laser system emits 500-1000 ns quasi-rectangular pulses at 527 nm with near diffraction-limited divergence and near transform-limited bandwidth. The system consists of one or more flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass zig-zag amplifiers, a very low threshold stimulated-Brillouin-scattering (SBS) phase conjugator system, and a free-running single frequency Nd:YLF master oscillator. Completely passive polarization switching provides eight amplifier gain passes. Multiple frequency output can be generated by using SBS cells having different pressures of a gaseous SBS medium or different SBS materials. This long pulse, low divergence, narrow-bandwidth, multi-frequency output laser system is ideally suited for use as an illuminator for long range speckle imaging applications. Because of its high average power and high beam quality, this system has application in any process which would benefit from a long pulse format, including material processing and medical applications. 5 figs.

  5. Stratospheric aircraft: Impact on the stratosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, H.

    1992-02-01

    The steady-state distribution of natural stratospheric ozone is primarily maintained through production by ultraviolet photolysis of molecular oxygen, destruction by a catalytic cycle involving nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and relocation by air motions within the stratosphere. Nitrogen oxides from the exhausts of a commercially viable fleet of supersonic transports would exceed the natural source of stratospheric nitrogen oxides if the t should be equipped with 1990 technology jet engines. This model-free comparison between a vital natural global ingredient and a proposed new industrial product shows that building a large fleet of passenger stratospheric aircraft poses a significant global problem. NASA and aircraft industries have recognized this problem and are studying the redesign of jet aircraft engines in order to reduce the nitrogen oxides emissions. In 1989 atmospheric models identified two other paths by which the ozone destroying effects of stratospheric aircraft might be reduced or eliminated: (1) Use relatively low supersonic Mach numbers and flight altitudes. For a given rate of nitrogen oxides injection into the stratosphere, the calculated reduction of total ozone is a strong function of altitude, and flight altitudes well below 20 kilometers give relatively low calculated ozone reductions. (2) Include heterogeneous chemistry in the two-dimensional model calculations. Necessary conditions for answering the question on the title above are to improve the quality of our understanding of the lower stratosphere and to broaden our knowledge of hetergeneous stratospheric chemistry. This article reviews recently proposed new mechanisms for heterogeneous reactions on the global stratospheric sulfate aerosols.

  6. Stratospheric aircraft: Impact on the stratosphere?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, H.

    1992-02-01

    The steady-state distribution of natural stratospheric ozone is primarily maintained through production by ultraviolet photolysis of molecular oxygen, destruction by a catalytic cycle involving nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and relocation by air motions within the stratosphere. Nitrogen oxides from the exhausts of a commercially viable fleet of supersonic transports would exceed the natural source of stratospheric nitrogen oxides if the t should be equipped with 1990 technology jet engines. This model-free comparison between a vital natural global ingredient and a proposed new industrial product shows that building a large fleet of passenger stratospheric aircraft poses a significant global problem. NASA and aircraft industries have recognized this problem and are studying the redesign of jet aircraft engines in order to reduce the nitrogen oxides emissions. In 1989 atmospheric models identified two other paths by which the ozone destroying effects of stratospheric aircraft might be reduced or eliminated: (1) Use relatively low supersonic Mach numbers and flight altitudes. For a given rate of nitrogen oxides injection into the stratosphere, the calculated reduction of total ozone is a strong function of altitude, and flight altitudes well below 20 kilometers give relatively low calculated ozone reductions. (2) Include heterogeneous chemistry in the two-dimensional model calculations. Necessary conditions for answering the question on the title above are to improve the quality of our understanding of the lower stratosphere and to broaden our knowledge of hetergeneous stratospheric chemistry. This article reviews recently proposed new mechanisms for heterogeneous reactions on the global stratospheric sulfate aerosols.

  7. Improving Aircraft Engine Combustor Simulations | Argonne Leadership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing Facility Jet engine combustor design Pratt & Whitney is exploring leading-edge jet engine combustor design methods using the ALCF's Blue Gene/P. Improving Aircraft Engine Combustor Simulations PI Name: Peter Bradley PI Email: peter.c.bradley@pw.utc.com Institution: Pratt & Whitney Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 1.3 Million Year: 2008 Research Domain: Engineering A jet engine combustor combines air flowing faster than a hurricane with swirling fuel to

  8. Capillary electrophoresis-fluorescence line narrowing system (CE-FLNS) for on-line structural characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowiak, R.J.; Small, G.J.; Shields, P.A.

    1999-04-27

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is interfaced with low temperature fluorescence line-narrowing (FLN) spectroscopy for on-line structural characterization of separated molecular analytes. 21 figs.

  9. Capillary electrophoresis-fluorescence line narrowing system (CE-FLNS) for on-line structural characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowiak, Ryszard J.; Small, Gerald J.; Shields, Peter A.

    1999-04-27

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is interfaced with low temperature fluorescence line-narrowing (FLN) spectroscopy for on-line structural characterization of separated molecular analytes.

  10. Using doppler radar images to estimate aircraft navigational heading error

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W.; Jordan, Jay D.; Kim, Theodore J.

    2012-07-03

    A yaw angle error of a motion measurement system carried on an aircraft for navigation is estimated from Doppler radar images captured using the aircraft. At least two radar pulses aimed at respectively different physical locations in a targeted area are transmitted from a radar antenna carried on the aircraft. At least two Doppler radar images that respectively correspond to the at least two transmitted radar pulses are produced. These images are used to produce an estimate of the yaw angle error.

  11. Aircraft Integration and Flight Testing of 4STAR (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    integrated the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR-Air) instrument for flight operation aboard Battelle's G-1 aircraft and conducted a ...

  12. New Vapor-Particle Separator Improves Understanding of Aircraft...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    separate volatile particles from condensible vapors in aircraft engine emissions. ... of the combustion process of modern jet engines and the formation process of ...

  13. RACORO Extended-Term Aircraft Observations of Boundary-Layer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative ... SURFACES; THERMAL RADIATION; USA; WATER RACORO Extended-Term; Aircraft ...

  14. 3D Printing Aircraft Parts | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in GE aircraft engines signals a paradigm shift that is happening with the emergence of additive manufacturing. Additive not only offers the opportunity to design parts never...

  15. A new research aircraft for the documentation of the impacts...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that these data helped to achieve over the last two decades. Advances were quite spectacular over this period both in aircraft capabilities and in the instrumentation carried...

  16. V/STOL aircraft and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Owens, Phillip R.

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft apparatus and method capable of V/STOL (vertical, short takeoff and landing) in addition to conventional flight. For V/STOL operation, induced lift is provided by blowing air over the upper surface of each wing through a duct installed near the leading edge. Intake air is supplied to the blowing fan through a duct installed near the trailing edge, thus providing suction as well as blowing. Two fans in series are required. The engine provides power not only to the propeller but also to a transmission which provides power to the pulleys driving the belt-driven fans.

  17. V/STOL aircraft and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Owens, P.R.

    1997-11-18

    Aircraft apparatus and method capable of V/STOL (vertical, short takeoff and landing) in addition to conventional flight are disclosed. For V/STOL operation, induced lift is provided by blowing air over the upper surface of each wing through a duct installed near the leading edge. Intake air is supplied to the blowing fan through a duct installed near the trailing edge, thus providing suction as well as blowing. Two fans in series are required. The engine provides power not only to the propeller but also to a transmission which provides power to the pulleys driving the belt-driven fans. 10 figs.

  18. Body of work

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, R.A.

    2008-06-15

    Selection of the right dump body for the job requires careful thinking, as is discussed in this paper. 2 figs.

  19. Wave Energy Prize Narrowed from 92 Teams to Top 20 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Prize Narrowed from 92 Teams to Top 20 Wave Energy Prize Narrowed from 92 Teams to Top 20 August 14, 2015 - 2:16pm Addthis Wave Energy Prize Narrowed from 92 Teams to Top 20 Alison LaBonte Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Manager After an unprecedented 92 teams registered to compete in the Energy Department-funded Wave Energy Prize, today we announced the top 20 teams. These teams all passed through Technology Gate 1: providing a thorough technical submission detailing their device and its

  20. Origin of the narrow, single peak in the fission-fragment mass distribution

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for 258Fm (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Origin of the narrow, single peak in the fission-fragment mass distribution for 258Fm Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Origin of the narrow, single peak in the fission-fragment mass distribution for 258Fm We discuss the origin of the narrowness of the single peak at mass-symmetric division in the fragment mass-yield curve for spontaneous fission of {sup 258}Fm. For this purpose, we employ the macroscopic-microscopic model and calculate

  1. Observation in BaBar of a Narrow Resonance in the D{sub s} pi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the Dsub s pisup 0 System at 2317 MeVcsup 2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observation in BaBar of a Narrow Resonance in the Dsub s pisup 0 System at ...

  2. Coupling through tortuous path narrow slot apertures into complex cavities - Antennas and Propagation, IEEE Transactions on

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ANTENNAS AND PROPOGATION, VOL. 48, NO. 3, MARCH 2000 Coupling Through Tortuous Path Narrow Slot Apertures into Complex Cavities Russell P. Jedlicka, Senior Member, IEEE, Steven P. Castillo, Senior Member, IEEE, and Larry K. Warne Abstract-A hybrid finite-element method/method of moments (FEM/MOM) model has been implemented to compute the coupling of fields into a cavity through narrow slot apertures having depth. The model utilizes the slot model of Warne and Chen

  3. Two-Bunch Self-Seeding for Narrow-Bandwidth Hard X-Ray Free-Electron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Two-Bunch Self-Seeding for Narrow-Bandwidth Hard X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Two-Bunch Self-Seeding for Narrow-Bandwidth...

  4. Porous body infiltrating method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corman, Gregory Scot

    2002-01-01

    A mixture is formed that comprises at least some to about 10 wt % boron nitride and silicon. A body comprising a component that is wetted by or reacts with silicon is contacted with the mixture and the contacted body is infiltrated with silicon from the mixture.

  5. Polarimetric radar and aircraft observations of saggy bright...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Polarimetric radar and aircraft observations of saggy bright bands during MC3E Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on March 19, 2017 ...

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Liberty Aircraft Manufacturing Company

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - 025 Liberty Aircraft Manufacturing Company - 025 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Liberty Aircraft Manufacturing Company (025) Regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the State of New York. More information at http://cumulis.epa.gov/supercpad/cursites/csitinfo.cfm?id=0201184&msspp=med Designated Name: Not Designated under FUSRAP Alternate Name: Liberty Industrial Finishing Location: Long Island, New York (alternate location: Farmingdale, New York) Evaluation Year: Not

  7. Electronic structure descriptor for the discovery of narrow-band red-emitting phosphors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Zhenbin; Chu, Iek -Heng; Zhou, Fei; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-05-09

    Narrow-band red-emitting phosphors are a critical component of phosphor-converted light-emitting diodes for highly efficient illumination-grade lighting. In this work, we report the discovery of a quantitative descriptor for narrow-band Eu2+-activated emission identified through a comparison of the electronic structures of known narrow-band and broad-band phosphors. We find that a narrow emission bandwidth is characterized by a large splitting of more than 0.1 eV between the two highest Eu2+ 4f7 bands. By incorporating this descriptor in a high-throughput first-principles screening of 2259 nitride compounds, we identify five promising new nitride hosts for Eu2+-activated red-emitting phosphors that are predicted to exhibit goodmore » chemical stability, thermal quenching resistance, and quantum efficiency, as well as narrow-band emission. Lastly, our findings provide important insights into the emission characteristics of rare-earth activators in phosphor hosts and a general strategy to the discovery of phosphors with a desired emission peak and bandwidth.« less

  8. Railway vehicle body structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The strength and durability of railway vehicle structures is a major topic of engineering research and design. To reflect this importance the Railway Division of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers organised a conference to discuss all matters relating to railway vehicle design. This book presents the papers discussed in that conference. The contents include: Vehicle body design and the UIC's international contribution; LUL prototype 1986 stock - body structure; vehicle structure for the intermediate capacity transmit system vehicles; car body technology of advanced light rapid transit vehicles; concepts, techniques and experience in the idealization of car body structures for finite element analysis; Calcutta metropolitan railway; design for a lightweight diesel multiple unit body; the design of lightweight inter-city coal structures; the BREL international coach body shell structure; new concepts and design techniques versus material standards; structures of BR diesel electric freight locomotives; structural design philosophy for electric locomotives; suspension design for a locomotive with low structural frequencies; freight wagon structures; a finite element study of coal bodyside panels including the effects of joint flexibility; a fresh approach to the problem of car body design strength; energy absorption in automatic couplings and draw gear; passenger vehicle design loads and structural crashworthiness; design of the front part of railway vehicles (in case of frontal impact); the development of a theoretical technique for rail vehicle structural crashworthiness.

  9. Using ultra narrow bandwidth to overcome traditional problems with distribution line carrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, P.C.; Hunt, L.R.

    1995-12-31

    It has long been common knowledge among communication engineers that wide bandwidth signals require more energy to overcome noise than do narrow band signals. This is why, during adverse conditions Morse code radio communications can get through when voice can`t. To achieve similar range: A television transmitter (6000 kHz bandwidth) requires 200,000 watts; A music broadcast transmitter (60 kHz bandwidth) requires 2000 watts; A voice only transmitter (3 kHz bandwidth) requires 100 watts. Carry this principle to extremes: An Ultra Narrow Bandwidth (UNB) transmitter (.00001 kHz bandwidth) requires .003 watts. This paper explores the advantages of using Ultra Narrow Bandwidth (UNB) in power line carrier systems. Using an Automatic Meter Reading System as an example, the authors explore how UNB allows (or sometimes requires) a change in system architecture, which creates further advantages.

  10. Three-body forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nefkens, B.M.K.

    1986-10-15

    A review of current knowledge of three-body forces from experimental and theoretical standpoints is given. The 3-H and 3-He nuclei are discussed. Also, nucleon scattering from deuterium is discussed. (AIP)

  11. Optic for an endoscope/borescope having high resolution and narrow field of view

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stone, Gary F.; Trebes, James E.

    2003-10-28

    An optic having optimized high spatial resolution, minimal nonlinear magnification distortion while at the same time having a limited chromatic focal shift or chromatic aberrations. The optic located at the distal end of an endoscopic inspection tool permits a high resolution, narrow field of view image for medical diagnostic applications, compared to conventional optics for endoscopic instruments which provide a wide field of view, low resolution image. The image coverage is over a narrow (<20 degrees) field of view with very low optical distortion (<5% pin cushion or barrel distortion. The optic is also optimized for best color correction as well as to aid medical diagnostics.

  12. Recipient luminophoric mediums having narrow spectrum luminescent materials and related semiconductor light emitting devices and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LeToquin, Ronan P; Tong, Tao; Glass, Robert C

    2014-12-30

    Light emitting devices include a light emitting diode ("LED") and a recipient luminophoric medium that is configured to down-convert at least some of the light emitted by the LED. In some embodiments, the recipient luminophoric medium includes a first broad-spectrum luminescent material and a narrow-spectrum luminescent material. The broad-spectrum luminescent material may down-convert radiation emitted by the LED to radiation having a peak wavelength in the red color range. The narrow-spectrum luminescent material may also down-convert radiation emitted by the LED into the cyan, green or red color range.

  13. WELDED JACKETED URANIUM BODY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gurinsky, D.H.

    1958-08-26

    A fuel element is presented for a neutronic reactor and is comprised of a uranium body, a non-fissionable jacket surrounding sald body, thu jacket including a portion sealed by a weld, and an inclusion in said sealed jacket at said weld of a fiux having a low neutron capture cross-section. The flux is provided by combining chlorine gas and hydrogen in the intense heat of-the arc, in a "Heliarc" welding muthod, to form dry hydrochloric acid gas.

  14. Effect of Narrow Cut Oil Shale Distillates on HCCI Engine Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, Scott J; Bunting, Bruce G; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Fairbridge, Craig

    2009-01-01

    In this investigation, oil shale crude obtained from the Green River Formation in Colorado using Paraho Direct retorting was mildly hydrotreated and distilled to produce 7 narrow boiling point fuels of equal volumes. The resulting derived cetane numbers ranged between 38.3 and 43.9. Fuel chemistry and bulk properties strongly correlated with boiling point.

  15. Finite-difference modeling of commercial aircraft using TSAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennock, S.T.; Poggio, A.J.

    1994-11-15

    Future aircraft may have systems controlled by fiber optic cables, to reduce susceptibility to electromagnetic interference. However, the digital systems associated with the fiber optic network could still experience upset due to powerful radio stations, radars, and other electromagnetic sources, with potentially serious consequences. We are modeling the electromagnetic behavior of commercial transport aircraft in support of the NASA Fly-by-Light/Power-by-Wire program, using the TSAR finite-difference time-domain code initially developed for the military. By comparing results obtained from TSAR with data taken on a Boeing 757 at the Air Force Phillips Lab., we hope to show that FDTD codes can serve as an important tool in the design and certification of U.S. commercial aircraft, helping American companies to produce safe, reliable air transportation.

  16. Porous metallic bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Landingham, R.L.

    1984-03-13

    Porous metallic bodies having a substantially uniform pore size of less than about 200 microns and a density of less than about 25 percent theoretical, as well as the method for making them, are disclosed. Group IIA, IIIB, IVB, VB, and rare earth metal hydrides a

  17. Temperature of aircraft cargo flame exposure during accidents involving fuel spills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansfield, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes an evaluation of flame exposure temperatures of weapons contained in alert (parked) bombers due to accidents that involve aircraft fuel fires. The evaluation includes two types of accident, collisions into an alert aircraft by an aircraft that is on landing or take-off, and engine start accidents. Both the B-1B and B-52 alert aircraft are included in the evaluation.

  18. Shape-controlled narrow-gap SnTe nanostructures: From nanocubes to nanorods and nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Shaojun; Andrew F. Fidler; He, Kai; Su, Dong; Chen, Gen; Lin, Qianglu; Pietryga, Jeffrey M.; Klimov, Victor I.

    2015-11-06

    In this study, the rational design and synthesis of narrow-gap colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) is an important step toward the next generation of solution-processable photovoltaics, photodetectors, and thermoelectric devices. SnTe NCs are particularly attractive as a Pb-free alternative to NCs of narrow-gap lead chalcogenides. Previous synthetic efforts on SnTe NCs have focused on spherical nanoparticles. Here we report new strategies for synthesis of SnTe NCs with shapes tunable from highly monodisperse nanocubes, to nanorods (NRs) with variable aspect ratios, and finally to long, straight nanowires (NWs). Reaction at high temperature quickly forms thermodynamically favored nanocubes, but low temperatures lead to elongated particles. Transmission electron microscopy studies of reaction products at various stages of the synthesis reveal that the growth and shape-focusing of monodisperse SnTe nanocubes likely involves interparticle ripening, while directional growth of NRs and NWs may be initiated by particle dimerization via oriented attachment.

  19. SHAPED FISSIONABLE METAL BODIES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wigner, E.P.; Williamson, R.R.; Young, G.J.

    1958-10-14

    A technique is presented for grooving the surface of fissionable fuel elements so that expansion can take place without damage to the interior structure of the fuel element. The fissionable body tends to develop internal stressing when it is heated internally by the operation of the nuclear reactor and at the same time is subjected to surface cooling by the circulating coolant. By producing a grooved or waffle-like surface texture, the annular lines of tension stress are disrupted at equally spaced intervals by the grooves, thereby relieving the tension stresses in the outer portions of the body while also facilitating the removal of accumulated heat from the interior portion of the fuel element.

  20. Few-body physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briceno, Raul

    2015-05-01

    Few-body hadronic observables play an essential role in a wide number of processes relevant for both particle and nuclear physics. In order for Lattice QCD to offer insight into the interpretation of few-body states, a theoretical infrastructure must be developed to map Euclidean-time correlation functions to the desired Minkowski-time few-body observables. In this talk, I will first review the formal challenges associated with the studies of such systems via Lattice QCD, as first introduced by Maiani and Testa, and then review methodology to circumvent said limitations. The first main example of the latter is the formalism of Luscher to analyze elastic scattering and a second is the method of Lellouch & Luscher to analyze weak decays. I will then proceed to discus recent theoretical generalizations of these frameworks that allow for the determination of scattering amplitudes, resonances, transition and elastic form factors. Finally, I will outline outstanding problems, including those that are now beginning to be addressed.

  1. DRAFT CONTRACT BODY

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    CONTRACT BODY PAGE of PAGES 2 50 2. CONTRACT NO. DE-SOL-0008449 CONTRACT SPECIALIST MARIA D. VASQUEZ Attn: Maria D. Vasquez, Bldg 20388 / NA-APM-123.1 Phone: 505-845-4880 EMail: maria.vasquez@nnsa.doe.gov Table of Contents SEC DESCRIPTION PAGE(S) SEC DESCRIPTION PAGE(S) PART I - THE SCHEDULE PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES  A SOLICITATION/CONTRACT FORM 2  I CONTRACT CLAUSES 32  B SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS 3 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS & ATTACHMENTS  C

  2. Three-body dwell time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelkar, N. G.

    2010-06-15

    The lifetime of an unstable state or resonance formed as an intermediate state in two-body scattering is known to be related to the dwell time or the time spent within a given region of space by the two interacting particles. This concept is extended to the case of three-body systems and a relation connecting the three-body dwell time with the two-body dwell times of the substructures of the three-body system is derived for the case of separable wave functions. The Kapur-Peierls formalism is revisited to discover one of the first definitions of dwell time in the literature. An extension of the Kapur-Peierls formalism to the three-body case shows that the lifetime of a three-body resonance can indeed be given by the three-body dwell time.

  3. Observation of spectral gain narrowing in a high-order harmonic seeded soft-x-ray amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tissandier, F.; Sebban, S.; Ribiere, M.; Gautier, J.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Lambert, G.; Barszczak Sardinha, A.; Goddet, J.-Ph.; Burgy, F.; Lefrou, T.; Valentin, C.; Rousse, A.; Guilbaud, O.; Klisnick, A.; Nejdl, J.; Mocek, T.; Maynard, G.

    2010-06-15

    We report an observation of spectral gain narrowing of a high-order harmonic amplified by a soft-x-ray optical-field-ionized plasma. The temporal coherence and spectral linewidth of both the seeded and unseeded soft-x-ray lasers were experimentally measured using a varying-path-difference interferometer. The results showed that the high-order harmonic is subject to a strong spectral narrowing during its propagation in the plasma amplifier without rebroadening at saturation. This is in good agreement with a radiative transfer calculation including gain narrowing and saturation rebroadening.

  4. Bioanalytical Applications of Fluorescence Line-Narrowing and Non-Line-Narrowing Spectroscopy Interfaced with Capillary Electrophoresis and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth Paul Roberts

    2002-06-27

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are widely used analytical separation techniques with many applications in chemical, biochemical, and biomedical sciences. Conventional analyte identification in these techniques is based on retention/migration times of standards; requiring a high degree of reproducibility, availability of reliable standards, and absence of coelution. From this, several new information-rich detection methods (also known as hyphenated techniques) are being explored that would be capable of providing unambiguous on-line identification of separating analytes in CE and HPLC. As further discussed, a number of such on-line detection methods have shown considerable success, including Raman, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), mass spectrometry (MS), and fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopy (FLNS). In this thesis, the feasibility and potential of combining the highly sensitive and selective laser-based detection method of FLNS with analytical separation techniques are discussed and presented. A summary of previously demonstrated FLNS detection interfaced with chromatography and electrophoresis is given, and recent results from on-line FLNS detection in CE (CE-FLNS), and the new combination of HPLC-FLNS, are shown.

  5. Observation of narrow structures in the p-p analyzing power around 1 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajime, Shimizu . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-01-01

    The momentum dependence of the analyzing power Ay in proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured in small steps using an internal target inserted into a polarized proton beam during acceleration from 1 to 3 GeV/c. The momentum bin size ranges from 5 to 18 MeV/c. The relative uncertainty of the analyzing power, {Delta}Ay, is typically less than 0.01 for each momentum bin. Narrow structures have been observed in the two-proton invariant mass distribution of the analyzing power. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. A simplified scheme for generating narrow-band mid-ultraviolet laser radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almog, G.; Scholz, M. Weber, W.; Leisching, P.; Kaenders, W.; Udem, Th.

    2015-03-15

    We report on the development and characterization of continuous, narrow-band, and tunable laser systems that use direct second-harmonic generation from blue and green diode lasers with an output power level of up to 11.1 mW in the mid-ultraviolet. One of our laser systems was tuned to the mercury 6{sup 1}S{sub 0} → 6{sup 3}P{sub 1} intercombination line at 253.7 nm. We could perform Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy on this line and were able to lock our laser to the transition frequency on long time scales.

  7. CORROSION RESISTANT JACKETED METAL BODY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brugmann, E.W.

    1958-08-26

    S>Metal jacketed metallic bodies of the type used as feel elements fer nuclear reactors are presented. The fuel element is comprised of a plurality of jacketed cylindrical bodies joined in end to end abutting relationship. The abutting ends of the internal fissionable bodies are provided with a mating screw and thread means for joining the two together. The jacket material is of a corrosion resistant metal and overlaps the abutting ends of the internal bodies, thereby effectively sealing these bodies from contact with exteral reactive gases and liquids.

  8. Low gloss UV-cured coatings for aircraft

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowman, Mark; Muschar, Harry

    2014-12-09

    A method of applying a low gloss coating to a substrate such as the exterior surface of an aircraft is disclosed. The coating composition comprising a polyene, a polythiol, a flatting agent and a coloring pigment is applied to the substrate and given a first dosage of UV radiation followed by a second dosage in which the second dosage is greater than the first resulting in an ultralow gloss coating.

  9. Shape-controlled narrow-gap SnTe nanostructures: From nanocubes to nanorods and nanowires

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, Shaojun; Andrew F. Fidler; He, Kai; Su, Dong; Chen, Gen; Lin, Qianglu; Pietryga, Jeffrey M.; Klimov, Victor I.

    2015-11-06

    In this study, the rational design and synthesis of narrow-gap colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) is an important step toward the next generation of solution-processable photovoltaics, photodetectors, and thermoelectric devices. SnTe NCs are particularly attractive as a Pb-free alternative to NCs of narrow-gap lead chalcogenides. Previous synthetic efforts on SnTe NCs have focused on spherical nanoparticles. Here we report new strategies for synthesis of SnTe NCs with shapes tunable from highly monodisperse nanocubes, to nanorods (NRs) with variable aspect ratios, and finally to long, straight nanowires (NWs). Reaction at high temperature quickly forms thermodynamically favored nanocubes, but low temperatures lead tomore » elongated particles. Transmission electron microscopy studies of reaction products at various stages of the synthesis reveal that the growth and shape-focusing of monodisperse SnTe nanocubes likely involves interparticle ripening, while directional growth of NRs and NWs may be initiated by particle dimerization via oriented attachment.« less

  10. D{sup 0} magnetism in Ca doped narrow carbon nanotubes: First principle chirality effect study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajiheidari, F.; Khoshnevisan, B.; Hashemifar, S. J.

    2014-06-21

    Curvature has always had crucial effects on the physical properties of narrow carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and here spin-polarized density functional calculations were employed to study electronic and magnetic properties of calcium-decorated narrow (5,5) and (9,0)CNTs with close diameters (∼7 Å) and different chiralities. Our results showed that chirality had great impact on the electronic structure and magnetization of the doped CNTs. In addition, internally or externally doping of the calcium atoms was studied comparatively and although for the (9,0)CNT the internal doping was the most stable configuration, which involves a novel kind of spin-polarization originated from Ca-4s electrons, but for the (5,5)tube the external doping was the most stable one without any spin-polarization. On the other hand, calcium doping in the center of the (5,5)CNT was an endothermic process and led to the spin-polarization of unoccupied Ca-3d orbitals via direct exchange interaction between adjacent Ca atoms. In the considered systems, the existence of magnetization in the absence of any transition-metal elements was an example of valuable d{sup 0} magnetism title.

  11. A vortex panel method for calculating aircraft downwash on parachute trajectories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullerton, T.L.; Strickland, J.H.; Sundberg, W.D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of a methodology of the paneled-wing method for calculating aircraft-induced wake velocities. This discussion will include a description of how an aircraft and its wake are represented by finite length vortex filaments, how the strength and location of these filaments are determined based upon aircraft characteristics and trajectory data, and how the induced velocity values are determined once the location and strength of the vortex filaments are known. Examples will be presented showing comparisons between induced velocity values calculated using both the paneled-wing method and Strickland's lifting line method. Comparison is also made between calculated results from the paneled-wing method and wind tunnel data collected in the wake of a scale model aircraft. Additional examples will show the effect of including aircraft downwash calculations in a trajectory analysis for a parachute-retarded store delivered via aircraft. 3 refs., 12 figs.

  12. A user`s guide to LUGSAN II. A computer program to calculate and archive lug and sway brace loads for aircraft-carried stores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, W.N.

    1998-03-01

    LUG and Sway brace ANalysis (LUGSAN) II is an analysis and database computer program that is designed to calculate store lug and sway brace loads for aircraft captive carriage. LUGSAN II combines the rigid body dynamics code, SWAY85, with a Macintosh Hypercard database to function both as an analysis and archival system. This report describes the LUGSAN II application program, which operates on the Macintosh System (Hypercard 2.2 or later) and includes function descriptions, layout examples, and sample sessions. Although this report is primarily a user`s manual, a brief overview of the LUGSAN II computer code is included with suggested resources for programmers.

  13. FACT SHEET U.S. Department of Energy ARM Aerial Facility G-1 Research Aircraft

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility G-1 Research Aircraft The Gulfstream-159 (G-1) twin turboprop aircraft, owned by Battelle Memorial Institute since 1988 and operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), serves as an airborne atmospheric research laboratory for DOE and other users. The aircraft can measure a wide range of radiative, aerosol, and cloud properties, as well as collect gas-phase measurements. It is capable of taking measurements at altitudes approaching

  14. Narrow band wavelength selective filter using grating assisted single ring resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prabhathan, P. Murukeshan, V. M.

    2014-09-15

    This paper illustrates a filter configuration which uses a single ring resonator of larger radius connected to a grating resonator at its drop port to achieve single wavelength selectivity and switching property with spectral features suitable for on-chip wavelength selection applications. The proposed configuration is expected to find applications in silicon photonics devices such as, on-chip external cavity lasers and multi analytic label-free biosensors. The grating resonator has been designed for a high Q-factor, high transmittivity, and minimum loss so that the wavelength selectivity of the device is improved. The proof-of-concept device has been demonstrated on a Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) platform through electron beam lithography and Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) process. The transmission spectrum shows narrow band single wavelength selection and switching property with a high Free Spectral Range (FSR) ?60 nm and side band rejection ratio >15 dB.

  15. Optical Resonance in a Narrow Slit in a Thick Metallic Screen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takakura, Y.

    2001-06-11

    Interaction of TM-polarized waves with a subwavelength thick metallic slit has been analyzed. A Fabry-Perot-like behavior is reported. The resonance peaks, however, have very low magnitude and a systematic shift towards longer wavelengths is observed. The slit being narrow, this shift can be interpreted as the result of an aperture effect. Spectral transmission from a periodic array of such slits features the same peaks with a high increase in their magnitude, confirming that a grating acts as an amplifier of those resonances. Such a mechanism might explain the enhancement of the transmission observed in recent experiments [T.W. Ebbesen, H.J. Lezec, H.F. Ghaemi, T. Thio, and P.A. Wolff, Nature (London) 391, 667 (1998)].

  16. A proposed interim improvement to the Tevatron beam position monitors with narrow band crystal filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng-Yang Tan

    2003-08-25

    Since the start of Run II, we have found that we are unable to reliably and accurately measure the beam position with the present BPM system during high energy physics (HEP). This problem can be traced back to the analogue frontend called the AM/PM module which has trouble handling coalesced beam, but works well with uncoalesced beam. In this paper, we propose a simple fix to the AM/PM module so that we can measure the beam position during HEP. The idea is to use narrow band crystal filters which ring when pinged by coalesced beam so that the AM/PM module is tricked into thinking that it is measuring uncoalesced beam.

  17. Interaction of Josephson Junction and Distant Vortex in Narrow Thin-Film Superconducting Strips

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogan, V. G.; Mints, R. G.

    2014-01-31

    The phase difference between the banks of an edge-type planar Josephson junction crossing the narrow thin-film strip depends on wether or not vortices are present in the junction banks. For a vortex close to the junction this effect has been seen by Golod, Rydh, and Krasnov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 227003 (2010)], who showed that the vortex may turn the junction into ? type. It is shown here that even if the vortex is far away from the junction, it still changes the 0 junction to a ? junction when situated close to the strip edges. Within the approximation used, the effect is independent of the vortex-junction separation, a manifestation of the topology of the vortex phase which extends to macroscopic distances of superconducting coherence.

  18. Band gap narrowing in zinc oxide-based semiconductor thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Jitendra E-mail: akrsri@gmail.com; Kumar Srivastava, Amit E-mail: akrsri@gmail.com

    2014-04-07

    A simple expression is proposed for the band gap narrowing (or shrinkage) in semiconductors using optical absorption measurements of spin coated 1 at. % Ga-doped ZnO (with additional 0–1.5 at. % zinc species) thin films as ΔE{sub BGN} = Bn{sup 1/3} [1 − (n{sub c}/n){sup 1/3}], where B is the fitting parameter, n is carrier concentration, and n{sub c} is the critical density required for shrinkage onset. Its uniqueness lies in not only describing variation of ΔE{sub BGN} correctly but also allowing deduction of n{sub c} automatically for several M-doped ZnO (M: Ga, Al, In, B, Mo) systems. The physical significance of the term [1 − (n{sub c}/n){sup 1/3}] is discussed in terms of carrier separation.

  19. Observations of narrow bipolar events reveal how lightning is initiated in thunderstorms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rison, William; Krehbiel, Paul R.; Stock, Michael G.; Edens, Harald E.; Shao, Xuan-Min; Thomas, Ronald J.; Stanley, Mark A.; Zhang, Yang

    2016-02-15

    A long-standing but fundamental question in lightning studies concerns how lightning is initiated inside storms, given the absence of physical conductors. The issue has revolved around the question of whether the discharges are initiated solely by conventional dielectric breakdown or involve relativistic runaway electron processes. Here we report observations of a relatively unknown type of discharge, called fast positive breakdown, that is the cause of high-power discharges known as narrow bipolar events. We find that the breakdown has a wide range of strengths and is the initiating event of numerous lightning discharges. It appears to be purely dielectric in naturemore » and to consist of a system of positive streamers in a locally intense electric field region. It initiates negative breakdown at the starting location of the streamers, which leads to the ensuing flash. The observations show that many or possibly all lightning flashes are initiated by fast positive breakdown.« less

  20. CORROSION RESISTANT JACKETED METAL BODY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brugmann, E.W.

    1958-08-26

    Jacketed metal bodies of the type used as fuel elements for nuclear reactors, which contain an internal elongated body of fissionable material jacketed in a corrosion resistant metal are described. The ends of the internal bodies are provided with screw threads having a tapered outer end. The jacket material overlaps the ends and extends into the tapered section of the screw threaded opening. Screw caps with a mating tapered section are screwed into the ends of the body to compress the jacket material in the tapered sections to provtde an effective seal against corrosive gases and liquids.

  1. Line narrowing spectroscopic studies of DNA-carcinogen adducts and DNA-dye complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suh, Myungkoo

    1995-12-06

    Laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing and non-line narrowing spectroscopic methods were applied to conformational studies of stable DNA adducts of the 7{beta}, 8{alpha}-dihydoxy-9{alpha}, l0{alpha}-epoxy-7,8,9, 10-tetrahydrobenzo[{alpha}]pyrene (anti-BPDE). Stereochemically distinct (+)-trans-, ({minus})-trans-, (+)-cis- and ({minus})-cis adducts of anti-BPDE bound to exocyclic amino group of the central guanine in an 11-mer oligonucleotide, exist in a mixture of conformations in frozen aqueous buffer matrices. The (+)-trans adduct adopts primarily an external conformation with a smaller fraction ( {approximately} 25 %) exists in a partially base-stacked conformation. Both cis adducts were found to be intercalated with significant {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions between the pyrenyl residues and the bases. Conformations of the trans-adduct of (+)-anti -BPDE in 11-mer oligonucleotides were studied as a function of flanking bases. In single stranded form the adduct at G{sub 2} or G{sub 3} (5 ft-flanking, base guanine) adopts a conformation with strong, interaction with the bases. In contrast, the adduct with a 5ft-flanking, thymine exists in a primarily helixexternal conformation. Similar differences were observed in the double stranded oligonucleotides. The nature of the 3ft-flanking base has little influence on the conformational equilibrium of the (+)-trans-anti BPDE-dG adduct. The formation and repair of BPDE-N{sup 2}-dG in DNA isolated from the skin of mice treated topically with benzo[{alpha}]pyrene (BP) was studied. Low-temperature fluorescence spectroscopy of the intact DNA identified the major adduct as (+)-trans-anti-BPDE-N-dG, and the minor adduct fraction consisted mainly of (+)-cis-anti-BPDE-N{sup 2}-dG.

  2. CONSTRAINING JET PRODUCTION SCENARIOS BY STUDIES OF NARROW-LINE RADIO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sikora, Marek; Stasinska, Grazyna; Koziel-Wierzbowska, Dorota; Madejski, Greg M.; Asari, Natalia V.

    2013-03-01

    We study a large sample of narrow-line radio galaxies (NLRGs) with extended radio structures. Using 1.4 GHz radio luminosities L {sub 1.4}, narrow optical emission line luminosities L {sub [OIII]} and L{sub H{sub {alpha}}}, as well as black hole masses M {sub BH} derived from stellar velocity dispersions measured from the optical spectra obtained with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we find that (1) NLRGs cover about four decades of the Eddington ratio, {lambda} {identical_to} L {sub bol}/L {sub Edd}{proportional_to}L {sub line}/M {sub BH}; (2) L {sub 1.4}/M {sub BH} strongly correlates with {lambda}; and (3) radio loudness, R{identical_to}L{sub 1.4}/L{sub line}, strongly anti-correlates with {lambda}. A very broad range of the Eddington ratio indicates that the parent population of NLRGs includes both radio-loud quasars (RLQs) and broad-line radio galaxies (BLRGs). The correlations they obey and their high jet production efficiencies favor a jet production model which involves the so-called magnetically choked accretion scenario. In this model, production of the jet is dominated by the Blandford-Znajek mechanism, and the magnetic fields in the vicinity of the central black hole are confined by the ram pressure of the accretion flow. Since large net magnetic flux accumulated in central regions of the accretion flow required by the model can take place only via geometrically thick accretion, we speculate that the massive, 'cold' accretion events associated with luminous emission-line active galactic nucleus can be accompanied by an efficient jet production only if preceded by a hot, very sub-Eddington accretion phase.

  3. Nature of the narrow optical band in H*-aggregates: Dozy-chaos–exciton coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egorov, Vladimir V.

    2014-07-15

    Dozy chaos emerges as a combined effect of the collective chaotic motion of electrons and nuclei, and their chaotic electromagnetic interactions in the transient state of molecules experiencing quantum transitions. Following earlier discussions of the well-known Brönsted relations for proton-transfer reactions; the temperature-dependent electron transfer in Langmuir–Blodgett films; the shape of the optical bands of polymethine dye monomers, their dimers, and J-aggregates, this paper reports one more application of the dozy-chaos theory of molecular quantum transitions. The qualitative and quantitative explanations for shape of a narrow and blue-shifted optical absorption band in H{sup *}-aggregates is given on the basis of the dozy-chaos theory by taking into account the dozy-chaos–exciton coupling effect. It is emphasized that in the H{sup *}-aggregate chromophore (dimer of cyclic bis-thiacarbocyanines) there is a competition between two Frenkel exciton transitions through the chaotic reorganization motion of nuclear environment. As a result, the highly organized quantum transition to the upper exciton state becomes an exciton-induced source of dozy chaos for the low organized transition to the lower exciton state. This manifests itself in appearing the narrow peak and broad wing in the optical spectrum pattern of H{sup *}-aggregates. A similar enhancement in the H{sup *}-effect caused by the strengthening of the exciton coupling in H{sup *}-dimers, which could be achieved by synthesizing tertiary and quarternary thiacarbocyanine monomers, is predicted.

  4. Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This study, completed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, examines approaches to providing electrical power on board commercial aircraft using solid oxide fuel (SOFC) technology.

  5. DOD-DOE Aircraft Petroleum Use Reduction Workshop Agenda | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy DOD-DOE Aircraft Petroleum Use Reduction Workshop Agenda DOD-DOE Aircraft Petroleum Use Reduction Workshop Agenda Workshop agenda for the DOD-DOE Aircraft Petroleum Use Reduction Workshop, September 30, 2010, in Washington, DC. aircraft_agenda.pdf (145.95 KB) More Documents & Publications Report of the DOE-DOE Workshop on Fuel Cells in Aviation: Workshop Summary and Action Plan Report of the DOD-DOE Workshop on Converting Waste to Energy Using Fuel Cells: Workshop Summary and

  6. A CFD/CSD interaction methodology for aircraft wings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhardwaj, M.K.; Kapania, R.K.; Reichenbach, E.; Guruswamy, G.P.

    1998-01-01

    With advanced subsonic transports and military aircraft operating in the transonic regime, it is becoming important to determine the effects of the coupling between aerodynamic loads and elastic forces. Since aeroelastic effects can significantly impact the design of these aircraft, there is a strong need in the aerospace industry to predict these interactions computationally. Such an analysis in the transonic regime requires high fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis tools, due to the nonlinear behavior of the aerodynamics in the transonic regime and also high fidelity computational structural dynamics (CSD) analysis tools. Also, there is a need to be able to use a wide variety of CFD and CSD methods to predict aeroelastic effects. Since source codes are not always available, it is necessary to couple the CFD and CSD codes without alteration of the source codes. In this study, an aeroelastic coupling procedure is developed to determine the static aeroelastic response of aircraft wings using any CFD and CSD code with little code integration. The aeroelastic coupling procedure is demonstrated on an F/A-18 Stabilator using NASTD (an in-house McDonnell Douglas CFD code) and NASTRAN. In addition, the Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-2) is used for demonstration of the aeroelastic coupling procedure by using ENSAERO (NASA Ames Research Center CFD code) and a finite element wing-box code. The results obtained from the present study are compared with those available from an experimental study conducted at NASA Langley Research Center and a study conducted at NASA Ames Research Center using ENSAERO and modal superposition. The results compare well with experimental data.

  7. Aircraft wire system laboratory development : phase I progress report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinallo, Michael Anthony; Lopez, Christopher D.

    2003-08-01

    An aircraft wire systems laboratory has been developed to support technical maturation of diagnostic technologies being used in the aviation community for detection of faulty attributes of wiring systems. The design and development rationale of the laboratory is based in part on documented findings published by the aviation community. The main resource at the laboratory is a test bed enclosure that is populated with aged and newly assembled wire harnesses that have known defects. This report provides the test bed design and harness selection rationale, harness assembly and defect fabrication procedures, and descriptions of the laboratory for usage by the aviation community.

  8. DOD-DOE Aircraft Petroleum Use Reduction Workshop Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOD-DOE Workshop Aircraft Petroleum Use Reduction: Can Fuel Cells be a Game Changer? U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC 4 th Floor Conference Room (4A-104) September 30, 2010 8:30 am to 5 pm Agenda 8:30 am Welcome, introductions and mtg logistics: Pete Devlin (DOE EERE FCTP) Overall Purpose * To begin discussing collaboration across DOD and DOE in keeping with the MOU * To motivate RD&D for APU applications and identify R&D challenges * To identify the next steps and potential

  9. Exploring dynamics of unstable many-body systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volya, Alexander; Zelevinsky, Vladimir

    2014-10-15

    In this work we acquaint reader with the Continuum Shell Model (CSM), which is a proper theoretical tool for the description of physics of unstable systems. We describe the effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian of the CSM and concentrate on specific aspects of dynamics using realistic examples. The continuum effects are discussed in the case of weakly bound heavy oxygen isotopes, where inclusion of continuum coupling is necessary to improve the traditional nuclear shell model techniques. Physics of overlapping resonances is illustrated using recent experimental information on {sup 8}B nucleus. In the limit of strong continuum coupling the many-body states restructure relative to continuum leading to a few very broad super-radiant states, while at the same time other states become narrow and nearly decoupled from decay. The recent observations of very broad alpha clustering states in {sup 18}O is one of the most transparent manifestations of super-radiance.

  10. Light effects in the atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances in wall-coated cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breschi, E.; Schori, C.; Di Domenico, G.; Mileti, G. [Laboratoire Temps-Frequence-University of Neuchatel, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Kazakov, G.; Litvinov, A.; Matisov, B. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, RU-195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-15

    We report on light shift and broadening in the atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances prepared in alkali-metal vapors contained in wall-coated cells without buffer gas. The atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing is due to the free motion of the polarized atomic spins in and out of the optical interaction region before spin relaxation. As a consequence of this effect, we observe a narrowing of the dark resonance linewidth as well as a reduction of the ground states' light shift when the volume of the interaction region decreases at constant optical intensity. The results can be intuitively interpreted as a dilution of the intensity effect similar to a pulsed interrogation due to the atomic motion. Finally the influence of this effect on the performance of compact atomic clocks is discussed.

  11. TH-A-18C-06: A Scatter Elimination Scheme for Cone Beam CT Using An Oscillating Narrow Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, H; Folkerts, M; Jia, X; Jiang, S; Xu, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: While cone beam CT (CBCT) has been widely used in image guided radiation therapy, its low image quality, primarily caused by scattered x-rays, hinders advanced clinical applications, e.g., CBCT based on-line adaptive re-planning. We propose in this abstract a new scheme called oscillating narrow beam CBCT (ONB-CBCT) to eliminate scatter signals. Methods: ONB-CBCT consists of two major components. 1) Oscillating narrow beam (ONB) scan and 2) partitioned flat panel containing multiple individual detector strips and their own readouts. Both the beam oscillation and detector partition are along the superior-inferior (SI) direction. During data acquisition, at a given projection, the narrow beam sweep through the detector region, and different portions of the detector acquires projection data in synchrony with the narrow beam. ONB can be generated by a rotating slit collimator design with conventional tube with single focal spot, or by directly using a new source with multiple focal spots. A proof-of-principle study via Monte Carlo simulation is conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of ONB-CBCT. Results: As the beam becomes narrower, more and more scatter signals are eliminated. For the case with a bowtie filter and using 15 ONBs, the maximum and the average intensity error due to scatter are below 20 and 10 HU, respectively. Conclusion: ONB yields a narrowed exposure field at each snapshot and hence an inherently negligible scatter effect. Meanwhile, the individualized detector units guarantee high frame rate detection and hence a same large volume coverage as that in conventional CBCT. In summary, ONB-CBCT is a promising design to achieve high-quality CBCT imaging. This study is supported in part by NIH (1R01CA154747-01)

  12. Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Banded, epithermal quartz-adularia veins have produced about 1.5 million ounces of gold and 7 million ounces of silver from the Bodie mining district, eastern California. The...

  13. INFORMATION: Audit Report on The Office of Secure Transportation DC-9 Aircraft Refurbishment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-05-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Secure Transportation (OST) maintains a fleet of seven aircraft to transport sensitive items, equipment and security personnel. Based on increasing requirements for transporting components and security personnel, OST decided to add a heavy transport aircraft to meet the Department's weapons surety and emergency response missions. In 2004, as a replacement following the sale of a portion of its fleet, OST acquired a DC-9 cargo aircraft that had been excessed by the U.S. military. Prior to integrating the DC-9 into its fleet, NNSA ordered a refurbishment of the aircraft. This refurbishment project was to permit the aircraft to be certified to civil air standards so that it could transport passengers for site visits, training and other travel. The NNSA Service Center (Service Center) awarded a contract for the refurbishment of the aircraft in December 2004. In recent years, the Office of Inspector General has addressed a number of issues relating to the Department's aircraft management activities and services. As part of our ongoing review process and because of the national security importance of its fleet of aircraft, we conducted this review to determine whether OST had an effective and efficient aviation management program.

  14. A narrow window of Rabi frequency for competition between electromagnetically induced transparency and Raman absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Ray-Yuan; Fang, Wei-Chia; Lee, Ming-Tsung; He, Zong-Syun; Ke, Bai-Cian; Lee, Yi-Chi; Tsai, Chin-Chun

    2010-01-15

    This investigation clarifies the transition phenomenon between the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and Raman absorption in a ladder-type system of Doppler-broadened cesium vapor. A competition window of this transition was found to be as narrow as 2 MHz defined by the probe Rabi frequency. For a weak probe, the spectrum of EIT associated with quantum interference suggests that the effect of the Doppler velocity on the spectrum is negligible. When the Rabi frequency of the probe becomes comparable with the effective decay rate, an electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) dip emerges at the center of the power broadened EIT peak. While the Rabi frequency of the probe exceeds the effective decay rate, decoherence that is generated by the intensified probe field occurs and Raman absorption dominates the interaction process, yielding a pure absorption spectrum; the Doppler velocity plays an important role in the interaction. A theory that is based on density matrix simulation, with or without the Doppler effect, can qualitatively fit the experimental data. In this work, the coherence of atom-photon interactions is created or destroyed using the probe Rabi frequency as a decoherence source.

  15. Distributed seeding for narrow-line width hard x-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong; Anisimov, Petr Mikhaylovich; Buechler, Cynthia Eileen; Lewellen, IV, John W.; Marksteiner, Quinn R.

    2015-09-09

    We describe a new FEL line-narrowing technique called distributed seeding (DS), using Si(111) Bragg crystal monochromators to enhance the spectral brightness of the MaRIE hard X-ray freeelectron laser. DS differs from self-seeding in three important aspects. First, DS relies on spectral filtering of the radiation at multiple locations along the undulator, with a monochromator located every few power gain lengths. Second, DS performs filtering early in the exponential gain region before SASE spikes start to appear in the radiation longitudinal profile. Third, DS provides the option to select a wavelength longer than the peak of the SASE gain curve, which leads to improved spectral contrast of the seeded FEL over the SASE background. Timedependent Genesis simulations show the power-vs-z growth curves for DS exhibit behaviors of a seeded FEL amplifier, such as exponential growth region immediately after the filters. Of the seeding approaches considered, the two-stage DS spectra produce the highest contrast of seeded FEL over the SASE background and that the three-stage DS provides the narrowest linewidth with a relative spectral FWHM of 8 X 10-5 .

  16. Numerical simulation of supercritical heat transfer under severe axial density gradient in a narrow vertical tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bae, Y. Y.; Hong, S. D.; Kim, Y. W.

    2012-07-01

    A number of computational works have been performed so far for the simulation of heat transfer in a supercritical fluid. The simulations, however, faced a lot of difficulties when heat transfer deteriorates due either to buoyancy or by acceleration. When the bulk temperature approaches the pseudo-critical temperature the fluid experiences a severe axial density gradient on top of a severe radial one. Earlier numerical calculations showed, without exception, unrealistic over-predictions, as soon as the bulk temperature exceeded the pseudo-critical temperature. The over-predictions might have been resulted from an inapplicability of widely-used turbulence models. One of the major causes for the difficulties may probably be an assumption of a constant turbulent Prandtl number. Recent research, both numerical and experimental, indicates that the turbulent Prandtl number is never a constant when the gradient of physical properties is significant. This paper describes the applicability of a variable turbulent Prandtl number to the numerical simulation of heat transfer in supercritical fluids flowing in narrow vertical tubes. (authors)

  17. THE EXTENDED NARROW-LINE REGION OF TWO TYPE-I QUASI-STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oh, Semyeong; Woo, Jong-Hak; Bennert, Vardha N.; Jungwiert, Bruno; Leipski, Christian; Albrecht, Marcus E-mail: woo@astro.snu.ac.kr E-mail: bruno@ig.cas.cz E-mail: leipski@mpia-hd.mpg.de

    2013-04-20

    We investigate the narrow-line region (NLR) of two radio-quiet QSOs, PG1012+008 and PG1307+085, using high signal-to-noise spatially resolved long-slit spectra obtained with FORS1 at the Very Large Telescope. Although the emission is dominated by the point-spread function of the nuclear source, we are able to detect extended NLR emission out to several kiloparsec scales in both QSOs by subtracting the scaled central spectrum from outer spectra. In contrast to the nuclear spectrum, which shows a prominent blue wing and a broad line profile of the [O III] line, the extended emission reveals no clear signs of large-scale outflows. Exploiting the wide wavelength range, we determine the radial change of the gas properties in the NLR, i.e., gas temperature, density, and ionization parameter, and compare them with those of Seyfert galaxies and type-II QSOs. The QSOs have higher nuclear temperature and lower electron density than Seyferts, but show no significant difference compared to type-II QSOs, while the ionization parameter decreases with radial distance, similar to the case of Seyfert galaxies, For PG1012+008, we determine the stellar-velocity dispersion of the host galaxy. Combined with the black hole mass, we find that the luminous radio-quiet QSO follows the local M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation of active galactic nuclei.

  18. A FANAROFF-RILEY TYPE I CANDIDATE IN NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY Mrk 1239

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doi, Akihiro; Wajima, Kiyoaki; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Inoue, Makoto

    2015-01-10

    We report finding kiloparsec-scale radio emissions aligned with parsec-scale jet structures in the narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxy Mrk 1239 using the Very Large Array and the Very Long Baseline Array. Thus, this radio-quiet NLS1 has a jet-producing central engine driven by essentially the same mechanism as that of other radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Most of the radio luminosity is concentrated within 100 parsecs and overall radio morphology looks edge-darkened; the estimated jet kinetic power is comparable to Fanaroff-Riley Type I radio galaxies. The conversion from accretion to jet power appears to be highly inefficient in this highly accreting low-mass black hole system compared with that in a low-luminosity AGN with similar radio power driven by a sub-Eddington, high-mass black hole. Thus, Mrk 1239 is a crucial probe to the unexplored parameter spaces of central engines for a jet formation.

  19. Optic for industrial endoscope/borescope with narrow field of view and low distortion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stone, Gary F.; Trebes, James E.

    2005-08-16

    An optic for the imaging optics on the distal end of a flexible fiberoptic endoscope or rigid borescope inspection tool. The image coverage is over a narrow (<20 degrees) field of view with very low optical distortion (<5% pin cushion or barrel distortion), compared to the typical <20% distortion. The optic will permit non-contact surface roughness measurements using optical techniques. This optic will permit simultaneous collection of selected image plane data, which data can then be subsequently optically processed. The image analysis will yield non-contact surface topology data for inspection where access to the surface does not permit a mechanical styles profilometer verification of surface topology. The optic allows a very broad spectral band or range of optical inspection. It is capable of spectroscopic imaging and fluorescence induced imaging when a scanning illumination source is used. The total viewing angle for this optic is 10 degrees for the full field of view of 10 degrees, compared to 40-70 degrees full angle field of view of the conventional gradient index or GRIN's lens systems.

  20. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Release Commercial Aircraft Propulsion and Energy Systems Research: Reducing Global Carbon Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine releases the Commercial Aircraft Propulsion and Energy Systems Research: Reducing Global Carbon Emissions report, which focuses on large (single- and twin-aisle) planes that transport more than 100 people. These aircraft account for more than 90% of greenhouse gas emissions from all commercial aircraft.

  1. Results of the Triggered TROI Steam Explosion Experiments with a Narrow Interaction Vessel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, J.H.; Park, I.K.; Min, B.T.; Hong, S.W.; Hong, S.H.; Song, J.H.; Kim, H.D.

    2006-07-01

    The effect of the interaction vessel geometry has been studied on the energetics of a steam explosion in the TROI experiment. The interaction vessel was 30 cm in diameter (1-D geometry). Two types of corium composition were used as a melt. One was spontaneously non-explosive 80 : 20 corium (UO{sub 2} : ZrO{sub 2}) and the other was spontaneously explosive 70 : 30 eutectic corium. A test with 80 : 20 corium was carried out without an external triggering. Another test with 80 : 20 corium was also carried out with an external trigger. In addition, two tests with 70 : 30 corium were carried out with an external trigger. The external trigger was applied just before the contact between the melt and the bottom of the interaction vessel. This time was thought to be the triggering time of a spontaneous steam explosion. The external trigger was a chemical explosive of PETN 1.0 g. However, none of these tests led to steam explosions even with an external triggering. Since eutectic corium led to spontaneous or triggered steam explosions in a previous test using a 60 cm wide interaction vessel (3-D geometry), it is quite probable that a geometry effect of the interaction vessel could exist. The reason for no steam explosions in the narrow (1-D) interaction vessel is believed to be a relatively high void fraction in the vessel when compared with the 3-D vessel. Due to the high void fraction, a steam explosion could not propagate to the surroundings of the melt where the water was depleted. (authors)

  2. Developing a narrow-line laser spectrometer based on a tunable continuous-wave dye laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chun; Lv, Shasha; Bi, Jin; Liu, Fang; Li, Liufeng; Chen, Lisheng

    2014-08-15

    We present the development of a dye-laser-based spectrometer operating at 550–600 nm. The spectrometer will be used to detect an ultra-narrow clock transition ({sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0}) in an Ytterbium optical lattice clock and perform high-resolution spectroscopy of iodine molecules trapped in the sub-nanometer channels of zeolite crystal (AlPO{sub 4}-11). Two-stage Pound-Drever-Hall frequency stabilization is implemented on the tunable continuous-wave dye laser to obtain a reliable operation and provide stable laser radiations with two different spectral linewidths. In the first-stage frequency locking, a compact home-built intracavity electro-optic modulator is adopted for suppressing fast frequency noise. With an acquisition time of 0.1 s the 670-kHz linewidth of the free-running dye laser is reduced to 2 kHz when locked to a pre-stabilization optical cavity with a finesse of 1170. When the pre-stabilized laser is locked to a high-finesse optical cavity, a linewidth of 1.4 Hz (2 s) is observed and the frequency stability is 3.7 × 10{sup −15} (3 s). We also measure and analyze the individual noise contributions such as those from residual amplitude modulation and electronic noise. The ongoing upgrades include improving long-term frequency stability at time scales from 10 to 100 s and implementing continuous frequency scan across 10 GHz with radio-frequency precision.

  3. KILOPARSEC-SCALE JETS IN THREE RADIO-LOUD NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, Joseph L.; Lister, Matthew L.

    2015-02-10

    We have discovered kiloparsec-scale extended radio emission in three narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) in sub-arcsecond resolution 9 GHz images from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. We find all sources show two-sided, mildly core-dominated jet structures with diffuse lobes dominated by termination hotspots. These span 20–70 kpc with morphologies reminiscent of FR II radio galaxies, while the extended radio luminosities are intermediate between FR I and FR II sources. In two cases the structure is linear, while a 45° bend is apparent in the third. Very Long Baseline Array images at 7.6 GHz reveal parsec-scale jet structures, in two cases with extended structure aligned with the inner regions of the kiloparsec-scale jets. Based on this alignment, the ratio of the radio core–luminosity to the optical luminosity, the jet/counter-jet intensity and extension length ratios, and moderate core brightness temperatures (≲10{sup 10} K), we conclude these jets are mildly relativistic (β≲0.3, δ∼1−1.5) and aligned at moderately small angles to the line of sight (10–15°). The derived kinematic ages of ∼10{sup 6}–10{sup 7} yr are much younger than radio galaxies but comparable to other NLS1s. Our results increase the number of radio-loud NLS1s with known kiloparsec-scale extensions from 7 to 10 and suggest that such extended emission may be common, at least among the brightest of these sources.

  4. Fermi monitoring of radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paliya, Vaidehi S.; Stalin, C. S.; Ravikumar, C. D.

    2015-02-01

    We present detailed analysis of the γ-ray flux variability and spectral properties of the five radio-loud narrow line Seyfert 1 (RL-NLSy1) galaxies, detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, namely 1H 0323+342, SBS 0846+513, PMN J0948+0022, PKS 1502+036, and PKS 2004−447. The first three sources show significant flux variations, including the rapid variability of a few hours by 1H 0323+342. The average γ-ray spectrum of 1H 0323+342 and PMN J0948+0022 shows deviation from a simple power-law (PL) behavior, whereas the PL model gives a better fit for the other three sources. The spectra of 1H 0323+342, SBS 0846+513, and PMN J0948+0022, which are in low, flaring, and moderately active states, respectively, show significant curvature. Such curvature in the γ-ray spectrum of 1H 0323+342 and PMN J0948+0022 could be due to the emission region located inside the broad line region (BLR) where the primary mechanism of the γ-ray emission is inverse-Compton (IC) scattering of BLR photons occurring in the Klein–Nishina regime. The γ-ray emission of SBS 0846+513 is explained by IC scattering of dusty torus photons, which puts the emission region outside the BLR and thus under the Thomson regime. Therefore, the observed curvature of SBS 0846+513 could be intrinsic to the particle energy distribution. The presence of curvature in the γ-ray spectrum and flux variability amplitudes of some of the RL-NLSy1 galaxies suggests that these sources could be akin to low/moderate jet power flat spectrum radio quasars.

  5. A Comprehensive Program for Measurement of Military Aircraft Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Mengdawn

    2009-11-01

    Emissions of gases and particulate matter by military aircraft were characterized inplume by 'extractive' and 'optical remote-sensing (ORS)' technologies. Non-volatile particle size distribution, number and mass concentrations were measured with good precision and reproducibly. Time-integrated particulate filter samples were collected and analyzed for smoke number, elemental composition, carbon contents, and sulfate. Observed at EEP the geometric mean diameter (as measured by the mobility diameter) generally increased as the engine power setting increased, which is consistent with downstream observations. The modal diameters at the downstream locations are larger than that at EEP at the same engine power level. The results indicate that engine particles were processed by condensation, for example, leading to particle growth in-plume. Elemental analysis indicated little metals were present in the exhaust, while most of the exhaust materials in the particulate phase were carbon and sulfate (in the JP-8 fuel). CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, HCHO, ethylene, acetylene, propylene, and alkanes were measured. The last five species were most noticeable under engine idle condition. The levels of hydrocarbons emitted at high engine power level were generally below the detection limits. ORS techniques yielded real-time gaseous measurement, but the same techniques could not be extended directly to ultrafine particles found in all engine exhausts. The results validated sampling methodology and measurement techniques used for non-volatile particulate aircraft emissions, which also highlighted the needs for further research on sampling and measurement for volatile particulate matter and semi-volatile species in the engine exhaust especially at the low engine power setting.

  6. Development and validation of bonded composite doubler repairs for commercial aircraft.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2007-07-01

    A typical aircraft can experience over 2,000 fatigue cycles (cabin pressurizations) and even greater flight hours in a single year. An unavoidable by-product of aircraft use is that crack, impact, and corrosion flaws develop throughout the aircraft's skin and substructure elements. Economic barriers to the purchase of new aircraft have placed even greater demands on efficient and safe repair methods. The use of bonded composite doublers offers the airframe manufacturers and aircraft maintenance facilities a cost effective method to safely extend the lives of their aircraft. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is now possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. The FAA's Airworthiness Assurance Center at Sandia National Labs (AANC), Boeing, and Federal Express completed a pilot program to validate and introduce composite doubler repair technology to the U.S. commercial aircraft industry. This project focused on repair of DC-10 fuselage structure and its primary goal was to demonstrate routine use of this repair technology using niche applications that streamline the design-to-installation process. As composite doubler repairs gradually appear in the commercial aircraft arena, successful flight operation data is being accumulated. These commercial aircraft repairs are not only demonstrating the engineering and economic advantages of composite doubler technology but they are also establishing the ability of commercial maintenance depots to safely adopt this repair technique. This report presents the array of engineering activities that were completed in order to make this technology available for widespread commercial aircraft use. Focused laboratory testing was conducted to compliment the field data and to address specific issues regarding damage tolerance and flaw growth in composite doubler repairs. Fatigue and strength tests were performed on a simulated wing repair using a

  7. Proceedings of the International Workshop on inspection and evaluation of aging aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Economics is the key issue in a discussion on the inspection of aging aircraft. The airline industry has taken heavy losses resulting in layoffs and bankruptcies in recent years. Improving air service to customers is the ultimate reason for conducting research on the effects of aging on aircraft, but cost must be taken into account for the effective implementation of inspection programs. These papers present state of the art research to predict, detect, define, and correct the effects of age and usage on the metals and materials used in construction of aircraft and powerplants. Individual papers are abstracted separately.

  8. Proceedings of the International Workshop on inspection and evaluation of aging aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Economics is the key issue in a discussion on the inspection of aging aircraft. The airline industry has taken heavy losses resulting in layoffs and bankruptcies in recent years. Improving air service to customers is the ultimate reason for conducting research on the effects of aging on aircraft, but cost must be taken into account for the effective implementation of inspection programs. These papers present state of the art research to predict, detect, define, and correct the effects of age and usage on the metals and materials used in construction of aircraft and powerplants. Individual papers are abstracted separately.

  9. DOD-DOE Aircraft Petroleum Use Reduction Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOD-DOE Aircraft Petroleum Use Reduction Workshop DOD-DOE Aircraft Petroleum Use Reduction Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Office and the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) held a workshop on September 30, 2010, in Washington, DC, to discuss the potential for fuel cells to reduce aircraft petroleum use. Workshop objectives were to discuss collaboration across DOD and DOE in keeping with the DOD-DOE Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), to motivate RD&D for

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Northrup Aircraft Co Inc - CA 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Northrup Aircraft Co Inc - CA 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NORTHRUP AIRCRAFT CO., INC (CA.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Hawthorne , California CA.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CA.0-02-1 CA.0-02-2 Site Operations: Participated in projects involving nuclear energy for the propulsion of aircraft. CA.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - No Authority - NRC licensed CA.0-02-1 CA.0-02-2 Radioactive Materials

  11. METHOD OF MAKING REFRACTORY BODIES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andersen, J.C.

    1960-05-31

    A method is given for the manufacture of silicon carbide bodies that are characterized by high density, high purity, and superior resistance to oxidative deterioration. Dense silicon bodies are obtained by a process in which granular silicon carbide, a carbonizable material, and a carbonaceous material are mixed together, the mixture is shaped as desired, and then the shape is fired in the presence of more than the stoichiometric amount of silicon. The carbonizable material preferably includes a temporary binder that is set before the firing step to hold the mix in shape for firing.

  12. The microstructural mechanism of electromigration failure in narrow interconnects of Al alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Choongun

    1993-04-01

    This thesis reports a study of the mechanism of electromigration failure in Al-2Cu-1Si thin-film conducting lines on Si. Samples were patterned from 0.5 {mu}m thick vapor-deposited films with various mean grain sizes (G), and had lines widths (W) of 1.3, 2, 4 and 6 {mu}m. The lines were aged at various conditions to change the Cu-precipitate distribution and were tested to failure at T = 225{degrees}C and j = 2.5 {times} 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2}. Some samples were tested over a range of substrate temperatures, current densities and current reversal times. Aging produces an initially dense distribution of metastable {Theta}{prime} (Al{sub 2}Cu; coherent) in the grain interiors, with stable {Theta} (Al{sub 2}Cu; incoherent) at the grain boundaries. The intragranular {theta}{prime} is gradually absorbed into the grain boundary precipitates. In the wide lines the mean time to failure increases slowly and monotonically with pre-aging time and current reversal time. The failure mode is the formation and coalescence of voids that form on grain boundaries with an apparent activation energy of 0.65 eV. In the narrow lines, the lines failed by a transgranular-slit mechanism with an activation energy near 0.93 eV. The distribution of the polygranular segments and the kinetics of failure varies with the linewidths. Failure occurs after Cu has been swept from the grains that fail. Pre-aging the line to create a more stable distribution of Cu significantly increases the time to failure. When the density of intragranular {Theta}-phase precipitates is maximized, the transgranular-slit failure mechanism is suppressed, and the bamboo grain fails by diffuse thinning to rupture. The results from the current reversal test indicate that the time to sweep Cu in the polygranular segments is longer for longer polygranular segments. Thus the time to first failure in an array of lines is much longer than predicted by a log-normal fit to the distribution of failure times.

  13. Development of stable, narrow spectral line-width, fiber delivered laser source for spin exchange optical pumping

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Bo; Tong, Xin; Jiang, Chenyang; Brown, Daniel R.; Robertson, Lee

    2015-06-05

    In this study, we developed a stable, narrow spectral line-width, fiber delivered laser source for spin exchange optical pumping. An optimized external cavity equipped with an off-the-shelf volume holographic grating narrowed the spectral line-width of a 100 W high-power diode laser and stabilized the laser spectrum. The laser spectrum showed a high side mode suppression ratio of >30 dB and good long-term stability (center wavelength drifting within ±0.002 nm during 220 h of operation). Finally, our laser is delivered by a multimode fiber with power ~70 W, center wavelength of 794.77 nm, and spectral bandwidth of ~0.12 nm.

  14. Holder for rotating glass body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kolleck, Floyd W.

    1978-04-04

    A device is provided for holding and centering a rotating glass body such as a rod or tube. The device includes a tubular tip holder which may be held in a lathe chuck. The device can utilize a variety of centering tips each adapted for a particular configuration, such as a glass O-ring joint or semi-ball joint.

  15. Narrowing of the coherent population trapping resonance under zone pumping in cells with different characteristics of the wall coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazakov, G A; Litvinov, A N; Matisov, B G [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-02-28

    It is shown that when coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance is excited by a narrow laser beam, the presence of elastic collisions with the cell wall significantly affects the line shape of the CPT-resonance. We have constructed a theoretical model, which is based on averaging over the random Ramsey sequences of the atom dwell time in the beam and dark zones and takes into account the probability of elastic bounce of an atom from the wall.

  16. The enlargement of high reflectance range in ultra-narrow bandpass filter with disordered one-dimensional photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Guibin, E-mail: gbchen@hytc.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Chemistry of Low Dimensional Material, Huaiyin Normal University, Jiangsu 223300 (China); State Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Electron, and Ion Beams, School of Physics, Optoelectronic Technology and College of Advanced Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Yu, Haichun [Department of Physics and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Chemistry of Low Dimensional Material, Huaiyin Normal University, Jiangsu 223300 (China)

    2014-01-21

    The conventional ultra-narrow bandpass filter structure has only a very limited width of high-reflectance range. This study, by introducing disorder into one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal, attempts to enlarge the width of high-reflectance range while keeping the ultra-narrow bandpass. Enlargement by 46.8% was obtained after theoretical design. Since this structure contains some degree of disorder already, it has a strong tolerance of the variation of layer thicknesses. Unlike studies using conventional periodic structures, theoretical statistical results in this study demonstrate that high quality remains even after allowing for 5% variation of layer thicknesses. This indicates that only a very low thickness control precision is required in the future and the production difficulty is immensely lowered. To put the construction to test, a structure has been developed and demonstrated by a magnetron reactive sputtering coating system, which agrees with the theoretical result very well. By introducing disorder into the periodic 1D photonic crystal structure, the high-reflectance range is significantly extended by 37%, with an ultra-narrow pass band of 0.8?nm and intensity of 82%.

  17. Further Evolution of Composite Doubler Aircraft Repairs Through a Focus on Niche Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROACH,DENNIS P.

    2000-07-15

    The number of commercial airframes exceeding twenty years of service continues to grow. A typical aircraft can experience over 2,000 fatigue cycles (cabin pressurizations) and even greater flight hours in a single year. An unavoidable by-product of aircraft use is that crack and corrosion flaws develop throughout the aircraft's skin and substructure elements. Economic barriers to the purchase of new aircraft have created an aging aircraft fleet and placed even greater demands on efficient and safe repair methods. The use of bonded composite doublers offers the airframe manufacturers and aircraft maintenance facilities a cost effective method to safety extend the lives of their aircraft. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is now possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. The FAA's Airworthiness Assurance Center at Sandia National Labs (AANC) is conducting a program with Boeing and Federal Express to validate and introduce composite doubler repair technology to the US commercial aircraft industry. This project focuses on repair of DC-10 structure and builds on the foundation of the successful L-1011 door corner repair that was completed by the AANC, Lockheed-Martin, and Delta Air Lines. The L-1011 composite doubler repair was installed in 1997 and has not developed any flaws in over three years of service, As a follow-on effort, this DC-1O repair program investigated design, analysis, performance (durability, flaw containment, reliability), installation, and nondestructive inspection issues. Current activities are demonstrating regular use of composite doubler repairs on commercial aircraft. The primary goal of this program is to move the technology into niche applications and to streamline the design-to-installation process. Using the data accumulated to date, the team has designed, analyzed, and developed inspection techniques for an array of composite doubler repairs

  18. Numerical simulations of a vertical tail of a commercial aircraft with

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    active flow control | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility simulations of a vertical tail of a commercial aircraft with active flow control Authors: Rasquin, M., Martin, J., Jansen, K. A series of numerical simulations of a realistic vertical tail of a commercial aircraft, with a tapered swept stabilizer and a rudder, is considered in this work with application of flow control. Flow control is known to have the capacity to augment the streamwise momentum near the rudder suction peak where

  19. Fuel dispersal modeling for aircraft-runway impact scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tieszen, S.R.

    1995-11-01

    A fuel dispersal model for C-141 transport accidents was developed for the Defense Nuclear Agency`s Fuel Fire Technology Base Program to support Weapon System Safety Assessments. The spectrum of accidents resulting from aircraft impact on a runway was divided into three fuel dispersal regimes: low, intermediate, and high-velocity impact. Sufficient data existed in the accident, crash test, and fuel-filled bomb literature to support development of a qualitative framework for dispersal models, but not quantitative models for all regimes. Therefore, a test series at intermediate scale was conducted to generate data on which to base the model for the high-velocity regime. Tests were conducted over an impact velocity range from 12 m/s to 91 m/s and angles of impact from 22.5{degrees} to 67.5{degrees}. Dependent variables were area covered by dispersed fuel, amount of mass in that area, and location of the area relative to the impact line. Test results showed that no liquid pooling occurred for impact velocities greater than 61 m/s, independent of the angle of impact. Some pooling did occur at lower velocities, but in no test was the liquid-layer thickness greater than 5.25 mm.

  20. Data development technical support document for the aircraft crash risk analysis methodology (ACRAM) standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, C.Y.; Glaser, R.E.; Mensing, R.W.; Lin, T.; Haley, T.A.; Barto, A.B.; Stutzke, M.A.

    1996-08-01

    The Aircraft Crash Risk Analysis Methodology (ACRAM) Panel has been formed by the US Department of Energy Office of Defense Programs (DOE/DP) for the purpose of developing a standard methodology for determining the risk from aircraft crashes onto DOE ground facilities. In order to accomplish this goal, the ACRAM panel has been divided into four teams, the data development team, the model evaluation team, the structural analysis team, and the consequence team. Each team, consisting of at least one member of the ACRAM plus additional DOE and DOE contractor personnel, specializes in the development of the methodology assigned to that team. This report documents the work performed by the data development team and provides the technical basis for the data used by the ACRAM Standard for determining the aircraft crash frequency. This report should be used to provide the generic data needed to calculate the aircraft crash frequency into the facility under consideration as part of the process for determining the aircraft crash risk to ground facilities as given by the DOE Standard Aircraft Crash Risk Assessment Methodology (ACRAM). Some broad guidance is presented on how to obtain the needed site-specific and facility specific data but this data is not provided by this document.

  1. Five-body Moshinsky brackets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Shuyuan; Mu, Xueli; Deng, Zhixuan; Chen, Hong

    2015-04-15

    In variational calculations with harmonic oscillator wavefunctions as trial bases, the transformation coefficients that relate harmonic oscillator wavefunctions in two different sets of internal coordinates are convenient to the evaluation of some matrix elements. Here, we present the explicit expression of these transformation coefficients for five-body systems. These transformation coefficients can be collected in a matrix according to the quantum number N of harmonic oscillator shell and can be programmed for arbitrary N. .

  2. Observation of a narrow structure in 1 H( γ , KS0 ) X via interference with φ -meson production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amaryan, M. J.; Gavalian, G.; Nepali, C.; Polyakov, M. V.; Azimov, Ya.; Briscoe, W. J.; Dodge, G. E.; Hyde, C. E.; Klein, F.; Kuznetsov, V.; et al

    2012-03-01

    We report observation of a narrow peak structure at ≈1.54 GeV with a Gaussian width σ = 6 MeV in the missing mass of KS in the reaction γ + p → pKSKL. The observed structure may be due to the interference between a strange (or antistrange) baryon resonance in the pKL system and the φ(KSKL) photoproduction leading to the same final state. The statistical significance of the observed excess of events estimated as the log-likelihood ratio of the resonant signal + background hypothesis and the φ-production-based background-only hypothesis corresponds to 5.3σ.

  3. Resonant loop mirror with narrow-band reflections and its application in single-frequency fiber lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paschotta, R.; Brinck, D.J.; Farwell, S.G.; Hanna, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    We present a new form of loop mirror (to be realized with all-fiber or integrated optics technology) that can produce narrow-band reflections and could find an application in single-frequency fiber lasers, allowing for a standing-wave design with a long doped section and eliminating the need for a Faraday isolator or a fiber grating. We discuss the main features of such a loop mirror and present experimental results that agree well with the theory. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  4. Observation of coherently enhanced tunable narrow-band terahertz transition radiation from a relativistic sub-picosecond electron bunch train

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Piot, P.; Sun, Y. -E; Maxwell, T. J.; Ruan, J.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Rihaoui, M. M.; Thurman-Keup, R.

    2011-06-27

    We experimentally demonstrate the production of narrow-band (?f/f ~ =20% at f ~ = 0.5 THz) THz transition radiation with tunable frequency over [0.37, 0.86] THz. The radiation is produced as a train of sub-picosecond relativistic electron bunches transits at the vacuum-aluminum interface of an aluminum converter screen. We also show a possible application of modulated beams to extend the dynamical range of a popular bunch length diagnostic technique based on the spectral analysis of coherent radiation.

  5. Observation of a narrow structure in 1H(?,KS0)X via interference with phi-meson production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amaryan, M J; Nepali, C; Polyakov, M V; Azimov, Ya; Briscoe, W J; Dodge, G E; Hyde, C E; Klein, F; Kuznetsov, V; Strakovsky, I

    2012-03-21

    We report observation of a narrow peak structure at ?1.54 GeV with a Gaussian width ? = 6 MeV in the missing mass of KS in the reaction ? + p ? pKSKL. The observed structure may be due to the interference between a strange (or antistrange) baryon resonance in the pKL system and the ?(KSKL) photoproduction leading to the same final state. The statistical significance of the observed excess of events estimated as the log-likelihood ratio of the resonant signal + background hypothesis and the ?-production-based background-only hypothesis corresponds to 5.3?.

  6. Become an SEP Verification Body

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™) establishes a high standard in energy management and performance, and SEP certification validates your commitment to energy efficiency by verifying your achieved energy performance improvement using an ANSI-ANAB Accredited Verification body. This third-party verification provides independent confirmation of energy performance achievements and commitment to managing energy use. Currently, SEP is the only national certification program offering this level of rigor and credibility to industrial facilities through accredited third-party verification of sustained energy performance improvements.

  7. Metal stub and ceramic body electrode assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rolf, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    An electrically conductive ceramic electrode body having an opening therein is threadably engaged with a metal stub having at least a slot therein to provide space for expansion of the stub without damage to the electrode body.

  8. Metal stub and ceramic body electrode assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rolf, R.L.

    1984-05-22

    An electrically conductive ceramic electrode body having an opening therein is threadably engaged with a metal stub having at least a slot therein to provide space for expansion of the stub without damage to the electrode body. 3 figs.

  9. Development of an ultrasonic pulse-echo (UPE) technique for aircraft icing studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yang; Hu, Hui; Chen, Wen-Li; Bond, Leonard J.

    2014-02-18

    Aircraft operating in some cold weather conditions face the risk of icing. Icing poses a threat to flight safety and its management is expensive. Removing light frost on a clear day from a medium-size business jet can cost $300, heavy wet snow removal can cost $3,000 and removal of accumulated frozen/freezing rain can cost close to $10,000. Understanding conditions that lead to severe icing events is important and challenging. When an aircraft or rotorcraft flies in a cold climate, some of the super cooled droplets impinging on exposed aircraft surfaces may flow along the surface prior to freezing and give various forms and shapes of ice. The runback behavior of a water film on an aircraft affects the morphology of ice accretion and the rate of formation. In this study, we report the recent progress to develop an Ultrasonic Pulse-Echo (UPE) technique to provide real-time thickness distribution measurements of surface water flows driven by boundary layer airflows for aircraft icing studies. A series of initial experimental investigations are conducted in an ice wind tunnel employing an array of ultrasonic transducers placed underneath the surface of a flat plate. The water runback behavior on the plate is evaluated by measuring the thickness profile variation of the water film along the surface by using the UPE technique under various wind speed and flow rate conditions.

  10. Energy and emissions saving potential of additive manufacturing: the case of lightweight aircraft components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Runze; Riddle, Matthew; Graziano, Diane; Warren, Joshua; Das, Sujit; Nimbalkar, Sachin; Cresko, Joe; Masanet, Eric

    2015-05-08

    Additive manufacturing (AM) holds great potential for improving materials efficiency, reducing life-cycle impacts, and enabling greater engineering functionality compared to conventional manufacturing (CM) processes. For these reasons, AM has been adopted by a growing number of aircraft component manufacturers to achieve more lightweight, cost-effective designs. This study estimates the net changes in life-cycle primary energy and greenhouse gas emissions associated with AM technologies for lightweight metallic aircraft components through the year 2050, to shed light on the environmental benefits of a shift from CM to AM processes in the U.S. aircraft industry. A systems modeling framework is presented, with integrates engineering criteria, life-cycle environmental data, and aircraft fleet stock and fuel use models under different AM adoption scenarios. Estimated fleetwide life-cycle primary energy savings in a rapid adoption scenario reach 70-174 million GJ/year in 2050, with cumulative savings of 1.2-2.8 billion GJ. Associated cumulative emission reduction potentials of CO2e were estimated at 92.8-217.4 million metric tons. About 95% of the savings is attributed to airplane fuel consumption reductions due to lightweighting. In addition, about 4050 tons aluminum, 7600 tons titanium and 8100 tons of nickel alloys could be saved per year in 2050. The results indicate a significant role of AM technologies in helping society meet its long-term energy use and GHG emissions reduction goals, and highlight barriers and opportunities for AM adoption for the aircraft industry.

  11. Ion cascade acceleration from the interaction of a relativistic femtosecond laser pulse with a narrow thin target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He Feng; Xu Han; Tian Youwei; Yu Wei; Lu Peixiang; Li Ruxin

    2006-07-15

    Particle-in-cell simulations are performed to study the acceleration of ions due to the interaction of a relativistic femtosecond laser pulse with a narrow thin target. The numerical results show that ions can be accelerated in a cascade by two electrostatic fields if the width of the target is smaller than the laser beam waist. The first field is formed in front of the target by the central part of the laser beam, which pushes the electron layer inward. The major part of the abaxial laser energy propagates along the edges to the rear side of the target and pulls out some hot electrons from the edges of the target, which form another electrostatic field at the rear side of the target. The ions from the front surface are accelerated stepwise by these two electrostatic fields to high energies at the rear side of the target. The simulations show that the largest ion energy gain for a narrow target is about four times higher than in the case of a wide target.

  12. Multiwavelength Monitoring of the Enigmatic Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 PMN J0948 0022 in March-July 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R. Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E. Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T.H.; Caliandro, G.A.; /more authors..

    2012-03-29

    Following the recent discovery of {gamma} rays from the radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy PMN J0948+0022 (z = 0.5846), we started a multiwavelength campaign from radio to {gamma} rays, which was carried out between the end of 2009 March and the beginning of July. The source displayed activity at all the observed wavelengths: a general decreasing trend from optical to {gamma}-ray frequencies was followed by an increase of radio emission after less than two months from the peak of the {gamma}-ray emission. The largest flux change, about a factor of about 4, occurred in the X-ray band. The smallest was at ultraviolet and near-infrared frequencies, where the rate of the detected photons dropped by a factor 1.6-1.9. At optical wavelengths, where the sampling rate was the highest, it was possible to observe day scale variability, with flux variations up to a factor of about 3. The behavior of PMN J0948+0022 observed in this campaign and the calculated power carried out by its jet in the form of protons, electrons, radiation, and magnetic field are quite similar to that of blazars, specifically of flat-spectrum radio quasars. These results confirm the idea that radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies host relativistic jets with power similar to that of average blazars.

  13. Uniformly dense polymeric foam body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whinnery, Jr., Leroy

    2003-07-15

    A method for providing a uniformly dense polymer foam body having a density between about 0.013 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.5 g/cm.sup.3 is disclosed. The method utilizes a thermally expandable polymer microsphere material wherein some of the microspheres are unexpanded and some are only partially expanded. It is shown that by mixing the two types of materials in appropriate ratios to achieve the desired bulk final density, filling a mold with this mixture so as to displace all or essentially all of the internal volume of the mold, heating the mold for a predetermined interval at a temperature above about 130.degree. C., and then cooling the mold to a temperature below 80.degree. C. the molded part achieves a bulk density which varies by less then about .+-.6% everywhere throughout the part volume.

  14. METHOD OF MAKING FUEL BODIES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goeddel, W.V.; Simnad, M.T.

    1962-04-24

    An improved method of making a fuel body containing carbon for reactors is described. Carbides of uranium and thorium having a particle size of from 100 to 500 microns are mixed with carbon having a particle size that will pass a 200 mesh screen but be retained by a 325 mesh screen, and 10 per cent by weight pitch. The mixture is heated to a temperature of about 700 to 900 deg C, at which point bonding is effected while maintaining it under mechanical pressure of over 3,000 pounds per square inch. The entire compact is heated to a uniform temperature during the process, preferably by electrical resistance of the compact itself. (AEC)

  15. First-principles study of direct and narrow band gap semiconducting β -CuGaO2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2015-04-16

    Semiconducting oxides have attracted much attention due to their great stability in air or water and the abundance of oxygen. Recent success in synthesizing a metastable phase of CuGaO2 with direct narrow band gap opens up new applications of semiconducting oxides as absorber layer for photovoltaics. Using first-principles density functional theory calculations, we investigate the thermodynamic and mechanical stabilities as well as the structural and electronic properties of the β-CuGaO2 phase. Our calculations show that the β-CuGaO2 structure is dynamically and mechanically stable. The energy band gap is confirmed to be direct at the Γ point of Brillouin zone. Inmore » conclusion, the optical absorption occurs right at the band gap edge and the density of states near the valance band maximum is large, inducing an intense absorption of light as observed in experiment.« less

  16. A precise narrow-beam filter infrared radiometer and its use with lidar in the ARM Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, C.M.R.

    1992-05-01

    The first six months of the grant (December 1991--May 1992) have been taken up with the design and specification for the new narrow-beam radiometer. The radiometer will be built and tested at the Division of Atmospheric Research over the next three months. Improved algorithms for obtaining cloud extinction have also been developed. It is proposed during 1993 to use the radiometer in conjunction with a new CSIRO 3-wavelength lidar in the ARM PROBE experiment at Kavieng, New Guinea, which is a test mission under tropical conditions for the ARM CART Tropical West Pacific site, and is part of the TOGA COARE experiment. During the latter part of 1992, the radiometer will be tested thoroughly and tested at the Division of Atmospheric Research, Aspendale.

  17. Numerical simulations of the bending of narrow-angle-tail radio jets by ram pressure or pressure gradients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soker, N.; Sarazin, C.L.; O'Dea, C.P.

    1988-04-01

    Three-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations are used to study the bending of radio jets. The simulations are compared with observations of jets in narrow-angle-tail radio sources. Two mechanisms for the observed bending are considered: direct bending of quasi-continuous jets by ram pressure from intergalactic gas and bending by pressure gradients in the interstellar gas of the host galaxy, the pressure gradients themselves being the result of ram pressure by intergalactic gas. It is shown that the pressure gradients are much less effective in bending jets, implying that the jets have roughly 30 times lower momentum fluxes if they are bent by this mechanism. Ram-pressure bending produces jets with kidney-shaped cross sections; when observed from the side, these jets appear to have diffuse extensions on the downstream side. On the other hand, pressure-gradient bending causes the jets to be densest near their upstream side. 31 references.

  18. B2 0800+24 - a narrow-angle tail radio galaxy in a small group of galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stocke, J.T.; Burns, J.O.

    1987-08-01

    The environments of three asymmetric sources (B2 0800+24, NGC 4410a/b, and B2 1553+24) are studied in detail. Because the morphology of B2 0800+24 most clearly resembles the narrow-angle tails (NATs) found in clusters, this source is used to study the apparent conflict between the head-tail morphology and the low ram pressure present in a small group environment. If the jets in the NATs are ram-pressure confined, then lateral expansion of the jets in poor groups makes them easier to bend (this was observed for B2 0800+24). It is concluded that NAT morphology may be common both in rich clusters and in poor groups. 56 references.

  19. Modeling of In-stream Tidal Energy Development and its Potential Effects in Tacoma Narrows, Washington, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2014-10-01

    Understanding and providing proactive information on the potential for tidal energy projects to cause changes to the physical system and to key water quality constituents in tidal waters is a necessary and cost-effective means to avoid costly regulatory involvement and late stage surprises in the permitting process. This paper presents a modeling study for evaluating the tidal energy extraction and its potential impacts on the marine environment in a real world site - Tacoma Narrows of Puget Sound, Washington State, USA. An unstructured-grid coastal ocean model, fitted with a module that simulates tidal energy devices, was applied to simulate the tidal energy extracted by different turbine array configurations and the potential effects of the extraction at local and system-wide scales in Tacoma Narrows and South Puget Sound. Model results demonstrated the advantage of an unstructured-grid model for simulating the far-field effects of tidal energy extraction in a large model domain, as well as assessing the near-field effect using a fine grid resolution near the tidal turbines. The outcome shows that a realistic near-term deployment scenario extracts a very small fraction of the total tidal energy in the system and that system wide environmental effects are not likely; however, near-field effects on the flow field and bed shear stress in the area of tidal turbine farm are more likely. Model results also indicate that from a practical standpoint, hydrodynamic or water quality effects are not likely to be the limiting factor for development of large commercial-scale tidal farms. Results indicate that very high numbers of turbines are required to significantly alter the tidal system; limitations on marine space or other environmental concerns are likely to be reached before reaching these deployment levels. These findings show that important information obtained from numerical modeling can be used to inform regulatory and policy processes for tidal energy development.

  20. ATHENA, the Desktop Human "Body"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iyer, Rashi; Harris, Jennifer

    2014-09-29

    Creating surrogate human organs, coupled with insights from highly sensitive mass spectrometry technologies, a new project is on the brink of revolutionizing the way we screen new drugs and toxic agents. ATHENA, the Advanced Tissue-engineered Human Ectypal Network Analyzer project team, is developing four human organ constructs - liver, heart, lung and kidney - that are based on a significantly miniaturized platform. Each organ component will be about the size of a smartphone screen, and the whole ATHENA "body" of interconnected organs would fit neatly on a desk. "By developing this 'homo minutus,' we are stepping beyond the need for animal or Petri dish testing: There are huge benefits in developing drug and toxicity analysis systems that can mimic the response of actual human organs," said Rashi Iyer, a senior scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the lead laboratory on the five-year, $19 million multi-institutional effort. The project is supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). Some 40 percent of pharmaceuticals fail their clinical trials, Iyer noted, and there are thousands of chemicals whose effects on humans are simply unknown. Providing a realistic, cost-effective and rapid screening system such as ATHENA with high-throughput capabilities could provide major benefits to the medical field, screening more accurately and offering a greater chance of clinical trial success.

  1. ATHENA, the Desktop Human "Body"

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Iyer, Rashi; Harris, Jennifer

    2015-01-05

    Creating surrogate human organs, coupled with insights from highly sensitive mass spectrometry technologies, a new project is on the brink of revolutionizing the way we screen new drugs and toxic agents. ATHENA, the Advanced Tissue-engineered Human Ectypal Network Analyzer project team, is developing four human organ constructs - liver, heart, lung and kidney - that are based on a significantly miniaturized platform. Each organ component will be about the size of a smartphone screen, and the whole ATHENA "body" of interconnected organs would fit neatly on a desk. "By developing this 'homo minutus,' we are stepping beyond the need for animal or Petri dish testing: There are huge benefits in developing drug and toxicity analysis systems that can mimic the response of actual human organs," said Rashi Iyer, a senior scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the lead laboratory on the five-year, $19 million multi-institutional effort. The project is supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). Some 40 percent of pharmaceuticals fail their clinical trials, Iyer noted, and there are thousands of chemicals whose effects on humans are simply unknown. Providing a realistic, cost-effective and rapid screening system such as ATHENA with high-throughput capabilities could provide major benefits to the medical field, screening more accurately and offering a greater chance of clinical trial success.

  2. body energy | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    body energy Home No Battery Wearables Description: Wearable IT and communication devices that don't require a battery. This group is for discussion about innovations in wearable...

  3. Method of producing .beta.-spodumene bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chyung, Kenneth; Day, J. Paul; Holleran, Louis M.; Olszewski, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    Beta-spodumene bodies and method of preparing the bodies that involves providing a uniform plastic batch of inorganic raw materials, organic binder, and vehicle, wherein the inorganic raw materials are composed of, in percent by weight, about 75% to 95% minerals, and about 5% to 25% glass. The batch is formed into a green body that is fired to produce a body composed substantially of beta-spodumene, and having a thermal expansion coefficient of <10.times.10.sup.-7 /.degree.C.(0-800.degree. C.), and a strength of .gtoreq.4 Ksi.

  4. Full-Scale Structural and NDI Validation Tests of Bonded Composite Doublers for Commercial Aircraft Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

    1999-02-01

    Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. Most of the concerns surrounding composite doubler technology pertain to long-term survivability, especially in the presence of non-optimum installations, and the validation of appropriate inspection procedures. This report focuses on a series of full-scale structural and nondestructive inspection (NDI) tests that were conducted to investigate the performance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Full-scale tests were conducted on fuselage panels cut from retired aircraft. These full-scale tests studied stress reductions, crack mitigation, and load transfer capabilities of composite doublers using simulated flight conditions of cabin pressure and axial stress. Also, structures which modeled key aspects of aircraft structure repairs were subjected to extreme tension, shear and bending loads to examine the composite laminate's resistance to disbond and delamination flaws. Several of the structures were loaded to failure in order to determine doubler design margins. Nondestructive inspections were conducted throughout the test series in order to validate appropriate techniques on actual aircraft structure. The test results showed that a properly designed and installed composite doubler is able to enhance fatigue life, transfer load away from damaged structure, and avoid the introduction of new stress risers (i.e. eliminate global reduction in the fatigue life of the structure). Comparisons with test data obtained prior to the doubler installation revealed that stresses in the parent material can be reduced 30%--60% through the use of the composite doubler. Tests to failure demonstrated that the bondline is able to transfer plastic strains into the doubler and that the

  5. Energy and emissions saving potential of additive manufacturing: the case of lightweight aircraft components

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Runze; Riddle, Matthew; Graziano, Diane; Warren, Joshua; Das, Sujit; Nimbalkar, Sachin; Cresko, Joe; Masanet, Eric

    2015-05-08

    Additive manufacturing (AM) holds great potential for improving materials efficiency, reducing life-cycle impacts, and enabling greater engineering functionality compared to conventional manufacturing (CM) processes. For these reasons, AM has been adopted by a growing number of aircraft component manufacturers to achieve more lightweight, cost-effective designs. This study estimates the net changes in life-cycle primary energy and greenhouse gas emissions associated with AM technologies for lightweight metallic aircraft components through the year 2050, to shed light on the environmental benefits of a shift from CM to AM processes in the U.S. aircraft industry. A systems modeling framework is presented, with integratesmore » engineering criteria, life-cycle environmental data, and aircraft fleet stock and fuel use models under different AM adoption scenarios. Estimated fleetwide life-cycle primary energy savings in a rapid adoption scenario reach 70-174 million GJ/year in 2050, with cumulative savings of 1.2-2.8 billion GJ. Associated cumulative emission reduction potentials of CO2e were estimated at 92.8-217.4 million metric tons. About 95% of the savings is attributed to airplane fuel consumption reductions due to lightweighting. In addition, about 4050 tons aluminum, 7600 tons titanium and 8100 tons of nickel alloys could be saved per year in 2050. The results indicate a significant role of AM technologies in helping society meet its long-term energy use and GHG emissions reduction goals, and highlight barriers and opportunities for AM adoption for the aircraft industry.« less

  6. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

  7. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milewski, John O.; Sklar, Edward

    1998-01-01

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  8. Maintaining ideal body weight counseling sessions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brammer, S.H.

    1980-10-09

    The purpose of this program is to provide employees with the motivation, knowledge and skills necessary to maintain ideal body weight throughout life. The target audience for this program, which is conducted in an industrial setting, is the employee 40 years of age or younger who is at or near his/her ideal body weight.

  9. Suppression of roll-off characteristics of organic light-emitting diodes by narrowing current injection/transport area to 50?nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayashi, Kyohei Inoue, Munetomo; Yoshida, Kou; Nakanotani, Hajime; Mikhnenko, Oleksandr; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen E-mail: adachi@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Adachi, Chihaya E-mail: adachi@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2015-03-02

    Using e-beam nanolithography, the current injection/transport area in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) was confined into a narrow linear structure with a minimum width of 50?nm. This caused suppression of Joule heating and partial separation of polarons and excitons, so the charge density where the electroluminescent efficiency decays to the half of the initial value (J{sub 0}) was significantly improved. A device with a narrow current injection width of 50?nm exhibited a J{sub 0} that was almost two orders of magnitude higher compared with that of the unpatterned OLED.

  10. Toward Photochemical Water Splitting Using Band-Gap-Narrowed Semiconductors and Transition-Metal Based Molecular Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muckerman,J.T.; Rodriguez, J.A.; Fujita, E.

    2009-06-07

    We are carrying out coordinated theoretical and experimental studies of toward photochemical water splitting using band-gap-narrowed semiconductors (BGNSCs) with attached multi-electron molecular water oxidation and hydrogen production catalysts. We focus on the coupling between the materials properties and the H{sub 2}O redox chemistry, with an emphasis on attaining a fundamental understanding of the individual elementary steps in the following four processes: (1) Light-harvesting and charge-separation of stable oxide or oxide-derived semiconductors for solar-driven water splitting, including the discovery and characterization of the behavior of such materials at the aqueous interface; (2) The catalysis of the four-electron water oxidation by dinuclear hydroxo transition-metal complexes with quinonoid ligands, and the rational search for improved catalysts; (3) Transfer of the design principles learned from the elucidation of the DuBois-type hydrogenase model catalysts in acetonitrile to the rational design of two-electron hydrogen production catalysts for aqueous solution; (4) Combining these three elements to examine the function of oxidation catalysts on BGNSC photoanode surfaces and hydrogen production catalysts on cathode surfaces at the aqueous interface to understand the challenges to the efficient coupling of the materials functions.

  11. Optical and ultraviolet observations of the narrow-lined type Ia SN 2012fr in NGC 1365

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ju-Jia; Bai, Jin-Ming; Wang, Bo; Liu, Zheng-Wei [Yunnan Observatories (YNAO), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Wang, Xiao-Feng; Zhao, Xu-Lin; Chen, Jun-Cheng [Physics Department and Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics (THCA), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Tian-Meng, E-mail: jujia@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: baijinming@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: wang_xf@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Extensive optical and ultraviolet (UV) observations of the type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2012fr are presented in this paper. It has a relatively high luminosity, with an absolute B-band peak magnitude of about 19.5 mag and a smaller post-maximum decline rate than normal SNe Ia (e.g., ?m {sub 15}(B) =0.85 0.05 mag). Based on the UV and optical light curves, we derived that a {sup 56}Ni mass of about 0.88 M {sub ?} was synthesized in the explosion. The earlier spectra are characterized by noticeable high-velocity features of Si II ?6355 and Ca II with velocities in the range of ?22, 000-25, 000 km s{sup 1}. At around the maximum light, these spectral features are dominated by the photospheric components which are noticeably narrower than normal SNe Ia. The post-maximum velocity of the photosphere remains almost constant at ?12,000 km s{sup 1} for about one month, reminiscent of the behavior of some luminous SNe Ia like SN 1991T. We propose that SN 2012fr may represent a subset of the SN 1991T-like SNe Ia viewed in a direction with a clumpy or shell-like structure of ejecta, in terms of a significant level of polarization reported in Maund et al. in 2013.

  12. Empirical determination of the energy band gap narrowing in p{sup +} silicon heavily doped with boron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Di Cuevas, Andres

    2014-11-21

    In the analysis of highly doped silicon, energy band gap narrowing (BGN) and degeneracy effects may be accounted for separately, as a net BGN in conjunction with Fermi-Dirac statistics, or lumped together in an apparent BGN used with Boltzmann statistics. This paper presents an experimental study of silicon highly doped with boron, with the aim of evaluating the applicability of previously reported BGN models. Different boron diffusions covering a broad range of dopant densities were prepared, and their characteristic recombination current parameters J{sub 0} were measured using a contactless photoconductance technique. The BGN was subsequently extracted by matching theoretical simulations of carrier transport and recombination in each of the boron diffused regions and the measured J{sub 0} values. An evaluation of two different minority carrier mobility models indicates that their impact on the extraction of the BGN is relatively small. After considering possible uncertainties, it can be concluded that the BGN is slightly larger in p{sup +} silicon than in n{sup +} silicon, in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions by Schenk. Nevertheless, in quantitative terms that theoretical model is found to slightly underestimate the BGN in p{sup +} silicon. With the two different parameterizations derived in this paper for the BGN in p{sup +} silicon, both statistical approaches, Boltzmann and Fermi-Dirac, provide a good agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Method of Making Uranium Dioxide Bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilhelm, H. A.; McClusky, J. K.

    1973-09-25

    Sintered uranium dioxide bodies having controlled density are produced from U.sub.3 O.sub.8 and carbon by varying the mole ratio of carbon to U.sub.3 O.sub.8 in the mixture, which is compressed and sintered in a neutral or slightly oxidizing atmosphere to form dense slightly hyperstoichiometric uranium dioxide bodies. If the bodies are to be used as nuclear reactor fuel, they are subsequently heated in a hydrogen atmosphere to achieve stoichiometry. This method can also be used to produce fuel elements of uranium dioxide -- plutonium dioxide having controlled density.

  14. A miniature powerplant for very small, very long range autonomous aircraft. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tad McGeer

    1999-09-29

    The authors have developed a new piston engine offering unprecedented efficiency for a new generation of miniature robotic aircraft. Following Phase 1 preliminary design in 1996--97, they have gone forward in Phase 2 to complete detail design, and are nearing completion of a first batch of ten engines. A small-engine dynamometer facility has been built in preparation for the test program. Provisions have been included for supercharging, which will allow operation at ceilings in the 10,000 m range. Component tests and detailed analysis indicate that the engine will achieve brake-specific fuel consumption well below 300 gm/kWh at power levels of several hundred watts. This level of performance opens the door to development of tabletop-sized aircraft having transpacific range and multi-day endurance, which will offer extraordinary new capabilities for meteorology, geomagnetic, and a variety of applications in environmental monitoring and military operations.

  15. Machining of Aircraft Titanium with Abrasive-Waterjets for Fatigue Critical Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H. T.; Hovanski, Yuri; Dahl, Michael E.

    2012-02-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the fatigue performance of abrasive-waterjet- (AWJ-) machined aircraft titanium. Dog-bone specimens machined with AWJs were prepared and tested with and without sanding and dry-grit blasting with Al2O3 as secondary processes. The secondary processes were applied to remove the visual appearance of AWJ-generated striations and to clean up the garnet embedment. The fatigue performance of AWJ-machined specimens was compared with baseline specimens machined with CNC milling. Fatigue test results of the titanium specimens not only confirmed our previous findings in aluminum dog-bone specimens but in comparison also further enhanced the fatigue performance of the titanium. In addition, titanium is known to be difficult to cut, particularly for thick parts, however AWJs cut the material 34% faster han stainless steel. AWJ cutting and dry-grit blasting are shown to be a preferred ombination for processing aircraft titanium that is fatigue critical.

  16. Comparison of coating alternatives for US Coast Guard aircraft. Final report for April 1993-August 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, D.J.; Spadafora, S.J.

    1994-12-12

    Current coatings used on U.S. Coast Guard aircraft contain high volatile organic compound (VOC) contents. Federal, state, and local environmental agencies restrict the amount of VOCs from the use of these materials through legislation such as the Clean Air Act and local Air Quality Management District Rules. At the request of the Coast Guard, the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division Warminster investigated several low VOC candidate replacements to the current paint scheme. The physical performance properties of these materials (i.e. corrosion resistance, adhesion, etc.) were characterized using standard coatings tests. The results of this program show that there are several acceptable alternatives. Replacement of current coating systems would reduce the total amount of hazardous materials emitted from Coast Guard painting operations and eliminate the need for expensive control equipment which will be required by the Clean Air Act (resulting in substantial future cost savings).

  17. RACORO Extended-Term Aircraft Observations of Boundary-Layer Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogelmann, A. M.; McFarquhar, Greg; Ogren, John A.; Turner, David D.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Feingold, G.; Long, Charles N.; Jonsson, Haf; Bucholtz, Anthony; Collins, Donald R.; Diskin, G. S.; Gerber, H.; Lawson, Paul; Woods, Roy; Andrews, Elizabeth; Yang, Hee-Jung; Chiu, Christine J.; Hartsock, Daniel; Hubbe, John M.; Lo, Chaomei; Marshak, A.; Monroe, Justin; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Toto, Tami

    2012-06-30

    A first-of-a-kind, extended-term cloud aircraft campaign was conducted to obtain an in-situ statistical characterization of boundary-layer clouds needed to investigate cloud processes and refine retrieval algorithms. Coordinated by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility (AAF), the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign operated over the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site from 22 January to 30 June 2009, collecting 260 h of data during 59 research flights. A comprehensive payload aboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft measured cloud microphysics, solar and thermal radiation, aerosol properties, and atmospheric state parameters. Proximity to the SGP's extensive complement of surface measurements provides ancillary data that supports modeling studies and enables evaluating a variety of surface retrieval algorithms. The five-month duration enabled sampling a range of conditions associated with the seasonal transition from winter to summer. Although about two-thirds of the cloud flights occurred in May and June, boundary-layer cloud fields were sampled under a variety of environmental and aerosol conditions, with about 75% of the flights occurring in cumulus and stratocumulus. Preliminary analyses show how these data are being used to analyze cloud-aerosol relationships, determine the aerosol sizes that are responsible for nucleating cloud drops, characterize the horizontal variability of the cloud radiative impacts, and evaluate air-borne and surface-based cloud property retrievals. We discuss how conducting an extended-term campaign requires a simplified operating paradigm that is different from that used for typical, short-term, intensive aircraft field programs.

  18. Simulation of lightning attachment to open ground, tall towers and aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratnamahilan, P.; Hoole, P. . Dept. of Electrical and Telecommunications Engineering); Ratnajeevan, S.; Hoole, H. . Dept. of Engineering)

    1993-04-01

    The characteristics of lightning waveforms are important in taking protective measures against it. However, many of these characteristics cannot be measured. This paper employs a mathematical model of lightning currents to write a software package to simulate all manner of lightning flashes. The capabilities available to us through this are demonstrated by extracting the behavior of lightning waveforms following attachment to open ground, tall towers and aircraft.

  19. Development and validation of nondestructive inspection techniques for composite doubler repairs on commercial aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

    1998-05-01

    Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single boron-epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. In order for the use of composite doublers to achieve widespread use in the civil aviation industry, it is imperative that methods be developed which can quickly and reliably assess the integrity of the doubler. In this study, a specific composite application was chosen on an L-1011 aircraft in order to focus the tasks on application and operation issues. Primary among inspection requirements for these doublers is the identification of disbonds, between the composite laminate and aluminum parent material, and delaminations in the composite laminate. Surveillance of cracks or corrosion in the parent aluminum material beneath the doubler is also a concern. No single nondestructive inspection (NDI) method can inspect for every flaw type, therefore it is important to be aware of available NDI techniques and to properly address their capabilities and limitations. A series of NDI tests were conducted on laboratory test structures and on full-scale aircraft fuselage sections. Specific challenges, unique to bonded composite doubler applications, were highlighted. An array of conventional and advanced NDI techniques were evaluated. Flaw detection sensitivity studies were conducted on applicable eddy current, ultrasonic, X-ray and thermography based devices. The application of these NDI techniques to composite doublers and the results from test specimens, which were loaded to provide a changing flaw profile, are presented in this report. It was found that a team of these techniques can identify flaws in composite doubler installations well before they reach critical size.

  20. Realistic Probability Estimates For Destructive Overpressure Events In Heated Center Wing Tanks Of Commercial Jet Aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvares, N; Lambert, H

    2007-02-07

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) identified 17 accidents that may have resulted from fuel tank explosions on commercial aircraft from 1959 to 2001. Seven events involved JP 4 or JP 4/Jet A mixtures that are no longer used for commercial aircraft fuel. The remaining 10 events involved Jet A or Jet A1 fuels that are in current use by the commercial aircraft industry. Four fuel tank explosions occurred in center wing tanks (CWTs) where on-board appliances can potentially transfer heat to the tank. These tanks are designated as ''Heated Center Wing Tanks'' (HCWT). Since 1996, the FAA has significantly increased the rate at which it has mandated airworthiness directives (ADs) directed at elimination of ignition sources. This effort includes the adoption, in 2001, of Special Federal Aviation Regulation 88 of 14 CFR part 21 (SFAR 88 ''Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance Evaluation Requirements''). This paper addresses SFAR 88 effectiveness in reducing HCWT ignition source probability. Our statistical analysis, relating the occurrence of both on-ground and in-flight HCWT explosions to the cumulative flight hours of commercial passenger aircraft containing HCWT's reveals that the best estimate of HCWT explosion rate is 1 explosion in 1.4 x 10{sup 8} flight hours. Based on an analysis of SFAR 88 by Sandia National Laboratories and our independent analysis, SFAR 88 reduces current risk of historical HCWT explosion by at least a factor of 10, thus meeting an FAA risk criteria of 1 accident in billion flight hours. This paper also surveys and analyzes parameters for Jet A fuel ignition in HCWT's. Because of the paucity of in-flight HCWT explosions, we conclude that the intersection of the parameters necessary and sufficient to result in an HCWT explosion with sufficient overpressure to rupture the HCWT is extremely rare.

  1. Sonic IR crack detection of aircraft turbine engine blades with multi-frequency ultrasound excitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ding; Han, Xiaoyan; Newaz, Golam

    2014-02-18

    Effectively and accurately detecting cracks or defects in critical engine components, such as turbine engine blades, is very important for aircraft safety. Sonic Infrared (IR) Imaging is such a technology with great potential for these applications. This technology combines ultrasound excitation and IR imaging to identify cracks and flaws in targets. In general, failure of engine components, such as blades, begins with tiny cracks. Since the attenuation of the ultrasound wave propagation in turbine engine blades is small, the efficiency of crack detection in turbine engine blades can be quite high. The authors at Wayne State University have been developing the technology as a reliable tool for the future field use in aircraft engines and engine parts. One part of the development is to use finite element modeling to assist our understanding of effects of different parameters on crack heating while experimentally hard to achieve. The development has been focused with single frequency ultrasound excitation and some results have been presented in a previous conference. We are currently working on multi-frequency excitation models. The study will provide results and insights of the efficiency of different frequency excitation sources to foster the development of the technology for crack detection in aircraft engine components.

  2. Techniques for Intravascular Foreign Body Retrieval

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodhouse, Joe B.; Uberoi, Raman

    2013-08-01

    As endovascular therapies increase in frequency, the incidence of lost or embolized foreign bodies is increasing. The presence of an intravascular foreign body (IFB) is well recognized to have the potential to cause serious complications. IFB can embolize and impact critical sites such as the heart, with subsequent significant morbidity or mortality. Intravascular foreign bodies most commonly result from embolized central line fragments, but they can originate from many sources, both iatrogenic and noniatrogenic. The percutaneous approach in removing an IFB is widely perceived as the best way to retrieve endovascular foreign bodies. This minimally invasive approach has a high success rate with a low associated morbidity, and it avoids the complications related to open surgical approaches. We examined the characteristics, causes, and incidence of endovascular embolizations and reviewed the various described techniques that have been used to facilitate subsequent explantation of such materials.

  3. RECOVERY OF VALUABLE MATERIAL FROM GRAPHITE BODIES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fromm, L.W. Jr.

    1959-09-01

    An electrolytic process for recovering uranium from a graphite fuel element is described. The uraniumcontaining graphite body is disposed as the anode of a cell containing a nitric acid electrolyte and a 5 amp/cm/sup 2/ current passed to induce a progressive disintegration of the graphite body. The dissolved uranium is quickly and easily separated from the resulting graphite particles by simple mechanical means, such as centrifugation, filtration, and decontamination.

  4. The annual probability of an aircraft crash on the US Department of Energy reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seigler, R.S.; Luttrell, L.J.

    1992-11-01

    Aircraft hazards were evaluated to determine the total annual probability of an aircraft crash occurring at any structure located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This report documents the use of an accepted methodology for calculating the probability of an aircraft crash as applied to the three Oak Ridge plant sites including the adjoining facilities. Based on the data contained herein, the evaluation concluded that the probability of an aircraft crash occurrence at a single facility is generally considered ``not credible`` as defined in DOE/OR-901. Additionally, reevaluation of probabilities would be necessary if significant changes were made to local air traffic. The probability of an aircraft crash could increase as a result of the opening of any new airport or heliport in the vicinity; a greater volume of air traffic from McGhee Tyson airport in Knoxville, should the airport status change from feeder airport to hub airport; the rerouting of commercial and/or military flights at the McGhee Tyson airport; and finally, a change in direction or the addition of a federal airway. At one time, DOE planned to establish a zone of prohibited airspace over the Y-12 plant; if the plans are enacted in the future, the probability of an aircraft crash at the Y-12 plant could decrease. Pilots since have been voluntarily requested not to fly below 3000 feet over the Y-12 plant. Also, the Federal Aviation Administration plans to reroute air traffic in the spring of 1993 on federal airway V16. However, the section of V16 which traverses the three plant sites and five adjoining facilities will not be altered. If this plan is implemented, the air traffic over the Oak Ridge facilities would not be affected significantly, and the probability of an aircraft crash as determined herein would be unchanged.

  5. Aircraft gas-turbine engines: Noise reduction and vibration control. (Latest citations from Information Services in Mechanical Engineering data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design and analysis of aircraft gas turbine engines with respect to noise and vibration control. Included are studies regarding the measurement and reduction of noise at its source, within the aircraft, and on the ground. Inlet, nozzle and core aerodynamic studies are cited. Propfan, turbofan, turboprop engines, and applications in short take-off and landing (STOL) aircraft are included. (Contains a minimum of 202 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. {ital In} {ital situ} x-ray diffraction analysis of the C49--C54 titanium silicide phase transformation in narrow lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, R.A.; Clevenger, L.A.; Cabral, C. Jr.; Saenger, K.L.; Brauer, S.; Jordan-Sweet, J.; Bucchignano, J.; Stephenson, G.B.; Morales, G.; Ludwig, K.F. Jr.

    1995-04-03

    The transformation of titanium silicide from the C49 to the C54 structure was studied using x-ray diffraction of samples containing arrays of narrow lines of preformed C49 TiSi{sub 2}. Using a synchrotron x-ray source, diffraction patterns were collected at 1.5--2 {degree}C intervals during sample heating at rates of 3 or 20 {degree}C/s to temperatures of 1000--1100 {degree}C. The results show a monotonic increase in the C54 transition temperature by as much as 180 {degree}C with a decreasing linewidth from 1.0 to 0.1 {mu}m. Also observed is a monotonic increase in (040) preferred orientation of the C54 phase with decreasing linewidth. The results demonstrate the power of {ital in} {ital situ} x-ray diffraction of narrow line arrays as a tool to study finite size effects in thin-film reactions.

  7. REDUCTION OF THE MOMENTUM OF FALLING BODIES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kendall, J.W.; Morrison, I.H.

    1954-09-21

    A means for catching free falling bodies that may be damaged upon impact is given. Several layers of floating gas-filled rubber balls are contained within a partially compartmented tank of liquid. The compartment extends from beneath the surface of the liquid to that height necessary to contain the desired number of layers of the balls. The balls and the liquid itself break the force of the fall by absorbing the kinetic energy of falling body. The body may then be retrieved from the floor of the tank by a rake that extends from outside of the tank through the free surface area and underneath the compartment wall. This arrangement is particularly useful in collecting irradiated atomic fuel rods that are discharged from a reactor at considerable height without damaging the thin aluminum jacket of the rods.

  8. Joining of porous silicon carbide bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bates, Carl H.; Couhig, John T.; Pelletier, Paul J.

    1990-05-01

    A method of joining two porous bodies of silicon carbide is disclosed. It entails utilizing an aqueous slip of a similar silicon carbide as was used to form the porous bodies, including the sintering aids, and a binder to initially join the porous bodies together. Then the composite structure is subjected to cold isostatic pressing to form a joint having good handling strength. Then the composite structure is subjected to pressureless sintering to form the final strong bond. Optionally, after the sintering the structure is subjected to hot isostatic pressing to further improve the joint and densify the structure. The result is a composite structure in which the joint is almost indistinguishable from the silicon carbide pieces which it joins.

  9. Electronic unit integrated into a flexible polymer body (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electronic unit integrated into a flexible polymer body Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electronic unit integrated into a flexible polymer body A peel and stick ...

  10. Network for ab initio Many-body Methods: Development, Education...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Miguel Morales is Prinicipal Investigator on Network for ab initio Many-body Methods: Development, Education and Training. Network for ab initio Many-body Methods: Development,...

  11. ATHENA desktop human "body" reduces need for animal drug tests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATHENA desktop human "body" ATHENA desktop human "body" reduces need for animal drug tests ATHENA project team is developing four human organ constructs that are based on a ...

  12. METHOD OF MAKING METAL BONDED CARBON BODIES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goeddel, W.V.; Simnad, M.T.

    1961-09-26

    A method of producing carbon bodies having high structural strength and low permeability is described. The method comprises mixing less than 10 wt.% of a diffusional bonding material selected from the group consisting of zirconium, niobium, molybdenum, titanium, nickel, chromium, silicon, and decomposable compounds thereof with finely divided particles of carbon or graphite. While being maintained at a mechanical pressure over 3,000 psi, the mixture is then heated uniformly to a temperature of 1500 deg C or higher, usually for less than one hour. The resulting carbon bodies have a low diffusion constant, high dimensional stability, and high mechanical strength.

  13. Anaerobic treatment of aircraft de-icing agent using the SNC-LAVALIN Multiplate Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulligan, C.; Chebib, J.; Safi, B.

    1997-12-31

    A system for the anaerobic treatment of aircraft de-icing agent has been developed by SNC Research Corp., a subsidiary of the SNC-LAVALIN Group (Montreal, Canada). The de-icing agent used in the evaluation contains 54% ethylene glycol, 46% water and trace additives such as surfactants and colorants. The process is comprised of a buffer tank and the SNC-LAVALIN Multiplate Reactor and is as follows. The effluent containing the aircraft de-icing agent with ethylene glycol as the major component enters the buffer tank where the temperature and pH adjustment and the addition of nutrients takes place. The water is then sent to the SNC-LAVALIN Multiplate Reactor. Here, the de-icing agent is converted to biogas which contains 80% methane and the liquid effluent which is essentially ethylene glycol free is discharged. The biogas can be either burned in a flare or used for heating purposes. The following results are typical for the aircraft de-icing agent: Greater than 90% total COD and 99% ethylene glycol removal at an organic load of 15 kg COD/m{sup 3}-day. The de-icing agent can be collected and subsequently treated on-site using the SNC-LAVALIN system. The advantages of the SNC-LAVALIN system are low capital and operating costs, possibility of treating a wide range of de-icing agent concentrations and other liquid effluents unlike evaporation processes, potential recuperation of the biogas and a gentle technology for the environment without generation of VOCs.

  14. Assessment of methodologies for analysis of the dungeness B accidental aircraft crash risk.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2010-09-01

    The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has requested Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to review the aircraft crash methodology for nuclear facilities that are being used in the United Kingdom (UK). The scope of the work included a review of one method utilized in the UK for assessing the potential for accidental airplane crashes into nuclear facilities (Task 1) and a comparison of the UK methodology against similar International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), United States (US) Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) methods (Task 2). Based on the conclusions from Tasks 1 and 2, an additional Task 3 would provide an assessment of a site-specific crash frequency for the Dungeness B facility using one of the other methodologies. This report documents the results of Task 2. The comparison of the different methods was performed for the three primary contributors to aircraft crash risk at the Dungeness B site: airfield related crashes, crashes below airways, and background crashes. The methods and data specified in each methodology were compared for each of these risk contributors, differences in the methodologies were identified, and the importance of these differences was qualitatively and quantitatively assessed. The bases for each of the methods and the data used were considered in this assessment process. A comparison of the treatment of the consequences of the aircraft crashes was not included in this assessment because the frequency of crashes into critical structures is currently low based on the existing Dungeness B assessment. Although the comparison found substantial differences between the UK and the three alternative methodologies (IAEA, NRC, and DOE) this assessment concludes that use of any of these alternative methodologies would not change the conclusions reached for the Dungeness B site. Performance of Task 3 is thus not recommended.

  15. Method for producing microporous metal bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Danko, Joseph C.

    1982-01-01

    Tungsten is vapor-deposited by hydrogen reduction of tungsten hexafluoride (WF.sub.6) to produce a tungsten body having from 40 to 100 ppm fluorine. The tungsten is then heated under vacuum to produce grain boundary porosity for a sufficient period of time to allow the pores along the grain boundaries to become interconnected.

  16. METHOD OF JACKETING A FISSIONABLE BODY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creutz, E.C.

    1960-02-16

    A method for jacketing fuel elements is described. A fissionablc body ts fitted into a steel jacket, and a steel rimmed closure disk is inserted into the open end of the jacket. The jacket is then drawn through a die, aind the rim of the disk is welded to the jacket to form an impervious seal.

  17. An intercomparison of aircraft instrumentation for tropospheric measurements of sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, G.L.; Davis, D.D.; Beltz, N.; Bandy, A.R.; Ferek, R.J.; Thornton, D.C. [NASA, Langely Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)]|[Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)]|[J.W. Goethe Univ., Frankfurt (Germany)]|[Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)]|[Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    As part of the NASA Tropospheric Chemistry Program, a series of field intercomparisons have been conducted to evaluate the state-of-the art for measuring key tropospheric species. One of the objectives of the third intercomparison campaign in this series, Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation 3 (CITE 3), was to evaluate instrumentation for making reliable tropospheric aircraft measurements of sulfur dioxide, dimethyl sulfide, hydrogen sulfide, carbon disulfide, and carbonyl sulfide. This paper reports the results of the intercomparisons of five sulfur dioxide measurement methods ranging from filter techniques, in which samples collected in flight are returned to the laboratory for analyses (chemiluminescent or ion chromatographic), to near real-time, in-flight measurements via gas chromatographic, mass spectrometric, and chemiluminescent techniques. All techniques showed some tendency to track sizeable changes in ambient SO2 such as those associated with altitude changes. For SO2 mixing ratios in the range of 200 pptv to a few ppbv, agreement among the techniques varies from about 30% to several orders of magnitude, depending upon the pair of measurements intercompared. For SO2 mixing ratios less than 200 pptv, measurements from the techniques are uncorrelated. In general, observed differences in the measurement of standards do not account for the flight results. The CITE 3 results do not unambiguously identify one or more of the measurement techniques as providing valid or invalid SO2 measurements, but identify the range of `potential` uncertainty in SO2 measurements reported by currently available instrumentation and as measured under realistic aircraft environments.

  18. Numerical description of cavitation on axisymmetric bodies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickox, C.E.; Hailey, C.E.; Wolfe, W.P.; Watts, H.A.; Gross, R.J.; Ingber, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on ongoing studies which are directed toward the development of predictive techniques for the modeling of steady cavitation on axisymmetric bodies. The primary goal of the modeling effort is the prediction of cavity shape and pressure distribution from which forces and moments can be calculated. Here we present an overview of the modeling techniques developed and compare predictions with experimental data obtained from water tunnel tests for both limited and supercavitation. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Observation of a narrow mass state decaying into ?(1S)+? in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.

    2012-08-15

    Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.3 fb?, we observe a narrow mass state decaying into ?(1S)+?, where the ?(1S) meson is detected by its decay into a pair of oppositely charged muons, and the photon is identified through its conversion into an electron-positron pair. The significance of this observation is 5.6 standard deviations. The mass of the state is centered at 10.5510.014(stat)0.017(syst) GeV/c, which is consistent with that of the state recently observed by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  20. Observation of a narrow mass state decaying into Υ(1S)+γ in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; et al

    2012-08-15

    Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.3 fb⁻¹, we observe a narrow mass state decaying into Υ(1S)+γ, where the Υ(1S) meson is detected by its decay into a pair of oppositely charged muons, and the photon is identified through its conversion into an electron-positron pair. The significance of this observation is 5.6 standard deviations. The mass of the state is centered at 10.551±0.014(stat)±0.017(syst) GeV/c², which is consistent with that of the state recently observed by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  1. High pressure annular two-phase flow in a narrow duct. Part 1: Local measurements in the droplet field, and Part 2: Three-field modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trabold, T.A.; Kumar, R.

    1999-07-01

    In Part 1, detailed measurements were made in a high pressure, adiabatic (boiled at the inlet) annular flow in a narrow, high aspect ratio duct using a gamma densitometer, hot-film anemometer and high-speed video photography. Measurements of void fraction, droplet frequency, velocity, drop size, and interfacial area concentration have been made to support the three field computational capability. An important aspect of this testing is the use of a modeling fluid (R-134a) in a vertical duct which permits visual access in annular flow. This modeling fluid accurately simulates the low liquid-to-vapor density ratio of steam-water flows at high pressures. These measurements have been taken in a narrow duct of hydraulic diameter 4.85 mm, and a cross-section aspect ratio of 22.5. However, the flow displays profiles of various shapes not only in the narrow dimension, but also in the width dimension. In particular, the shape of the droplet profiles depends on the entrained droplet flux from the edges in the vapor core. The average diameter from these profiles compare well with the models developed in the literature. Interfacial area concentration for these low density ratio flows is higher than the highest concentration reported for air-water flows. Video records show that along with the bow-shaped waves, three-dimensional {lambda}-shaped waves appear in annular flows for high flow rates. Part 2 outlines the development of a three-field modeling approach in annular flow and the predictive capability of an analysis code. Models have been developed here or adapted from the literature for the thin film near the wall as well as the droplets in the vapor core, and have been locally applied in a fully developed, two-phase adiabatic boiling annular flow in a duct heated at the inlet at high pressure. Numerical results have been obtained using these models that are required for the closure of the continuity and momentum equations. The two-dimensional predictions are compared with

  2. RACORO long-term, systematic aircraft observations of boundary layer clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogelmann, A.M.; McFarquhar, G.; Ogren, J.; Turner, D. D.; Comstock, J. M.; Feingold, G.; Long, C. N.; Jonsson, H. H.; Bucholtz, A.; Collins, D. R.; Diskin, G.; Gerber, H.; Lawson, R. P.; Woods, R. K.; Hubbe, J.; Tomlinson, J.; Schmid, B.

    2010-06-27

    Our knowledge of boundary layer cloud processes is insufficient to resolve pressing scientific problems. Boundary layer clouds often have liquid-water paths (LWPs) less than 100 gm{sup 2}, which are defined here as being 'thin' Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD). This type of cloud is common globally, and the Earth's radiative energy balance is particularly sensitive to small changes in their optical properties. However, it is difficult to retrieve accurately their cloud properties via remote sensing because they are tenuous and often occur in partly cloudy skies. This interferes with our ability to obtain the routine, long-term statistics needed to improve their representation in climate models. To address this problem, in-situ data are needed to investigate cloud processes and to evaluate and refine existing retrieval algorithms. Coordinated by the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF), the Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign conducted long-term, systematic flights in boundary layer, liquid-water clouds over the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site between 22 January and 30 June 2009. This was the first time that a long-term aircraft campaign was undertaken for systematic in-situ sampling of cloud properties. Using the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft equipped with a comprehensive set of instruments to measure solar and thermal radiation, cloud microphysics, aerosol properties and atmospheric state, the RACORO team logged an unprecedented 59 flights and 259 research hours above the SGP site. Data gathered during the RACORO campaign will provide researchers with a statistically relevant data set of boundary-layer cloud and aerosol properties for future study. These data can be used to validate retrieval algorithms and support process studies and model simulations of boundary layer clouds and, in particular, CLOWD-type clouds. In addition to cloud observations, complementary clear-sky flight patterns were conducted to map the surface

  3. Surface reflectance retrieval from satellite and aircraft sensors: Results of sensor and algorithm comparisons during FIFE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markham, B.L. ); Halthore, R.N.; Goetz, S.J. )

    1992-11-30

    This work is part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), an international land-surface-atmosphere experiment aimed at improving the way climate models represent energy, water, heat, and carbon exchanges, and improving the utilization of satellite based remote sensing to monitor such parameters. This paper reports on comparison of measurement systems which were deployed to measure surface reflectance factors, from aircraft or satellites. These instruments look over the general range of 0.4 to 2.5[mu]m. Instruments studied include Landsat 5 thematic mapper (TM), the SPOT 1 high-resolution visible sensor (HRV) 1, the NS001 thematic mapper simulator, and the modular multispectral radiometers (MMRs). The study looked at the radiometric consistency of the different instruments, and the adequacy of the atmospheric correction routines applied to data analysis.

  4. Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft Using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whyatt, Greg A.; Chick, Lawrence A.

    2012-04-01

    This report examines the potential for Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to provide electrical generation on-board commercial aircraft. Unlike a turbine-based auxiliary power unit (APU) a solid oxide fuel cell power unit (SOFCPU) would be more efficient than using the main engine generators to generate electricity and would operate continuously during flight. The focus of this study is on more-electric aircraft which minimize bleed air extraction from the engines and instead use electrical power obtained from generators driven by the main engines to satisfy all major loads. The increased electrical generation increases the potential fuel savings obtainable through more efficient electrical generation using a SOFCPU. However, the weight added to the aircraft by the SOFCPU impacts the main engine fuel consumption which reduces the potential fuel savings. To investigate these relationships the Boeing 787­8 was used as a case study. The potential performance of the SOFCPU was determined by coupling flowsheet modeling using ChemCAD software with a stack performance algorithm. For a given stack operating condition (cell voltage, anode utilization, stack pressure, target cell exit temperature), ChemCAD software was used to determine the cathode air rate to provide stack thermal balance, the heat exchanger duties, the gross power output for a given fuel rate, the parasitic power for the anode recycle blower and net power obtained from (or required by) the compressor/expander. The SOFC is based on the Gen4 Delphi planar SOFC with assumed modifications to tailor it to this application. The size of the stack needed to satisfy the specified condition was assessed using an empirically-based algorithm. The algorithm predicts stack power density based on the pressure, inlet temperature, cell voltage and anode and cathode inlet flows and compositions. The algorithm was developed by enhancing a model for a well-established material set operating at atmospheric pressure to reflect the

  5. A nondestructive test for aircraft Halon bottles, the development of an acoustic emission application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beattie, A.G.

    1996-12-01

    An acoustic emission test for aircraft Halon bottles has been developed in response to a need expressed by the US Airline Industry. During this development many choices had to be made about test methods, procedures and analysis techniques. This paper discusses these choices and how successful they were. The test itself was designed to replace the currently required hydrostatic test for these bottles. The necessary load is applied by heating the sealed bottles. Acoustic emission is monitored, during the heating, by six sensors held in position by a special fixture. A prototype of the test apparatus was constructed and used in two commercial Halon bottle repair and test facilities. Results to date indicate that about 97% of the bottles tested show no indications of flaws. The other 3% have had indications of possible flaws in non-critical areas of the bottles. All bottles tested to date have passed the hydrostatic test subsequent to the acoustic emission test.

  6. Department management of the Ross Aviation, Inc. , contract aircraft major spare parts inventory, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-07-26

    The purpose of this audit was to determine whether the Department of Energy's (Department) management of its contract with Ross Aviation, Inc. (Ross) provided reasonable assurance that the inventory of aircraft major spare parts at Ross was economical and efficient. The audit disclosed that approximately $447,000 (acquisition and interest carrying costs) of low-use major spare parts was excessive. Internal control deficiencies which fostered the excessive inventory included: (1) Ross had set stock levels without considering such factors as consumption or projected needs; and (2) the Department had not reviewed inventory quantities when appraising Ross' property management. The Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) agreed to take the corrective actions recommended in the report.

  7. The impact of instructions on aircraft visual inspection performance : a first look at the overall results.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, Colin G.; Spencer, Floyd Wayne; Wenner, Caren A.

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of instructions on aircraft visual inspection performance and strategy. Forty-two inspectors from industry were asked to perform inspections of six areas of a Boeing 737. Six different instruction versions were developed for each inspection task, varying in the number and type of directed inspections. The amount of time spent inspecting, the number of calls made, and the number of the feedback calls detected all varied widely across the inspectors. However, inspectors who used instructions with a higher number of directed inspections referred to the instructions more often during and after the task, and found a higher percentage of a selected set of feedback cracks than inspectors using other instruction versions. This suggests that specific instructions can help overall inspection performance, not just performance on the defects specified. Further, instructions were shown to change the way an inspector approaches a task.

  8. Development and testing of the Perseus proof-of-concept aircraft. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langford, J.S.

    1993-02-26

    Many areas of global climate change research could benefit from a flexible, affordable, and near-term platform that could provide in situ measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. To provide such a capability, the Perseus unmanned science research aircraft was proposed in 1989. As a first step toward the development of Perseus, a proof-of-concept (POC) demonstrator was constructed and tested during 1990 and 1991. The POC was a full scale Perseus airframe intended to validate the structural, aerodynamic, and flight control technologies for the Perseus within a total budget of about $1.5 million. Advanced propulsion systems needed for the operational Perseus were not covered in the POC program due to funding limitations. This report documents the design, development, and testing of the Perseus POC.

  9. Performance of a narrow band microwave filter implemented in thin-film YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus. delta. with ohmic contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalokitis, D.; Fathy, A.; Pendrick, V.; Belohoubek, E. ); Findikoglu, A.; Inam, A.; Xi, X.X.; Venkatesan, T. ); Barner, J.B. )

    1991-02-04

    Using {ital in} {ital situ} deposited thin-film Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} on LaAlO{sub 3} substrates, we have developed a pseudo-interdigital three-pole stripline filter with a minimum passband loss under 3.5 dB at 9.5 GHz and 77 K. The passband is very narrow, having a bandwidth of only 50 MHz (0.5%). The filter occupies a volume of less than 0.1 cm{sup 3}. An equivalent copper filter produced a loss of 18.5 and 28 dB at 77 and 300 K, respectively. The input and output coupling is achieved by {ital ex} {ital situ} sputtered Au thin-film contacts defined on the Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} by a lift-off technology and ultrasonically bonded to hermetic K connectors. Some of the major concerns in the realization of narrow band filters such as air gaps between high dielectric constant substrates and uniformity of the substrate's dielectric constant are addressed.

  10. DISCOVERY OF DRAMATIC OPTICAL VARIABILITY IN SDSS J1100+4421: A PECULIAR RADIO-LOUD NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Doi, Mamoru; Kikuchi, Yuki; Itoh, Ryosuke; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Kawabata, Koji S.; Tominaga, Nozomu; Saito, Yoshihiko; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Stawarz, ?ukasz; Gandhi, Poshak; Ali, Gamal; Essam, Ahmad; Hamed, Gamal; Aoki, Tsutomu; Contreras, Carlos; Hsiao, Eric Y.; Iwata, Ikuru; and others

    2014-10-01

    We present our discovery of dramatic variability in SDSS J1100+4421 by the high-cadence transient survey Kiso Supernova Survey. The source brightened in the optical by at least a factor of three within about half a day. Spectroscopic observations suggest that this object is likely a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLS1) at z = 0.840, however, with unusually strong narrow emission lines. The estimated black hole mass of ?10{sup 7} M {sub ?} implies bolometric nuclear luminosity close to the Eddington limit. SDSS J1100+4421 is also extremely radio-loud, with a radio loudness parameter of R ? 4 10{sup 2}-3 10{sup 3}, which implies the presence of relativistic jets. Rapid and large-amplitude optical variability of the target, reminiscent of that found in a few radio- and ?-ray-loud NLS1s, is therefore produced most likely in a blazar-like core. The 1.4GHz radio image of the source shows an extended structure with a linear size of about 100kpc. If SDSS J1100+4421 is a genuine NLS1, as suggested here, this radio structure would then be the largest ever discovered in this type of active galaxies.

  11. Substitutes for methylene chloride paint strippers -- performance evaluation and adaptation to aircraft maintenance procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, G.E.; Hollins, E.F.

    1997-12-31

    The US Air Force is conducting a focused review of alternative solvents for use in depainting aircraft. This effort is to provide a replacement for methylene chloride, which is a suspected carcinogen, a listed hazardous air pollutant, presents a serious workplace hazard, and is nearly eliminated from use as a paint stripper by the Aerospace Rule of the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. An evaluation of available alternatives was conducted through a background and literature search, laboratory analytical work on a subset of alternative candidates, and actual field testing of alternative solvents on removable components of KC-135 aircraft at Tinker AFB, OK. The literature search and lab analyses resulted in a recommendation for field testing of seven alternative products; one of these emerged as superior in removal power testing and was recommended for full scale prototype testing on a KC-135. The entire effort was conducted to identify and test alternatives for use on polyurethane topcoats with a Koroflex (polyurethane) primer paint system. Additional testing of alternative solvents on panels employing three different primer systems: epoxy, BMS 10-11, and a self-priming topcoat are currently planned for the next steps. This project represents the only Air Force project aimed at finding a chemical replacement for methylene chloride. The experimental design of each phase of the project, the specific analytical and technical criteria used in screening and evaluating each alternative, and the documentation of the results in a series of technical reports have yielded not only several viable alternatives, but, more importantly, a detailed methodology for conducting similar projects.

  12. Bone fragments a body can make

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stout, S.D.; Ross, L.M. Jr. )

    1991-05-01

    Data obtained from various analytical techniques applied to a number of small bone fragments recovered from a crime scene were used to provide evidence for the occurrence of a fatality. Microscopic and histomorphometric analyses confirmed that the fragments were from a human skull. X-ray microanalysis of darkened areas on the bone fragments revealed a chemical signature that matched the chemical signature of a shotgun pellet recovered at the scene of the crime. The above findings supported the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fingerprint evidence which, along with other evidence, was used to convict a man for the murder of his wife, even though her body was never recovered.

  13. What Is the Relationship of Electricity and the Human Body? ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Is the Relationship of Electricity and the Human Body? Click to email this to a friend ... What Is the Relationship of Electricity and the Human Body? 2012.05.30 Chief Scientist Jim ...

  14. Body monitoring and imaging apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    A non-acoustic pulse-echo radar monitor is employed in the repetitive mode, whereby a large number of reflected pulses are averaged to produce a voltage that modulates an audio oscillator to produce a tone that corresponds to the heart motion. The antenna used in this monitor generally comprises two flat copper foils, thus permitting the antenna to be housed in a substantially flat housing. The monitor converts the detected voltage to an audible signal with both amplitude modulation and Doppler effect. It further uses a dual time constant to reduce the effect of gross sensor-to-surface movement. The monitor detects the movement of one or more internal body parts, such as the heart, lungs, arteries, and vocal chords, and includes a pulse generator for simultaneously inputting a sequence of pulses to a transmit path and a grating path. The pulses transmitted along the transmit path drive Oh impulse, generator and provide corresponding transmit pulses that are applied to a transmit antenna. The gating path includes a range delay generator which generates timed gating pulses. The timed gating pulses cause the receive path to selectively conduct pulses reflected from the body parts and received by a receive antenna. The monitor output potential can be separated into a cardiac output indicative of the physical movement of the heart, and a pulmonary output indicative of the physical movement of the lung. The impulse generator in the transmit path can be replaced with a pulsed RF generator.

  15. Body monitoring and imaging apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-06-16

    A non-acoustic pulse-echo radar monitor is employed in the repetitive mode, whereby a large number of reflected pulses are averaged to produce a voltage that modulates an audio oscillator to produce a tone that corresponds to the heart motion. The antenna used in this monitor generally comprises two flat copper foils, thus permitting the antenna to be housed in a substantially flat housing. The monitor converts the detected voltage to an audible signal with both amplitude modulation and Doppler effect. It further uses a dual time constant to reduce the effect of gross sensor-to-surface movement. The monitor detects the movement of one or more internal body parts, such as the heart, lungs, arteries, and vocal chords, and includes a pulse generator for simultaneously inputting a sequence of pulses to a transmit path and a grating path. The pulses transmitted along the transmit path drive Oh impulse, generator and provide corresponding transmit pulses that are applied to a transmit antenna. The gating path includes a range delay generator which generates timed gating pulses. The timed gating pulses cause the receive path to selectively conduct pulses reflected from the body parts and received by a receive antenna. The monitor output potential can be separated into a cardiac output indicative of the physical movement of the heart, and a pulmonary output indicative of the physical movement of the lung. The impulse generator in the transmit path can be replaced with a pulsed RF generator. 13 figs.

  16. Body monitoring and imaging apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A non-acoustic pulse-echo radar monitor is employed in the repetitive mode, whereby a large number of reflected pulses are averaged to produce a voltage that modulates an audio oscillator to produce a tone that corresponds to the heart motion. The antenna used in this monitor generally comprises two flat copper foils, thus permitting the antenna to be housed in a substantially flat housing. The monitor converts the detected voltage to an audible signal with both amplitude modulation and Doppler effect. It further uses a dual time constant to reduce the effect of gross sensor-to-surface movement. The monitor detects the movement of one or more internal body parts, such as the heart, lungs, arteries, and vocal chords, and includes a pulse generator for simultaneously inputting a sequence of pulses to a transmit path and a gating path. The pulses transmitted along the transmit path drive an impulse generator and provide corresponding transmit pulses that are applied to a transmit antenna. The gating path includes a range delay generator which generates timed gating pulses. The timed gating pulses cause the receive path to selectively conduct pulses reflected from the body parts and received by a receive antenna. The monitor output potential can be separated into a cardiac output indicative of the physical movement of the heart, and a pulmonary output indicative of the physical movement of the lung.

  17. Body monitoring and imaging apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-11-12

    A non-acoustic pulse-echo radar monitor is employed in the repetitive mode, whereby a large number of reflected pulses are averaged to produce a voltage that modulates an audio oscillator to produce a tone that corresponds to the heart motion. The antenna used in this monitor generally comprises two flat copper foils, thus permitting the antenna to be housed in a substantially flat housing. The monitor converts the detected voltage to an audible signal with both amplitude modulation and Doppler effect. It further uses a dual time constant to reduce the effect of gross sensor-to-surface movement. The monitor detects the movement of one or more internal body parts, such as the heart, lungs, arteries, and vocal chords, and includes a pulse generator for simultaneously inputting a sequence of pulses to a transmit path and a gating path. The pulses transmitted along the transmit path drive an impulse generator and provide corresponding transmit pulses that are applied to a transmit antenna. The gating path includes a range delay generator which generates timed gating pulses. The timed gating pulses cause the receive path to selectively conduct pulses reflected from the body parts and received by a receive antenna. The monitor output potential can be separated into a cardiac output indicative of the physical movement of the heart, and a pulmonary output indicative of the physical movement of the lung. 12 figs.

  18. Non-equilibrium many body dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creutz, M.; Gyulassy, M.

    1997-09-22

    This Riken BNL Research Center Symposium on Non-Equilibrium Many Body Physics was held on September 23-25, 1997 as part of the official opening ceremony of the Center at Brookhaven National Lab. A major objective of theoretical work at the center is to elaborate on the full spectrum of strong interaction physics based on QCD, including the physics of confinement and chiral symmetry breaking, the parton structure of hadrons and nuclei, and the phenomenology of ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions related to the up-coming experiments at RHIC. The opportunities and challenges of nuclear and particle physics in this area naturally involve aspects of the many body problem common to many other fields. The aim of this symposium was to find common theoretical threads in the area of non-equilibrium physics and modern transport theories. The program consisted of invited talks on a variety topics from the fields of atomic, condensed matter, plasma, astrophysics, cosmology, and chemistry, in addition to nuclear and particle physics. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the database for contributions to this workshop.

  19. Full body powder antichip. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-17

    Chipping is the major paint defect listed for automobile customer dissatisfaction. The improved chip resistance and smoother paint surfaces produced by full body powder antichip will result in greater customer satisfaction and greater demand for US-produced automobiles. Powder antichip contains virtually no solvent, thereby reducing the potential VOC emissions from Newark Assembly by more than 90 tons per year as compared to the solvent-borne material presently applied in most full body applications. Since Newark Assembly Plant is in a severe non-attainment air quality area, which must demonstrate a 15% reduction in emissions by 1996, projects such as this are crucial to the longevity of industry in this region. The liquid paint spray systems include incineration of the oven volatile organic compounds (VOC`s) at 1,500 F. Since there are minimal VOC`s in powder coatings and the only possible releases occur only during polymerization, incineration is not required. The associated annual savings resulting from the elimination of the incinerator utilized on the liquid spray system is 1.44 {times} 10{sup 10} BTU`s per unit installed. The annual cost savings is approximately $388 thousand, far below the original estimates.

  20. Seismicity and structure of Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes, Alaska, using joint body and surface wave tomography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Syracuse, E. M.; Maceira, M.; Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.

    2015-02-18

    Joint inversions of seismic data recover models that simultaneously fit multiple constraints while playing upon the strengths of each data type. Here, we jointly invert 14 years of local earthquake body wave arrival times from the Alaska Volcano Observatory catalog and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves based upon ambient noise measurements for local Vp, Vs, and hypocentral locations at Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes using a new joint inversion algorithm.The velocity structure and relocated seismicity of both volcanoes are significantly more complex than many other volcanoes studied using similar techniques. Seismicity is distributed among several areas beneath or beyond the flanks ofmore » both volcanoes, illuminating a variety of volcanic and tectonic features. The velocity structures of the two volcanoes are exemplified by the presence of narrow high-Vp features in the near surface, indicating likely current or remnant pathways of magma to the surface. A single broad low-Vp region beneath each volcano is slightly offset from each summit and centered at approximately 7 km depth, indicating a potential magma chamber, where magma is stored over longer time periods. Differing recovery capabilities of the Vp and Vs datasets indicate that the results of these types of joint inversions must be interpreted carefully.« less

  1. Seismicity and structure of Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes, Alaska, using joint body and surface wave tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syracuse, E. M.; Maceira, M.; Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.

    2015-02-18

    Joint inversions of seismic data recover models that simultaneously fit multiple constraints while playing upon the strengths of each data type. Here, we jointly invert 14 years of local earthquake body wave arrival times from the Alaska Volcano Observatory catalog and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves based upon ambient noise measurements for local Vp, Vs, and hypocentral locations at Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes using a new joint inversion algorithm.The velocity structure and relocated seismicity of both volcanoes are significantly more complex than many other volcanoes studied using similar techniques. Seismicity is distributed among several areas beneath or beyond the flanks of both volcanoes, illuminating a variety of volcanic and tectonic features. The velocity structures of the two volcanoes are exemplified by the presence of narrow high-Vp features in the near surface, indicating likely current or remnant pathways of magma to the surface. A single broad low-Vp region beneath each volcano is slightly offset from each summit and centered at approximately 7 km depth, indicating a potential magma chamber, where magma is stored over longer time periods. Differing recovery capabilities of the Vp and Vs datasets indicate that the results of these types of joint inversions must be interpreted carefully.

  2. Using gaps in N-body tidal streams to probe missing satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngan, W. H. W.; Carlberg, R. G.

    2014-06-20

    We use N-body simulations to model the tidal disruption of a star cluster in a Milky-Way-sized dark matter halo, which results in a narrow stream comparable to (but slightly wider than) Pal-5 or GD-1. The mean Galactic dark matter halo is modeled by a spherical Navarro-Frenk-White potential with subhalos predicted by the ΛCDM cosmological model. The distribution and mass function of the subhalos follow the results from the Aquarius simulation. We use a matched filter approach to look for 'gaps' in tidal streams at 12 length scales from 0.1 kpc to 5 kpc, which appear as characteristic dips in the linear densities along the streams. We find that, in addition to the subhalos' perturbations, the epicyclic overdensities (EOs) due to the coherent epicyclic motions of particles in a stream also produce gap-like signals near the progenitor. We measure the gap spectra—the gap formation rates as functions of gap length—due to both subhalo perturbations and EOs, which have not been accounted for together by previous studies. Finally, we project the simulated streams onto the sky to investigate issues when interpreting gap spectra in observations. In particular, we find that gap spectra from low signal-to-noise observations can be biased by the orbital phase of the stream. This indicates that the study of stream gaps will benefit greatly from high-quality data from future missions.

  3. Determining sand-body geometries for waterflood reservoirs: Examples from Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreisa, R.D.; Pinero, E. )

    1987-02-01

    Waterflood projects require an accurate knowledge of reservoir geometry and well-to-well continuity. However, sandstones with thin, multiple-pay zones can be extremely difficult to correlate with confidence. Two case studies of Pennsylvanian sandstones in Oklahoma illustrate how a model for the depositional history of such reservoirs can be an effective tool for determining reservoir continuity. In contrast, correlation criteria such as similar wireline log signatures and relative sand-body thicknesses are not reliable in many situations. In Southwest Logan field (Beaver County), 5 to 15-ft thick reservoir sands formed as shallow marine sand ridges. Their dimensions were approximated from height-to-width ratios of modern sand ridges. Then the reservoir sands were mapped using wireline logs and core data. Individual reservoir sands were approximately 1-2 km wide and stacked en echelon vertically. Thus, a line-drive waterflood pattern oriented parallel to the axes of the ridges is recommended. Tatums field (Carter County) consists of 5 to 50-ft thick sandstones deposited in various deltaic environments. Distributary channel sands have good continuity downdip, but are narrow and lenticular across depositional strike. Crevasse splay and other bay-fill sands were deposited marginal to the channels and are extremely discontinuous. This depositional model can be used to improve flood patterns for these sands, leading to improved sweep efficiency. In both examples, for effective mapping, the depositional facies models have been used to register reservoir quality and wireline log signatures.

  4. Sampling device with a capped body and detachable handle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jezek, Gerd-Rainer

    2000-01-01

    The apparatus is a sampling device having a pad for sample collection, a body which supports the pad, a detachable handle connected to the body and a cap which encloses and retains the pad and body to protect the integrity of the sample.

  5. Fractionated total body irradiation for metastatic neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kun, L.E.; Casper, J.T.; Kline, R.W.; Piaskowski, V.D.

    1981-11-01

    Twelve patients over one year old with neuroblastoma (NBL) metastatic to bone and bone marrow entered a study of adjuvant low-dose, fractionated total body irradiation (TBI). Six children who achieved a ''complete clinical response'' following chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide and adriamycin) and surgical resection of the abdominal primary received TBI (10 rad/fraction to totals of 100-120 rad/10-12 fx/12-25 days). Two children received concurrent local irradiation for residual abdominal tumor. The intervals from cessation of chemotherapy to documented progression ranged from 2-16 months, not substatially different from patients receiving similar chemotherapy and surgery without TBI. Three additional children with progressive NBL received similar TBI (80-120 rad/8-12 fx) without objective response.

  6. Body temperature regulation during euthermia and hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimada, S.G.; Stitt, J.T.

    1981-10-01

    In this paper we have presented a few fundamental principles which are essential for an understanding of how microwaves might affect body temperature regulation. Application of the heat balance equation requires an accounting of all heat losses and heat gains. Thus, experimental measurements of these two processes are usually required to explain any thermoregulatory response. Knowledge of the individual elements of the thermoregulatory system and their integrative operation is imperative. Without such information one cannot hope to analyze or predict the consequences of microwave irradiation, or to separate simple heating effects from possible nonthermal effects. Finally, we have tried to emphasize that hyperthermia can be produced in different ways. Thus, there may be several forms of microwave hyperthermia, differing in their causality. Deposition of microwave energy in deep tissues might produce a response similar to exercise hyperthermia.

  7. A model problem of deceleration of a body in a resisting medium with a jet flow around the body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eroshin, V.A.; Samsonov, V.A.; Shamolin, M.V.

    1995-11-01

    A mathematical model is constructed describing the deceleration of a solid body moving in a medium with a jet flow around the body. The regime of translational deceleration is shown to be normally unstable. This has made it possible to develop a relatively simple technique for determining model parameters experimentally. An example of the application of this technique to a cylindrical body is presented.

  8. Tamper-indicating device having a glass body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R. E.

    2003-04-29

    A tamper-indicating device is described. The device has a first glass body member and a second glass body member that are attached to each other through a hasp. The glass body members of the device can be tempered. The body members can be configured with hollow volumes into which powders, microparticles, liquids, gels, or combinations thereof are sealed. The choice, the amount, and the location of these materials can produce a visible, band pattern to provide each body member with a unique fingerprint identifier, which makes it extremely difficult to repair or replace once it is damaged in order to avoid tamper detection.

  9. A precise narrow-beam filter infrared radiometer and its use with lidar in the ARM Program. Progress report, 1 December 1991--31 May 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, C.M.R.

    1992-05-01

    The first six months of the grant (December 1991--May 1992) have been taken up with the design and specification for the new narrow-beam radiometer. The radiometer will be built and tested at the Division of Atmospheric Research over the next three months. Improved algorithms for obtaining cloud extinction have also been developed. It is proposed during 1993 to use the radiometer in conjunction with a new CSIRO 3-wavelength lidar in the ARM PROBE experiment at Kavieng, New Guinea, which is a test mission under tropical conditions for the ARM CART Tropical West Pacific site, and is part of the TOGA COARE experiment. During the latter part of 1992, the radiometer will be tested thoroughly and tested at the Division of Atmospheric Research, Aspendale.

  10. Search for a narrow t(t)over-bar resonance in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph; Grivaz J-F; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-03-14

    We report a search for a narrow t{bar t} resonance that decays into a lepton+jets final state based on an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We set upper limits on the production cross section of such a resonance multiplied by its branching fraction to t{bar t}. We exclude a leptophobic topcolor Z' at the 95% confidence level for masses below 835 GeV (940 GeV) if its width is 1.2% (3%) of its mass. We also exclude color octet vector bosons (colorons) with masses below 775 GeV.

  11. Evidence for a Narrow Near-Threshold Structure in the $J/\\psi\\phi$ Mass Spectrum in $B^+\\to J/\\psi\\phi K^+$ Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-03-01

    Evidence is reported for a narrow structure near the J/{psi}{phi} threshold in exclusive B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}K{sup +} decays produced in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. A signal of 14 {+-} 5 events, with statistical significance in excess of 3.8 standard deviations, is observed in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb{sup -1}, collected by the CDF II detector. The mass and natural width of the structure are measured to be 4143.0 {+-} 2.9(stat) {+-} 1.2(syst) MeV/c{sup 2} and 11.7{sub -5.0}{sup +8.3}(stat) {+-} 3.7(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}.

  12. Tuning the narrow-band beam position monitor sampling clock to remove the aliasing errors in APS storage ring orbit measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, X.; Singh, O. )

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source storage ring employs a real-time orbit correction system to reduce orbit motion up to 50 Hz. This system uses up to 142 narrow-band rf beam position monitors (Nbbpms) in a correction algorithm by sampling at a frequency of 1.53 kHz. Several Nbbpms exhibit aliasing errors in orbit measurements, rendering these Nbbpms unusable in real-time orbit feedback. The aliasing errors are caused by beating effects of the internal sampling clocks with various other processing clocks residing within the BPM electronics. A programmable external clock has been employed to move the aliasing errors out of the active frequency band of the real-time feedback system (RTFB) and rms beam motion calculation. This paper discusses the process of tuning and provides test results.

  13. Aether Drift and the isotropy of the universe: a measurement of anisotropes in the primordial black-body radiation. Final report, 1 November 1978-31 October 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smoot, G.F.

    1981-07-01

    Large-angular-scale anisotropies in the 3 K primordial black-body radiation were detected and mapped with a sensitivity of 2 x to the minus 4 power K and an angular resolution of about 10 deg. The motion of the Earth with respect to the distant matter of the Universe ( Aether Drift ) was measured and the homogeneity and isotropy of the Universe (the Cosmological Principle ) was probed. The experiment uses two Dicke radiometers, one at 33 GHz to detect the cosmic anisotropy, and one at 54 GHz to detect anisotropies in the residual oxygen above the detectors. The system was installed in the NASA-Ames Earth survey aircraft (U-2), and operated successfully in a series of flights in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Data taking and analysis to measure the anisotropy were successful.

  14. Aqueous Processing of Atmospheric Organic Particles in Cloud Water Collected via Aircraft Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boone, Eric J.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Wirth, Christopher; Shepson, Paul B.; Stirm, Brian H.; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2015-07-21

    Cloud water and below-cloud atmospheric particle samples were collected onboard a research aircraft during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) over a forested region of Alabama in June 2013. The organic molecular composition of the samples was studied to gain insights into the aqueous-phase processing of organic compounds within cloud droplets. High resolution mass spectrometry with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization and direct infusion electrospray ionization were utilized to compare the organic composition of the particle and cloud water samples, respectively. Isoprene and monoterpene-derived organosulfates and oligomers were identified in both the particles and cloud water, showing the significant influence of biogenic volatile organic compound oxidation above the forested region. While the average O:C ratios of the organic compounds were similar between the atmospheric particle and cloud water samples, the chemical composition of these samples was quite different. Specifically, hydrolysis of organosulfates and formation of nitrogen-containing compounds were observed for the cloud water when compared to the atmospheric particle samples, demonstrating that cloud processing changes the composition of organic aerosol.

  15. Heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) for high-speed aircraft propulsion. Phase 2 (feasibility) final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S.; Silverstein, C.C.

    1994-03-25

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos), and CCS Associates are conducting the Heat Pipe Radiation Cooling (HPRC) for High-Speed Aircraft Propulsion program to determine the advantages and demonstrate the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This innovative approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from adjacent external surfaces. HPRC is viewed as an alternative (or complementary) cooling technique to the use of pumped cryogenic or endothermic fuels to provide regenerative fuel or air cooling of the hot surfaces. The HPRC program has been conducted through two phases, an applications phase and a feasibility phase. The applications program (Phase 1) included concept and assessment analyses using hypersonic engine data obtained from US engine company contacts. The applications phase culminated with planning for experimental verification of the HPRC concept to be pursued in a feasibility program. The feasibility program (Phase 2), recently completed and summarized in this report, involved both analytical and experimental studies.

  16. High Energy Two-Body Deuteron Photodisintegration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terburg, Bart

    1999-07-31

    The differential cross section for two­body deuteron photodisintegration was measured at photon energies between 0.8 and 4.0 GeV and center­of­mass angles theta_cm =37deg, 53deg, 70deg, and 90deg as part of CEBAF experiment E89­012. Constituent counting rules predict a scaling of this cross section at asymptotic energies. In previous experiments this scaling has surprisingly been observed at energies between 1.4 and 2.8 GeV at 90deg. The results from this experiment are in reasonable agreement with previous measurements at lower energies. The data at 70deg and 90deg show a constituent counting rule behavior up to 4.0 GeV photon energy. The 37deg and 53deg data do not agree with the constituent counting rule prediction. The new data are compared with a variety of theoretical models inspired by quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and traditional hadronic nuclear physics.

  17. A STUDY OF EXTRACTIVE AND REMOTE-SENSING SAMPLING AND MEASUREMENT OF EMISSIONS FROM MILITARY AIRCRAFT ENGINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Mengdawn; Corporan, E.

    2010-01-01

    Aircraft emissions contribute to the increased atmospheric burden of particulate matter (e.g., black carbon and secondary organic compounds) that plays a role in air quality, contrail formation and climate change. Sampling and measurement of modern aircraft emissions at the engine exhaust plane (EEP) for to engine and fuel certification remains a daunting task, no agency-certified method is available for the task. In this paper we summarize the results of a recent study that was devoted to investigate both extractive and optical remote-sensing (ORS) technologies in sampling and measurement of gaseous and particulate matter (PM) emitted by a number of military aircraft engines operated with JP-8 and a Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuel at various engine conditions. These engines include cargo, bomber, and helicopter types of military aircraft that consumes 70-80% of the military aviation fuel each year. The emission indices of selected pollutants are discussed as these data may be of interest for atmospheric modeling and for design of air quality control strategies around the airports and military bases. It was found that non-volatile particles in the engine emissions were all in the ultrafine range. The mean diameter of particles increased as the engine power increased; the mode diameters were in the 20nm range for the low power condition of a new helicopter engine to 80nm for the high power condition of a newly maintained bomber engine. Elemental analysis indicated little metals were present on particles in the exhaust, while most of the materials on the exhaust particles were based on carbon and sulfate. Carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, ethylene, acetylene, propylene, and alkanes were detected using both technologies. The last five species (in the air toxics category) were most noticeable only under the low engine power. The emission indices calculated based on the ORS data were however observed to differ significantly (up to

  18. Essential Body of Knowledge (EBK) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services » Training » Cybersecurity Training Warehouse » DOE Training & Education » Essential Body of Knowledge (EBK) Essential Body of Knowledge (EBK) Train12.jpg The OCIO has developed a DOE-specific Essential Body of Knowledge (EBK) using DOE cybersecurity policy, industry best practices and lessons learned, and comprehensive internal needs assessments to identify fundamental cybersecurity roles and associated responsibilities. Core competencies, as identified and documented in the

  19. Metal spring stub and ceramic body electrode assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rolf, Richard L.; Sharp, Maurice L.

    1984-01-01

    An electrode assembly comprising an electrically conductive ceramic electrode body having an opening therein and a metal stub retained in the opening with at least a surface of the stub in intimate contact with a surface of the body and the stub adapted with a spring to flex and prevent damage to the body from expansion of the stub when subjected to a temperature differential.

  20. Metal spring stub and ceramic body electrode assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rolf, R.L.; Sharp, M.L.

    1984-06-26

    An electrode assembly is disclosed comprising an electrically conductive ceramic electrode body having an opening therein and a metal stub retained in the opening with at least a surface of the stub in intimate contact with a surface of the body and the stub adapted with a spring to flex and prevent damage to the body from expansion of the stub when subjected to a temperature differential. 1 fig.

  1. Additional Verification Bodies Now Available for SEP | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Additional Verification Bodies Now Available for SEP Additional Verification Bodies Now Available for SEP May 14, 2014 - 11:40am Addthis Superior Energy Performance (SEP) recognizes industrial facilities that demonstrate energy management excellence and sustained energy savings. Third-party verification using an ANSI-ANAB Accredited Verification Body offers robust, independent confirmation of a facility's conformance to ISO 50001 and improved energy performance-providing accurate energy numbers

  2. Method of preparing uranium nitride or uranium carbonitride bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilhelm, Harley A.; McClusky, James K.

    1976-04-27

    Sintered uranium nitride or uranium carbonitride bodies having a controlled final carbon-to-uranium ratio are prepared, in an essentially continuous process, from U.sub.3 O.sub.8 and carbon by varying the weight ratio of carbon to U.sub.3 O.sub.8 in the feed mixture, which is compressed into a green body and sintered in a continuous heating process under various controlled atmospheric conditions to prepare the sintered bodies.

  3. Quadrupole collectivity in the two-body random ensemble

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramkina, Volha; Volya, Alexander

    2011-08-15

    We conduct a systematic investigation of the nuclear collective dynamics that emerges in systems with two-body random interactions. We explore the development of the mean field and study its geometry. We investigate multipole collectivities in the many-body spectra and their dependence on the underlying two-body interaction Hamiltonian. The quadrupole-quadrupole interaction component appears to be dynamically dominating in the two-body random ensemble. This quadrupole coherence leads to rotational spectral features and thus suggests the formation of the deformed mean-field of a specific geometry.

  4. New Technologies Power Wearable Devices through Body Power or...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Wearable Devices through Body Power or the Environment Home > Groups > No Battery Wearables WikiSysop's picture Submitted by WikiSysop(15) Member 12 August, 2014 -...

  5. Essential Body of Knowledge (EBK) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Essential Body of Knowledge (EBK) DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: CORE COMPETENCY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS: CA DOE CYBER SECURITY EBK: MINIMUM CORE COMPETENCY ...

  6. PROCESS OF PREPARING URANIUM-IMPREGNATED GRAPHITE BODY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kanter, M.A.

    1958-05-20

    A method for the fabrication of graphite bodies containing uniformly distributed uranium is described. It consists of impregnating a body of graphite having uniform porosity and low density with an aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate preferably by a vacuum technique, thereafter removing excess aqueous solution from the surface of the graphite, then removing the solvent water from the body under substantially normal atmospheric conditions of temperature and pressure in the presence of a stream of dry inert gas, and finally heating the dry impregnated graphite body in the presence of inert gas at a temperature between 800 and 1400 d C to convert the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate to an oxide of uranium.

  7. Three-body Recombination in Bose Gases with Large Scattering...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 74 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS; BOSE-EINSTEIN GAS; RECOMBINATION; THREE-BODY PROBLEM; S STATES; SCATTERING LENGTHS; ...

  8. Annihilation diagrams in two-body nonleptonic decays of charmed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; CHARMED MESONS; WEAK HADRONIC DECAY; ANNIHILATION; FEYNMAN DIAGRAM; TWO-BODY PROBLEM; AXIAL VECTOR MESONS; KOBAYASHI-MASKAWA ...

  9. Many-Body Localization in Imperfectly Isolated Quantum Systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Many-Body Localization in Imperfectly Isolated Quantum Systems Not Available Temp HTML Storage 2: Johri, Sonika; Nandkishore, Rahul; Bhatt, R. N. Temp Plain Text Storage 2: http:...

  10. Stabilization of green bodies via sacrificial gelling agent during...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of a three-dimensionally patterned green body includes suspending a first material in a ... each layer includes a gradient in composition, microstructure, andor density in an ...

  11. Approach of Czech regulatory body to LBB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tendera, P.

    1997-04-01

    At present there are two NPPs equipped with PWR units in Czech Republic. The Dukovany, NPP is about ten years in operation (four units 440 MW - WWBFL model 213) and Tomelin NPP is under construction (two units 1000 MW - WWER model 320). Both NPPs were built to Soviet design and according to Soviet regulations and standards but most of equipment for primary circuits was supplied by home manufacturers. The objective of the Czech LBB program is to prove the LBB status of the primary piping systems of there NPPs and the LBB concept is a part of strategy to meet western style safety standards. The reason for the Czech LBB project is a lack of some standard safety Facilities too. For both Dukovany and Tomelin NPPs a full LBB analysis should be carried out. The application of LBB to the piping system should be also a cost effective means to avoid installations of pipe whip restraints and jet shields. The Czech regulatory body issued non-mandatory requirement, {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} which is in compliance with national legal documents and which is based on the US NRC Regulatory Procedures and US standards (ASMF CODE, ANSI). The requirement has been published in the document {open_quotes}Safety of Nuclear Facilities{close_quotes} No 1/1991 as {open_quotes}Requirements on the Content and Format of Safety Reports and their Supplements{close_quote} and consist of two parts (1) procedure for obtaining proof of evidence {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} (2) leak detection systems for the pressurized reactor primary circuit. At present some changes concerning both parts of the above document will be introduced. The reasons for this modifications will be presented.

  12. Approach for Czech regulatory body to LBB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tendera, P.

    1997-04-01

    At present there are two NPPs equipped with PWR units in Czech Republic. The Dukovany NPP is about ten years in operation (four units 440 MW - WWER model 213) and Temelin NPP is under construction (two units 1000 MW-WWER model 320). Both NPPs were built to Soviet design and according to Soviet regulations and standards but most of equipment for primary circuits was supplied by home manufactures. The objective for the Czech LBB programme is to prove the LBB status of the primary piping systems of these NPPs and the LBB concept is a part of strategy to meet western style safety standards. The reason for the Czech LBB project is a lack of some standard safety facilities, too. For both Dukovany and Temolin NPPs a full LBB analysis should be carried out. The application of LBB to the piping system should be also a cost effective means to avoid installations of pipe whip restraints and jet shields. The Czech regulatory body issued non-mandatory requirement {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} which is in compliance with national legal documents and which is based on the US NRC Regulatory Procedures and US standards (ASME, CODE, ANSI). The requirement has been published in the document {open_quotes}Safety of Nuclear Facilities{close_quotes} No. 1/1991 as {open_quotes}Requirements on the Content and Format of Safety Reports and their Supplements{close_quotes} and consists of two parts (1) procedure for obtaining proof of evidence {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} (2) leak detection systems for the pressurized reactor primary circuit. At present some changes concerning both parts of the above document will be introduced. The reasons for this modifications will be presented.

  13. Temperature dependence of the carrier lifetime in narrow-gap Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1–x}Te solid solutions: Radiative recombination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazhenov, N. L. Mynbaev, K. D.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2015-09-15

    The probability of the radiative recombination of carriers in narrow-gap semiconductors is analyzed for the example of Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1–x}Te solid solutions. Expressions are derived for the imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity in terms of the three-band Kane’s model with consideration for the nonparabolic dependence of the carrier energy on the wave vector. It is shown that taking into account this nonparabolicity of the energy spectrum of carriers modifies the dependence of the imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity on frequency. Expressions for the probability of radiative recombination, derived in terms of the simple parabolic model and Kane’s model with and without the nonparabolicity effect taken into account, are compared. It is shown that the contributions to recombination from electron transitions to heavy- and light-hole bands are close and the contribution from light holes cannot be neglected when calculating the radiative-recombination probability.

  14. A precise passive narrow-beam filter infrared radiometer and its use with LIDAR in the ARM program. Progress report, 1 June 1992--31 May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, C.M.R.

    1993-05-01

    The work done divides conveniently into two parts. First, the completion of the design and manufacture of the new narrow-beam radiometer, which occupied the period of July to December, 1992. The second part of the report concerns participation of the CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research (DAR) Lidar/radiometer team in the ARM PROBE experiment at Kavieng, New Ireland, Papua New Guinea as part of the international TOGA COARE experiment. The DAR team participated for about one month from mid-January. The PROBE experiment allowed the new radiometer to be tested under field conditions, a test which was very successful, with very few teething problems. It is proposed during the rest of 1993 and during 1994 to make further tests with the radiometer and particularly to look at using a stirling cycle liquid nitrogen detector to obviate the need for supplies of liquid nitrogen. It is proposed further during 1994 to carry out a thorough analysis of the PROBE data and collaborate with other US PROBE participants in studying and interpreting the observations as a whole. Some further work with the new ARM radiometer will be done during the CSIRO SOCEX experiment.

  15. JET PROPERTIES OF GeV-SELECTED RADIO-LOUD NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES AND POSSIBLE CONNECTION TO THEIR DISK AND CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiao-Na; Lin, Da-Bin; Liang, En-Wei; Zhang, Jin; Xue, Zi-Wei; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2015-01-01

    The observed spectral energy distributions of five GeV-selected narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies are fitted with a model including the radiation ingredients from the relativistic jet, the accretion disk, and the corona. We compare the properties of these GeV NLS1 galaxies with flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs), and radio-quiet (RQ) Seyfert galaxies, and explore possible hints for jet-disk/corona connection. Our results show that the radiation physics and the jet properties of the GeV NLS1 galaxies resemble that of FSRQs. The luminosity variations of PMN J0948+0022 and 1H 0323+342 at the GeV band is tightly correlated with the beaming factor (?), similar to that observed in FSRQ 3C 279. The accretion disk luminosities and the jet powers of the GeV NLS1 galaxies cover both the ranges of FSRQs and BL Lacs. With the detection of bright corona emission in 1H 0323+342, we show that the ratio of the corona luminosity (L {sub corona}) to the accretion disk luminosity (L {sub d}) is marginally within the high end of this ratio distribution for an RQ Seyfert galaxy sample, and the variation of jet luminosity may connect with L {sub corona}. However, it is still unclear whether a system with a high L {sub corona}/L {sub d} ratio prefers to power a jet.

  16. Large-amplitude, narrow-linewidth microwave emission in a dual free-layer MgO spin-torque oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagasawa, Tazumi Kudo, Kiwamu; Suto, Hirofumi; Mizushima, Koichi; Sato, Rie

    2014-11-03

    Synchronized magnetization motion among the several magnetic layers composing a spin-torque oscillator (STO) is considered an effective way to improve spectral purity. To utilize this scheme in a MgO-based STO, we have fabricated a dual free-layer STO composed of a CoFeB free layer (FL), a MgO barrier layer, and a CoFe/Ru/CoFeB synthetic ferrimagnet free layer (SyF). Unlike conventional MgO-based STOs, this structure does not have an antiferromagnetic layer that pins the SyF, leading to a large-amplitude oscillation of magnetization in the SyF. The dual free-layer STO exhibits coherent microwave emissions with power spectrum density beyond 800 nW/GHz and narrow spectral linewidth below 5 MHz (Q-factor ≈ 2000). Macrospin simulations confirm that the stable oscillations originate from the synchronized magnetization motion of the FL and the SyF through dynamical dipolar coupling.

  17. VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY IMAGING OF PARSEC-SCALE RADIO EMISSIONS IN NEARBY RADIO-QUIET NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doi, Akihiro; Asada, Keiichi; Inoue, Makoto; Fujisawa, Kenta; Nagai, Hiroshi; Hagiwara, Yoshiaki; Wajima, Kiyoaki

    2013-03-01

    We conducted Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of seven nearby narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies at 1.7 GHz ({lambda}18 cm) with milliarcsecond resolution. This is the first systematic very long baseline interferometry study focusing on the central parsec-scale regions of radio-quiet NLS1s. Five of the seven were detected at a brightness temperature of {approx}> 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K and contain radio cores with high brightness temperatures of >6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} K, indicating a nonthermal process driven by jet-producing central engines as in radio-loud NLS1s and other active galactic nucleus classes. VLBA images of MRK 1239, MRK 705, and MRK 766 exhibit parsec-scale jets with clear linear structures. A large portion of the radio power comes from diffuse emission components that are distributed within the nuclear regions ({approx}< 300 pc), which is a common characteristic throughout the observed NLS1s. Jet kinetic powers limited by the Eddington limit may be insufficient to allow the jets to escape to kiloparsec scales for these radio-quiet NLS1s with low-mass black holes of {approx}< 10{sup 7} M {sub Sun }.

  18. SUZAKU VIEW OF THE SWIFT/BAT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. IV. NATURE OF TWO NARROW-LINE RADIO GALAXIES (3C 403 AND IC 5063)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tazaki, Fumie; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Terashima, Yuichi; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2011-09-01

    We report the results of Suzaku broadband X-ray observations of the two narrow-line radio galaxies, 3C 403 and IC 5063. Combined with the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) spectra averaged for 58 months, we are able to accurately constrain their spectral properties over the 0.5-200 keV band. The spectra of both nuclei are well represented with an absorbed cutoff power law, an absorbed reflection component from cold matter with an iron-K emission line, and an unabsorbed soft component, which gives a firm upper limit for the scattered emission. The reflection strength normalized to the averaged BAT flux is R {identical_to} {Omega}/2{pi} {approx} 0.6 in both targets, implying that their tori have a sufficiently large solid angle to produce the reprocessed emission. A numerical torus model with an opening angle of {approx}50{sup 0} well reproduces the observed spectra. We discuss the possibility that the amount of the normal gas responsible for Thomson scattering is systematically smaller in radio galaxies compared with Seyfert galaxies.

  19. Damage tolerance assessment of bonded composite doubler repairs for commercial aircraft applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, D.

    1998-08-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration has sponsored a project at its Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) to validate the use of bonded composite doublers on commercial aircraft. A specific application was chosen in order to provide a proof-of-concept driving force behind this test and analysis project. However, the data stemming from this study serves as a comprehensive evaluation of bonded composite doublers for general use. The associated documentation package provides guidance regarding the design, analysis, installation, damage tolerance, and nondestructive inspection of these doublers. This report describes a series of fatigue and strength tests which were conducted to study the damage tolerance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Tension-tension fatigue and ultimate strength tests attempted to grow engineered flaws in coupons with composite doublers bonded to aluminum skin. An array of design parameters, including various flaw scenarios, the effects of surface impact, and other off-design conditions, were studied. The structural tests were used to: (1) assess the potential for interply delaminations and disbonds between the aluminum and the laminate, and (2) determine the load transfer and crack mitigation capabilities of composite doublers in the presence of severe defects. A series of specimens were subjected to ultimate tension tests in order to determine strength values and failure modes. It was demonstrated that even in the presence of extensive damage in the original structure (cracks, material loss) and in spite of non-optimum installations (adhesive disbonds), the composite doubler allowed the structure to survive more than 144,000 cycles of fatigue loading. Installation flaws in the composite laminate did not propagate over 216,000 fatigue cycles. Furthermore, the added impediments of impact--severe enough to deform the parent aluminum skin--and hot-wet exposure did not effect the doubler`s performance. Since the tests were conducting

  20. Evaluating and Constraining Ice Cloud Parameterizations in CAM5 using Aircraft Measurements from the SPARTICUS Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Minghuai; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Mitchell, David; Mishra, Subhashree; Mace, Gerald G.

    2013-01-01

    This study uses aircraft measurements of relative humidity and ice crystal size distribution collected in synoptic cirrus during the SPARTICUS (Small PARTicles In CirrUS) field campaign to evaluate and constrain ice cloud parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5. The probability density function (PDF) of ice crystal number concentration (Ni) derived from high frequency (1 Hz) measurements features a strong dependence on ambient temperature. As temperature decreases from -35C to -62C, the peak in the PDF shifts from 10-20 L-1 to 200-1000 L-1, while the ice crystal number concentration shows a factor of 6-7 increase. Model simulations are performed with two different insitu ice nucleation schemes. One of the schemes can reproduce a clear increase of Ni with decreasing temperature, by using either an observation based ice nuclei spectrum or a classical theory based spectrum with a relatively low (5%-10%) maximum freezing ratio for dust aerosols. The simulation with the other scheme, which assumes a high maximum freezing ratio (100%), shows much weaker temperature dependence of Ni. Simulations are also performed to test empirical parameters related to water vapor deposition and the auto-conversion of ice crystals to snow. Results show that a value between 0.05 and 0.1 for the water vapor deposition coefficient and 250 um for the critical ice crystal size can produce good agreements between model simulation and the SPARTICUS measurements in terms of ice crystal number concentration and effective radius. The climate impact of perturbing these parameters is also discussed.

  1. Nickel container of highly-enriched uranium bodies and sodium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zinn, Walter H.

    1976-01-01

    A fuel element comprises highly a enriched uranium bodies coated with a nonfissionable, corrosion resistant material. A plurality of these bodies are disposed in layers, with sodium filling the interstices therebetween. The entire assembly is enclosed in a fluid-tight container of nickel.

  2. Electronic unit integrated into a flexible polymer body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Maghribi, Mariam N.; Benett, William J.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Rose, Klint A.; Davidson, James Courtney; Strauch, Mark S.

    2005-04-12

    A peel and stick electronic system comprises a silicone body, and at least one electronic unit operatively connected to the silicone body. The electronic system is produce by providing a silicone layer on a substrate, providing a metal layer on the silicone layer, and providing at least one electronic unit connected to the metal layer.

  3. Electronic Unit Integrated Into A Flexible Polymer Body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Maghribi, Mariam N.; Benett, William J.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Rose, Klint A.; Davidson, James Courtney; Strauch, Mark S.

    2006-01-31

    A peel and stick electronic system comprises a silicone body, and at least one electronic unit operatively connected to the silicone body. The electronic system is produce by providing a silicone layer on a substrate, providing a metal layer on the silicone layer, and providing at least one electronic unit connected to the metal layer.

  4. FRAMES User Defined Body Burden Concentration File Module Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelton, Mitchell A.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Eslinger, Melany A.; Gelston, Gariann M.

    2001-06-01

    The Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems (FRAMES) Body Burden Concentration File (BBF) contains time-varying, instantaneous, constituent concentrations for body burden by contaminant. This report contains the requirements for this file and will be used by software engineers and testers to ensure that the file inputs properly.

  5. Electronic unit integrated into a flexible polymer body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Maghribi, Mariam N.; Benett, William J.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Rose, Klint A.; Davidson, James Courtney; Strauch, Mark S.

    2008-03-11

    A peel and stick electronic system comprises a silicone body, and at least one electronic unit operatively connected to the silicone body. The electronic system is produce by providing a silicone layer on a substrate, providing a metal layer on the silicone layer, and providing at least one electronic unit connected to the metal layer.

  6. Electronic unit integrated into a flexible polymer body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Maghribi, Mariam N.; Benett, William J.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Rose, Klint A.; Davidson, James Courtney; Strauch, Mark S.

    2006-04-18

    A peel and stick electronic system comprises a silicone body, and at least one electronic unit operatively connected to the silicone body. The electronic system is produce by providing a silicone layer on a substrate, providing a metal layer on the silicone layer, and providing at least one electronic unit connected to the metal layer.

  7. On the representation of many-body interactions in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medders, Gregory R.; Gotz, Andreas W.; Morales, Miguel A.; Bajaj, Pushp; Paesani, Francesco

    2015-09-09

    Our recent work has shown that the many-body expansion of the interactionenergy can be used to develop analytical representations of global potential energy surfaces (PESs) for water. In this study, the role of short- and long-range interactions at different orders is investigated by analyzing water potentials that treat the leading terms of the many-body expansion through implicit (i.e., TTM3-F and TTM4-F PESs) and explicit (i.e., WHBB and MB-pol PESs) representations. Moreover, it is found that explicit short-range representations of 2-body and 3-body interactions along with a physically correct incorporation of short- and long-range contributions are necessary for an accurate representation of the waterinteractions from the gas to the condensed phase. Likewise, a complete many-body representation of the dipole moment surface is found to be crucial to reproducing the correct intensities of the infrared spectrum of liquid water.

  8. VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY IMAGING OF PARSEC-SCALE JET STRUCTURES IN RADIO-LOUD NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doi, Akihiro; Asada, Keiichi; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2011-09-10

    We conducted very long baseline interferometry observations of five radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies in milliarcsecond resolutions at 1.7 GHz ({lambda}18 cm) using the Very Long Baseline Array. Significant parsec (pc) scale structures were revealed for three out of the five sources with high brightness temperature by direct imaging; this is convincing evidence for nonthermal jets. FBQS J1644+2619 with an inverted spectrum showed a prominent one-sided linear structure, indicating Doppler beaming with an intrinsic jet speed of >0.74c. FBQS J1629+4007, also with an inverted spectrum, showed rapid flux variability, indicating Doppler beaming with an intrinsic jet speed of >0.88c. Thus, we found convincing evidence that these two NLS1s can generate at least mildly or highly relativistic jets, which may make them apparently radio loud even if they are intrinsically radio quiet. On the other hand, the other three NLS1s had steep spectra and two of them showed significantly diffuse pc-scale structures, which were unlikely to be strongly beamed. Thus, some NLS1s have the ability to generate jets strong enough to make them intrinsically radio loud without Doppler beaming. NLS1s as a class show a number of extreme properties and radio-loud ones are very rare. We build on these radio results to understand that the central engines of radio-loud NLS1s are essentially the same as that of other radio-loud active galactic nuclei in terms of the formation of nonthermal jets.

  9. Gemini long-slit observations of luminous obscured quasars: Further evidence for an upper limit on the size of the narrow-line region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hainline, Kevin N.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Greene, Jenny E.; Myers, Adam D.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Liu, Guilin; Liu, Xin

    2014-05-20

    We examine the spatial extent of the narrow-line regions (NLRs) of a sample of 30 luminous obscured quasars at 0.4 < z < 0.7 observed with spatially resolved Gemini-N GMOS long-slit spectroscopy. Using the [O III] ?5007 emission feature, we estimate the size of the NLR using a cosmology-independent measurement: the radius where the surface brightness falls to 10{sup 15} erg s{sup 1} cm{sup 2} arcsec{sup 2}. We then explore the effects of atmospheric seeing on NLR size measurements and conclude that direct measurements of the NLR size from observed profiles are too large by 0.1-0.2 dex on average, as compared to measurements made to best-fit Srsic or Voigt profiles convolved with the seeing. These data, which span a full order of magnitude in IR luminosity (log (L {sub 8} {sub ?m}/erg s{sup 1}) = 44.4-45.4), also provide strong evidence that there is a flattening of the relationship between NLR size and active galactic nucleus luminosity at a seeing-corrected size of ?7 kpc. The objects in this sample have high luminosities which place them in a previously under-explored portion of the size-luminosity relationship. These results support the existence of a maximal size of the NLR around luminous quasars; beyond this size, there is either not enough gas or the gas is over-ionized and does not produce enough [O III] ?5007 emission.

  10. A study of two-body forces in fluidization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwa, B. A.; Rauenzahn, Rick M.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of two-body forces on the structure of dynamic waves in fluidized beds is studied, with particular emphasis on expansion waves. Averaged equations of motion are used for the study, so the media appear to be interpenetrating continua. Both inertial and viscous two-body effects are considered for incompressible materials fluidized by an incompressible fluid. Inertial effects are included in the averaged momentum exchange force, using exact (classical) results for the potential flow generated by the motion of one submerged body relative to another body. Viscous effects are represented, in the limit of zero relative Reynolds number, by solutions to Stokes equations for the two-body problem. For simple one-dimensional motion the inertial force is repulsive always, giving a positive compressibility to the dispersed field total density; the force is of such a magnitude that the single-pressure continuum equations are unconditionally hyperbolic. The corresponding 1-D viscous force is attractive when the bodies move apart, and therefore introduces a negative compressibility to the dispersed field. Competition between the two-body inertial and viscous forces ultimately determines the nature of dynamic waves in a given fluidization system.

  11. Aircraft-measured indirect cloud effects from biomass burning smoke in the Arctic and subarctic

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zamora, L. M.; Kahn, R. A.; Cubison, M. J.; Diskin, G. S.; Jimenez, J. L.; Kondo, Y.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Nenes, A.; Thornhill, K. L.; Wisthaler, A.; et al

    2016-01-21

    The incidence of wildfires in the Arctic and subarctic is increasing; in boreal North America, for example, the burned area is expected to increase by 200–300% over the next 50–100 years, which previous studies suggest could have a large effect on cloud microphysics, lifetime, albedo, and precipitation. However, the interactions between smoke particles and clouds remain poorly quantified due to confounding meteorological influences and remote sensing limitations. Here, we use data from several aircraft campaigns in the Arctic and subarctic to explore cloud microphysics in liquid-phase clouds influenced by biomass burning. Median cloud droplet radii in smoky clouds were ~40–60% smallermore » than in background clouds. Based on the relationship between cloud droplet number (Nliq) and various biomass burning tracers (BBt) across the multi-campaign data set, we calculated the magnitude of subarctic and Arctic smoke aerosol–cloud interactions (ACIs, where ACI = (1/3) × dln(Nliq)/dln(BBt)) to be ~0.16 out of a maximum possible value of 0.33 that would be obtained if all aerosols were to nucleate cloud droplets. Interestingly, in a separate subarctic case study with low liquid water content (~0.02gm–3) and very high aerosol concentrations (2000–3000 cm–3) in the most polluted clouds, the estimated ACI value was only 0.05. In this case, competition for water vapor by the high concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) strongly limited the formation of droplets and reduced the cloud albedo effect, which highlights the importance of cloud feedbacks across scales. Using our calculated ACI values, we estimate that the smoke-driven cloud albedo effect may decrease local summertime short-wave radiative flux by between 2 and 4 Wm–2 or more under some low and homogeneous cloud cover conditions in the subarctic, although the changes should be smaller in high surface albedo regions of the Arctic. Furthermore, we lastly explore evidence suggesting that

  12. Assessment of the 60 km rapid update cycle (RUC) with near real-time aircraft reports. Project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.E.; Richard, C.; Kim, S.; Bailey, D.

    1998-07-15

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing the Center-TRA-CON Advisory System (CTAS), a set of Air Traffic Management (ATM) Decision Support Tools (DST) for en route (Center) and terminal (TRACON) airspace designed to enable controllers to increase capacity and flight efficiency. A crucial component of the CTAS, or any ATM DST, is the computation of the time-of-flight of aircraft along flight path segments. Earlier NASA studies show that accurate knowledge of the wind through which the aircraft are flying is required to estimate time-of-flight accurately. There are current envisioned to be two sources of wind data for CTAS: The Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) for the Center airspace, a numerical model developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Forecast System Laboratory (FSL) and run operationally by the National Weather Service (NWS) National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP); and The Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS) Terminal Winds (TW) for the TRACON airspace, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory under funding from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This study has three goals: (1) determine the errors in the baseline 60 km resolution RUC forecast wind fields relative to the needs of en route DSTs such as CTAS, (2) determine the benefit of using the TW algorithm to refine the RUC forecast wind fields with near real-time Meteorological Data Collection and Reporting System (MDCRS) reports, and (3) identify factors that influence wind errors in order to improve accuracy and estimate errors in real time.

  13. TCCP 49 - Inquests Upon Dead Bodies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Inquests Upon Dead BodiesLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 1987 Legal Citation TCCP 49 (1987) DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org...

  14. CCP Art. 49 Inquests upon dead bodies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CCP Art. 49 Inquests upon dead bodies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: CCP Art. 49 Inquests upon dead...

  15. Trails and Dead Bodies: Directly Characterizing Extrasolar Planets...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trails and Dead Bodies: Directly Characterizing Extrasolar Planets with Adaptive Optics October 2, 2015 11:00AM to 12:00PM Presenter Mark Ammons, Lawrence Livermore National...

  16. ORS 97 - Rights and Duties Relating to Cemeteries, Human Bodies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    97 - Rights and Duties Relating to Cemeteries, Human Bodies and Anatomical Gifts Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute:...

  17. ATHENA desktop human "body" could reduce need for animal drug...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATHENA could reduce need for animal drug tests ATHENA desktop human "body" could reduce need for animal drug tests ATHENA project team is developing four human organ constructs that ...

  18. Energy and momentum conserving algorithms for rigid body contact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puso, M.A.; Zywicz, E.

    1998-04-09

    Energy-momentum conserving methods are developed for rigid body dynamics with contact. Because these methods are unconditionally stable, they are not time step dependent and, hence, are well suited for incorporation into structural mechanics finite element codes. Both penalty and Lagrange multiplier methods are developed herein and are the extension of the energy-momentum conserving integration schemes for rigid bodies given by Simo and Wong [1].

  19. Motion of small bodies in classical field theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gralla, Samuel E. [Enrico Fermi Institute and Department of Physics University of Chicago 5640 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    I show how prior work with R. Wald on geodesic motion in general relativity can be generalized to classical field theories of a metric and other tensor fields on four-dimensional spacetime that (1) are second-order and (2) follow from a diffeomorphism-covariant Lagrangian. The approach is to consider a one-parameter-family of solutions to the field equations satisfying certain assumptions designed to reflect the existence of a body whose size, mass, and various charges are simultaneously scaled to zero. (That such solutions exist places a further restriction on the class of theories to which our results apply.) Assumptions are made only on the spacetime region outside of the body, so that the results apply independent of the body's composition (and, e.g., black holes are allowed). The worldline 'left behind' by the shrinking, disappearing body is interpreted as its lowest-order motion. An equation for this worldline follows from the 'Bianchi identity' for the theory, without use of any properties of the field equations beyond their being second-order. The form of the force law for a theory therefore depends only on the ranks of its various tensor fields; the detailed properties of the field equations are relevant only for determining the charges for a particular body (which are the ''monopoles'' of its exterior fields in a suitable limiting sense). I explicitly derive the force law (and mass-evolution law) in the case of scalar and vector fields, and give the recipe in the higher-rank case. Note that the vector force law is quite complicated, simplifying to the Lorentz force law only in the presence of the Maxwell gauge symmetry. Example applications of the results are the motion of 'chameleon' bodies beyond the Newtonian limit, and the motion of bodies in (classical) non-Abelian gauge theory. I also make some comments on the role that scaling plays in the appearance of universality in the motion of bodies.

  20. Choice of an equivalent black body solar temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parrott, J.E. )

    1993-09-01

    In the course of modeling the performance of photovoltaic solar cells for space use, it became desirable to set up a black body spectrum equivalent to the standard Air Mass Zero (AMO) solar spectrum. A method of calculating the equivalent black body solar surface temperature, based on irradiance and photon number flux derived from the AMO spectrum, is presented. It does not require knowledge of the angle subtended by the sun at the earth's surface. The value obtained is 5730 +/- 90 K.

  1. International Carbon Storage Body Praises Department of Energy Projects |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Carbon Storage Body Praises Department of Energy Projects International Carbon Storage Body Praises Department of Energy Projects November 8, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Three U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) projects have been identified by an international carbon storage organization as an important advancement toward commercialization and large-scale deployment of carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) technologies. The projects were officially

  2. STRONG UV AND X-RAY VARIABILITY OF THE NARROW LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY WPVS 007-ON THE NATURE OF THE X-RAY LOW STATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grupe, Dirk; Barlow, Brad N.; Komossa, S.; Scharwaechter, Julia; Dietrich, Matthias; Leighly, Karen M.; Lucy, Adrian E-mail: julia.scharwaechter@obspm.fr

    2013-10-01

    We report on multi-wavelength observations of the X-ray transient Narrow Line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxy WPVS 007. The galaxy was monitored with Swift between 2005 October and 2013 July, after it had previously undergone a dramatic drop in its X-ray flux. For the first time, we are able to repeatedly detect this NLS1 in X-rays again. This increased number of detections in the last couple of years may suggest that the strong absorber that has been found in this active galactic nucleus (AGN) is starting to become leaky and may eventually disappear. The X-ray spectra obtained for WPVS 007 are all consistent with a partial covering absorber model. A spectrum based on the data during the extreme low X-ray flux states shows that the absorption column density is of the order of 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2} with a covering fraction of 95%. WPVS 007 also displays one of the strongest UV variabilities seen in NLS1s. The UV continuum variability anti-correlates with the optical/UV slope {alpha}{sub UV}, which suggests that the variability may be primarily due to reddening. The UV variability timescales are consistent with moving dust ''clouds'' located beyond the dust sublimation radius of R{sub sub} Almost-Equal-To 20 lt-days. We present for the first time near-infrared JHK data of WPVS 007, which reveal a rich emission-line spectrum. Recent optical spectroscopy does not indicate significant variability in the broad permitted and Fe II emission lines, implying that the ionizing continuum seen by those gas clouds has not significantly changed over the last decades. All X-ray and UV observations are consistent with a scenario in which an evolving broad absorption line (BAL) flow obscures the continuum emission. As such, WPVS 007 is an important target for our understanding of BAL flows in low-mass AGNs.

  3. Temperature dependence of the carrier lifetime in Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1−x}Te narrow-gap solid solutions with consideration for Auger processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazhenov, N. L. Mynbaev, K. D.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2015-04-15

    The temperature dependence of the carrier lifetime in Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1−x}Te narrow-gap solid solutions in the temperature range 5 K < T < 300 K is analyzed within the scope of a microscopic model. Main attention is given to an analysis of the Auger recombination mechanism governing the carrier lifetime at high temperatures. The Auger-recombination rates are calculated with consideration for specific features of the band structure of the narrow-gap semiconductor in microscopic theory. It is shown that strict account of the non-parabolicity of the electronic structure in terms of Kane’s model leads to a substantially different temperature dependence of the Auger-recombination rates, compared with the approach in which nonparabolicity is disregarded.

  4. Multiple and fast: The accretion of ordinary chondrite parent bodies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vernazza, P.; Barge, P.; Zanda, B.; Hewins, R.; Binzel, R. P.; DeMeo, F. E.; Lockhart, M.; Hiroi, T.; Birlan, M.; Ricci, L.

    2014-08-20

    Although petrologic, chemical, and isotopic studies of ordinary chondrites and meteorites in general have largely helped establish a chronology of the earliest events of planetesimal formation and their evolution, there are several questions that cannot be resolved via laboratory measurements and/or experiments alone. Here, we propose the rationale for several new constraints on the formation and evolution of ordinary chondrite parent bodies (and, by extension, most planetesimals) from newly available spectral measurements and mineralogical analysis of main-belt S-type asteroids (83 objects) and unequilibrated ordinary chondrite meteorites (53 samples). Based on the latter, we suggest that spectral data may be used to distinguish whether an ordinary chondrite was formed near the surface or in the interior of its parent body. If these constraints are correct, the suggested implications include that: (1) large groups of compositionally similar asteroids are a natural outcome of planetesimal formation and, consequently, meteorites within a given class can originate from multiple parent bodies; (2) the surfaces of large (up to ∼200 km) S-type main-belt asteroids mostly expose the interiors of the primordial bodies, a likely consequence of impacts by small asteroids (D < 10 km) in the early solar system; (3) the duration of accretion of the H chondrite parent bodies was likely short (instantaneous or in less than ∼10{sup 5} yr, but certainly not as long as 1 Myr); (4) LL-like bodies formed closer to the Sun than H-like bodies, a possible consequence of the radial mixing and size sorting of chondrules in the protoplanetary disk prior to accretion.

  5. The probability of laser caused ocular injury to the aircrew of undetected aircraft violating the exclusion zone about the airborne aura LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2006-12-01

    The probability of a laser caused ocular injury, to the aircrew of an undetected aircraft entering the exclusion zone about the AURA LIDAR airborne platform with the possible violation of the Laser Hazard Zone boundary, was investigated and quantified for risk analysis and management.

  6. Small Body Exploration Technologies as Precursors for Interstellar Robotics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noble, Robert; Sykes, Mark V.; /PSI, Tucson

    2012-02-15

    The scientific activities undertaken to explore our Solar System will be the same as required someday at other stars. The systematic exploration of primitive small bodies throughout our Solar System requires new technologies for autonomous robotic spacecraft. These diverse celestial bodies contain clues to the early stages of the Solar System's evolution as well as information about the origin and transport of water-rich and organic material, the essential building blocks for life. They will be among the first objects studied at distant star systems. The technologies developed to address small body and outer planet exploration will form much of the technical basis for designing interstellar robotic explorers. The Small Bodies Assessment Group, which reports to NASA, initiated a Technology Forum in 2011 that brought together scientists and technologists to discuss the needs and opportunities for small body robotic exploration in the Solar System. Presentations and discussions occurred in the areas of mission and spacecraft design, electric power, propulsion, avionics, communications, autonomous navigation, remote sensing and surface instruments, sampling, intelligent event recognition, and command and sequencing software. In this paper, the major technology themes from the Technology Forum are reviewed, and suggestions are made for developments that will have the largest impact on realizing autonomous robotic vehicles capable of exploring other star systems.

  7. On the representation of many-body interactions in water

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Medders, Gregory R.; Gotz, Andreas W.; Morales, Miguel A.; Bajaj, Pushp; Paesani, Francesco

    2015-09-09

    Our recent work has shown that the many-body expansion of the interactionenergy can be used to develop analytical representations of global potential energy surfaces (PESs) for water. In this study, the role of short- and long-range interactions at different orders is investigated by analyzing water potentials that treat the leading terms of the many-body expansion through implicit (i.e., TTM3-F and TTM4-F PESs) and explicit (i.e., WHBB and MB-pol PESs) representations. Moreover, it is found that explicit short-range representations of 2-body and 3-body interactions along with a physically correct incorporation of short- and long-range contributions are necessary for an accurate representationmore » of the waterinteractions from the gas to the condensed phase. Likewise, a complete many-body representation of the dipole moment surface is found to be crucial to reproducing the correct intensities of the infrared spectrum of liquid water.« less

  8. Isolation and characterization of Microtox{reg_sign}-active components from aircraft de-icing/anti-icing fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cancilla, D.A.; Holtkamp, A.; Fang, X.; Matassa, L.

    1997-03-01

    The goal of this project was to isolate and identify individual components from aircraft de-icing/anti-icing fluids (ADAFs) through a toxicity-based bioassay analysis. A Microtox{reg_sign} bioassay fractionation scheme was used to isolate a number of active fractions from ADAFs. Active fractions were identified using multiple spectral techniques, including nuclear magnetic resonance, gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and ultraviolet characterization. The primary Microtox-active fraction was shown to be a mixture of benzotriazole and tolyltriazoles, which are used as corrosion inhibitors in ADAF formulations. The identity of the compounds was confirmed through spectral and Microtox-toxicity analysis and comparison of commercially available standards.

  9. Parallel halo finding in N-body cosmology simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfitzner, D.W.; Salmon, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    Cosmological N-body simulations on parallel computers produce large datasets - about five hundred Megabytes at a single output time, or tens of Gigabytes over the course of a simulation. These large datasets require further analysis before they can be compared to astronomical observations. We have implemented two methods for performing halo finding, a key part of the knowledge discovery process, on parallel machines. One of these is a parallel implementation of the friends of friends (FOF) algorithm, widely used in the field of N-body cosmology. The new isodensity (ID) method has been developed to overcome some of the shortcomings of FOR Both have been implemented on a variety of computer systems, and successfully used to extract halos from simulations with up to 256{sup 3} (or about 16.8 million) particles, which axe among the largest N-body cosmology simulations in existence.

  10. Structural Diagnostics of CFRP Composite Aircraft Components by Ultrasonic Guided Waves and Built-In Piezoelectric Transducers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard M. Matt

    2007-02-15

    To monitor in-flight damage and reduce life-cycle costs associated with CFRP composite aircraft, an autonomous built-in structural health monitoring (SHM) system is preferred over conventional maintenance routines and schedules. This thesis investigates the use of ultrasonic guided waves and piezoelectric transducers for the identification and localization of damage/defects occurring within critical components of CFRP composite aircraft wings, mainly the wing skin-to-spar joints. The guided wave approach for structural diagnostics was demonstrated by the dual application of active and passive monitoring techniques. For active interrogation, the guided wave propagation problem was initially studied numerically by a semi-analytical finite element method, which accounts for viscoelastic damping, in order to identify ideal mode-frequency combinations sensitive to damage occurring within CFRP bonded joints. Active guided wave tests across three representative wing skin-to-spar joints at ambient temperature were then conducted using attached Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) transducers. Results from these experiments demonstrate the importance of intelligent feature extraction for improving the sensitivity to damage. To address the widely neglected effects of temperature on guided wave base damage identification, analytical and experimental analyses were performed to characterize the influence of temperature on guided wave signal features. In addition, statistically-robust detection of simulated damage in a CFRP bonded joint was successfully achieved under changing temperature conditions through a dimensionally-low, multivariate statistical outlier analysis. The response of piezoceramic patches and MFC transducers to ultrasonic Rayleigh and Lamb wave fields was analytically derived and experimentally validated. This theory is useful for designing sensors which possess optimal sensitivity toward a given mode-frequency combination or for predicting the frequency dependent

  11. Comparison of improved Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) CO{sub 2} with HIPPO and SGP aircraft profile measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulawik, S. S.; Worden, J. R.; Wofsy, S. C.; Biraud, S. C.; Nassar, R.; Jones, D. B.A.; Olsen, E. T.; Osterman, G. B.

    2012-02-01

    Comparisons are made between mid-tropospheric Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) satellite measurements and ocean profiles from three Hiaper Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) campaigns and land aircraft profiles from the United States Southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site over a 4-yr period. These comparisons are used to characterize the bias in the TES CO{sub 2} estimates and to assess whether calculated and actual uncertainties and sensitivities are consistent. The HIPPO dataset is one of the few datasets spanning the altitude range where TES CO{sub 2} estimates are sensitive, which is especially important for characterization of biases. We find that TES CO{sub 2} estimates capture the seasonal and latitudinal gradients observed by HIPPO CO{sub 2} measurements; actual errors range from 0.8–1.2 ppm, depending on the campaign, and are approximately 1.4 times larger than the predicted errors. The bias of TES versus HIPPO is within 0.85 ppm for each of the 3 campaigns; however several of the sub-tropical TES CO{sub 2} estimates are lower than expected based on the calculated errors. Comparisons of aircraft flask profiles, which are measured from the surface to 5 km, to TES CO{sub 2} at the SGP ARM site show good agreement with an overall bias of 0.1 ppm and rms of 1.0 ppm. We also find that the predicted sensitivity of the TES CO{sub 2} estimates is too high, which results from using a multi-step retrieval for CO{sub 2} and temperature. We find that the averaging kernel in the TES product corrected by a pressure-dependent factor accurately reflects the sensitivity of the TES CO{sub 2} product.

  12. TIGER -- A technology to improve the delivery capability of nuclear bombs and the survivability of the delivery aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-12-31

    The TIGER (Terminal guided and Extended-Range) Program was initiated in 1972 to study improved delivery capabilities for stockpiled tactical nuclear bombs. The Southeast Asia conflict fostered the development of air-delivered standoff conventional weapons utilizing terminal guidance systems. SNL initiated the TIGER program to determine if current nuclear bombs could be provided with a similarly accurate standoff capabilities. These conventional weapon delivery techniques, while allowing highly accurate attack, generally require entering the target area at high altitude to establish line of sight to the target. In parallel with the TIGER program, system studies analyzed this concept and showed marked improvement in aircraft and weapon survivability with moderate standoff (10--20 km) if low level deliveries (60 m) could be accomplished. As a result of this work, the TIGER program was redirected in early 1974 to demonstrate a standoff bomb with good accuracy (90 m CEP) when delivered from low flying aircraft. This program redirection resulted in the selection of an inertial guidance system to replace the earlier terminal guidance systems. This program was called the Extended-Range Bomb (ERB). In May 1974, a joint Air Force/DOE study identified the desirability of having a single tactical weapon which could be employed against either fixed, preselected targets, or mobile battlefield targets. Studies conducted on the ERB system showed that the inertially guided weapon could fly not only the standoff mission but also a return-to-target mission against the mobile battlefield targets whose locations are not known accurately enough to use a standoff delivery. The ERB program evolved from these initial investigations into an exploratory program to develop the hardware and demonstrate the technology required to fly standoff and return-to-target trajectories. The application of this technology in the form of field retrofit kits to the B61 bomb is called TIGER II.

  13. Porter-Thomas distribution in unstable many-body systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volya, Alexander

    2011-04-15

    We use the continuum shell model approach to explore the resonance width distribution in unstable many-body systems. The single-particle nature of a decay, the few-body character of the interaction Hamiltonian, and the collectivity that emerges in nonstationary systems due to the coupling to the continuum of reaction states are discussed. Correlations between the structures of the parent and daughter nuclear systems in the common Fock space are found to result in deviations of decay width statistics from the Porter-Thomas distribution.

  14. Design for manufacturability evaluation: Composite NIF Pockel Cell body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, W.A.; Spellman, G.P.

    1994-04-01

    A survey of composite materials and processes for the NIF Optical Switch Body is described. Mechanical and physical criterion set upon the part are used as guidelines for the selection of materials and processes for manufacturing. Benefits, costs, and risks associated with selected processes, as well as a recommendation for prototype fabrication is presented.

  15. Advanced Waste Management Now Available as Accredited SEP Verification Body

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy is pleased to announce that Advanced Waste Management Systems Inc. (AWM) is now a fully accredited Verification Body for Superior Energy Performance™ (SEP). This ANSI-ANAB accreditation enables AWM to provide third-party verification for industrial facilities that wish to demonstrate energy management excellence and sustained energy savings to earn SEP certification.

  16. Heterogeneous composite bodies with isolated lenticular shaped cermet regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sherman, Andrew J.

    2009-12-22

    A heterogeneous body having ceramic rich cermet regions in a more ductile metal matrix. The heterogeneous bodies are formed by thermal spray operations on metal substrates. The thermal spray operations apply heat to a cermet powder and project it onto a solid substrate. The cermet powder is composed of complex composite particles in which a complex ceramic-metallic core particle is coated with a matrix precursor. The cermet regions are generally comprised of complex ceramic-metallic composites that correspond approximately to the core particles. The cermet regions are approximately lenticular shaped with an average width that is at least approximately twice the average thickness. The cermet regions are imbedded within the matrix phase and generally isolated from one another. They have obverse and reverse surfaces. The matrix phase is formed from the matrix precursor coating on the core particles. The amount of heat applied during the formation of the heterogeneous body is controlled so that the core particles soften but do not become so fluid that they disperse throughout the matrix phase. The force of the impact on the surface of the substrate tends to flatten them. The flattened cermet regions tend to be approximately aligned with one another in the body.

  17. Forces and moments on a slender, cavitating body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hailey, C.E.; Clark, E.L.; Buffington, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Recently a numerical code has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to predict the pitching moment, normal force, and axial force of a slender, supercavitating shape. The potential flow about the body and cavity is calculated using an axial distribution of source/sink elements. The cavity surface is assumed to be a constant pressure streamline, extending beyond the base of the model. Slender body approximation is used to model the crossflow for small angles of attack. A significant extension of previous work in cavitation flow is the inclusion of laminar and turbulent boundary layer solutions on the body. Predictions with this code, for axial force at zero angle of attack, show good agreement with experiments. There are virtually no published data availble with which to benchmark the pitching moment and normal force predictions. An experiment was designed to measure forces and moments on a supercavitation shape. The primary reason for the test was to obtain much needed data to benchmark the hydrodynamic force and moment predictions. Since the numerical prediction is for super cavitating shapes at very small cavitation numbers, the experiment was designed to be a ventilated cavity test. This paper describes the experimental procedure used to measure the pitching moment, axial and normal forces, and base pressure on a slender body with a ventilated cavity. Limited results are presented for pitching moment and normal force. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Comparisons of cloud ice mass content retrieved from the radar-infrared radiometer method with aircraft data during the second international satellite cloud climatology project regional experiment (FIRE-II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matrosov, S.Y. |; Heymsfield, A.J.; Kropfli, R.A.; Snider, J.B.

    1996-04-01

    Comparisons of remotely sensed meteorological parameters with in situ direct measurements always present a challenge. Matching sampling volumes is one of the main problems for such comparisons. Aircraft usually collect data when flying along a horizontal leg at a speed of about 100 m/sec (or even greater). The usual sampling time of 5 seconds provides an average horizontal resolution of the order of 500 m. Estimations of vertical profiles of cloud microphysical parameters from aircraft measurements are hampered by sampling a cloud at various altitudes at different times. This paper describes the accuracy of aircraft horizontal and vertical coordinates relative to the location of the ground-based instruments.

  19. Observation of a narrow mass state decaying into Υ(1S)+γ in pp[over ¯] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2012-08-01

    Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.3 fb{sup -1}, we observe a narrow mass state decaying into {Upsilon}(1S) + {gamma}, where the {Upsilon}(1S) meson is detected by its decay into a pair of oppositely charged muons, and the photon is identified through its conversion into an electron-positron pair. The significance of this observation is 5.6 standard deviations. The mass of the state is centered at 10.551 {+-} 0.014(stat.) {+-} 0.017(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, which is consistent with that of the state recently observed by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  20. Method of forming aluminum oxynitride material and bodies formed by such methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bakas, Michael P. [Ammon, ID; Lillo, Thomas M. [Idaho Falls, ID; Chu, Henry S. [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-11-16

    Methods of forming aluminum oxynitride (AlON) materials include sintering green bodies comprising aluminum orthophosphate or another sacrificial material therein. Such green bodies may comprise aluminum, oxygen, and nitrogen in addition to the aluminum orthophosphate. For example, the green bodies may include a mixture of aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, and aluminum orthophosphate or another sacrificial material. Additional methods of forming aluminum oxynitride (AlON) materials include sintering a green body including a sacrificial material therein, using the sacrificial material to form pores in the green body during sintering, and infiltrating the pores formed in the green body with a liquid infiltrant during sintering. Bodies are formed using such methods.

  1. Single-friction-surface triboelectric generator with human body conduit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Bo; Cheng, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Han, Mengdi; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Haixia

    2014-03-10

    We present a transparent single-friction-surface triboelectric generator (STEG) employing human body as the conduit, making the applications of STEG in portable electronics much more practical and leading to a significant output improvement. The STEG with micro-patterned polydimethylsiloxane surface achieved an output voltage of over 200 V with a current density of 4.7 ?A/cm{sup 2}. With human body conduit, the output current increased by 39% and the amount of charge that transferred increased by 34% compared to the results with grounded electrode. A larger increment of 210% and 81% was obtained in the case of STEG with a large-size flat polyethylene terephthalate surface.

  2. Chiral Two-body Currents and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menendez, Javier [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2011-12-16

    The nuclear matrix elements (NMEs) of neutrinoless double-beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay are studied using weak currents derived in the framework of chiral effective field theory. Apart from the standard one-body (1b) currents, it is shown that two-body (2b) currents contribute to weak processes. The normal-ordered 1b part of 2b currents modifies the Gamow-Teller (GT){sigma}{tau}{sup -} part of the 1b current, contributing to the well-known quenching of GT single-{beta} decays. The momentum-transfer dependence of the quenching due to 2b currents is also predicted. Therefore, including 2b currents allows to address, microscopically, the problem of the axial weak coupling (g{sub A}) value, which is the biggest uncertainty in the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay NME calculations for all available methods.

  3. COMPOSITION AND METHOD FOR COATING A CERAMIC BODY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blanchard, M.K.

    1958-11-01

    A method is presented for protecting a beryllium carbide-graphite body. The method consists in providing a ceramic coating which must contain at least one basic oxide component, such as CaO, at least one amphoteric oxide component, such as Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and at least one acidic oxide component, such as SiO/ sub 2/. Various specific formulations for this ceramic coating are given and the coating is applied by conventional ceramic techniques.

  4. Experimental studies of electromagnetic properties of few body systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosted, P.E.

    1987-08-01

    An overview is given of some recent and planned experiments which have or will substantially increase our knowledge of the electromagnetic properties of few body systems. Specific examples include the proton and neutron elastic form factors, the deuteron elastic form factors, deuteron threshold electrodisintegration and quasi-elastic scattering, deuteron photodisintegration, and finally measurements of cross sections in deep inelastic scattering from hydrogen, deuterium, and iron. 47 refs., 13 figs. (DWL)

  5. Probing many-body interactions in an optical lattice clock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rey, A.M.; Gorshkov, A.V.; Kraus, C.V.; Martin, M.J.; Bishof, M.; Swallows, M.D.; Zhang, X.; Benko, C.; Ye, J.; Lemke, N.D.; Ludlow, A.D.

    2014-01-15

    We present a unifying theoretical framework that describes recently observed many-body effects during the interrogation of an optical lattice clock operated with thousands of fermionic alkaline earth atoms. The framework is based on a many-body master equation that accounts for the interplay between elastic and inelastic p-wave and s-wave interactions, finite temperature effects and excitation inhomogeneity during the quantum dynamics of the interrogated atoms. Solutions of the master equation in different parameter regimes are presented and compared. It is shown that a general solution can be obtained by using the so called Truncated Wigner Approximation which is applied in our case in the context of an open quantum system. We use the developed framework to model the density shift and decay of the fringes observed during Ramsey spectroscopy in the JILA {sup 87}Sr and NIST {sup 171}Yb optical lattice clocks. The developed framework opens a suitable path for dealing with a variety of strongly-correlated and driven open-quantum spin systems. -- Highlights: •Derived a theoretical framework that describes many-body effects in a lattice clock. •Validated the analysis with recent experimental measurements. •Demonstrated the importance of beyond mean field corrections in the dynamics.

  6. Insights into riming and aggregation processes as revealed by aircraft, radar, and disdrometer observations for a 27 April 2011 widespread precipitation event: Insights into Riming and Aggregation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Giangrande, Scott E.; Toto, Tami; Bansemer, Aaron; Kumjian, Matthew R.; Mishra, Subhashree; Ryzhkov, Alexander V.

    2016-05-19

    Our study presents aircraft spiral ascent and descent observations intercepting a transition to riming processes during widespread stratiform precipitation. The sequence is documented using collocated scanning and profiling radar, including longer-wavelength dual polarization measurements and shorter-wavelength Doppler spectra. Riming regions are supported using aircraft measurements recording elevated liquid water concentrations, spherical particle shapes, and saturation with respect to water. Profiling cloud radar observations indicate riming regions during the event as having increasing particle fall speeds, rapid time-height changes, and bimodalities in Doppler spectra. These particular riming signatures are coupled to scanning dual polarization radar observations of higher differential reflectivity (ZDR)more » aloft. Moreover, reduced melting layer enhancements and delayed radar bright-band signatures in the column are also observed during riming periods, most notably with the profiling radar observations. The bimodal cloud radar Doppler spectra captured near riming zones indicate two time-height spectral ice peaks, one rimed particle peak, and one peak associated with pristine ice needle generation and/or growth between -4°C and -7°C also sampled by aircraft probes. We observe this pristine needle population near the rimed particle region which gives a partial explanation for the enhanced ZDR. The riming signatures aloft and radar measurements within the melting level are weakly lag correlated (r~0.6) with smaller median drop sizes at the surface, as compared with later times when aggregation of larger particle sizes was believed dominant.« less

  7. Ecological Risk Assessment Framework for Low-Altitude Overflights by Fixed-Wing and Rotary-Wing Military Aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroymson, R.A.

    2001-01-12

    This is a companion report to the risk assessment framework proposed by Suter et al. (1998): ''A Framework for Assessment of Risks of Military Training and Testing to Natural Resources,'' hereafter referred to as the ''generic framework.'' The generic framework is an ecological risk assessment methodology for use in environmental assessments on Department of Defense (DoD) installations. In the generic framework, the ecological risk assessment framework of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1998) is modified for use in the context of (1) multiple and diverse stressors and activities at a military installation and (2) risks resulting from causal chains, e.g., effects on habitat that indirectly impact wildlife. Both modifications are important if the EPA framework is to be used on military installations. In order for the generic risk assessment framework to be useful to DoD environmental staff and contractors, the framework must be applied to specific training and testing activities. Three activity-specific ecological risk assessment frameworks have been written (1) to aid environmental staff in conducting risk assessments that involve these activities and (2) to guide staff in the development of analogous frameworks for other DoD activities. The three activities are: (1) low-altitude overflights by fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft (this volume), (2) firing at targets on land, and (3) ocean explosions. The activities were selected as priority training and testing activities by the advisory committee for this project.

  8. Naval Air Warfare Center, Aircraft Division at Warminster Environmental Materials Program. Phase 1. Interim report, October 1989-May 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spadafora, S.J.; Hegedus, C.R.; Clark, K.J.; Eng, A.T.; Pulley, D.F.

    1992-06-24

    With the recent increase in awareness about the environment, there is an expanding concern of the deleterious effects of current materials and processes. Federal, state and local environmental agencies such as the EPA, State Air Resource Boards and local Air Quality Management Districts (AQMD) have issued legislation that restrict or prohibit the use and disposal of hazardous materials. National and local laws like the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, and AQMD regulations are examples of rules that govern the handling and disposal of hazardous materials and waste. The Department of Defense (DoD), in support of this effort, has identified the major generators of hazardous materials and hazardous waste to be maintenance depots and operations, particularly cleaning, pretreating, plating, painting and paint removal processes. Reductions of waste in these areas has been targeted as a primary goal in the DOD. The Navy is committed to significantly reducing its current hazardous waste generation and is working to attain a near zero discharge of hazardous waste by the year 2000. In order to attain these goals, the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division at Warminster has organized and is carrying out a comprehensive program in cooperation with the Naval Air Systems Command, the Air Force and the Department of Energy that deal with the elimination or reduction of hazardous materials. .... Environmental materials, Organic coatings, Inorganic pretreatments, Paint removal techniques, Cleaners, CFC'S.

  9. Modelled Black Carbon Radiative Forcing and Atmospheric Lifetime in AeroCom Phase II Constrained by Aircraft Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, Andreas; Kondo, Yutaka; Li, Shao-Meng; Moteki, N.; Koike, Makoto; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, M.; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Lin, Guang; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, Joyce E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Zhang, Kai

    2014-11-27

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols absorb solar radiation, and are generally held to exacerbate global warming through exerting a positive radiative forcing1. However, the total contribution of BC to the ongoing changes in global climate is presently under debate2-8. Both anthropogenic BC emissions and the resulting spatial and temporal distribution of BC concentration are highly uncertain2,9. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood, leading to large estimated uncertainty in BC concentration at high altitudes and far from emission sources10. These uncertainties limit our ability to quantify both the historical, present and future anthropogenic climate impact of BC. Here we compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns with 13 state of the art aerosol models, and show that recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing. Further, an atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in transport dominated remote regions. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in the multi-model median direct BC forcing from fossil fuel and biofuel burning over the industrial era.

  10. Investigation of defect-induced abnormal body current in fin field-effect-transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Kuan-Ju; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Liu, Xi-Wen; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Ching-En; Yang, Ren-Ya; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung

    2015-08-24

    This letter investigates the mechanism of abnormal body current at the linear region in n-channel high-k/metal gate stack fin field effect transistors. Unlike body current, which is generated by impact ionization at high drain voltages, abnormal body current was found to increase with decreasing drain voltages. Notably, the unusual body leakage only occurs in three-dimensional structure devices. Based on measurements under different operation conditions, the abnormal body current can be attributed to fin surface defect-induced leakage current, and the mechanism is electron tunneling to the fin via the defects, resulting in holes left at the body terminal.

  11. Computational nuclear quantum many-body problem: The UNEDF project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fann, George I [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The UNEDF project was a large-scale collaborative effort that applied high-performance computing to the nuclear quantum many-body problem. The primary focus of the project was on constructing, validating, and applying an optimized nuclear energy density functional, which entailed a wide range of pioneering developments in microscopic nuclear structure and reactions, algorithms, high-performance computing, and uncertainty quantification. UNEDF demonstrated that close associations among nuclear physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists can lead to novel physics outcomes built on algorithmic innovations and computational developments. This review showcases a wide range of UNEDF science results to illustrate this interplay.

  12. Continuous method for manufacturing grain-oriented magnetostrictive bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gibson, Edwin D.; Verhoeven, John D.; Schmidt, Frederick A.; McMasters, O. Dale

    1988-01-01

    The invention comprises a continuous casting and crystallization method for manufacturing grain-oriented magnetostrictive bodies. A magnetostrictive alloy is melted in a crucible having a bottom outlet. The melt is discharged through the bottom of the crucible and deposited in an elongated mold. Heat is removed from the deposited melt through the lower end portion of the mold to progressively solidify the melt. The solid-liquid interface of the melt moves directionally upwardly from the bottom to the top of the mold, to produce the axial grain orientation.

  13. Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Medical ExaminerCoroner on the Handling of a BodyHuman Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Medical ExaminerCoroner on the Handling of a BodyHuman Remains ...

  14. STIP 2.0 Static Content for Front Page Body | OSTI, US Dept of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Static Content for Front Page Body STIP 2.0 Static Content for Front Page Body My Profile Create Review OSTI.Gov Newsletter - April-May 2016 Issue 15 OSTIblog: Thorium - An ...

  15. An effective theory for the four-body system (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The well-known linear correlation between the three-body binding energies and the four-body binding energies of these physical systems can be understood as a consequence of the ...

  16. Catalytic Growth of Macroscopic Carbon Nanofibers Bodies with Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdullah, N.; Muhammad, I. S.; Hamid, S. B. Abd.; Rinaldi, A.; Su, D. S.; Schlogl, R.

    2009-06-01

    Carbon-carbon composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofibers have been synthesized by growing Carbon nanofiber (CNF) on Palm shell-based Activated carbon (AC) with Ni catalyst. The composites are in an agglomerated shape due to the entanglement of the defective CNF between the AC particles forming a macroscopic body. The macroscopic size will allow the composite to be used as a stabile catalyst support and liquid adsorbent. The preparation of CNT/AC nanocarbon was initiated by pre-treating the activated carbon with nitric acid, followed by impregnation of 1 wt% loading of nickel (II) nitrate solutions in acetone. The catalyst precursor was calcined and reduced at 300 deg. C for an hour in each step. The catalytic growth of nanocarbon in C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/H{sub 2} was carried out at temperature of 550 deg. C for 2 hrs with different rotating angle in the fluidization system. SEM and N{sub 2} isotherms show the level of agglomeration which is a function of growth density and fluidization of the system. The effect of fluidization by rotating the reactor during growth with different speed give a significant impact on the agglomeration of the final CNF/AC composite and thus the amount of CNFs produced. The macrostructure body produced in this work of CNF/AC composite will have advantages in the adsorbent and catalyst support application, due to the mechanical and chemical properties of the material.

  17. Menu driven heat treatment control of thin walled bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kothmann, Richard E.; Booth, Jr., Russell R.; Grimm, Noel P.; Batenburg, Abram; Thomas, Vaughn M.

    1992-01-01

    A process for controlling the heating of a thin-walled body according to a predetermined temperature program by means of electrically controllable heaters, comprising: disposing the heaters adjacent one surface of the body such that each heater is in facing relation with a respective zone of the surface; supplying heat-generating power to each heater and monitoring the temperature at each surface zone; and for each zone: deriving (16,18,20), on the basis of the temperature values obtained in the monitoring step, estimated temperature values of the surface at successive time intervals each having a first selected duration; generating (28), on the basis of the estimated temperature values derived in each time interval, representations of the temperature, THSIFUT, which each surface zone will have, based on the level of power presently supplied to each heater, at a future time which is separated from the present time interval by a second selected duration; determining (30) the difference between THSIFUT and the desired temperature, FUTREFTVZL, at the future time which is separated from the present time interval by the second selected duration; providing (52) a representation indicating the power level which sould be supplied to each heater in order to reduce the difference obtained in the determining step; and adjusting the power level supplied to each heater by the supplying step in response to the value of the representation provided in the providing step.

  18. The biokinetics of ruthenium in the human body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leggett, Richard Wayne

    2011-01-01

    The biokinetics of ruthenium (Ru) in the human body is of interest due mainly to the potential for occupational or environmental exposure to 106Ru (T1/2 = 373.6 d) and 103Ru (T1/2 = 39.3 d), which typically represent a significant portion of the fission products in a reactor inventory. During reactor operations or nuclear fuel reprocessing these ruthenium isotopes may be present as ruthenium tetroxide (RuO4) vapor, a highly mobile form of ruthenium that has been involved in a number of cases of accidental exposure to 106Ru or 103Ru. This paper summarizes the biokinetic database for ruthenium and proposes a new respiratory model for inhaled RuO4 vapor, a new biokinetic for systemic (absorbed) ruthenium, and material-specific gastrointestinal absorption fractions for ruthenium. The proposed respiratory model for RuO4 differs from the current ICRP model mainly in that it depicts slower clearance of deposited activity from the respiratory tract and lower absorption to blood than depicted in the current ICRP model. The proposed systemic biokinetic model depicts more realistic paths of movement of absorbed ruthenium in the body than the current ICRP model and, in contrast to the present model, a less uniform distribution of systemic activity. Implications of the proposed models with regard to inhalation and ingestion dose coefficients for 106Ru are examined.

  19. Search for the Production of Narrow t anti-b Resonances in 1.9 fb-1 of p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-02-01

    We present new limits on resonant tb production in ppbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV, using 1.9 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We reconstruct a putative tb mass in events with a lepton, neutrino candidate, and two or three jets, and search for anomalous tb production as modeled by W{prime} {yields} tb. We set a new limit on a right-handed W{prime} with standard model-like coupling, excluding any mass below 800 GeV at 95% C.L. For any narrow W{prime}-like state with mass above 800 GeV, the cross-section is found to be less than 0.28 pb at 95% C.L. We also present an exclusion of the W{prime} coupling strength versus W{prime} mass.

  20. Article comprising a garment or other textile structure for use in controlling body temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butzer, Melissa J.

    2000-01-01

    There is disclosed an article for use in cooling body temperature which comprises a garment having a coat and pant, with each having a body section adapted to receive a portion of the torso of the wearer and extensions from the body section to receive the wearer's limbs. The garment includes a system for circulating temperature controlling fluid from a suitable source through patches removably received in pockets in each of body section and extensions.

  1. At DOE, body blows to Fusion, Nuclear Physics, and Particle Physics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    news.sciencemag.orgscienceinsider201202at-doe-body-blows-to-fusion-nucl.html Submitted: Monday, February 13...

  2. Structural phase transition, narrow band gap, and room-temperature ferromagnetism in [KNbO{sub 3}]{sub 1?x}[BaNi{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2}O{sub 3??}]{sub x} ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wenliang; Yang, Pingxiong Chu, Junhao; Deng, Hongmei

    2014-09-15

    Structural phase transition, narrow band gap (E{sub g}), and room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) have been observed in the [KNbO{sub 3}]{sub 1?x}[BaNi{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2}O{sub 3??}]{sub x} (KBNNO) ceramics. All the samples have single phase perovskite structure, but exhibit a gradual transition behaviour from the orthorhombic to a cubic structure with the increase of x. Raman spectroscopy analysis not only corroborates this doping-induced change in normal structure but also shows the local crystal symmetry for x ? 0.1 compositions to deviate from the idealized cubic perovskite structure. A possible mechanism for the observed specific changes in lattice structure is discussed. Moreover, it is noted that KBNNO with compositions x?=?0.10.3 have quite narrow E{sub g} of below 1.5?eV, much smaller than the 3.2?eV band gap of parent KNbO{sub 3} (KNO), which is due to the increasing Ni 3d electronic states within the gap of KNO. Furthermore, the KBNNO materials present RTFM near a tetragonal to cubic phase boundary. With increasing x from 0 to 0.3, the magnetism of the samples develops from diamagnetism to ferromagnetism and paramagnetism, originating from the ferromagneticantiferromagnetic competition. These results are helpful in the deeper understanding of phase transitions, band gap tunability, and magnetism variations in perovskite oxides and show the potential role, such materials can play, in perovskite solar cells and multiferroic applications.

  3. Method for forming a uniformly dense polymer foam body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whinnery, Jr., Leroy

    2002-01-01

    A method for providing a uniformly dense polymer foam body having a density between about 0.013 .sup.g /.sub.cm.sup..sub.3 to about 0.5 .sup.g /.sub.cm.sup..sub.3 is disclosed. The method utilizes a thermally expandable polymer microballoon material wherein some of the microballoons are unexpanded and some are only partially expanded. It is shown that by mixing the two types of materials in appropriate ratios to achieve the desired bulk final density, filling a mold with this mixture so as to displace all or essentially all of the internal volume of the mold, heating the mold for a predetermined interval at a temperature above about 130.degree. C., and then cooling the mold to a temperature below 80.degree. C. the molded part achieves a bulk density which varies by less then about .+-.6% everywhere throughout the part volume.

  4. Charmless three-body decays of B mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, H.-Y.; Chua, C.-K.; Soni, Amarjit

    2007-11-01

    An exploratory study of charmless 3-body decays of B mesons is presented using a simple model based on the framework of the factorization approach. The nonresonant contributions arising from B{yields}P{sub 1}P{sub 2} transitions are evaluated using heavy meson chiral perturbation theory (HMChPT). The momentum dependence of nonresonant amplitudes is assumed to be in the exponential form e{sup -{alpha}{sub N}{sub R}}{sup p{sub B}{center_dot}}{sup (p{sub i}+p{sub j})} so that the HMChPT results are recovered in the soft meson limit p{sub i},p{sub j}{yields}0. In addition, we have identified another large source of the nonresonant signal in the matrix elements of scalar densities, e.g. , which can be constrained from the decay B{sup 0}{yields}K{sub S}K{sub S}K{sub S} or B{sup -}{yields}K{sup -}K{sub S}K{sub S}. The intermediate vector-meson contributions to 3-body decays are identified through the vector current, while the scalar meson resonances are mainly associated with the scalar density. Their effects are described in terms of the Breit-Wigner formalism. Our main results are: (i) All KKK modes are dominated by the nonresonant background. The predicted branching ratios of K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub S(L)}, K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup -} and K{sup -}K{sub S}K{sub S} modes are consistent with the data within errors. (ii) Although the penguin-dominated B{sup 0}{yields}K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub S} decay is subject to a potentially significant tree pollution, its effective sin2{beta} is very similar to that of the K{sub S}K{sub S}K{sub S} mode. However, direct CP asymmetry of the former, being of order -4%, is more prominent than the latter. (iii) For B{yields}K{pi}{pi} decays, we found sizable nonresonant contributions in K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} modes, in agreement with the Belle measurements but larger than the BABAR result. (iv) Time-dependent CP asymmetries in K{sub S}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, a purely CP-even state, and K{sub S

  5. FORMATION BY IRRADIATION OF AN EXPANDED, CELLULAR, POLYMERIC BODY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Charlesby, A.; Ross, M.

    1958-12-01

    The treatment of polymeric esters of methacrylic acid having a softening polnt above 40 icient laborato C to form an expanded cellular mass with a smooth skin is discussed. The disclosed method comprises the steps of subjecting the body at a temperature below the softenpoint to a dose of at least 5 x lO/sup 6/ roentgen of gamma radiation from cobalt-60 source until its average molecular weight is reduced to a value within the range of 3 x lO/sup 5/ to 10/sup 4/, and heating at a temperature within the range of 0 to lO icient laborato C above its softening point to effect expansion.

  6. Tidal dissipation in a homogeneous spherical body. I. Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroimsky, Michael; Makarov, Valeri V. E-mail: vvm@usno.navy.mil

    2014-11-01

    A formula for the tidal dissipation rate in a spherical body is derived from first principles to correct some mathematical inaccuracies found in the literature. The development is combined with the Darwin-Kaula formalism for tides. Our intermediate results are compared with those by Zschau and Platzman. When restricted to the special case of an incompressible spherical planet spinning synchronously without libration, our final formula can be compared with the commonly used expression from Peale and Cassen. However, the two turn out to differ, as in our expression the contributions from all Fourier modes are positive-definite, which is not the case with the formula from Peale and Cassen. Examples of the application of our expression for the tidal damping rate are provided in the work by Makarov and Efroimsky (Paper II) published back to back with the current paper.

  7. A study of the first and second polar bodies in mouse oogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evsikov, A.V.; Evsikov, S.V.

    1995-05-01

    The possibility of using a polar body for biopsy of human oocytes and early embryos has recently been shown. Genetic analysis of polar bodies can also provide additional information about the mechanisms underlying oocyte maturation. The first polar body is extremely unstable: in mouse oocytes, it disintegrates within several hours. Thus, the possibilities for its analysis are limited. We obtained karyoplasts of mouse eggs that contained the metaphase II spindle. By using them as a model for the first polar body, we studied the causes of its rapid disintegration. The rates of disintegration of the karyoplasts treated with various inhibitors of the cytoskeleton indicate that disintegration of the first polar body may be due to interaction between the actin cytoskeleton, chromatin, and the plasma membrane. The second polar body is found in mouse embryos until the blastocyst stage. Fusion of the second polar body with the enucleated zygote allowed analysis of its chromosomes. 22 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

    2013-01-22

    Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

  9. Aircraft Propeller Hub Repair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muth, Thomas R.; Peter, William H.

    2015-02-13

    The team performed a literature review, conducted residual stress measurements, performed failure analysis, and demonstrated a solid state additive manufacturing repair technique on samples removed from a scrapped propeller hub. The team evaluated multiple options for hub repair that included existing metal buildup technologies that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has already embraced, such as cold spray, high velocity oxy-fuel deposition (HVOF), and plasma spray. In addition the team helped Piedmont Propulsion Systems, LLC (PPS) evaluate three potential solutions that could be deployed at different stages in the life cycle of aluminum alloy hubs, in addition to the conventional spray coating method for repair. For new hubs, a machining practice to prevent fretting with the steel drive shaft was recommended. For hubs that were refurbished with some material remaining above the minimal material condition (MMC), a silver interface applied by an electromagnetic pulse additive manufacturing method was recommended. For hubs that were at or below the MMC, a solid state additive manufacturing technique using ultrasonic welding (UW) of thin layers of 7075 aluminum to the hub interface was recommended. A cladding demonstration using the UW technique achieved mechanical bonding of the layers showing promise as a viable repair method.

  10. Thermoluminescence dosimeters with narrow bandpass filters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Scottie W.

    2004-07-20

    A dosimetry method exposes more than one thermoluminescence crystals to radiation without using conventional filters, and reads the energy stored in the crystals by converting the energy to light in a conventional manner, and then filters each crystal output in a different portion of the spectrum generated by the crystals.

  11. Ultra-narrow bandwidth voice coding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.

    2007-01-09

    A system of removing excess information from a human speech signal and coding the remaining signal information, transmitting the coded signal, and reconstructing the coded signal. The system uses one or more EM wave sensors and one or more acoustic microphones to determine at least one characteristic of the human speech signal.

  12. Synchrotron studies of narrow band materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Since last year, we have had three 3-week blocks of beamtime, in April and November 1991 and February 1992, on the Ames/Montana beamline at the Wisconsin Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC). These runs continued our program on high temperature superconductors, heavy Fermion and related uranium and rare earth materials, and started some work on transition metal oxides. We have also had beamtime at the Brookhaven NSLS, 5 days of beamtime on the Dragon monochromator, beamline U4B, studying resonant photoemission of transition metal oxides using photon energies around the transition metal 2p edges. Data from past runs has been analyzed, and in some cases combined with photoemission and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy (BIS) data taken in the home U-M lab. 1 fig.

  13. Prevention of crack initiation in valve bodies under thermal shock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delmas, J.; Coppolani, P.

    1996-12-01

    On site and testing experience has shown that cracking in valves affects mainly the stellite hardfacing on seats and discs but may also be a concern for valve bodies. Metallurgical investigations conducted by EDF laboratories on many damaged valves have shown that most of the damage had either a chemical, manufacturing, or operating origin with a strong correlation between the origins and the type of damage. The chemical defects were either excess ferritic dilution of stellite or excess carburizing. Excess carburizing leads to a too brittle hardfacing which cracks under excessive stresses induced on the seating surfaces, via the stem, by too high operating thrusts. The same conditions can also induce cracks of the seats in the presence, in the hardfacing, of hidden defects generated during the welding process. Reduction of the number of defects results first from controls during manufacturing, mainly in the thickness of stellite. On the other hand, maintenance must be fitted to the type of defect. In-situ lapping may lead to release of cobalt, resulting in contamination of the circuit. Furthermore, it is ineffectual in the case of a crack through the seating surface, as is often found on globe valves. The use of new technologies of valves with removable seats and cobalt-free alloys solves permanently this kind of problem.

  14. Analysis Of Dynamic Dent Resistance Of Auto Body Panel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deolgaonkar, S. S.; Nandedkar, V. M.

    2007-04-07

    In automotive industry there is increasing demand for higher quality exterior panels, better functional properties and lower weight. The demand for weight reduction has led to thinner sheets, greater use of high strength steels and a change from steel to aluminum grades. This thickness reduction, which causes decrease in the dent resistance, promoted examination of the dent resistance against static and dynamic concentrated loads. This paper describes an investigation of the suitability of explicit dynamic FE analysis as a mean to determine the dynamic dent properties of the panel. This investigation is carried out on the body panel of utility vehicle and covers two parts, in first experimental analysis is carried out on developed test rig, which is interfaced with the computer. This test rig measures deflection with accuracy of .001mm. The experimental results are then compared with the simulation results, which is the second part. Simulation is carried with non-linear transient dynamic explicit analysis using Ansys -Ls Dyna. The experimental results show great accuracy with simulation results. The effect of change in thickness and geometry of the existing fender is then studied with help of simulation technique. By considering the best possible option overall weight of fender is reduced by 7.07 % by keeping the dent resistance of the panel constant.

  15. Semi-Implicit Reversible Algorithms for Rigid Body Rotational Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nukala, Phani K; Shelton Jr, William Allison

    2006-09-01

    This paper presents two semi-implicit algorithms based on splitting methodology for rigid body rotational dynamics. The first algorithm is a variation of partitioned Runge-Kutta (PRK) methodology that can be formulated as a splitting method. The second algorithm is akin to a multiple time stepping scheme and is based on modified Crouch-Grossman (MCG) methodology, which can also be expressed as a splitting algorithm. These algorithms are second-order accurate and time-reversible; however, they are not Poisson integrators, i.e., non-symplectic. These algorithms conserve some of the first integrals of motion, but some others are not conserved; however, the fluctuations in these invariants are bounded over exponentially long time intervals. These algorithms exhibit excellent long-term behavior because of their reversibility property and their (approximate) Poisson structure preserving property. The numerical results indicate that the proposed algorithms exhibit superior performance compared to some of the currently well known algorithms such as the Simo-Wong algorithm, Newmark algorithm, discrete Moser-Veselov algorithm, Lewis-Simo algorithm, and the LIEMID[EA] algorithm.

  16. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for Imaging Body Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krohn, Ken

    2001-04-25

    PET is a nuclear medicine technology for imaging chemical processes as they are occurring in the human body. This distinguishes it from conventional radiographic and NMR imaging, which depict anatomic changes that generally occur secondary to chemical changes. As our knowledge about human genomics and molecular biology increases and as we develop new approaches to therapy based on this biochemical information, it becomes increasingly important to be able to image important chemical processes occurring in vivo. Methods exist for imaging metabolic rates for energy utilization, cellular proliferation, and protein synthesis. The sending and receiving function of neurotransmitters can be imaged to test for mismatch in their communication function. Gene transfection can be imaged with PET reporters. All of these approaches allow the physician to better select the appropriate treatment for an individual patient, rather than basing treatment on historical experience for a population of similar patients. The technology for PET requires synthesis of positron emitting radioactive molecules, most commonly labeled with C-11 (20.4m) and F-18 (109.8 m) which are made on site with an accelerator. FNAL was involved in developing new RFQ technology for making PET isotopes. The technology also requires better imaging technology, including scintillators, and more robust algorithms for image reconstruction and data analysis.

  17. Integrating Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and wide-body aircraft Six advanced aircraft technologies Medium and heavy freight truck size classes Thirty-Seven advanced freight truck technologies Nine Census divisions...

  18. Human body impedance for electromagnetic hazard analysis in the VLF to MF band

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanai, H.; Chatterjee, I.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1984-08-01

    A knowledge of the average electrical impedance of the human body is essential for the analysis of electromagnetic hazards in the VLF to MF band. The purpose of the measurements was to determine the average body impedance of several human subjects as a function of frequency. Measurements were carried out with the subjects standing barefoot on a ground plane and touching various metal electrodes with the hand or index finger. The measured impedance includes the electrode polarization and skin impedances, spread impedance near the electrode, body impedance, stray capacitance between the body surface and ground, and inductance due to the body and grounding strap. These components are separated and simplified equivalent circuits are presented for body impedance of humans exposed to free-space electromagnetic waves as well as in contact with large ungrounded metallic objects therein.

  19. METHOD FOR FORMING A COATING OF MOLYBDENUM CARBIDE ON A CARBON BODY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simnad, M.T.

    1962-04-01

    A method is described for coating a carbon bodywith molybdenum carbide in such a manner that the carbon body is rendered less permeable to the flow of gases and has increased resistance to corrosion and erosion. The method includes coating a carbon body with molybdenum trioxide by contacting it at a temperature below the condensation temperature with molybdenum trioxide vapors and thereafter carburizing the molybdenum trioxide in situ in an inert atmosphere on the carhon body. (AEC)

  20. Electrodynamics of a rotating body; Relativistic theory of circular and axial birefringence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, M.W. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-09-20

    In this paper, the theory of the electrodynamics of a rotating body is used to show that there exists: circular birefringence purely relativistic origin, composed of dispersive aether drag and residual, ensemble averaged, magnetization; non-relativistic circular birefringence due to the angular velocity of the body in the observer frame; non-relativistic axial birefringence in chiral media due to the angular velocity of the body; second order, relativistic equivalents.

  1. A three-body model of the {sup 11}B nucleus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2011-08-15

    The binding energy and the rms charge and mass radii have been calculated in terms of the single-channel three-body {sup 4}He{sup 4}He{sup 3}H model of the {sup 11}B nucleus with an expansion of the three-body wave function in a nonorthogonal Gaussian basis. Parameters of the wave function are presented and convergence of the three-body energy depending on the number of expansion terms is demonstrated.

  2. Charmless Three-Body $B$ Decays at BABAR (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Charmless Three-Body B Decays at BABAR Citation Details In-Document Search ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Experiment-HEP,HEPEX Word ...

  3. One-pot refolding of core histones from bacterial inclusion bodies...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: One-pot refolding of core histones from bacterial inclusion bodies allows rapid reconstitution of histone octamer Citation Details ...

  4. Sintering of beta-type alumina bodies using alpha-alumina encapsulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEntire, Bryan J.; Virkar, Anil V.

    1981-01-01

    A method of sintering a shaped green, beta-type alumina body comprising: (A) inserting said body into an open chamber prepared by exposing the interior surface of a container consisting essentially of at least about 50 weight percent of alpha-alumina and a remainder of other refractory material to a sodium oxide or sodium oxide producing environment; (B) sealing the chamber; and heating the chamber with the shaped body encapsulated therein to a temperature and for a time necessary to sinter said body to the desired density. The encapsulation chamber prepared as described above is also claimed.

  5. A vortex panel analysis of circular-arc bluff-bodies in unsteady flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strickland, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    A method which is capable of calculating the unsteady flow field around circular-arc bluff bodies of zero thickness is presented. This method utilizes linear vortex panels to model the body surface and a portion of the wake surfaces. Discrete vortices are used to model the remainder of the wake surfaces. Separation is assumed to occur at the sharp edges of the bodies. Numerical results for circular-arc bodies with included angles of less than 180/degree/ are compared with experimental data and found to be in good agreement. 31 refs., 15 figs.

  6. Ab Initio NCSM/RGM For Three-Body Cluster Systems And Application...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: 22nd European Conference of Few-Body Problems in Physics (EFB22), Krakow, Poland, Sep 09 - Sep 13, 2013 Research Org: Lawrence ...

  7. Ab Initio NCSM/RGM For Three-Body Cluster Systems And Application...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: 22nd European Conference of Few-Body Problems in Physics (EFB22), Krakow, Poland, Sep 09 - Sep 13, 2013

  8. Hartree-Fock many-body perturbation theory for nuclear ground...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hartree-Fock many-body perturbation theory for nuclear ground-states Prev Next ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: Netherlands Language: English Word Cloud ...

  9. Correction of MRI-induced geometric distortions in whole-body...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    task in whole-body PET-MRI. The quality of the registration between these two ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ...

  10. Strand-Specific RNA-Seq Analyses of Fruiting Body Development...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fruiting bodies of C. cinerea are typical mushrooms, which can be produced synchronously on defined media in the laboratory. To investigate the transcriptome in detail during ...

  11. Stochastic many-body perturbation theory for anharmonic molecular vibrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermes, Matthew R.; Hirata, So

    2014-08-28

    A new quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method for anharmonic vibrational zero-point energies and transition frequencies is developed, which combines the diagrammatic vibrational many-body perturbation theory based on the Dyson equation with Monte Carlo integration. The infinite sums of the diagrammatic and thus size-consistent first- and second-order anharmonic corrections to the energy and self-energy are expressed as sums of a few m- or 2m-dimensional integrals of wave functions and a potential energy surface (PES) (m is the vibrational degrees of freedom). Each of these integrals is computed as the integrand (including the value of the PES) divided by the value of a judiciously chosen weight function evaluated on demand at geometries distributed randomly but according to the weight function via the Metropolis algorithm. In this way, the method completely avoids cumbersome evaluation and storage of high-order force constants necessary in the original formulation of the vibrational perturbation theory; it furthermore allows even higher-order force constants essentially up to an infinite order to be taken into account in a scalable, memory-efficient algorithm. The diagrammatic contributions to the frequency-dependent self-energies that are stochastically evaluated at discrete frequencies can be reliably interpolated, allowing the self-consistent solutions to the Dyson equation to be obtained. This method, therefore, can compute directly and stochastically the transition frequencies of fundamentals and overtones as well as their relative intensities as pole strengths, without fixed-node errors that plague some QMC. It is shown that, for an identical PES, the new method reproduces the correct deterministic values of the energies and frequencies within a few cm{sup −1} and pole strengths within a few thousandths. With the values of a PES evaluated on the fly at random geometries, the new method captures a noticeably greater proportion of anharmonic effects.

  12. Bluff Body Flow Simulation Using a Vortex Element Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony Leonard; Phillippe Chatelain; Michael Rebel

    2004-09-30

    Heavy ground vehicles, especially those involved in long-haul freight transportation, consume a significant part of our nation's energy supply. it is therefore of utmost importance to improve their efficiency, both to reduce emissions and to decrease reliance on imported oil. At highway speeds, more than half of the power consumed by a typical semi truck goes into overcoming aerodynamic drag, a fraction which increases with speed and crosswind. Thanks to better tools and increased awareness, recent years have seen substantial aerodynamic improvements by the truck industry, such as tractor/trailer height matching, radiator area reduction, and swept fairings. However, there remains substantial room for improvement as understanding of turbulent fluid dynamics grows. The group's research effort focused on vortex particle methods, a novel approach for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Where common CFD methods solve or model the Navier-Stokes equations on a grid which stretches from the truck surface outward, vortex particle methods solve the vorticity equation on a Lagrangian basis of smooth particles and do not require a grid. They worked to advance the state of the art in vortex particle methods, improving their ability to handle the complicated, high Reynolds number flow around heavy vehicles. Specific challenges that they have addressed include finding strategies to accurate capture vorticity generation and resultant forces at the truck wall, handling the aerodynamics of spinning bodies such as tires, application of the method to the GTS model, computation time reduction through improved integration methods, a closest point transform for particle method in complex geometrics, and work on large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence modeling.

  13. At DOE, body blows to Fusion, Nuclear Physics, and Particle Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Science) | Jefferson Lab At DOE, body blows to Fusion, Nuclear Physics, and Particle Physics (Science) External Link: http://news.sciencemag.org/scienceinsider/2012/02/at-doe-body-blows-to-fusion-nu... By jlab_admin on Mon, 2012-02-13

  14. Comparison of classical and quantal calculations of helium three-body recombination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prez-Ros, Jess Greene, Chris H.; Ragole, Steve; Wang, Jia

    2014-01-28

    A general method to study classical scattering in n-dimension is developed. Through classical trajectory calculations, the three-body recombination is computed as a function of the collision energy for helium atoms, as an example. Quantum calculations are also performed for the J{sup ?} = 0{sup +} symmetry of the three-body recombination rate in order to compare with the classical results, yielding good agreement for E ? 1 K. The classical threshold law is derived and numerically confirmed for the Newtonian three-body recombination rate. Finally, a relationship is found between the quantum and classical three-body hard hypersphere elastic cross sections which is analogous to the well-known shadow scattering in two-body collisions.

  15. Three- and four-body nonadditivities in nucleic acid tetramers: a CCSD(T) study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitonak, Michal; Neogrady, Pavel; Hobza, Pavel

    2009-12-18

    Three- and four-body nonadditivities in the uracil tetramer (in DNA-like geometry) and the GC step (in crystal geometry) were investigated at various levels of the wave-function theory: HF, MP2, MP3, L-CCD, CCSD and CCSD(T). All of the calculations were performed using the 6-31G**(0.25,0.15) basis set, whereas the HF, MP2 and the MP3 nonadditivities were, for the sake of comparison, also determined with the much larger aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. The HF and MP2 levels do not provide reliable values for many-body terms, making it necessary to go beyond the MP2 level. The benchmark CCSD(T) three- and four-body nonadditivities are reasonably well reproduced at the MP3 level, and almost quantitative agreement is obtained (fortuitously) either on the L-CCD level or as an average of the MP3 and the CCSD results. Reliable values of many-body terms (especially their higher-order correlation contributions) are obtained already when the rather small 6-31G**(0.25,0.15) basis set is used. The four-body term is much smaller when compared to the three-body terms, but it is definitely not negligible, e.g. in the case of the GC step it represents about 16% of all of the three- and four-body terms. While investigating the geometry dependence of many-body terms for the GG step at the MP3/6-31G**(0.25,0.15) level, we found that it is necessary to include at least three-body terms in the determination of optimal geometry parameters.

  16. Evidence for Universal Four-Body States Tied to an Efimov Trimer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferlaino, F.; Knoop, S.; Berninger, M.; Harm, W.; Naegerl, H.-C.; D'Incao, J. P.; Grimm, R.

    2009-04-10

    We report on the measurement of four-body recombination rate coefficients in an atomic gas. Our results obtained with an ultracold sample of cesium atoms at negative scattering lengths show a resonant enhancement of losses and provide strong evidence for the existence of a pair of four-body states, which is strictly connected to Efimov trimers via universal relations. Our findings confirm recent theoretical predictions and demonstrate the enrichment of the Efimov scenario when a fourth particle is added to the generic three-body problem.

  17. First Mott lobe of bosons with local two- and three-body interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva-Valencia, J.; Souza, A. M. C.

    2011-12-15

    Using the density matrix renormalization group method, we determine the phase diagram of the Bose-Hubbard model with local two- and three-body interactions, describing polar molecules in one-dimensional optical lattices. The difference in the block von Neumann entropy with different system sizes was used to establish the critical points. We found that the quantum critical point position increases with the three-body interaction. We show that the model studied is in the same universality class as the model with pure two-body interactions.

  18. Three-Body Recombination into Deep Bound States in a Bose Gas with Large Scattering Length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braaten, Eric; Hammer, H.-W.

    2001-10-15

    An effective field theory for the three-body system with large two-body scattering length a is applied to three-body recombination into deep bound states in a Bose gas. The recombination constant {alpha} is calculated to first order in the short-distance interactions that allow the recombination. For a<0 , the dimensionless combination m{alpha}/({Dirac_h}a{sup 4}) is a periodic function of ln|a| that exhibits resonances at values of a that differ by multiplicative factors of 22.7. This dramatic behavior should be observable near a Feshbach resonance when a becomes large and negative.

  19. Apparatus for removing oil and other floating contaminants from a moving body of water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strohecker, J.W.

    1973-12-18

    The patent describes a process in which floating contaminants such as oil and solid debris are removed from a moving body of water by employing a skimming system which uses the natural gravitational flow of the water. A boom diagonally positioned across the body of water diverts the floating contaminants over a floating weir and into a retention pond where an underflow weir is used to return contaminant-free water to the moving body of water. The floating weir is ballasted to maintain the contaminant-receiving opening therein slightly below the surface of the water during fluctuations in the water level for skimming the contaminants with minimal water removal.

  20. STIP 2.0 Static Content for Front Page Body | OSTI, US Dept of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Static Content for Front Page Body What is STIP? The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP) is a collaboration from across the DOE ...

  1. Crashworthiness Assessment of Auto-body Members Considering the Fabrication Histories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huh, Hoon; Song, Jung-Han; Kim, Kee-Poong; Kim, Hyun-Sub

    2005-08-05

    This paper is concerned with crashworthiness of auto-body members considering the effect of fabrication. Most auto-body members are fabricated with sheet metal forming process and welding process that induce fabrication histories such as the plastic work hardening, non-uniform thickness distribution and residual stress. Crash simulation is carried out for auto-body members with LS-DYNA3D in order to identify the fabrication effect on the crashworthiness. The analysis calculated crash mode, the reaction force and the energy absorption for crashworthiness assessment with the forming effect. The result shows that the crash analysis with considering the forming history leads to a different result from that without considering the forming effect. The analysis results demonstrate that the design of auto-body members should be carried out considering the forming history for accurate assessment of the crashworthiness.

  2. Lifetime measurements of C 17 excited states and three-body and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Lifetime measurements of C 17 excited ... Title: Lifetime measurements of C 17 excited states and three-body and continuum effects ...

  3. On computing stress in polymer systems involving multi-body potentials from molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Yao E-mail: jhsong@cec.sc.edu; Song, Jeong-Hoon E-mail: jhsong@cec.sc.edu

    2014-08-07

    Hardy stress definition has been restricted to pair potentials and embedded-atom method potentials due to the basic assumptions in the derivation of a symmetric microscopic stress tensor. Force decomposition required in the Hardy stress expression becomes obscure for multi-body potentials. In this work, we demonstrate the invariance of the Hardy stress expression for a polymer system modeled with multi-body interatomic potentials including up to four atoms interaction, by applying central force decomposition of the atomic force. The balance of momentum has been demonstrated to be valid theoretically and tested under various numerical simulation conditions. The validity of momentum conservation justifies the extension of Hardy stress expression to multi-body potential systems. Computed Hardy stress has been observed to converge to the virial stress of the system with increasing spatial averaging volume. This work provides a feasible and reliable linkage between the atomistic and continuum scales for multi-body potential systems.

  4. Three-body Recombination in Bose Gases with Large Scattering Length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedaque, P. F.; Braaten, Eric; Hammer, H.-W.

    2000-07-31

    An effective field theory for the three-body system with large scattering length is applied to three-body recombination to a weakly bound s -wave state in a Bose gas. Our model independent analysis demonstrates that the three-body recombination constant {alpha} is not universal, but can take any value between zero and 67.9({Dirac_h}/2{pi})a{sup 4}/m , where a is the scattering length. Other low-energy three-body observables can be predicted in terms of a and {alpha} . Near a Feshbach resonance, {alpha} should oscillate between those limits as the magnetic field B approaches the point where a{yields}{infinity} . In any interval of B over which a increases by a factor of 22.7, {alpha} should have a zero. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  5. Charmless Three-Body $B$ Decays at BABAR (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Charmless Three-Body B Decays at BABAR Authors: Liu, Feng ; UC, Riverside SLAC Publication Date: 2015-04-06 OSTI Identifier: 1177768 ...

  6. Effective-range corrections to three-body recombination for atoms...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The rate constant for three-body recombination of bosonic atoms of mass m into a shallow dimer scales as (Dirach2pi)asup 4m times a log-periodic function of the scattering ...

  7. UC 76-9-704 - Criminal Penalties for Abuse of Human Body | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    6-9-704 - Criminal Penalties for Abuse of Human Body Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: UC 76-9-704 - Criminal...

  8. Nontraumatic Rupture of Lumbar Artery Causing an Intravertebral Body Pseudoaneurysm: Treatment by Transcatheter Embolization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shigematsu, Yoshinori Kudoh, Kouichi; Nakasone, Yutaka; Fujisaki, Tadashi; Uemura, Shouichirou; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2006-10-15

    We report a case of nontraumatic rupture of the lumbar artery that led to a pseudoaneurysm in the vertebral body and massive retroperitoneal to retropleural hematoma. The pseudoaneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular embolization. To our knowledge, idiopathic rupture of the lumbar artery has been reported in a limited number of cases and pseudoaneurysm formation in the vertebral body has not been presented in the literature. The etiology of hemorrhage has been discussed based on CT, MRI, and three-dimensional rotational angiography.

  9. Very large radiative transfer over small distances from a black body for thermophotovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, J.L.; Choy, H.K.H.; Fonstad, C.G. Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The maximum amount of radiated heat intensity which can be transferred from a black body of refractive index n{sub BB} to an object of refractive index n{sub OBJ} located a short distance away is shown to be n{sup 2}{sub smaller} times the free space Planck distribution, where n{sub smaller} is the smaller of n{sub BB} and n{sub OBJ}, and where n{sub BB} and n{sub OBJ} are assumed greater than unity. The implication is that the radiative power spectral density within a thermophotovoltaic cell could be designed to be much greater than the free space Planck distribution. The maximum radiative intensity transferred occurs when the index of the black body matches that of the object at wavelengths where the Planck distribution is sizeable. A simple expression is found for the transferred radiative intensity as a function of the refractive indices of, and the distance separating, the black body and the object. The expression is interpreted in terms of the specific black body modes which are evanescent in the space between the black body and the object and which make the largest contribution to the transmission of radiation. The black body, the object, and the gap region are all modeled as lossless dielectrics.

  10. Measurement of the body composition of living gray seals by hydrogen isotope dilution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly, J.J.; Fedak, M.A. )

    1990-09-01

    The body composition of living gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) can be accurately predicted from a two-step model that involves measurement of total body water (TBW) by {sup 2}H or {sup 3}H dilution and application of predictive relationships between body components and TBW that were derived empirically by slaughter chemical analysis. TBW was overestimated by both {sup 2}HHO and {sup 3}HHO dilution; mean overestimates were 2.8 +/- 0.9% (SE) with 2H and 4.0 +/- 0.6% with {sup 3}H. The relationships for prediction of total body fat (TBF), protein (TBP), gross energy (TBGE), and ash (TBA) were as follows: %TBF = 105.1 - 1.47 (%TBW); %TBP = 0.42 (%TBW) - 4.75; TBGE (MJ) = 40.8 (mass in kg) - 48.5 (TBW in kg) - 0.4; and TBA (kg) = 0.1 - 0.008 (mass in kg) + 0.05 (TBW in kg). These relationships are applicable to gray seals of both sexes over a wide range of age and body conditions, and they predict the body composition of gray seals more accurately than the predictive equations derived from ringed seals (Pusa hispida) and from the equation of Pace and Rathbun, which has been reported to be generally applicable to mammals.

  11. LAGRANGE SOLUTIONS TO THE DISCRETE-TIME GENERAL THREE-BODY PROBLEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minesaki, Yukitaka

    2013-03-15

    There is no known integrator that yields exact orbits for the general three-body problem (G3BP). It is difficult to verify whether a numerical procedure yields the correct solutions to the G3BP because doing so requires knowledge of all 11 conserved quantities, whereas only six are known. Without tracking all of the conserved quantities, it is possible to show that the discrete general three-body problem (d-G3BP) yields the correct orbits corresponding to Lagrange solutions of the G3BP. We show that the d-G3BP yields the correct solutions to the G3BP for two special cases: the equilateral triangle and collinear configurations. For the triangular solution, we use the fact that the solution to the three-body case is a superposition of the solutions to the three two-body cases, and we show that the three bodies maintain the same relative distances at all times. To obtain the collinear solution, we assume a specific permutation of the three bodies arranged along a straight rotating line, and we show that the d-G3BP maintains the same distance ratio between two bodies as in the G3BP. Proving that the d-G3BP solutions for these cases are equivalent to those of the G3BP makes it likely that the d-G3BP and G3BP solutions are equivalent in other cases. To our knowledge, this is the first work that proves the equivalence of the discrete solutions and the Lagrange orbits.

  12. Hepatocyte-derived cultured cells with unusual cytoplasmic keratin-rich spheroid bodies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delavalle, Pierre-Yves; Alsaleh, Khaled; Pillez, Andre; Cocquerel, Laurence; Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille; Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille ; Allet, Cecile; Dumont, Patrick; Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille; CNRS UMR 8161, F-59021 Lille ; Loyens, Anne; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Omary, M. Bishr; Dubuisson, Jean; Rouille, Yves; Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille; Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille ; Wychowski, Czeslaw; Universite Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille; Institut Pasteur de Lille, F-59019 Lille

    2011-11-01

    Cytoplasmic inclusions are found in a variety of diseases that are characteristic morphological features of several hepatic, muscular and neurodegenerative disorders. They display a predominantly filamentous ultrastructure that is also observed in malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT). A cellular clone containing an intracytoplasmic body was isolated from hepatocyte cell culture, and in the present study we examined whether this body might be related or not to Mallory-Denk body (MDB), a well characterized intracytoplasmic inclusion, or whether this cellular clone was constituted by malignant rhabdoid tumor cells. The intracytoplasmic body was observed in electron microscopy (EM), confocal immunofluorescence microscopy and several proteins involved in the formation of its structure were identified. Using light microscopy, a spheroid body (SB) described as a single regular-shaped cytoplasmic body was observed in cells. During cytokinesis, the SB was disassembled and reassembled in a way to reconstitute a unique SB in each progeny cell. EM examination revealed that the SB was not surrounded by a limiting membrane. However, cytoplasmic filaments were concentrated in a whorled array. These proteins were identified as keratins 8 and 18 (K8/K18), which formed the central core of the SB surrounded by a vimentin cage-like structure. This structure was not related to Mallory-Denk body or aggresome since no aggregated proteins were located in SB. Moreover, the structure of SB was not due to mutations in the primary sequence of K8/K18 and vimentin since no difference was observed in the mRNA sequence of their genes, isolated from Huh-7 and Huh-7w7.3 cells. These data suggested that cellular factor(s) could be responsible for the SB formation process. Aggregates of K18 were relocated in the SB when a mutant of K18 inducing disruption of K8/K18 IF network was expressed in the cellular clone. Furthermore, the INI1 protein, a remodeling-chromatin factor deficient in rhabdoid cells, which

  13. Identification of genetic factors that modify motor performance and body weight using Collaborative Cross mice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mao, Jian -Hua; Langley, Sasha A.; Huang, Yurong; Hang, Michael; Bouchard, Kristofer E.; Celniker, Susan E.; Brown, James B.; Jansson, Janet K.; Karpen, Gary H.; Snijders, Antoine M.

    2015-11-09

    Evidence has emerged that suggests a link between motor deficits, obesity and many neurological disorders. However, the contributing genetic risk factors are poorly understood. Here we used the Collaborative Cross (CC), a large panel of newly inbred mice that captures 90% of the known variation among laboratory mice, to identify the genetic loci controlling rotarod performance and its relationship with body weight in a cohort of 365 mice across 16 CC strains. Body weight and rotarod performance varied widely across CC strains and were significantly negatively correlated. Genetic linkage analysis identified 14 loci that were associated with body weight. However,more » 45 loci affected rotarod performance, seven of which were also associated with body weight, suggesting a strong link at the genetic level. As a result, we show that genes identified in this study overlap significantly with those related to neurological disorders and obesity found in human GWA studies. In conclusion, our results provide a genetic framework for studies of the connection between body weight, the central nervous system and behavior.« less

  14. Identification of genetic factors that modify motor performance and body weight using Collaborative Cross mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Jian -Hua; Langley, Sasha A.; Huang, Yurong; Hang, Michael; Bouchard, Kristofer E.; Celniker, Susan E.; Brown, James B.; Jansson, Janet K.; Karpen, Gary H.; Snijders, Antoine M.

    2015-11-09

    Evidence has emerged that suggests a link between motor deficits, obesity and many neurological disorders. However, the contributing genetic risk factors are poorly understood. Here we used the Collaborative Cross (CC), a large panel of newly inbred mice that captures 90% of the known variation among laboratory mice, to identify the genetic loci controlling rotarod performance and its relationship with body weight in a cohort of 365 mice across 16 CC strains. Body weight and rotarod performance varied widely across CC strains and were significantly negatively correlated. Genetic linkage analysis identified 14 loci that were associated with body weight. However, 45 loci affected rotarod performance, seven of which were also associated with body weight, suggesting a strong link at the genetic level. As a result, we show that genes identified in this study overlap significantly with those related to neurological disorders and obesity found in human GWA studies. In conclusion, our results provide a genetic framework for studies of the connection between body weight, the central nervous system and behavior.

  15. RANS Simulation of the Heave Response of a Two-Body Floating Point Wave Absorber: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Y.; Li, Y.

    2011-03-01

    A preliminary study on a two-body floating wave absorbers is presented in this paper. A Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes computational method is applied for analyzing the hydrodynamic heave response of the absorber in operational wave conditions. The two-body floating wave absorber contains a float section and a submerged reaction section. For validation purposes, our model is first assumed to be locked. The two sections are forced to move together with each other. The locked single body model is used in a heave decay test, where the RANS result is validated with the experimental measurement. For the two-body floating point absorber simulation, the two sections are connected through a mass-spring-damper system, which is applied to simulate the power take-off mechanism under design wave conditions. Overall, the details of the flow around the absorber and its nonlinear interaction with waves are investigated, and the power absorption efficiency of the two-body floating wave absorber in waves with a constant value spring-damper system is examined.

  16. Universality in the three-body problem for {sup 4}He atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braaten, Eric; Hammer, H.-W.

    2003-04-01

    The two-body scattering length a for {sup 4}He atoms is much larger than their effective range r{sub s}. As a consequence, low-energy few-body observables have universal characteristics that are independent of the interaction potential. Universality implies that, up to corrections suppressed by r{sub s}/a, all low-energy three-body observables are determined by a and a three-body parameter {lambda}{sub *}. We give simple expressions in terms of a and {lambda}{sub *} for the trimer binding-energy equation, the atom-dimer scattering phase shifts, and the rate for three-body recombination at threshold. We determine {lambda}{sub *} for several {sup 4}He potentials from the calculated binding energy of the excited state of the trimer and use it to obtain the universality predictions for the other low-energy observables. We also use the calculated values for one potential to estimate the effective range corrections for the other potentials.

  17. 2HOT: An Improved Parallel Hashed Oct-Tree N-Body Algorithm for Cosmological Simulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Warren, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    We report on improvements made over the past two decades to our adaptive treecode N-body method (HOT). A mathematical and computational approach to the cosmological N-body problem is described, with performance and scalability measured up to 256k (2 18 ) processors. We present error analysis and scientific application results from a series of more than ten 69 billion (4096 3 ) particle cosmological simulations, accounting for 4×10 20 floating point operations. These results include the first simulations using the new constraints on the standard model of cosmology from the Planck satellite. Our simulations set a new standard for accuracymore » and scientific throughput, while meeting or exceeding the computational efficiency of the latest generation of hybrid TreePM N-body methods.« less

  18. Silicon-on-insulator field effect transistor with improved body ties for rad-hard applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Draper, Bruce L.; Dodd, Paul E.

    2001-01-01

    A silicon-on-insulator (SOI) field-effect transistor (FET) and a method for making the same are disclosed. The SOI FET is characterized by a source which extends only partially (e.g. about half-way) through the active layer wherein the transistor is formed. Additionally, a minimal-area body tie contact is provided with a short-circuit electrical connection to the source for reducing floating body effects. The body tie contact improves the electrical characteristics of the transistor and also provides an improved single-event-upset (SEU) radiation hardness of the device for terrestrial and space applications. The SOI FET also provides an improvement in total-dose radiation hardness as compared to conventional SOI transistors fabricated without a specially prepared hardened buried oxide layer. Complementary n-channel and p-channel SOI FETs can be fabricated according to the present invention to form integrated circuits (ICs) for commercial and military applications.

  19. Contoured inner after-heater shield for reducing stress in growing crystalline bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalejs, Juris P.

    1996-09-24

    An apparatus for growing hollow crystalline bodies by the EFG process, comprising an EFG die having a top surface shaped for growing a hollow crystalline body having a cross-sectional configuration in the shape of a polygon having n faces, and a radiation shield adjacent to and surrounded by the top end surface of the die, characterized in that the shield has an inner edge defining a similar polygon with n sides, and the inner edge of the shield is notched so that the spacing between the n faces and the n sides is greatest between the central portions of the n faces and the n sides, whereby the greater spacing at the central portions helps to reduce lateral temperature gradients in the crystalline body that is grown by use of the die.

  20. Three-body interactions in complex fluids: Virial coefficients from simulation finite-size effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashton, Douglas J.; Wilding, Nigel B.

    2014-06-28

    A simulation technique is described for quantifying the contribution of three-body interactions to the thermodynamical properties of coarse-grained representations of complex fluids. The method is based on a new approach for determining virial coefficients from the measured volume-dependent asymptote of a certain structural function. By comparing the third virial coefficient B{sub 3} for a complex fluid with that of an approximate coarse-grained model described by a pair potential, three body effects can be quantified. The strategy is applicable to both Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation. Its utility is illustrated via measurements of three-body effects in models of star polymers and in highly size-asymmetrical colloid-polymer mixtures.

  1. Bifurcation and chaos in the simple passive dynamic walking model with upper body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Qingdu; Guo, Jianli; Yang, Xiao-Song

    2014-09-01

    We present some rich new complex gaits in the simple walking model with upper body by Wisse et al. in [Robotica 22, 681 (2004)]. We first show that the stable gait found by Wisse et al. may become chaotic via period-doubling bifurcations. Such period-doubling routes to chaos exist for all parameters, such as foot mass, upper body mass, body length, hip spring stiffness, and slope angle. Then, we report three new gaits with period 3, 4, and 6; for each gait, there is also a period-doubling route to chaos. Finally, we show a practical method for finding a topological horseshoe in 3D Poincar map, and present a rigorous verification of chaos from these gaits.

  2. Human Homolog of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI) is a marker of cellular proliferation associated with nuclear bodies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmehdawi, Fatima; Wheway, Gabrielle; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Adams, Matthew; High, Alec S.; Johnson, Colin A.; Robinson, Philip A.

    2013-02-01

    HHARI (also known as ARIH1) is an ubiquitin-protein ligase and is the cognate of the E2, UbcH7 (UBE2L3). To establish a functional role for HHARI in cellular proliferation processes, we performed a reverse genetics screen that identified n=86/522 (16.5%) ubiquitin conjugation components that have a statistically significant effect on cell proliferation, which included HHARI as a strong hit. We then produced and validated a panel of specific antibodies that establish HHARI as both a nuclear and cytoplasmic protein that is expressed in all cell types studied. HHARI was expressed at higher levels in nuclei, and co-localized with nuclear bodies including Cajal bodies (p80 coilin, NOPP140), PML and SC35 bodies. We confirmed reduced cellular proliferation after ARIH1 knockdown with individual siRNA duplexes, in addition to significantly increased levels of apoptosis, an increased proportion of cells in G2 phase of the cell cycle, and significant reductions in total cellular RNA levels. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma biopsies, there are higher levels of HHARI expression associated with increased levels of proliferation, compared to healthy control tissues. We demonstrate that HHARI is associated with cellular proliferation, which may be mediated through its interaction with UbcH7 and modification of proteins in nuclear bodies. -- Highlights: ? We produce and validate new antibody reagents for the ubiquitin-protein ligase HHARI. ? HHARI colocalizes with nuclear bodies including Cajal, PML and SC35 bodies. ? We establish new functions in cell proliferation regulation for HHARI. ? Increased HHARI expression associates with squamous cell carcinoma and proliferation.

  3. Phonon-magnon interactions in body centered cubic iron: A combined molecular and spin dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perera, Dilina Landau, David P.; Nicholson, Don M.; Malcolm Stocks, G.; Eisenbach, Markus; Yin, Junqi; Brown, Gregory

    2014-05-07

    Combining an atomistic many-body potential with a classical spin Hamiltonian parameterized by first principles calculations, molecular-spin dynamics computer simulations were performed to investigate phonon-magnon interactions in body centered cubic iron. Results obtained for spin-spin and density-density dynamic structure factors show that noticeable softening and damping of magnon modes occur due to the presence of lattice vibrations. Furthermore, as a result of the phonon-magnon coupling, additional longitudinal spin wave excitations are observed, with the same frequencies as the longitudinal phonon modes.

  4. Dimpled/grooved face on a fuel injection nozzle body for flame stabilization and related method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Kim, Kwanwoo; Zuo, Baifang

    2013-08-20

    A fuel injection head for a fuel nozzle used in a gas turbine combustor includes a substantially hollow body formed with an upstream end face, a downstream end face and a peripheral wall extending therebetween. A plurality of pre-mix tubes or passages extend axially through the hollow body with inlets at the upstream end face and outlets at the downstream end face. An exterior surface of the downstream end face is formed with three-dimensional surface features that increase a total surface area of the exterior surface as compared to a substantially flat, planar downstream end face.

  5. Ab Initio Many-Body Calculations Of Light-Ion Reactions (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Conference: Ab Initio Many-Body Calculations Of Light-Ion Reactions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ab Initio Many-Body Calculations Of Light-Ion Reactions Authors: Romero-Redondo, C ; Navratil, P ; Quaglioni, S ; Hupin, G ; Langhammer, J ; Calci, A ; Roth, R Publication Date: 2013-07-31 OSTI Identifier: 1093413 Report Number(s): LLNL-PROC-642196 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: Nuclear

  6. Nuclear pairing from bare interaction: Two and three-body chiral forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finelli, Paolo

    2012-10-20

    In a recent paper the {sup 1}S{sub 0} pairing gap in isospin-symmetric nuclear matter and finite nuclei has been investigated starting from the chiral nucleon-nucleon potential at the N{sup 3}LO order in the two-body sector and the N{sup 2}LO order in the three-body sector. To include realistic nuclear forces in RHB (Relativistic Hartree Bolgoliubov) calculations we relied on a separable representation of the pairing interaction. In this paper we would like to show recent results concerning isotonic chains with N= 28,50,82.

  7. In vivo Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Facility for Total Body Nitrogen and Cd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munive, Marco; Revilla, Angel; Solis, Jose L.

    2007-10-26

    A Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) system has been designed and constructed to measure the total body nitrogen and Cd for in vivo studies. An aqueous solution of KNO{sub 3} was used as phantom for system calibration. The facility has been used to monitor total body nitrogen (TBN) of mice and found that is related to their diet. Some mice swallowed diluted water with Cl{sub 2}Cd, and the presence of Cd was detected in the animals. The minimum Cd concentration that the system can detect was 20 ppm.

  8. Flight Test of Weapons System Body by Navy Successful | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Flight Test of Weapons System Body by Navy Successful April 02, 2015 Third Flight Demonstrated Dynamics and Functional Performance in Flight Environment WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) today announced the Follow-On Commander Evaluation Test-51 (FCET-51) flight body was successfully flown by the Navy recently. This test was one of several in a sequence of flight tests for the qualification efforts of the W88-0/Mk5 ALT 370

  9. Class of model problems in three-body quantum mechanics that admit exact solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takibayev, N. Zh.

    2008-03-15

    An approach to solving scattering problems in three-body systems for cases where the mass of one of the particles is extremely small in relation to the masses of the other two particles and where the pair potentials of interaction between the particles involved are separable is developed. Exact analytic solutions to such model problems are found for the scattering of a light particle on two fixed centers and on two interacting heavy particles. It is shown that new resonances and a dynamical resonance enhancement may appear in a three-body system.

  10. A simple model simulating a fan as a source of axial and circumferential body forces

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-07-01

    This software can be used in a computational fluids dynamics (CFD) code to represent a fan as a source of axial and circumferential body forces. The combined software can be used effectively in car design analyses that involve many underhood thermal management simulations. FANMOD uses as input the rotational speed of the fan, geometric fan data, and the lift and drag coefficients of the blades, and predicts the body forces generated by the fan inmore » the axial and circumferential directions. These forces can be used as momentum forces in a CFD code to simulate the effect of the fan in an underhood thermal management simulation.« less

  11. Neutral weak-current two-body contributions in inclusive scattering from {sup 12}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovato, Alessandro; Gandolfi, Stefano; Carlson, Joseph; Pieper, S. C.; Schiavilla, Rocco

    2014-05-01

    An {\\it ab initio} calculation of the sum rules of the neutral weak response functions in $^{12}$C is reported, based on a realistic Hamiltonian, including two- and three-nucleon potentials, and on realistic currents, consisting of one- and two-body terms. We find that the sum rules of the response functions associated with the longitudinal and transverse components of the (space-like) neutral current are largest and that a significant portion ($\\simeq 30$\\%) of the calculated strength is due to two-body terms. This fact may have implications for the MiniBooNE and other neutrino quasi-elastic scattering data on nuclei.

  12. Apparatus And Method For Reducing Drag Of A Bluff Body In Ground Effect Using Counter-Rotating Vortex Pairs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortega, Jason M.; Sabari, Kambiz

    2005-12-27

    An aerodynamic base drag reduction apparatus and method for bluff bodies, such as tractor-trailer trucks, utilizing a pair of lift surfaces extending to lift surface tips and located alongside the bluff body such as on opposing left and right side surfaces. In a flowstream substantially parallel to the longitudinal centerline of the bluff body, the pair of lift surfaces generate a pair of counter-rotating trailing vortices which confluence together in the wake of the bluff body in a direction orthogonal to the flowstream. The confluence draws or otherwise turns the flowstream, such as the flowstream passing over a top surface of the bluff body, in and around behind a trailing end of the bluff body to raise the pressure on a base surface at the trailing end and thereby reduce the aerodynamic base drag.

  13. Apparatus And Method For Reducing Drag Of A Bluff Body In Ground Effect Using Counter-Rotating Vortex Pairs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortega, Jason M.; Salari, Kambiz

    2005-08-09

    An aerodynamic base drag reduction apparatus and method for bluff bodies, such as tractor-trailer trucks, utilizing a pair of lift surfaces extending to lift surface tips and located alongside the bluff body such as on opposing left and right side surfaces. In a flowstream substantially parallel to the longitudinal centerline of the bluff body, the pair of lift surfaces generate a pair of counter-rotating trailing vortices which confluence together in the wake of the bluff body in a direction orthogonal to the flowstream. The confluence draws or otherwise turns the flowstream, such as the flowstream passing over a top surface of the bluff body, in and around behind a trailing end of the bluff body to raise the pressure on a base surface at the trailing end and thereby reduce the aerodynamic base drag.

  14. Methods and apparatus for manufacturing monocrystalline cast silicon and monocrystalline cast silicon bodies for photovoltaics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, Nathan G

    2014-01-14

    Methods and apparatuses are provided for casting silicon for photovoltaic cells and other applications. With such methods and apparatuses, a cast body of monocrystalline silicon may be formed that is free of, or substantially free of, radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 35 cm is provided.

  15. Methods and apparatuses for manufacturing monocrystalline cast silicon and monocrystalline cast silicon bodies for photovoltaics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, Nathan G.

    2011-11-01

    Methods and apparatuses are provided for casting silicon for photovoltaic cells and other applications. With such methods and apparatuses, a cast body of monocrystalline silicon may be formed that is free of, or substantially free of, radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 35 cm is provided.

  16. Percutaneous CT-Guided Biopsy of C3 Vertebral Body: Modified Approach for an Old Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pua, Uei; Chan, Stephen Yung-Wei

    2013-06-15

    Percutaneous biopsy of upper cervical vertebrae is challenging due to the various critical structures in the location and often requires difficult trajectory such as transoral or paramaxillary approaches. The purpose of this manuscript is to illustrate the utility of head rotation in creating a potential space for direct percutaneous access to C3 vertebral body for safe biopsy.

  17. Lloyd's Register Quality Assurance, Inc. Now Available as Accredited SEP Verification Body

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy is pleased to announce that Lloyd's Register Quality Assurance, Inc. (LRQA) is now a fully accredited Verification Body for Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™). This ANSI-ANAB accreditation enables LRQA to provide third-party verification for industrial facilities that wish to demonstrate energy management excellence and sustained energy savings to earn SEP certification.

  18. In vivo measurement of total body magnesium and manganese in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, R.Q.; Ellis, K.J. )

    1989-11-01

    Mg and Mn are essential minerals in many biological processes. Thus knowledge of their absolute amounts and how those amounts may be altered is important. In the past the in vivo measurement of Mg in animals was limited by both the poor geometry of the counting system and the requirement for multiple counts of the animal over several hours. We have developed a neutron activation technique for the direct in vivo measurement of total body Mg and Mn in the rat. The counting system adapted for the technique has a response that is relatively invariant (+/- 2.5%) to differences in body size. A least-squares curve fitting technique was developed that requires only a single 5-min count of the animal. Our in vivo values for body Mg and Mn were in excellent agreement (+/- 2.0%) with the results of total carcass analysis using atomic absorption. Longitudinal changes in total body Mg and Mn were examined in vivo in two groups of animals maintained on test diets that contained different amounts of Mg.

  19. Probing new gauge-boson couplings via three-body decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewett, J.L.; Rizzo, T.G. )

    1993-06-01

    We examine the possibility of using rare, three-body decays of a new neutral gauge boson [ital Z][sub 2] to probe its gauge couplings at hadron colliders. Specifically, we study the decays [ital Z][sub 2][r arrow][ital Wl][nu] and [ital Z][sub 2][r arrow][ital Z][nu][bar [nu

  20. Lethal body concentrations and accumulation patterns determine time-dependent toxicity of cadmium in soil arthropods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crommentuijn, T.; Doodeman, C.J.A.M.; Doornekamp, A.; Pol, J.J.C. van der; Bedaux, J.J.M.; Gestel, C.A.M. van )

    1994-11-01

    Time-dependent toxicity in bioassays is usually explained in terms of uptake and elimination kinetics of the toxicant. By comparing different species with essentially different accumulation kinetics, a firm test of this concept may be made. This article compares the sensitivity of six soil arthropods, the collembolans Orchesella cincta and Tomocerus minor, the oribatid mite Platynothrus peltifer, the isopods Porcellio scaber and Oniscus asellus, and the diplopod Cylindroiulus britannicus, when exposed to cadmium in the food. Survival was determined at various time intervals; accumulation of cadmium in the animals was measured at one time interval. Kinetic-based toxicity models were fitted to the data, and estimates were obtained for lethal body concentration, uptake rate constant, elimination rate constant, and ultimate LC50. Two different accumulation patterns could be discerned; these were correlated with time-survival relationships. One, species that have the possibility to eliminate cadmium will reach an equilibrium for the internal concentration and also an ultimate LC50. Two, species that are unable to eliminate cadmium but store it in the body will have an ultimate LC50 equal to zero. For these species the time in which the lethal body concentration is reached is more important. Taxonomically related species appeared to have comparable accumulation patterns, but lethal body concentrations differed. It is concluded that knowledge of the accumulation pattern is indispensable for the evaluation of species' sensitivities to toxicants.

  1. Positronium formation as a three-body reaction. II. The second-order nuclear amplitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shojaei, F.; Bolorizadeh, M. A.; Ghanbari-Adivi, E.; Brunger, M. J.

    2009-01-15

    We derive an exact analytic form for the second-order nuclear amplitudes, under the Faddeev three-body approach, which is applicable to the nonrelativistic high energy impact interaction where positronium is formed in the collision of a positron with an atom.

  2. The record of sea level rise by tidal sand bodies of the English Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berne, S; Lericolais, G. (Ifremer, Plouzane, (France)); Lafont, F. (Universite d'Orsay (France))

    1990-05-01

    Improvements of very high resolution seismic reflection provide new information about internal structures of modern sand bodies. This allows us to reconstruct their recent history, which is related to the Holocene sea level rise. A major distinction is found between inner shelf sand bodies, dominated by autocyclic processes, and outer shelf sand bodies, where allocyclic processes are invoked to explain the apparent contradiction between internal structures and present-day dynamics. On the inner shelf, evidence of the migration of tidal dunes (sand waves) has been obtained by repeated surveys using accurate positioning systems. Major bounding surfaces are thought to result from the action of tidal current and/or from episodic storms. A rough estimation of the age of these sand bodies can be proposed. On the outer shelf, some dunes of the English Channel exhibit cross-beds indicative of a past net bed-load transport at the opposite of present days dynamics, inherited from different tidal conditions when sea level was between 20 and 40 m lower. Some large tidal sand banks (e.g., the Sark Bank near the Channel Islands) display a more complicated pattern. The upper part of the sand bank is the result of the migration of very large dunes climbing at positive angles, whereas the lower part shows major erosional surfaces, attributed to the action of storms during lower sea levels.

  3. Blood lead level association with lower body weight in NHANES 1999–2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scinicariello, Franco; Buser, Melanie C.; Mevissen, Meike; Portier, Christopher J.

    2013-12-15

    Background: Lead exposure is associated with low birth-weight. The objective of this study is to determine whether lead exposure is associated with lower body weight in children, adolescents and adults. Methods: We analyzed data from NHANES 1999–2006 for participants aged ≥ 3 using multiple logistic and multivariate linear regression. Using age- and sex-standardized BMI Z-scores, overweight and obese children (ages 3–19) were classified by BMI ≥ 85th and ≥ 95th percentiles, respectively. The adult population (age ≥ 20) was classified as overweight and obese with BMI measures of 25–29.9 and ≥ 30, respectively. Blood lead level (BLL) was categorized by weighted quartiles. Results: Multivariate linear regressions revealed a lower BMI Z-score in children and adolescents when the highest lead quartile was compared to the lowest lead quartile (β (SE) = − 0.33 (0.07), p < 0.001), and a decreased BMI in adults (β (SE) = − 2.58 (0.25), p < 0.001). Multiple logistic analyses in children and adolescents found a negative association between BLL and the percentage of obese and overweight with BLL in the highest quartile compared to the lowest quartile (OR = 0.42, 95% CI: 0.30–0.59; and OR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.52–0.88, respectively). Adults in the highest lead quartile were less likely to be obese (OR = 0.42, 95% CI: 0.35–0.50) compared to those in the lowest lead quartile. Further analyses with blood lead as restricted cubic splines, confirmed the dose-relationship between blood lead and body weight outcomes. Conclusions: BLLs are associated with lower body mass index and obesity in children, adolescents and adults. - Highlights: • NHANES analysis of BLL and body weight outcomes • Increased BLL associated with decreased body weight in children and adolescent • Increased BLL associated with decreased body weight in adults.

  4. Ab Initio Many-Body Calculation of the 7Be(p,g)8B Radiative Capture...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ab Initio Many-Body Calculation of the 7Be(p,g)8B Radiative Capture Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ab Initio Many-Body Calculation of the 7Be(p,g)8B Radiative Capture ...

  5. Compliant mechanism road bicycle brake: a rigid-body replacement case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Brian M; Howell, Larry L; Magleby, Spencer P

    2011-01-19

    The design of high-performance bicycle brakes is complicated by the competing design objectives of increased performance and low weight. But this challenge also provides a good case study to demonstrate the design of compliant mechanisms to replace current rigid-link mechanisms. This paper briefly reviews current road brake designs, demonstrates the use of rigid-body replacement synthesis to design a compliant mechanism, and illustrates the combination of compliant mechanism design tools. The resulting concept was generated from the modified dual-pivot brake design and is a partially compliant mechanism where one pin has the dual role of a joint and a mounting pin. The pseudo-rigid-body model, finite element analysis, and optimization algorithms are used to generate design dimensions, and designs are considered for both titanium and E-glass flexures. The resulting design has the potential of reducing the part count and overall weight while maintaining a performance similar to the benchmark.

  6. Three-body fragmentation of CO{sub 2} driven by intense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Chengyin Liu, Yunquan; Gong, Qihuang; Wu, Cong; Fan, Yameng; Xie, Xiguo; Wang, Peng; Deng, Yongkai

    2015-03-28

    Dissociative ionization dynamics were studied experimentally for CO{sub 2} driven by intense laser pulses. Three-dimensional momentum vectors of correlated atomic ions were obtained for each three-body fragmentation event using triple ion coincidence measurement. Newton diagram demonstrated that three-body fragmentation of CO{sub 2}{sup n+} (n = 3-6) can occur through Coulomb explosion process and sequential fragmentation process depending on the fragmentation channels. The experimental data from these two processes were disentangled by using correlation diagram of correlated ions. Based on the accurate Coulomb explosion data, we reconstructed the bond angle distributions of CO{sub 2}{sup n+} at the moment of fragmentation, which are close to that of neutral CO{sub 2} before laser irradiation.

  7. Slip casting and green body evaluation of 6% yttria, 2% alumina silicon nitride. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, J.

    1991-12-01

    The superior high temperature properties of silicon nitride are well known. It has good strength, excellent high temperature strength, oxidation resistance, and is resistant to thermal shock. These properties make silicon nitride a good choice for many structural ceramics. Additionally, its high thermal conductivity and low dielectric constant make it a possible candidate for electronic substrates. Knowledge in the areas of characterization, machining, and proper firing parameters is growing and crucial to the production of modern ceramics. Such knowledge also makes it increasingly evident that a poor initial green body cannot result in a good final product. Many fabrication problems can be traced back to the processes such as casting and green body preparation and attention is being concentrated in these areas.

  8. Complete fourth-order relativistic many-body calculations for atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, Caleb C.; Derevianko, Andrei

    2004-03-01

    We report, to our knowledge, the first relativistic calculation for many-electron atoms complete through the fourth order of many-body perturbation theory. Owing to an overwhelmingly large number of underlying diagrams, the calculations are aided by our suite of symbolic algebra tools. We augment all-order single-double excitation method with 1648 omitted fourth-order diagrams and compute amplitudes of principal transitions in Na. The resulting ab initio relativistic electric dipole amplitudes are in an excellent agreement with 0.05%-accurate experimental values. Analysis of previously unmanageable classes of diagrams provides a useful guide to a design of even more accurate, yet practical, many-body methods.

  9. Communication: Classical threshold law for ion-neutral-neutral three-body recombination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H.

    2015-07-28

    A very recently method for classical trajectory calculations for three-body collision [Pérez-Ríos et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044307 (2014)] has been applied to describe ion-neutral-neutral ternary processes for low energy collisions: 0.1 mK–10 mK. As a result, a threshold law for the three-body recombination cross section is obtained and corroborated numerically. The derived threshold law predicts the formation of weakly bound dimers, with binding energies comparable to the collision energy of the collisional partners. In this low energy range, this analysis predicts that molecular ions should dominate over molecular neutrals as the most products formed.

  10. Aerodynamic drag reduction apparatus for gap-divided bluff bodies such as tractor-trailers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortega, Jason M.; Salari, Kambiz

    2006-07-11

    An apparatus for reducing the aerodynamic drag of a bluff-bodied vehicle such as a tractor-trailer in a flowstream, the bluff-bodied vehicle of a type having a leading portion, a trailing portion connected to the leading portion, and a gap between the leading and trailing portions defining a recirculation zone. The apparatus is preferably a baffle assembly, such as a vertical panel, adapted to span a width of the gap between the leading and trailing portions so as to impede cross-flow through the gap, with the span of the baffle assembly automatically adjusting for variations in the gap width when the leading and trailing portions pivot relative to each other.

  11. More many-body perturbation theory for an electron-ion system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, G.A. Jr.; Johnson, J.D.

    1997-10-01

    From previous finite-temperature, quantum, many-body perturbation theory results for the grand partition function of an electron-ion fluid through order {epsilon}{sup 4}, we compute the electron and ion fugacities in terms of the volume per ion and the temperature to that same order in perturbation theory. From these results we also give the pressure, again to the same order in perturbation theory about the values for the non-interacting fluid.

  12. NON-EQUILIBRIUM DYNAMICS OF MANY-BODY QUANTUM SYSTEMS: FUNDAMENTALS AND NEW FRONTIER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMille, David; LeHur, Karyn

    2013-11-27

    Rapid progress in nanotechnology and naofabrication techniques has ushered in a new era of quantum transport experiments. This has in turn heightened the interest in theoretical understanding of nonequilibrium dynamics of strongly correlated quantum systems. This project has advanced the frontiers of understanding in this area along several fronts. For example, we showed that under certain conditions, quantum impurities out of equilibrium can be reformulated in terms of an effective equilibrium theory; this makes it possible to use the gamut of tools available for quantum systems in equilibrium. On a different front, we demonstrated that the elastic power of a transmitted microwave photon in circuit QED systems can exhibit a many-body Kondo resonance. We also showed that under many circumstances, bipartite fluctuations of particle number provide an effective tool for studying many-body physics—particularly the entanglement properties of a many-body system. This implies that it should be possible to measure many-body entanglement in relatively simple and tractable quantum systems. In addition, we studied charge relaxation in quantum RC circuits with a large number of conducting channels, and elucidated its relation to Kondo models in various regimes. We also extended our earlier work on the dynamics of driven and dissipative quantum spin-boson impurity systems, deriving a new formalism that makes it possible to compute the full spin density matrix and spin-spin correlation functions beyond the weak coupling limit. Finally, we provided a comprehensive analysis of the nonequilibrium transport near a quantum phase transition in the case of a spinless dissipative resonant-level model. This project supported the research of two Ph.D. students and two postdoctoral researchers, whose training will allow them to further advance the field in coming years.

  13. Efficacy of Lower-Body Shielding in Computed Tomography Fluoroscopy-Guided Interventions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Sedlmair, Martin; Ritter, Christine; Banckwitz, Rosemarie; Flohr, Thomas

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided interventions pose relevant radiation exposure to the interventionalist. The goal of this study was to analyze the efficacy of lower-body shielding as a simple structural method for decreasing radiation dose to the interventionalist without limiting access to the patient. Material and Methods: All examinations were performed with a 128-slice dual source CT scanner (12 Multiplication-Sign 1.2-mm collimation; 120 kV; and 20, 40, 60, and 80 mAs) and an Alderson-Rando phantom. Scatter radiation was measured with an ionization chamber and a digital dosimeter at standardized positions and heights with and without a lower-body lead shield (0.5-mm lead equivalent; Kenex, Harlow, UK). Dose decreases were computed for the different points of measurement. Results: On average, lower-body shielding decreased scatter radiation by 38.2% within a 150-cm radius around the shielding. This decrease is most significant close to the gantry opening and at low heights of 50 and 100 cm above the floor with a maximum decrease of scatter radiation of 95.9% close to the scanner's isocentre. With increasing distance to the gantry opening, the effect decreased. There is almost no dose decrease effect at {>=}150 above the floor. Scatter radiation and its decrease were linearly correlated with the tube current-time product (r{sup 2} = 0.99), whereas percent scatter radiation decrease was independent of the tube current-time product. Conclusion: Lower-body shielding is an effective way to decrease radiation exposure to the interventionalist and should routinely be used in CT fluoroscopy-guided interventions.

  14. Fullrmc, A Rigid Body Reverse Monte Carlo Modeling Package Enabled With

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Machine Learning And Artificial Intelligence - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research January 22, 2016, Research Highlights Fullrmc, A Rigid Body Reverse Monte Carlo Modeling Package Enabled With Machine Learning And Artificial Intelligence Liquid Sulfur. Sx≤8 molecules recognized and built upon modelling Scientific Achievement Novel approach to reverse modelling atomic and molecular systems from a set of experimental data and constraints. New fitting concepts such as 'Group',

  15. MONICA: a compact, portable dual gamma camera system for mouse whole-body imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choyke, Peter L.; Xia, Wenze; Seidel, Jurgen; Kakareka, John W.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Milenic, Diane E.; Proffitt, James; Majewski, Stan; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Green, Michael V.

    2010-04-01

    Introduction We describe a compact, portable dual-gamma camera system (named "MONICA" for MObile Nuclear Imaging CAmeras) for visualizing and analyzing the whole-body biodistribution of putative diagnostic and therapeutic single photon emitting radiotracers in animals the size of mice. Methods Two identical, miniature pixelated NaI(Tl) gamma cameras were fabricated and installed ?looking up? through the tabletop of a compact portable cart. Mice are placed directly on the tabletop for imaging. Camera imaging performance was evaluated with phantoms and field performance was evaluated in a weeklong In-111 imaging study performed in a mouse tumor xenograft model. Results Tc-99m performance measurements, using a photopeak energy window of 140 keV?10%, yielded the following results: spatial resolution (FWHM at 1 cm), 2.2 mm; sensitivity, 149 cps (counts per seconds)/MBq (5.5 cps/μCi); energy resolution (FWHM, full width at half maximum), 10.8%; count rate linearity (count rate vs. activity), r2=0.99 for 0?185 MBq (0?5 mCi) in the field of view (FOV); spatial uniformity, <3% count rate variation across the FOV. Tumor and whole-body distributions of the In-111 agent were well visualized in all animals in 5-min images acquired throughout the 168-h study period. Conclusion Performance measurements indicate that MONICA is well suited to whole-body single photon mouse imaging. The field study suggests that inter-device communications and user-oriented interfaces included in the MONICA design facilitate use of the system in practice. We believe that MONICA may be particularly useful early in the (cancer) drug development cycle where basic whole-body biodistribution data can direct future development of the agent under study and where logistical factors, e.g., limited imaging space, portability and, potentially, cost are important.

  16. Distribution and pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine in the human body: clinical implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.; Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Wang, G.-J.; Shumay, E.; Telang, F.; Thanos, P.; Alexoff, D.

    2010-12-01

    Methamphetamine is one of the most toxic of the drugs of abuse, which may reflect its distribution and accumulation in the body. However no studies have measured methamphetamine's organ distribution in the human body. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was used in conjunction with [{sup 11}C]d-methamphetamine to measure its whole-body distribution and bioavailability as assessed by peak uptake (% Dose/cc), rate of clearance (time to reach 50% peak-clearance) and accumulation (area under the curve) in healthy participants (9 Caucasians and 10 African Americans). Methamphetamine distributed through most organs. Highest uptake (whole organ) occurred in lungs (22% Dose; weight {approx}1246 g), liver (23%; weight {approx}1677 g) and intermediate in brain (10%; weight {approx}1600 g). Kidneys also showed high uptake (per/cc basis) (7%; weight 305 g). Methamphetamine's clearance was fastest in heart and lungs (7-16 minutes), slowest in brain, liver and stomach (>75 minutes), and intermediate in kidneys, spleen and pancreas (22-50 minutes). Lung accumulation of [{sup 11}C]d-methamphetamine was 30% higher for African Americans than Caucasians (p < 0.05) but did not differ in other organs. The high accumulation of methamphetamine, a potent stimulant drug, in most body organs is likely to contribute to the medical complications associated with methamphetamine abuse. In particular, we speculate that methamphetamine's high pulmonary uptake could render this organ vulnerable to infections (tuberculosis) and pathology (pulmonary hypertension). Our preliminary findings of a higher lung accumulation of methamphetamine in African Americans than Caucasians merits further investigation and questions whether it could contribute to the infrequent use of methamphetamine among African Americans.

  17. The phase topology of a special case of Goryachev integrability in rigid body dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryabov, P. E.

    2014-07-31

    The phase topology of a special case of Goryachev integrability in the problem of motion of a rigid body in a fluid is investigated using the method of Boolean functions, which was developed by Kharlamov for algebraically separated systems. The bifurcation diagram of the moment map is found and the Fomenko invariant, which classifies the systems up to rough Liouville equivalence, is specified. Bibliography: 15 titles. (paper)

  18. Indirect detection of gravitino dark matter including its three-body decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Ki-Young; Restrepo, Diego; Yaguna, Carlos E.; Zapata, Oscar E-mail: restrepo@udea.edu.co E-mail: pfozapata@eia.edu.co

    2010-10-01

    It was recently pointed out that in supersymmetric scenarios with gravitino dark matter and bilinear R-parity violation, gravitinos with masses below M{sub W} typically decay with a sizable branching ratio into the 3-body final states W*l and Z*?. In this paper we study the indirect detection signatures of gravitino dark matter including such final states. First, we obtain the gamma ray spectrum from gravitino decays, which features a monochromatic contribution from the decay into ?? and a continuum contribution from the three-body decays. After studying its dependence on supersymmetric parameters, we compute the expected gamma ray fluxes and derive new constraints, from recent FERMI data, on the R-parity breaking parameter and on the gravitino lifetime. Indirect detection via antimatter searches, a new possibility brought about by the three-body final states, is also analyzed. For models compatible with the gamma ray observations, the positron signal is found to be negligible whereas the antiproton one can be significant.

  19. Early aqueous activity on the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies recorded by fayalite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Patricia M.; Jogo, Kaori; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Wakita, Shigeru; Ciesla, Fred J.; Hutcheon, Ian D.

    2015-06-23

    Here, chronology of aqueous activity on chondrite parent bodies constrains their accretion times and thermal histories. Radiometric 53Mn–53Cr dating has been successfully applied to aqueously formed carbonates in CM carbonaceous chondrites. Owing to the absence of carbonates in ordinary (H, L and LL), and CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites, and the lack of proper standards, there are no reliable ages of aqueous activity on their parent bodies. Here we report the first 53Mn–53Cr ages of aqueously formed fayalite in the L3 chondrite Elephant Moraine 90161 as 2.4 +1.8-1.3 Myr after calcium–aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), the oldest Solar System solids. In addition, measurements using our synthesized fayalite standard show that fayalite in the CV3 chondrite Asuka 881317 and CO3-like chondrite MacAlpine Hills 88107 formed and 4.2+0.8-0.7 Myr after CAIs, respectively. Thermal modelling, combined with the inferred conditions (temperature and water/rock ratio) and 53Mn–53Cr ages of aqueous alteration, suggests accretion of the L, CV and CO parent bodies ~1.8–2.5 Myr after CAIs.

  20. Early aqueous activity on the ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite parent bodies recorded by fayalite

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Doyle, Patricia M.; Jogo, Kaori; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Wakita, Shigeru; Ciesla, Fred J.; Hutcheon, Ian D.

    2015-06-23

    Here, chronology of aqueous activity on chondrite parent bodies constrains their accretion times and thermal histories. Radiometric 53Mn–53Cr dating has been successfully applied to aqueously formed carbonates in CM carbonaceous chondrites. Owing to the absence of carbonates in ordinary (H, L and LL), and CV and CO carbonaceous chondrites, and the lack of proper standards, there are no reliable ages of aqueous activity on their parent bodies. Here we report the first 53Mn–53Cr ages of aqueously formed fayalite in the L3 chondrite Elephant Moraine 90161 as 2.4 +1.8-1.3 Myr after calcium–aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), the oldest Solar System solids. In addition,more » measurements using our synthesized fayalite standard show that fayalite in the CV3 chondrite Asuka 881317 and CO3-like chondrite MacAlpine Hills 88107 formed and 4.2+0.8-0.7 Myr after CAIs, respectively. Thermal modelling, combined with the inferred conditions (temperature and water/rock ratio) and 53Mn–53Cr ages of aqueous alteration, suggests accretion of the L, CV and CO parent bodies ~1.8–2.5 Myr after CAIs.« less

  1. D{sup +{yields}}K{sup -{pi}+{pi}+}: three-body FSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magalhaes, P. C.; Robilotta, M. R.

    2010-11-12

    Even with the important advances of the last decade, charmed meson decays are still poorly understood theoretically. We do not understand, for example, why the kappa scalar resonance is responsible for 70% of the fit in the D{sup +{yields}}K{sup -{pi}+{pi}+} decay, as observed by the E791 (2002) experiment and confirmed by different collaborations. The fact that quark c can neither be considered soft nor heavy prevents the direct use of known theoretical results in the description of D. This scenario indicates two big gaps in the knowledge of D{sup +{yields}{pi}+{pi}+}K{sup -} decay. The first concerns the weak vertex, still not suitably treated in literature. The second is the three-body final state interaction (FSI) of the pseudoscalar mesons, until now considered in the literature as a quasi two-body interaction . This investigation aims at calculating the D{sup +{yields}{pi}+{pi}+}K{sup -} decay considering 3 body FSI.

  2. Tidal dissipation in a homogeneous spherical body. II. Three examples: Mercury, Io, and Kepler-10 b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Valeri V.; Efroimsky, Michael E-mail: michael.efroimsky@usno.navy.mil

    2014-11-01

    In Efroimsky and Makarov (Paper I), we derived from the first principles a formula for the tidal heating rate in a homogeneous sphere, compared it with the previously used formulae, and noted the differences. Now we present case studies: Mercury, Kepler-10 b, and a triaxial Io. A sharp frequency dependence of k {sub 2}/Q near spin-orbit resonances yields a sharp dependence of k {sub 2}/Q (and, therefore, of tidal heating) upon the spin rate. Thereby physical libration plays a major role in tidal heating of synchronously rotating planets. The magnitude of libration in the spin rate being defined by the planet's triaxiality, the latter becomes a factor determining the dissipation rate. Other parameters equal, a strongly triaxial synchronized body generates more heat than a similar body of a more symmetrical shape. After an initially triaxial object melts and loses its triaxiality, dissipation becomes less intensive; the body can solidify, with the tidal bulge becoming a new figure with triaxiality lower than the original. We derive approximate expressions for the dissipation rate in a Maxwell planet with the Maxwell time longer than the inverse tidal frequency. The expressions derived pertain to the 1:1 and 3:2 resonances and a nonresonant case; so they are applicable to most close-in super-Earths detected. In these planets, the heating outside synchronism is weakly dependent on the eccentricity and obliquity, provided both these parameters's values are moderate. According to our calculation, Kepler-10 b could hardly survive the intensive tidal heating without being synchronized, circularized, and reshaped through a complete or partial melt-down.

  3. Insights on activation enthalpy for non-Schmid slip in body-centered cubic metals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hale, Lucas M.; Lim, Hojun; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Battaile, Corbett C.; Weinberger, Christopher R.

    2014-12-18

    We use insights gained from atomistic simulation to develop an activation enthalpy model for dislocation slip in body-centered cubic iron. Furthermore, using a classical potential that predicts dislocation core stabilities consistent with ab initio predictions, we quantify the non-Schmid stress-dependent effects of slip. The kink-pair activation enthalpy is evaluated and a model is identified as a function of the general stress state. Thus, our model enlarges the applicability of the classic Kocks activation enthalpy model to materials with non-Schmid behavior.

  4. Enhancement of thermal stability of porous bodies comprised of stainless steel or an alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bischoff, Brian L.; Sutton, Theodore G.; Judkins, Roddie R.; Armstrong, Timothy R.; Adcock, Kenneth D.

    2010-11-09

    A method for treating a porous item constructed of metal powder, such as a powder made of Series 400 stainless steel, involves a step of preheating the porous item to a temperature of between about 700 and 900.degree. C. degrees in an oxidizing atmosphere and then sintering the body in an inert or reducing atmosphere at a temperature which is slightly below the melting temperature of the metal which comprises the porous item. The thermal stability of the resulting item is enhanced by this method so that the item retains its porosity and metallic characteristics, such as ductility, at higher (e.g. near-melting) temperatures.

  5. COLLISIONS BETWEEN GRAVITY-DOMINATED BODIES. I. OUTCOME REGIMES AND SCALING LAWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leinhardt, Zoee M.; Stewart, Sarah T. E-mail: sstewart@eps.harvard.edu

    2012-01-20

    Collisions are the core agent of planet formation. In this work, we derive an analytic description of the dynamical outcome for any collision between gravity-dominated bodies. We conduct high-resolution simulations of collisions between planetesimals; the results are used to isolate the effects of different impact parameters on collision outcome. During growth from planetesimals to planets, collision outcomes span multiple regimes: cratering, merging, disruption, super-catastrophic disruption, and hit-and-run events. We derive equations (scaling laws) to demarcate the transition between collision regimes and to describe the size and velocity distributions of the post-collision bodies. The scaling laws are used to calculate maps of collision outcomes as a function of mass ratio, impact angle, and impact velocity, and we discuss the implications of the probability of each collision regime during planet formation. Collision outcomes are described in terms of the impact conditions and the catastrophic disruption criteria, Q*{sub RD}-the specific energy required to disperse half the total colliding mass. All planet formation and collisional evolution studies have assumed that catastrophic disruption follows pure energy scaling; however, we find that catastrophic disruption follows nearly pure momentum scaling. As a result, Q*{sub RD} is strongly dependent on the impact velocity and projectile-to-target mass ratio in addition to the total mass and impact angle. To account for the impact angle, we derive the interacting mass fraction of the projectile; the outcome of a collision is dependent on the kinetic energy of the interacting mass rather than the kinetic energy of the total mass. We also introduce a new material parameter, c*, that defines the catastrophic disruption criteria between equal-mass bodies in units of the specific gravitational binding energy. For a diverse range of planetesimal compositions and internal structures, c* has a value of 5 {+-} 2; whereas

  6. Many-body electronic structure and Kondo properties of cobalt-porphyrin molecules.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboredo, Fernando A; Tiago, Murilo L; Dagotto, Elbio R; Dias Da Silva, Luis G; Ulloa, Sergio E

    2009-01-01

    We use a unique combination of first principles many-body methods and the numerical renormalization-group technique to study the Kondo regime of cobalt-porphyrin compounds adsorbed on a Cu(111) surface. We find the Kondo temperature to be highly sensitive to both molecule charging and distance to the surface, which can explain the variations observed in recent scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements. We discuss the importance of manybody effects in the molecular electronic structure controlling this phenomenon and suggest scenarios where enhanced temperatures can be achieved in experiments.

  7. Three-Body Recombination of {sup 6}Li Atoms with Large Negative Scattering Lengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braaten, Eric; Kang, Daekyoung; Platter, Lucas; Hammer, H.-W.

    2009-08-14

    The three-body recombination rate at threshold for distinguishable atoms with large negative pair scattering lengths is calculated in the zero-range approximation. The only parameters in this limit are the 3 scattering lengths and the Efimov parameter, which can be complex-valued. We provide semianalytic expressions for the cases of 2 or 3 equal scattering lengths, and we obtain numerical results for the general case of 3 different scattering lengths. Our general result is applied to the three lowest hyperfine states of {sup 6}Li atoms. Comparisons with recent experiments provide indications of loss features associated with Efimov trimers near the 3-atom threshold.

  8. Dosimetric aspects of inverse-planned modulated-arc total-body irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Held, Mareike; Kirby, Neil; Morin, Olivier; Pouliot, Jean

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To develop optimal beam parameters and to verify the dosimetric aspects of the recently developed modulated-arc total-body irradiation (MATBI) technique, which delivers an inverse-planned dose to the entire body using gantry rotation. Methods: The patient is positioned prone and supine underneath the gantry at about 2 m source-to-surface distance (SSD). Then, up to 28 beams irradiate the patient from different gantry angles. Based on full-body computed-tomography (CT) images of the patient, the weight of each beam is optimized, using inverse planning, to create a uniform body dose. This study investigates how to best simulate patients and the ideal beam setup parameters, such as field size, number of beams, and beam geometry, for treatment time and dose homogeneity. In addition, three anthropomorphic water phantoms were constructed and utilized to verify the accuracy of dose delivery, with both diode array and ion chamber measurements. Furthermore, to improve the accuracy of the new technique, a beam model is created specifically for the extended-SSD positioning for MATBI. Results: Low dose CT scans can be utilized for dose calculations without affecting the accuracy. The largest field size of 40 Multiplication-Sign 40 cm{sup 2} was found to deliver the most uniform dose in the least amount of time. Moreover, a higher number of beams improves dose homogeneity. The average dose discrepancy between ion chamber measurements and extended-SSD beam model calculations was 1.2%, with the largest discrepancy being 3.2%. This average dose discrepancy was 1.4% with the standard beam model for delivery at isocenter. Conclusions: The optimum beam setup parameters, regarding dose uniformity and treatment duration, are laid out for modulated-arc TBI. In addition, the presented dose measurements show that these treatments can be delivered accurately. These measurements also indicated that a new beam model did not significantly improve the accuracy of dose calculations

  9. No Core CI calculations for light nuclei with chiral 2- and 3-body forces |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility No Core CI calculations for light nuclei with chiral 2- and 3-body forces Authors: Pieter Maris, H Metin Aktulga, Sven Binder, Angelo Calci, Ümit V Çatalyürek, Joachim Langhammer, Esmond Ng, Erik Saule, Robert Roth, James P Vary, Chao Yang The atomic nucleus is a self-bound system of strongly interacting nucleons. In No-Core Configuration Interaction calculations, the nuclear wavefunction is expanded in Slater determinants of single-nucleon

  10. Present knowledge about specific absorption rates inside a human body exposed to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garn, J.; Gabriel, C.

    1995-02-01

    We have compiled results of scientific investigations about the relationship between external field-strengths and specific absorption rates inside the human body. The data were normalized to SAR-values that form the basis for current safety standards. Results were compared to exposure limits given in these standard. This comparison should serve as a reference for the selection of reliable reference levels for personal protection against thermal effects in radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. The need to measure and monitor ankle/wrist currents to protect some exposed workers is explained. The study has also highlighted a scarcity of dosimetric data at frequencies below 3 MHz. 20 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Electromagnetic field interactions with the human body: observed effects and theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raines, J.K.

    1981-04-01

    The effects of nonionizing electromagnetic (EM) field interactions with the human body were reported and human related studies were collected. Nonionizing EM fields are linked to cancer in humans in three different ways: cause, means of detection, and effective treatment. Bad and benign effects are expected from nonionizing EM fields and much more knowledge is necessary to properly categorize and qualify EM field characteristics. It is concluded that knowledge of the boundary between categories, largely dependent on field intensity, is vital to proper future use of EM radiation for any purpose and the protection of the individual from hazard.

  12. Many-body effects in heavy fermion compounds [sic]. Final technical report for period September 1984 - January 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riseborough, Peter S.

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical investigation of many-body effects in Cerium and Uranium Heavy Fermion and Mixed Valent Compounds and their experimental manifestations in thermodynamic, transport, and spectroscopic properties is discussed in this report.

  13. Ab Initio Many-Body Calculation of the 7Be(p,g)8B Radiative Capture...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Ab Initio Many-Body Calculation of the 7Be(p,g)8B Radiative Capture Authors: Navratil, P ; Roth, R ; Quaglioni, S Publication Date: 2011-05-23 OSTI Identifier: 1122228 ...

  14. Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this Model Procedure is to identify precautions and provide guidance to Medical Examiners/Coroners on the handling of a body or human remains that are potentially contaminated with...

  15. Process for producing elements from a fused bath using a metal strap and ceramic electrode body nonconsumable electrode assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byrne, S.C.

    1984-07-03

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly is described suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a ceramic electrode body and a metal subassembly of a metal conductor rod and at least one metal strap affixed to an end of the rod with opposing portions extending radially outwardly from the rod axis and having the ends of the strap attached to the electrode body. 7 figs.

  16. Process for producing elements from a fused bath using a metal strap and ceramic electrode body nonconsumable electrode assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byrne, Stephen C.

    1984-01-01

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a ceramic electrode body and a metal subassembly of a metal conductor rod and at least one metal strap affixed to an end of the rod with opposing portions extending radially outwardly from the rod axis and having the ends of the strap attached to the electrode body.

  17. Response of a fluid-immersed microcantilever close to a deformable body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, R. J.; Lee, T. C.; Cater, J. E.; Bachtiar, V.; Minton, J.

    2015-03-07

    The importance of hydrodynamics upon the response of a microcantilever immersed in a viscous fluid has been well established [J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 84, 64 (1998); C. A. Eysden and J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 101, 044908 (2007)]. It has previously been shown that the presence of a nearby rigid planar surface can significantly alter a microcantilever's non-contact response, through microcantilever–surface hydrodynamic interactions [C. P. Green and J. E. Sader, Phys. Fluids 17, 073102 (2005); C. P. Green and J. E. Sader, J. Appl. Phys. 98, 114913 (2005); R. J. Clarke et al., J. Fluid Mech. 545, 397426 (2005); R. J. Clarke et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 050801 (2006).]. In cases where the nearby surface is a finite-sized deformable body, such as in noncontact microrheology measurements, we expect to see further changes in the microcantilever's response. Hence, we here compute the thermal spectra of several microcantilevers in the presence of different compliant samples that have the characteristics of soft biological fibres. Our findings demonstrate that the elastohydrodynamic regime can substantially dictate the extent to which the compliance of a given body is evident in the microcantilever's thermal spectra, and suggest that certain nondimensional quantities should lie within particular, ranges for this to be the case. We expect these findings to be of interest in areas such as Atomic Force Microscopy, microsensing, and non-contact microrheology.

  18. Effect of Fractionation in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Using the Linear Quadratic Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jun; Philadelphia Cyberknife, Havertown, Pennsylvania ; Lamond, John; Philadelphia Cyberknife, Havertown, Pennsylvania ; Fowler, Jack; Lanciano, Rachelle; Philadelphia Cyberknife, Havertown, Pennsylvania ; Feng, Jing; Brady, Luther; Philadelphia Cyberknife, Havertown, Pennsylvania

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To examine the fractionation effect of stereotactic body radiation therapy with a heterogeneous dose distribution. Methods: Derived from the linear quadratic formula with measurements from a hypothetical 2-cm radiosurgical tumor, the threshold percentage was defined as (?/?{sub tissue}/?/?{sub tumor}), the balance ?/? ratio was defined as (prescription dose/tissue tolerance*?/?{sub tumor}), and the balance dose was defined as (tissue tolerance/threshold percentage). Results: With increasing fractions and equivalent peripheral dose to the target, the biological equivalent dose of hot spots in a target decreases. The relative biological equivalent doses of serial organs decrease only when the relative percentage of its dose to the prescription dose is above the threshold percentage. The volume of parallel organs at risk decreases only when the tumor's ?/? ratio is above the balance ?/? ratio and the prescription dose is lower than balance dose. Conclusions: The potential benefits of fractionation in stereotactic body radiation therapy depend on the complex interplay between the total dose, ?/? ratios, and dose differences between the target and the surrounding normal tissues.

  19. Strand-Specific RNA-Seq Analyses of Fruiting Body Development in Coprinopsis cinerea

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Muraguchi, Hajime; Umezawa, Kiwamu; Niikura, Mai; Yoshida, Makoto; Kozaki, Toshinori; Ishii, Kazuo; Sakai, Kiyota; Shimizu, Motoyuki; Nakahori, Kiyoshi; Sakamoto, Yuichi; et al

    2015-10-28

    We report that the basidiomycete fungus Coprinopsis cinerea is an important model system for multicellular development. Fruiting bodies of C. cinerea are typical mushrooms, which can be produced synchronously on defined media in the laboratory. To investigate the transcriptome in detail during fruiting body development, high-throughput sequencing (RNA-seq) was performed using cDNA libraries strand-specifically constructed from 13 points (stages/tissues) with two biological replicates. The reads were aligned to 14,245 predicted transcripts, and counted for forward and reverse transcripts. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between two adjacent points and between vegetative mycelium and each point were detected by Tag Count Comparison (TCC).more » To validate RNA-seq data, expression levels of selected genes were compared using RPKM values in RNA-seq data and qRT-PCR data, and DEGs detected in microarray data were examined in MA plots of RNA-seq data by TCC. We discuss events deduced from GO analysis of DEGs. In addition, we uncovered both transcription factor candidates and antisense transcripts that are likely to be involved in developmental regulation for fruiting.« less

  20. Discovery and Characterization of Iron Sulfide and Polyphosphate Bodies Coexisting in Archaeoglobus fulgidus Cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Toso, Daniel B.; Javed, Muhammad Mohsin; Czornyj, Elizabeth; Gunsalus, Robert P.; Zhou, Z. Hong

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic storage granules have long been recognized in bacterial and eukaryotic cells but were only recently identified in archaeal cells. Here, we report the cellular organization and chemical compositions of storage granules in the Euryarchaeon , Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain VC16, a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and sulfate-reducing microorganism. Dense granules were apparent in A. fulgidus cells imaged by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) but not so by negative stain electron microscopy. Cryo electron tomography (cryoET) revealed that each cell contains one to several dense granules located near the cell membrane. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) showmore » that, surprisingly, each cell contains not just one but often two types of granules with different elemental compositions. One type, named iron sulfide body (ISB), is composed mainly of the elements iron and sulfur plus copper; and the other one, called polyphosphate body (PPB), is composed of phosphorus and oxygen plus magnesium, calcium, and aluminum. PPBs are likely used for energy storage and/or metal sequestration/detoxification. ISBs could result from the reduction of sulfate to sulfide via anaerobic energy harvesting pathways and may be associated with energy and/or metal storage or detoxification. The exceptional ability of these archaeal cells to sequester different elements may have novel bioengineering applications.« less

  1. Internal air flow analysis of a bladeless micro aerial vehicle hemisphere body using computational fluid dynamic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Othman, M. N. K. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Zuradzman, M. Razlan E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Hazry, D. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Khairunizam, Wan E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Shahriman, A. B. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Yaacob, S. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Ahmed, S. Faiz E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; and others

    2014-12-04

    This paper explain the analysis of internal air flow velocity of a bladeless vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) hemisphere body. In mechanical design, before produce a prototype model, several analyses should be done to ensure the product's effectiveness and efficiency. There are two types of analysis method can be done in mechanical design; mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamic. In this analysis, I used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) by using SolidWorks Flow Simulation software. The idea came through to overcome the problem of ordinary quadrotor UAV which has larger size due to using four rotors and the propellers are exposed to environment. The bladeless MAV body is designed to protect all electronic parts, which means it can be used in rainy condition. It also has been made to increase the thrust produced by the ducted propeller compare to exposed propeller. From the analysis result, the air flow velocity at the ducted area increased to twice the inlet air. This means that the duct contribute to the increasing of air velocity.

  2. Peculiar velocities in redshift space: formalism, N-body simulations and perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okumura, Teppei; Seljak, Uroš; Vlah, Zvonimir; Desjacques, Vincent E-mail: useljak@berkeley.edu E-mail: Vincent.Desjacques@unige.ch

    2014-05-01

    Direct measurements of peculiar velocities of galaxies and clusters of galaxies can in principle provide explicit information on the three dimensional mass distribution, but this information is modulated by the fact that velocity field is sampled at galaxy positions, and is thus probing galaxy momentum. We derive expressions for the cross power spectrum between the density and momentum field and the auto spectrum of the momentum field in redshift space, by extending the distribution function method to these statistics. The resulting momentum cross and auto power spectra in redshift space are expressed as infinite sums over velocity moment correlators in real space, as is the case for the density power spectrum in redshift space. We compute each correlator using Eulerian perturbation theory (PT) and halo biasing model and compare the resulting redshift-space velocity statistics to those measured from N-body simulations for both dark matter and halos. We find that in redshift space linear theory predictions for the density-momentum cross power spectrum as well as for the momentum auto spectrum fail to predict the N-body results at very large scales. On the other hand, our nonlinear PT prediction for these velocity statistics, together with real-space power spectrum for dark matter from simulations, improves the accuracy for both dark matter and halos. We also present the same analysis in configuration space, computing the redshift-space pairwise mean infall velocities and velocity correlation function and compare to nonlinear PT.

  3. Calibration of the Accuscan II In Vivo System for Whole Body Counting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orval R. Perry; David L. Georgeson

    2011-08-01

    This report describes the April 2011 calibration of the Accuscan II HpGe In Vivo system for whole body counting. The source used for the calibration was a NIST traceable BOMAB manufactured by DOE as INL2006 BOMAB containing Eu-154, Eu-155, Eu-152, Sb-125 and Y-88 with energies from 27 keV to 1836 keV with a reference date of 11/29/2006. The actual usable energy range was 86.5 keV to 1597 keV on 4/21/2011. The BOMAB was constructed inside the Accuscan II counting 'tub' in the order of legs, thighs, abdomen, thorax/arms, neck, and head. Each piece was taped to the backwall of the counter. The arms were taped to the thorax. The phantom was constructed between the v-ridges on the backwall of the Accuscan II counter. The energy and efficiency calibrations were performed using the INL2006 BOMAB. The calibrations were performed with the detectors in the scanning mode. This report includes an overview introduction and records for the energy/FWHM and efficiency calibration including performance verification and validation counting. The Accuscan II system was successfully calibrated for whole body counting and verified in accordance with ANSI/HPS N13.30-1996 criteria.

  4. Dissecting jets and missing energy searches using $n$-body extended simplified models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cohen, Timothy; Dolan, Matthew J.; El Hedri, Sonia; Hirschauer, James; Tran, Nhan; Whitbeck, Andrew

    2016-08-04

    Simplified Models are a useful way to characterize new physics scenarios for the LHC. Particle decays are often represented using non-renormalizable operators that involve the minimal number of fields required by symmetries. Generalizing to a wider class of decay operators allows one to model a variety of final states. This approach, which we dub the $n$-body extension of Simplified Models, provides a unifying treatment of the signal phase space resulting from a variety of signals. In this paper, we present the first application of this framework in the context of multijet plus missing energy searches. The main result of thismore » work is a global performance study with the goal of identifying which set of observables yields the best discriminating power against the largest Standard Model backgrounds for a wide range of signal jet multiplicities. Our analysis compares combinations of one, two and three variables, placing emphasis on the enhanced sensitivity gain resulting from non-trivial correlations. Utilizing boosted decision trees, we compare and classify the performance of missing energy, energy scale and energy structure observables. We demonstrate that including an observable from each of these three classes is required to achieve optimal performance. In conclusion, this work additionally serves to establish the utility of $n$-body extended Simplified Models as a diagnostic for unpacking the relative merits of different search strategies, thereby motivating their application to new physics signatures beyond jets and missing energy.« less

  5. Strand-Specific RNA-Seq Analyses of Fruiting Body Development in Coprinopsis cinerea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muraguchi, Hajime; Umezawa, Kiwamu; Niikura, Mai; Yoshida, Makoto; Kozaki, Toshinori; Ishii, Kazuo; Sakai, Kiyota; Shimizu, Motoyuki; Nakahori, Kiyoshi; Sakamoto, Yuichi; Choi, Cindy; Ngan, Chew Yee; Lindquist, Eika; Lipzen, Anna; Tritt, Andrew; Haridas, Sajeet; Barry, Kerrie; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Pukkila, Patricia J.

    2015-10-28

    We report that the basidiomycete fungus Coprinopsis cinerea is an important model system for multicellular development. Fruiting bodies of C. cinerea are typical mushrooms, which can be produced synchronously on defined media in the laboratory. To investigate the transcriptome in detail during fruiting body development, high-throughput sequencing (RNA-seq) was performed using cDNA libraries strand-specifically constructed from 13 points (stages/tissues) with two biological replicates. The reads were aligned to 14,245 predicted transcripts, and counted for forward and reverse transcripts. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between two adjacent points and between vegetative mycelium and each point were detected by Tag Count Comparison (TCC). To validate RNA-seq data, expression levels of selected genes were compared using RPKM values in RNA-seq data and qRT-PCR data, and DEGs detected in microarray data were examined in MA plots of RNA-seq data by TCC. We discuss events deduced from GO analysis of DEGs. In addition, we uncovered both transcription factor candidates and antisense transcripts that are likely to be involved in developmental regulation for fruiting.

  6. Experimental observation of spin-dependent electron many-body effects in CdTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horodysk, P.; N?mec, P. Novotn, T.; Trojnek, F.; Mal, P.

    2014-08-07

    In semiconductors, the spin degree of freedom is usually disregarded in the theoretical treatment of electron many-body effects such as band-gap renormalization and screening of the Coulomb enhancement factor. Nevertheless, as was observed experimentally in GaAs, not only the single-particle phase-space filling but also many-body effects are spin sensitive. In this paper, we report on time- and polarization-resolved differential transmission pump-probe measurements in CdTe, which has the same zincblende crystal structure but different material parameters compared to that of GaAs. We show experimentally that at room temperature in CdTeunlike in GaAsthe pump-induced decrease of transmission due to the band-gap renormalization can even exceed the transmission increase due to the phase-space filling, which enables to measure directly the spin-sensitivity of the band-gap renormalization. We also observed that the influence of the band-gap renormalization is more prominent at low temperatures.

  7. Application and results of whole-body autoradiography in distribution studies of organic solvents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergman, K.

    1983-01-01

    With the growing concern for the health hazards of occupational exposure to toxic substances attention has been focused on the organic solvents, which are associated with both deleterious nervous system effects and specific tissue injuries. Relatively little is known about the distribution of organic solvents and their metabolites in the living organism. Knowledge of the specific tissue localizations and retention of solvents and solvent metabolites is of great value in revealing and understanding the sites and mechanisms of organic solvent toxicity. Whole-body autoradiography has been modified and applied to distribution studies of benzene, toluene, m-xylene, styrene, methylene chloride, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene and carbon disulfide. The high volatility of these substances has led to the development of cryo-techniques. Whole-body autoradiographic techniques applicable to the study of volatile substances are reviewed. The localizations of nonvolatile solvent metabolites and firmly bound metabolites have also been examined. The obtained results are discussed in relation to toxic effects and evaluated by comparison with other techniques used in distribution studies of organic solvents and their metabolites.

  8. Analysis of Coiled-Coil Interactions between Core Proteins of the Spindle Pole Body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zizlsperger, N.; Malashkevich, V; Pillay, S; Keating, A

    2008-01-01

    The spindle pole body (SPB) is a multiprotein complex that organizes microtubules in yeast. Due to its large size and association with the nuclear membrane, little is known about its detailed structure. In particular, although many SPB components and some of the interactions between them have been identified, the molecular details of how most of these interactions occur are not known. The prevalence of predicted coiled-coil regions in SPB proteins suggests that some interactions may occur via coiled coils. Here this hypothesis is supported by biochemical characterization of isolated coiled-coil peptides derived from SPB proteins. Formation of four strongly self-associating coiled-coil complexes from Spc29, Spc42, and Spc72 was demonstrated by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay. Many weaker self- and heteroassociations were also detected by CD, FRET, and/or cross-linking. The thermal stabilities of nine candidate homooligomers were assessed; six unfolded cooperatively with melting temperatures ranging from <11 to >50 C. Solution studies established that coiled-coil peptides derived from Spc42 and Spc72 form parallel dimers, and this was confirmed for Spc42 by a high-resolution crystal structure. These data contribute to a growing body of knowledge that will ultimately provide a detailed model of the SPB structure.

  9. The GENGA code: gravitational encounters in N-body simulations with GPU acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimm, Simon L.; Stadel, Joachim G.

    2014-11-20

    We describe an open source GPU implementation of a hybrid symplectic N-body integrator, GENGA (Gravitational ENcounters with Gpu Acceleration), designed to integrate planet and planetesimal dynamics in the late stage of planet formation and stability analyses of planetary systems. GENGA uses a hybrid symplectic integrator to handle close encounters with very good energy conservation, which is essential in long-term planetary system integration. We extended the second-order hybrid integration scheme to higher orders. The GENGA code supports three simulation modes: integration of up to 2048 massive bodies, integration with up to a million test particles, or parallel integration of a large number of individual planetary systems. We compare the results of GENGA to Mercury and pkdgrav2 in terms of energy conservation and performance and find that the energy conservation of GENGA is comparable to Mercury and around two orders of magnitude better than pkdgrav2. GENGA runs up to 30 times faster than Mercury and up to 8 times faster than pkdgrav2. GENGA is written in CUDA C and runs on all NVIDIA GPUs with a computing capability of at least 2.0.

  10. Maps of CMB lensing deflection from N-body simulations in Coupled Dark Energy Cosmologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbone, Carmelita; Baldi, Marco; Baccigalupi, Carlo E-mail: marco.baldi5@unibo.it E-mail: bacci@sissa.it

    2013-09-01

    We produce lensing potential and deflection-angle maps in order to simulate the weak gravitational lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) via ray-tracing through the COupled Dark Energy Cosmological Simulations (CoDECS), the largest suite of N-body simulations to date for interacting Dark Energy cosmologies. The constructed maps faithfully reflect the N-body cosmic structures on a range of scales going from the arcminute to the degree scale, limited only by the resolution and extension of the simulations. We investigate the variation of the lensing pattern due to the underlying Dark Energy (DE) dynamics, characterised by different background and perturbation behaviours as a consequence of the interaction between the DE field and Cold Dark Matter (CDM). In particular, we study in detail the results from three cosmological models differing in the background and perturbations evolution at the epoch in which the lensing cross section is most effective, corresponding to a redshift of ∼ 1, with the purpose to isolate their imprints in the lensing observables, regardless of the compatibility of these models with present constraints. The scenarios investigated here include a reference ΛCDM cosmology, a standard coupled DE (cDE) scenario, and a ''bouncing'' cDE scenario. For the standard cDE scenario, we find that typical differences in the lensing potential result from two effects: the enhanced growth of linear CDM density fluctuations with respect to the ΛCDM case, and the modified nonlinear dynamics of collapsed structures induced by the DE-CDM interaction. As a consequence, CMB lensing highlights the DE impact in the cosmological expansion, even in the degenerate case where the amplitude of the linear matter density perturbations, parametrised through σ{sub 8}, is the same in both the standard cDE and ΛCDM cosmologies. For the ''bouncing'' scenario, we find that the two opposite behaviours of the lens density contrast and of the matter abundance lead to

  11. Outcomes for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and an Analysis of Predictors of Local Recurrence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Tao, Randa; Rebueno, Neal C.; Christensen, Eva N.; Allen, Pamela K.; Wang, Xin A.; Amini, Behrang; Tannir, Nizar M.; Tatsui, Claudio E.; Rhines, Laurence D.; Li, Jing; Chang, Eric L.; Brown, Paul D.; Ghia, Amol J.

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate local control, survival outcomes, and predictors of local relapse for patients treated with spine stereotactic body radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 332 spinal metastases consecutively treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy between 2002 and 2012. The median follow-up for all living patients was 33 months (range, 0-111 months). Endpoints were overall survival and local control (LC); recurrences were classified as either in-field or marginal. Results: The 1-year actuarial LC and overall survival rates were 88% and 64%, respectively. Patients with local relapses had poorer dosimetric coverage of the gross tumor volume (GTV) compared with patients without recurrence (minimum dose [Dmin] biologically equivalent dose [BED] 23.9 vs 35.1 Gy, P<.001; D98 BED 41.8 vs 48.1 Gy, P=.001; D95 BED 47.2 vs 50.5 Gy, P=.004). Furthermore, patients with marginal recurrences had poorer prescription coverage of the GTV (86% vs 93%, P=.01) compared with those with in-field recurrences, potentially because of more upfront spinal canal disease (78% vs 24%, P=.001). Using a Cox regression univariate analysis, patients with a GTV BED Dmin ≥33.4 Gy (median dose) (equivalent to 14 Gy in 1 fraction) had a significantly higher 1-year LC rate (94% vs 80%, P=.001) compared with patients with a lower GTV BED Dmin; this factor was the only significant variable on multivariate Cox analysis associated with LC (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.29, 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.60) and also was the only variable significant in a separate competing risk multivariate model (P=.001, hazard ratio 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.15-0.62). Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy offers durable control for spinal metastases, but there is a subset of patients that recur locally. Patients with local relapse had significantly poorer tumor coverage, which was likely attributable to treatment planning directives that prioritized the

  12. NREL Study Suggests Cost Gap for Western Renewables Could Narrow...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transmission and integration costs-with the cost of energy from a new natural gas-fired generator built near ... within the three-state market, unless environmental or ...

  13. Investigation of narrow-band thermal emission from intersubband...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 22489449 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Applied Physics; Journal Volume: 118; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: (c) ...

  14. Narrow Field of View Zenith Radiometer (NFOV) Handbook (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    With a one-second sampling rate of the NFOV2, faster than almost any other ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrument, we are able, for the first time, to capture changes in ...

  15. Search for Charged Lepton Violation in Narrow Upsilon Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Hawkes, C.M.; /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Columbus Supercond., Genova /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-19

    Charged lepton flavor violating processes are unobservable in the standard model, but they are predicted to be enhanced in several extensions to the standard model, including supersymmetry and models with leptoquarks or compositeness. We present a search for such processes in a sample of 99 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) decays and 117 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected with the BABAR detector. We place upper limits on the branching fractions {Beta}({Upsilon}(nS) {yields} e{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {-+}}) and {Beta}({Upsilon}(nS) {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {-+}}) (n = 2, 3) at the 10{sup -6} level and use these results to place lower limits of order 1 TeV on the mass scale of charged lepton flavor violating effective operators.

  16. MHK Projects/Wrangell Narrows Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.6324,"lon":-132.936,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:prod-http-80-800498448.us-east...

  17. Hyperfine Structure and Exchange Narrowing of Paramagnetic Resonance

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Townes, C. H.; Turkevich, J.

    1950-01-01

    Discussion of electronic paramagnetic resonance for the free radical á, á-diphenyl â-picryl hydrazyl as observed by its effect on the transmission of microwave through a TE{sub 01} cavity with a small amount of the free radical placed approximately on the axis of the cavity; the half-width of this resonance at half maximum absorption was 1.45 oersteds.

  18. MHK Projects/Castine Harbor Badaduce Narrows | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maritime Academy Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesAtlantis AR 1000 Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  19. Optical and ultraviolet observations of the narrow-lined type...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    m sub 15(B) 0.85 0.05 mag). Based on the UV and optical light curves, we derived that a sup 56Ni mass of about 0.88 M sub was synthesized in the explosion....

  20. Scaling the energy conversion rate from magnetic field reconnection to different bodies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mozer, F. S.; Hull, A.

    2010-10-15

    Magnetic field reconnection is often invoked to explain electromagnetic energy conversion in planetary magnetospheres, stellar coronae, and other astrophysical objects. Because of the huge dynamic range of magnetic fields in these bodies, it is important to understand energy conversion as a function of magnetic field strength and related parameters. It is conjectured theoretically and shown experimentally that the energy conversion rate per unit area in reconnection scales as the cube of an appropriately weighted magnetic field strength divided by the square root of an appropriately weighted density. With this functional dependence, the energy release in flares on the Sun, the large and rapid variation of the magnetic flux in the tail of Mercury, and the apparent absence of reconnection on Jupiter and Saturn, may be understood. Electric fields at the perihelion of the Solar Probe Plus mission may be tens of V/m.

  1. Communication: Stochastic evaluation of explicitly correlated second-order many-body perturbation energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willow, Soohaeng Yoo; Center for Superfunctional Materials, Department of Chemistry, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 ; Zhang, Jinmei; Valeev, Edward F.; Hirata, So; CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012

    2014-01-21

    A stochastic algorithm is proposed that can compute the basis-set-incompleteness correction to the second-order many-body perturbation (MP2) energy of a polyatomic molecule. It evaluates the sum of two-, three-, and four-electron integrals over an explicit function of electron-electron distances by a Monte Carlo (MC) integration at an operation cost per MC step increasing only quadratically with size. The method can reproduce the corrections to the MP2/cc-pVTZ energies of H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 6}H{sub 6} within a few mE{sub h} after several million MC steps. It circumvents the resolution-of-the-identity approximation to the nonfactorable three-electron integrals usually necessary in the conventional explicitly correlated (R12 or F12) methods.

  2. A study on periodic solutions for the circular restricted three-body problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, F. B.; Zhang, W. E-mail: gaofabao@gmail.com

    2014-12-01

    For the circular restricted three-body problem (CR3BP) in the inertial frame, we interpret the fact that there is no non-trivial 2π-periodic solution of the problem's homogeneous system. Furthermore, based on Reissig's theory, the existence of periodic solutions for the CR3BP is proved rigorously by using the above fact in conjunction with an a priori estimate. It is significant that the existence of periodic solutions of the CR3BP is mainly influenced by factors such as initial values, primary masses, and selection of the problem's control function. In addition, it is notable that the analytic proof of Poincaré's first class solutions is addressed for all values of the mass parameter in the interval (0, 1), the value of which must be sufficiently small according to previously published literature.

  3. Stabilization of green bodies via sacrificial gelling agent during electrophoretic deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Rose, Klint A.

    2016-03-22

    In one embodiment, a method for electrophoretic deposition of a three-dimensionally patterned green body includes suspending a first material in a gelling agent above a patterned electrode of an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) chamber, and gelling the suspension while applying a first electric field to the suspension to cause desired patterning of the first material in a resulting gelation. In another embodiment, a ceramic, metal, or cermet includes a plurality of layers, wherein each layer includes a gradient in composition, microstructure, and/or density in an x-y plane oriented parallel to a plane of deposition of the plurality of layers along a predetermined distance in a z-direction perpendicular to the plane of deposition.

  4. Top quark rare three-body decays in the littlest Higgs model with T parity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han Jinzhong; Li Bingzhong; Wang Xuelei

    2011-02-01

    In the littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT), the mirror quarks have flavor structures and will contribute to the top quark flavor changing neutral current. In this work, we perform an extensive investigation of the top quark rare three-body decays t{yields}cVV, (V={gamma}, Z, g) and t{yields}cff, (f=b, {tau}, {mu}, e) at one-loop level. Our results show that the branching ratios of t{yields}cgg and t{yields}cbb could reach O(10{sup -3}) in the favorite parameter space of the littlest Higgs model with T-parity, which implies that these decays may be detectable at the LHC or ILC, while for the other decays, their rates are too small to be observable at the present or future colliders.

  5. First results with charmless two-body B-decays at LHCb, and future prospects

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    LHCb is an experiment which is designed to perform flavour physics measurements at the LHC. Charged two-body charmless B decays (e.g. B^0 -> Kpi, pipi, B_s->KK, etc) receive significant contributions from loop diagrams and are thus sensitive probes of New Physics. Study of these modes is therefore an important physics goal of LHCb. First results will be presented, using around 37 pb^{-1} of data collected at \\sqrt{s}=7 TeV in 2010. These results illustrate the power of the LHCb trigger system and particle identification capabilities of the RICH detectors in isolating clean samples of each final state, and include preliminary measurements of direct CP-violation in certain key modes. The prospects for these measurements in the coming run will be presented. A brief survey will also be given of results and prospect in other areas of the LHCb physics programme.

  6. P- and S-body wave tomography of the state of Nevada.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, Leiph

    2010-04-01

    P- and S-body wave travel times collected from stations in and near the state of Nevada were inverted for P-wave velocity and the Vp/Vs ratio. These waves consist of Pn, Pg, Sn and Sg, but only the first arriving P and S waves were used in the inversion. Travel times were picked by University of Nevada Reno colleagues and were culled for inclusion in the tomographic inversion. The resulting tomographic model covers the entire state of Nevada to a depth of {approx}90 km; however, only the upper 40 km indicate relatively good resolution. Several features of interest are imaged including the Sierra Nevada, basin structures, and low velocities at depth below Yucca Mountain. These velocity structure images provide valuable information to aide in the interpretation of geothermal resource areas throughout the state on Nevada.

  7. Orientation dependence of the dislocation microstructure in compressed body-centered cubic molybdenum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S.; Wang, M.P.; Chen, C.; Xiao, Z.; Jia, Y.L.; Li, Z.; Wang, Z.X.

    2014-05-01

    The orientation dependence of the deformation microstructure has been investigated in commercial pure molybdenum. After deformation, the dislocation boundaries of compressed molybdenum can be classified, similar to that in face-centered cubic metals, into three types: dislocation cells (Type 2), and extended planar boundaries parallel to (Type 1) or not parallel to (Type 3) a (110) trace. However, it shows a reciprocal relationship between face-centered cubic metals and body-centered cubic metals on the orientation dependence of the deformation microstructure. The higher the strain, the finer the microstructure is and the smaller the inclination angle between extended planar boundaries and the compression axis is. - Highlights: • A reciprocal relationship between FCC metals and BCC metals is confirmed. • The dislocation boundaries can be classified into three types in compressed Mo. • The dislocation characteristic of different dislocation boundaries is different.

  8. The fixed hypernode method for the solution of the many body Schroedinger equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pederiva, F; Kalos, M H; Reboredo, F; Bressanini, D; Guclu, D; Colletti, L; Umrigar, C J

    2006-01-24

    We propose a new scheme for an approximate solution of the Schroedinger equation for a many-body interacting system, based on the use of pairs of walkers. Trial wavefunctions for these pairs are combinations of standard symmetric and antisymmetric wavefunctions. The method consists in applying a fixed-node restriction in the enlarged space, and computing the energy of the antisymmetric state from the knowledge of the exact ground state energy for the symmetric state. We made two conjectures: first, that this fixed-hypernode energy is an upper bound to the true fermion energy; second that this bound would necessarily be lower than the usual fixed-node energy using the same antisymmetric trial function. The first conjecture is true, and is proved in this paper. The second is not, and numerical and analytical counterexamples are given. The question of whether the fixed-hypernode energy can be better than the usual bound remains open.

  9. Three-body scattering theory without knowledge of exact asymptotic boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shakeshaft, Robin

    2009-07-15

    We formulate the theory of three-body scattering without explicit reference to exact asymptotic boundary conditions on the wave function. The transition rate and amplitude are expressed as volume integrals of the resolvent, which are insensitive to the region of asymptotically large distances. The physical branch of the resolvent is selected through the arrow of time, which is required to point forward in each subchannel. This is accomplished by first expressing the resolvent as an integral over time and then making a conformal transformation of each half of the time plane onto a unit disk. The physical branch corresponds to a path of integration in the upper half of the disk. We have tested the method, using a real discrete basis, by calculating the total cross section for singlet S-wave electron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen; our results are in reasonable agreement overall with the landmark results of Bartlet and Stelbovics [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 233201 (2004)].

  10. Ab Initio Many-Body Calculations Of Nucleon-Nucleus Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaglioni, S; Navratil, P

    2008-12-17

    We develop a new ab initio many-body approach capable of describing simultaneously both bound and scattering states in light nuclei, by combining the resonating-group method with the use of realistic interactions, and a microscopic and consistent description of the nucleon clusters. This approach preserves translational symmetry and Pauli principle. We outline technical details and present phase shift results for neutron scattering on {sup 3}H, {sup 4}He and {sup 10}Be and proton scattering on {sup 3,4}He, using realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials. Our A = 4 scattering results are compared to earlier ab initio calculations. We find that the CD-Bonn NN potential in particular provides an excellent description of nucleon-{sup 4}He S-wave phase shifts. We demonstrate that a proper treatment of the coupling to the n-{sup 10}Be continuum is successful in explaining the parity-inverted ground state in {sup 11}Be.

  11. Parabolic sturmians approach to the three-body continuum Coulomb problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaytsev, S. A.; Popov, Yu. V.; Piraux, B.

    2013-03-15

    The three-body continuum Coulomb problem is treated in terms of the generalized parabolic coordinates. Approximate solutions are expressed in the form of a Lippmann-Schwinger-type equation, where the Green's function includes the leading term of the kinetic energy and the total potential energy, whereas the potential contains the non-orthogonal part of the kinetic energy operator. As a test of this approach, the integral equation for the (e{sup -}, e{sup -}, He{sup ++}) system has been solved numerically by using the parabolic Sturmian basis representation of the (approximate) potential. Convergence of the expansion coefficients of the solution has been obtained as the basis set used to describe the potential is enlarged.

  12. Sub-discretized surface model with application to contact mechanics in multi-body simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, S; Williams, J

    2008-02-28

    The mechanics of contact between rough and imperfectly spherical adhesive powder grains are often complicated by a variety of factors, including several which vary over sub-grain length scales. These include several traction factors that vary spatially over the surface of the individual grains, including high energy electron and acceptor sites (electrostatic), hydrophobic and hydrophilic sites (electrostatic and capillary), surface energy (general adhesion), geometry (van der Waals and mechanical), and elasto-plastic deformation (mechanical). For mechanical deformation and reaction, coupled motions, such as twisting with bending and sliding, as well as surface roughness add an asymmetry to the contact force which invalidates assumptions for popular models of contact, such as the Hertzian and its derivatives, for the non-adhesive case, and the JKR and DMT models for adhesive contacts. Though several contact laws have been offered to ameliorate these drawbacks, they are often constrained to particular loading paths (most often normal loading) and are relatively complicated for computational implementation. This paper offers a simple and general computational method for augmenting contact law predictions in multi-body simulations through characterization of the contact surfaces using a hierarchically-defined surface sub-discretization. For the case of adhesive contact between powder grains in low stress regimes, this technique can allow a variety of existing contact laws to be resolved across scales, allowing for moments and torques about the contact area as well as normal and tangential tractions to be resolved. This is especially useful for multi-body simulation applications where the modeler desires statistical distributions and calibration for parameters in contact laws commonly used for resolving near-surface contact mechanics. The approach is verified against analytical results for the case of rough, elastic spheres.

  13. Prenatal exposure to environmental contaminants and body composition at age 7–9 years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delvaux, Immle; Van Cauwenberghe, Jolijn; Den Hond, Elly; Schoeters, Greet; Govarts, Eva; Nelen, Vera; Baeyens, Willy; Van Larebeke, Nicolas; Sioen, Isabelle

    2014-07-15

    The study aim was to investigate the association between prenatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and the body composition of 7 to 9 year old Flemish children. The subjects were 114 Flemish children (50% boys) that took part in the first Flemish Environment and Health Study (2002–2006). Cadmium, PCBs, dioxins, p,p′-DDE and HCB were analysed in cord blood/plasma. When the child reached 7–9 years, height, weight, waist circumference and skinfolds were measured. Significant associations between prenatal exposure to EDCs and indicators of body composition were only found in girls. After adjustment for confounders and covariates, a significant negative association was found in girls between prenatal cadmium exposure and weight, BMI and waist circumference (indicator of abdominal fat) and the sum of four skinfolds (indicator of subcutaneous fat). In contrast, a significant positive association (after adjustment for confounders/covariates) was found between prenatal p,p′-DDE exposure and waist circumference as well as waist/height ratio in girls (indicators of abdominal fat). No significant associations were found for prenatal PCBs, dioxins and HCB exposure after adjustment for confounders/covariates. This study suggests a positive association between prenatal p,p′-DDE exposure and indicators of abdominal fat and a negative association between prenatal cadmium exposure and indicators of both abdominal as well as subcutaneous fat in girls between 7 and 9 years old. - Highlights: • Associations between prenatal contaminant exposure and anthropometrics in children. • Significant association only found in girls. • No significant associations found for prenatal PCBs, dioxins and HCB exposure. • Girls: negative association between cadmium and abdominal and subcutaneous fat. • Girls: positive association between p,p′-DDE and indicators of abdominal fat.

  14. Sediment body quantification: Examples from a Late Permian mixed influence deltaic system, Bowen Basin, Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falkner, A.; Fielding, C. )

    1990-05-01

    The Bowen basin open-cut coal mines of central Queensland, Australia, provide some of the best exposures of alluvial and fluviodeltaic sequences in the world. Within the Bowen basin coal is mined extensively along a strike length of 5-600 km exposing various parts of an Upper Permian terrestrial to shallow-marine sequence. Individual mines cover 10-30 km of strike and may work several different seams that are correlatable between mines. The project described here is aimed at providing a detailed database on facies geometry within coal-bearing alluvial and fluviodeltaic sequences of the Bowen basin. Data has been collected from the profusion of very large open-cut coal mine exposures in eastern Queensland, Australia, and rationalized into a form useful for hydrocarbon reservoir description. High-quality geometrical data is obtained from controlled photomosaics of highwalls supplemented by information from close-spaced borehole networks. Detailed information from core and accessible exposures allows accurate sedimentological interpretation. Interpretation of the German Creek Formation, one of the coalbearing units of the Bowen basin, suggests that accumulation occurred on an extensive lower delta plain, within a mixed (i.e., wave-tide-fluvial influenced) delta. Four facies have been identified, two of which are possible reservoirs: facies A, major channelized sandstone bodies (4-11 m thick and 0.5-5 km wide, elongate perpendicular to basin edge), interpreted as deltaic distributary channel fills; and facies B, tabular sandstone bodies (9-20 m thick tens of km in areal extent, elongate parallel to basin margin) internally dominated by hummocky cross-stratification, interpreted as proximal mouth bar deposits.

  15. Factorized three-body S-matrix restrained by the YangBaxter equation and quantum entanglements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Li-Wei; Zhao, Qing; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2014-09-15

    This paper investigates the physical effects of the YangBaxter equation (YBE) to quantum entanglements through the 3-body S-matrix in entangling parameter space. The explicit form of 3-body S-matrix ?{sub 123}(?,?) based on the 2-body S-matrices is given due to the factorization condition of YBE. The corresponding chain Hamiltonian has been obtained and diagonalized, also the Berry phase for 3-body system is given. It turns out that by choosing different spectral parameters the ?(?,?)-matrix gives GHZ and W states respectively. The extended 1-D Kitaev toy model has been derived. Examples of the role of the model in entanglement transfer are discussed. - Highlights: We give the relation between 3-body S-matrix and 3-qubit entanglement. The relation between 3-qubit and 2-qubit entanglements is investigated via YBE. 1D Kitaev toy model is derived by the Type-II solution of YBE. The condition of YBE kills the Zero boundary mode in our chain model.

  16. Investigations of the structure and electromagnetic interactions of few-body systems. Progress report, September 1, 1983-August 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper, E.P.; Lehman, D.R.; Prats, F.

    1984-09-26

    The George Washington University nuclear theory group proposes to conduct investigations of the structure and electromagnetic interactions of few-body systems. The structural properties of the very light nuclei are examined by developing theoretical models that begin from the basic interactions between the constituents and that are solved exactly (numerically), i.e., full three or four-body dynamics. Such models are then used in an attempt to understand the details of the strong and electromagnetic interactions of the few-nucleon nuclei after the basic underlying reaction mechanisms are understood with simpler models. Examples of specific work proposed are the following: (1) From exact four-body dynamics, derive the equations that will permit calculation of the /sup 4/He..-->../sup 3/He+n and /sup 4/He..-->..d+d asymptotic normalization constants; (2) Develop a unified picture of the p + d ..-->.. /sup 3/He = ..gamma.., p + d ..-->.. /sup 3/He = ..pi../sup 0/ , p + d ..-->.. /sup 3/H + ..pi../sup +/ reactions at intermediate energies; (3) Calculate the elastic and inelastic (1/sup +/..-->..0/sup +/) form factors for /sup 6/Li with three-body (..cap alpha..NN) wave functions; (4) Calculate static properties (RMS radius, magnetic moment, and quadrupole moment) of /sup 6/Li with three-body wave functions; and (5) Develop the theory for the coincidence reactions /sup 6/Li(p,2p)n..cap alpha.., /sup 6/Li(e,e'p)n..cap alpha.., and /sup 6/Li(e,e'd)..cap alpha... It is anticipated that these efforts will expand the frontiers of our knowledge about few-body nuclei.

  17. A Close Cut: A Technical Report of Endovascular Removal of a Penetrating Intravascular Foreign Body after a Lawn Mowing Injury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tapping, C. R.; Gallo, A.; Silva, R. J. De; Uberoi, R.

    2012-12-15

    We present a case of endovascular retrieval of a penetrating foreign body that was originally lodged in the mediastinum and then migrated to the hepatic vein. The steel nail entered the thorax and traversed the left lung causing a pneumothorax. The patient underwent a thoracotomy, but the foreign body had migrated from its original mediastinal position. A postsurgical CT showed that the object was below the right hemidiaphragm. Diagnostic venogram demonstrated that the object was in the main hepatic vein. Using a double-snare technique, the object was safely and successfully removed from the hepatic vein via the right common femoral vein.

  18. Rigid-body translation and bonding across l brace 110 r brace antiphase boundaries in GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, D.R.; McKernan, S.; Carter, C.B. )

    1991-05-20

    A transmission-electron-microscope strong-beam technique is used to investigate the rigid-body translation across {l brace}110{r brace} antiphase boundaries in GaAs. The results show a translation in the {l angle}001{r angle} direction parallel to the plane of the boundary. The magnitude of the translation is determined, and the antisite bond lengths are discussed in terms of the tetrahedral radii of Ga and As. Given this knowledge of the rigid-body translation, the absolute polarity of a GaAs grain can be determined immediately from a bright-field image of the {l brace}110{r brace} antiphase boundary.

  19. Impact of Immobilization on Intrafraction Motion for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Winnie; Sahgal, Arjun; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario ; Foote, Matthew; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Jaffray, David A.; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario ; Letourneau, Daniel; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) involves tight planning margins and steep dose gradients to the surrounding organs at risk (OAR). This study aimed to assess intrafraction motion using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for spine SBRT patients treated using three immobilization devices. Methods and Materials: Setup accuracy using CBCT was retrospectively analyzed for 102 treated spinal metastases in 84 patients. Thoracic and lumbar spine patients were immobilized with either an evacuated cushion (EC, n = 24) or a semirigid vacuum body fixation (BF, n = 60). For cases treated at cervical/upper thoracic (thoracic [T]1-T3) vertebrae, a thermoplastic S-frame (SF) mask (n = 18) was used. Patient setup was corrected by using bony anatomy image registration and couch translations only (no rotation corrections) with shifts confirmed on verification CBCTs. Repeat imaging was performed mid- and post-treatment. Patient translational and rotational positioning data were recorded to calculate means, standard deviations (SD), and corresponding margins {+-} 2 SD for residual setup errors and intrafraction motion. Results: A total of 355 localizations, 333 verifications, and 248 mid- and 280 post-treatment CBCTs were analyzed. Residual translations and rotations after couch corrections (verification scans) were similar for all immobilization systems, with SDs of 0.6 to 0.9 mm in any direction and 0.9 Degree-Sign to 1.6 Degree-Sign , respectively. Margins to encompass residual setup errors after couch corrections were within 2 mm. Including intrafraction motion, as measured on post-treatment CBCTs, SDs for total setup error in the left-right, cranial-caudal, and anterior-posterior directions were 1.3, 1.2, and 1.0 mm for EC; 0.9, 0.7, and 0.9 mm for BF; and 1.3, 0.9, and 1.1 mm for SF, respectively. The calculated margins required to encompass total setup error increased to 3 mm for EC and SF and remained within 2 mm for BF. Conclusion: Following image

  20. N-body simulations of terrestrial planet formation under the influence of a hot Jupiter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogihara, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro E-mail: ogihara@nagoya-u.jp

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the formation of multiple-planet systems in the presence of a hot Jupiter (HJ) using extended N-body simulations that are performed simultaneously with semianalytic calculations. Our primary aims are to describe the planet formation process starting from planetesimals using high-resolution simulations, and to examine the dependences of the architecture of planetary systems on input parameters (e.g., disk mass, disk viscosity). We observe that protoplanets that arise from oligarchic growth and undergo type I migration stop migrating when they join a chain of resonant planets outside the orbit of an HJ. The formation of a resonant chain is almost independent of our model parameters, and is thus a robust process. At the end of our simulations, several terrestrial planets remain at around 0.1 AU. The formed planets are not equal mass; the largest planet constitutes more than 50% of the total mass in the close-in region, which is also less dependent on parameters. In the previous work of this paper, we have found a new physical mechanism of induced migration of the HJ, which is called a crowding-out. If the HJ opens up a wide gap in the disk (e.g., owing to low disk viscosity), crowding-out becomes less efficient and the HJ remains. We also discuss angular momentum transfer between the planets and disk.

  1. Dynamics of Delayed p53 Mutations in Mice Given Whole-Body Irradiation at 8 Weeks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Ootsuyama, Akira; Kakihara, Hiroyo; Mabuchi, Yo; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Michikawa, Yuichi; Imai, Takashi; Norimura, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Ionizing irradiation might induce delayed genotoxic effects in a p53-dependent manner. However, a few reports have shown a p53 mutation as a delayed effect of radiation. In this study, we investigated the p53 gene mutation by the translocation frequency in chromosome 11, loss of p53 alleles, p53 gene methylation, p53 nucleotide sequence, and p53 protein expression/phosphorylation in p53{sup +/+} and p53{sup +/-} mice after irradiation at a young age. Methods and Materials: p53{sup +/+} and p53{sup +/-} mice were exposed to 3 Gy of whole-body irradiation at 8 weeks of age. Chromosome instability was evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. p53 allele loss was evaluated by polymerase chain reaction, and p53 methylation was evaluated by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. p53 sequence analysis was performed. p53 protein expression was evaluated by Western blotting. Results: The translocation frequency in chromosome 11 showed a delayed increase after irradiation. In old irradiated mice, the number of mice that showed p53 allele loss and p53 methylation increased compared to these numbers in old non-irradiated mice. In two old irradiated p53{sup +/-} mice, the p53 sequence showed heteromutation. In old irradiated mice, the p53 and phospho-p53 protein expressions decreased compared to old non-irradiated mice. Conclusion: We concluded that irradiation at a young age induced delayed p53 mutations and p53 protein suppression.

  2. Subsurface failure in spherical bodies. A formation scenario for linear troughs on Vesta’s surface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stickle, Angela M.; Schultz, P. H.; Crawford, D. A.

    2014-10-13

    Many asteroids in the Solar System exhibit unusual, linear features on their surface. The Dawn mission recently observed two sets of linear features on the surface of the asteroid 4 Vesta. Geologic observations indicate that these features are related to the two large impact basins at the south pole of Vesta, though no specific mechanism of origin has been determined. Furthermore, the orientation of the features is offset from the center of the basins. Experimental and numerical results reveal that the offset angle is a natural consequence of oblique impacts into a spherical target. We demonstrate that a set ofmore » shear planes develops in the subsurface of the body opposite to the point of first contact. Moreover, these subsurface failure zones then propagate to the surface under combined tensile-shear stress fields after the impact to create sets of approximately linear faults on the surface. Comparison between the orientation of damage structures in the laboratory and failure regions within Vesta can be used to constrain impact parameters (e.g., the approximate impact point and likely impact trajectory).« less

  3. Machine learning predictions of molecular properties: Accurate many-body potentials and nonlocality in chemical space

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hansen, Katja; Biegler, Franziska; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; Pronobis, Wiktor; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Müller, Klaus -Robert; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2015-06-04

    Simultaneously accurate and efficient prediction of molecular properties throughout chemical compound space is a critical ingredient toward rational compound design in chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Aiming toward this goal, we develop and apply a systematic hierarchy of efficient empirical methods to estimate atomization and total energies of molecules. These methods range from a simple sum over atoms, to addition of bond energies, to pairwise interatomic force fields, reaching to the more sophisticated machine learning approaches that are capable of describing collective interactions between many atoms or bonds. In the case of equilibrium molecular geometries, even simple pairwise force fields demonstratemore » prediction accuracy comparable to benchmark energies calculated using density functional theory with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals; however, accounting for the collective many-body interactions proves to be essential for approaching the “holy grail” of chemical accuracy of 1 kcal/mol for both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium geometries. This remarkable accuracy is achieved by a vectorized representation of molecules (so-called Bag of Bonds model) that exhibits strong nonlocality in chemical space. The same representation allows us to predict accurate electronic properties of molecules, such as their polarizability and molecular frontier orbital energies.« less

  4. Eccentricity growth and orbit flip in near-coplanar hierarchical three-body systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Gongjie; Naoz, Smadar; Kocsis, Bence; Loeb, Abraham

    2014-04-20

    The secular dynamical evolution of a hierarchical three-body system in which a distant third object orbits around a binary has been studied extensively, demonstrating that the inner orbit can undergo large eccentricity and inclination oscillations. It was shown before that starting with a circular inner orbit, large mutual inclination (40-140) can produce long timescale modulations that drive the eccentricity to extremely large values and can flip the orbit. Here, we demonstrate that starting with an almost coplanar configuration, for eccentric inner and outer orbits, the eccentricity of the inner orbit can still be excited to high values, and the orbit can flip by ?180, rolling over its major axis. The ?180 flip criterion and the flip timescale are described by simple analytic expressions that depend on the initial orbital parameters. With tidal dissipation, this mechanism can produce counter-orbiting exoplanetary systems. In addition, we also show that this mechanism has the potential to enhance the tidal disruption or collision rates for different systems. Furthermore, we explore the entire e {sub 1} and i {sub 0} parameter space that can produce flips.

  5. Lifetime measurements of 17C excited states and three-body and continuum effects

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smalley, D.; Iwasaki, H.; Navratil, P.; Roth, R.; Langhammer, J.; Bader, V. M.; Bazin, D.; Barryman, J. S.; Campbell, C. M.; Dohet-Eraly, J.; et al

    2015-12-18

    We studied transition rates for the lowest 1/2+ and 5/2+ excited states of 17C through lifetime measurements with the GRETINA array using the recoil-distance method. The present measurements provide a model-independent determination of transition strengths giving the values of B(M1;1/2+ → 3/2+g.s.) = 1.04+0.03–0.12 × 10–2μ2N and B(M1;5/2+ → 3/2+g.s.) = 7.12+1.27–0.96 × 10–2μ2N. The quenched M1 transition strength for the 1/2+ → 3/2+g.s. transition, with respect to the 5/2+ → 3/2+g.s. transition, has been confirmed with greater precision. Furthermore, the current data are compared to importance-truncated no-core shell model calculations addressing effects due to continuum and three-body forces.

  6. Subsurface failure in spherical bodies. A formation scenario for linear troughs on Vestas surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stickle, Angela M.; Schultz, P. H.; Crawford, D. A.

    2014-10-13

    Many asteroids in the Solar System exhibit unusual, linear features on their surface. The Dawn mission recently observed two sets of linear features on the surface of the asteroid 4 Vesta. Geologic observations indicate that these features are related to the two large impact basins at the south pole of Vesta, though no specific mechanism of origin has been determined. Furthermore, the orientation of the features is offset from the center of the basins. Experimental and numerical results reveal that the offset angle is a natural consequence of oblique impacts into a spherical target. We demonstrate that a set of shear planes develops in the subsurface of the body opposite to the point of first contact. Moreover, these subsurface failure zones then propagate to the surface under combined tensile-shear stress fields after the impact to create sets of approximately linear faults on the surface. Comparison between the orientation of damage structures in the laboratory and failure regions within Vesta can be used to constrain impact parameters (e.g., the approximate impact point and likely impact trajectory).

  7. A quasi-Bohmian approach for a homogeneous spherical solid body based on its geometric structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koupaei, Jalaledin Yousefi; Institutes for Theoretical Physics and Mathematics , Tehran ; Golshani, Mehdi; Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran

    2013-12-15

    In this paper we express the space of rotation as a Riemannian space and try to generalize the classical equations of motion of a homogeneous spherical solid body in the domain of quantum mechanics. This is done within Bohm's view of quantum mechanics, but we do not use the Schrödinger equation. Instead, we assume that in addition to the classical potential there is an extra potential and try to obtain it. In doing this, we start from a classical picture based on Hamilton-Jacobi formalism and statistical mechanics but we use an interpretation which is different from the classical one. Then, we introduce a proper action and extremize it. This procedure gives us a mathematical identity for the extra potential that limits its form. The classical mechanics is a trivial solution of this method. In the simplest cases where the extra potential is not a constant, a mathematical identity determines it uniquely. In fact the first nontrivial potential, apart from some constant coefficients which are determined by experiment, is the usual Bohmian quantum potential.

  8. Efficient calculation of many-body induced electrostatics in molecular systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaughlin, Keith Cioce, Christian R.; Pham, Tony; Space, Brian; Belof, Jonathan L.

    2013-11-14

    Potential energy functions including many-body polarization are in widespread use in simulations of aqueous and biological systems, metal-organics, molecular clusters, and other systems where electronically induced redistribution of charge among local atomic sites is of importance. The polarization interactions, treated here via the methods of Thole and Applequist, while long-ranged, can be computed for moderate-sized periodic systems with extremely high accuracy by extending Ewald summation to the induced fields as demonstrated by Nymand, Sala, and others. These full Ewald polarization calculations, however, are expensive and often limited to very small systems, particularly in Monte Carlo simulations, which may require energy evaluation over several hundred-thousand configurations. For such situations, it shall be shown that sufficiently accurate computation of the polarization energy can be produced in a fraction of the central processing unit (CPU) time by neglecting the long-range extension to the induced fields while applying the long-range treatments of Ewald or Wolf to the static fields; these methods, denoted Ewald E-Static and Wolf E-Static (WES), respectively, provide an effective means to obtain polarization energies for intermediate and large systems including those with several thousand polarizable sites in a fraction of the CPU time. Furthermore, we shall demonstrate a means to optimize the damping for WES calculations via extrapolation from smaller trial systems.

  9. Risk communication with Fukushima residents affected by the Fukushima Daiichi accident at whole-body counting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunji, I.; Furuno, A.; Yonezawa, R.; Sugiyama, K.

    2013-07-01

    After the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, the Tokai Research and Development Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) have had direct dialogue as risk communication with Fukushima residents who underwent whole-body counting examination (WBC). The purpose of the risk communication was to exchange information and opinions about radiation in order to mitigate Fukushima residents' anxiety and stress. Two kinds of opinion surveys were performed: one survey evaluated residents' views of the nuclear accident itself and the second survey evaluated the management of WBC examination as well as the quality of JAEA's communication skills on risks. It appears that most Fukushima residents seem to have reduced their anxiety level after the direct dialogue. The results of the surveys show that Fukushima residents have the deepest anxiety and concern about their long-term health issues and that they harbor anger toward the government and TEPCO. On the other hand, many WBC patients and patients' relatives have expressed gratitude for help in reducing their feelings of anxiety.

  10. Machine learning predictions of molecular properties: Accurate many-body potentials and nonlocality in chemical space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Katja; Biegler, Franziska; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; Pronobis, Wiktor; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Müller, Klaus -Robert; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2015-06-04

    Simultaneously accurate and efficient prediction of molecular properties throughout chemical compound space is a critical ingredient toward rational compound design in chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Aiming toward this goal, we develop and apply a systematic hierarchy of efficient empirical methods to estimate atomization and total energies of molecules. These methods range from a simple sum over atoms, to addition of bond energies, to pairwise interatomic force fields, reaching to the more sophisticated machine learning approaches that are capable of describing collective interactions between many atoms or bonds. In the case of equilibrium molecular geometries, even simple pairwise force fields demonstrate prediction accuracy comparable to benchmark energies calculated using density functional theory with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals; however, accounting for the collective many-body interactions proves to be essential for approaching the “holy grail” of chemical accuracy of 1 kcal/mol for both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium geometries. This remarkable accuracy is achieved by a vectorized representation of molecules (so-called Bag of Bonds model) that exhibits strong nonlocality in chemical space. The same representation allows us to predict accurate electronic properties of molecules, such as their polarizability and molecular frontier orbital energies.

  11. Transition pathways in a many-body system: Application to hydrogen-bond breaking in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Csajka, F.S.; Chandler, D.

    1998-07-01

    We apply a stochastic method introduced by Dellago {ital et al.} [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 108}, 1964 (1998)] to sample transition paths in high-dimensional systems. The method connects two endpoint regions (for example a reactant and a product region) by a set of space-time paths. This approach is an importance sampling for rare events that does not require prior knowledge of the location of dynamical bottlenecks. Transition paths are generated with a weight corresponding to a chain of Metropolis Monte Carlo steps. We derive Monte Carlo algorithms and apply the technique to the dynamics of hydrogen-bond breaking in liquid water. We obtain averages in a transition path ensemble for the structure and energy along the trajectory. While characterized by a rate constant, hydrogen-bond breaking in water occurs frequently enough to be studied by standard methods. The process therefore provides a useful test of path sampling methods. The comparison between path sampling and standard Monte Carlo demonstrate the feasibility of transition path sampling for a many-body system with a rough potential energy surface. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Large eddy simulation of forced ignition of an annular bluff-body burner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subramanian, V.; Domingo, P.; Vervisch, L.

    2010-03-15

    The optimization of the ignition process is a crucial issue in the design of many combustion systems. Large eddy simulation (LES) of a conical shaped bluff-body turbulent nonpremixed burner has been performed to study the impact of spark location on ignition success. This burner was experimentally investigated by Ahmed et al. [Combust. Flame 151 (2007) 366-385]. The present work focuses on the case without swirl, for which detailed measurements are available. First, cold-flow measurements of velocities and mixture fractions are compared with their LES counterparts, to assess the prediction capabilities of simulations in terms of flow and turbulent mixing. Time histories of velocities and mixture fractions are recorded at selected spots, to probe the resolved probability density function (pdf) of flow variables, in an attempt to reproduce, from the knowledge of LES-resolved instantaneous flow conditions, the experimentally observed reasons for success or failure of spark ignition. A flammability map is also constructed from the resolved mixture fraction pdf and compared with its experimental counterpart. LES of forced ignition is then performed using flamelet fully detailed tabulated chemistry combined with presumed pdfs. Various scenarios of flame kernel development are analyzed and correlated with typical flow conditions observed in this burner. The correlations between, velocities and mixture fraction values at the sparking time and the success or failure of ignition, are then further discussed and analyzed. (author)

  13. Adiabatic representation in the three-body problem with Coulomb interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinitskii, S.I.; Ponomarev, L.I.

    1982-11-01

    An effective method for solving the three-body problem with Coulomb interaction is presented systematically. The essential feature of the method is an expansion of the wave function of the three-particle system with respect to an adiabatic basis and reduction of the original Schroedinger equation to a system of ordinary differential equations. Convergence of the adiabatic expansion is ensured not only by the smallness of the ratio of the particle masses but also by the smallness of the nondiagonal matrix elements of the kinetic-energy operator of particles of the same charge. The possibilities of the method are demonstrated by the example of the calculation of the energies and wave functions of all states of the ..mu..-mesic molecules of the hydrogen isotopes and the e/sup -/e/sup -/e/sup +/ system. The method is equally suitable for calculating the ground state and the excited states of a three-particle system. This is particularly important in the calculation of the energies of the weakly bound states of the mesic molecules dd..mu.. and dt..mu.., knowledge of which is needed to describe the processes of muonic catalysis of nuclear fusion reactions.

  14. Direct measurement of the characteristic three-body electron attachment time in the atmospheric air in direct current electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shutov, A. V.; Smetanin, I. V.; Ionin, A. A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Zvorykin, V. D.

    2013-07-15

    We report the results of theoretical and experimental study of the characteristic time for three-body attachment of electrons produced by 100 fs UV laser pulse in the atmosphere air in the external DC electric field ranged from 0.2 to 10 kV/cm.

  15. Methods and apparatuses for manufacturing geometric multicrystalline cast silicon and geometric multicrystalline cast silicon bodies for photovoltaics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, Nathan G

    2015-02-10

    Methods and apparatuses are provided for casting silicon for photovoltaic cells and other applications. With such methods and apparatuses, a cast body of geometrically ordered multi-crystalline silicon may be formed that is free or substantially free of radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 10 cm is provided.

  16. Manipulating the ferromagnetism in narrow-bandwidth Pr{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.6) by means of the Mn-Ru t{sub 2g} ferromagnetic super-exchanges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Y. L.; Liu, M. F.; Xie, Y. L.; Yan, Z. B.; Dong, S.; Liu, J.-M.

    2015-09-28

    The concurrent ferromagnetic and metal-insulator transitions via the double-exchange route and electronic phase separation scenario represent the core ingredients of the physics of manganites. In this work, a Ca{sup 2+} and Ru{sup 4+} co-substitution of Pr{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 3+} in narrow-bandwidth and insulating PrMnO{sub 3}, namely, Pr{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}Mn{sub 1-x}Ru{sub x}O{sub 3} (PCMRO, x ≤ 0.6), is carried out in order to investigate an alternative approach to effectively manipulate the ferromagnetism of PrMnO{sub 3}-based manganites. It is revealed that PCMRO over the whole substitution range is homogeneous solid solution with increased lattice distortion. The preference of Ru{sup 4+} valence state and the absence of Mn{sup 4+} valence state disable the Mn{sup 3+}-Mn{sup 4+} e{sub g}-orbital double-exchange, and the random occupation of Ru{sup 4+} in the lattice excludes the charge ordering and electronic phase separation. While all these consequences should favor antiferromagnetic insulating states, nevertheless, a high-temperature ferromagnetic transition is triggered by the co-substitution and the magnetization can reach up to ∼1.0 μ{sub B}/f.u. at x ∼ 0.2–0.3, much bigger than the moment (<0.1 μ{sub B}/f.u.) of Pr{sub 1−x}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} in the weak ferromagnetic insulator state. It is suggested that this strong ferromagnetism is substantially ascribed to the Mn{sup 3+}-Ru{sup 4+} t{sub 2g}-orbital ferromagnetic super-exchange, and a simple geometric network illustration of the magnetism and electrical transport is presented.

  17. A review of stereotactic body radiotherapy – is volumetric modulated arc therapy the answer?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sapkaroski, Daniel Osborne, Catherine; Knight, Kellie A

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a high precision radiotherapy technique used for the treatment of small to moderate extra-cranial tumours. Early studies utilising SBRT have shown favourable outcomes. However, major disadvantages of static field SBRT include long treatment times and toxicity complications. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may potentially mitigate these disadvantages. This review aims to assess the feasibility of emerging VMAT and IMRT-based SBRT treatment techniques and qualify which offers the best outcome for patients, whilst identifying any emerging and advantageous SBRT planning trends. A review and synthesis of data from current literature up to September 2013 was conducted on EMBASE, Medline, PubMed, Science Direct, Proquest central, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews. Only full text papers comparing VMAT and or IMRT and or Static SBRT were included. Ten papers were identified that evaluated the results of VMAT/IMRT SBRT. Five related to medically inoperable stage 1 and 2 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), three to spinal metastasis, one related to abdominal lymph node malignancies, with the final one looking at pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Overall treatment times with VMAT were reduced by 66–70% for lung, 46–58% for spine, 42% and 21% for lymph node and pancreatic metastasis respectively, planning constraints were met with several studies showing improved organs at risk sparing with IMRT/VMAT to static SBRT. Both IMRT and VMAT were able to meet all planning constraints in the studies reviewed, with VMAT offering the greatest treatment efficiency. Early clinical outcomes with VMAT and IMRT SBRT have demonstrated excellent local control and favourable survival outcomes.

  18. Generalizable Class Solutions for Treatment Planning of Spinal Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weksberg, David C.; Palmer, Matthew B.; Vu, Khoi N.; Rebueno, Neal C.; Sharp, Hadley J.; Luo, Dershan; Yang, James N.; Shiu, Almon S.; Rhines, Laurence D.; McAleer, Mary Frances; Brown, Paul D.; Chang, Eric L.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) continues to emerge as an effective therapeutic approach to spinal metastases; however, treatment planning and delivery remain resource intensive at many centers, which may hamper efficient implementation in clinical practice. We sought to develop a generalizable class solution approach for spinal SBRT treatment planning that would allow confidence that a given plan provides optimal target coverage, reduce integral dose, and maximize planning efficiency. Methods and Materials: We examined 91 patients treated with spinal SBRT at our institution. Treatment plans were categorized by lesion location, clinical target volume (CTV) configuration, and dose fractionation scheme, and then analyzed to determine the technically achievable dose gradient. A radial cord expansion was subtracted from the CTV to yield a planning CTV (pCTV) construct for plan evaluation. We reviewed the treatment plans with respect to target coverage, dose gradient, integral dose, conformality, and maximum cord dose to select the best plans and develop a set of class solutions. Results: The class solution technique generated plans that maintained target coverage and improved conformality (1.2-fold increase in the 95% van't Riet Conformation Number describing the conformality of a reference dose to the target) while reducing normal tissue integral dose (1.3-fold decrease in the volume receiving 4 Gy (V{sub 4Gy}) and machine output (19% monitor unit (MU) reduction). In trials of planning efficiency, the class solution technique reduced treatment planning time by 30% to 60% and MUs required by {approx}20%: an effect independent of prior planning experience. Conclusions: We have developed a set of class solutions for spinal SBRT that incorporate a pCTV metric for plan evaluation while yielding dosimetrically superior treatment plans with increased planning efficiency. Our technique thus allows for efficient, reproducible, and high-quality spinal

  19. Vertebral Compression Fracture (VCF) After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT): Analysis of Predictive Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunha, Marcelo V.R.; Al-Omair, Ameen; Atenafu, Eshetu G.; Masucci, Giuseppina Laura; Letourneau, Daniel; Korol, Renee; Yu, Eugene; Howard, Peter; Lochray, Fiona; Costa, Leodante B. da; Fehlings, Michael G.; Sahgal, Arjun; Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) are increasingly observed after spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The aim of this study was to determine the risk of VCF after spine SBRT and identify clinical and dosimetric factors predictive for VCF. The analysis incorporated the recently described Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score (SINS) criteria. Methods and Materials: The primary endpoint of this study was the development of a de novo VCF (ie, new endplate fracture or collapse deformity) or fracture progression based on an existing fracture at the site of treatment after SBRT. We retrospectively scored 167 spinal segments in 90 patients treated with spine SBRT according to each of the 6 SINS criteria. We also evaluated the presence of paraspinal extension, prior radiation, various dosimetric parameters including dose per fraction ({>=}20 Gy vs <20 Gy), age, and histology. Results: The median follow-up was 7.4 months. We identified 19 fractures (11%): 12 de novo fractures (63%) and 7 cases of fracture progression (37%). The mean time to fracture after SBRT was 3.3 months (range, 0.5-21.6 months). The 1-year fracture-free probability was 87.3%. Multivariate analysis confirmed that alignment (P=.0003), lytic lesions (P=.007), lung (P=.03) and hepatocellular (P<.0001) primary histologies, and dose per fraction of 20 Gy or greater (P=.004) were significant predictors of VCF. Conclusions: The presence of kyphotic/scoliotic deformity and the presence of lytic tumor were the only predictive factors of VCF based on the original 6 SINS criteria. We also report that patients with lung and hepatocellular tumors and treatment with SBRT of 20 Gy or greater in a single fraction are at a higher risk of VCF.

  20. Sexual Function After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiegner, Ellen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); King, Christopher R., E-mail: crking@stanford.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To study the sexual quality of life for prostate cancer patients after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC)-validated quality-of-life questionnaire, the sexual function of 32 consecutive patients who received prostate SBRT in a prospective Phase II clinical trial were analyzed at baseline, and at median times of 4, 12, 20, and 50 months after treatment. SBRT consisted of 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy using the Cyberknife. No androgen deprivation therapy was given. The use of erectile dysfunction (ED) medications was monitored. A comprehensive literature review for radiotherapy-alone modalities based on patient self-reported questionnaires served as historical comparison. Results: Median age at treatment was 67.5 years, and median follow-up was 35.5 months (minimum 12 months). The mean EPIC sexual domain summary score, sexual function score, and sexual bother score decreased by 45%, 49%, and 25% respectively at 50 months follow-up. These differences reached clinical relevance by 20 months after treatment. Baseline ED rate was 38% and increased to 71% after treatment (p = 0.024). Use of ED medications was 3% at baseline and progressed to 25%. For patients aged <70 years at follow-up, 60% maintained satisfactory erectile function after treatment compared with only 12% aged {>=}70 years (p = 0.008). Penile bulb dose was not associated with ED. Conclusions: The rates of ED after treatment appear comparable to those reported for other modalities of radiotherapy. Given the modest size of this study and the uncertainties in the physiology of radiotherapy-related ED, these results merit further investigations.