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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Green waxes, adhesives and lubricants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...predicted shortage of energy resources and environmental...the development of green waxes, adhesives...acid methyl esters. Green Chem. 9, 469-474...synergistic antioxidants. Energy Fuels 21, 2408-2414...predicted shortage of energy resources and environmental...the development of green waxes, adhesives...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Green waxes, adhesives and lubricants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Therefore, to develop ideal green waxes, it is expected that...and hydraulic fluids. 2. Green adhesives (a) Introduction...instance, in a conventional solvent-based adhesive formulation, solvents such as toluene and trichloroethane...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

1994 lubricating oil and wax capacities of U. S. and Canadian refineries  

SciTech Connect

The paper consists of several tables which list the names of US and Canadian refineries, their location, and their capacity for production of lubricating oil and waxes categorized by finishing operations and primary processing. A separate table lists US and Canadian re-refiners and their capacity for refining waste lubricating oils.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Combination process for upgrading naphtha  

SciTech Connect

A straight-run naphtha is fractionated at about 66/sup 0/C, which is just below the boiling point of methylcyclopentane. The 66/sup 0/C+ fraction is reformed, and at least a portion of the reformate combined with the 66/sup 0/C- fraction and reacted under aromatization conditions over a zsm-5-type catalyst to form a C5+ product rich in aromatics. The C5+ aromaticized product and the remaining reformate can be either sent for BTx recovery or used as a high-octane component of a gasoline blending pool.

Hughes, T.R.; Miller, S.J.

1980-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

5

Process for removing polymer-forming impurities from naphtha fraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polymer precursor materials are vaporized without polymerization or are removed from a raw naphtha fraction by passing the raw naphtha to a vaporization zone and vaporizing the naphtha in the presence of a wash oil while stripping with hot hydrogen to prevent polymer deposits in the equipment. 2 figs.

Kowalczyk, D.C.; Bricklemyer, B.A.; Svoboda, J.J.

1983-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

6

Selective hydrocracking of light naphtha cuts  

SciTech Connect

For the production of high-quality automotive gasolines, technology has been developed for a combined ''isoreforming'' process, in which hydrocracking of a heavy straight-run naphtha cut to give a high-octane component with an octane number of 84-86 (MM) is combined with catalytic reforming of the residual fraction from hydrocracking. The ''isoreforming'' technology can be used to produce AI-93 automotive gasolines with aromatic hydrocarbon contents of 45-49% by weight, without TEL, in yields of 78-82% by weight on the original feed. The authors also discuss a catalytic upgrading process for light straight-run naphtha distillates or raffinates from catalytic reforming. The influence of the depth of reaction in hydrocracking n-paraffins in the straight-run 62-105 degrees C cut on the yield of the C5-EP cut and its octane number is investigated.

Koslov, I.T.; Khavkin, V.A.; Nefedov, B.K.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Data reconciliation and optimal operation of a catalytic naphtha reformer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-mail:skoge@chemeng.ntnu.no) #12;Abstract The naphtha reforming process converts low-octane gasoline blending compo- nents to high cases. #12;1 Introduction The naphtha reforming process converts low-octane gasoline blending compo-octane components for use in high-performance gasoline fuels. The reformer also has an important function

Skogestad, Sigurd

8

Large Diesel Engine Lubrication  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Centralized lubrication for slow-speed internal combustion engines ; Marine diesel engine lubrication ...

Hans Gaca; Jan Ruiter; Götz Mehr; Theo Mang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Estimation of Individual C8 to C10 Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Naphthas and Motor Gasolines by Capillary Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......naphthas and motor gasolines is o f great importance...C10 aromatics in straight run, processed naphtha...reformed, and motor gasolines), or i n aromatic...analysis in any straight run, reformed naphthas, and gasolines with final boiling......

Basant Kumar; R.K. Kuchhal; Pradeep Kumar; P.L. Gupta

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Data reconciliation and optimal operation of a catalytic naphtha reformer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-mail:skoge@chemeng.ntnu.no) #12;Abstract The naphtha reforming process converts low-octane gasoline blending compo- nents to high process converts low-octane gasoline blending compo- nents to high-octane components for use in high-octane components for use in high-performance gasoline fuels. The reformer also has a important function

Skogestad, Sigurd

11

Tethered Lubricants  

SciTech Connect

We have performed extensive experimental and theoretical studies of interfacial friction, relaxation dynamics, and thermodynamics of polymer chains tethered to points, planes, and particles. A key result from our tribology studies using lateral force microscopy (LFM) measurements of polydisperse brushes of linear and branched chains densely grafted to planar substrates is that there are exceedingly low friction coefficients for these systems. Specific project achievements include: (1) Synthesis of three-tiered lubricant films containing controlled amounts of free and pendent PDMS chains, and investigated the effect of their molecular weight and volume fraction on interfacial friction. (2.) Detailed studies of a family of hairy particles termed nanoscale organic hybrid materials (NOHMs) and demonstration of their use as lubricants.

Archer, Lynden

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lubricants to someone by Lubricants to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Fuel Effects on Combustion Lubricants Natural Gas Research Biofuels End-Use Research Materials Technologies Lubricants As most vehicles are on the road for more than 15 years before they are retired, investigating technologies that will improve today's vehicles is

13

Naphtha Process Wool Scouring Preferred by America's Largest Wool Grease Producer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Naphtha Process Wool Scouring Preferred by America's Largest Wool Grease Producer ... Though the bulk of the nation's wool processors still scour wool by the traditional "soap and water" emulsion process, William Whitman Co., Inc., Arlington Division has been using the Naphtha Process with outstanding success for more than half a century. ...

1949-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

14

Low-cost options for upgrading light straight run naphtha  

SciTech Connect

Of the many alternatives available for gasoline pool octane improvement, light straight run naphtha isomerization is among the most attractive. Recent catalyst and process developments have improved the cost effectiveness and flexibility of the Penex process for achieving octane improvement. Two new commercial catalysts have been developed, the first obtains maximum once-through octane on desulfurized feeds in new or revamped units, the second allows operation at feed sulfur levels above 100 ppm. New process developments permit low cost product recycle to achieve maximum octane. An isomerization unit may be designed for once-through operation initially with postponed investment for recycle operation.

Schmidt, R.J.; Weiszmann, J.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

1989 annual book of ASTM standards. Section 5: Petroleum products, lubricants and fossil fuels  

SciTech Connect

This volume of standards pertains to petroleum products and lubricants and to catalysts. The standards presented include: Standard test method for estimation of net and gross heat of combustion of petroleum fuels; Standard guide for generation and dissipation of static electricity in petroleum fuel systems; and Standard test method for solidification point of petroleum wax.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Reaction kinetics of olefin saturation in the hydrodesulfurization of fluid catalytic cracked naphtha  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. governmental agencies are calling for strict environmental regulations on the quality of gasoline. Fluid catalytic cracked naphtha is an important blending component of the gasoline pool. The majority of the sulfur in the gasoline pool comes...

Schumann, Brian Herbert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

17

Combined isomerization of overhead cuts of straight-run naphtha and reformate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technology was developed for combined isomerization of IBP-85°C overhead cuts of straight-run naphtha and reformate to reduce the benzene content in automotive gasolines. In comparison to the traditional technolo...

Nguen Van Ty

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Ionic Liquids as Novel Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Additives Ionic Liquids as Novel Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives Bench test results showed that compared with fully-formulated engine oils, selected low-viscosity...

19

DIESEL FUEL LUBRICATION  

SciTech Connect

The diesel fuel injector and pump systems contain many sliding interfaces that rely for lubrication upon the fuels. The combination of the poor fuel lubricity and extremely tight geometric clearance between the plunger and bore makes the diesel fuel injector vulnerable to scuffing damage that severely limits the engine life. In order to meet the upcoming stricter diesel emission regulations and higher engine efficiency requirements, further fuel refinements that will result in even lower fuel lubricity due to the removal of essential lubricating compounds, more stringent operation conditions, and tighter geometric clearances are needed. These are expected to increase the scuffing and wear vulnerability of the diesel fuel injection and pump systems. In this chapter, two approaches are discussed to address this issue: (1) increasing fuel lubricity by introducing effective lubricity additives or alternative fuels, such as biodiesel, and (2) improving the fuel injector scuffing-resistance by using advanced materials and/or surface engineering processes. The developing status of the fuel modification approach is reviewed to cover topics including fuel lubricity origins, lubricity improvers, alternative fuels, and standard fuel lubricity tests. The discussion of the materials approach is focused on the methodology development for detection of the onset of scuffing and evaluation of the material scuffing characteristics.

Qu, Jun [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Fuel and Lubricant Effects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel and Lubricant Effects Fuels Research, DOE agreements 13415, 13425 Bruce G. Bunting, Mike Bunce, Kukwon Cho, Jun Qu, Robert Crawford, Jim Szybist, Scott Sluder, John Storey,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

4 - Hydrodynamic Lubrication  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary In this chapter the basic principles of hydrodynamic lubrication are discussed. The mechanisms of hydrodynamic film generation and the effects of operating variables such as velocity, temperature, load, design parameters, etc., on the performance of such films are outlined. These are explained using bearings commonly found in many engineering applications as examples. Secondary effects in hydrodynamic lubrication such as viscous heating, compressible and non-Newtonian lubricants, bearing-vibration and deformation are described and their influence on bearing-performance assessed. The complete separation of sliding surfaces by a liquid film under full hydrodynamic lubrication can allow bearings to operate indefinitely without any wear. Any liquid or gas can be used for this form of lubrication, provided that no chemical attack on the bearing occurs. The disadvantage of hydrodynamic lubrication is that a non-zero sliding or “squeeze” velocity is required before load capacity is obtained. Some damage to bearings during starting or stopping is inevitable because of this condition. Vibration induced by hydrodynamic instability may occur during operation at high speeds and this should always be carefully controlled. Despite these deficiencies, hydrodynamic lubrication is the preferred form of lubrication in most bearing systems.

Gwidon W. Stachowiak; Andrew W. Batchelor

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lubricants Lubricants As most vehicles are on the road for more than 15 years before they are retired, investigating technologies that will improve today's vehicles is essential. Because 11.5 percent of fuel energy is consumed by engine friction, decreasing this friction through lubricants can lead to substantial improvements in the fuel economy of current vehicles, without needing to wait for the fleet to turn over. In fact, a 1 percent fuel savings in the existing vehicle fleet possible through lubricants could save 97 thousand barrels of oil a day or $3.5 billion a year. Because of these benefits, the Vehicle Technologies Office supports research on lubricants that can improve the efficiency of internal combustion engine vehicles, complementing our work on advanced combustion engine technology.

23

8 Modern refining concepts-an update on naphtha-isomerization to modern gasoline manufacture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses several major refinery processes to improve RON. These include naphtha-isomerization, reforming, addition of FCC-Naphtha, alkylation, addition of oxygenates or polygas or butanes. Naphtha isomerization is a simple and very cost effective technology for octane replacement. Isomerization of light naphtha streams rich in C5's and C6's typically results in an increase of 10 to 20 octane numbers. The octane increase depends upon the feed composition and the octane need of the refiner. Proper selection of the isomerization technology is an assurance against lack of octane and surplus of benzene in the gasoline pool. Normal C5's and C6's typically are abundant in streams from gas condensate units, light raffinate from aromatics extraction units, and light straight-run naphtha from atmospheric distillation. Even benzene containing feedstocks became potential sources for isomerization as modern catalysts help to manage the benzene surplus through saturation and ring opening reactions to high octane product. This conversion of benzene is an added benefit of isomerization to refiners' economics, especially in those countries where extra credit is given for benzene reduction in the gasoline pool. The isomerization reaction takes place over a catalyst under relatively mild conditions in the presence of hydrogen.

Hartmut Weyda; Ernst Köhler

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

4 Hydrodynamic Lubrication  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the theory of hydrodynamic lubrication. The chapter demonstrates how a basic property of all liquids, such as viscosity, can be used to produce cheap, reliable bearings that operate with low friction and wear. The mechanisms of hydrodynamic film generation and the effects of operating variables such as velocity, temperature, load, design parameters, etc., on the performance of such films are outlined. This is explained using bearings commonly found in many engineering applications as examples. Secondary effects in hydrodynamic lubrication such as viscous heating, compressible and non-Newtonian lubricants, bearing vibration and deformation is described and their influence on bearing performance is assessed. Like many important scientific principles, chance observation played an important role in the recognition of hydrodynamic action as a basic mechanism of bearing lubrication. The complete separation of sliding surfaces by a liquid film under full hydrodynamic lubrication can allow bearings to operate indefinitely without any wear. Any liquid or gas can be used for this form of lubrication provided that no chemical attack of the bearing occurs. The disadvantage of hydrodynamic lubrication is that a non-zero sliding or “squeeze” velocity is required before load capacity is obtained.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Chapter 16 - Wax and Asphaltenes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Waxes or paraffins are typically long-chain, normal alkane compounds that are naturally present in crude oil. When the temperature drops, these compounds can come out of the oil and formwaxy and elongated crystals. If the control of wax deposition is not effective, the waxy deposits can build up significantly with time and cause disruption of production, reduction of throughput, and even complete blockage of the flowlines. Subsea production facilities and pipelines are very susceptible to wax deposits and asphaltene precipitates induced by the lower temperature and decreasing pressure environment. Asphaltenes are a component of the bitumen in petroleum and are usually black, brittle coal-like materials. Wax remediation treatments often involve the use of solvents, hot water, a combination of hot water and surfactants, or hot oil treatments to revitalize production. In addition there are currently no standard design and operating guidelines for the control of asphaltenes in subsea systems. Some experience has been gained from asphaltene control programs used for onshore wells.

Yong Bai; Qiang Bai

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Rate enhancement for catalytic upgrading coal naphthas. Quarterly report, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we compare the activities of unsupported molybdenum nitride and unsupported molybdenum sulfide for the hydrotreatment of a real feedstock, naphtha derived from Illinois No. 6 coal. Two sets of conditions were employed for the hydrotreatment of the Illinois No. 6 naphtha. In the first condition, heteroatom removal was obtained for the temperatures of 200 to 400{degrees}C. The temperature was varied while holding constant the total pressure (600 psig), weight hourly space velocity (WHSV = 1), and hydrogen to naphtha g-mole ratio (2.6). The catalyst activities for HDN and HDS reactions were compared and the activation energies of these two reactions were determined for different catalysts. In the second condition, the weight hourly space velocity at 350 {degrees}C was varied to compare the reaction rate of N and S removal. Results are discussed.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

An experimental investigation into oil mist lubrication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil mist lubrication offers many advantages over sump lubrication. Unfortunately, mist lubrication generates sub-micrometer sized aerosol particles (fines) that escape from the oil mist lubrication system. These particles are an environmental hazard...

Kannan, Krishna

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

28

Power system with an integrated lubrication circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power system includes an engine having a first lubrication circuit and at least one auxiliary power unit having a second lubrication circuit. The first lubrication circuit is in fluid communication with the second lubrication circuit.

Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Lane, William H. (Chillicothe, IL)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

29

Synthesis of new high performance lubricants and solid lubricants  

SciTech Connect

Synthesis and testing was begun on a number of new classes of lubricants: perfluoropolyethers (branching effects), perfluoromethylene oxide ethers, chlorine-substituted fluorocarbon polyethers, fluorine-containing branched ether lubricants, glycerine- based perfluoropolyesters, perfluoro epoxy ether chains, etc.

Lagow, R.J.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Computational study of wax deposition in pipeline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wax deposition in subsea pipelines is one of the flow assurance problems for oil and gas production. In contrast to many studies about single phase wax deposition gas-oil wax deposition studies are very limited. The wax deposition mechanism and model prediction are restricted by many factors such as hydrodynamic and thermal when multiphase flow is involved. Wax deposition modeling becomes complicated under multiphase flowing conditions. wax deposition is depended by the flow pattern. The stratified flow is one of the most common flow patterns in the actual subsea gas-oil flowing conditions. In this work numerical methods are used to study wax deposition in oil-gas stratified flow through a pipe. Based on the flow analysis about stratified flow the non-isothermal heat and mass transfer is calculated. The temperature profile of the oil and the concentration profile of wax in oil are obtained. The change of the oil-gas interface i.e. the liquid holdup throughout the pipe must be taken into the heat and mass balance. The valid wax deposition surface must be taken into the wax deposition modeling by establishing function of the liquid holdup and the wetted area by oil. The molecular diffusion is as the deposition mechanism. The increase of the wax fraction in the deposit as a function of time depends on the mass flux from the oil deposit interface into the gel and the growth of the deposit thickness depends on the difference between the mass flux from the bulk oil to the oil deposit interface and the mass flux from the interface into the deposit. In addition the growth of the wax deposit as a function of time along with the effect oil flow rate gas flow rate and the inlet temperature are discussed. The presence of gas significantly reduces the severity of wax deposition by altering the heat and mass transfer characteristics.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Materials - Coatings & Lubricants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coatings and Lubricants: Coatings and Lubricants: Super-Hard and Ultra-Low-Friction Films for Friction and Wear Control Ali Erdemir researches nanolubricants. Ali Erdemir researches nanolubricants. The many rolling, rotating and sliding mechanical assemblies in advanced transportation vehicles present friction and wear challenges for automotive engineers. These systems operate under severe conditions-high loads, speeds and temperatures-that currently available materials and lubricants do not tolerate well. Improving the surface friction and wear characteristics of the mechanical system components is an opportunity for engineers, and the use of super-hard, slippery surface films offers promise. Argonne scientists have developed a number of smooth, wear-resistant, low-friction nanocomposite nitride and diamond-like carbon films that have

32

Modelling of Paraffin Wax in Oil Pipelines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? As warm oil or condensate from the reservoir flow through a pipeline on the cold sea bottom, wax often precipitate and deposit on the… (more)

Siljuberg, Morten Kristoffer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels and Lubricants Fuels and Lubricants Research to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Fuel Effects on Combustion Lubricants Natural Gas Research Biofuels End-Use Research

34

Rate enhancement for catalytic upgrading coal naphthas. Final of final technical progress report, July 1991--September 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to remove sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen from naphtha derived from coal liquefaction. The project is concerned with the development of hydrotreating catalysts. This period, a ruthenium sulfide catalyst has been studied.

Davis, B.H.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Modeling wax thickness in single-phase turbulent flow.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Oil and gas transport is today a vital part of the industry. Oil cooled during transport in pipelines may precipitate paraffin wax. Precipitated wax… (more)

Botne, Kjetil Kandal

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Analytical and Numerical Modeling of Paraffin Wax in Pipelines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Paraffin wax deposition, or the settling of solid wax particles on pipelines and equipment, is an extensive problem encountered in oil production and transportation.… (more)

Stubsjøen, Marte

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Thermodvnamics Thermodynamics of Wax Precipitation in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermodvnamics Thermodynamics of Wax Precipitation in Petroleum Mixtures C. Lira-Galeana and A, Berkeley, CIA 94720 A thermodynamic pamework is developed for calculating wax precipitation in petroleum only recently have attempts been made to develop a thermodynamic description. Published methods

Firoozabadi, Abbas

38

Hydrogen Production by Catalytic Steam Reforming of Bio-oil, Naphtha  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen production by catalytic steam reforming of the bio-oil, naphtha, and CH4 was investigated over a novel metal-doped catalyst of (Ca24Al28O64)4+4O?/Mg (C12A7-Mg). The catalytic steam reforming was investigated from 250 to 850°C in the fixed-bed continuous flow reactor. For the reforming of bio-oil, the yield of hydrogen of 80% was obtained at 750°C, and the maximum carbon conversion is nearly close to 95% under the optimum steam reforming condition. For the reforming of naphtha and CH4, the hydrogen yield and carbon conversion are lower than that of bio-oil at the same temperature. The characteristics of catalyst were also investigated by XPS. The catalyst deactivation was mainly caused by the deposition of carbon in the catalytic steam reforming process.

Yue Pan; Zhao-xiang Wang; Tao Kan; Xi-feng Zhu; Quan-xin Li

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Gamma-Ray Transmission Scans of Naphtha Splitter Column: A Case Study  

SciTech Connect

The gamma-ray transmission technique is well known and widely used to on-line examine inner details of industrial process column. For that purpose, a particular case study was conducted to diagnose the performance of a Naphtha Splitter Column in real time at one petrochemical plant in Malaysia. The technique employed Co-60 as a radioisotope sealed source to emit gamma radiation and a NaI(TI) scintillation as detector. This technique provides a visible representation of the true nature of the naphtha splitter column wherein the process and mechanical problems inside the column can be identified while it is in operation. This paper demonstrates details of the technique used and shows the result obtained.

Zain, Rasif Mohd; Rahman, Mohd Fitri Abd; Hasan, Nor Pa'iza Mohamad; Abdullah, Jaafar [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuklear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

40

Synthesis of new high performance lubricants and solid lubricants  

SciTech Connect

We have started to make a number of classes of new perfluoropolyethers both in the solid lubricant area and liquid lubricant area. We have prepared some chlorofluoroethers for testing as additives for normal petroleum and polyalphaolefin lubricants which are so widely used in the United States. Perfluoropolyethers are not soluble in hydrocarbons. On the other hand, these chlorofluoropolyethers are soluble in substantial amounts in simple hydrocarbons. These are uniquely capable of being additives that flow with the motor oil or the polyalphaolefin.

Lagow, R.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Rate enhancement for catalytic upgrading coal naphthas. Quarterly progress report, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

During this quarter, hydrotreatment of the Black Thunder naphtha sample was carried out using two commercial catalysts. Also, the Illinois No. 6 naphtha were hydrotreated using unsupported transition metal sulfides. Each reaction condition was maintained for 24 hours and three steady state samples were taken in the last 6 hours of the 24 hours period to calculate the removal of the heteroatoms for each condition. Prior to G.C. analysis, the samples were washed three times with distilled water to remove dissolved H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}. Two commercial catalysts, a Co-Mo on alumina (American Cyanamid HDS-1442A, 1/16in. {times} 1/4in. pellets) and a Ni-W on alumina (Harshaw Catalyst, Ni-4301, E 1/12, Lot 16, Drum 29) were employed in the processing of the Black Thunder naphtha samples. Analytical data for these catalysts are presented in Table 1. Unsupported transition metal sulfides were prepared following the procedure published by Chianelli et al.

Davis, B.H.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Selective hydrocracking of heavy straight run naphtha bottoms for T90 reduction  

SciTech Connect

Refiners are being presented with a major challenge to meet proposed stringent specifications for reformulated gasoline to lower auto exhaustive emissions. Among the specifications proposed to be regulated by EPA, the T90 boiling point of gasoline is found to have a great influence on hydrocarbon emissions. T90 reduction of naphtha streams by hydrocracking has been identified as a processing scheme to upgrade the heavy naphtha fraction before blending with other refining streams. In this paper, a commercially available catalyst was evaluated for the T90 reduction of the heavy fraction of heavy straight run naphtha with an ASTM D-86 boiling range of 275-386F (HSRN). The catalyst was found to be effective in lowering the T90 of HSRN from 344F to 300F under reaction conditions of 2 LHSV/1000 psig/650 F or 4 LHSV/1000 psig/695 F. The product yield shift by hydrocracking was from C9-C11 hydrocarbons to C4-C6 components, particularly C4 and C5 isoparaffins. Both RON and MON of the liquid products were increased significantly from 36 and 42 up to 78 and 74, respectively. The increase of octane numbers is a function of hydrocracking severity. The liquid product yield was about 75 vol% with a T90 of 300F. The liquid product sulfur and nitrogen contents were less than 30 and 0.15 wppm, respectively.

Hsing, L.H.; Nelson, R.G. [Texaco Research and Development, Port Arthur, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

14 - Lubricant use and disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Criteria are defined for optimum machine-specific selection of conventional, high-performance and specialty lubricants. Lubrication consolidation is indicated as a means of rationalisation of inventories. Intended use of lubricants may be compromised by oxidation, water and air contamination, additive depletion and accumulation of contaminants, including wear debris, and biological degradation. Strategic oil analysis is described from simple in-shop sensory inspections to primary on-site standard testing and more comprehensive secondary testing methods as an operational maintenance tool for machine and lubricant condition monitoring to estimate remaining lubricant life time and prevent premature machine failure. The disposal of spent lubricants, including waste oil legislation and management, and re-refining technologies, are discussed.

Jan C.J. Bart; Emanuele Gucciardi; Stefano Cavallaro

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Methods for predicting wax precipitation and deposition  

SciTech Connect

Removal of wax from wells and flowlines can account for significant additional operating costs. To evaluate these potential costs, the operating conditions that allow waxes to precipitate in the wellbore must be identified, and deposition rates must be estimated to determine the costs associated with removal of wax deposits. Presented in this paper are laboratory and analytic methods that can be used to estimate both the critical operating conditions and the deposition rates. The laboratory tests and analysis presented may be used to characterize any type of oil.

Weingarten, J.S.; Euchner, J.A.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Fuel and Lubricant Effects | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel and Lubricant Effects Fuel and Lubricant Effects 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

46

Fuel & Lubricant Technologies | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Lubricant Technologies Fuel & Lubricant Technologies 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

47

Fuel & Lubricant Technologies | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel & Lubricant Technologies Fuel & Lubricant Technologies 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

48

fuels and lubricants | netl.doe.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels and Lubricants The DOE Vehicle Technologies Office supports fuels and lubricants research and development (R&D) to provide vehicle users with cost-competitive options that...

49

Wax_finalreport_UofU  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RPSEA RPSEA Wax C ontrol i n t he P resence o f Hydrates RPSEA 0 7121---1201 Project T itle Contract N umber October 1 5, 2 011 Milind D eo Professor Department o f C hemical E ngineering University o f U tah, S alt L ake C ity, U T 8 4112 LEGAL N OTICE This r eport w as p repared b y t he University o f U tah a s a n a ccount o f w ork s ponsored by t he R esearch P artnership t o S ecure E nergy f or A merica, R PSEA. N either R PSEA members o f R PSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of E nergy, nor a ny p erson a cting o n b ehalf o f any of the entities: a. MAKES A NY W ARRANTY O R R EPRESENTATION, E XPRESS O R I MPLIED W ITH RESPECT T O A CCURACY, C OMPLETENESS, O R U SEFULNESS O F T HE INFORMATION C ONTAINED I N T HIS D OCUMENT, O R T HAT T HE U SE O F A NY INFORMATION, A PPARATUS, M ETHOD,

50

A new method for evaluating wax inhibitors and drag reducers  

SciTech Connect

Conventional wax inhibitor evaluation methods such as cold finger and laminar flow loop are not adequate and accurate for evaluating wax inhibitors to be used in a wide operating temperature range and flow regimes such as North Sea subsea transport pipelines. A new method has been developed to simultaneously measure fluid rheology change and wax inhibition and to evaluate wax inhibitors or drag reducers at the field operating conditions. Selection criteria have been defined to search for an effective wax inhibitor. The criteria ensure the chemical selected is the most effective one for the specific oil and flow conditions. The operation cost savings by this accurate method is significant. Nine chemical companies joined the project of finding an wax inhibitor for a North Sea prospect. More than twenty wax inhibitors have been tested and evaluated with this new method for several waxy oil fields. The new method provides data of fluid rheology, war deposition rates and wax inhibition in the operating temperature range, overall average wax inhibition and degree of fluid flow improvement. These data are important to evaluate a wax inhibitor or drag reducer. Most of the wax inhibitors tested have good wax inhibition at high temperatures, but not many chemicals work well at low temperatures. The chemical tested may improved fluid flow behavior at low temperature but not wax deposition. Drag reducers tested did not work well at North Sea seabed temperature.

Hsu, J.J.C.; Brubaker, J.P.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Defining the role of elastic lubricants and micro textured surfaces in lubricated, sliding friction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solutions for reducing friction in sliding, lubricated systems include modifying lubricant rheology using polymers and adding a micro-scale texture to the sliding surfaces, but the mechanism of how lubrication properties ...

Hupp, Sara J. (Sara Jean), 1979-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Wax Point Determinations Using Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

The thermodynamic characterization of the wax point of a given crude is essential in order to maintain flow conditions that prevent plugging of undersea pipelines. This report summarizes the efforts made towards applying an Acoustic Cavity Resonance Spectrometer (ACRS) to the determination of pressures and temperatures at which wax precipitates from crude. Phillips Petroleum Company, Inc., the CRADA participant, supplied the ACRS. The instrumentation was shipped to Dr. Thomas Schmidt of ORNL, the CRADA contractor, in May 2000 after preliminary software development performed under the guidance of Dr. Samuel Colgate and Dr. Evan House of the University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. Upon receipt it became apparent that a number of modifications still needed to be made before the ACRS could be precisely and safely used for wax point measurements. This report reviews the sequence of alterations made to the ACRS, as well as defines the possible applications of the instrumentation once the modifications have been completed.

Jubin, R.T.

2002-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

53

Fuels & Lubricant Technologies- FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels & Lubricants Technology Fuels & Lubricants Technology Fuels and lubricants research at FEERC involves study of the impacts of fuel and lubricant properties on advanced combustion processes as well as on emissions and emission control strategies and devices. The range of fuels studied includes liquid fuels from synthetic and renewable sources as well as conventional and unconventional fossil-based sources. Combustion and emissions studies are leveraged with relevant single and multi-cylinder engine setups in the FEERC and access to a suite of unique diagnostic tools and a vehicle dynamometer laboratory. ORNL/DOE research has been cited by EPA in important decisions such as the 2006 diesel sulfur rule and the 2010/2011 E15 waiver decision. Major program categories and examples

54

On the effect of wax content on paraffin wax deposition in a batch oscillatory baffled tube apparatus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Deposition of paraffin wax is one of the major problems facing in the petroleum industries with the main implication being wax blockage in oil and gas pipelines especially for offshore production. The objectives of this work are to investigate the effect of applying oscillatory motion on wax deposition in an oscillatory baffled tube apparatus, a relatively new mixing technology that offers more uniform mixing and solid suspension than traditional devices; and are to understand the mechanism and kinetics of the wax crystallisation in accordance to the Avrami theory. The wax deposition was determined gravimetrically. The results indicate that the oscillatory motion has two opposite effects on the percentage of wax deposition: at low concentration of wax in solution, the presence of oscillation significantly reduces the wax deposition, e.g. 40–60% without the presence of any solvent or wax inhibitor; and completely prevents 100% wax gelation from occurring – the beneficial effect; at higher wax contents, however, the introduction of oscillatory motion not only promotes wax deposition, but also accelerates the crystal growth to achieve 100% wax deposition – the detrimental effect.

Lukman Ismail; Robin E. Westacott; Xiongwei Ni

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Study of Paraffin Wax Deposition in Seasonally Pigged Pipelines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waxy crude oil pipelines are pigged periodically to scrape the adhered wax deposit from the pipe wall and remove it from the pipeline. If wax deposition on the pipe wall is not ... severe and there is not much ch...

Wang Wenda; Huang Qiyu; Huang Jun; Pang Quan…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Florida Wax Scales: Control Measures in Texas for Hollies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains how to control Florida wax scales, which have begun attacking hollies in Texas. 6 pp., 4 photos...

Drees, Bastiaan M.; Reinert, James; Williams, Michael L.

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

57

A New Approach to the Improved Separation and Identification of Complex Mixtures by Gas Chromatography I. Application of Naphtha  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the components in naphtha or gasoline. The non-polar stationary...literature values, yielded a straight line, thereby, providing...not available from squalane runs alone. For example: (a...intercepts of the universal I-T straight lines vis-a-vis the solute......

N. C. Saha; G. D. Mitra

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

2014 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Fuels & Lubricants...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Fuels & Lubricants Technologies 2014 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Fuels & Lubricants Technologies Merit review of DOE Vehicle Technologies research activities...

59

Online monitoring of wax deposition in sub-sea pipelines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a new technology (heat pulse wax monitoring) to monitor wax deposition in sub-sea pipelines continuously. The equipment that has been tested in a lab rig consists of a heating element and a temperature sensor which are installed at a fixed point on the oil pipe. By applying a short external heat pulse to the oil pipe, a correlation between the measured transient thermal response and the wax thickness could be derived. If such a system could also be installed in a sub-sea pipeline, it would make continuous measuring of the wax build-up possible. This would in turn allow for a much more efficient use of wax control techniques, by e.g. sending a pig only when a certain thickness threshold has been passed. The equipment in this technology is located outside the pipeline, so that it becomes possible to retrofit it to an existing pipeline. To test the technology, a numerical model was derived to correlate the wax thickness with the thermal readings from the heat pulse wax monitoring. This model was validated using the results from a single-phase flow experimental campaign using a North Sea waxy gas condensate in the Porsgrunn wax deposition test rig. In this experimental campaign, wax deposition experiments were carried out with different flow rates and temperatures. The wax thickness predictions from the heat pulse wax monitoring compared favourably with conventional measurement techniques.

R Hoffmann; L Amundsen; R Schüller

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and /or Lubricant Additives  

SciTech Connect

This ORNL-GM CRADA developed ionic liquids (ILs) as novel lubricants or oil additives for engine lubrication. A new group of oil-miscible ILs have been designed and synthesized with high thermal stability, non-corrosiveness, excellent wettability, and most importantly effective anti-scuffing/anti-wear and friction reduction characteristics. Mechanistic analysis attributes the superior lubricating performance of IL additives to their physical and chemical interactions with metallic surfaces. Working with a leading lubricant formulation company, the team has successfully developed a prototype low-viscosity engine oil using a phosphonium-phosphate IL as an anti-wear additive. Tribological bench tests of the IL-additized formulated oil showed 20-33% lower friction in mixed and elastohydrodynamic lubrication and 38-92% lower wear in boundary lubrication when compared with commercial Mobil 1 and Mobil Clean 5W-30 engine oils. High-temperature, high load (HTHL) full-size engine tests confirmed the excellent anti-wear performance for the IL-additized engine oil. Sequence VID engine dynamometer tests demonstrated an improved fuel economy by >2% for this IL-additized engine oil benchmarked against the Mobil 1 5W-30 oil. In addition, accelerated catalyst aging tests suggest that the IL additive may potentially have less adverse impact on three-way catalysts compared to the conventional ZDDP. Follow-on research is needed for further development and optimization of IL chemistry and oil formulation to fully meet ILSAC GF-5 specifications and further enhance the automotive engine efficiency and durability.

Qu, J. [ORNL; Viola, M. B. [General Motors Company

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Method For Testing Properties Of Corrosive Lubricants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of testing corrosive lubricating media using a wear testing apparatus without a mechanical seal. The wear testing apparatus and methods are effective for testing volatile corrosive lubricating media under pressure and at high temperatures.

Ohi, James (Denver, CO); De La Cruz, Jose L. (San Antonio, TX); Lacey, Paul I. (Wexford, IE)

2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

62

Synthesis of new high performance lubricants and solid lubricants  

SciTech Connect

In our second year of funding we began the testing phase of a number of new classes of lubricants. Three different testing collaborations have already begun and a fourth one is In the works with Dr. Stephen Hsu of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Dr. Hsu also plans to test some of the same materials for us that Shell Development is studying. With Dr. Bill Jones of NASA, we are studying the effects of branching an high temperature lubricant properties in perfluoropolyethers, Initially Bill Jones is comparing the lubrication and physical properties of perfluorotetraglyme and the following two spherical perfluoropolyethers, Note that one contains a fluorocarbon chain and the other one contains a fluorocarbon ether chain. The synthesis of these was reported in the last progress report. With Professor Patricia Thiel of Iowa State University, we are working on studies of perfluoromethylene oxide ethers and have prepared a series of four of these polyethers to study in collaboration with her research group. These perfluoromethylene oxide ethers have the best low temperature properties of any known lubricants. Thiel's group is studying their interactions with metals under extreme conditions. Thirdly, we have also begun an Interaction with W. August Birke of Shell Development Company in Houston for whom we have already prepared samples of the chlorine-substituted fluorocarbon polyether lubricants whose structures appear on page 54 of our research proposal. Each of these four structures is thought to have potential as lubricant additives to motor oils. We also have underway syntheses of other fluorine-containing branched ether lubricants. These new materials which are also promising as antifriction additives for motor oils appear ahead of the perfluoro additives as Appendix I to the progress report. Additionally for Birke and Shell Development we have at their request prepared the novel compound perfluoro salicylic acid. This synthesis was suggested by the Shell staff who thought that esters of perfluoro salicylic acid might be an excellent antifriction additive for motor oil fuels. One of the best additives currently used in motor oils is the hydrocarbon ester of salicylic acid.

Lagow, Richard J.

1993-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

63

Compostability of petroleum wax-based coatings  

SciTech Connect

Composting is an important aspect of solid-waste management. Results of one independent study and a second continuing study demonstrate that waxed packaging may be composted to produce a high-quality end product with certain limitations on the proportions of materials which comprise the compost mixture. Contaminants from packaging material are the main constraints to compost quality. There are suggestions for developing readily compostable packaging.

Davie, I.N. (International Group, Inc., Agincourt, Ontario (Canada))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Wax and hydrate control with electrical power  

SciTech Connect

Electrical heating of subsea flowlines is an effective way to prevent wax and hydrate information, especially for long transportation distances and in low-temperature deep water. Systems are available for use in conjunction with bundles, pipe-in-pipe, and wet-thermal-insulation systems. These systems provide environmentally friendly fluid-temperature control without chemicals or flaring for pipeline depressurizing. Enhanced production is achieved because no time is lost by unnecessary depressurizing, pigging, heating-medium circulation, or removal of hydrate and wax blockages. The seabed temperature at 100-m and greater water depths may range from 7 to {minus}1.5 C, causing a rapid cooling of the hot well streams being transported in subsea flowlines. Under these supercooling conditions, vulnerable crude oils and multiphase compositions will deposit wax and asphalts; also the gas/water phase may freeze solid with hydrate particles. The paper discusses thermal-insulated flowlines, heat-loss compensation with electrical power, electrical power consumption and operation, and subsea electrical-power distribution system.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Unsteady-state kinetic simulation of naphtha reforming and coke combustion processes in the fixed and moving catalyst beds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The work is dedicated to the construction of kinetics models for the naphtha reforming process and the adjacent process of catalyst regeneration by coke combustion. The proposed kinetic model for the reforming process is based on the use of common rate equations for the groups of similar reactions with account of difference in reaction rates for individual homologs within these groups by simple correlations with thermodynamic properties (first of all – with the values of Gibbs free energy) of individual reactions and by other simplification methods. Such approach gives the way to construct the kinetics models optimal from the point of view of compromise between accuracy and simplicity. The proposed naphtha reforming model is characterized with the high level of kinetic scheme detailization (62 individual and group reactants and 146 individual reactions), at the same it is rather simple and provides the accurate description of the experimental data using only 22 kinetic parameters. This model is thermodynamically consistent and provides accurate description of experimental data in a wide range of process parameters. Account of catalyst deactivation by coke deposition in the model gives the way to simulate transient reforming process performance both in fixed and moving catalyst beds. Kinetics of coke combustion for catalysts with moderate coke content (up to 3% mass) may described by simple kinetic equation with apparent reaction rate orders closed to unit for relative coke content and to 1/2 for oxygen. Demonstration simulations of naphtha reforming and coke combustion processes are presented.

Andrey N. Zagoruiko; Alexander S. Belyi; Mikhail D. Smolikov; Alexander S. Noskov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Synthesis and Evaluation of Wax Dispersant for Diesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Synthesis and Evaluation of Wax Dispersant for Diesel ... We can predict that the sensitivity of diesels A and C will be better than that of diesel B. ...

Wangang Zheng; Shujun Wang; Jie Liu; Fanbin Meng; Yanshan Li; Huanqing Ma; Ting Li

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

67

Thermal Energy Storage in Metal Foams filled with Paraffin Wax.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Phase change materials (PCM) such as paraffin wax are known to exhibit slow thermal response due to their relatively low thermal conductivity. In this study,… (more)

Vadwala, Pathik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Kinetics of wax deposition and its movement in a pipeline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An electrical analog has been used in studying the thermal processes involved in crystallization of a wax melt as it moves within a short section of a pipeline.

N. I. Gel'perin; G. I. Lapshenkov…

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Physical properties of wax deposits on the walls of crude pipelines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wax deposits on the wall of a crude oil pipeline are a solid wax network of fine crystals, filled with oil ... this paper, a series of experiments on wax deposition in a laboratory flow loop were ... rate, temper...

Qiyu Huang; Jifeng Wang; Jinjun Zhang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Synthesis of new high performance lubricants and solid lubricants. Progress report, April 1992--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

Synthesis and testing was begun on a number of new classes of lubricants: perfluoropolyethers (branching effects), perfluoromethylene oxide ethers, chlorine-substituted fluorocarbon polyethers, fluorine-containing branched ether lubricants, glycerine- based perfluoropolyesters, perfluoro epoxy ether chains, etc.

Lagow, R.J.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Different process schemes for converting light straight run and fluid catalytic cracking naphthas in a FCC unit for maximum propylene production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Light straight run (LSR) and fluid catalytic cracking (FCCN) naphthas were cracked in a transported bed reactor (MicroDowner) and in a fixed bed reactor (MAT) over a commercial Y zeolite based catalyst, over a commercial ZSM-5 zeolite based additive, and over a mixture of both at selected conditions. Based on the mechanisms through which naphtha hydrocarbons are converted, we evaluated the best alternatives for processing these streams to produce light olefins and/or to reduce olefins content in commercial gasoline. The experimental set-up allowed us to simulate the cracking behaviour of the different naphtha streams in a fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) unit by different processing schemes. Results indicate that LSR only cracks at high severity, yielding large amounts of dry gas. Despite its high olefins content, FCCN practically does not crack when it is fed together with gas oil feed. When cracking FCCN alone at typical gas oil cracking conditions, olefins are transformed preferentially into naphtha-range isoparaffins and aromatics, and when cracking FCCN at high severity, olefins are transformed preferentially into propylene and butylenes. Finally, cracking naphtha in the stripper produces some propylene and increases the aromatics in the remaining gasoline.

Avelino Corma; FranciscoV Melo; Laurent Sauvanaud; F.J Ortega

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Low Reactivity SI Engine Lubricant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Results showed that lubricant improvement allowed up to 4 degree improvement in spark advance at knock limited conditions resulting in potentially over 3 percent indicated efficiency improvement

73

Research on Fuels & Lubricants | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuels lDimethyl Ether Rheology and Materials Studies Natural Oils - The Next Generation of Diesel Engine Lubricants? Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy...

74

Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Batteries Fuel Efficiency & Emissions Combustion Engines Fuel Effects on Combustion Idle Reduction Emissions Waste Heat Recovery Lightweighting Parasitic Loss Reduction Lubricants...

75

Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and Exhaust Conditions on Diesel Particulate Filter Service Life and Vehicle Fuel Economy A Consortium to Optimize...

76

Detailed Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species in Diesel Exhaust and Aftertreatment Systems Detailed Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species in Diesel...

77

Lubricant Formulation and Consumption Effects on Diesel Exhaust...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lubricant Formulation and Consumption Effects on Diesel Exhaust Ash Emissions: Lubricant Formulation and Consumption Effects on Diesel Exhaust Ash Emissions: 2005 Diesel Engine...

78

Lubricants - Pathway to Improving Fuel Efficiency of Legacy Fleet...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for low-viscosity lubricants and low-friction surfaces and additives to reduce fuel consumption, and impact of such approaches on other critical lubricant metrics...

79

The Role of Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reductions: Viscosity Effects The Role of Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reductions: Viscosity Effects...

80

Axial bearing with gas lubrication for marine turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possibility of enhancing the carrying capacity of the lubricant layer in bearings with gas lubrication is considered, for marine turbines. The basic design features of the hybrid...

M. V. Gribinichenko; A. V. Kurenskii; N. V. Sinenko

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Friction Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components Friction Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs...

82

Fuels & Lubricants R&D | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fuels & Lubricants R&D Fuels & Lubricants R&D 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Vehicle...

83

Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) Project...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) Project Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) Project Extensive chemical and physical characterization...

84

Biodiesel Impact on Engine Lubricant Oil Dilution | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Impact on Engine Lubricant Oil Dilution Biodiesel Impact on Engine Lubricant Oil Dilution Heavy-duty engine and light-duty vehicle experiments were conducted to investigate the...

85

Reducing Lubricant Ash Impact on Exhaust Aftertreatment with...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lubricant Ash Impact on Exhaust Aftertreatment with a Oil Conditioning Filter Reducing Lubricant Ash Impact on Exhaust Aftertreatment with a Oil Conditioning Filter Under the test...

86

Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission Aftertreat...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission Aftertreatment Systems via an Oil Conditioning Filter Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission...

87

Theoretical study on the lubrication failure for the lubricants with a limiting shear stress  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is observed that the non-slip boundary conditions in the classical lubrication theory are not valid for lubricant with a limiting shear stress. By determining the position of the maximum shear stress and changing velocity boundary condition to stress condition, slip lubrication equations are deduced. With numerical solution of the equations, the location and scale of the boundary slip are analyzed. Finally, after the influences of the slip on the lubrication properties are discussed, results show that a significant decrease of the load carrying capacity causes slip lubrication failure.

Huang Ping; Luo Jianbin; Wen Shizhu

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Tribological Characterization of Carbon Based Solid Lubricants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lubrication modes. ..................... 10 Figure 5. Typical Stribeck Curve [22]. ..................................................................... 11 Figure 6. This figure illustrates the lamellar structure of graphite. ........................... 13... or low pressures, and high and low operating speeds. For purposes of this research, the extreme conditions will refer to high temperatures, and low pressures. The most common types of solid lubricants encompass four materials: graphite, molybdenum...

Sanchez, Carlos Joel

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

89

Phosphoric chemical conversion coating with excellent wax-repellent performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wax deposition on pipelines is a serious problem for the production of crude oil. In this paper, phosphoric chemical conversion coatings were exploited to solve the problem. The chemical conversion coatings were fabricated on carbon substrate by surface modification technology at different temperature. A self-designed wax deposition apparatus based on cold-finger was used to study the wax-repellent properties of coatings, which indicated that all chemical conversion coatings showed superior wax-repellent performance to bare carbon substrate and the wax deposition reduction value of 80–95% was achieved by the chemical conversion coating obtained at room temperature. The microstructure and composition of coatings were evaluated by SEM and XRD, revealing that there existed much difference in the content of Zn3(PO4)2(H2O)4 phase and the microstructure among different coatings. The contact angle results measured on a contact angle meter showed that all coatings belonged to hydrophilic surface. And the study on the wetting behavior of Zn3(PO4)2(H2O)4 phase suggested that the water wetting property of coating was a key factor for suppressing wax deposition and the weak affinity between coating and wax also played an important role.

Yuzhen Guo; Weiping Li; Liqun Zhu; Zhiwei Wang; Huicong Liu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Wax formation in oil pipelines: A critical review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gelling of waxy crudes and the deposition of wax on the inner walls of subsea crude oil pipelines present a costly problem in the production and transportation of oil. The timely removal of deposited wax is required to address the reduction in flow rate that it causes, as well as to avoid the eventual loss of a pipeline in the event that it becomes completely clogged. In order to understand this problem and address it, significant research has been done on the mechanisms governing wax deposition in pipelines in order to model the process. Furthermore, methods of inhibiting the formation of wax on pipeline walls and of removing accumulated wax have been studied to find the most efficient and cost-effective means of maintaining pipelines prone to wax deposition. This paper seeks to review the current state of research into these areas, highlighting what is so far understood about the mechanisms guiding this wax deposition, and how this knowledge can be applied to modelling and providing solutions to this problem.

Ararimeh Aiyejina; Dhurjati Prasad Chakrabarti; Angelus Pilgrim; M.K.S. Sastry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Stabilizing contact angle hysteresis of paraffin wax surfaces with nanoclay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Another observation with regard to the effect of the organoclay is that it increases surface roughness. Figure 3 shows optical profilometry images of the pure wax and nanocomposite samples. Average roughness valu...

Gang Pu; Steven J. Severtson

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Wax deposition scale-up modeling for waxy crude production lines  

SciTech Connect

A wax deposition scale-up model has been developed to scale-up laboratory wax deposition results for waxy crude production lines. The wax deposition model allows users to predict wax deposition profile along a cold pipeline and predict potential wax problems and pigging frequency. Consideration of the flow turbulence effect significantly increases prediction accuracy. Accurate wax deposition prediction should save capital and operation investments for waxy crude production systems. Many wax deposition models only apply a molecular diffusion mechanism in modeling and neglect shear effect. However, the flow turbulence effect has significant impact on wax deposition and can not be neglected in wax deposition modeling. Wax deposition scale-up parameters including shear rate, shear stress, and Reynolds number have been studied. None of these parameters can be used as a scaler. Critical wax tension concept has been proposed as a scaler. A technique to scale up shear effect and then wax deposition is described. For a given oil and oil temperature, the laboratory wax deposition data can be scaled up by heat flux and flow velocity. The scale-up techniques could be applied to multiphase flow conditions. Examples are presented in this paper to describe profiles of wax deposition and effective inside diameter along North Sea and West Africa subsea pipelines. The difference of wax deposition profiles from stock tank oil and live oil is also presented.

Hsu, J.J.C.; Brubaker, J.P.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication with Polyolester Lubricants and HFC Refrigerants, Final Report, Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Lubrication properties of refrigeration lubricants were investigated in high pressure nonconforming contacts under different conditions of temperature, rolling speed, and refrigerant concentration. The program was based upon the recognition that the lubrication regime in refrigeration compressors is generally elastohydrodynamic or hydrodynamic, as determined by the operating conditions of the compressor and the properties of the lubricant. Depending on the compressor design, elastohydrodynamic lubrication conditions exist in many rolling and sliding elements of refrigeration compressors such as roller element bearings, gears, and rotors. The formation of an elastohydrodynamic film separating rubbing surfaces is important in preventing the wear and failure of compressor elements. It is, therefore, important to predict the elastohydrodynamic (EHD) performance of lubricants under realistic tribocontact renditions. This is, however, difficult as the lubricant properties that control film formation are critically dependent upon pressure and shear, and cannot be evaluated using conventional laboratory instruments. In this study, the elastohydrodynamic behavior of refrigeration lubricants with and without the presence of refrigerants was investigated using the ultrathin film EHD interferometry technique. This technique enables very thin films, down to less than 5 nm, to be measured accurately within an EHD contact under realistic conditions of temperature, shear, and pressure. The technique was adapted to the study of lubricant refrigerant mixtures. Film thickness measurements were obtained on refrigeration lubricants as a function of speed, temperature, and refrigerant concentration. The effects of lubricant viscosity, temperature, rolling speed, and refrigerant concentration on EHD film formation were investigated. From the film thickness measurements, effective pressure-viscosity coefficients were calculated. The lubricants studied in this project included two naphthenic mineral oils (NMO), four polyolesters (POE), and two polyvinyl ether (PVE) fluids. These fluids represented viscosity grades of ISO 32 and ISO 68 and are shown in a table. Refrigerants studied included R-22, R-134a, and R-410A. Film thickness measurements were conducted at 23 C, 45 C, and 65 C with refrigerant concentrations ranging from zero to 60% by weight.

Gunsel, Selda; Pozebanchuk, Michael

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Synthesis of new high performance lubricants and solid lubricants. Progress report, June 1991--March 1992  

SciTech Connect

We have started to make a number of classes of new perfluoropolyethers both in the solid lubricant area and liquid lubricant area. We have prepared some chlorofluoroethers for testing as additives for normal petroleum and polyalphaolefin lubricants which are so widely used in the United States. Perfluoropolyethers are not soluble in hydrocarbons. On the other hand, these chlorofluoropolyethers are soluble in substantial amounts in simple hydrocarbons. These are uniquely capable of being additives that flow with the motor oil or the polyalphaolefin.

Lagow, R.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Preparation of synthetic hydrocarbon lubricants  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for preparing synthetic lubricating materials which process comprises: (a) reacting (i) at least a portion of a reaction product of the liquid phase oligomerization of propylene, butylene or mixtures thereof containing a C/sub 6/ olefin component, (ii) a linear olefin reactant having an average carbon number ranging from about 10 to about 18 in the presence of a catalyst, (b) separating from the reaction mixture of (a) hydrocarbons which distill at a temperature above about 660/sup 0/ F. (316/sup 0/ C.), and (c) hydrogenating the reaction product of (b) by contact with hydrogen with or without a catalyst at a temperature ranging from about 25/sup 0/ C. to about 300/sup 0/ C.

Johnson, T.H.

1986-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

96

Lubricity of Components of Biodiesel and Petrodiesel. The Origin of Biodiesel Lubricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lubricity of Components of Biodiesel and Petrodiesel. ... The use of vegetable oil based fuels, called biodiesels, lowers particulate emissions due to the increased oxygen content of the fuel. ...

Gerhard Knothe; Kevin R. Steidley

2005-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

97

Metallic Wear in the Presence of Lubricants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... or adhesion of one to the other leading to a roughness; the extent of this roughening and of the consequent wear is determined by the continuity of the film of lubricant ...

1936-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

98

Biodiesel Impact on Engine Lubricant Oil Dilution  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact on Engine Lubricant Oil Dilution Xin He, Aaron M. Williams, Earl D. Christensen, Jonathan L. Burton, Robert L. McCormick National Renewable Energy Laboratory October 5, 2011...

99

Advanced lubrication systems and materials. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report described the work conducted at the National Institute of Standards and Technology under an interagency agreement signed in September 1992 between DOE and NIST for 5 years. The interagency agreement envisions continual funding from DOE to support the development of fuel efficient, low emission engine technologies in terms of lubrication, friction, and wear control encountered in the development of advanced transportation technologies. However, in 1994, the DOE office of transportation technologies was reorganized and the tribology program was dissolved. The work at NIST therefore continued at a low level without further funding from DOE. The work continued to support transportation technologies in the development of fuel efficient, low emission engine development. Under this program, significant progress has been made in advancing the state of the art of lubrication technology for advanced engine research and development. Some of the highlights are: (1) developed an advanced high temperature liquid lubricant capable of sustaining high temperatures in a prototype heat engine; (2) developed a novel liquid lubricant which potentially could lower the emission of heavy duty diesel engines; (3) developed lubricant chemistries for ceramics used in the heat engines; (4) developed application maps for ceramic lubricant chemistry combinations for design purpose; and (5) developed novel test methods to screen lubricant chemistries for automotive air-conditioning compressors lubricated by R-134a (Freon substitute). Most of these findings have been reported to the DOE program office through Argonne National Laboratory who manages the overall program. A list of those reports and a copy of the report submitted to the Argonne National Laboratory is attached in Appendix A. Additional reports have also been submitted separately to DOE program managers. These are attached in Appendix B.

Hsu, S.

1998-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

100

Rate enhancement for catalytic upgrading coal naphthas. Quarterly technical progress report for period ending March 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The study of the removal of heteroatoms from naphtha using second row unsupported metal sulfide catalysts was completed. For the HDS reaction, the maximum and minimum % sulfur removal, based on three grams of catalyst, is obtained for molybdenum sulfide and niobium sulfide, respectively. Chianelli et al.(l) reported for the second row transition metals that ruthenium sulfide has the highest activity for HDS of dibenzothiophene and zirconium sulfide has the lowest activity. The maximum activity for HDN, based on three grams of catalyst, is obtained for molybdenum sulfide and the minimum activity is obtained for niobium sulfide, just as was the case for the HDS reaction. A HDS of dibenzothiophene was carried over the unsupported second row transition metal sulfides following the procedure of Chianelli (1). The results show that the transition metal sulfides prepared at the CAER were similar in activity for HDS of dibenzothiophene as those prepared by Chianelli at al.(1).

Davis, B.H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Compatibility of lubricant additives with HFC refrigerants and synthetic lubricants. Final report, Part 1  

SciTech Connect

Part one of this research provides manufacturers of components of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment with a useful list of lubricant additives, sources, functional properties and chemical species. The list in part one is comprised of domestic lubricant additive suppliers and the results of a literature search that was specifically targeted for additives reported to be useful in polyolester chemistry.

Cavestri, R.C. [Imagination Resources, Inc., Dublin, OH (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Calculations aid breaking of wax-plugged lines  

SciTech Connect

Manipulation of pressure/volume data helps locate a wax plug in a pipeline, and it may then be possible to clear the line by interception of the plug with a hot tap. Or, in an extreme case, information obtained from the pressure/volume data will allow better assessment of where to replace the pipe. The possibility of a pipeline becoming plugged by paraffin buildup is greatest in winter when cooler temperatures may cause wax to precipitate and plate out on the pipe walls or completely gel in the line. The risk of plugging is also greatest during pigging. This is because passage of the pig may cause a large mass of wax to accumulate by scraping a thin layer of wax from a long length of pipe. This type of plug does not enlarge once the pipeline is stopped up. It has been successfully cleared by tapping the pipeline at a point within the wax blockage and then pumping the plug out in sections.

Gilchrist, R.T. Jr.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Supercritical Fluid Extraction as a Cleanup Technique for Gas Chromatographic Analysis of Pesticides in Wool Wax  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supercritical Fluid Extraction as a Cleanup Technique for Gas Chromatographic Analysis of Pesticides in Wool Wax ... Wool wax is the lipid secreted by the sebaceous glands of sheep and is recovered during the scouring of raw wool. ...

F. William Jones

1997-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

104

Effect of operating conditions on wax deposition in a laboratory flow loop characterized with DSC technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crude oil is a mixture of a diverse group of paraffins, aromatics, naphthenes, resins, asphaltenes, etc. Among these groups of hydrocarbons, heavy paraffinic hydrocarbons (waxes) can cause wax deposition on the pipeline

Wenda Wang; Qiyu Huang; Changhui Wang; Si Li…

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Lubricants- Pathway to Improving Fuel Efficiency of Legacy Fleet Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Reviews recent studies on potential for low-viscosity lubricants and low-friction surfaces and additives to reduce fuel consumption, and impact of such approaches on other critical lubricant metrics

106

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory State-of-the-Art Fuel and Vehicle Testing The Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy's...

107

Overview of DOE Fuel & Lubricant Technologies R&D | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Overview of DOE Fuel & Lubricant Technologies R&D Overview of DOE Fuel & Lubricant Technologies R&D 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer...

108

Mathematical formulation and numerical modeling of wax deposition in pipelines from enthalpyporosity approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical formulation and numerical modeling of wax deposition in pipelines from enthalpy and in the North Sea, the deposition of wax crystals in oil and gas pipelines becomes a major concern operational complexities. To pre- vent blockage of pipelines, wax deposits should be removed periodically

Firoozabadi, Abbas

109

Heat and mass transport in non-isothermal partially saturated oil-wax Antonio Fasano1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mario Primicerio1 Abstract Deposition of wax at the wall of pipelines during the flow of mineral oilsHeat and mass transport in non-isothermal partially saturated oil-wax solutions Antonio Fasano1 of the main mechanisms at the origin of wax deposition, i.e. diffusion in non-isothermal solutions. We

Primicerio, Mario

110

Multi component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines ITP Nanomanufacturing:...

111

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels and Lubricants Research Fuels and Lubricants Research As transportation accounts for two-thirds of the nearly $1 billion the U.S. spends daily on foreign oil, it is vital to increase our use of alternative fuels. Increasing the fuels available to drivers reduces price volatility, supports domestic industries, and increases environmental sustainability. The DOE's Alternative Fuels Data Center provides basic information on alternative fuels, including Biodiesel, Ethanol, Natural Gas, Propane, and Hydrogen. The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports research to improve how vehicles use these many of these fuels in the future, as well as activities to increase their availability today. It also researches how new petroleum-based fuels affect advanced combustion systems and how lubricants can improve the efficiency of vehicles currently on the road.

112

Tribological behavior of some candidate advanced space lubricants  

SciTech Connect

Performance of a variety of space lubricants was compared under boundary and elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL). The types of fluids studied were naphthenic mineral oil, paraffinic mineral oil, polyalphaolefin, and silahydrocarbon. The silahydrocarbon and the polyalphaolefin lubricants exhibited lower traction under similar conditions. A specific additive package increased the traction of the polyalphaolefin. Volatility characteristics of some of these fluids were also studied. 10 refs.

Sharma, S.K.; Snyder, C.E. Jr.; Gschwender, L.J. (USAF, Wright Lab., Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Guidelines for maintaining steam turbine lubrication systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Failures of steam turbine bearings and rotors cost the utility industry an estimated $150 million a year. A third of these failures involve contaminated lubricants or malfunctioning lubricant supply system components. This report, outlining a comprehensive surveillance program, presents guidelines for maintaining major elements in the turbine lubrication system.

Lamping, G.A.; Cuellar, J.P. Jr.; Silvus, H.S.; Barsun, H.F.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Mathematical modeling of wax deposition in oil pipeline systems  

SciTech Connect

Deposition of wax on the wall of oil pipelines is often regarded as a problem since the tube diameter is reduced. Consequently, more power is needed to force the same amount of oil through the system. A mathematical model for quantitative prediction of wax deposition for each hydrocarbon component has been developed. Each component is characterized by weight fraction, heat of fusion, and melting point temperature. A model explains how a phase transition in the flow from liquid oil to waxy crystals may create a local density gradient and mass flux, which depends on the local temperature gradient. The model predicts that wax deposition can be considerably reduced even when the wall temperature is below the wax appearance point, provided the liquid/solid phase transition, expressed by the change in moles of liquid with temperature, is small at the wall temperature. Deposition as function of time has been obtained as a solution of differential equations derived from the principles of mass and energy conservation and the laws of diffusion.

Svendsen, J.A. (Hydro Research Centre, Porsgrunn (Norway). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Wax Segregation in Oils: A Multiscale Mario Primicerio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wax Segregation in Oils: A Multiscale Problem. Mario Primicerio Department of Mathematics "Ulisse in the pipeline. The experimental evidence is that when these oils are pumped in pipelines crossing zones at relatively low temperature (as e.g. in the submarine pipelines) a deposit is formed at the walls that grows

Primicerio, Mario

116

The Experimental Study on the Wax-Deposit Law in High-Pour-Point Crude Oi1 Transportation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High pour point properties of crude oil are generally due to the high wax content, so the study of the laws and the characteristics of wax deposition are significant for taking steps to save energy and transport safely. For the wax deposition of high ... Keywords: pipeline transportation, high-pour-point waxy crude, wax deposition law, DSC, experimental study

Wang Zhihua; Si Minglin; Wang Jinxiu; Li Jungang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Exploring Low Emission Lubricants for Diesel Engines  

SciTech Connect

A workshop to explore the technological issues involved with the removal of sulfur from lubricants and the development of low emission diesel engine oils was held in Scottsdale, Arizona, January 30 through February 1, 2000. It presented an overview of the current technology by means of panel discussions and technical presentations from industry, government, and academia.

Perez, J. M.

2000-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

118

Inertial Lubrication Theory N. O. Rojas,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inertial Lubrication Theory N. O. Rojas,1 M. Argentina,1 E. Cerda,2 and E. Tirapegui3 1 Universite on the boundary conditions enforced, the energy input and the specific Reynolds number of the fluid motion. Here input of energy. We derive the minimal set of equations containing inertial effects in this strongly

Argentina, Mederic

119

Extraction of aromatics from petroleum naphtha reformate by a 1-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidone/ethylene carbonate mixed solvent  

SciTech Connect

The phase equilibria for the extraction of aromatics from petroleum naphtha reformate (with a boiling range of 338--403 K) using a mixed solvent of 1-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidone (CHP) and ethylene carbonate (EC) have been correlated using the universal function-group activity coefficients model (UNIFAC). The interaction parameters of CHP and EC with different hydrocarbon groups present in the reformate such as CH{sub 2} (paraffinic CH{sub 2}), ACH (aromatic CH), ACCH{sub 2} (aromatic CCH{sub 2}), and each of the two solvents have been fitted to experimental concentrations of three ternary systems that contain these groups. The extraction runs have been carried out at different temperatures, solvent compositions, and solvent-to-feed ratios. Experimental results compared favorably with those predicted from the UNIFAC method. The optimum extraction conditions were determined by calculation of the minimum energy of separation. In this study these conditions were found to be at a mixed solvent composition of 65% EC (by weight) and 35% CHP. The solvent-to-feed ratio was 1.8 on a volume basis, and the extraction temperature was 329 K.

Radwan, G.M.; Al-Muhtaseb, S.A.; Dowaidar, A.M.; Fahim, M.A. [United Arab Emirates Univ., Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates). Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Dept.] [United Arab Emirates Univ., Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates). Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Dept.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Studies of wax deposition in the Trans Alaska pipeline  

SciTech Connect

The crude oil being pumped into the Trans Alaska pipeline experiences considerable cooling during its 800-mile (1,287 km) journey from Prudhoe Bay to Valdez. The conditions during the initial flow period were favorable especially for the deposition of the waxy constituents of the crude on the pipeline wall. As time passed and the crude oil flow rate increased, segments of the pipeline warmed up to temperatures greater than that at which wax deposition occurs. This study investigated mechanisms of wax deposition and determined the expected nature and thickness of deposits in the pipeline as a function of time and distance. Results indicate that deposition during start-up is a consequence of 3 separate mechanisms which transport both dissolved and precipitated waxy residue laterally. 31 references.

Burger, E.D.; Perkins, T.K.; Striegler, J.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

In situ nitrogen generation removes wax from flowlines  

SciTech Connect

Formation of paraffin (wax) in cold deepwater flowlines is a major problem for offshore operators of such facilities. Petrobras faces this problem continuously in its deepwater operations in the Campos basin, offshore Brazil. Since 1990, through its Petrobras Research Center (CENPES), the company has developed, extensively field tested, and recently commercialized, a novel technique for chemically removing such wax depositions. The process involves mixing and introducing to the line, two inorganic salts and organic solvents. The ensuing chemical reaction--which both generates nitrogen and heats the inside of the blocked flowline--allows the solvent to dissolve and dislodge the buildup, which is then flushed from the line. The process is called the Nitrogen Generation System (SGN). Petrobras/CENPES has recently formed a joint venture with the Brazilian service company Maritima Navegacao e Engenharia Ltda. to offer SGN services worldwide.

Khalil, C.N. [Petrobras S.A., Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

MHK Projects/Wax Lake Outlet | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wax Lake Outlet Wax Lake Outlet < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.6455,"lon":-91.394,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

123

Effect of microwave radiation on Jayadhar cotton fibers: WAXS studies  

SciTech Connect

Thermal effect in the form of micro wave energy on Jayadhar cotton fiber has been investigated. Microstructural parameters have been estimated using wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) data and line profile analysis program developed by us. Physical properties like tensile strength are correlated with X-ray results. We observe that the microwave radiation do affect significantly many parameters and we have suggested a multivariate analysis of these parameters to arrive at a significant result.

Niranjana, A. R., E-mail: arnphysics@gmail.com; Mahesh, S. S., E-mail: arnphysics@gmail.com; Divakara, S., E-mail: arnphysics@gmail.com; Somashekar, R., E-mail: arnphysics@gmail.com [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Mysore-570006 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

124

Rubber friction on (apparently) smooth lubricated surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study rubber sliding friction on hard lubricated surfaces. We show that even if the hard surface appears smooth to the naked eye, it may exhibit short wavelength roughness, which may give the dominant contribution to rubber friction. That is, the observed sliding friction is mainly due to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber by the substrate surface asperities. The presented results are of great importance for rubber sealing and other rubber applications involving (apparently) smooth surfaces.

M. Mofidi; B. Prakash; B. N. J. Persson; O. Albohl

2007-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

125

A conversion coating on carbon steel with good anti-wax performance in crude oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Wax deposition on pipeline from crude oil is a prevalent problem that petroleum industry has always been suffered. In this paper, a conversion coating on carbon steel with good anti-wax performance was constructed to solve this problem through a simple coating and heat treatment process. The conversion coating is composed of pyrophosphate with a flower-like microstructure. After wax deposition test, the conversion coating has low wax deposition weight which is 2.9 mg/cm2 and high wax deposition reduction rate (80% in average). The conversion coating has a special wettability which is superoleophobic with low oil-adhesion in water (oil contact angle is 162° and rolling angle is 7°) and hydrophilic in oil. The anti-wax mechanism is discussed and it may be attributed to the polar hydrophilic component and micro-structure of the conversion coating.

Zhiwei Wang; Liqun Zhu; Huicong Liu; Weiping Li

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Wax phase equilibria: developing a thermodynamic model using a systematic approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reservoir hydrocarbon fluids contain heavy paraffins that may form solid phases of wax at low temperatures. Problems associated with wax formation and deposition are a major concern in production and transportation of hydrocarbon fluids. The industry has directed considerable efforts towards generating reliable experimental data and developing thermodynamic models for estimating the wax phase boundary. The cloud point temperature, i.e. the wax appearance temperature (WAT) is commonly measured in laboratories and traditionally used in developing and/or validating wax models. However, the WAT is not necessarily an equilibrium point, and its value can depend on experimental procedures. Furthermore, when determining the wax phase boundary at pipeline conditions, the common practice is to measure the wax phase boundary at atmospheric pressure, then apply the results to real pipeline pressure conditions. However, neglecting the effect of pressure and associated fluid thermophysical/compositional changes can lead to unreliable results. In this paper, a new thermodynamic model for wax is proposed and validated against wax disappearance temperature (WDT) data for a number of binary and multi-component systems. The required thermodynamic properties of pure n-paraffins are first estimated, and then a new approach for describing wax solids, based on the UNIQUAC equation, is described. Finally, the impact of pressure on wax phase equilibria is addressed. The newly developed model demonstrates good reliability for describing solids behaviour in hydrocarbon systems. Furthermore, the model is capable of predicting the amount of wax precipitated and its composition. The predictions compare well with independent experimental data, demonstrating the reliability of the thermodynamic approach.

Hong-Yan Ji; Bahman Tohidi; Ali Danesh; Adrian C Todd

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Candle and candle wax containing metathesis and metathesis-like products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wax comprises a metathesis product and/or a product that resembles, at least in part, a product which may be formed from a metathesis reaction. The wax may be used to form articles for example, candles (container candles, votive candles, and/or a pillar candles), crayons, fire logs or tarts. The wax commonly includes other components in addition to the metathesis product.

Murphy, Timothy A; Tupy, Michael J; Abraham, Timothy W; Shafer, Andy

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

128

Effects of diffusion on lubricant distribution under flying headon thin-film disks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lubricants on thin-film disks have large effects on head–disk interface characteristics. They reduce head and disk wear while thick lubricant film increases friction ... in many cases. Lubricant depletion due to

K. Yanagisawa; Y. Kawakubo; M. Yoshino

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Overview of DOE Fuel & Lubricant Technologies R&D  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

friendly highway transportation technologies that enable America to use less petroleum. --EERE Strategic Plan, October 2002-- Overview of DOE Fuel & Lubricant Technologies...

130

Controlled Experiments on the Effects of Lubricant/Additive ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ashless) Characteristics on DPF Degradation Effects of lubricant additive chemistries and exhaust conditions on ash properties affecting diesel particulate filter performance....

131

Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Lubricant and Additive...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Theoretical Investigation of Lubricant and Additive Effects on Engine Friction Combining data from motored engine friction, a theoretical engine model, a line friction contact...

132

Effects of Fuel Dilution with Biodiesel on Lubricant Acidity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Affecting Fuel Economy and Engine Wear Reducing Lubricant Ash Impact on Exhaust Aftertreatment with a Oil Conditioning Filter Development of High Performance Heavy Duty Engine Oils...

133

Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and Exhaust Conditions on Diesel Particulate Filter Service Life and Vehicle Fuel Economy Characteristics and Effects of...

134

Study on the wax deposition of waxy crude in pipelines and its application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental loop for the wax deposition study is established; a novel method to determine the thickness of the wax deposition in the experimental loop is developed, taking into account the impact of the instant temperature decreasing of the test section wall which leads to the increasing of the viscosity of the crude oil near the pipe wall and the distortion of the flow field in the pipe. The wax deposition characteristics of the QH crude are studied using the experimental loop. For the QH crude oil, there is a peak area of the wax deposition when it is 40 °C around. And very little deposition emerges when the temperature is not only higher than the wax appearance point but also lower than the temperature of solidification. It is also proved in the lab that the shearing dispersion of the wax crystal particles plays little role in the wax deposition when the shearing rate is high. The observation of the pipe which is cut in the field shows that the laying of the wax deposition in the pipe is very clear, and the wax deposition caused by the shearing dispersion exists clearly. From the angel of the shutdown temperature drop and safely restart for the hot oil pipeline, it is concluded that there is a permissible critical thickness of the sedimentary layer for the low flow rate pipelines.

Zhang Guozhong; Liu Gang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Computational and Rheological Study of Wax Deposition and Gelation in Subsea Pipelines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Highly waxy crude oils can cause significant problems such as blockage of a pipeline because of the precipitation and deposition of select wax components during… (more)

Lee, Hyun Su

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Prediction of the wax content of the incipient wax-oil gel in a pipeline: An application of the controlled-stress rheometer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High molecular weight paraffins are known to form gels of complex morphology at low temperatures due to the low solubility of these compounds in aromatic or naphthene-base oil solvents. The characteristics of these gels are strong functions of the shear and thermal histories of these samples. A model system of wax and oil was used to understand the gelation process of these mixtures. A significant depression in the gel point of a wax-oil sample was observed by either decreasing the cooling rate or increasing the steady shear stress. The wax-oil sample separates into two layers of different characteristics a gel-like layer and a liquid-like layer when sheared with a controlled-stress rheometer at high steady shear stresses and low cooling rates. The phase diagram of the model wax-oil system obtained using a controlled-stress rheometer was verified by analyzing the wax content of the incipient gel deposits formed on the wall of a flow loop. Based on the rheological measurements a law has been suggested for the prediction of the wax content of the gel deposit on the laboratory flow loop walls. The wax content of the incipient gel formed on the wall of a field subsea pipeline was predicted to be much higher than that for the flow loop at similar operating conditions. This variation in the gel deposit characteristics is due to the significant differences in the cooling histories in the two cases.

Probjot Singh; H. Scott Fogler; Nagi Nagarajan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced lubrication systems Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cutting Cost: Considering all aspects such as lubricant cost per part, application and removal system... consistent lubrication thickness with proper instrumentation. ......

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - actively lubricated journal Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-align and mount to the hydrophilic trench binding sites with electric connections by heat curable lubricant oil... ) lubricant oil covers only hydrophilic nickel surface of PZT...

139

Influence of boric acid additive size on green lubricant performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of these were automotive lubricants-engine oils and transmission fluids-whereas...P. Turgis, and S. Lamouri1996A general approach to discontinuous transfer films...Method to improve lubricity of low-sulfur diesel and gasoline fuelsUS Patent no. 6783561...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Acoustic resonance determination of the effect of light hydrocarbons on wax appearance points in a Njord well fluid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wax formation and deposition in pipelines and process equipment pose severe problems for ... play an important role in the shift of wax appearance points by increasing the solubilities of ... to study the effect ...

S. O. Colgate; A. Sivaraman

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Multiresidue Analysis of Pesticides in Wool Wax and Lanolin Using Gel Permeation and Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Multiresidue Analysis of Pesticides in Wool Wax and Lanolin Using Gel Permeation and Gas Chromatography ... This is a result of both the blending of different lots of raw wool before scouring and the subsequent blending of wool wax from a variety of sources to make up commercial shipments. ...

F. William Jones

1996-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

142

Honeywell, Gong Myoung conclude supply agreement for speciality waxes and additives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A multi-year strategic supply agreement has been signed between Honeywell and South Korean speciality chemicals manufacturer Gong Myoung Technologies (GMT) under which Honeywell will be the exclusive marketer of GMT's waxes in all markets except South Korea. The supply deal includes high-density polyethylene waxes used in polyvinyl chloride processing as well as in inks, coatings and floor polish.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Biosynthesis and secretion of plant cuticular wax L. Kunst, A.L. Samuels*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review Biosynthesis and secretion of plant cuticular wax L. Kunst, A.L. Samuels* Department: direct transfer of lipids from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane, and Golgi mediated exocytosis. The potential roles of ABC transporters and non-spe- cific lipid transfer proteins in wax export

Kunst, Ljerka

144

The development of a wax layer on the interior wall of a circular pipe transporting heated oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of oil in long subsea pipelines is a common occurrence...formation of a paraffinic wax deposit on the inside...Striegler, Studies of wax deposition in the trans Alaska pipeline, Journal of Petroleum...review of the modeling of wax deposition mechanisms......

D. J. Needham; B. T. Johansson; T. Reeve

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Wax Inhibition by Comb-like Polymers: Support of the Incorporation-Perturbation Mechanism from Molecular Dynamics Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with a high-pressure flow inside the pipeline. This suggests design principles for developing improved wax and by the temperature gradient between the outside cold temperature and that inside the pipeline. The wax deposit causesWax Inhibition by Comb-like Polymers: Support of the Incorporation-Perturbation Mechanism from

Goddard III, William A.

146

Contaminants in Used Lubricating Oils and Their Fate during Distillation/Hydrotreatment Re-Refining  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Contaminants in Used Lubricating Oils and Their Fate during Distillation/Hydrotreatment Re-Refining ...

Dennis W. Brinkman; John R. Dickson

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

FY 2012 Progress Report for Fuel & Lubricant Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

911 911 Fuels & Lubricant Technologies VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE 2012 annual progress report U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 FY 2012 PROGRESS REPORT FOR FUEL & LUBRICANT TECHNOLOGIES Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Vehicle Technologies Office Approved by Kevin Stork Team Leader, Fuel & Lubricant Technologies Vehicle Technologies Office June 2013 DOE/EE-0911 Acknowledgement We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Alliance Technical Services, Inc. and Oak Ridge National Laboratory for their technical and artistic contributions in preparing and publishing this report.

148

Manufacture of naphthenic type lubricating oils  

SciTech Connect

A process for making naphthenic type lubricating oils from a low viscosity waxy crude which comprises distilling said low viscosity waxy crude to 500 to 650/sup 0/F. At atmospheric pressure to separate distillable fractions therefrom, subjecting the residue to a vacuum distillation at about 25 to about 125 mm Hg absolute pressure to obtain one or more gas oil fractions, optionally hydrotreating said gas oil fractions in the presence of a Ni/Mo catalyst at 550 to 650/sup 0/F, 0.25 to 1.0 lhsv, and 700-1500 psig, and catalytically dewaxing said distillates in the presence of a H+ form mordenite catalyst containing a group VI or group VIII metal at 550 to 750/sup 0/F, 500 to 1500 psig and 0.25 to 5.0 lhsv, to obtain said naphthenic type oils having pour points of from about -60 to +20/sup 0/F.

Reynolds, R.W.

1981-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

149

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Chemistry Laboratory.

Not Available

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

An experimental design approach for investigating the effects of operating factors on the wax deposition in pipelines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental study is conducted to determine the wax deposition potential of three waxy crude oils during laminar flow in a pipeline system. The Taguchi experimental design approach is used to evaluate the influence of important operating factors such as inlet crude oil temperature, temperature difference between the oil and the pipe wall (?T), the flow rate of crude oil, wax content and time on wax deposition phenomena. It is found that the parameter ?T and flow rate have maximum and minimum percentage of contribution on the amount of deposited wax, respectively. The results demonstrate that a waxy crude oil with higher wax content could lead the more deposited solid wax in transportation lines. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis showed that wax appearance temperature (WAT) and solid content of the deposit were increased as deposition time increased.

Reza Valinejad; Ali R. Solaimany Nazar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Development and application of a lubricant composition model to study effects of oil transport, vaporization, fuel dilution, and soot contamination on lubricant rheology and engine friction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engine oil lubricants play a critical role in controlling mechanical friction in internal combustion engines by reducing metal-on-metal contact. This implies the importance of understanding lubricant optimization at the ...

Gu, Grace Xiang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Ionic Liquids as Multifunctional Ashless Additives for Engine Lubrication  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A group of oil-miscible ionic liquids has been developed by an ORNL-GM team as candidate lubricant additives with promising physical/chemical properties and potential multiple functionalities.

153

Choline for neutralizing naphthenic acid in fuel and lubricating oils  

SciTech Connect

A method is described of neutralizing at least a portion of the naphthenic acids present in fuel and lubricating oils which contain naphthenic acids which comprises treating these oils with a neutralizing amount of choline.

Ries, D.G.; Roof, G.L.

1986-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Notes 01. The fundamental assumptions and equations of lubrication theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental assumption in Lubrication Theory. Derivation of thin film flow equations from Navier-Stokes equations. Importance of fluid inertia effects in thin film flows. Some fluid physical properties...

San Andres, Luis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Flying Height Drop Due to Air Entrapment in Lubricant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, it is found experimentally that the flying height of an air bearing slider is influenced by the lubricant on the disk. It is explained as the air molecules ... in air bearing force, and hence, the flying

Wei Hua; Kang Kee Ng; Shengkai Yu; Bo Liu; Vivian Ng

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Influence of boric acid additive size on green lubricant performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...towards green manufacturing processes, there...boric acid powder additives with canola oil...change present manufacturing process lines...powder-based lubricant additives As conceptually...of boric acid additive size on green...towards green manufacturing processes, there...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Chapter Five The Classification and Applications of Liquid Lubricants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the classification and applications of liquid lubricants. As a result of technical developments, currently many types of lubricating oils and special fluids exist. The technical needs are expressed in various commercial criteria used for oil classification. The type of equipment, and its component parts, defines the basis of the oil classification; the operating conditions of the lubricated part provide other important criteria needed to define the characteristics required in the oil. The main oil classifications in terms of equipment are into engine oils, turbine oil, steam turbine oils, etc. Oils for various parts of the equipment include bearing oils, transmission oils, hydraulic oils, etc. Another classification system deals with the special requirements of certain industrial sectors. Thus, for example, textile oils, electrical insulating oils, quenching oils and oils for application in radioactive environments are specially manufactured and classified. Two-stroke gasoline engines used for powering four- and two-wheeled road vehicles, small boats, mowers, etc., can be classified in the context of lubrication under two groups: (1) engines with conventional lubrication systems and (2) engines with separate lubrication systems.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Prediction for wax deposition in oil pipelines validated by field pigging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The deposition of wax in oil pipelines presents a costly production and transportation problem. The deposited wax is removed periodically by pigging operation in field. In this study, in order to understand this problem and address it, a series of wax deposition experiments involved the sloughing effect was performed in the laboratory flow loop, and a model was established to predict the wax deposition distribution along the pipeline. These results were used to implement a pigging program. In addition, a practical experimental method by testing the viscosity of deposit-in-oil slurry ahead of the pig was specially designed to measure the volume of deposit during pigging in actual field. The model predictions agreed with the field measured results excellently with a relative error being ?10.9%. Of more importance, some pigging issues are discussed in combination with the data from the laboratory simulations and field pigging operation.

Wenda Wang; Qiyu Huang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Flow behaviour of water-in-oil emulsions stabilized by wax crystals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The large temperature gradients experienced by crude oil emulsions in pipelines found in colder environments can lead to the precipitation, deposition and build-up of wax-like… (more)

Aafaqi, Roomana

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Method for maximizing the pumpability efficiency of a hydrocarbon slurry by controlling the wax crystal content  

SciTech Connect

The efficiency of pumping a hydrocarbon slurry in a pipeline is determined prior to transportation by the relationship: delta P AEBX wherein delta P is the pressure drop expected to be experienced by the slurry in the pipeline in pounds per square inch (psi), ''A'' and ''B'' are constants relating to the size of the pipeline, the flow rate of the slurry and the hydrodynamic volume of the wax crystals, and ''X'' is the wax crystal content in the slurry from the congealed particles in percentage by weight. The wax crystal content of the slurry is measured, such as by nuclear magnetic resonance and/or differential scanning calorimetry, and is used in conjunction with the constants ''A'' and ''B'' to determine the expected pressure drop of the slurry in a particular pipeline. The wax crystal content of the slurry may then be modified, if necessary, to obtain desirable or optimum slurry pumpability conditions for the pipeline.

Tackett, J.E.

1982-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Formation and Growth of Wax Deposit in the Pipelining of Crude Oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work presents a model for the turbulent flow of a waxy crude oil in a pipeline, in which deposition is taken into account ... of heavy molecular weight compounds, usually called waxes. When a sufficiently lo...

S. Correra; D. Merino-Garcia; A. Fasano…

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The MYB96 Transcription Factor Regulates Cuticular Wax Biosynthesis under Drought Conditions in Arabidopsis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...lines indicate unidentified enzymes and processes, respectively. FAE, fatty acid elongation...biosynthesis and cuticular wax accumulation are interrelated or not. SA biosynthesis may be induced...the mutant. Alternatively, the two processes may be independently regulated by MYB96...

Pil Joon Seo; Saet Buyl Lee; Mi Chung Suh; Mi-Jeong Park; Young Sam Go; Chung-Mo Park

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

163

Molten wax as a dust control agent for demolition of facilities  

SciTech Connect

Molten wax shows considerable promise as a fixative and dust control agent in demolition of radioactively contaminated facilities. Sticky molten wax, modified with special surfactants and wetting agents, is capable of not only coating materials but also penetrating into friable or dusty materials and making them incapable of becoming airborne during demolition. Wax also shows significant promise for stabilization of waste residuals that may be contained in buildings undergoing demolition. Some of the building materials that have been tested to date include concrete, wood, sheet rock, fiber insulation, lime, rock, and paper. Protective clothing, clay, sand, sulfur, and bentonite clay have been tested as surrogates for certain waste materials that may be encountered during building demolition. The paper describes several potential applications of molten wax for dust control in demolition of radioactive contaminated facilities. As a case-study, this paper describes a research test performed for a pipeline closure project being completed by the Idaho Cleanup Project at the Idaho National Laboratory. The project plans to excavate and remove a section of buried Duriron drain piping containing highly radioactive and friable and 'flighty' waste residuals. A full-scale pipeline mockup containing simulated waste was buried in sand to simulate the direct buried subsurface condition of the subject piping. The pipeline was pre-heated by drawing hot air through the line with a HEPA vacuum blower unit. Molten wax was pumped into the line and allowed to cool. The line was then broken apart in various places to evaluate the permeation performance of the wax. The wax fully permeated all the surrogate materials rendering them non-friable with a consistency similar to modeling clay. Based on the performance during the mockup, it is anticipated that the wax will be highly effective in controlling the spread of radiological contamination during pipe demolition activities. (authors)

Carter, E.E. [Carter Technologies Co, Sugar Land, TX (United States); Welty, B.D. [Portage, Inc, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A new thermodynamic model to predict wax deposition from crude oils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrocarbons 5 Comparison of Experimental and Predicted Onset Temperatures using this Model at 1 Atm. 30 31 37 6 Component Data for Oil Mixture l. 7 Characterization for Oil Mixture l. 8 Characterization for Oil Mixture 2. 9 Characterization for Oil... for Flash Calculations . . 34 4 Variation of Onset Temperature with Pressure for Oil Mixture l. . . 5 Variation of Onset Temperature with Pressure for Oil Mixture 2 . . 51 52 6 Wax Precipitation Curves for Oil Mixture 1 at 1 Atm. . . 7 Wax...

Loganathan, Narayanan

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Prediction of wax buildup in 24 inch cold, deep sea oil loading line  

SciTech Connect

When designing pipelines for cold environments, it is important to know how to predict potential problems due to wax deposition on the pipeline's inner surface. The goal of this work was to determine the rate of wax buildup and the maximum, equlibrium wax thickness for a North Sea field loading line. The experimental techniques and results used to evaluate the waxing potential of the crude oil (B) are described. Also, the theoretic model which was used for predicting the maximum wax deposit thickness in the crude oil (B) loading pipeline at controlled temperatures of 40 F (4.4 C) and 100 F (38 C), is illustrated. Included is a recommendation of a procedure for using hot oil at the end of a tanker loading period in order to dewax the crude oil (B) line. This technique would give maximum heating of the pipeline and should be followed by shutting the hot oil into the pipeline at the end of the loading cycle which will provide a hot oil soaking to help soften existing wax. 14 references.

Asperger, R.G.; Sattler, R.E.; Tolonen, W.J.; Pitchford, A.C.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Rotary seal with enhanced lubrication and contaminant flushing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A resilient, ring shaped interference-type hydrodynamic rotary seal having waves on the lubricant side which provide increased film thickness and flushing action by creating contact pressure induced angulated restrictions formed by abrupt restrictive diverters. The angulated restrictions are defined by projecting ridges, corners at the trailing edge of the waves, or simply by use of a converging shape at the trailing edge of the waves which is more abrupt than the gently converging hydrodynamic inlet shape at the leading edge of the waves. The abrupt restrictive diverter performs two functions; a restricting function and a diverting function. The angulated restrictions cause a local film thickness restriction which produces a damming effect preventing a portion of the lubricant from leaking out of the dynamic sealing interface at the trailing edge of the wave, and results in a much thicker lubricant film thickness under the waves. This contributes to more film thickness in the remainder of the dynamic sealing interface toward the environment because film thickness tends to decay gradually rather than abruptly due to the relative stiffness of the seal material. Because of the angle of the abrupt restrictive diverter relative to the relative rotation direction, in conjunction with the restriction or damming effect, a strong diverting action is produced which pumps lubricant across the dynamic sealing interface toward the environment. The lubricant diversion is caused by the component of the rotational velocity tangent to the abrupt restrictive diverter. The component of rotational velocity normal to the abrupt restrictive diverter causes a portion of the lubricant film to be pumped past the abrupt restrictive diverter, thereby assuring adequate lubrication thereof.

Dietle, Lannie L. (Sugar Land, TX)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Performance of MOV Stem Lubricants at Elevated Temperatures  

SciTech Connect

This paper documents the results of recent tests sponsored by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and performed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These tests address the effectiveness of the lubricant used on the threaded portion of the valve stem, where the stem nut turns on the stem. Recent testing indicates that an elevated temperature environment can lead to significant increases in the friction coefficient at the stem/stem-nut interface. Most valve actuator qualification tests are performed at room temperature. Similarly, in-service tests are run at ambient plant temperatures, usually 70 to 100°F. Since design conditions can lead to valve operating temperatures in the 200 to 300°F range, it is important to know whether a temperature-induced increase in friction at the stem/stem-nut interface will prevent the required operation of critical valves. Lubricant aging is another phenomenon that might have deleterious effects on the thrust output of a valve actuator. Laboratory experience and field experience both indicate that after long periods in elevated temperature environments, the lubricants may lose their lubrication qualities. The scope of the current test program includes testing of five different lubricants on four different valve stems. Pending completion of the testing, results of the tests conducted using two of the four stems are discussed. The test series included collection of baseline data at room temperature, single step temperature tests where the temperature of the test setup was elevated directly to 250°F, and step testing where the temperature was elevated in steps to 130, 190, and 250°F, then returned to 70°F. All greases tested showed evidence of physical change after elevated temperature tests. Except for one particular lubricant, all of the greases tested showed increased coefficients of friction at elevated temperatures. Numerous other preliminary conclusions are presented. Recommendations for future research in the area of aged valve stem lubricant performance at elevated temperatures are also presented.

DeWall, Kevin George; Nitzel, Michael Everett; Watkins, John Clifford

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Investigating the Effect of Engine Lubricant Viscosity on Engine Friction and Fuel Economy of a Diesel Engine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fuel economy is affected, both by fuel and engine lubricant quality. Engine lubricant quality plays a vital role in reduction of fuel consumption by effective… (more)

Singh, Devendra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

In situ control of lubricant properties for reduction of power cylinder friction through thermal barrier coating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lowering lubricant viscosity to reduce friction generally carries a side effect of increased metal-metal contact in mixed or boundary lubrication, for example near top ring reversal along the engine cylinder liner. A ...

Molewyk, Mark Allen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Reducing Lubricant Ash Impact on Exhaust Aftertreatment with a Oil Conditioning Filter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Under the test conditions used in this study, the strong base filter had a significant and beneficial effect on the rate of oil degradation. The strong base filter reduced lubricant acidity by absorbing acidic contaminants in the lubricant

171

Thickness Change in Molecularly Thin Lubricant Under Flying Head in Hard Disk Drives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In hard disk drives (HDDs), lubricants on disks are very important material to reduce head and disk wear. Thus, it is necessary to ... thickness to keep lubricant thickness constant on rotating disks. For this pu...

K. Yanagisawa; T. Watanabe; Y. Kawakubo; M. Yoshino

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

The Extraction?Flocculation Re-refining Lubricating Oil Process Using Ternary Organic Solvents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Extraction?Flocculation Re-refining Lubricating Oil Process Using Ternary Organic Solvents ... Res., 1997, 36 (9), ... Waste lubricating oils may be re-refined with organic solvents that dissolve base oil and segregate the additives and solid particles. ...

J. P. Martins

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

173

Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design Superhard and low-friction coatings and surface...

174

Effects of Fuel Dilution with Biodiesel on Lubricant Acidity, Oxidation and Corrosion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In-cylinder fuel injection to produce rich exhaust for regeneration of lean NOx trap catalyst and diesel particulate filter results in substantial fuel dilution of lubricating oil cause changes of lubricating oil properties and scuffing of engine components.

175

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Fuel & Lubricant Technologies subprogram supports fuels and lubricants research and development (R&D) to provide vehicle users with cost-competitive options that enable high fuel economy with low emissions, and contribute to petroleum displacement.

176

Properties of carbon overcoats and perfluoro-polyether lubricants in hard disk drives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interactions of perfluoropolyether lubricants with magnetichydroxyl-terminated perfluoropolyether liquid films on theand R.L. Siemens, "Perfluoropolyether characterization by

Brunner, Ralf

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

11 - Environmental life-cycle assessment (LCA) of lubricants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Lubricants impact on the environment from raw material extraction to manufacturing, usage and disposal or reuse. Life-cycle assessment (LCA) is utilised for evaluation of the environmental impacts of energy and material flows throughout the product life. Several comprehensive \\{LCAs\\} have compared mineral oil-based and bio-based lubricants, reporting varying conclusions. Environmental savings of biolubricants are more apparent at a local level than at a global scale. Negative impacts mainly stem from their agricultural production and performance in the use phase. \\{LCAs\\} should be used in industrial product design of biolubricants. Sustainable development indicators also consider the socio-economic impact of a product. Optimised lubricants determine significant energy savings.

Jan C.J. Bart; Emanuele Gucciardi; Stefano Cavallaro

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Adhesion, Lubrication, and Wear on the Atomic Scale James B. Adams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adhesion, Lubrication, and Wear on the Atomic Scale James B. Adams Dept. of Chemical and Materials, lubrication and wear) of tribology on the atomic Scale with a focus on our group's work on Aluminum. Adhesion to control friction and wear in bulk metal processes, lubricant boundary additives are added to bind

Adams, James B

179

ME 379M Lubrication, Wear, and Bearing Technology ABET EC2000 syllabus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ME 379M � Lubrication, Wear, and Bearing Technology Page 1 ABET EC2000 syllabus ME 379M � Lubrication, Wear, and Bearing Technology Spring 2010 Required or Elective: Elective 2008-2010 Catalog Data: Topics may vary: Lubrication, Wear, and Bearing Technology Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Major

Ben-Yakar, Adela

180

Load expansion of naphtha multiple premixed compression ignition (MPCI) and comparison with partially premixed compression ignition (PPCI) and conventional diesel combustion (CDC)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In previous studies, multiple premixed compression ignition (MPCI) has been proposed as a novel combustion concept in gasoline compression ignition engines which has great potential to achieve high thermal efficiency and low emissions simultaneously. MPCI mode was realized by a sequence of “spray–combustion–spray–combustion” around the compression top dead center (TDC). This study is aimed for the high load expansion of naphtha MPCI. In addition, the study investigated advantages and disadvantages of MPCI compared with partially premixed compression ignition (PPCI) and conventional diesel combustion (CDC). Engine operating range successfully reached indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) of 1.4 MPa with high thermal efficiency, low emissions and acceptable combustion noise by the optimization of the injection parameters and the intake management. For MPCI, earlier combustion phasing was possible even at the high load operation compared with PPCI and CDC. This was attributed to the separated heat release characteristics and pressure rise rate process. The divided pressure rise rate process caused considerably low maximum pressure rise rate (MPRR) characteristics such as 0.8 MPa/deg at IMEP 1.4 MPa condition. The earlier combustion phasing led to the higher thermal efficiency characteristics of MPCI combustion compared with PPCI and CDC. This was attributed to the lower exhaust heat loss characteristics. However, high level of hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions with low combustion stability at the low load operation were considered as severe challenges to overcome.

Kihyun Kim; Zhi Wang; Buyu Wang; Shijin Shuai; Hongqiang Yang; Choongsik Bae

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Wax formation assessment of condensate in South Pars gas processing plant sea pipeline (a case study)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The wax deposition from the gas condensate in South Pars gas processing plant causes a number of severe problems. These problems include: (1) deposits form on the reboiler tubes of stabilizer column and tend to reduce its duty (2) forcing periodic shut-down and removal of deposits (3) interrupting normal processing operations. An understanding of deposition, nature and propensity is necessary to mitigate the mentioned problems. In this work, the multi solid phase model is used to predict the wax precipitation from gas condensate fluid. For five different reservoir fluids, several methods were investigated to split the heavy hydrocarbon fraction into pseudo fractions. The results show that the Al-Meshari method is the most accurate one. Also, a set of consistent correlations were used to calculate the critical points, fusion properties and the acentric factor of the single carbon number groups in the extended composition. Finally the best methods for predicting the wax formation are selected and used to predict the wax formation in the sea line of South Pars gas processing plant. The modeling shows that wax precipitation starts at 293 K and 86 bar. At this pressure and temperature the pipeline is 94 km away from the wellhead.

M.R. Rahimpour; M. Davoudi; S.M. Jokar; I. Khoramdel; A. Shariati; M.R. Dehnavi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Pressure and composition effect on wax precipitation: Experimental data and model results  

SciTech Connect

Wax precipitation is often studied using the stock tank oil. However, precipitation may be very different in well tubing and production facilities due to the effects of pressure and composition. As an example, the cloudpoint temperature may decrease as much as 15 K from atmospheric pressure to the saturation pressure of 100 bar mostly due to the dissolution of light gases into the oil (i.e. due to composition changes). It is also often assumed that the addition of solvents such as C{sub 5} and C{sub 6} decreases the cloudpoint temperature. On the contrary, from our modeling results, we have found that the mixing of a crude with a solvent increases the cloudpoint temperature (i.e., enhances the wax precipitation). In this study, the cloudpoint temperature at live oil conditions and the amount of the precipitated wax at stock tank oil conditions are provided for three crudes. A modified multisolid wax precipitation model is used to study the effects of pressure and composition on wax precipitation. The modeling results reveal that an increase in methane and CO{sub 2} concentration decreases the cloudpoint temperature while an increase in C{sub 5} concentration increases the cloud point temperature.

Pan, H.; Firoozabadi, A.; Fotland, P.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Midwest (PADD 2) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

184

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional Gasoline Blend. Comp. Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

185

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from All Countries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

186

Net Imports of Total Crude Oil and Products into the U.S. by Country  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Conventional Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reformulated Gasoline Blend. Comp. Conventional Gasoline Blend. Comp. MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

187

Refinery Yield of Liquefied Refinery Gases  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Yield Refinery Yield (Percent) Product: Liquefied Refinery Gases Finished Motor Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 5.3 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.1 3.9 1993-2013 PADD 1 4.4 5.1 4.9 4.9 4.6 2.1 1993-2013 East Coast 4.4 5.3 5.1 5.1 4.9 2.2 1993-2013

188

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Diesel Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

189

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional Gasoline Blend. Comp. Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

190

Midwest (PADD 2) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Diesel Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

191

East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Diesel Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

192

An examination of additive-mediated wax nucleation in oil pipeline environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As part of a wider study probing the molecular-scale factors important in controlling wax crystallisation processes, the effect of additives on the surface and bulk nucleation of wax crystals from hydrocarbon solution phases was examined. Bulk nucleation data obtained in the absence and presence of two growth inhibiting additives indicated an increase in the meta-stable zone width (MSZW) on addition of both inhibitors, and differences in their kinetics of inhibition. Complementary studies of surface nucleation using a pipe blocking apparatus revealed a lowering in the temperature at which blockage occurred on addition of inhibitor to the model oil, and existence of fractional crystallisation observed in the bulk phase was confirmed. The hydrodynamic dependence of the nucleation process provided added information on how the inhibitors and wax would perform in a field situation, with a strong dependence on shear rate.

A.J Hennessy; A Neville; K.J Roberts

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Prediction and inhibition of hydrate and wax formation. Annual report, January-December 1991  

SciTech Connect

The first objective of the research project is to quantify and explain kinetics of co-precipitation of natural gas hydrates and wax. The second objective is to find means for inhibiting the rate of formation of natural gas hydrates, and the rate of natural gas/wax co-precipitation. During the first contract year, a method for measuring the rate of formation of natural gas hydrates was developed. This method has five advantages over other possible methods. First, it provides a defined surface area on which the hydrate nucleation and growth can proceed. Second, it minimizes the initial resistance to mass and heat transfer, thus maximizing sensitivity to kinetics. Third, it provides a way to test the effect of a variety of solid surfaces on hydrate formation. Fourth, it requires a low-cost apparatus with low operational cost. Fifth, it can be applied with little modification to the scheduled studies of kinetic inhibition and hydrate/wax-co-precipitation.

Sloan, E.D.; Christiansen, R.L.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Printed wax masks for 254 nm deep-UV pattering of PMMA-based microfluidics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports a new technique for masking deep-UV exposure of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) using a printed wax mask. This technique provides an inexpensive and bulk fabrication method for PMMA structures. The technique involves the direct printing of the mask onto a polymer sheet using a commercial wax printer. The wax layer was then transferred to a PMMA substrate using a thermal laminator, exposed using deep-UV (with a wavelength of 254 nm), developed in an IPA:water solution, and completed by bonding on a PMMA cap layer. A sample microfluidic device fabricated with this method is also presented, with the microchannel as narrow as 50 µm. The whole process is easy to perform without the requirement for any microfabrication facilities.

Yiqiang Fan; Yang Liu; Huawei Li; Ian G Foulds

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Diesel engine lubrication with poor quality residual fuel  

SciTech Connect

The quality of marine residual fuel is declining. This is being caused by a gradual trend towards production of heavier crudes and increased residuum conversion processes in refineries to meet light product demand while holding down crude runs. Additionally, more stringent inland fuel sulfur regulations have caused the higher sulfur residues to be used for marine residual fuel blending. Engine manufacturers are making major efforts in design so that their engines can burn these fuels at high efficiency with minimum adverse effects. The oil industry is developing improved lubricants to reduce as much as possible the increased wear and deposit formation caused by these poor quality fuels. To guide the development of improved lubricants, knowledge is required about the impact of the main fuel characteristics on lubrication. This paper summarizes work conducted to assess the impact of fuel sulfur, Conradson carbon and asphaltenes on wear and deposit formation in engines representative of full scale crosshead diesel engines and medium speed trunk piston engines. Results obtained with improved lubricants in these engines are reviewed.

Van der Horst, G.W.; Hold, G.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Honeywell's high-performance lubricants boost PVC extrusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the recent International PVC Conference, held in Brighton, UK, Honeywell Specialty Materials presented new test results demonstrating the advantages offered to polyvinyl chloride (PVC) producers by its newest high-performance lubricants (HPLs). According to the company, the products make the extrusion process more efficient, helping producers ‘meet critical industry challenges’.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Use of Textured Surfaces to Mitigate Sliding Friction and Wear of Lubricated and Non-Lubricated Contacts  

SciTech Connect

If properly employed, the placement of three-dimensional feature patterns, also referred to as textures, on relatively-moving, load-bearing surfaces can be beneficial to their friction and wear characteristics. For example, geometric patterns can function as lubricant supply channels or depressions in which to trap debris. They can also alter lubricant flow in a manner that produces thicker load-bearing films locally. Considering the area occupied by solid areas and spaces, textures also change the load distribution on surfaces. At least ten different attributes of textures can be specified, and their combinations offer wide latitude in surface engineering. By employing directional machining and grinding procedures, texturing has been used on bearings and seals for well over a half century, and the size scales of texturing vary widely. This report summarizes past work on the texturing of load-bearing surfaces, including past research on laser surface dimpling of ceramics done at ORNL. Textured surfaces generally show most pronounced effects when they are used in conformal or nearly conformal contacts, like that in face seals. Combining textures with other forms of surface modification and lubrication methods can offer additional benefits in surface engineering for tribology. As the literature and past work at ORNL shows, texturing does not always provide benefits. Rather, the selected pattern and arrangement of features must be matched to characteristics of the proposed application, bearing materials, and lubricants.

Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Analysis of the Compositional Variation in the Epicuticular Wax Layer of Wheat (Triticum aestivum)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

treatment. By comparing the composition of lines from each treatment, abiotic stress associated changes in composition were identified. 1.2. Review of literature relevant to this dissertation 1.2.1. Role of the epicuticular wax layer The aerial surface...

Beecher, Francis Ward

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

199

Study of the mechanisms of wax prevention in a pipeline with glass inner layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mechanisms of wax prevention in a pipeline with a glass inner layer have been studied by simulating crude oil production by a pump well, and transport of crude oil and formation water in glass and steel tubes in a laboratory. It is clearly demonstrated that the water wetting property of glass and steel is the key factor in controlling the ability of wax to be deposited on the walls of glass and steel tubes. When the water content of crude oils A and B was more than 60%, the oils and formation water flowed as a plug and o/w emulsion, and a stable water film was formed between the oil and the wall of the glass tube. The film prevented the oil being deposited on the wall of the glass tube, consequently, the amount of wax deposited on the wall was reduced. The mechanisms of wax deposition on the wall of glass and steel tubes are molecular diffusion and shear dispersion.

Mingyuan Li; Jianguo Su; Zhaoliang Wu; Yaodong Yang; Shuling Ji

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Materials - Coatings & Lubricants - Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology ICAT brochure cover TRI - BOL*O*GY (N) -- the science and technology of friction, wear, and lubrication of interacting surfaces in relative motion. The Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology (ICAT) is a virtual center that brings together the skills and talents of multiple investigators and unique facilities from Argonne National Laboratory and three partnering universities to resolve critical friction, wear, and lubrication issues in biomedical implants, alternative energy technologies, and extreme environments. The Center's tribology experts work closely with industry, and with state and federal agencies through jointly funded research projects, to perform leading-edge research on the impact of materials, coatings, and fluids on

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201

Gas film lubrication equations for very small clearances  

SciTech Connect

In the hard disk magnetic recording technology, the slider carrying the magnetic elements is supported above the magnetic disk by a self-acting air bearing, which produces the load support. A lubricating film must support a required load with suitably small frictional energy losses and without introducing undesirable instabilities. Under submicron clearance conditions, gas film flow can not be described with continuum models since the molecular mean free path is not negligible compared with the clearance. Accurate results for the load-carrying capacity of gas films for arbitrary Knudsen number are very important since they strongly influence the design of the flying head slider and, consequently, the performance of the magnetic disk storage unit. Here we generalize the previous lubrication equations for arbitrary Knudsen number, accommodation coefficient and a small inclination of the slider relative to the magnetic disk surface.

Sobehart, J.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Reyna, L.G. [International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (United States). Thomas J. Watson Research Center

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

10 - Friction and lubrication in diesel engine system design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter addresses engine friction and lubrication dynamics modeling in diesel engine system design. It starts by introducing important fundamental principles of engine tribology and builds up a three-level system modeling approach of engine friction. The chapter summarizes the friction characteristics and friction-reduction design measures for both the overall engine system and individual subsystems such as the piston assembly, the piston rings, the bearings, and the valvetrain.

Qianfan Xin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A novel system to study wear, friction, and lubricants  

SciTech Connect

A novel enclosed (pressurized) multispecimen wear testing system was design and built to allow the fully computerized on-line measurement and control of friction, wear, and lubricants of different materials (metals, ceramics, composites, and plastics). This system is described in detail. The tribological parameters can be adjusted and controlled to reproduce the actual conditions that prevail in machine components. Several examples of the capabilities of the system are presented.

Maamouri, M.; Masson, J.F.; Marchand, N.J. (Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. de Metallurgie et de Genie des Materiaux)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Process for reforming naphthene and paraffin-containing hydrocarbons in the naphtha boiling range and isomerizing C sub 5 -C sub 6 normal paraffin feedstock to produce a high octane gasoline  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for reforming a naphthenic and paraffin-containing hydrocarbon feedstock to produce a reformate product having an increased octane rating by contacting the feedstock with a reforming catalyst in the presence of hydrogen at reforming conditions in a reforming zone, the reforming zone including a naphtha dehydrogenation zone and a paraffin dehydrocyclization zone wherein heated, pressurized hydrogen is added to the effluent stream from the naphtha dehydrogenation zone prior to charging the effluent stream to the paraffin dehydrocyclization zone to produce a first product stream comprising a gasoline range reformate product having an RON octane rating of at least about 90 and hydrogen wherein the reformate product is separated from the hydrogen in a reformate separation zone. It comprises: charging at least a portion of the heated, pressurized hydrogen with a C{sub 5}-C{sub 6} n-paraffin feedstock to an isomerization zone containing an isomerization catalyst at isomerization conditions to produce a second product stream containing an isomerized C{sub 5}-C{sub 6} product and passing the second product stream to the reformate separation zone and recovering at least a major portion of the isomerized C{sub 5}-C{sub 6} product with the reformate product.

Dalson, M.H.

1990-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

205

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkane lubrication films Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that is mostly applicable... in tribology, the science of friction, lubrication, and wear within sliding and contacting interfaces. He uses... between sliding surfaces in...

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - actively lubricated bearings Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: to operation of bearings and splines include wear, fatigue, lubrication, and heat dissipation. Mechanical... shafts that are lined along the length of the engine. Both...

207

Tribological Behaviors of Self-lubricating Coating Prepared by Electrospark Deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cu/h-BN self-lubricating coating was prepared on AISI1045 steel by electrospark deposition. The friction coefficient and wear rates were...

Tongkun Cao; Zhijian Xiao

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Investigation into the Interactions between thermal management, lubrication and control systems of a diesel engine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Engine thermal and lubricant systems have only recently been a serious focus in engine design and in general remain under passive control. The introduction of… (more)

Burke, Richard D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Solid/liquid lubrication of ceramics at elevated temperatures  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates the effect of solid and liquid lubrication on friction and wear performance of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) and cast iron. The solid lubricant was a thin silver film ({approx}2 {mu}m thick) produced on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} by ion-beam-assisted deposition. A high-temperature polyol-ester-base synthetic oil served as the liquid lubricant. Friction and wear tests were performed with pin-on-disk and oscillating-slider wear test machines at temperatures up to 300{degrees}C. Without the silver films, the friction coefficients of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} test pairs were 0.05 to 0.14, and the average wear rates of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} pins were {approx}5 x 10{sup -8} mm{sup 3} N{sup -1}. The friction coefficients of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/cast iron test pairs ranged from 0.08 to 0.11, depending on test temperature. The average specific wear rates of cast iron pins were {approx}3 x 10{sup -7} mm{sup 3} N{sup -1} m{sup -1}. However, simultaneous use of the solid-lubricant silver and synthetic oil on the sliding surfaces reduced friction coefficients to 0.02 to 0.08. Moreover, the wear of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} pins and silver-coated Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} disks was so low that it was difficult to assess by a surface profilometer. The wear rates of cast iron pins were {approx}7 x 10{sup -9} mm{sup 3} N{sup -1} m{sup -1} up to 250{degrees}C, but showed a tendency to increase slightly at much higher temperatures. In general, the test results demonstrated that the solid/liquid lubrication of ceramic and/or metallic components is both feasible and effective in controlling friction and wear.

Erdemir, A.; Erck, R.A.; Fenske, G.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hong, H. [Lubrizol Corp., Wickliffe, OH (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Application of the Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer to the Investigation of Wax Deposition in Subsea Pipelines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The doctoral study focuses on the development of a rigorous understanding of wax deposition using the fundamentals of heat and mass transfer. First, a state-of-the-art… (more)

Huang, Zhenyu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Evaluation of Wax Deposition and its Control during Production of Alaska North Slope Oils  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-01NT41248 Evaluation of Wax Deposition and Its Control During Production of Alaska North Slope Oils Petroleum Development Laboratory Institute of Northern Engineering University of Alaska Fairbanks P.O. Box 755880 Fairbanks, Alaska 99775-5880 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory December 2008 Office of Fossil Energy Evaluation of Wax Deposition and Its Control During Production of Alaskan North Slope Oils Final Report Reporting Period: October 1, 2005-September 30, 2008 Principal Investigator: Tao Zhu University of Alaska Fairbanks P.O. Box 755880 Fairbanks, AK 99775-5880 fftz@uaf.edu, 907-474-5141 External Principal Investigator: Jack A. Walker

212

Removal of wool wax, nonylphenol ethoxylates and pesticide residues from wool scour effluent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aqueous scouring of raw wool produces a highly polluting effluent that primarily contains emulsified wool wax, together with high levels of nonionic detergents and trace levels of various agricultural pesticides. The SIROLAN CF chemical flocculation process transferred over 95% of the wool wax and detergent and greater than 98% of the pesticide residues from the wastewater stream to a spadeable sludge that was used as a starting material to produce a high quality compost. During the composting process the nonionic detergents and organophosphorus pesticide residues were degraded to below detectable levels while the pyrethroid pesticides, cypermethrin and cyhalothrin, together with the organochlorine pesticide, lindane were degraded to below 15% of their initial levels.

F.William Jones; David J Westmoreland

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax from Catalyst by Supercritical Extraction  

SciTech Connect

The proposed process of using supercritical fluid extraction in conjunction with the Fischer-Tropsch slurry bubble column reactor has been examined using the ASPEN Plus simulator by the research group at North Carolina State University. Qualitative results have been obtained for varying the following process parameters: solvent-to-wax ratio, solvent type (pentane or hexane), extraction temperature and pressure, and recovery unit temperature and pressure. The region of retrograde behavior was determined for pentane and hexane. Initial results show hexane to be the superior solvent; compared to pentane, hexane requires lower quantities of solvent makeup (the amount of solvent which needs to be added to account for solvent that cannot be recycled), and also results in a lower average molecular weight of slurry in the reactor. Studies indicate that increasing the extraction temperature, extraction pressure, recovery temperature, or solvent to wax ratio decreases the amount solvent makeup required. Decreasing the recovery pressure was found to decrease the makeup flowrate.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C.

1997-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Determining Genetic Overlap between Staygreen, Leaf Wax and Canopy Temperature Depression in Sorghum RILs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to clock the 9 billion mark by the year 2050(FAOSTAT, 2007). Clearly, making agriculture sustainable requires a major reduction in water demand by crops for food, bioenergy and feed. Enhanced manipulation and selection for drought resistance therefore... for wax analysis were taken at 50% flowering observed independently in each row. The 100 RILs were dry planted with three plants in two replications in 12 inch diameter pots filled with ?Metromix? forest soil mixture. Watering occurred 1 day after...

Awika, Henry

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

215

SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES  

SciTech Connect

In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was continued to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. The shakedown phase of the pilot-scale filtration platform was completed at the end of the last reporting period. A study of various molecular weight waxes was initiated to determine the effect of wax physical properties on the permeation rate without catalyst present. As expected, the permeation flux was inversely proportional to the nominal average molecular weight of the polyethylene wax. Even without catalyst particles present in the filtrate, the filtration membranes experience fouling during an induction period on the order of days on-line. Another long-term filtration test was initiated using a batch of iron catalyst that was previously activated with CO to form iron carbide in a separate continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system. The permeation flux stabilized more rapidly than that experienced with unactivated catalyst tests.

James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

216

Physical and Chemical Impact of Sulphuric Acid on Cylinder Lubrication for Large 2-Stroke Marine Diesel Engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of sulphuric acid, H2SO4..., on the physical and chemical behaviour of marine Diesel engine lubricant base oils was investigated. To understand...2SO4 with the lubricant film, the saturated hydrocar...

Falko A. Sautermeister; Martin Priest

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Lubricant oil consumption effects on diesel exhaust ash emissions using a sulfur dioxide trace technique and thermogravimetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed experimental study was conducted targeting lubricant consumption effects on ,diesel exhaust ash levels using a model year 2002 5.9L diesel engine, high and low Sulfur commercial lubricants, and clean diesel ...

Plumley, Michael J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Wear 260 (2006) 12951304 On the friction and wear performance of boric acid lubricant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wear 260 (2006) 1295­1304 On the friction and wear performance of boric acid lubricant combinations a Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, 323 Benedum hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA b Abstract Lubrication is critical for minimizing wear in mechanical systems that operate for extended time

Sawyer, Wallace

219

Department of Industrial Engineering Spring 2013 Lubricant Performance in the Machining of Austempered Ductile Iron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis for tool wear and surface finish using Excel charts, and Minitab Box-Cox Transformations were done for machining ADI where minimum flank wear for tool inserts is the primary concern The type of lubrication does average values of surface roughness than the dry run, but the differences between the three lubricants

Demirel, Melik C.

220

Spring-supported thrust bearings used in hydroelectric generators: Limit ofhydrodynamic lubrication  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fluid film breakdown in large spring-supported thrust bearings was examined experimentally for low rotor speeds. Under these conditions, the lubrication was hydrodynamic rather than thermohydrodynamic and thus, the limit of hydrodynamic lubrication was sought. A thrust bearing test facility was used to test three bearings with various loads, speeds, and lubricant viscosities. Power loss and oil temperatures were measured and, using elementary theory, these measured quantities were linked to friction and average fluid film thickness in the bearing. A dimensionless performance number was developed and correlated with the coefficient of friction based on the power loss measurements. The breakdown of fluid film lubrication at the limit of hydrodynamic lubrication was established for an average performance number. The accuracy of the experimental findings was explored by comparing the friction and film thickness calculated from the measurements with the predictions of a comprehensive software package. Some general agreement was obtained. The relationship between the lambda ratio and a modified performance number was also examined based on typical surface roughness measurements. Although the procedures developed did not provide a high level of precision, some clear insights were gained into the thrust bearing behaviour at the limit of hydrodynamic lubrication. In particular, a large spring-supported thrust bearing under a typical load with a common lubricant was shown to sustain predominantly hydrodynamic lubrication at rotational speeds as low as 10 rpm.

A.L. Brown; J.B. Medley; J.H. Ferguson

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Effect of sulfur on heavy duty diesel engine lubricants  

SciTech Connect

Diesel engine exhaust legislation has become quite onerous for heavy duty engines. Yet, these high thermal efficiency engines continue to meet lower exhaust particulate and NOx emissions limits, due to new engine designs and the complementary engine oil performance requirements of the API service categories. In addition, the EPA has mandated changes in on-highway diesel fuel to help meet particulate emissions regulations. On October 1, 1993, when the EPA outlawed high sulfur fuels for on-highway use, the development of the API CG-4 engine oil performance specification was already in progress. All the new diesel engine tests in the category were therefore designed to run with low (< 0.05% wt.) sulfur fuel. In some engine tests, this new fuel improved some lubricant performance characteristics and degraded others. An engine oil specification for low sulfur fuel brings new challenges to developing future specifications for diesel engine oils. Both higher and lower lubricant additive treat rate products, high performance single grade oils, and formulations to meet world-wide specifications become viable. This paper discusses the results of a diesel engine oil technology that performs well with the new, low sulfur fuel in both engine tests and in the field.

Hayden, T.E. [Texaco Fuels and Lubricants Research Dept., Beacon, NY (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Waste lubricating oil: an annotated review. 1982 revision  

SciTech Connect

Because of renewed interest in waste oil, both in terms of energy conservation and as a threat to the environment, there appears to be a need for a systemic compilation of information on the subject. This is a revision of the 1979 manuscript (BETC/IC-79/4) reflecting publications of the last three years as well as incorporation of papers that were overlooked. The number of citations has jumped from 486 to 1203, with all previous citations also listed here. The bibliography is divided into broad subject areas. The Introduction gives the history and development of the used oil reclamation industry. The General section includes the comprehensive papers that address several subjects and thus, give a capsulated overview of the used oil situation. Sources of Information and Statistical Treatments of Data tell how to obtain additional and future information and data relating to waste oil and could aid those persons interested in keeping their knowledge current. The Other Lubricating Oils section covers many of the lubricants that have the potential for recycling. The Other Oils section is divided into four sub-sections to aid the reader to find the subject of interest. The section on Related Subjects includes those sideline areas that could apply to used oil reclamation.

Cotton, F.O.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 47, NO. 7, JULY 2011 1849 Enhanced Photo-Thermal Stability of Modified PFPE Lubricants Under  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-type lubricants is of importance. Perfluoropolyethers (PFPEs) are widely used in hard disk drives due

Wang, Deli

224

Acoustic resonance determination of the effect of light hydrocarbons on wax appearance points in a Njord well fluid  

SciTech Connect

Wax formation and deposition in pipelines and process equipment pose severe problems for petroleum companies, especially during transportation of crude oil in offshore environments. The light hydrocarbons present in the crude oil can play an important role in the shift of wax appearance points by increasing the solubilities of the heavier components. The following work was undertaken to study the effect of light hydrocarbons on wax appearance points in a Njord well fluid for Norsk Hydro, Norway. An automated high-pressure spherical acoustic resonator (50.8-mm-diameter) assembly designed and fabricated for that purpose has been used to measure resonance frequencies in a Njord well fluid (stabilized oil sample) provided by Norsk Hydro and blended with the appropriate amount of a synthetically prepared gaseous mixture containing six light hydrocarbons (Cl to C6), at pressures from 2 to 107 bar and temperatures in the range 35 to 50{degrees}C. Results on the present method to locate the wax appearance points in the Njord well fluid are presented. A figure showing experimental wax appearance points as a function of pressure is presented. The results are compared with those predicted by the Norsk Hydro model.

Colgate, S.O.; Sivaraman, A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst by supercritical extraction. Quarterly report, July 1, 1996 - September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research projects is to evaluate the potential of SCF extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer- Tropsch (F-T) slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor into two fractions: (1) a catalyst-free wax containing less than 10 ppm particulate matter and (2) a concentrated catalyst slurry that is ready for recycle or regeneration. The wax will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e. 200-300{degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent. The success of the projects depends on two major factors. First, the supercritical solvent must be able to dissolve the F-T wax; furthermore, the must be accomplished without entraining the solid catalyst. Second, the extraction must be controlled so as not to favor the removal of the low molecular weight wax compounds, i.e., a constant carbon-number distribution of the alkanes in the wax slurry must be maintained at steady-state column operation. The project includes three tasks (1) equilibrium solubility measurements, (2) thermodynamic modeling, and (3) process design studies.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Sherrard, D.; Biales, J.; Kilpatrick, P.; Roberts, G. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Determination of wax deposition and corrosion in pipelines by neutron back diffusion collimation and neutron capture gamma rays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wax deposition in pipelines can be very costly for plant operation in oil industry. New techniques are needed for allocation and thickness determination of wax deposits. The timely removal of wax can make large saving in operational cost. Neutron back diffusion and neutron capture gamma rays were used in this study to measure paraffin, asphalt and polyethylene deposition thicknesses inside pipes and to enable simultaneous determination of scale and pipe corrosion. It was possible to determine a thickness change of less than one mm in 2 min. It was also possible to detect localized scale from a small region of the pipe of approximately 2 cm in diameter. Although experiments were performed in lab, the system can be made portable for field applications.

Samir Abdul-Majid

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Chemistry Laboratory.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst by supercritical fluid extraction. Technical progress report, January--March 1995  

SciTech Connect

Objective is to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer-Tropsch (F- T) slurry bubble column reactor into a wax and a concentrated catalyst slurry that is ready for recycle/regeneration. The automated apparatus was evaluated using a toluene-petroleum pitch system. The Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT) equation will be used to fit the VLE and LLE data for F-T wax-solvent systems; this equation was successful in predicting both phase compositions and average molecular weight distributions.

Thies, M.C.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Mechanism of degradation of wool wax in the anaerobic treatment of woolscouring wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results of the anaerobic digestion of a woolscouring wastewater treatment and some considerations about the anaerobic degradation mechanisms of wool wax, are presented. A 57 live anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) was operated with woolscouring effluent. When organic load varied from 3 to 5 kg COD/m3 d, COD and grease removal ranged from 40 to 55% and 50 to 65%, respectively. With centrifuged effluent, COD removal was 45% to 60%. A 300 m3 ABR was built and operated during two years based on the previous laboratory results. COD removal was between 45% to 18% with organic load of 3 to 10 kg COD/m3 d. With centrifuged effluent, COD efficiencies ranged between 72% and 47%. No inhibition by long chain fatty acids was observed. Considering the results of grease content determination and TLC analysis in both reactors, it could be assumed that wool wax is hydrolyzed forming sterols and free fatty acids and that free fatty acids are degraded while sterols are accumulated in the sludge.

Soledad Gutiérrez; Alberto Hernández; María Viñas

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Thermally insulated pipelines successfully move high-wax-content crude offshore Gabon  

SciTech Connect

Three thermally insulated pipelines have been installed at a water depth of 35 m (115 ft) in Shell Gabon's Lucina Marine field. The three lines consist of two 2-km (1.24-mile) long flowlines connecting drilling and production platforms and a 3.2 km (2 mile) long loading line connecting a production platform to a storage tanker permanently moored in the field. All three pipelines are of 10.75-in. OD with rigid polyurethane-foam insulation contained in a high-density polyethylene sleeve. The pipelines have been designed with an operating temperature of 90/degree/C. (194/degree/F.). Thermal insulation was chosen because of the Lucina crude's high wax cloud point of 55/degree/C. (131/degree/F.). Without insulation, cooling of the crude in subsea pipelines would have lead to rapid wax deposition. Details of the coating and insulation of the line and riser pipe are given. For the line pipe, a thermal-insulation system consisting of polyurethane foam (PUF) within a polyethylene (PE) sleeve pipe was chosen.

Hales, M.

1982-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

231

Low severity upgrading of F-T waxes with solid superacids  

SciTech Connect

We have previously reported the isomerization and hydrocracking of n-hexadecane and a n-C{sub 32} straight chain paraffin with a Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} catalyst at 170{degrees}C and 350 psig of hydrogen. This study has now been extended to the treatment of a Fisher-Tropsch wax with a carbon number range from C{sub 55}-C{sub 62}. The results reported in Table 1 show that the Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} catalyst is active for the isomerization and hydrocracking of this substrate. At an 88.6 wt% conversion level, an 86.1% selectivity to isoparaffins was achieved. The products consisted mainly of C{sub 4}-C{sub 9} and C{sub 10}-C{sub 14} fractions, suitable as gasoline and diesel fuels. A feed/catalyst ratio of 6:1 was used; there was no evidence of catalytic deactivation. The melted wax is viscous and there was a decrease in conversion with time, indicating that diffusion might be a limitation for chains of very high molecular weight.

Wender, I.; Tierney, J.W.

1992-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

232

SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX FROM CATALYST BY SUPERCRITICAL EXTRACTION  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project was to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction for the recovery and fractionation of the wax product from the slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor of the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. The wax, comprised mostly of branched and linear alkanes with a broad molecular weight distribution up to C{sub 100}, is to be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200-300 C. Aspen Plus{trademark} was used to perform process simulation studies on the proposed extraction process, with Redlich-Kwong-Soave (RKS) being used for the thermodynamic property model. In summary, we have made comprehensive VLE measurements for short alkane + long alkane systems over a wide range of pressures and temperatures, dramatically increasing the amount of high-quality data available for these simple, yet highly relevant systems. In addition, our work has demonstrated that, surprisingly, no current thermodynamic model can adequately predict VLE behavior for these systems. Thus, process simulations (such as those for our proposed SCF extraction process) that incorporate these systems can currently only give results that are qualitative at best. Although significant progress has been made in the past decade, more experimental and theoretical work remain to be done before the phase equilibria of asymmetric alkane mixtures can be predicted with confidence.

Patrick C. Joyce; Mark C. Thies

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Refinery Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Ether* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Reformulated Blended with Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil, 15 ppm and Under Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Less than 0.31 Percent Sulfur 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Greater than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Units: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

234

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Comp. Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Gasoline, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petro. Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

235

U.S. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propylene (Nonfuel Use) Normal Butane/Butylene Refinery Grade Butane Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Comp. Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Gasoline, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petro. Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products

236

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report describes the progress over the course of 2013 made on the research and development projects funded by the Fuel and Lubricants subprogram in the Vehicle Technologies Office.

237

High temperature solid lubricant materials for heavy duty and advanced heat engines  

SciTech Connect

Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature sterling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. The following paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis to heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

DellaCorte, C.; Wood, J.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Modeling the lubrication of the piston ring pack in internal combustion engines using the deterministic method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Piston ring packs are used in internal combustion engines to seal both the high pressure gas in the combustion chamber and the lubricant oil in the crank case. The interaction between the piston ring pack and the cylinder ...

Chen, Haijie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Rheological Modification of Lubricating Greases with Recycled Polymers from Different Plastics Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rheological Modification of Lubricating Greases with Recycled Polymers from Different Plastics Waste ... Tall, S.; Albertsson, A. C.; Karlsson, S. Recycling of Mixed Plastic Fractions: Mechanical Properties of Multicomponent Extruded Polyolefin Blends Using Response Surface Methodology J. Appl. ...

J. E. Martín-Alfonso; C. Valencia; M. C. Sánchez; J. M. Franco; C. Gallegos

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

240

Determination of properties of PVE lubricants with HFC refrigerants[PolyVinylEther  

SciTech Connect

Polyalkyleneglycol (PAG) and polyol ester (POE) have been developed as refrigeration lubricants, used with HFC134a. PAG is used for automotive air conditioning systems and POE is used for domestic reciprocating refrigerators and for A/C systems. Although PAG exhibits good lubricity performance, it is difficult to use for domestic reciprocating refrigerators due to its low dielectric property. POE is difficult to use for automotive A/C systems, due to hydrolysis and poor lubricity performance. Polyvinylether (PVE) can be used in place of PAG and POE with HFC refrigerants. PVE is used for A/C systems as well as refrigerator and freezer applications. PVE is an ideal lubricant for use with HFCs.

Kaneko, Masato; Sakanoue, Shuichi; Tazaki, Toshihiro; Tominaga, Shoichi; Takagi, Minoru; Goodin, M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Effects of Y_(2)O_(3) and ?-ZrP Additives on Lubrication of Grease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of novel additives in lubricants is a promising approach for high performance and energy saving devices. Those include automotive, marine, and wind turbines. In a wind turbine, the unplanned break-down rate of bearings caused by improper...

Kim, Chung Jwa

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

242

Few-Layer Graphene as a Dry Lubricant | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Few-Layer Graphene as a Dry Lubricant Technology available for licensing: Graphene layers act as a two-dimensional nanomaterial and form a conformal protective coating on sliding...

243

Determination of Wear Metals in Marine Lubricating Oils by Microwave Digestion and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?The difficulties associated with the development of a microwave-assisted acid digestion of lubricating oils in determination of wear metals are presented. The interest of this sample treatment lies in its bas...

Celestino Sanz-Segundo; María P. Hernández-Artiga…

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Effects of lubricant viscosity and surface texturing on ring-pack performance in internal combustion engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The piston ring-pack contributes approximately 25% of the mechanical losses in an internal combustion engine. Both lubricant viscosity and surface texturing were investigated in an effort to reduce this ring-pack friction ...

Takata, Rosalind (Rosalind Kazuko), 1978-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Impact of Lubricant on Emissions from a Medium-Duty Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

on Emissions from a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine The Impact of Lubricant on Emissions from a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: National Renewable Energy Lab...

246

E-Print Network 3.0 - applying controllable lubrication Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-align and mount to the hydrophilic trench binding sites with electric connections by heat curable lubricant oil... and well-controlled bonding of bulk PZTs for micro pumps with...

247

A tribological study of the interaction between surface micro texturing and viscoelastic lubricants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study is performed on micro textured surfaces using both elastic and Newtonian fluids in order to understand the effect of surface texturing and fluid rheology on sliding friction under lubricated conditions. ...

Hupp, Sara J. (Sara Jean), 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Compressors Without Lubrication of Cylinders for Automobile Gas-Filling Stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technical data for nonlubricated compressors built on a new vertical base and characteristics of new self-lubricating antifriction materials (based on fiber-reinforced fluoroplastic and heat-resistant polyamid...

V. P. Zakharenko; I. I. Novikov

249

Properties of carbon overcoats and perfluoro-polyether lubricants in hard disk drives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stable head-disk interface at ultralow flying height," IEEElow flying sliders during contact with a lubricated disk,"for stable flying of the slider over the disk [16], [17].

Brunner, Ralf

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

LinearizedAnalysesof MolecularGasFilmLubricationEquation (GeneralizedtheoryfordynamiccharacteristicsofInfinitewidthslideronrunningdisk)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

number to squeeze number . Key Words : Tribology, Molecular Gas Film Lubrication, Magnetic Disk Storage, Flying Head Slider, Squeeze Force, Linearlized Solution , , 1 10P , 01P (2), (3) (1) , ( )O : 2 10

Matsuoka, Hiroshige

251

Evaluation of energy efficiency in cutting aerospace materials with high-pressure cooling lubricant supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the field of machining difficult-to-cut materials like titanium or nickel-based alloys, the use of high-pressure cooling lubricant supply (HPCLS) offers ... , tool wear can be decreased which allows higher app...

Fritz Klocke; Dieter Lung; Tolga Cayli…

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Effect of Lubricant on the Formation of Heavy-Duty Diesel Exhaust Nanoparticles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Lubricant on the Formation of Heavy-Duty Diesel Exhaust Nanoparticles ... The effect of lubricants on nanoparticle formation in heavy-duty diesel exhaust with and without a continuously regenerating diesel particulate filter (CRDPF) is studied. ... The fine particles in diesel exhaust contain solid material produced during combustion process and volatile organic and sulfur compounds converted to particle phase during the exhaust gas cooling and dilution. ...

Kati Vaaraslahti; Jorma Keskinen; Barouch Giechaskiel; Anu Solla; Timo Murtonen; Hannu Vesala

2005-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

253

Relationship of Viscosity, Surface Tensions, and Coefficient of Friction of Lubricating Oils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in that a para- fine contains two atoms more hydrogen than the corresponding 22 number of the olefino group; for example, the lowest number of each group is respectively: Harsh Gas CE4 Olefiant Gas CHZ Americans and Russians lubricating mineral oils...RELATI01ISHII OF VISCOSITY, SUHFACE TEUSIOUS, A3D COEFFICIENT O? FlilCTIOB 0? LUBRICATING OILS. A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School, University of Kansas, Lawrence. For The Degree of Master of Science ilechanioal...

Carson, Earl

1914-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Re-refined lubrication oils. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning treatments and re-refining of used lubrication oils. Topics include the decontamination processes, reclamation of automobile oils, and handling and storage of waste oils. Environmental analyses of used oil recycling are included. Environmental, resource conservation, and economic aspects of recycled lubricating oils are also discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Laser-induced short time scale thermal chemistry of perfluoropolyether lubricant films  

SciTech Connect

The authors investigate the effect of heating a perfluoropolyether lubricant film in a localized area for relatively short time periods using laser irradiation versus conventional oven heating. These experiments help provide understanding on how flash temperatures generated at frictional contacts affect the thermal chemistry of lubricant films. In these experiments, a CO{sub 2} laser heats a 50 {micro}m wide area of a silicon wafer for time periods ranging from 0.1 to 60 s. The surface temperature within the heated area (up to 280 C in these experiments) is monitored with a second laser by measuring the change in reflectivity near the center of the heated area. A major difference observed for laser heating compared to oven heating is that the effective evaporation rate is orders of magnitude higher for laser heating. If the lubricant film is heated for sufficiently long enough time at high temperatures, the authors are able to observe thermal bonding of the lubricant via its alcohol end groups to the silicon oxide surface, followed by thermal decomposition of the lubricant molecules. After laser heating, the authors are able to observe the diffusion of lubricant back into the localized heated area using a combination of optical microscopy and imaging ellipsometry.

Heller, J.; Mate, C.J.; Poon, C.C.; Tam, A.C.

1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

256

Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and Additives for Diesel Engine Applications  

SciTech Connect

The lubricating properties of two ionic liquids with the same anion but different cations, one ammonium IL [C8H17]3NH.Tf2N and one imidazolium IL C10mim.Tf2N, were evaluated both in neat form and as oil additives. Experiments were conducted using a standardized reciprocating sliding test using a segment of a Cr-plated diesel engine piston ring against a grey cast iron flat specimen with simulated honing marks as on the engine cylinder liner. The selected ionic liquids were benchmarked against conventional hydrocarbon oils. Substantial friction and wear reductions, up to 55% and 34%, respectively, were achieved for the neat ionic liquids compared to a fully-formulated 15W40 engine oil. Adding 5 vol% ILs into mineral oil has demonstrated significant improvement in the lubricity. One blend even outperformed the 15W40 engine oil with 9% lower friction and 34% less wear. Lubrication regime modeling, worn surface morphology examination, and surface chemical analysis were conducted to help understand the lubricating mechanisms for ionic liquids. Results suggest great potential for using ionic liquids as base lubricants or lubricant additives for diesel engine applications.

Qu, Jun [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Luo, Huimin [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Mathematical formulation and numerical modeling of wax deposition in pipelines from enthalpy–porosity approach and irreversible thermodynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the last 10 years, there have been a number of studies in modeling of the deposition processes in flowlines. Most of these models: (1) assume empirical or semi-empirical correlations to predict the pressure drop and temperature profile, (2) ignore the radial convection flow in the layer composed of the two-phase wax and oil (that is the gel layer), and (3) use Fick’s law to describe the diffusion flux of species towards the wall by using the chain rule to relate concentration gradient to temperature gradient. In this work, a rigorous mathematical model for the prediction of wax deposition in pipelines is presented for laminar flow. The transient deposition of each component is calculated from the solution of the coupled momentum, energy and, species balance equations, and a thermodynamic wax precipitation model at the local level. An enthalpy formulation based on a fixed-grid approach is used to approximate the convection flow in the gel layer. We do not use the chain rule to relate composition gradient to temperature gradient in Fick’s law to avoid violating the laws of irreversible thermodynamics. Our diffusion flux expression includes molecular diffusion (concentration gradient is driving force) and thermal diffusion (temperature gradient is driving force) with appropriate diffusion coefficients. This work also includes the description of the numerical solution of the governing equations. Numerical results and features of wax deposition as well as model verification with experimental data are presented in a separate paper.

R. Banki; H. Hoteit; A. Firoozabadi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Using Rheo?Optical Methods to Analyze the Waxing of Crude Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As the trend for future crude oil reservoirs goes towards more and more extreme depths the requirements for enhanced oil recovery become more sophisticated. This is due to the fact that one has to face not only extremely elevated temperatures and pressures but the crude oil itself exhibits a high content of high molecular weight hydrocarbons. As these hydrocarbons contain different functional groups like paraffins and asphaltines they are prone to show pronounced waxy crystallization during later transportation processes. Hence the rheological properties of the crude oil itself as well as supporting fluids used in the process e.g. drilling fluids have to be monitored for the whole process cycle from the well to the refinery. Whereas the rheological properties in the reservoir is dominated by the salinity temperature and pressure all of which can be simulated in the measuring cell of a rheometer the rheological properties during the actual transportation is a completely different challenge. One of the major issues is the enormous volume of the oil itself that has to flow through a pipeline. As crude oil always contains a high amount of high molecular weight saturated hydrocarbons it will show a tendency to precipitate or “wax” while the oil cools down being pumped to the surface. The precipitated wax may cause partial congestion of the pipeline which again can lead to a significant pressure drop. Trying to reduce this waxy crystallisation by insulating or even heating the pipeline requires tremendous financial efforts requiring more pumps heating elements or additives. The complete transportation cycle of a crude oil starting at the drilling site leading through the pipeline (which may cover diverse climatic zones) before finally reaching the refinery can be simulated with a rotational rheometer by implementing time profiles of distinct shear rates temperatures and pressures. Moreover the formation of wax can be measured under shear by means of optical microscopy providing rheological data and microscopic images simultaneously. Even in a pipeline accident Rheology can help providing the answers on how to recover the oil with minimum environmental damage.

Klaus Oldörp; Fritz Soergel; Cornelia Küchenmeister; Jan Philip Plog

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Electric field induced structuring in clay–oil suspensions: new insights from WAXS, SEM,  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electric field induced structuring in clay–oil suspensions has been studied by means of wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS), rheometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), as well as leak current density and dielectric constant measurements. The clay particles' orientation distribution was inferred from the azimuthal changes of the clay diffraction peak intensity. The angular width of that distribution was quantified through an orientational order parameter. Chain and column formation processes were distinguished by comparison of the time evolution of the diffraction peak amplitude with that of the current density. Leak current density was measured for different electric field strengths E and clay particle concentrations ?. The following scaling relation was found: . In addition, the dependence of the yield stress on the electric field and on the particle concentration was measured and shown to scale as: .

Z Rozynek; K D Knudsen; J O Fossum; Y Méheust; B Wang; M Zhou

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Examining Effects of Lubricant Composition in Engine Component Systems in Pursuit of Enhanced Efficiency under Environmental Constraints  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Four lubricant technical themes are presented that aim to work synergistically with advanced engine technologies to meet a goal of improving mechanical efficiency by 10 percent.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES  

SciTech Connect

In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was continued to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. In this reporting period, a series of crossflow filtration experiments were initiated to study the effect of olefins and oxygenates on the filtration flux and membrane performance. Iron-based FTS reactor waxes contain a significant amount of oxygenates, depending on the catalyst formulation and operating conditions. Mono-olefins and aliphatic alcohols were doped into an activated iron catalyst slurry (with Polywax) to test their influence on filtration properties. The olefins were varied from 5 to 25 wt% and oxygenates from 6 to 17 wt% to simulate a range of reactor slurries reported in the literature. The addition of an alcohol (1-dodecanol) was found to decrease the permeation rate while the olefin added (1-hexadecene) had no effect on the permeation rate. A passive flux maintenance technique was tested that can temporarily increase the permeate rate for 24 hours.

James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles  

SciTech Connect

In this reporting period, a study of ultra-fine iron catalyst filtration was initiated to study the behavior of ultra-fine particles during the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids filtration. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. The change of particle size during the slurry-phase FTS has monitored by withdrawing catalyst sample at different TOS. The measurement of dimension of the HRTEM images of samples showed a tremendous growth of the particles. Carbon rims of thickness 3-6 nm around the particles were observed. This growth in particle size was not due to carbon deposition on the catalyst. A conceptual design and operating philosophy was developed for an integrated wax filtration system for a 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor to be used in Phase II of this research program. The system will utilize a primary inertial hydroclone followed by a Pall Accusep cross-flow membrane. Provisions for cleaned permeate back-pulsing will be included to as a flux maintenance measure.

James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Amitava Sarkar; Burtron H. Davis

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

Online estimation of wax deposition thickness in single-phase sub-sea pipelines based on acoustic chemometrics: A feasibility study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wax deposition in sub-sea oil producing pipelines is a concern to the oil producing companies. The deposition of wax in pipelines can cause serious economic implications if not monitored and controlled. Several researchers have developed models and investigated the deposition of wax in crude oil pipelines. As of today, there is no off the shelf instrument available for reliable online estimation of the wax deposition thickness in sub-sea pipelines. Acoustic chemometrics was applied to investigate the potential for online estimation of wax deposition thickness in sub-sea pipelines. This feasibility study was carried out as a so called piggy back on experiments performed at Statoil research centre in Porsgrunn, Norway with real crude oil or waxy gas condensate. The first investigations focused on the repeatability of the acoustic chemometric technique followed by online prediction of the wax deposition thickness in a single-phase oil flow pipeline. A partial least squares regression model was calibrated and validated with a totally independent data set. The calibrated model had a root mean squared error of prediction of 0.28 mm with a final wax deposition thickness of 3.36 mm, a slope of 0.91 and R2 of 0.83 which were satisfactory results. The effect of varying oil flow rates on the wax deposition thickness was also investigated. The preliminary results showed the need for further investigations based on a robust experimental design and sample pre-processing. The general conclusion that can be drawn from this feasibility study was that the potential of adapting the acoustic chemometric technique for online estimation of the wax deposition thickness exist and must be further investigated.

Maths Halstensen; Benjamin Kaku Arvoh; Lene Amundsen; Rainer Hoffmann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Process for producing a corrosion-resistant solid lubricant coating  

SciTech Connect

A corrosion-resistant surface formed of a sulfide-forming metal, in particular nickel, is first subjected to an electric plasma in an atmosphere containing hydrogen sulfide to form an adherent sulfide on said surface. The sulfided surface is then exposed to simultaneous cathodic sputtering of at least one solid lubricant which is a chalcogen compound of layer structure, in particular MoS/sub 2/, and at least one hydrophobic solid polymer, in particular PTFE. The coating thus formed is a composite coating in which the particles of the chalcogen compound are coated by the polymer. When the surface of the part to be coated does not consist of a corrosion-resistant sulfide-forming metal, a layer of such a metal is first deposited by cathodic sputtering. The composite coating withstands a wet oxidizing atmosphere, contrary to a coating of MoS/sub 2/ alone, and the method is applicable to any mechanical part intended to rub on other surfaces, such as a watch balance wheel staff and ball or roller bearings.

Niederhaeuser, P.; Hintermann, H.E.; Maillat, M.

1983-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

XPS analysis of 440C steel surfaces lubricated with perfluoropolyethers under sliding conditions in high vacuum  

SciTech Connect

This work presents the results of the X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of AISI 440C ball surfaces lubricated with perfluoropolyether (PFPE) oils after friction experiments under sliding conditions at high load in air and vacuum environments. The PFPE lubricants tested were Demnum S100, Fomblin Z-25, and Krytox 143AB. It was found that all the PFPE lubricants were degraded by sliding contact causing the formation of inorganic fluorides on the metallic surfaces and a layer of organic decomposition products. KRYTOX 143AB was the least reactive of the three lubricants tested. It was also found that metal fluoride formed at off-scar areas. This suggests the formation of reactive species, such as COF2 or R[sub f]COF, during sliding experiments, which can diffuse through the lubricant film and react with the metallic surfaces away from the contact region. Comparison of reference specimens before sliding with those that had undergone the sliding tests showed that the amount of non-degraded PFPE remaining on the surface of the balls after the sliding experiments was greater than that of the balls without sliding.

Herrera-Fierro, P.; Masuko, M.; Jones, W.R. Jr.; Pepper, S.V.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Experimental Study of Single-Phase and Two-Phase Water-in-Crude-Oil Dispersed Flow Wax Deposition in a Mini Pilot-Scale Flow Loop  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental Study of Single-Phase and Two-Phase Water-in-Crude-Oil Dispersed Flow Wax Deposition in a Mini Pilot-Scale Flow Loop ... The axial length was discretized into 174 grid points (173 discretized sections). ...

Ekarit Panacharoensawad; Cem Sarica

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

267

Effect of flow and physical parameters on the wax deposition of Middle East crude oil under subsea condition: heat transfer viewpoint  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Change in pressure, temperature, flow rate and concentration of oil causes precipitation and deposition of wax particles in the pipelines which has become a major problem for ... reserves increases. Change in tem...

Reza Gooya; Mehdy Gooya; Bahram Dabir

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Effects of optimal concentrations of asphalt-tar substances and wax on the rheological characteristics of high-viscosity petroleum during transport in large pipelines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that the optimum ratio of asphalt-tar substances to wax is independent of temperature and pressure in transport of high-viscosity petroleum through pipelines.

A. M. Shammazov

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Formation damage studies of lubricants used with drill-in fluids systems on horizontal open-hole wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tests were conducted to evaluate the effect of lubricants in formation damage. Two types of lubricants were tested along with two types of drill-in fluids. The DIF's tested included a sized-calcium carbonate (SCC) and a sized-salt (SS). Also a set...

Gutierrez, Fernando A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

270

Identification of tribological research and development needs for lubrication of advanced heat engines  

SciTech Connect

The continuous evolution of higher power density propulsion systems has always fueled the search for materials and lubricants with improved thermal and/or durability characteristics. Tribology of the upper cylinder region is the major technology roadblock in the path of the adiabatic diesel engine which has an energy reduction potential that exceeds that of all other engine development types. This tribology assessment resulted in the following major conclusions: a low friction and a low wear seal between the ring belt and cylinder bore are the most critical tribology functions in the diesel combustion chamber; development of solid lubrication systems will not satisfy the simultaneous low friction and low wear requirements in the upper cylinder area; development of separate upper cylinder liquid lubrication systems offers the most attractive design alternative for meeting the operational goals of future ''minimum cooled'' diesel engines.

Fehrenbacher, L.L.; Levinson, T.M.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Miscibility, solubility, and viscosity measurements for R-236EA with potential lubricants. Final report, October 1992-March 1995  

SciTech Connect

The report gives results of miscibility, solubility, and viscosity measurements of refrigerant R-236ea with three potential lubricants. The lubricants were a mineral oil, alkylbenzene, and polyol ester, each with a nominal viscosity of 68 cSt. The miscibility tests were performed in a test facility consisting of a series of miniature test cells in a constant-temperature bath. Critical solution temperatures obtained from the miscibility data are presented for each refrigerant/lubricant combination. In addition to miscibility data, both solubility and viscosity data were obtained for R-236ea and the most promising lubricant. For comparison purposes, data were also taken for the existing U.S. Navy shipboard chiller refrigerant and lubricant concentration, namely 4-114 and a naphthenic oil.

Zoz, S.C.; Pate, M.B.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst by supercritical fluid extraction. Technical progress report, October--December 1994  

SciTech Connect

Goal is to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer-Tropsch slurry bubble column reactor into two fractions: a catalyst-free wax containing <10 ppM solids and a concentrated catalyst slurry ready for recycle/regeneration. Efforts focused on programming and testing of the SAFT equation and automation of the continuous-flow apparatus.

Thies, M.C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Development of high temperature liquid lubricants for low-heat rejection heavy duty diesel engines  

SciTech Connect

Objective was to develop a liquid lubricant that will allow advanced diesel engines to operate at top ring reversal temperatures approaching 500 C and lubricant sump temperatures approaching 250 C. Base stock screening showed that aromatic esters and diesters has the lowest deposit level, compared to polyol esters, poly-alpha-olefins, or refined mineral oil of comparable viscosity. Classical aryl and alkyl ZDP antiwear additives are ineffective in reducing wear with aromatic esters; the phosphate ester was a much better antiwear additive, and polyol esters are more amenable to ZDP treatment. Zeolites and clays were evaluated for filtration.

Wiczynski, T.A.; Marolewski, T.A.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Improved surface adhesion and coverage of perfluoropolyether lubricants following far-UV irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Far-UV treatment of a surface with a thin film of a perfluoropolyether improves adhesion and lowers surface free energy substantially compared to the unirradiated, lubricated surface. With 185-nm radiation, approximately one monolayer can be fixed to surfaces such as amorphous carbon, silica, and gold. These lubricated surfaces become extremely hydrophobic after UV treatment (advancing water contact angle increases about 65{degree} to {ge} 110{degree}) and are not removed by fluorinated solvents. In the absence of far-UV radiation, most perfluoropolyethers show poor adhesion to carbon and are removed easily by rinsing with fluorinated solvents.

Saperstein, D.D. (IBM General Products Div., San Jose, CA (USA)); Lin , L.J. (IBM Research Div., San Jose, CA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

In situ measurement of the bonded film thickness of Z-Tetraol lubricant on magnetic recording media  

SciTech Connect

Currently, the bonded film thickness of perfluoropolyether lubricant on top of magnetic recording media is measured by a two-step process. First, the media disk has to be rinsed thoroughly using a fluorocarbon solvent (for instance, Vetrel) to remove the mobile lubricant. Second, the thickness of the remaining lubricant on the media surface which is regarded as the bonded lubricant thickness is then measured either by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) or electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. As the total lubricant thickness approaches single molecular dimension ({approx}10 A), current methods face tremendous challenge on the accuracy and sensitivity of the measurement. We studied the spectral characteristics responding to the lubricant bonding with the carbon overcoat by the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectra and proposed to use the peak area ratio (C{sub 3}H{sub 2}F/C{sub 3}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 4}H{sub 10}O/C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O{sub 2}) to characterize the bonded Z-Tetraol lubricant that produces a direct bonded lubricant thickness measurement without the need to remove the mobile lubricant with a solvent. After taking the background signal of disks prior to bonding by UV irradiation into account, this method becomes independent of the total lubricant thickness as well as shows good correlation linearity (R{sup 2{approx}}87%) with the current FTIR method for the ratio of C{sub 4}H{sub 10}O/C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O{sub 2}.

Zhu Lei; Li Feng [Material Science Laboratory, Recording Media Operation, Seagate Technology International, 16 Woodlands Loop, Singapore 738340 (Singapore)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

WAXS fat subtraction model to estimate differential linear scattering coefficients of fatless breast tissue: Phantom materials evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Develop a method to subtract fat tissue contributions to wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) signals of breast biopsies in order to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficients ?{sub s} of fatless tissue. Cancerous and fibroglandular tissue can then be compared independent of fat content. In this work phantom materials with known compositions were used to test the efficacy of the WAXS subtraction model. Methods: Each sample 5 mm in diameter and 5 mm thick was interrogated by a 50 kV 2.7 mm diameter beam for 3 min. A 25 mm{sup 2} by 1 mm thick CdTe detector allowed measurements of a portion of the ? = 6° scattered field. A scatter technique provided means to estimate the incident spectrum N{sub 0}(E) needed in the calculations of ?{sub s}[x(E, ?)] where x is the momentum transfer argument. Values of ?{sup ¯}{sub s} for composite phantoms consisting of three plastic layers were estimated and compared to the values obtained via the sum ?{sup ¯}{sub s}{sup ?}(x)=?{sub 1}?{sub s1}(x)+?{sub 2}?{sub s2}(x)+?{sub 3}?{sub s3}(x), where ?{sub i} is the fractional volume of the ith plastic component. Water, polystyrene, and a volume mixture of 0.6 water + 0.4 polystyrene labelled as fibphan were chosen to mimic cancer, fat, and fibroglandular tissue, respectively. A WAXS subtraction model was used to remove the polystyrene signal from tissue composite phantoms so that the ?{sub s} of water and fibphan could be estimated. Although the composite samples were layered, simulations were performed to test the models under nonlayered conditions. Results: The well known ?{sub s} signal of water was reproduced effectively between 0.5 < x < 1.6 nm{sup ?1}. The ?{sup ¯}{sub s} obtained for the heterogeneous samples agreed with ?{sup ¯}{sub s}{sup ?}. Polystyrene signals were subtracted successfully from composite phantoms. The simulations validated the usefulness of the WAXS models for nonlayered biopsies. Conclusions: The methodology to measure ?{sub s} of homogeneous samples was quantitatively accurate. Simple WAXS models predicted the probabilities for specific x-ray scattering to occur from heterogeneous biopsies. The fat subtraction model can allow ?{sub s} signals of breast cancer and fibroglandular tissue to be compared without the effects of fat provided there is an independent measurement of the fat volume fraction ?{sub f}. Future work will consist of devising a quantitative x-ray digital imaging method to estimate ?{sub f} in ex vivo breast samples.

Tang, Robert Y., E-mail: rx-tang@laurentian.ca [Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); Laamanen, Curtis, E-mail: cx-laamanen@laurentian.ca; McDonald, Nancy, E-mail: mcdnancye@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); LeClair, Robert J., E-mail: rleclair@laurentian.ca [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6, Canada and Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by Source Total Energy, 1970-2010 By Energy Type, 2010 Prices³ by Energy Type, Indexed, 1970-2010 By Petroleum Product, 2010 72 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Fuel Oil Gasoline 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Wood and wood-derived fuels, and biomass waste; excludes fuel ethanol and biodiesel. Prior to 2001, also includes non-biomass waste. 3 Based on nominal dollars. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. 5 Consumption-weighted average price for asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline, kerosene, lubricants, petrochemical feedstocks, petroleum coke, special naphthas, waxes, and miscella- neous petroleum products. Source: Table 3.3. Electricity

278

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by Source Consumer Expenditure Estimates for Energy by Source Total Energy, 1970-2010 By Energy Type, 2010 Expenditures³ by Energy Type, Indexed, 1970-2010 By Petroleum Product, 2010 76 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Wood and wood-derived fuels, and biomass waste; excludes fuel ethanol and biodiesel. 3 Based on nominal dollars. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. 5 Asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline, kerosene, lubricants, petrochemical feedstocks, petroleum coke, special naphthas, waxes, and miscellaneous petroleum products. Source: Table 3.5. 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 300 600 900 1,200 1,500 Billion Dollars¹ Electricity Gas 709 366 160 50 6

279

Tribological performance of NFC coatings under oil lubrication[Near Frictionless Carbon  

SciTech Connect

An increase in engine and vehicle efficiency usually requires an increase in the severity of contact at the interfaces of many critical components. Examples of such components include piston rings and cylinder liners in the engine, gears in the transmission and axle, bearings, etc. These components are oil-lubricated and require enhancement of their tribological performance. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) recently developed a carbon-based coating with very low friction and wear properties. These near-frictionless-carbon (NFC) coatings have potential for application in various engine components for performance enhancement. This paper presents the study of the tribological performance of NFC-coated steel surfaces when lubricated with fully formulated and basestock synthetic oils. The NFC coatings reduced both the friction and wear of lubricated steel surfaces. The effect of the coating was much more pronounced in tests with basestock oil. This suggests that NFC-coated parts may not require heavily formulated lubricant oils to perform satisfactorily in terms of reliability and durability.

Ajayi, O. O.; Alzoubi, M.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Zimmerman, S.

2000-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

280

Tribological characteristics of aluminum alloys against steel lubricated by ammonium and imidazolium ionic liquids  

SciTech Connect

Sliding friction and wear characteristics of aluminum alloys against AISI 52100 steel lubricated by ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated at both room and elevated temperatures. The tested aluminum alloys include a commercially pure aluminum Al 1100, a wrought alloy Al 6061-T6511, and a cast alloy Al 319-T6. The lubricating performance of two ILs with the same anion, one ammonium-based [C8H17]3NH.Tf2N and one imidazolium-based C10mim.Tf2N, were compared each other and benchmarked against that of a conventional fully-formulated engine oil. Significant friction (up to 35%) and wear (up to 55%) reductions were achieved by the ammonium IL when lubricating the three aluminum alloys compared to the engine oil. The imidazolium IL performed better than the oil but not as well as the ammonium IL for Al 1100 and 319 alloys. However, accelerated wear was unexpectedly observed for Al 6061 alloy when lubricated by C10mim.Tf2N. Surface chemical analyses implied complex tribochemical reactions between the aluminum surfaces and ILs during the wear testing, which has been demonstrated either beneficial by forming a protective boundary film or detrimental by causing severe tribo-corrosion. The effects of the IL cation structure, aluminum alloy composition, and tribo-testing condition on the friction and wear results have been discussed.

Qu, Jun [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Luo, Huimin [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Truhan, John J. [Caterpillar Inc.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Surface Engineering to Improve the Durability and Lubricity of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy  

SciTech Connect

Titanium alloys offer high strength, high corrosion resistance, and the opportunity to reduce the weight of heavy vehicle engine components, but they do not perform well as bearing surfaces without further treatments or coatings. This paper explores a series of surface engineering treatments to improve the friction and wear behavior of Ti-6Al-4V alloy under diesel engine oil-lubricated conditions.

Bansal, Dinesh G [ORNL; Eryilmaz, Osman L [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

BERTOZZI,A.L. Lubrication Approximations for Surface Tension Driven Interfaces: Some  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BERTOZZI,A.L. Lubrication Approximations for Surface Tension Driven Interfaces: Some Open Problems approxi- mation of fluid interfaces driven by surface tension. A number of different physical examples are considered. Free surface flow in which surface tension plays a role in the dynamics of an interface

Ball, John M.

283

Design and testing of a procedure for evaluating fuel-efficient crankcase lubricants  

SciTech Connect

Experiments were conducted to design and evaluate a procedure for evaluating the fuel efficiency characteristics of crankcase lubricants using the driving cycles of the 1975 Federal Test Procedure and the Highway Fuel Economy Test. Most of the test protocol was based on guidelines proposed by the American Society for Testing and Materials. Three crankcase lubricants and five oil supplements, as well as a baseline lubricant, were used in eight 1980 model-year vehicles of identical make. The vehicles were operated at 75/sup 0/F (24/sup 0/C) in closely controlled chassis dynamometer tests designed to detect small changes in fuel efficiency. Results from these tests showed measurable increases in fuel economy of 0 to 6% with the test lubricants when compared to a common SAE 30 grade oil. These results are not definitive because of lack of quantification of mileage accumulation effects. The test protocol did reduce measurement variability greatly; this procedure can be applied to evaluation of fuel-efficient oils using larger test fleets. A good potential exists for improving the fuel economy of the US automotive fleet. Because of the large quantities of petroleum consumed in the automotive sector, this potential savings translates into conserving a very significant quantity of petroleum.

Naman, T.M.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Honeywell launches PVC lubricants & anti-counterfeiting technology; boosts additives R&D  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Honeywell Specialty Additives, part of Honeywell International, has recently commercialized a range of high-performance speciality lubricants for PVC processing in Europe. The company says that the new products provide PVC producers with a viable solution as lead formulations are phased out in Europe.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

High-performance lubricants from Honeywell certified for PVC water pipe formulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Honeywell Specialty Materials reports that its Rheochem® line of high-performance lubricants (HPLs) has received certifications from independent, not-for-profit organization NSF International and the Plastics Pipe Institute for use in PVC water pipe formulations. The certifications indicate that the \\{HPLs\\} are safe and effective for use in plastic pipes that carry water throughout homes and municipalities.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Alkane Contamination Effects on PFPE Lubricant Bonding to a-CHx Overcoats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by a small recording head that flies over the surface of the disk as it spins. A 50-100 Ã? thick hydrogenated of the amorphous carbon overcoat.1-3 The recording head flies over the disk surface and lubricant film on a layer hard disk drives promote increased outgassing from drive components and thus can adversely influence

Gellman, Andrew J.

287

Techno-economic study of re-refining waste lubricating oils in the Arabian Gulf countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waste oil reclaimation by re-refining is a promising process for recycling valuable polutant waste. In Arabian Gulf countries, a limited volume of waste oil is recycled. A technical and economical evaluation of some reclaimation methods to produce lubricating oil has been conducted.

M.I. Al-Ahmad; I.S. Al-Mutaz

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

THE CHALLENGE IN FINDING LONG-TERM LUBRICATION solutions for wind turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE CHALLENGE IN FINDING LONG-TERM LUBRICATION solutions for wind turbines is well known wind turbines in a farm in order to improve their longevity. In a previous TLT article, research- ers used a technique known as Simula- tor for Offshore /Onshore Wind Farm Applications to examine

Chiao, Jung-Chih

289

The influence of lubrication on the energy cost of pushing a mine car  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The oxygen intakes of 16 well-trained Bantu mine recruits were studied while they pushed a mine car at a constant speed of 2 miles p. h. The car had dry or partially lubricated axles and was pushed with loads ...

C. G. Williams; J. H. Viljoen…

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A study on lubricant oil supply for positive-displacement expanders in small-scale organic Rankine cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Positive-displacement expanders, which are widely used in small-scale \\{ORCs\\} (Organic Rankine Cycles), need reliable LOS (Lubricant Oil Supply) to get well lubrication and sealing. In the present paper, the characteristics of two traditional LOS schemes are examined. Moreover, a modified one is proposed. Analyses of those elements that lead to work loss of lubricant oil supply have been carried out for all the three LOS schemes. The work loss of lubricant oil supply, which is caused by the employment of lubricant oil pumps, pressure drop in lubricant oil separator and other components contributing to work loss, is evaluated by a definition of WLLS (Work Loss Factor of Lubrication Oil Supply). Based on the thermodynamic model of ORC established, the calculation methods of WLLS are presented. Through analyses of LOS schemes and calculation of WLLS in two typical ORCs, it was found that the traditional LOS schemes either can not work reliably, or might cause up to 11.5% and 9.5% power decrease. The values can be reduced by half in the proposed LOS scheme, which can also work reliably. Accompanied with the advantages, the defects of the new scheme were also investigated.

Biao Lei; Yu-Ting Wu; Wei Wang; Jing-Fu Wang; Chong-Fang Ma

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst using supercritical fluid extraction. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to evaluate the potential of SCF extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer- Tropsch (F-T) slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor into two fractions: (1) a catalyst-free wax containing less than 10 ppm particulate matter and (2) a concentrated catalyst slurry that is ready for recycle or regeneration. The wax will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200-300{degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent. The success of the project depends on two major factors. First, the supercritical solvent must be able to dissolve the F-T wax; furthermore, this must be accomplished without entraining the solid catalyst. Second, the extraction must be controlled so as not to favor the removal of the low molecular weight wax compounds, i.e., a constant carbon-number distribution of the alkanes in the wax slurry must be maintained at steady-state column operation. To implement our objectives, the following task structure is being implemented: Task 1 equilibrium solubility measurements; Task 2 thermodynamic modeling; and Task 3 process design studies. Progress reports are presented for each task.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst using supercritical fluid extraction. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 January 1996--31 March 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor into two fractions: (1) a catalyst-free wax containing less than 10 ppm particulate matter and (2) a concentrated catalyst slurry that is ready for recycle or regeneration. The wax will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200--300 {degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent. The success of the project depends on two major factors. First, the supercritical solvent must be able to dissolve the F-T wax; furthermore, this must be accomplished without entraining the solid catalyst. Second, the extraction must be controlled so as not to favor the removal of the low molecular weight wax compounds, i.e., a constant carbon-number distribution of the alkanes in the wax slurry must be maintained at steady-state column operation. During this quarter work focused on task 1b, experimental measurement of selected model systems. Vapor-liquid equilibrium experiments for the n- hexane/squalane system, which we initiated in the previous quarter, were continued and results are discussed in this report.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst by supercritical extraction. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

One of the major objectives of this research project is to predict the phase behavior of model wax compounds in dense supercritical fluids such as hexane. Because initial results with the SAFT equation have been less promising than expected, the group at North Carolina State University has focused their recent attention on cubic equations of state, in particular the Peng-Robinson and Soave-Redlich-Kwong versions. The focus of this work has been on developing correlations that can be used to predict binary interaction parameters (i.e., k{sub ij}s) for a given binary wax-solvent system. As a first step, k{sub ij}s were first calculated from experimental data on systems containing alkanes between nC{sub 4} and nC{sub 23} at temperatures between 25 and 357{degrees} C. Attempts were then made to correlate these parameters with specific pure component properties of the alkanes of interest. Reasonably good agreement between experimental and predicted k{sub ij}s was found using a correlation that incorporates both temperature and the molecular size of the alkanes. As phase equilibrium data becomes available for higher molecular weight model wax compounds, the ability of the correlation to handle such systems will need to be tested. The phase equilibrium apparatus is currently undergoing modifications that will allow the system to run components that are solids at ambient temperatures. Some problems are still being resolved, as the heavy component tends to precipitate in the sample lines. Modifications have been made that should allow the system to operate reliably.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A review of lubrication and preformance issues in refrigeration systems using an HFC (R-134a) refrigerant  

SciTech Connect

It has been considered critical for refrigerant and compressor lubricant to be miscible with each other over part of the range of operating conditions of refrigerant systems. Adequate miscibility, many believe, provides oil return to the compressor. Presently, synthetic polyol esters have been selected for use with HFC refrigerants, such as R-134a, which are considered appropriate alternatives to CFCs. The authors will review the mechanical issues in miscible vs non-miscible naphthenic hydrocarbon oil-based lubricants. Extensive lab, test stand and cabinet testing has been conducted and data will be presented which show responsible and predictable performance based on the chemical and physical properties of the lubricant and refrigerant. Many non-miscible systems show satisfactory performance with the proper selection of lubricant, additives and mechanical configuration. 3 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

Reyes-Gavilan, J.; Eckard, A.; Flak, T.; Tritak, T. [Witco Corporation, Oakland, NJ (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Controlled Experiments on the Effects of Lubricant/Additive (Low-Ash, Ashless) Characteristics on DPF Degradation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Effects of lubricant additive chemistries and exhaust conditions on ash properties affecting diesel particulate filter performance. Comparison of ash characteristics such as packing density and elemental composition in field and laboratory aged DPFs.

296

Study on Influence of Cylinder Liner Surface Texture on Lubrication Performance for Cylinder Liner–Piston Ring Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A marine diesel engine, where the cylinder liner–piston ... rubbing pairs, is the heart of a marine system. Studying the lubrication characteristics of the ... for rational design of the CLPR to reduce wear and p...

Zhiwei Guo; Chengqing Yuan; Peng Liu; Zhongxiao Peng; Xinping Yan

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Air Entrapment in Nanometer-Thick Lubricant Films and its Effect on Slider Flying Height in a Hard Disk Drive  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental data are presented, showing that the flying height of a slider in a hard disk drive can be altered by the chemical ... of the molecularly-thin lubricant film on the disk surface. It is suggested that...

B. Marchon; X. C. Guo; S. Canchi; R. H. Wang; N. Supper; J. Burns…

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Thin film gas lubrication characteristics of flying head slider bearings over patterned media in hard disk drives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...? This paper describes the effects of moving patterned disk surfaces on thin film gas lubrication characteristics for flying head slider bearings in magnetic hard disk drives. In order to perform the most real...

N. Tagawa; A. Mori

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels -- Diesel Emissions Control Project (APBF-DEC): Lubricants Project, Phase 2 Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of the second phase of a lubricants project, which investigated the impact of engine oil formulation on diesel vehicle emissions and the performance of a nitrogen oxide adsorber catalyst (NAC).

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Experimental Studies on Visco-plastic Lubrication of Visco-elastic Fluid: Interfacial Instability and Geometry Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of application in industry, such as in co- extrusion processes and lubricated pipelining. In the case of a duct to establish the base multi-layer flows at all, using a visco-elastic fluid (Poly Ethylene Oxide solution

Ishii, Hitoshi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

Temperature–friction characteristics of used lubricant from two-stroke cross-head marine diesel engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is now quite apparent that, in a two-stroke, cross-head marine diesel engine, the lubrication regime in the contact between piston ring and cylinder liner at the top dead centre (TDC) is of a boundary type. Therefore, the tribological performance of a system to simulate the real contact should be assessed under conditions closely resembling the operating engine environment. In the reality of engine operation, the lubricant is often contaminated by fuel and products of combustion, hence the need to study the temperature–friction characteristics of this actual lubricant under the conditions of boundary lubrication. In this paper, an oil taken from the drainage system of the engine was used. A five times heating and cooling test methodology was employed to assess tribological performance of a model contact lubricated with the actual oil. The model contact was formed by a pin sliding over a plate both made of materials used in two-stroke, cross-head marine diesel engines. Experiments showed that the general trend in temperature–friction characteristics of the used oil is similar to that of a new oil. However, the level of friction in the contact lubricated with an used oil is significantly higher than that for a new oil.

T.A Stolarski; Q Zhou

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Lubricant return comparison of naphthenic and polyol ester oils in R-134a household refrigeration applications  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents mineral oils and polyol esters as possible lubricant options for domestic refrigeration applications employing R-134a as the heat exchange fluid. A performance comparison, based on data presented, is made between the mineral oils and polyol esters evaluated. To more closely examine lubricant return with N-70 and R-134a and ensure that the oil is not contributing to any deterioration in efficiency due to its accumulation in evaporators, a special test unit was designed with a difficult oil return configuration and its performance carefully monitored. Oil return with a hydrofluorocarbon-miscible polyol ester, R-133-O was also evaluated in this setup and its performance results compared to those obtained with the naphthenic refrigeration oil.

Reyes-Gavilan, J.L.; Flak, G.T.; Tritcak, T.R. [Witco Corp., Oakland, NJ (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Ab initio calculations of various protonation sites in perfluorodiethyl ether: Models for high temperature lubricant decomposition?  

SciTech Connect

Although perfluoropolyether (PFPE) lubricants have found successful application in spacecraft mechanisms and computer hard drives, there eventual breakdown is irksome, and the mechanism of decomposition is the subject of much scrutiny. However, very little notice is taken of the monomer ethers on which the polymer lubricants are based. Recently, concerted studies of the Lewis base properties of various fluorinated ethers have been performed, both from an experimental and a theoretical viewpoint. As an extension of the theoretical work, this study presents ab initio theoretical consideration of the multiple potential basic sites within perfluorodiethyl ether, (CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}){sub 2}O, by way of the proton affinity of the molecule at various possible protonation sites (i.e., oxygen and fluorine atoms). The results indicate that although protonation at the oxygen is more energetically favored, protonation at the fluorine is not much higher in energy and provides for formation of an excellent leaving group, HF.

Ball, D.W. [Cleveland State Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Tribocharging phenomena in hard disk amorphous carbon coatings with and without perfluoropolyether lubricants  

SciTech Connect

Scanning polarization force microscopy was used to study changes in surface potential (tribocharging) caused by the contact between a tungsten carbide tip and the amorphous carbon coating of a hard disk, both when bare and when covered with Zdol-TX lubricant. The surface potential change produced by tip contact decays with time at a rate that is strongly dependent on lubricant coverage and on the presence of oxygen and water vapor in the environment. Two different charging mechanisms are proposed. One involves chemical modification of the surface by removal of oxygen bound to the surface. This gives rise to a potential change that decays with time. Another mechanism involves trapping of charge in states within the energy gap of the insulating carbon film. The potential change due to this trapped charge does not decay over periods much greater than 1 h.

van den Oetelaar, R. J. A.; Xu, L.; Ogletree, D. F.; Salmeron, M.; Tang, H.; Gui, J.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Tribocharging phenomena in hard disk amorphous carbon coatings with and without perfluoropolyether lubricants  

SciTech Connect

Scanning polarization force microscopy was used to study changes in surface potential (tribocharging) caused by the contact between a tungsten carbide tip and the amorphous carbon coating of a hard disk,both when bare and when covered with Zdol-TX lubricant. The surface potential change produced by tip contact decays with time at a rate that is strongly dependent on lubricant coverage, and on the presence of oxygen and water vapor in the environment. Two different charging mechanisms are proposed. One involves chemical modification of the surface by removal of oxygen bound to the surface. This gives rise to a potential change that decays with time. Another mechanism involves trapping of charge in states within the energy gap of the insulating carbon film. The potential change due to this trapped charge does not decay over periods much greater than 1 hour.

van den Oetelaar, Ronald J.A.; Xu, Lei; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel; Tang, Hung; Gui, Jing

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Transverse electrokinetic and microfluidic effects in micro-patterned channels: lubrication analysis for slab geometries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Off-diagonal (transverse) effects in micro-patterned geometries are predicted and analyzed within the general frame of linear response theory, relating applied presure gradient and electric field to flow and electric current. These effects could contribute to the design of pumps, mixers or flow detectors. Shape and charge density modulations are proposed as a means to obtain sizeable transverse effects, as demonstrated by focusing on simple geometries and using the lubrication approximation.

Armand Ajdari

2001-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

307

Future marine fuels - Prediction and alleviation of potential combustion and lubrication problems  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the current and future marine fuels market and future fuel quality. It also describes the development of a method of ranking fuels by ignition delay which has led to the concept of a Calculated Carbon Aromaticity Index derived from simple fuel inspection properties. It also shows how increased engine fouling and corrosive wear, which might be expected from future quality fuel, can be controlled by improvements in lubrication and due attention to engine temperatures.

Williams, R.E.; Belcher, P.R.; Hengeveld, J.; Newbery, P.J.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Low severity upgrading of F-T waxes with solid superacids. Progress report, March 1, 1992--May 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

We have previously reported the isomerization and hydrocracking of n-hexadecane and a n-C{sub 32} straight chain paraffin with a Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} catalyst at 170{degrees}C and 350 psig of hydrogen. This study has now been extended to the treatment of a Fisher-Tropsch wax with a carbon number range from C{sub 55}-C{sub 62}. The results reported in Table 1 show that the Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} catalyst is active for the isomerization and hydrocracking of this substrate. At an 88.6 wt% conversion level, an 86.1% selectivity to isoparaffins was achieved. The products consisted mainly of C{sub 4}-C{sub 9} and C{sub 10}-C{sub 14} fractions, suitable as gasoline and diesel fuels. A feed/catalyst ratio of 6:1 was used; there was no evidence of catalytic deactivation. The melted wax is viscous and there was a decrease in conversion with time, indicating that diffusion might be a limitation for chains of very high molecular weight.

Wender, I.; Tierney, J.W.

1992-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

309

US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component)- The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component) - The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

310

Cheap and simple straight run naphtha isomerization  

SciTech Connect

A low cost approach to LSR naptha isomerization is presented. Prospects for realizing the approach is encouraging, and is currently being pursued through a commercial demonstration in Cincinnati. The real challenge has been put to the process companies. The authors hope to build the state-of-the-art isomerization process, but lack the capital. They realize there will be no guarantees at Cincinnati, but no matter which catalyst is selected, they will have more octane-barrels than they did before.

Suchanek, A.J.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Refinery & Blender Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Blender Net Production & Blender Net Production Product: Total Finished Petroleum Products Liquefied Refinery Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethane Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Isobutane Isobutylene Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Less Than 0.31 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel Greater Than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha For Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils For Petro. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

312

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

313

East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products

314

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Components (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

315

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Exports Exports Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Biomass-Based Diesel Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils Petro. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

316

Product Supplied for Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petro. Feed Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Petroleum Coke - Marketable Petroleum Coke - Catalyst Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

317

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker and Barge between PAD  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tanker and Barge between PAD Districts Tanker and Barge between PAD Districts Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Residual FO - Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual FO - 0.31 to 1.00% Sulfur Residual FO - Greater than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

318

Triboelectric charging of a perfluoropolyether lubricant J. V. Wasem, B. L. LaMarche, S. C. Langford, and J. T. Dickinsona)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Triboelectric charging of a perfluoropolyether lubricant J. V. Wasem, B. L. LaMarche, S. C, Washington 99164-2814 Received 10 July 2002; accepted 14 November 2002 Perfluoropolyethers PFPE are used of the lubricant. © 2003 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.1536011 1. INTRODUCTION Perfluoropolyethers

Dickinson, J. Thomas

319

Miscibility, solubility, viscosity, and density measurements for R-236fa with potential lubricants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report gives results of miscibility, solubility, viscosity, and density measurements for refrigerant R-236fa and two potential lubricants. (The data are needed to determine the suitability of refrigerant/lubricant combinations for use in refrigeration systems.) The tested oils were pentaerythritol ester mixed-acid (ISO68), hereafter SW-68 manufactured by Castrol, and polyol ester mixed-acid (ISO46), hereafter Arctic-46 manufactured by Mobil. Miscibility was measured in a series of miniature test cells submerged in a constant temperature bath, precisely controlled over a temperature range of -50 to 90 C. Solubility, viscosity, and density data were also obtained for R-236fa mixed with the two oils for a refrigerant concentration of 0 to 40 wt % refrigerant over a temperature range of 30 to 100 C. This research shows that: (1) solubility, viscosity, and density are functions of temperature and concentration, (2) solubility increases with increasing temperature and refrigerant concentration (i.e., mass fraction of refrigerant). (3) viscosity decreases with increasing temperature and refrigerant concentration, and (4) density decreases with increasing temperature but increases with increasing refrigerant concentration. R-114 and naphthenic mineral oil were also tested.

Kang, H.M.; Pate, M.B.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Thin film hydrodynamic lubrication of flying heads in magnetic disk storages  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Typical hydrodynamic lubrication problems commonly encountered in the ultrathin spacing between a computer flying head and a magnetic disk are reviewed. In magnetic disk storages, minimizing the spacing between the head and disk is essential to promote the largest possible increase in magnetic bit density. In the small (nearly 1.0 ?m) spacing that has recently been attained, the rarefaction effects owing to the molecular mean free path become dominant. Specifically, in this paper the three governing equations resulting from the first- and second-order slip-flow models and from the linearized Boltzmann equation are compared. Next, some numerical approaches to eliminating the instability in pressure distribution in the high bearing number region are described. Surface roughness effects are also a principal concern in thin spacing. A mixed lubrication model which enables the analysis of the start/stop operation and the average film thickness theory for one- and two-dimensional roughnesses is summarized. Finally, from the viewpoint of practical head design, the slider dynamic characteristics and related slider design factors are discussed.

Yasunaga Mitsuya

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Prediction of refrigerant-lubricant viscosity using the general PC-SAFT friction theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work, a friction theory (f-theory) viscosity model founded on the perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) equation of state (EoS) was used to calculate the viscosity of refrigerant-oil mixtures. The model, which links viscosity to the repulsive and attractive pressure terms of the PC-SAFT EoS, can provide satisfactory viscosity predictions of mixtures of carbon dioxide (R-744) and two synthetic lubricants, namely, a polyolester (POE) ISO VG 68 and an alkylbenzene (AB) ISO VG 32, as well as mixtures of isobutane (R-600a) and two other synthetic lubricants, a POE ISO VG 7 and an AB ISO VG 5. The root-mean square (RMS) deviations related to the viscosity prediction were 0.69% (R-600a/POE ISO 7), 0.99% (R-600a/AB ISO VG 5), 3.16% (R-744/POE ISO VG 68) and 3.18% (R-744/AB ISO VG 32).

Moisés A. Marcelino Neto; Jader R. Barbosa Jr.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Effects of moisture on wear of components lubricated with diesel fuel. Interim report, May 1996--September 1997  

SciTech Connect

The durability of some fuel injection systems on compression-ignition engines will be adversely affected by fuels of significantly low lubricity. Previous work has shown that fuel-lubricated wear is sensitive to the availability of moisture, particularly in severely refined fuels, which are designed to minimize exhaust emissions. The effects of moisture may be particularly relevant in a marine environment in which sea water is used as ballast in the fuel tanks. Traditional, less-refined fuels contain natural corrosion inhibitors that reduce oxidative wear, although alternate wear mechanisms may still affect long-term durability. However, no detailed study bas been performed to define the effects of water contamination and its relationship to fuel composition. Standardized laboratory-scale tests that show good correlation with wear in full-scale fuel injection systems for ground vehicles are available. In the present work, the standard procedures for the HFRR and BOCLE/SLBOCLE apparatus were modified to show the effects of both dissolved and emulsified water on fuel-lubricated wear. The results indicate that the lubricity of all but the most severely hydrotreated fuels are insensitive to contamination by either deionized or salt water. Moreover, the relatively short aeration period used in the ASTM D 5001 and D 6078 BOCLE test procedures has no measurable effect on water concentration in the test fuel sample.

Lacey, P.I.; Erwin, J.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Friction-induced vibration of a lubricated mechanical system J-J. Sinou*, J. Cayer-Barrioz and H. Berro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Friction-induced vibration of a lubricated mechanical system J-J. Sinou*, J. Cayer-Barrioz and H that incorporates realistic laws of local friction issued from previous experimental results. The objective or by themselves, such as friction-induced vibrations. In all cases, these vibrations are hardly controllable

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

324

Titanium Lubrication  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Iodine and n-butylbenzene were analytical reagent grade and were used without further purification. The SAE 10, 150 SUS oil was a highly refined straight chain hydrocarbon oil without additives. ... 0-25-0-38 Little wear, wear track had

RICHARD W. ROBERTS; ROBERT S. OWENS

1963-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

325

Marine Lubricants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marine diesel engines are classified by speed, either ... detergents/dispersants, antioxidants, corrosion inhibitors, anti-wear/load-carrying/ep, pour-point depressants and ... . There are no simple systems for c...

B. H. Carter; D. Green

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Lubricants Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

327

News From the D.C. Office: Lubricating the Market for Energy-Efficient  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Aerial view of Washington D.C. 3 Aerial view of Washington D.C. News From the D.C. Office Lubricating the Market for Energy-Efficient Products: Snake Oil vs. Slick Databases A handful of tools are essential for those involved in analyzing energy-efficiency policies or designing and implementing programs, no matter what their area of interest or institutional or individual role. My own short list includes: Detailed information on the structure of energy end-use and market trends. Empirical data that document the real-world performance of technologies and programs. Simulation models that use these data to shed light on the future impact of policies and programs. Accessible, accurate information on the efficiency, costs, and other characteristics of energy-efficient products. My colleagues could certainly add to this list, but for now I want to focus

328

A new emergency lubricating-oil system for steam turbine generators: Final report  

SciTech Connect

A positive-displacement pump, powered by a turbine-shaft driven permanent magnet generator (PMG) can be used to provide lubricating oil over nearly the entire turbine generator speed range. The concept offers high reliability through its simplicity; switchgear, batteries and other auxiliaries are eliminated by hard-wiring the PMG to the pump induction drive motor. In this study, an existing PMG supplying power to the electrohydraulic control (EHC) system was evaluated as the power supply for an induction motor-driven screw pump running in a ''wafting'' mode as a backup to a conventional dc emergency oil system. The screw pump rotates all the time that the turbine shaft turns; check valves allow it to deliver oil instantly if the system pressure falls. It was found that the pump drive motor would start and run reliably with no adverse effects on the PMG or the electrohydraulic control (EHC) system. 6 refs., 23 figs., 11 tabs.

Kalan, G.L.; Oney, W.R.; Steenburgh, J.H.; Elwell, R.C.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Effects of self-assembled monolayer and PFPE lubricant on wear characteristics of flat silicon tips.  

SciTech Connect

The effects of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and perfluoropolyether (PFPE) lubricant on the wear characteristics of flat silicon tips were investigated. The wear test consisted of sliding the silicon tips fabricated on a flat silicon specimen against SAM and PFPE (Z-tetraol) coated silicon (100) wafer. The tips were slid at a low speed for about 15 km under an applied load of 39.2 {micro}N. The wear volume of the tip was obtained by measuring the tip profile using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). It was found that the coatings were effective in reducing the wear of the tips by an order of magnitude from 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -7}.

Kim, H. J.; Jang, C. E.; Kim, D. E.; Kim, Y. K.; Choa, S. H.; Hong, S.; Materials Science Division; Yonsei Univ.; Samsung Adv. Inst. Science and Technology; Seoul National Univ. of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Closed-loop study of the effects of multicycle re-refining of automotive lubricating oil  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-five gallons of a hydrofinished virgin lubricating oil basestock was blended with additives into a 10W30 crankcase oil. After the engines had been pruged with a flush oil, 11 vehicles were charged with the blended virgin oil. Mileages ranging from 2000 to over 3000 miles of use were accumulated before the oil was drained, re-refined and recharged to the vehicles. This cycle was repeated until the oil had been re-refined three times. At each stage, detailed analyses and compound characterizations were performed on both the oil being recycled and on the same oil which was re-refined but never charged to vehicles. The data showed no significant change in the composition of the base oil, except for a minor buildup of additive base oil, which was expected.

Reynolds, J.W.; Goetzinger, J.W.; Cotton, F.O.; Brinkman, D.W.; Whisman, M.L.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Theory of a Possible Mechanism for Lubrication and Surface Protection by an Electrically Neutral Hydrogels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is demonstrated that polymers sticking out of the surface of a neutral hydrogel are capable of preventing adhesive forces from pulling a hydrogel into close contact with a surface against which it is pressed. The proposed mechanism for lubrication or surface protection suggests a possible mechanism for protecting the cornea from a contact lens, which is held against the eye by Laplace pressure. This mechanism, however, is only able to keep a gel coated surface from sticking to a surface against which it is pressed, if the gel and surface are bathed in fluid. Expected optical properties of the gel-surface interface are discussed, in order to suggest possible ways to study the gel-solid interface experimentally.

J. B. Sokoloff

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

332

Thickness and density of adsorbed additive layer on metal surface in lubricant by neutron reflectometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thickness and density of the adsorbed additive layer on a metal surface in lubricant were directly measured by neutron reflectometry. First, two kinds of metal surfaces, iron and copper, on ultra-flat silicon blocks were prepared by physical vapor deposition. After that, each target surface was analyzed by neutron reflectometry in air, in base oil and in base oil with an additive. Poly-alpha-olefin was used as the base oil, while deuterated acetic acid was used as an additive. Fitting operation based on Parratt's theory showed that the thicknesses of the adsorbed layers on the iron and copper surfaces were quite thin, only 2.0 nm. The friction coefficients of the metal surfaces measured by a ball-on-disk tribometer decreased considerably when the acetic acid was added to the base oil. It was concluded that the additive adsorbed layers on the metal surfaces considerably affected friction properties despite being only several nanometers thick.

Tomoko Hirayama; Takashi Torii; Yohei Konishi; Masayuki Maeda; Takashi Matsuoka; Kazuko Inoue; Masahiro Hino; Dai Yamazaki; Masayasu Takeda

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. The Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to

334

Interactions between nano-spacing flying head sliders and ultra-thin liquid lubricant films with non-uniform distribution in hard disk drives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the effect of ultra-thin liquid lubricant films on air bearing dynamics and flyability of less than 10 nm spacing flying head sliders in hard disk drives. In particular, the effect of non-uni...

Norio Tagawa; Noritaka Yoshioka; Atsunobu Mori

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

The Effect of PFPE Film Thickness and Molecular Polarity on the Pick-Up of Disk Lubricant by a Low-Flying Slider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lubricant pick-up by a low-flying slider is investigated for hydroxyl-terminated perfluoropolyethers ... film thickness on the surface of finished rigid disks. The total number of hydroxyl (OH) ... , and ZTMD, re...

R. J. Waltman; H. Deng; G. J. Wang; H. Zhu; G. W. Tyndall

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Evaluation of high-temperature lubricants for low-heat rejection diesel engines. Interim report, October 1983-March 1988  

SciTech Connect

A single-cylinder diesel engine was modified to simulate a low-heat rejection (LHR) engine, and it was used to develop lubrication requirements for future Army LHR diesel engines. Several high-temperature lubricant (HTL) candidates were evaluated, and the simulated LHR engine discriminated HTL deposition performance over a range of engine cylinder wall temperatures (CWTs). Three HTLs were identified that had promising performance at CWTs of 600 deg F (316 deg C) while none were adequate at 650 deg F (343 deg C). Oil was collected and analyzed from the ring zone of the simulated LHR engine. Oil degradation was as much as 3.7 times more severe in the ring zone as compared to the oil sump. Preliminary oxidation and friction-wear bench tests were investigated. New and used oil analyses flow charts were developed, and analytical techniques to separate and identify HTL additives and base stocks were developed.

Frame, E.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and power via biomass gasification. Biomass and Bioenergyrenewables Integrated coal gasification combined cycle withLubricants Waxes Naptha Gasification Ethane, Benzene, and

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and power via biomass gasification. Biomass and Bioenergyrenewables Integrated coal gasification combined cycle withLubricants Waxes Naptha Gasification Ethane, Benzene, and

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

REACTOR ENGINEERING DIVISION QUARTERLY REPORT FOR DECEMBER 1...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

(physics, thermal analysis, and experimental and development program); corrosion of Al coating: irradiation of wax and lubricants; effect of long-term irradiation on pile...

340

Examination of failed ex vivo metal-on-metal metatarsophalangeal prosthesis and comparison with theoretically determined lubrication regimes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Replacement of the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint is a relatively uncommon procedure compared with hip and knee arthroplasty. A cobalt chrome-on-cobalt chrome MTP prosthesis, which had a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating applied to its articulating faces, was obtained for ex vivo analysis. By modelling the ball and socket implant as an equivalent ball-on-plane model and employing elastohydrodynamic theory, the predicted lubrication regimes applicable to this implant design were determined. These calculations were undertaken for a 10–1500 N range of loading values and a 0–30 mm/s range of entraining velocities, for both worn and unworn situations. Calculations showed that the implant would almost always operate in the boundary lubrication regime. The presence of scratches on the articulating faces of the ex vivo sample further implied boundary lubrication. The DLC coating had been removed from the entire face of the phalangeal component and from most of the face of the metatarsal component. From the latter it appeared as if the coating had been scratched and then flaked away parallel to the scratches. In turn this suggested a corrosion based failure of the interface between the DLC coating and the cobalt chrome subsurface.

T.J. Joyce

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Rolling contact fatigue in high vacuum using ion plated nickel-copper-silver solid lubrication  

SciTech Connect

Ion plated, nickel-copper-silver coated steel ball bearings that were tested in rolling contact fatigue (RCF) experiments in high vacuum are presented in this article. ANSI T5 ball bearings were coated with approximately 10 nm of nickel-copper followed by 100 nm of silver using a dc ion plating process. The balls were then tested for RCF in vacuum in the 10{sup -7} Torr range at 130 Hz rotational speed and at 4.1 GPa Hertzian contact stress. The significance of this work is in the extension of RCF testing to an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) application using silver as a lubricant instead of oil. The effects of pressure and voltage on the ion plating process were also investigated using scanning electron microscopy and RCF life testing in UHV. Test results with a ball size of 5/16 in. in UHV show that deposition at voltages greater than 2.5 kV shortens the RCF life and introduces a unique failure mode. Voltage and pressure fluctuations during the deposition process result in significant thickness monitor measurement errors as well. A regulator control scheme that minimizes the process pressure overshoot is also simulated.

Danyluk, Mike; Dhingra, Anoop [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211-3029 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Tribological evaluation of piston skirt/cylinder liner contact interfaces under boundary lubrication conditions.  

SciTech Connect

The friction and wear between the piston and cylinder liner significantly affects the performance of internal combustion engines. In this paper, segments from a commercial piston/cylinder system were tribologically tested using reciprocating motion. The tribological contact consisted of aluminium alloy piston segments, either uncoated, coated with a graphite/resin coating, or an amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C : H) coating, in contact with gray cast iron liner segments. Tests were conducted in commercial synthetic motor oils and base stocks at temperatures up to 120 C with a 2 cm stroke length at reciprocating speeds up to 0.15 m s{sup -1}. The friction dependence of these piston skirt and cylinder liner materials was studied as a function of load, sliding speed and temperature. Specifically, an increase in the sliding speed led to a decrease in the friction coefficient below approximately 70 C, while above this temperature, an increase in sliding speed led to an increase in the friction coefficient. The presence of a coating played an important role. It was found that the graphite/resin coating wore quickly, preventing the formation of a beneficial tribochemical film, while the a-C : H coating exhibited a low friction coefficient and provided significant improvement over the uncoated samples. The effect of additives in the oils was also studied. The tribological behaviour of the interface was explained based on viscosity effects and subsequent changes in the lubrication regime, formation of chemical and tribochemical films.

Demas, N. G.; Erck, R. A.; Fenske, G. R.; Energy Systems

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

U.S. Refinery Yield  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Liquefied Refinery Gases 5.3 5.4 5.2 5.2 5.1 3.9 1993-2013 Finished Motor Gasoline 44.4 44.1 44.4 43.9 43.9 44.9 1993-2013 Finished Aviation Gasoline 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2013 Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel 10.0 9.1 9.3 9.4 9.8 9.6 1993-2013 Kerosene 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.0 0.0 1993-2013 Distillate Fuel Oil 28.4 29.4 28.7 29.2 29.3 29.7 1993-2013 Residual Fuel Oil 3.3 2.9 2.8 2.8 2.5 2.6 1993-2013 Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use 1.4 1.5 1.5 1.6 1.5 1.5 1993-2013 Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.7 1993-2013 Special Naphthas 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.2 1993-2013 Lubricants 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1993-2013 Waxes

344

U.S. Refinery Yield  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Liquefied Refinery Gases 4.1 4.1 4.1 4.3 4.0 4.1 1993-2012 Finished Motor Gasoline 45.5 44.2 46.1 45.7 44.9 45.0 1993-2012 Finished Aviation Gasoline 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2012 Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel 9.1 9.7 9.3 9.3 9.4 9.5 1993-2012 Kerosene 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2012 Distillate Fuel Oil 26.1 27.8 26.9 27.5 28.9 29.1 1993-2012 Residual Fuel Oil 4.2 4.0 4.0 3.8 3.4 3.2 1993-2012 Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use 1.3 1.0 1.3 1.4 1.3 1.3 1993-2012 Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use 1.3 1.2 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.6 1993-2012 Special Naphthas 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 1993-2012 Lubricants 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.0 1993-2012 Waxes 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 1993-2012

345

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst using supercritical fluid extraction. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Programming and testing of the highly complex Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (or SAFT) equation of state is essentially complete. As an accuracy check, results from our program were compared and found to be in excellent agreement with those of two other research groups (one in the US and two in Europe) for both a nonassociating (methane-hexadecane) and an associating (carbon dioxide-methanol) system. This equation is being used to model the solubility our model Fischer-Tropsch compounds in supercritical solvents such as hexane. SAFT has been chosen for this work because of its fundamental rigor. Therefore, extension of our model compound results to the poorly defined Fischer-Tropsch waxes should be more successful compared to more empirical equations such as Peng-Robinson. Computer-controlled automation of one of our dynamic supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction apparatus is complete. The apparatus collects samples automatically, dramatically reducing operator manpower and fatigue, and is also capable of controlling the operating pressure more precisely (i.e., within {plus_minus}2 psi). This apparatus (SFE I) will be used for future experiments with actual Fischer-Tropsch waxes. Modification/construction of another apparatus (SCF II) that will be used for our model component-SCF phase equilibria/solubility studies is nearly complete; it is currently being leak-tested. This apparatus was built to handle the low mass flow rates that will be required when measuring solubility data for the more expensive model compounds, such as n-C40. Anticipated results for the next quarter include VLE measurements for hexane-squalane at temperatures to 573 K.

Thies, M.C.; Joyce, P.C.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst using supercritical fluid extraction. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October 1995--31 December 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer-Tropsch slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor into two fractions: (1) a catalyst-free wax containing less than 10 ppm particulate matter and (2) a concentrated catalyst slurry that is ready for recycle or regeneration. The wax will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200-300{degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent. During the reporting period, work on the small-scale, continuous-flow apparatus continued. Initial experiments have been performed on a binary mixture of n-hexane (solvent) and squalane (model compound) at 200{degrees}C. A total of fifteen samples were collected at 135, 160, and 208 psig, with pressures being controlled to within {plus_minus}2 psi. Results indicate that the equilibrium phase compositions can in principle be measured to a reproducibility of {plus_minus}0.5% in the squalane-rich bottomphase and {plus_minus}2% in the hexane-rich top phase, with respect to the minor component. However, other data measured at these same conditions at another time exhibited scatter that was as much as 5 times greater. We believe that improvements in (1) the method of preheating the feed to the view cell/phase separator and to (2) the sample collection technique are required before data of high accuracy can consistently be generated. The apparatus modifications required to effect these improvements are currently underway and should be completed by the middle of February.

Thies, M.C.; Joyce, P.C.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Formation of carbonaceous nano-layers under high interfacial pressures during lubrication with mineral and bio-based oils  

SciTech Connect

In order to better protect steel surfaces against wear under high loads, understanding of chemical reactions between lubricants and metal at high interfacial pressures and elevated temperatures needs to be improved. Solutions at 5 to 20 wt. % of zinc di-2-ethylhexyl dithio phosphate (ZDDP) and chlorinated paraffins (CP) in inhibited paraffinic mineral oil (IPMO) and inhibited soy bean oil (ISBO) were compared on a Twist Compression Tribotester (TCT) at 200 MPa. Microscopy of wear tracks after 10 seconds tribotesting showed much smoother surface profiles than those of unworn areas. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) coupled with Ar-ion sputtering demonstrated that additive solutions in ISBO formed 2–3 times thicker carbon-containing nano-layers compared to IPMO. The amounts of Cl, S or P were unexpectedly low and detectable only on the top surface with less than 5 nm penetration. CP blends in IPMO formed more inorganic chlorides than those in ISBO. It can be concluded that base oils are primarily responsible for the thickness of carbonaceous nano-layers during early stages of severe boundary lubrication, while CP or ZDDP additive contributions are important, but less significant.

Baltrus, John P. [U.S. DOE

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Cryogenic friction behavior of PTFE based solid lubricant composites N.L. McCook, D.L. Burris, P.L. Dickrell and W.G. Sawyer*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cryogenic friction behavior of PTFE based solid lubricant composites N.L. McCook, D.L. Burris, P life [4,5], ability to operate from cryogenic temperature (4 K) to 500 K, and their relative that operate at cryogenic temperatures, there is a paucity of data available for friction coeffi- cients

Sawyer, Wallace

349

Harold and Inge Marcus Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Fall 2010 Lubrication and Tool Wear in the Turning of Powdered Metal M2 Steel Valve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

finish and tool wear was measured. Utilizing a One-Way ANOVA Test and Tukey's Test, the collected data-way ANOVA and Tukey's Tests were performed on the data in order to determine which lubricant performed done through Tukey's Test and general observation, that Microcut 3680 performed the best out

Demirel, Melik C.

350

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Imports by Area of Entry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Area of Entry by Area of Entry Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Ethylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Biomass-Based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene-Type Bonded Aircraft Fuel Other Bonded Aircraft Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Bonded, 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Other, 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 2000 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, 0.31 to 1.00% Sulfur Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, Greater than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

351

Hydrocracking of a Plastics Pyrolysis Gas Oil to Naphtha  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 Of the approximately 80 billion pounds of plastics currently produced in the United States, most eventually ends up in landfills, with only 2?3% being recycled. ... Disposal of these waste plastics by direct incineration would lead to increased greenhouse gas emissions, primarily carbon dioxide, and particulate pollutants, while direct mechanical recycling of plastics is limited by the fact that reconstituted objects generally possess a downgraded appearance in comparison with virgin plastics. ... 14 On the other hand, there has been little study of the hydrocracking of waste plastic-derived pyrolysis liquids. ...

H. S. Joo; James A. Guin

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

352

SRC-I naphtha octane study. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Octane numbers were measured by the engine method (RON and MON) and were calculated from gas chromatograms for eighteen gasoline samples comprising SRC-I and petroleum-derived raw gasoline, reformates, and selected blends of these materials. Conclusions derived from this work are: (1) Research and Motor Octane Numbers for blends of SRC-I liquids and of SRC-I liquids with petroleum gasoline components closely agree with the values calculated from linear combination of the measured RON and MON of the individual blend components. Although some interactions among the blend components were observed, these are not major and in all cases the 95% confidence interval of all of the individual points fall within the 95% confidence limits of linear blend correlation; (2) On the basis of octane numbers and blending characteristics, SRC-I straight run gasoline and SRC-I reformates are useful as blending components for the motor gasoline pool. In the case of the straight run gasoline, however, other factors such as its high sulfur content will impose a limitation to its direct use in the pool; and (3) Research Octane Numbers calculated from gas chromatograms agree closely with engine RON data for SRC-I gasolines. Accordingly, the GC method may be equally applicable to coal-derived and petroleum gasoline components.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

The glossyhead1 Allele of ACC1 Reveals a Principal Role for Multidomain Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase in the Biosynthesis of Cuticular Waxes by Arabidopsis  

SciTech Connect

A novel mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), having highly glossy inflorescence stems, postgenital fusion in floral organs, and reduced fertility, was isolated from an ethyl methanesulfonate-mutagenized population and designated glossyhead1 (gsd1). The gsd1 locus was mapped to chromosome 1, and the causal gene was identified as a new allele of Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase1 (ACC1), a gene encoding the main enzyme in cytosolic malonyl-coenzyme A synthesis. This, to our knowledge, is the first mutant allele of ACC1 that does not cause lethality at the seed or early germination stage, allowing for the first time a detailed analysis of ACC1 function in mature tissues. Broad lipid profiling of mature gsd1 organs revealed a primary role for ACC1 in the biosynthesis of the very-long-chain fatty acids (C{sub 20:0} or longer) associated with cuticular waxes and triacylglycerols. Unexpectedly, transcriptome analysis revealed that gsd1 has limited impact on any lipid metabolic networks but instead has a large effect on environmental stress-responsive pathways, especially senescence and ethylene synthesis determinants, indicating a possible role for the cytosolic malonyl-coenzyme A-derived lipids in stress response signaling.

Lu, S.; Xu, C.; Zhao, H.; Parsons, E. P.; Kosma, D. K.; Xu, X.; Chao, D.; Lohrey, G.; Bangarusamy, D. K.; Wang, G.; Bressan, R. A.; Jenks, M. A.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Please cite this article in press as: J.A. Bares, et al., In situ graphite lubrication of metallic sliding electrical contacts, Wear (2009), doi:10.1016/j.wear.2009.03.024  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sliding electrical contacts, Wear (2009), doi:10.1016/j.wear.2009.03.024 ARTICLE IN PRESSG Model WEA-99161; No.of Pages8 Wear xxx (2009) xxx­xxx Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Wear journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/wear In situ graphite lubrication of metallic sliding electrical contacts J

Sawyer, Wallace

355

Viscosity and Lubrication  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... oils in the tubes supplied. Further, each laboratory was invited to report the kinematic viscosity of the oils in absolute units at 20° C, according to the method used ... tubes may be selected from a set of apparently equally good tubes.

1945-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

356

Lubricating Oils and Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the course of research work by the second of the undersigned, on emulsification problems in scouring of ... of wool and ...

H. R. HIRST; A. T. KING

1932-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

357

Boundary Layer Lubrication  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

358

Boundary Layer Lubrication  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland.

359

Boundary Layer Lubrication Mechanisms  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

360

Boundary Layer Lubrication Mechanisms  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The tribology of PS212 coatings and PM212 composites for the lubrication of titanium 6A1-4V components of a Stirling engine space power system  

SciTech Connect

The Stirling space power machine incorporates a linear alternator to generate electrical power. The alternator is a reciprocating device that is driven by a solar or nuclear-powered Stirling engine. The power piston and cylinder are made of titanium 6A1-4V (Ti6-4) alloy, and are designed to be lubricated by a hydrodynamically-generated gas film. Rubbing occurs during starts and stops and there is a possibility of an occasional high speed rub. Since titanium is known to have a severe galling tendency in sliding contacts, a `backup,` self-lubricating coating on the cylinder and/or the piston is needed. This report describes the results of a research program to study the lubrication of Ti6-4 with the following chromium carbide based materials: plasma-sprayed PS212 coatings and sintered PM212 counterfaces. Program objectives are to achieve adherent coatings on Ti6-4 and to measure the friction and wear characteristics of the following sliding combinations under conditions simulative of the Stirling-driven space power linear alternator: Ti6-4/Ti6-4 baseline, Ti6-4/PS212 coated Ti6-4, and Ps212 coated Ti6-4/PM212

Sliney, H.E.; Dellacorte, C.; Lukaszewicz, V. [Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)]|[Calspan Corp., Cleveland, OH (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Optimization of the multivariate calibration of a Vis–NIR sensor for the on-line monitoring of marine diesel engine lubricating oil by variable selection methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper deals with the description of the optimization by variable selection methods of the multivariate calibration process of a low-cost Visible–Near Infrared (400–1100 nm) sensor, developed for the on-line monitoring of the insoluble content in diesel marine engine lubricating oil. The performance of the calibration model developed for the Vis–NIR sensor was compared with the performance of the calibration model developed with spectra obtained with a UV/Vis–NIR laboratory spectrometer. The calibration results obtained with the two devices were compared to determine the limitations of the sensor system with respect to the laboratory equipment. First, the spectra were correlated with the insoluble content analyzed in Wearcheckiberica's oil laboratories obtaining a calibration model based on Partial Least Squares-regression (PLSR). Once the pre-processing strategy had been defined, the most significant predictor variables were chosen with the help of Martens uncertainty test, interval Partial Least Squares (iPLS) and Genetic Algorithms (GA) variable selection techniques. Finally, the two models were compared based on the number of latent variables of each model of the values of the Root Mean Square Error of the Cross Validation (RMSECV), the Standard Error of Performance (SECV) and the Ratio of Prediction to Deviation (RPD).

Alberto Villar; Santiago Fernández; Eneko Gorritxategi; José I. Ciria; Luis A. Fernández

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Accelerated screening methods for determining chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures part II: Experimental comparisons and verification of methods. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1993--March 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The research reported herein continued to concentrate on in situ conductivity measurements for development into an accelerated screening method for determining the chemical and thermal stabilities of refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. The work reported herein was performed in two phases. In the first phase, sealed tubes were prepared with steel catalysts and mixtures of CFC-12, HCFC-22, HFC-134a, and HFC-32/HFC-134a (zeotrope 30:70) refrigerants with oils as described in ANSI/ASHRAE Method 97-1989. In the second phase of work, modified sealed tubes, with and without steel catalysts present, were used to perform in situ conductivity measurements on mixtures of CFC-12 refrigerant with oils. The isothermal in situ conductivity measurements were compared with conventional tests, e.g., color measurements, gas chromatography, and trace metals to evaluate the capabilities of in situ conductivity for determining the chemical and thermal stabilities of refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. Other sets of tests were performed using ramped temperature conditions from 175{degrees}C (347{degrees}F) to 205{degrees}C (401{degrees}F) to evaluate the capabilities of in situ conductivity for detecting the onset of rapid degradation in CFC-12, HCFC-22 and HFC-134a refrigerant mixtures with naphthenic oil aged with and without steel catalysts present.

Kauffman, R. [Dayton Univ., OH (United States). Research Inst.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Wax Segregation in Oils: A Multiscale Problem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is for me a great honour to be invited to deliver the Alan Tayler memorial lecture during this conference.

Mario Primicerio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Notes 02. Classical Lubrication Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.5 11 0 1 2 a=-5 a=0 a=5 velocity profiles cross-film coordinate (y/h) vel oci ty vx /U Mass flow rates across the film thickness and mean flow velocities in the x- and z- directions are defined as: ?? ?? h zzh xx dyVMdyVM 00....5 11 0 1 2 a=-5 a=0 a=5 velocity profiles cross-film coordinate (y/h) vel oci ty vx /U Mass flow rates across the film thickness and mean flow velocities in the x- and z- directions are defined as: ?? ?? h zzh xx dyVMdyVM 00...

San Andres, Luis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Mechanisms of mesothelial tissue lubrication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the pleural space, sliding between the lung and chest wall induces shear stress that could damage the delicate mesothelial cells covering the tissue surfaces. Normally, the pleural space, which is filled with fluid, is ...

Lin, Judy Li-Wen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The selective catalytic cracking of Fischer-Tropsch liquids to high value transportation fuels. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Amoco Oil Company, investigated a selective catalytic cracking process (FCC) to convert the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) gasoline and wax fractions to high value transportation fuels. The primary tasks of this contract were to (1) optimize the catalyst and process conditions of the FCC process for maximum conversion of F-T wax into reactive olefins for later production of C{sub 4}{minus}C{sub 8} ethers, and (2) use the olefin-containing light naphtha obtained from FCC processing of the F-T wax as feedstock for the synthesis of ethers. The catalytic cracking of F-T wax feedstocks gave high conversions with low activity catalysts and low process severities. HZSM-5 and beta zeolite catalysts gave higher yields of propylene, isobutylene, and isoamylenes but a lower gasoline yield than Y zeolite catalysts. Catalyst selection and process optimization will depend on product valuation. For a given catalyst and process condition, Sasol and LaPorte waxes gave similar conversions and product selectivities. The contaminant iron F-T catalyst fines in the LaPorte wax caused higher coke and hydrogen yields.

Schwartz, M.M.; Reagon, W.J.; Nicholas, J.J.; Hughes, R.D.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Chemicals from Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...will ship gas to Europe via pipeline. Much gas will reach the United...liquid fuels, lubricants, waxes, soaps, detergents, alcohols...synthetic meth-ane for sale to pipeline gas companies. Laboratory...World War 11, development of pipelines made natural gas the cheapest...

Arthur M. Squires

1976-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

369

Index of Books Reviewed in Science 25 April 1958 through 17 April 1959  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...petroleum products a heating, fuel, lubricating oils * petroleum waxes, etc. A simple instrument for accurate visual values of color...Chapman and Hall), 27 Feb. 1959, 562 Oil: From Prospect to Pipeline, R. R. Wheeler and M. Whited (Gulf Publish-ing Co...

1959-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

370

MEETINGS [AMP ] SHORT COURSES:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Supergrator-3 will compute the heating value, specific gravity...that remove moisture, oil, and dust from carrier...there's simply no better price/performance value on...F 7 Q | \\ | GREASES OILS WAXES Apiezon lubricants...joints or stop cocks. OILS--ideal as vapor diffusion......

Meetings & Short Courses

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Probing tribological properties of waxy oil in pipeline pigging with fluorescence technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Tribological behavior of waxy oil (wax-particles-in-oil mixture) under a sliding soft contact in pipeline pigging process has been investigated using fluorescence technique. Results are reported for a soft line contact between an elastomer cylinder and a glass plate, which is lubricated by a model wax–oil system. It was found that, for waxy oil, the wax particles were entrapped at inlet region and pass through the contact region. The study revealed that the pigging efficiency was a function of Young’s module in rubber and the different lubricated soft contacts in pipeline pigging could be in situ observed. Experimental results indicated that the efficiency of pigging process decreased with the increasing degree of wear in sealing disc and was determined by the flow property of waxy oil.

Gui-Bin Tan; De-Guo Wang; Shu-Hai Liu; Si-Wei Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

"RSE Table N1.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N1.3;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N1.3;" .3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N1.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " ,"Total" "Energy Source","First Use" ,"Total United States" "Coal ",3 "Natural Gas",1 "Net Electricity",1 " Purchases",1 " Transfers In",9 " Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy",15 " Sales and Transfers Offsite",3 "Coke and Breeze",2 "Residual Fuel Oil",4 "Distillate Fuel Oil",5 "Liquefied Petroleum Gases and Natural Gas Liquids",1 "Other",2 " Asphalt and Road Oil (a)",0 " Lubricants (a)",0 " Naphtha < 401 Degrees (a)",0

373

Turbocharger bearing retention and lubrication system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes exhausts gas driven turbocharger. It comprises a housing, a shaft within the housing having a longitudinal axis of rotation and a pair of ends, a compressor wheel mounted within the housing on one end of the shaft for rotation therewith, a turbine wheel mounted within the housing on the other end of the shaft for rotation therewith, means for communicating air to the compressor wheel, means for communicating exhaust gas to the turbine wheel to cause the latter to rotate the shaft and the compressor wheel mounted thereon to compress the air communicated to the compressor wheel, and bearing means mounting the shaft for rotation relative to the housing, the bearing means including a bearing outer ring, a bearing inner ring, and ball bearing elements supporting the bearing outer ring on the bearing inner ring, a bearing locating aperture in the bearing outer ring, and an elongated bearing location pin having a longitudinal axis of symmetry extending transversely to the longitudinal axis of the shaft.

Gutknecht, D.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and Additives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

375

Notes 00. Introduction to Hydrodynamic Lubrication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/product/448_448.htm Portable Generator http://www.notebookre view.com/ http://www.wir efly.com/ Mobile electronic equipment Large Scale Combustor http://www.uavpayloads.com/pr oducts.php4 UAV Micro Gas Turbine http://www.m-dot.com/page8.html Application...://www.robhaz.com/ RescueRobot http://www2.northerntool.c om/product/448_448.htm Portable Generator http://www.notebookre view.com/ http://www.wir efly.com/ Mobile electronic equipment Large Scale Combustor http://www.uavpayloads.com/pr oducts.php4 UAV Micro Gas Turbine...

San Andres, Luis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

National Agricultural-Based Lubricants (NABL) Center  

SciTech Connect

This project, while defined as a one year project from September 30, 2012 – September 30, 2013, was a continuation of a number of tasks that were defined in previous years. Those tasks were performed and were finalized in this period. The UNI-NABL Center, which has been in operation in various forms since 1991, has closed its facilities since September 2013 and will be phasing out in June 2014. This report covers the individual tasks that were identified in the previous reports and provides closure to each task in its final stage.

Honary, Lou

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

377

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

VTO's goals will help the country meet the Renewable Fuel Standard's goals for use of biofuels in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and the Energy Independence and Security Act of...

378

Fuel & Lubricant Technologies R&D  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

379

The Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication of Piston Rings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...throughout most of the engine cycle, but that a transition to mixed...four-stroke and six two-stroke diesel engines is assessed in terms...is presented to confirm the general findings recorded in the study...liners many times each second in diesel engines, together with the...

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies. The U.S. Department of Energy's Gasoline/Diesel Particulate Matter Split Study1 concluded vehicles fueled with gasoline, 10 percent ethanol in gasoline (commonly known as E10), diesel, biodiesel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Wellbore Heat Transfer Model for Wax Deposition in Permafrost Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3.2 Calculation Results ................................................................................................ 60 6. Results...

Cui, Xiaoting

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Bypass Pigging of Subsea Pipelines Suffering Wax Deposition.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Which criteria to pay attention to is important when finding the optimal pigging frequency. This thesis illustrates the forces acting on a bypass pig… (more)

Galta, Tore

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

[en] WAX DEPOSITION IN LAMINAR FLOW WITH SUSPENDED CRYSTALS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??[pt] A tendência da produção offshore do petróleo é crescente. O transporte do óleo nestes ambientes frios (águas profundas) ocasiona a perda de solubilidade e… (more)

JOSE LUIS PLASENCIA CABANILLAS

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Modeling of wax deposition in a crude oil carrying pipeline.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The oil modeled in this thesis has a large amount of paraffin and must be transported from where it is extracted to a refinery over… (more)

Montalvo, Preston

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Cloning and Characterization of the WAX2 Gene of Arabidopsis Involved in Cuticle Membrane and Wax Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Fe-O-Fe center in stearoyl- ACP desaturase: Primary sequence identity with other diiron-oxo protrins. Biochemistry 33, 12776-12786. Gachotte, D., Husselstein, T., Bard, M., Lacroute, F., and Benveniste, P. (1996). Isolation and characterization...

Xinbo Chen; S. Mark Goodwin; Virginia L. Boroff; Xionglun Liu; Matthew A. Jenks

2003-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

386

Improving Accuracy in the Determination of Aromatics in Gasoline by Gas Chromatography—Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......was composed of five gasoline blendstocks: light straight run (LSR) naphtha...consisted of the 21 gasoline fuels used in various...naphtha; LSR, light straight run naphtha; reformate...Because these common gasoline blendstocks contain......

Michael D. Mathiesen; Axel J. Lubeck

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 identified as potential technical risks to the EECP the fuel/engine performance and emissions of the F-T diesel fuel products. Hydrotreating the neat F-T diesel product reduces potentially reactive olefins, oxygenates, and acids levels and alleviates corrosion and fuel stability concerns. Future coproduction plants can maximize valuable transportation diesel by hydrocracking the F-T Synthesis wax product to diesel and naphtha. The upgraded neat F-T diesel, hydrotreater F-T diesel, and hydrocracker F-T diesel products would be final blending components in transportation diesel fuel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully carried out fuel lubricity property testing, fuel response to lubricity additives, and hot-start transient emission tests on a neat F-T diesel product, a hydrocracker F-T diesel product, a blend of hydrotreater and hydrocracker F-T diesel products, and a Tier II California Air Resources Board (CARB)-like diesel reference fuel. Only the neat F-T diesel passed lubricity inspection without additive while the remaining three fuel candidates passed with conventional additive treatment. Hot-start transient emission tests were conducted on the four fuels in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Federal Test Procedure (FTP) specified in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 86, and Subpart N on a rebuilt 1991 Detroit Diesel Corporation Series 60 heavy-duty diesel engine. Neat F-T diesel fuel reduced oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), total particulate (PM), hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and the Soluble Organic Fraction (SOF) by 4.5%, 31%, 50%, 29%, and 35%, respectively, compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The hydrocracker F-T diesel product and a blend of hydrocracker and hydrotreater F-T diesel products also reduced NO{sub x}, PM, HC, CO and SOF by 13%, 16% to 17%, 38% to 63%, 17% to 21% and 21% to 39% compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The fuel/engine performance and emissions of the three F-T diesel fuels exceed the performance of a Tier II CARB-like diesel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully met the lubricity property testing and F-T diesel fuel hot-start transient emissions test objectives. The results of the testing help mitigate potential economic risks on obtaining a premium price for the F-T diesel fuel

Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; J. Erwin; Matthew G. Banks; Terry L. Ullman

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

388

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The potential technical and economic risks to the EECP from Task 2.5 can be mitigated by demonstrating that the end-use products derived from the upgrading of the F-T synthesis total liquid product can meet or exceed current specifications for the manufacture of ethylene and propylene chemicals from F-T naphtha, for the generation of hydrogen from F-T naphtha to power fuel cells, for direct blending of F-T diesels into transportation fuels, for the conversion of F-T heavy product wax to transportation fuels, and the conversion of F-T Heavy product wax to a valuable high melting point food-grade specialty wax product. Product evaluations conducted under Task 2.5 of Phase II successfully mitigated the above technical and economic risks to the EECP with the development of product yields and product qualities for the production of chemicals, transportation fuels, and specialty food-grade waxes from the F-T synthesis products.

Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; Ming He; James F. Stevens; Centha A. Davis; Michael Henley; Jerome Mayer; Harry Tsang; Jimell Erwin; Jennifer Adams; Michael Tillman; Chris Taylor; Marjan J. Roos; Robert F. Earhart

2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

389

Prediction of ASTM Method D86 Distillation of Gasolines and Naphthas according to the Fugacity-Filmmodel from Gas Chromatographic Detailed Hydocarbon Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......were provided by Dennis Sutton, Marathon Oil Company, TX. * Results of GC...were provided by Dennis Sutton, Marathon Oil Company, TX. Figure 6. D86 distillation...were provided by Dennis Sutton, Marathon Oil Company, TX). Five ASTM D86......

Walter Spieksma

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Modeling a Catalytic Reactor for Hydrotreating of Straight-Run Gas Oil Blended with Fluid Catalytic Cracking Naphtha and Light Cycle Oil: Influence of Vapor–Liquid Equilibrium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Model results were validated using the industrial test run data, and very good predictions of overall sulfur conversion and reactor temperature were obtained. ...

Ivana M. Mijatovi?; Sandra B. Glisic; Aleksandar M. Orlovi?

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

NDP-030/R6 (Table 3)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3. Listing of the primary and secondary fuels from the United Nations 3. Listing of the primary and secondary fuels from the United Nations Energy Statistics Database used in calculating CO2-emission estimates. The two-letter commodity code used by he United Nations for each fuel type is shown in parentheses. Gas Fuels Primary gas fuels Secondary gas fuels Natural gas (NG) Gasworks gas (GG) Coke-oven gas (OG) Refinery gas (RG) Liquid Fuels Primary liquid fuels Secondary liquid fuels Crude petroleum (CR) Aviation gasoline (AV) Natural gas liquids (GL) Plant condensate (CD) Gas-diesel oils (DL) Feedstocks (FS) Jet fuel (JF) Kerosene (KR) Liquefied petroleum gas (LP) Motor gasoline (MO) Natural gasoline (NT) Residual fuel oils (RF) Secondary nonenergy liquid fuels Bitumen/asphalt (BT) Lubricants (LU) Naphthas (NP) Petroleum coke (PK)

392

Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Less Than 0.31 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel Greater Than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Special Naphthas Lubricants Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

393

Carbon Emissions: Petroleum Refining Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Refining Industry Petroleum Refining Industry Carbon Emissions in the Petroleum Refining Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 2911) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 79.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.5% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 16.5 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 6,263 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 28.9% Nonfuel Use of Energy Sources: 3,110 trillion Btu (49.7%) -- Naphthas and Other Oils: 1,328 trillion Btu -- Asphalt and Road Oil: 1,224 trillion Btu -- Lubricants: 416 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 12.75 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey", "Monthly Refinery Report" for 1994, and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998.

394

Efficiency of a gearbox lubricated with wind turbine gear oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study a two stage multiplying gearbox with helical gears and four fully formulated wind turbine gear oils were tested, on a back-to-back gearbox test rig with recirculating power, at low input speeds (100–500 rpm) and high input torques (500–1000 Nm). The gearbox oil sump temperature was set free. A numeric power loss model simulating all the relevant power loss mechanisms was implemented, aiming to evaluate the relative influence of each power loss component. The experimental results have shown that each wind turbine gear oil formulation generated different power loss resulting in distinct stabilized operating temperatures.

Pedro M.T. Marques; Carlos M.C.G. Fernandes; Ramiro C. Martins; Jorge H.O. Seabra

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Lubricating properties of ashless thiophosphates and dithiophosphates based on isononylphenol  

SciTech Connect

Nitrogen-containing thiophosphates and dithiophosphates that are prepared from commercial isooctylphenol manifest antiwear properties in mineral oils. The structure of the hydrocarbon radical is a major factor in determining the effectiveness of these additives. Isooctylphenol that is obtained by alkylating phenol with polymer distillate in the presence of the cation exchange resin KU-2-8 as a catalyst is a wide fraction distilling at 100-180{degrees}C under a residual pressure of 667 Pa; dithiophosphate additives prepared from this material consist of mixed dithiophosphates with monosubstituted and partially substituted C{sub 4}-C{sub 16} alkylphenyl radicals. Because of the nonimiformity of structure of such additives, they are readily soluble and highly effective in naphthenic-aromatic base mineral oils. However, the presence of phenol and butylphenols in the alkylphenol has deleterious effects on the additive quality, including a reduction of its solubility in mineral oils. In order to expand the raw material base and improve the additive quality, we have synthesized and investigated certain ashless additives containing sulfur, phosphorus, and nitrogen, prepared with isononylphenol. This isononylphenol distills within the 120-130{degrees}C interval at 400 Pa; it consists of a mixture of p-isononylphenols in which the iso-C{sub 9} alkyl groups vary in structure. We have carried out a comparison of the functional properties of thiophosphate and dithiophosphate additives based on isooctylphenol and isononylphenol. As antiwear and antifriction additives for M-11 base oil, we investigated diethylenetriamine salts of dithiophosphoric acids based on isononylphenol (A) and isooctylphenol (A{prime}), and also amidothiophosphates based on isononylphenol (B, C) and isooctylphenol (ATF additive). The ability of these additives to reduce the wear of rubbing pairs was determined.

Tsygankova, O.E.; Parfenova, V.A.; Belov, P.S.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Auto/Steel Partnership: Hydroforming Materials and Lubricant...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. lm27heimbuch.pdf More Documents & Publications FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting...

397

Natural Oils - The Next Generation of Diesel Engine Lubricants...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aftertreatment with a Oil Conditioning Filter Effect of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on Diesel Engine Oil - Impact on Wear Development of High Performance Heavy Duty Engine Oils...

398

FY 2012 Progress Report for Fuel & Lubricant Technologies  

Energy Savers (EERE)

For example, oil-sand-derived fuels from Canada, Fischer-Tropsch fuels made from natural gas, and biofuels derived from fats and vegetable oils will play increasingly important...

399

Tribological Properties of Nanoparticle-Based Lubrication Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

career. To my aunt, Baria, whose endless support helped shape the person I have become. iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to acknowledge the contribution and extensive knowledge of Dr. Mustafa Akbulut, whose patience and guidance were... of nanoparticles size ............................................................................. 44 2.7.2 Nanostructure and shape ................................................................................. 46 2.7.3 Surface structure...

Kheireddin, Bassem

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

400

Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE Project)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE Project)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

402

Recycling and re-refining used lubricating oils  

SciTech Connect

This article will point out the advantages and disadvantages of current oil and oily water disposal techniques in operation today. The emphasis will be on the environmental (long- and short-term) ramifications which may be encountered by each disposal technique.

Pyziak, T.; Brinkman, D.W. [Safety-Kleen Corp. Elk Gove Village, IL (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Tribological Properties of Ionic Liquids Lubricants Containing Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is to describe the tribological and rheological properties of mixtures of nanoparticles (NPs) and ionic liquids (ILs), specifically the mixture of bare SiO_(2) (silica) nanoparticles and ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (trifluoromethysulfony...

Lu, Wei

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

404

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

2008-2009 Fuels Technologies R&D Progress Report Vehicles Home About Vehicle Technologies Office Plug-in Electric Vehicles & Batteries Fuel Efficiency & Emissions Alternative Fuels...

405

Controlled Experiments on the Effects of Lubricant/Additive ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions CAI 300 HFID - Hydrocarbons CAI 400 HCLD - NONOx CAI 602P NDIR - COCO2O 2 API 100 E - SO 2 Particulate Emissions Sampling and comparison to burner Experimental...

406

Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of active nanoparticle additive for lubricatns that will minimize sulfur and phosporous content in engine oil, and lower ash forming elements deer08adhvaryu.pdf More Documents &...

407

Modeling piston secondary motion and skirt lubrication with applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interest in reducing emission and improving engine efficiency has become a major push in industry, due to upcoming stricter regulations. A great deal of attention has been given to the frictional losses due to piston ...

Totaro, Pasquale (Pasquale Pio)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Examining Effects of Lubricant Composition in Engine Component...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

work synergistically with advanced engine technologies to meet a goal of improving mechanical efficiency by 10 percent. deer12wong.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle...

409

Friction Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

410

Large-Scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticle-Based Lubrication Additives  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

acid; borax; solid boric acid (H 3 BO 3 ); powdered boric acid; mineral oil with 1% nano-boric acid particles; individual nano-boric acid particles. Illustration and images...

411

Lubrication in a corner Roman Stocker and A. E. Hosoi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). In agriculture, they play an important role in determining the effectiveness of agrochemicals like insecticides

Hosoi, Anette "Peko"

412

Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE Project...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ace046lawson2011...

413

Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE Project...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

0 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. ace046lawson2010...

415

Synthetic zeolites and other microporous oxide molecular sieves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...molecular weight are gasoline, aviation jet...cracking (to make gasoline) (14), and...fraction, light straight-run naphtha, rich...reduction of lead in gasoline required increased...hydroisomerization of the light straight-run naphtha fraction mentioned...

John D. Sherman

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Study on Penetration Equation by Experimental Investigation on Penetration into Wax  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Penetration of a projectile into a target is ... where both materials deform with very high strain rate. Most of experiments on penetration were to obtain resultant quantities such as depth of penetration and res...

Hwun Park; Weinong Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Formation of bands and ridges on Europa by cyclic deformation: Insights from analogue wax experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, California, USA Antoine Sinton Departement des Sciences de la Matiere, Ecole Normale Superieure, Lyon, France); KEYWORDS: Europa, ridges, tidal deformation Citation: Manga, M., and A. Sinton (2004), Formation of bands

Manga, Michael

418

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax from Catalyst by Supercritical Extraction  

SciTech Connect

Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of January I to March 31, 1998. The direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows was completed. Variations of particle trajectories are studied. It is shown that the near wall vortices profoundly affect the particle removal process in turbulent boundary layer flows. Experimental data for transport and deposition of fibrous particles in the aerosol wind tunnel was obtained. The measured deposition velocity for irregular fibrous particles is compared with the empirical correlation and the available data for glass fibers and discussed. Additional progress on the sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition and resuspension in turbulent flows was made.

Mark C. Thies; Patrick C. Joyce

1998-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

[en] ASSESSMENT OF MOLECULAR DIFFUSION AS A MECHANISM FOR WAX DEPOSITION IN PETROLEUM PIPELINES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??[pt] Deposição de parafinas, com alto peso molecular, na parede interna de linhas submarinas de produção e transporte continua a ser um problema crítico encontrado… (more)

MAO ILICH ROMERO VELASQUEZ

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Inhibiting the deposition of tars, asphaltenes, and waxes in oil pipelines with chemical reagents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements have been made on the rheological parameters of oils from the South Sukhokum and Meshalka deposits at 20-60°C in the presence of surfactants, and optimal concentrations for the latter have been de...

R. N. Shiryaeva; F. Kh. Kudasheva…

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Development of a heat-balance model for the characterization of wax blockage in flowlines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The presence of a blockage in a pipeline will alter the fluid dynamics of a flowing system in terms of the heat, mass and velocity… (more)

Ombu, Ebiaye Valerie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Two Approaches to Evaluate Drought Tolerance in Maize: Seedling Stress Response and Epicuticular Wax Accumulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We wanted to develop rapid and cost-effective drought tolerance screening methods for mass amounts of germplasm. In 2009 and 2010, we evaluated sixty-two maize inbred lines and their hybrid testcross progeny using seedling stress response...

Meeks, Meghyn

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

423

Proteomic profiling of intact proteins using WAX-RPLC 2-D separations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

also detected for S. oneidensis lysates obtained from cells grown on 13C, 15N depleted media under aerobic and sub-oxic conditions. This work aimed at optimizing intact protein...

424

The Role of Leaf Epicuticular Wax an Improved Adaptation to Moisture Deficit Environments in Wheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water deficiency is the primary reason for decreasing wheat (Triticum aestivum) yields globally, causing a nearly 50-90% yield reduction on at least 60 Mha of land in developing countries Previous studies have identified associations in genomic...

Mohammed, Suheb

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

425

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax from Catalyst by Supercritical Extraction  

SciTech Connect

Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of January I to March 31, 1998. The direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows was completed. Variations of particle trajectories are studied. It is shown that the near wall vortices profoundly affect the particle removal process in turbulent boundary layer flows. Experimental data for transport and deposition of fibrous particles in the aerosol wind tunnel was obtained. The measured deposition velocity for irregular fibrous particles is compared with the empirical correlation and the available data for glass fibers and discussed. Additional progress on the sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition and resuspension in turbulent flows was made.

Mark C. Thies; Patrick C. Joyce

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

426

Optimal Model-Based Production Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrotreatment Gasoline blending Distillate blending Gas oil blending Cat Crack CDU crude1 crude2 butane Fuel gas Premium Reg. Distillate GO Treated Residuum SR Fuel gas SR Naphtha SR Gasoline SR Distillate SR GO SR Feedstock Heavy Naphtha 13 9 Refinery Production Fuel Gas 13 17 LPG 18 20 Light Naphtha 6 6 Premium Gasoline

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

427

Standard version Advanced version  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average octane levels must be: Gasoline Jet fuel Heating oil Distilled 2 Naphtha Distill (barrels) 0.25 0.25 0.5 Distilled naphtha can be used only to produce gasoline version Advanced version Margaret Oil - basic (3) Crude Distill Naphtha Gasoline Distilled 1 Jet fuel

Hall, Julian

428

Investigation of bit patterned media, thermal flying height control sliders and heat assisted magnetic recording in hard disk drives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photo degradation of perfluoropolyether lubricants used indegradation of perfluoropolyether lubricant for datainteractions between ZDOL perfluoropolyether lubricant and

Zheng, Hao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

A Novel Method for Separation and Identification of Sulphur Compounds in Naphtha (30–200°C) and Middle Distillate (200–350°C) Fractions of Lloydminster Heavy Oil by GC/MS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......5-diethylthiophene thiophene diethyl sulphide tetrahydrothiophene ethyl phenyl sulphide naphthalene...benzothiophene dibenzothiophene methyl tetrahydrothiophene methyl tetrahydrothiopyran dimethyl tetrahydrothiophene ethyl butyl sulphide amyl ethyl......

M.A. Poirier; G.T. Smiley

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

36191,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,152,"MOTOR GAS, OTHER FINISHED"...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WAX AMERICAS INC",6,70,"WAX",1601,"CHARLESTON, SC","SOUTH CAROLINA",1,428,"GERMANY",1,0,0 36191,"SASOL WAX AMERICAS INC",7,70,"WAX",1001,"NEW YORK, NY","NEW...

431

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 1.15 Non-Combustion Use of Fossil Fuels, Selected Years, 1980-2011 Year Petroleum Products Natural Gas 4 Coal Total Percent of Total Energy Consumption Asphalt and Road Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1 Lubricants Petro- chemical Feedstocks 2 Petroleum Coke Special Naphthas Other 3 Total Physical Units 5 1980 145 230 58 253 R 14 37 58 R 795 639 2.4 - - - - 1985 156 R 278 53 144 R 16 30 41 R 719 500 1.1 - - - - 1990 176 R 373 60 199 20 20 39 R 887 R 567 .6 - - - - 1991 162 R 426 53 203 17 17 44 R 922 573 .6 - - - - 1992 166 R 448 54 214 R 28 20 35 R 966 R 606 1.2 - - - - 1993 174 R 436 55 216 R 18 20 35 R 955 R 640 .9 - - - - 1994 176 R 483 58 224 R 21 15 35 R 1,013 673 .9 - - - - 1995 178 R 479 57 215 R 20 13 33 R 996 R 695 .9 - - - - 1996 177 R 502 55 217 R 20 14 33 R 1,019 R 718 .9 - - - - 1997 184 R 501 58 250 R 15 14 34 R 1,056 R 740 .9 - - - - 1998 190 R 485 61 252 25 20 39 R 1,073 762 .8 - - - - 1999 200 R 566 62 238

432

NATURE PHYSICS | VOL 10 | FEBRUARY 2014 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 81 String and sealing wax --although probably  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-solar-power hibernation, that put it on course to meet the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko later this year. It has already 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in August 2014. The spacecraft will be the first ever to orbit a comet to land a probe. In November 2014, that probe, called Philae, will deploy and anchor itself to the nucleus

Loss, Daniel

433

[en] EXPERIMENTAL VALIDATION OF MODELS FOR PREDICTING THE FORCES FOR REMOVING WAX DEPOSITS IN PIPELINES USING PIGS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??[pt] Pigs ainda são a ferramenta mais utilizada pela indústria para remover depósitos de parafina em linhas submarinas de petróleo. A passagem de Pigs é… (more)

ROBSON DE OLIVEIRA SOUZA

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Experimental and numerical study on the effects of surfactant as drag reducing agent in paraffin wax oil pipeline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents an experimental and simulated approach to investigate the drag-reducing phenomenon of surfactants. The experiments to examine the effects of surfactant as a drag reducing agent (DRA) were cond...

Hochang Jang; Yvan Christian Supartono…

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

168 nature neuroscience volume 2 no 2 february 1999 Sleep spindle oscillations consist of waxing-and-waning field poten-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

produced propagating patterns of spike-burst activity, which could be transformed into self-sustained at different membrane voltages Self-sustained rhythmic activity in the thalamic reticular nucleus mediated

Bazhenov, Maxim

436

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax from Catalyst Using Near-Critical Fluid Extraction: Analysis of Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

", can be produced from materials such as coal, natural gas, waste biomass, and petroleum coke. A great of coal and natural gas exist in many geographical regions that lack sufficient petroleum. Therefore

Kilpatrick, Peter K.

437

FAQs for Survey Forms 804 and 814  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 and 814 4 and 814 How are different types of naphtha cargoes classified for reporting purposes? Naphtha to be used as reformer feed is classified as unfinished oils, naphtha and lighter (EIA product code 820). Naphtha intended for gasoline blending is classified as motor gasoline blending components. If the naphtha is intended for gasoline blending but it's not already blended to form RBOB (EIA product codes 122 and 123), CBOB (EIA product code 139), or GTAB (EIA product codes 120 and 121), then classify the product as "All Other Motor Gasoline Blending Components" (EIA product code 138). Naphtha classified as unfinished oils or motor gasoline blending components requires reporting of a processing facility. Traders will probably be able to tell the difference between reformer feed

438

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

biodiesel or renewable diesel, renewable gasoline, renewable naphtha, biocrude, biogas, and other renewable, biodegradable, mono alkyl ester combustible fuel derived from...

439

A Review of DOE Biofuels Program  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Recycle nutrients water Makeup solvent Solvent recycle Spent algae + water Sludge Biogas for energy Flue gas from turbine Hydrogen Offgas Naphtha Diesel Raw oil Power...

440

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

feedstocks such as ethane, propane, butane, naphtha oruse mainly ethane and propane for steam cracking, availablecracking of ethane and propane (Oil and Gas Journal, 2006a).

Neelis, Maarten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Impact of Biodiesel on Ash Emissions and Lubricant Properties Affecting Fuel Economy and Engine Wear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

442

E-Print Network 3.0 - automotive lubricants astm Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

standards - ISO - ASTM - CEN - Codex - ..... Other - miscellaneous... Automotive parts Tyres for cars - improving "green strength" Re-use of Teflon scrap 12;56 End of part 1...

443

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Fuel and Lubricant Effects on Emissions Control Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about fuel and...

444

Friction of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in Commercial Gear Oils at Elevated Temperatures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This study was conducted to understand how to increase engine efficiency by reducing parasitic boundary regime friction losses and enable operation with lower viscosity oils while maintaining engine durability.

445

Ionic Liquids as Multi-Functional Lubricant Additives to Enhance Engine Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

446

The Influence of Molecular Structure of Distillate Fuels on HFRR Lubricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given at 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

447

Simulation of Thermal Stability and Friction: A lubricant confined between Monolayers of Wear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract To understand antiwear phenomena in motor engines at the atomic level and provide evidence in selecting future ashless wear inhibitors, we studied the thermal stability of the self­assembled monolayer derived from fitting to ab initio quantum chemical calculations of dimethyl DTP (and DTC) and Fe(OH)2(H2O

Ã?agin, Tahir

448

Mechanics of Contact and Lubrication Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stones on rollers to modern turbine engines that are use to propel aircraft [5]. Ball bearings are used

Müftü, Sinan

449

Numerical Study of Heavy Oil Flow on Horizontal Pipe Lubricated by Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter reports information related to multiphase flow with emphasis to core-annular flow. Industrial application has been given to transient water-heavy ultraviscous oil two-phase flow in horizontal pipe...

Tony Herbert Freire de Andrade…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

The effect of lubricant derived ash on the catalytic activity of diesel particulate filters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A diesel particulate filter (DPF) is an aftertreatment device used to remove hazardous particulate matter (PM) from diesel engine exhaust. Modem emission restrictions have limited the acceptable amount of PM output by ...

Murray, Timothy Quinn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

1989 annual book of ASTM standards. Section 5: Petroleum products, lubricants, and fossil fuels  

SciTech Connect

This standards volume covers test methods for rating motor, diesel, and aviation fuels. The standards include: Standard test method for knock characteristics of motor and aviation fuels by the motor method and Standard test method for knock characteristics of motor fuels by the research method.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission Aftertreatment Systems via an Oil Conditioning Filter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

453

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous lubricated short Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 41 SELF-ASSEMBLY OF MICRO PUMPS WITH HIGH UNIFORMITY IN PERFORMANCE Summary: -align and mount to the hydrophilic...

454

Dynamics of ultra low flying sliders during contact with a lubricated disk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Magnetic recording sliders are expected to fly at a spacing of 3 to 5 nm above the disk in the near future. At such a small spacing, flying height modulations are becoming an increasingly more ... the past concer...

Jianfeng Xu; James D. Kiely; Yiao-Tee Hsia; Frank E. Talke

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Detailed Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species in Diesel Exhaust and Aftertreatment Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs.

456

The Sensitivity of DPF Performance to the Spatial Distribution of Ash Generated from Six Lubricant Formulations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Discusses potential of DPF pressure drop reduction by optimizing the spatial distribution of ash inside DPF inlet channel

457

Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Development of active nanoparticle additive for lubricatns that will minimize sulfur and phosporous content in engine oil, and lower ash forming elements

458

Multi component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency And Durability in Engines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland.

459

Numerical modeling of piston secondary motion and skirt lubrication in internal combustion engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Internal combustion engines dominate transportation of people and goods, contributing significantly to air pollution, and requiring large amounts of fossil fuels. With increasing public concern about the environment and ...

McClure, Fiona

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Effects of piston design and lubricant selection on reciprocating engine friction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interaction between the piston and the liner in a reciprocating engine is of much interest because it affects reliability, noise, and efficiency. This study evaluated various changes to the piston skirt with the specific ...

Moughon, Luke (Luke Frank)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Hollow nanoparticles of WS2 as potential solid-state lubricants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... . Experiment C represents an extended experiment which tests wear under varying speeds and loads (ASTM no. G77). The results show reduction in wear for the HNs, relative to ...

L. Rapoport; Yu. Bilik; Y. Feldman; M. Homyonfer; S. R. Cohen; R. Tenne

1997-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

462

Advances in hybrid water-lubricated journal bearings for use in ocean vessels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The outboard bearings that support shafts in naval ships and submarines present unique challenges to designers, shipbuilders, and operators. Such bearings must operate continuously and reliably in demanding environments ...

Heberley, Brian Douglas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Superhard and low-friction coatings and surface treatments can help improve fuel economy and durability in engines.

464

Auto/Steel Partnership: Hydroforming Materials and Lubricant Lightweight Rear Chassis Structures Future Generation Passenger Compartment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

465

Properties of carbon overcoats and perfluoro-polyether lubricants in hard disk drives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In addition, high surface energy materials rearrange ora high energy laser pulse vaporizes the carbon material and

Brunner, Ralf

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

E-Print Network 3.0 - active hybrid lubrication Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering, Iowa State University Collection: Materials Science 9 Capillary Forces in Micro-Fluidic Self-Assembly Andreas Greiner, Jan Lienemann, Jan G. Korvink, Xiaorong...

467

E-Print Network 3.0 - applying active lubrication Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sides, " Active Control of Wetting Using Applied Electrical Potentials and Self... the hydro- phobicity of the binding sites between micro-parts and substrates. Active assembly...

468

E-Print Network 3.0 - active lubrication applied Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sides, " Active Control of Wetting Using Applied Electrical Potentials and Self... the hydro- phobicity of the binding sites between micro-parts and substrates. Active assembly...

469

E-Print Network 3.0 - active lubricated multirecess Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MICRO-ASSEMBLY VIA ELECTROCHEMICAL MODULATION OF SURFACE ENERGY Summary: the hydro- phobicity of the binding sites between micro-parts and substrates. Active assembly...

470

Design, fabrication and testing of a bearing test rig and preliminary studies on oil mist lubrication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

three microns in diameter. The oil mist generated by the mist generator can be conveyed up to 500 ft. through pipes, also known as main headers at velocities up to 22 fps. (2, 3). The turbulence induced by higher velocities causes coalescence... at the bottom of the pipe. In order to prevent clogging of the smaller distribution pipes or reclassifiers with oil, the main header system is This thesis follows the form and style of STLE journal, i i n n in rin sloped back toward the generator so...

Shamim, Abdus

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

471

Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Lubricant and Additive Effects on Engine Friction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Combining data from motored engine friction, a theoretical engine model, a line friction contact rig, and a fired engine can provide better insight to lube oil and additive performance.

472

Dynamics of a parallel, high-speed, lubricated thrust bearing with Navier slip boundary conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and slip bearings is in the development of fluid stiffness and the minimum...carried out at the University Technology Centre in Gas Turbine Transmission Systems at the...and stability of self-acting gas journal bearings. J. Tribol......

N.Y. Bailey; K.A. Cliffe; S. Hibberd; H. Power

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

E-Print Network 3.0 - articular cartilage lubrication Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that knowledge of the cartilage thickness ... Source: Hung, Clark T. - Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbia University Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 3...

474

RPT_PERIOD","R_S_NAME","LINE_NUM","PROD_CODE","PROD_NAME","PORT...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BP LUBRICANTS ",8,854,"Lubricants, Total",1003,"NEWARK, NJ","NEW JERSEY",1,428,"GERMANY",1,0,0,,,,,," " "applicationvnd.ms-excel","CASTROL BP LUBRICANTS...

475

RPT_PERIOD","R_S_NAME","LINE_NUM","PROD_CODE","PROD_NAME","PORT...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BP LUBRICANTS ",4,854,"Lubricants, Total",5301,"HOUSTON, TX","TEXAS",3,428,"GERMANY",1,0,0,,,,,," " "applicationvnd.ms-excel","CASTROL BP LUBRICANTS...

476

Optimal Model-Based Production Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasoline blending Distillate blending Gas oil blending Cat Crack CDU crude1 crude2 butane Fuel gas Premium 17 LPG 18 20 Light Naphtha 6 6 Premium Gasoline 20 20 Reg. Gasoline 80 92 Gas Oil 163 170 Fuel Oil Reg. Distillate Treated Residuum SR Fuel gas SR Naphtha SR Gasoline SR Distillate SR GO SR Residuum

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

477

Optimal Model-Based Production Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrotreatment Gasoline blending Distillate blending Gas oil blending Cat Crack CDU crude1 crude2 butane Fuel gas Premium Reg. Distillate GO Treated Residuum SR Fuel gas SR Naphtha SR Gasoline SR Distillate SR GO SR Naphtha SR Gasoline SR Distillate SR GO SR Residuum #12;7 Complexity of CDU CDU depends on steam stripping

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

478

Optimal Model-Based Production Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrotreatment Gasoline blending Distillate blending Gas oil blending Cat Crack CDU crude1 crude2 butane Fuel gas Premium Reg. Distillate GO Treated Residuum SR Fuel gas SR Naphtha SR Gasoline SR Distillate SR GO SR crude2 SR Fuel gas SR Naphtha SR Gasoline SR Distillate SR GO SR Residuum backoutlet

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

479

PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN FROM POST-CONSUMER WASTES Stefan Czernik, Richard French, Calvin Feik, and Esteban Chornet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steam reforming of hydrocarbons: natural gas and naphtha. However, the instability of the prices potential) if CO were further converted by water-gas shift. 1 Proceedings of the 2002 U.S. DOE Hydrogen steam reforming of hydrocarbons: natural gas and naphtha. However, processes using other raw materials

480

A short presentation of mathematics and applications in Florence and more  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Deposition in pipelines Funded by ENI Wax deposits by Fickian diffusion Prediction of the amount-scalable algorithm Globally stable solution reached Compiled as library for blowdown simulation software #12;WAX of deposited wax #12;Wax ­ Laboratory studies Cold Finger Wax diffusivity and solubility detection Deposit

Rosso, Fabio

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "naphthas lubricants waxes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Impact of surface chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ii) the development of model systems...Lubricant Technology. A lubricant...compressors, turbines, and hydraulic...high-temperature gas turbines and space applications...lubrication for the development of lubricant technology. In past decades...

Gabor A. Somorjai; Yimin Li

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

High-Throughput Plasmonic Nanolithography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by a thin layer of Perfluoropolyether (PFPE) as a lubricant2-nm thick lubricant Perfluoropolyether (PFPE) was also dip-

Pan, Liang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improvement Switched reluctance motor Advanced lubricantsPinch Analysis Switched Reluctance Motor Advanced Lightingimprovement Switched reluctance motor Advanced lubricants

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

The Genome Sequence of Psychrobacter arcticus 273-4, a Psychroactive Siberian Permafrost Bacterium, Reveals Mechanisms for Adaptation to Low-Temperature Growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...important factor in cold adaptation is the synthesis of wax esters. Wax esters are commonly found in plants and animals (30). Acinetobacter sp. accumulates large amounts of wax esters that are used later as a carbon source for growth...

Héctor L. Ayala-del-Río; Patrick S. Chain; Joseph J. Grzymski; Monica A. Ponder; Natalia Ivanova; Peter W. Bergholz; Genevive Di Bartolo; Loren Hauser; Miriam Land; Corien Bakermans; Debora Rodrigues; Joel Klappenbach; Dan Zarka; Frank Larimer; Paul Richardson; Alison Murray; Michael Thomashow; James M. Tiedje

2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

485

Fluids in Hydrocarbon Basins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...solids as for example wax, may precipitate from...decreasing shear rate. Wax precipitation is common in subsea pipelines used to transport reservoir...decreasing shear rate. Wax precipitation is common in subsea pipelines used to transport reservoir...

Karen S. Pedersen; Peter L. Christensen

486

Geochemical characterization of solid bitumen in the Chesterian (Mississippian) sandstone reservoir of the Hitch field, southwest Kansas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The relative amounts of wax components in the produced oils...to those of the extractable wax hydrocarbons from the corresponding...Striegler, 1981, Studies of wax deposition in the trans-Alaska pipeline: Journal of Petroleum Technology...

Dongwon Kim; R. Paul Philp; Raymond P. Sorenson

487

E-Print Network 3.0 - adipic acid Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phophates Calcium stearate Amide wax Oligomeric wax Fatty acid amides Glycerides Triclosan Oxy... additives in automotive thermoplastics 12;Background CV of Pt in 75 mL of...

489

Fischer-Tropsch slurry phase process variations to understand wax formations: Quarterly report for period October 1, 1987 to December 31, 1987  

SciTech Connect

Effects of high syngas conversion on the secondary reactions of olefins formed by Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on a reduced fused magnetite catalyst were simulated by studies of olefins in the presence of hydrogen and low concentrations of CO, or none at all. kinetic models were developed for the effect of CO partial pressure on hydrogenation rates at 232)degree)C and 0.30 to 0.79 MPa. In the absence of carbon monoxide, olefin hydrogenation was more rapid than in its presence. A model indicated that a hydrogenated carbon monoxide species on the catalyst may be responsible for the inhibition of olefin hydrogenation, and that olefin adsorption is rate-limiting. The formation of secondary olefins appeared to follow similar trends with carbon monoxide partial pressure. Olefin incorporation was not observed in the small amount of Fischer-Tropsch products obtained in these experiments. The chain growth probability, alpha, appeared to correlate with the H/sub 2/CO feed ratio. 14 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Satterfield, C.N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Understanding the Genetic Interactions that Regulate Heat and Drought Tolerance in Relation to Wax Deposition and Yield Stability in Wheat (Tricticum Aestivum L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) has been a major food crop for nearly 8000 years. Breeders continue to face an ongoing battle to produce stress tolerant cultivars that are able to feed a rapidly increasing global population. The ability of varieties...

Huggins, Trevis D

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

491

The influence of surface lubricity on the adhesion of Navicula perminuta and Ulva linza to alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2000), the attachment of marine bacteria Cobetia marina (Ista...of the spore adhesive of the marine alga Ulva linza (synonym Enteromorpha...surface energy on attachment of marine bacteria and algal spores...of microscopic friction and wear. Langmuir. 13, 2504-2510...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and Exhaust Conditions on Diesel Particulate Filter Service Life and Vehicle Fuel Economy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

qAsh accumulation is a dynamic process - Ash first primarily accumulates along channel walls before forming end plugs at the back of the DPF.

493

Building a better snail: Lubrication and adhesive locomotion Hatsopoulos Microfluids Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigate this method of propulsion using two mathematical models: one for direct waves and one adopted by most marine and terrestrial gastro- pods provides an interesting challenge for fluid and material properties of the fluid are intimately involved in the propulsion mechanism. It has long been

Balmforth, Neil

494

Identification of Lubrication Oil in the Particulate Matter Emissions from Engine Exhaust of In-Service Commercial Aircraft  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This material is available free of charge via the Internet at http://pubs.acs.org. ... We are also grateful for the assistance and logistical support offered by John Jayne, Bill Brooks, and Tim Onasch at ARI during instrument preparation activities and laboratory studies. ... The characterization of volatile and nonvolatile particle materials present in gas turbine exhaust is crit. ...

Zhenhong Yu; Scott C. Herndon; Luke D. Ziemba; Michael T. Timko; David S. Liscinsky; Bruce E. Anderson; Richard C. Miake-Lye

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

495

Contamination effects on the performance of a heat pump charged with R-407C and POE lubricant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with an alternative refrigerant when the unit has mineral oil contamination present. One unit operated with R-22 and mineral oil, while the second used R-407c and POE with 11.9% mineral oil contamination. Data analysis showed that the R-407c unit operated...

Fitzhenry, Shane Alan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

496

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Lubricant Formulations to Enhance Engine Efficiency (LFEEE) in Modern Internal Combustion Engines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by Massachusetts Institute of Technology at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

497

Tribology Letters Vol. 12, No. 2, February 2002 ( 2002) 105 Effect of humidity on lubricated carbon overcoats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

due to intermittent contacts with the read-write head as it flies over the disk and from damage such as corrosion due to the environment. The read-write head flies over the spinning disk at a height of 50­70 �: magnetic hard disks; carbon overcoats; quartz crystal microbalance; water absorption; heat of absorption 1

Gellman, Andrew J.

498

Reduction of inspection gage wear: an investigation of the value of molybdenum disulphide as a lubricant for inspection gages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the uritcr to be an cri?-incl cns, ARl aC A~NIasl ~ JJl0g WJ . ". ~ 1+0, g/ alas "'c'. "rcy -nd ', "-'. "issons ~ Whig)mlm@ ' WJ c180s 19%, M9TVx". Tf '8 Ot APT'k&ATUS DRKRXPTIQi %' Amph NTUQ 'df' if~3 '. i4%DF~S To roalis~ test ths effaetivoma~ of a... by the uritcr to be an cri?-incl cns, ARl aC A~NIasl ~ JJl0g WJ . ". ~ 1+0, g/ alas "'c'. "rcy -nd ', "-'. "issons ~ Whig)mlm@ ' WJ c180s 19%, M9TVx". Tf '8 Ot APT'k&ATUS DRKRXPTIQi %' Amph NTUQ 'df' if~3 '. i4%DF~S To roalis~ test ths effaetivoma~ of a...

Bragg, Daniel Malcolm

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

499

Correlations Between Metallic Lubricant Additive Species in the Ring Pack and Ash Emissions and Their Dependence on Crankcase Oil Properties  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs.

500

In any gearbox, lubrication is just as important as the hardware. In wind turbine gearboxes, it is imperative that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Employer M/F/D/V Committed to Diversity in the Workplace 08-0711JCN241295tp Quality Accomplishments The Office of Automotive Engineering (OAE) at SwRI is certified to ISO 9001:2008, "Quality Management Systems - Requirements," accredited to ISO/IEC 17025:2005, "General Requirements for the Competence of Testing

Chapman, Clark R.