Sample records for naphthas lubricants waxes

  1. Naphtha | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoonNASA/AmesNSNanotecture Ltd JumpNapakiakNaphtha

  2. Coal liquefaction process with increased naphtha yields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, Daniel F. (Friendswood, TX)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process for liquefying solid carbonaceous materials wherein the solid carbonaceous material is slurried with a suitable solvent and then subjected to liquefaction at elevated temperature and pressure to produce a normally gaseous product, a normally liquid product and a normally solid product. The normally liquid product is further separated into a naphtha boiling range product, a solvent boiling range product and a vacuum gas-oil boiling range product. At least a portion of the solvent boiling-range product and the vacuum gas-oil boiling range product are then combined and passed to a hydrotreater where the mixture is hydrotreated at relatively severe hydrotreating conditions and the liquid product from the hydrotreater then passed to a catalytic cracker. In the catalytic cracker, the hydrotreater effluent is converted partially to a naphtha boiling range product and to a solvent boiling range product. The naphtha boiling range product is added to the naphtha boiling range product from coal liquefaction to thereby significantly increase the production of naphtha boiling range materials. At least a portion of the solvent boiling range product, on the other hand, is separately hydrogenated and used as solvent for the liquefaction. Use of this material as at least a portion of the solvent significantly reduces the amount of saturated materials in said solvent.

  3. Process for removing polymer-forming impurities from naphtha fraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kowalczyk, Dennis C. (Pittsburgh, PA); Bricklemyer, Bruce A. (Avonmore, PA); Svoboda, Joseph J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer precursor materials are vaporized without polymerization or are removed from a raw naphtha fraction by passing the raw naphtha to a vaporization zone (24) and vaporizing the naphtha in the presence of a wash oil while stripping with hot hydrogen to prevent polymer deposits in the equipment.

  4. Process for removing polymer-forming impurities from naphtha fraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kowalczyk, D.C.; Bricklemyer, B.A.; Svoboda, J.J.

    1983-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer precursor materials are vaporized without polymerization or are removed from a raw naphtha fraction by passing the raw naphtha to a vaporization zone and vaporizing the naphtha in the presence of a wash oil while stripping with hot hydrogen to prevent polymer deposits in the equipment. 2 figs.

  5. Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    product consumption Nat Gas NGL Additives Crude Tot Pet.Pet Coke Lubricants Asphalt Waxes Special Naphtha Petrochem feedstocks Other Petro Prods Coal Net reconciliation error Total Consumption

  6. Data reconciliation and optimal operation of a catalytic naphtha reformer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Data reconciliation and optimal operation of a catalytic naphtha reformer Tore Lid Statoil Mongstad-mail:skoge@chemeng.ntnu.no) #12;Abstract The naphtha reforming process converts low-octane gasoline blending compo- nents to high-octane components for use in high-performance gasoline fuels. The reformer also has a important function

  7. Data reconciliation and optimal operation of a catalytic naphtha reformer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Data reconciliation and optimal operation of a catalytic naphtha reformer Tore Lid Statoil Mongstad-mail:skoge@chemeng.ntnu.no) #12;Abstract The naphtha reforming process converts low-octane gasoline blending compo- nents to high-octane components for use in high-performance gasoline fuels. The reformer also has an important function

  8. Lubricant compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A.L.; Lawson, R.D.; Root, J.C.

    1981-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Lubricant compositions adapted for use under extreme pressure conditions are disclosed. They comprise a major proportion of a lubricating grease, and a minor proportion of an additive consisting essentially of a solid, oil insoluble arylene sulfide polymer, and a metal salt, particularly an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal salt, particularly an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal salt of a phosphorus acid, for example, mono- or dicalcium phosphate, or an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal carbonate exemplified by calcium carbonate, or a mixture of such a phosphate salt and carbonate.

  9. Simulating Wax Crayons Dave Rudolf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mould, David

    Simulating Wax Crayons Dave Rudolf dave.rudolf@usask.ca David Mould mould@cs.usask.ca Eric Neufeld a physically-inspired model of wax crayons, which synthesizes drawings from collections of user- specified that evolves as it interacts with the paper. The amount of wax deposition is computed based on the crayon

  10. Tethered Lubricants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer, Lynden

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed extensive experimental and theoretical studies of interfacial friction, relaxation dynamics, and thermodynamics of polymer chains tethered to points, planes, and particles. A key result from our tribology studies using lateral force microscopy (LFM) measurements of polydisperse brushes of linear and branched chains densely grafted to planar substrates is that there are exceedingly low friction coefficients for these systems. Specific project achievements include: (1) Synthesis of three-tiered lubricant films containing controlled amounts of free and pendent PDMS chains, and investigated the effect of their molecular weight and volume fraction on interfacial friction. (2.) Detailed studies of a family of hairy particles termed nanoscale organic hybrid materials (NOHMs) and demonstration of their use as lubricants.

  11. Engine lubrication oil aeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baran, Bridget A. (Bridget Anne)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lubrication system of an internal combustion engine serves many purposes. It lubricates moving parts, cools the engine, removes impurities, supports loads, and minimizes friction. The entrapment of air in the lubricating ...

  12. LUBRICANTS AND HYDRAULIC FLUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineer Manual Department

    Contents) Major General, USA Chief of Staff i Table of Contents Purpose ........................................................ 1-1 1-1 Applicability .................................................... 1-2 1-1 References ...................................................... 1-3 1-1 Distribution Statement ............................................. 1-4 1-1 Scope ......................................................... 1-5 1-2 Friction ........................................................ 2-1 2-1 Wear .......................................................... 2-2 2-4 Lubrication and Lubricants ......................................... 2-3 2-6 Hydrodynamic or Fluid Film Lubrication ............................... 2-4 2-6 Boundary Lubrication ............................................. 2-5 2-8 Extreme Pressure (EP) Lubrication ................................... 2-6 2-9 Elastohydrodynamic (EHD) Lubrication ................................ 2-7 2-9 Oil R

  13. Fuel and Lubricant Effects

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    accomplishments and progress - Comparisons of fuels and engines (3 slides) - Statistics (1 slide) - Kinetic modeling (1 slide) - Ionic lubricants (1 slide) - Lube effects...

  14. DIESEL FUEL LUBRICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Jun [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The diesel fuel injector and pump systems contain many sliding interfaces that rely for lubrication upon the fuels. The combination of the poor fuel lubricity and extremely tight geometric clearance between the plunger and bore makes the diesel fuel injector vulnerable to scuffing damage that severely limits the engine life. In order to meet the upcoming stricter diesel emission regulations and higher engine efficiency requirements, further fuel refinements that will result in even lower fuel lubricity due to the removal of essential lubricating compounds, more stringent operation conditions, and tighter geometric clearances are needed. These are expected to increase the scuffing and wear vulnerability of the diesel fuel injection and pump systems. In this chapter, two approaches are discussed to address this issue: (1) increasing fuel lubricity by introducing effective lubricity additives or alternative fuels, such as biodiesel, and (2) improving the fuel injector scuffing-resistance by using advanced materials and/or surface engineering processes. The developing status of the fuel modification approach is reviewed to cover topics including fuel lubricity origins, lubricity improvers, alternative fuels, and standard fuel lubricity tests. The discussion of the materials approach is focused on the methodology development for detection of the onset of scuffing and evaluation of the material scuffing characteristics.

  15. Fuel & Lubricant Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 15, 2012 Kevin Stork, Team Lead VTP Annual Merit Review VTP Fuel & Lubricant Technologies eere.energy.gov 2 | Vehicle Technologies Program Mission Enable advanced combustion...

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER Leaf wax d2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briner, Jason P.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Leaf wax d2 H and varve-thickness climate proxies from proglacial lake sediments Science+Business Media B.V. 2012 Abstract We present a multiproxy paleoclimate record using leaf wax Á Leaf wax Á Proglacial lake Á Varve Introduction Arctic proglacial lake sediments are excellent

  17. The CER3 wax biosynthetic gene from Arabidopsis thaliana is allelic to WAX2/YRE/FLP1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunst, Ljerka

    The CER3 wax biosynthetic gene from Arabidopsis thaliana is allelic to WAX2/YRE/FLP1 Owen Rowlanda with waxes. The Arabidopsis CER3 gene is important for cuticular wax biosynthesis and was reported and instead corresponds to WAX2/ YRE/FLP1 (At5g57800), a gene of unknown function required for wax

  18. LIQUIDSLIQUIDS GISAXSGISAXSGISAXS/WAXS station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Beamline CapabilitiesBeamline Capabilities Sector 12-ID. Poster updated March 2014. #12;LIQUIDSLIQUIDS GISAXSGISAXSGISAXS/WAXS station: * Energy range: 2.1 to 24 keV * Low divergence mode: * Energy range: 6.5 to 24 keV * Beam focus:

  19. Wax Segregation in Oils: A Multiscale Mario Primicerio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Primicerio, Mario

    Wax Segregation in Oils: A Multiscale Problem. Mario Primicerio Department of Mathematics "Ulisse the behaviour of a real oil. It is a mixture of a given standard "wax" and a "solvent" (decane). The wax we/dissolution of wax For any waxy crude oil, and in particular for our "ideal mixture" with a given wax concentration c

  20. Methods to improve lubricity of fuels and lubricants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL)

    2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for providing lubricity in fuels and lubricants includes adding a boron compound to a fuel or lubricant to provide a boron-containing fuel or lubricant. The fuel or lubricant may contain a boron compound at a concentration between about 30 ppm and about 3,000 ppm and a sulfur concentration of less than about 500 ppm. A method of powering an engine to minimize wear, by burning a fuel containing boron compounds. The boron compounds include compound that provide boric acid and/or BO.sub.3 ions or monomers to the fuel or lubricant.

  1. An experimental investigation into oil mist lubrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kannan, Krishna

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil mist lubrication offers many advantages over sump lubrication. Unfortunately, mist lubrication generates sub-micrometer sized aerosol particles (fines) that escape from the oil mist lubrication system. These particles are an environmental hazard...

  2. Wellbore Heat Transfer Model for Wax Deposition in Permafrost Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Xiaoting

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Producing waxy oil in arctic area may cause wax deposited on the well wall. Since wax deposition is strongly thermal related, accurate heat transfer model is necessary in predicting and preventing wax depostion. A mathematical model was derived...

  3. Friction, Wear, and Lubrication Technologies | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    emissions characteristics. Argonne research focuses on developing advanced lubricant additives and basefluids, lubricant-boosting materials and coatings; conducting mechanistic...

  4. Thermodvnamics Thermodynamics of Wax Precipitation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Thermodvnamics Thermodynamics of Wax Precipitation in Petroleum Mixtures C. Lira-Galeana and A, Berkeley, CIA 94720 A thermodynamic pamework is developed for calculating wax precipitation in petroleum only recently have attempts been made to develop a thermodynamic description. Published methods

  5. Diesel lubrication and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The film describes the parts of diesel lubricating and cooling systems and how they work in relation to each other.

  6. Diesel lubrication and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The film describes the parts of diesel lubricating and cooling systems and how they work in relation to each other.

  7. Lubrication with boric acid additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-lubricating resin compositions including a boric acid additive and a synthetic polymer including those thermoset materials.

  8. Rifts in Spreading Wax Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rolf Ragnarsson; J. Lewis Ford; Christian D. Santangelo; Eberhard Bodenschatz

    1995-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We report experimental results on the rift formation between two freezing wax plates. The plates were pulled apart with constant velocity, while floating on the melt, in a way akin to the tectonic plates of the earth's crust. At slow spreading rates, a rift, initially perpendicular to the spreading direction, was found to be stable, while above a critical spreading rate a "spiky" rift with fracture zones almost parallel to the spreading direction developed. At yet higher spreading rates a second transition from the spiky rift to a zig-zag pattern occurred. In this regime the rift can be characterized by a single angle which was found to be dependent on the spreading rate. We show that the oblique spreading angles agree with a simple geometrical model. The coarsening of the zig-zag pattern over time and the three-dimensional structure of the solidified crust are also discussed.

  9. Wax Deposition and Aging in Flowlines from Irreversible Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    , 2007. ReVised Manuscript ReceiVed April 4, 2008 The development of waxy crude oil and some gas of the wax deposit. However, most of these models assume that the wax-oil (gel) deposit has a constant wax and the composition of the gel layer as a function of position and time. The wax-oil gel region is considered

  10. Ionic Liquids as Novel Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    test results showed that compared with fully-formulated engine oils, selected low-viscosity ionic liquids, used as neat lubricants or basestock, produced significantly lower...

  11. Biofluid lubrication for artificial joints 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pendelton, Alice Mae

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This research investigated biofluid lubrication related to artificial joints using tribological and rheological approaches. Biofluids studied here represent two categories of fluids, base fluids and nanostructured biofluids. ...

  12. Coatings and films derived from clay/wax nanocomposites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.; Leyva, Argentina A.

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides methods for making clay/wax nanocomposites and coatings and films of same with improved chemical resistance and gas barrier properties. The invention further provides methods for making and using emulsions of such clay/wax nanocomposites. Typically, an organophillic clay is combined with a wax or wax/polymer blend such that the cohesion energy of the clay matches that of the wax or wax/polymer blend. Suitable organophilic clays include mica and phyllosilicates that have been surface-treated with edge or edge and surface modifying agents. The resulting nanocomposites have applications as industrial coatings and in protective packaging.

  13. About Total Lubricants USA, Inc. Headquartered in Linden, New Jersey, Total Lubricants USA provides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    New Jersey, Total Lubricants USA provides advanced quality industrial lubrication productsAbout Total Lubricants USA, Inc. Headquartered in Linden, New Jersey, Total Lubricants USA provides. A subsidiary of Total, S.A., the world's fourth largest oil company, Total Lubricants USA still fosters its

  14. A Bidirectional Deposition Model of Wax Crayons Dave Rudolf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mould, David

    A Bidirectional Deposition Model of Wax Crayons Dave Rudolf dave.rudolf@usask.ca David Mould mould present a physically-inspired model of wax crayons, which synthesizes drawings from collections of user that evolves as it interacts with the paper. The amount of wax deposition is computed based on the crayon

  15. Preparation of Samples for Light Microscopy Simple Wax Seal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    Preparation of Samples for Light Microscopy Simple Wax Seal Materials - Slide - Cover Slip - Paraffin Wax Candle - Pasteur Pipette (suggested size 5 3/4 inch) - Matches Preparation of the Slide - You may want to protect the work surface from melted wax. We use a sheet of aluminum foil taped

  16. Original article Ultrastructure of the wax gland complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Ultrastructure of the wax gland complex and secretion of beeswax in the worker; accepted 22 September 1994) Summary — The wax gland complex of the honey bee worker consists of 3 cell types, epithelial cells, oenocytes and adipocytes, which act synergistically to secrete wax

  17. Original article Residues in wax and honey after Apilife VAR®

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Residues in wax and honey after Apilife VAR® treatment Stefan Bogdanov Anton and foundation were exposed to the air during storage. © Inra/DIB/AGIB/Elsevier, Paris honey / wax / residue to accumulation of these substances in beeswax and less so in honey [1, 17]. The accumulation in wax depends

  18. Wax combs mediate nestmate recognition by guard honeybees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenseleers, Tom

    Wax combs mediate nestmate recognition by guard honeybees PATRIZIA D'ETTORRE*, TOM WENSELEERS 2006; MS. number: 8465) Research has shown that the wax combs are important in the acquisition in the laboratory or under artificial conditions. We investigated the role of the wax combs in nestmate recognition

  19. active hybrid lubrication: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lubrication oil aeration MIT - DSpace Summary: The lubrication system of an internal combustion engine serves many purposes. It lubricates moving parts, cools the engine, removes...

  20. active lubricated multirecess: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lubrication oil aeration MIT - DSpace Summary: The lubrication system of an internal combustion engine serves many purposes. It lubricates moving parts, cools the engine, removes...

  1. active lubrication applied: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lubrication oil aeration MIT - DSpace Summary: The lubrication system of an internal combustion engine serves many purposes. It lubricates moving parts, cools the engine, removes...

  2. applying controllable lubrication: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lubrication oil aeration MIT - DSpace Summary: The lubrication system of an internal combustion engine serves many purposes. It lubricates moving parts, cools the engine, removes...

  3. aqueous lubricated short: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lubrication oil aeration MIT - DSpace Summary: The lubrication system of an internal combustion engine serves many purposes. It lubricates moving parts, cools the engine, removes...

  4. applying active lubrication: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lubrication oil aeration MIT - DSpace Summary: The lubrication system of an internal combustion engine serves many purposes. It lubricates moving parts, cools the engine, removes...

  5. actively lubricated journal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lubrication oil aeration MIT - DSpace Summary: The lubrication system of an internal combustion engine serves many purposes. It lubricates moving parts, cools the engine, removes...

  6. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Lubricant and Additive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance of Engine Lube Oils, Ionic Liquids as Lubricants andor Lubricant Additives, Opportunities for Engine Friction Reduction and Durable Design Fuel and Lubricant...

  7. A NOVEL VAPOR-PHASE PROCESS FOR DEEP DESULFURIZATION OF NAPHTHA/DIESEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.S. Turk; R.P. Gupta; S.K. Gangwal

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tier 2 regulations issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) require a substantial reduction in the sulfur content of gasoline. Similar regulations have been enacted for the sulfur level in on-road diesel and recently off-road diesel. The removal of this sulfur with existing and installed technology faces technical and economic challenges. These challenges created the opportunity for new emerging technologies. Research Triangle Institute (RTI) with subcontract support from Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc., (KBR) used this opportunity to develop RTI's transport reactor naphtha desulfurization (TReND) process. Starting with a simple conceptual process design and some laboratory results that showed promise, RTI initiated an accelerated research program for sorbent development, process development, and marketing and commercialization. Sorbent development has resulted in the identification of an active and attrition resistant sorbent that has been prepared in commercial equipment in 100 lb batches. Process development has demonstrated both the sulfur removal performance and regeneration potential of this sorbent. Process development has scaled up testing from small laboratory to pilot plant transport reactor testing. Testing in the transport reactor pilot plant has demonstrated the attrition resistance, selective sulfur removal activity, and regeneration activity of this sorbent material. Marketing and commercialization activities have shown with the existing information that the process has significant capital and operating cost benefits over existing and other emerging technologies. The market assessment and analysis provided valuable feedback about the testing and performance requirements for the technical development program. This market analysis also provided a list of potential candidates for hosting a demonstration unit. Although the narrow window of opportunity generated by the new sulfur regulations and the conservative nature of the refining industry slowed progress of the demonstration unit, negotiations with potential partners are proceeding for commercialization of this process.

  8. Defining the role of elastic lubricants and micro textured surfaces in lubricated, sliding friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hupp, Sara J. (Sara Jean), 1979-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solutions for reducing friction in sliding, lubricated systems include modifying lubricant rheology using polymers and adding a micro-scale texture to the sliding surfaces, but the mechanism of how lubrication properties ...

  9. Biofluid lubrication for artificial joints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pendelton, Alice Mae

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    on fluid lubrication. Workpiece surface structure and wear mechanisms were investigated using a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope. The surface topography was examined using a profilometer. The results demonstrated...

  10. Method for lubricating contacting surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dugger, Michael T. (Tijeras, NM); Ohlhausen, James A. (Albuquerque, NM); Asay, David B. (Boalsburg, PA); Kim, Seong H. (State College, PA)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for tribological lubrication of sliding contact surfaces, where two surfaces are in contact and in motion relative to each other, operating in a vapor-phase environment containing at least one alcohol compound at a concentration sufficiently high to provide one monolayer of coverage on at least one of the surfaces, where the alcohol compound continuously reacts at the surface to provide lubrication.

  11. Engine lubrication circuit including two pumps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lane, William H.

    2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A lubrication pump coupled to the engine is sized such that the it can supply the engine with a predetermined flow volume as soon as the engine reaches a peak torque engine speed. In engines that operate predominately at speeds above the peak torque engine speed, the lubrication pump is often producing lubrication fluid in excess of the predetermined flow volume that is bypassed back to a lubrication fluid source. This arguably results in wasted power. In order to more efficiently lubricate an engine, a lubrication circuit includes a lubrication pump and a variable delivery pump. The lubrication pump is operably coupled to the engine, and the variable delivery pump is in communication with a pump output controller that is operable to vary a lubrication fluid output from the variable delivery pump as a function of at least one of engine speed and lubrication flow volume or system pressure. Thus, the lubrication pump can be sized to produce the predetermined flow volume at a speed range at which the engine predominately operates while the variable delivery pump can supplement lubrication fluid delivery from the lubrication pump at engine speeds below the predominant engine speed range.

  12. Top-of-Rail lubricant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alzoubi, M. F.; Fenske, G. R.; Erck, R. A.; Boparai, A. S.

    2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of the volatile and semivolatile fractions collected after use of the TOR lubricant indicated that other than contaminants in the collection laboratory, no compounds on the EPA's Target Compound Lists (Tables 2 and 5) were detected in these fractions. The data of these qualitative analyses, given in the various tables in the text, indicate only the relative amounts of the tentatively identified compounds. The authors recommend that quantitative analysis be performed on the volatile and semivolatile fractions to allow confirmation of the tentatively identified compounds and to obtain absolute amounts of the detected compounds. Additionally, the semivolatile fraction should be analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to identify compounds that are not chromatographable under the temperature program used for determination of semivolatile compounds. Introducing the top-of-rail (TOR) lubricant into the wheel/rail interface results in a reduction of almost 60% of lateral friction force over the forces encountered under dry conditions. This reveals good potential for energy savings, as well as wear reduction, for railroad companies. In TOR lubrication, an increase in the angle of attack and axle load results in increased lateral friction and rate of lubricant consumption. The most efficient TOR lubricant quantity to be used in the wheel/rail interface must be calculated precisely according to the number of cars, axle loads, train speed, and angle of attack.

  13. Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and /or Lubricant Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, J. [ORNL; Viola, M. B. [General Motors Company

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This ORNL-GM CRADA developed ionic liquids (ILs) as novel lubricants or oil additives for engine lubrication. A new group of oil-miscible ILs have been designed and synthesized with high thermal stability, non-corrosiveness, excellent wettability, and most importantly effective anti-scuffing/anti-wear and friction reduction characteristics. Mechanistic analysis attributes the superior lubricating performance of IL additives to their physical and chemical interactions with metallic surfaces. Working with a leading lubricant formulation company, the team has successfully developed a prototype low-viscosity engine oil using a phosphonium-phosphate IL as an anti-wear additive. Tribological bench tests of the IL-additized formulated oil showed 20-33% lower friction in mixed and elastohydrodynamic lubrication and 38-92% lower wear in boundary lubrication when compared with commercial Mobil 1 and Mobil Clean 5W-30 engine oils. High-temperature, high load (HTHL) full-size engine tests confirmed the excellent anti-wear performance for the IL-additized engine oil. Sequence VID engine dynamometer tests demonstrated an improved fuel economy by >2% for this IL-additized engine oil benchmarked against the Mobil 1 5W-30 oil. In addition, accelerated catalyst aging tests suggest that the IL additive may potentially have less adverse impact on three-way catalysts compared to the conventional ZDDP. Follow-on research is needed for further development and optimization of IL chemistry and oil formulation to fully meet ILSAC GF-5 specifications and further enhance the automotive engine efficiency and durability.

  14. acyl coa wax: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    paper using a commercially available printer and hot plate Prentiss, Mara 52 Asphaltenes and Waxes Do Not Interact Synergistically and Coprecipitate in Solid Organic...

  15. Microbial production of wax esters from highly branched alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bogan, William W.; Sullivan, Wendy R.; Paterek, James R.

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microbial culture and method for producing wax esters using highly branched alkanes. In accordance with one embodiment, the highly branched alkane is squalane.

  16. Vacuum/Compression Valving (VCV) Using Parrafin-Wax on a Centrifugal Microfluidic CD Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    implementing two valves using a single VCV wax plug. This isvalves such that melted wax from a normally-closed valve (releases it when the wax is melted) is later transferred to

  17. Synthesis of new high performance lubricants and solid lubricants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagow, Richard J.

    1993-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In our second year of funding we began the testing phase of a number of new classes of lubricants. Three different testing collaborations have already begun and a fourth one is In the works with Dr. Stephen Hsu of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Dr. Hsu also plans to test some of the same materials for us that Shell Development is studying. With Dr. Bill Jones of NASA, we are studying the effects of branching an high temperature lubricant properties in perfluoropolyethers, Initially Bill Jones is comparing the lubrication and physical properties of perfluorotetraglyme and the following two spherical perfluoropolyethers, Note that one contains a fluorocarbon chain and the other one contains a fluorocarbon ether chain. The synthesis of these was reported in the last progress report. With Professor Patricia Thiel of Iowa State University, we are working on studies of perfluoromethylene oxide ethers and have prepared a series of four of these polyethers to study in collaboration with her research group. These perfluoromethylene oxide ethers have the best low temperature properties of any known lubricants. Thiel's group is studying their interactions with metals under extreme conditions. Thirdly, we have also begun an Interaction with W. August Birke of Shell Development Company in Houston for whom we have already prepared samples of the chlorine-substituted fluorocarbon polyether lubricants whose structures appear on page 54 of our research proposal. Each of these four structures is thought to have potential as lubricant additives to motor oils. We also have underway syntheses of other fluorine-containing branched ether lubricants. These new materials which are also promising as antifriction additives for motor oils appear ahead of the perfluoro additives as Appendix I to the progress report. Additionally for Birke and Shell Development we have at their request prepared the novel compound perfluoro salicylic acid. This synthesis was suggested by the Shell staff who thought that esters of perfluoro salicylic acid might be an excellent antifriction additive for motor oil fuels. One of the best additives currently used in motor oils is the hydrocarbon ester of salicylic acid.

  18. Self lubrication of bitumen froth in pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, D.D. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper I will review the main properties of water lubricated pipelines and explain some new features which have emerged from studies of self-lubrication of Syncrudes` bitumen froth. When heavy oils are lubricated with water, the water and oil are continuously injected into a pipeline and the water is stable when in a lubricating sheath around the oil core. In the case of bitumen froth obtained from the Alberta tar sands, the water is dispersed in the bitumen and it is liberated at the wall under shear; water injection is not necessary because the froth is self-lubricating.

  19. Modeling of asphaltene and wax precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, F.; Sarathi, P.; Jones, R.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project was designed to focus on the development of a predictive technique for organic deposition during gas injection for petroleum EOR. A thermodynamic model has been developed to describe the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition on asphaltene precipitation. The proposed model combines regular solution theory with Flory-Huggins polymer solutions theory to predict maximum volume fractions of asphaltene dissolved in oil. The model requires evaluation of vapor-liquid equilibria, first using an equation of state followed by calculations of asphaltene solubility in the liquid-phase. A state-of-the-art technique for C{sub 7+} fraction characterization was employed in developing this model. The preliminary model developed in this work was able to predict qualitatively the trends of the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition. Since the mechanism of paraffinic wax deposition is different from that of asphaltene deposition, another thermodynamic model based on the solid-liquid solution theory was developed to predict the wax formation. This model is simple and can predict the wax appearance temperature with reasonable accuracy. Accompanying the modeling work, experimental studies were conducted to investigate the solubility of asphaltene in oil land solvents and to examine the effects of oil composition, CO{sub 2}, and solvent on asphaltene precipitation and its properties. This research focused on the solubility reversibility of asphaltene in oil and the precipitation caused by CO{sub 2} injection at simulated reservoir temperature and pressure conditions. These experiments have provided many observations about the properties of asphaltenes for further improvement of the model, but more detailed information about the properties of asphaltenes in solution is needed for the development of more reliable asphaltene characterization techniques. 50 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Process for upgrading wax from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derr, W.R. Jr.; Garwood, W.E.; Kuo, J.C.; Leib, T.M.; Nace, D.M.; Tabak, S.A.

    1987-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The waxy liquid phase of an oil suspension of Fischer-Tropsch catalyst containing dissolved wax is separated out and the wax is converted by hydrocracking, dewaxing or by catalytic cracking with a low activity catalyst to provide a highly olefinic product which may be further converted to premium quality gasoline and/or distillate fuel. 2 figs.

  1. Process for upgrading wax from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derr, Jr., W. Rodman (Vincentown, NJ); Garwood, William E. (Haddonfield, NJ); Kuo, James C. (Cherry Hill, NJ); Leib, Tiberiu M. (Voorhees, NJ); Nace, Donald M. (Woodbury, NJ); Tabak, Samuel A. (Wenonah, NJ)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The waxy liquid phase of an oil suspension of Fischer-Tropsch catalyst containing dissolved wax is separated out and the wax is converted by hydrocracking, dewaxing or by catalytic cracking with a low activity catalyst to provide a highly olefinic product which may be further converted to premium quality gasoline and/or distillate fuel.

  2. Lubrication from mixture of boric acid with oils and greases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdemir, A.

    1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Lubricating compositions are disclosed including crystalline boric acid and a base lubricant selected from oils, greases and the like. The lubricity of conventional oils and greases can also be improved by adding concentrates of boric acid.

  3. Life cycle analysis of lubricants from rape seed oil in comparison to conventional lubricants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. A. Reinhardt; R. Herbener; S. O. Gärtner

    Introduction and procedure Comparing with biomass-derived lubricants, in many cases conventional lubricants turn out to have disadvantages for their environmental impact, especially where losses occur during regular operation (e.g. in chainsaws) or where a leakage leads to immediate emissions into the environment as for agricultural machinery. Bio lubricants are supposed to be environmentally friendly, among other

  4. Acrinathrin, effective varroacide and its residues in stores, honey and wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Acrinathrin, effective varroacide and its residues in stores, honey and wax Synthetic pyrethroids in honey, stores and wax. Honey and stores were extracted by hexane, wax was dissolved in acetonitrile quantity of acrinathrin into the untreated honey and wax. After 25 d exposure of the preparation

  5. Biosynthesis and secretion of plant cuticular wax L. Kunst, A.L. Samuels*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunst, Ljerka

    Review Biosynthesis and secretion of plant cuticular wax L. Kunst, A.L. Samuels* Department the aerial portions of land plants. It consists of amorphous intracuticular wax embedded in cutin polymer, and epicuticular wax crystalloids that coat the outer plant surface and impart a whitish appearance. Cuticular wax

  6. Testing and Lubrication for Single Race Bearings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinhoff, R.G.

    1998-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Three ES and H-compatible lubricants (Environment, Safety and Health) for single race bearing applications and one hybrid-material single race bearings were evaluated and compared against single race bearings with trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) deposition of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bearing lubricant extracted from Vydax{trademark}. Vydax is a product manufactured by DuPont consisting of various molecular weights of PTFE suspended in trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon), which is an ozone-depleting solvent. Vydax has been used as a bearing lubricant in stronglink mechanisms since 1974. Hybrid bearings with silicon nitride balls and molded glass-nylon-Teflon retainers, bearings lubricated with titanium carbide (TiC) on the balls, bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on races and retainers, and bearings lubricated with electrophoretically deposited MoS{sub 2} were evaluated. The bearings were maintained in a preloaded state in bearing cartridges during cycling and vibration tests. Bearings with electrophoretically deposited MoS{sub 2} performed as well as bearings lubricated with Vydax and were the best performing candidate. All candidates were suitable for low preload applications. Bearings with TiC coated balls and bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers performed well at high preloads, though not as well as bearings lubricated with electrophoretic deposition of MoS{sub 2}. Bearings with silicon nitride balls were not suitable for high preload applications.

  7. Lubrication Behavior of Biolubricants and Antiwear Performance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biolubricants. Developing a new class of more effective anti-wear (AW) lubricant additives is of great interest from both fundamental and practical perspectives in energy...

  8. Biodiesel Impact on Engine Lubricant Oil Dilution

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Efficiency and Renewable Energy operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Biodiesel Impact on Engine Lubricant Oil Dilution Motivation * Modern diesel engines utilize...

  9. Florida Wax Scales: Control Measures in Texas for Hollies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drees, Bastiaan M.; Reinert, James; Williams, Michael L.

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    mold. Wax scales injure plants by removing large amounts of plant sap. Severe infestations may discol- or the leaves, cause shoots or branches to die back and occasionally kill the entire plant. Wax scales also produce honeydew, which serves as a..., and the foliage containing acephate will kill young scales that settle on the leaves and begin to feed on the plant sap. Timing: In Texas, the Florida wax scale eggs hatch primarily twice per year, although some eggs can hatch at any time. Egg hatch occurs...

  10. Impact of Biodiesel on Ash Emissions and Lubricant Properties...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biodiesel on Ash Emissions and Lubricant Properties Affecting Fuel Economy and Engine Wear Impact of Biodiesel on Ash Emissions and Lubricant Properties Affecting Fuel Economy and...

  11. Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and...

  12. Friction Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components Friction Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel and Lubricant Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report This report describes the...

  14. Controlled Experiments on the Effects of Lubricant/Additive ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on the Effects of LubricantAdditive (Low-Ash, Ashless) Characteristics on DPF Degradation Controlled Experiments on the Effects of LubricantAdditive (Low-Ash, Ashless)...

  15. Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission Aftertreat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission Aftertreatment Systems via an Oil Conditioning Filter Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission...

  16. The Role of Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reductions: Viscosity Effects The Role of Lubricant Additives in Fuel Efficiency and Emission Reductions: Viscosity Effects...

  17. alkane lubrication films: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    L. Mahadevan 2004-04-04 17 Compressible fluid model for hydrodynamic lubrication cavitation Mathematics Websites Summary: Compressible fluid model for hydrodynamic lubrication...

  18. Tribological Characterization of Carbon Based Solid Lubricants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Carlos Joel

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    lubrication modes. ..................... 10 Figure 5. Typical Stribeck Curve [22]. ..................................................................... 11 Figure 6. This figure illustrates the lamellar structure of graphite. ........................... 13... or low pressures, and high and low operating speeds. For purposes of this research, the extreme conditions will refer to high temperatures, and low pressures. The most common types of solid lubricants encompass four materials: graphite, molybdenum...

  19. Wetting and lubricating film instabilities in microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cubaud, Thomas

    , and silicone oils . Dynamic wetting transitions: a pearl flow thick lubricating film , b spider flow thinWetting and lubricating film instabilities in microchannels Thomas Cubaud Department of Mechanical of partially wetting threads in planar microchannels of height h=100 or 250 m fluids: ethanol, mineral oils

  20. Compressible fluid model for hydrodynamic lubrication cavitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sart, Remi

    Compressible fluid model for hydrodynamic lubrication cavitation G. Bayada L. Chupin I.C.J. UMR.chupin@math.univ-bpclermont.fr Keywords: cavitation, compressible Reynolds equation Date: april 2013 Summary In this paper, it is shown how vaporous cavitation in lubricant films can be modelled in a physically justified manner through

  1. Double angle seal forming lubricant film

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ernst, William D. (Troy, NY)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A lubricated piston rod seal which inhibits gas leaking from a high pressure chamber on one side of the seal to a low pressure chamber on the other side of the seal. A liquid is supplied to the surface of the piston rod on the low pressure side of the seal. This liquid acts as lubricant for the seal and provides cooling for the rod. The seal, which can be a plastic, elastomer or other material with low elastic modulus, is designed to positively pump lubricant through the piston rod/seal interface in both directions when the piston rod is reciprocating. The capacity of the seal to pump lubricant from the low pressure side to the high pressure side is less than its capacity to pump lubricant from the high pressure side to the low pressure side which ensures that there is zero net flow of lubricant to the high pressure side of the seal. The film of lubricant between the seal and the rod minimizes any sliding contact and prevents the leakage of gas. Under static conditions gas leakage is prevented by direct contact between the seal and the rod.

  2. Wax Blocks, Data Banks, and File #0467839: The Archive of Memory in William Gibson’s Science Fiction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanstrom, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of three discrete layers—a wax slab at the bottom, a “as the system of perception, the wax slab as unconsciousand its protective shield, the wax slab with the unconscious

  3. Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication with Polyolester Lubricants and HFC Refrigerants, Final Report, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunsel, Selda; Pozebanchuk, Michael

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lubrication properties of refrigeration lubricants were investigated in high pressure nonconforming contacts under different conditions of temperature, rolling speed, and refrigerant concentration. The program was based upon the recognition that the lubrication regime in refrigeration compressors is generally elastohydrodynamic or hydrodynamic, as determined by the operating conditions of the compressor and the properties of the lubricant. Depending on the compressor design, elastohydrodynamic lubrication conditions exist in many rolling and sliding elements of refrigeration compressors such as roller element bearings, gears, and rotors. The formation of an elastohydrodynamic film separating rubbing surfaces is important in preventing the wear and failure of compressor elements. It is, therefore, important to predict the elastohydrodynamic (EHD) performance of lubricants under realistic tribocontact renditions. This is, however, difficult as the lubricant properties that control film formation are critically dependent upon pressure and shear, and cannot be evaluated using conventional laboratory instruments. In this study, the elastohydrodynamic behavior of refrigeration lubricants with and without the presence of refrigerants was investigated using the ultrathin film EHD interferometry technique. This technique enables very thin films, down to less than 5 nm, to be measured accurately within an EHD contact under realistic conditions of temperature, shear, and pressure. The technique was adapted to the study of lubricant refrigerant mixtures. Film thickness measurements were obtained on refrigeration lubricants as a function of speed, temperature, and refrigerant concentration. The effects of lubricant viscosity, temperature, rolling speed, and refrigerant concentration on EHD film formation were investigated. From the film thickness measurements, effective pressure-viscosity coefficients were calculated. The lubricants studied in this project included two naphthenic mineral oils (NMO), four polyolesters (POE), and two polyvinyl ether (PVE) fluids. These fluids represented viscosity grades of ISO 32 and ISO 68 and are shown in a table. Refrigerants studied included R-22, R-134a, and R-410A. Film thickness measurements were conducted at 23 C, 45 C, and 65 C with refrigerant concentrations ranging from zero to 60% by weight.

  4. Notes 02. Classical Lubrication Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance of 1D-Tilting Pad Bearing U w load h1 h2 h(x) x y lubricant Moving surface s Pad width B L Offset = s/L ?: tilt angle or pad rotation angle pivot Luis San Andres (c) 2006, 2009 film thickess expression hx() h 2 ? 1 ??() x L... ?+ ? ? ? ? ? ? ?:= ? h 1 h 2 := ? h 1 h 2 ? () L = U: surface speed - varies Bearing geometry: L 0.06:= m length and width of bearing offset 0.59:= pad pivot location s/L B 0.180:= Fluid properties ? in 0.0597:= Pa-sec ? 878:= kg/m3 c p 1880:= J/kg-degC ? v 0.0414:= 1...

  5. Dry lubricant films for aluminum forming.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, J.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    During metal forming process, lubricants are crucial to prevent direct contact, adhesion, transfer and scuffing of workpiece materials and tools. Boric acid films can be firmly adhered to the clean aluminum surfaces by spraying their methanol solutions and provide extremely low friction coefficient (about 0.04). The cohesion strengths of the bonded films vary with the types of aluminum alloys (6061, 6111 and 5754). The sheet metal forming tests indicate that boric acid films and the combined films of boric acid and mineral oil can create larger strains than the commercial liquid and solid lubricants, showing that they possess excellent lubricities for aluminum forming. SEM analyses indicate that boric acid dry films separate the workpiece and die materials, and prevent their direct contact and preserve their surface qualities. Since boric acid is non-toxic and easily removed by water, it can be expected that boric acid films are environmentally friendly, cost effective and very efficient lubricants for sheet aluminum cold forming.

  6. Advanced lubrication systems and materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, S.

    1998-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report described the work conducted at the National Institute of Standards and Technology under an interagency agreement signed in September 1992 between DOE and NIST for 5 years. The interagency agreement envisions continual funding from DOE to support the development of fuel efficient, low emission engine technologies in terms of lubrication, friction, and wear control encountered in the development of advanced transportation technologies. However, in 1994, the DOE office of transportation technologies was reorganized and the tribology program was dissolved. The work at NIST therefore continued at a low level without further funding from DOE. The work continued to support transportation technologies in the development of fuel efficient, low emission engine development. Under this program, significant progress has been made in advancing the state of the art of lubrication technology for advanced engine research and development. Some of the highlights are: (1) developed an advanced high temperature liquid lubricant capable of sustaining high temperatures in a prototype heat engine; (2) developed a novel liquid lubricant which potentially could lower the emission of heavy duty diesel engines; (3) developed lubricant chemistries for ceramics used in the heat engines; (4) developed application maps for ceramic lubricant chemistry combinations for design purpose; and (5) developed novel test methods to screen lubricant chemistries for automotive air-conditioning compressors lubricated by R-134a (Freon substitute). Most of these findings have been reported to the DOE program office through Argonne National Laboratory who manages the overall program. A list of those reports and a copy of the report submitted to the Argonne National Laboratory is attached in Appendix A. Additional reports have also been submitted separately to DOE program managers. These are attached in Appendix B.

  7. Tribological Characterization of Carbon Based Solid Lubricants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Carlos Joel

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    TRIBOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF CARBON BASED SOLID LUBRICANTS A Thesis by CARLOS JOEL SANCHEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2011 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering TRIBOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF CARBON BASED SOLID LUBRICANTS A Thesis by CARLOS JOEL SANCHEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas...

  8. Can Psychophysical Identity Save Mental Causation? The popularity of psychophysical property identity has waxed and waned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    identity has waxed and waned since its presentation by the Australian materialists of the 1950s. It went

  9. Asphaltenes and Waxes Do Not Interact Synergistically and Coprecipitate in Solid Organic Deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilpatrick, Peter K.

    Asphaltenes and Waxes Do Not Interact Synergistically and Coprecipitate in Solid Organic Deposits Waxes and asphaltenes are the major components in organic deposits from petroleum fluids. A key unresolved issue is whether there are significant intermolecular interactions between wax and asphaltene

  10. WAX DEPOSITION IN CRUDE OILS: A NEW APPROACH Antonio Fasano -Mario Primicerio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Primicerio, Mario

    WAX DEPOSITION IN CRUDE OILS: A NEW APPROACH Antonio Fasano - Mario Primicerio abstract. The complex phenomenon of solid wax deposition in wax sat- urated crude oils subject to thermal gradients has. Introduction Crude oils are complex mixtures containing parans, aromatics, naph- tenics, resins, asphaltenes

  11. EFFECTS OF RESIN AND WAX ON THE WATER UPTAKE BEHAVIOR OF WOOD STRANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Siqun

    EFFECTS OF RESIN AND WAX ON THE WATER UPTAKE BEHAVIOR OF WOOD STRANDS Yang2hang1 Post and wax are essential additives in the manufactureof composite panels such as OSB. Resin binds wood elements together while wax acts as a water repellent. The objective of this study was to investigate

  12. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF THE WAX GLAND OF THE HONEY BEE (APIS MELLIFERA L.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    THE FINE STRUCTURE OF THE WAX GLAND OF THE HONEY BEE (APIS MELLIFERA L.) Malcolin T. SANFORD Alfred An electron microscopic study was initiated to elucidate the ultrastructure of the wax gland in an actively wax secreting worker honey bee. The investigation showed that the cuticle is penetrated by bundles

  13. Understanding Wax Printing: A Simple Micropatterning Process for Paper-Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    Understanding Wax Printing: A Simple Micropatterning Process for Paper-Based Microfluidics Emanuel a detailed study on wax printing, a simple and inexpensive method for fabricating microfluidic devices in paper using a commercially avail- able printer and hot plate. The printer prints patterns of solid wax

  14. Effects of aridity and vegetation on plant-wax dD in modern lake sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polissar, Pratigya J.

    Effects of aridity and vegetation on plant-wax dD in modern lake sediments Pratigya J. Polissar Abstract We analyzed the deuterium composition of individual plant-waxes in lake sediments from 28 fractionation (ea) between plant-wax n-alkanes and precipitation differs with watershed ecosystem type

  15. Sensors and Actuators A 134 (2007) 194200 A latchable microvalve using phase change of paraffin wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Qiao

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wax Bozhi Yanga,, Qiao Linb a Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University is desired. The microvalve innovatively exploits paraffin wax of low melting point, whose solid­liquid phase by integrating on-chip heaters, while the latchability of the microvalve can be improved by optimizing the wax

  16. Major Evolutionary Trends in Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation of Vascular Plant Leaf Waxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Erika J.

    Major Evolutionary Trends in Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation of Vascular Plant Leaf Waxes Li Gao1 States of America Abstract Hydrogen isotopic ratios of terrestrial plant leaf waxes (dD) have been widely in leaf wax dD values in different terrestrial vascular plants are still poorly understood, hampering

  17. A PHASE CHANGE MICROVALVE USING A MELTABLE MAGNETIC MATERIAL: FERRO-WAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Kwang W.

    A PHASE CHANGE MICROVALVE USING A MELTABLE MAGNETIC MATERIAL: FERRO-WAX Kwang W. Oh, Kak Namkoong This paper presents a novel phase change microvalve using a paraffin-based ferrofluid plug (called "Ferro-Wax"). The Ferro-Wax plug is essentially leak-proof because of the phase change nature of the material; once

  18. Characterizing the molecular composition of epicuticular waxes of vegetation and in surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Characterizing the molecular composition of epicuticular waxes of vegetation and in surface MBL Street, Woods Hole, MA 02543 #12;Abstract: Epicuticular plant waxes are nearly omnipresent of origin. These waxes can provide that information in real time when collected in aerosols, or from

  19. CONTROL OF THE WAX MOTH GALLERIA MELLONELLA ON BEECOMB BY H-SEROTPYE V

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CONTROL OF THE WAX MOTH GALLERIA MELLONELLA ON BEECOMB BY H-SEROTPYE V BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS, England SUMMARY Mature broodcombs were protected from attack by larvae of the wax moth Galleria mellonella was much less in laboratory assays made directly on sheets of foundation wax. Dipicolinic acid, penicillin

  20. Environmental control on eastern broadleaf forest species' leaf wax distributions and D/H ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental control on eastern broadleaf forest species' leaf wax distributions and D/H ratios the degree to which an individual plant's leaf waxes D/H ratios are affected by these parameters remains- sitions of leaf wax n-alkanes, stem and surface waters were analyzed and compared against high

  1. Calorimetric investigations on thermoregula-tion and growth of wax moth larvae (Galleria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Calorimetric investigations on thermoregula- tion and growth of wax moth larvae (Galleria mellonella) The larvae of the wax moth Galleria mellonella are living in honeybee colonies where they feed on wax, honey, pollen and other organic matter. Mass-invasions of larvae can occur in weak bee colonies

  2. Hydrogen isotopic variability in leaf waxes among terrestrial and aquatic plants around Blood Pond, Massachusetts (USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Hydrogen isotopic variability in leaf waxes among terrestrial and aquatic plants around Blood Pond interpretation of the hydrogen isotope ratios of plant leaf waxes extracted from sediments requires a thor- ough at a single site to determine how leaf wax hydro- gen isotope (D/H) ratios differ in different plant types

  3. Wax diffusivity under given thermal gradient: a mathematical model , A. Fasano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Primicerio, Mario

    Wax diffusivity under given thermal gradient: a mathematical model S. Correra , A. Fasano , L. Fusi , M. Primicerio , F. Rosso Abstract In this paper we describe how to obtain wax diffusivity and solubility in a saturated crude oil using the measurements of solid wax deposit in the experimental apparatus

  4. Environmental control on eastern broadleaf forest species' leaf wax distributions and D/H ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Environmental control on eastern broadleaf forest species' leaf wax distributions and D/H ratios plant's leaf waxes D/H ratios are affected by these parameters remains in question. Understanding Coast of the US, from Florida to Maine. Hydrogen isotopic compo- sitions of leaf wax n-alkanes, stem

  5. Bonding is carried out by building up Quartz Wax on the sample holder to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Tanya M.

    Bonding is carried out by building up Quartz Wax on the sample holder to support and bond the tooth that the Quartz Wax should cover as much of the sample face as possible to ensure a strong bond. Application Note Tooth Wax layer Figure 1 Sample holder Tooth Thin Section #12;B. Cutting - SIngle Selection Figure 2

  6. Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Plant cuticles shine: advances in wax biosynthesis and export

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunst, Ljerka

    Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Plant cuticles shine: advances in wax biosynthesis stresses. It is composed of cutin polymer matrix and waxes, produced and secreted by epidermal cells involved in fatty acid elongation and biosynthesis of wax components, as well as transporters required

  7. Formation of bands and ridges on Europa by cyclic deformation: Insights from analogue wax experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    Formation of bands and ridges on Europa by cyclic deformation: Insights from analogue wax perform a set of analogue wax experiments aimed at understanding the processes and conditions that lead to lineament formation on Europa. We heat a layer of wax from below and cool it from above so that a solid

  8. Leaf-wax n-alkanes record the plantwater environment at leaf ush

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Leaf-wax n-alkanes record the plant­water environment at leaf ush Brett J. Tipple1 , Melissa A, UT, and approved December 26, 2012 (received for review August 13, 2012) Leaf-wax n-alkanes 2 H/1 H the 2 H values of leaf-wax n-alkanes and of stem, leaf, stream, and atmospheric waters throughout

  9. A Core Subunit of the RNA-Processing/Degrading Exosome Specifically Influences Cuticular Wax Biosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunst, Ljerka

    A Core Subunit of the RNA-Processing/Degrading Exosome Specifically Influences Cuticular Wax is an extracellular matrix composed of cutin polyester and waxes that covers aerial organs of land plants and protects them from environmental stresses. The Arabidopsis thaliana cer7 mutant exhibits reduced cuticular wax

  10. Compatibility of lubricant additives with HFC refrigerants and synthetic lubricants. Final report, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavestri, R.C. [Imagination Resources, Inc., Dublin, OH (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part one of this research provides manufacturers of components of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment with a useful list of lubricant additives, sources, functional properties and chemical species. The list in part one is comprised of domestic lubricant additive suppliers and the results of a literature search that was specifically targeted for additives reported to be useful in polyolester chemistry.

  11. Original article Hydrocarbons and monoesters of propolis waxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Hydrocarbons and monoesters of propolis waxes from Brazil Giuseppina Negri* Maria yielded mono- esters as main constituents, followed by hydrocarbons. The methyl and acetyl esters of the car- boxylic acids and alcohols, respectively, derived from the monoesters, and the hydrocarbons were

  12. ORIGINAL PAPER Effect of Pitch and Roll Static Angle on Lubricant Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    ] showed that the bonding ratio, flying height, lubricant diffusion, the number of end groups, the molecular weight of a lubricant, lubricant bonding ratio, lubricant thickness, and air bearing surface in the lubricant bonding ratio, and (c) a decrease in the lubricant thickness on the disk [2, 3]. Ambekar proposed

  13. Dear APUNSC Member, This sheet is to help get you started in ski waxing. As you become more proficient and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheel, David

    Dear APUNSC Member, This sheet is to help get you started in ski waxing. As you become more will need. This sheet includes the Swix waxes and tools that we use the most in Anchorage and Alaska. My in any condition. By using this sheet and attending our program wax clinics waxing should become a more

  14. CER4 Encodes an Alcohol-Forming Fatty Acyl-Coenzyme A Reductase Involved in Cuticular Wax Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunst, Ljerka

    CER4 Encodes an Alcohol-Forming Fatty Acyl-Coenzyme A Reductase Involved in Cuticular Wax surfaces of land plants. It is composed of a cutin polymer matrix and waxes. Cuticular waxes are complex and characterization of CER4, a wax bio- synthetic gene from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Arabidopsis cer4

  15. Multi component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines ITP Nanomanufacturing:...

  16. Auto/Steel Partnership: Hydroforming Materials and Lubricant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lightweight Rear Chassis Structures Future Generation Passenger Compartment AutoSteel Partnership: Hydroforming Materials and Lubricant Lightweight Rear Chassis Structures...

  17. Electrophoretically-deposited solid film lubricants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dugger, M.T.; Panitz, J.K.J.; Vanecek, C.W.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aqueous-based process that uses electrophoresis to attract powdered lubricant in suspension to a charged target was developed. The deposition process yields coatings with low friction, complies with environmental safety regulations, requires minimal equipment, and has several advantages over processes involving organic binders or vacuum techniques. This work focuses on development of the deposition process, includes an analysis of the friction coefficient of the material in sliding contact with stainless steel under a range of conditions, and a functional evaluation of coating performance in a precision mechanical device application. Results show that solid lubricant films with friction coefficients as low as 0.03 can be produced. A 0.03 friction coefficient is superior to solid lubricants with binder systems and is comparable to friction coefficients generated with more costly vacuum techniques.

  18. Diesel lubrication and cooling systems -- lubrication of the GM-71 series engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The film shows, by the use of animation, the course of the oil through the engine. It describes how it lubricates each component part and explains the principle of the ventilation system.

  19. Lubricants or lubricant additives composed of ionic liquids containing ammonium cations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qu, Jun (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Truhan, Jr.,; John J. (Cookeville, TN) [Cookeville, TN; Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Luo, Huimin (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Blau, Peter J. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A lubricant or lubricant additive is an ionic liquid alkylammonium salt. The alkylammonium salt has the structure R.sub.xNH.sub.(4-x).sup.+,[F.sub.3C(CF.sub.2).sub.yS(O).sub.2].sub.2N.sup- .- where x is 1 to 3, R is independently C.sub.1 to C.sub.12 straight chain alkyl, branched chain alkyl, cycloalkyl, alkyl substituted cycloalkyl, cycloalkyl substituted alkyl, or, optionally, when x is greater than 1, two R groups comprise a cyclic structure including the nitrogen atom and 4 to 12 carbon atoms, and y is independently 0 to 11. The lubricant is effective for the lubrication of many surfaces including aluminum and ceramics surfaces.

  20. Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication with Polyolester Lubricants and HFC Refrigerants, Final Report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunsel, Selda; Pozebanchuk, Michael

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to investigate the film formation properties of refrigeration lubricants using the ultrathin film elastohydrodynamic (EHD) interferometry technique and to study the effects of refrigerants on film formation. Film thickness measurements were conducted as a function of lubricant viscosity, speed, temperature, and refrigerant concentration. Based on the EHD film thickness data, effective pressure-viscosity coefficients were calculated for the test fluids at different temperatures and the effects of refrigerants on pressure-viscosity properties were investigated.

  1. Fischer-Tropsch wax characterization and upgrading: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, P.P.; Sturtevant, G.C.; Gregor, J.H.; Humbach, M.J.; Padrta, F.G.; Steigleder, K.Z.

    1988-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The characterization and upgrading of Fischer-Tropsch wax was studied. The focus of the program was to maximize the yield of marketable transportation fuels from the Fischer-Tropsch process. The wax was characterized using gel permeation chromatography (GPC), high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), infrared spectroscopy (IR), gas chromatography (GC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and various other physical analyses. Hydrocracking studies conducted in a pilot plant indicate that Fischer-Tropsch wax is an excellent feedstock. A high yield of excellent quality diesel fuel was produced with satisfactory catalyst performance at relatively mild operating conditions. Correlations for predicting key diesel fuel properties were developed and checked against actual laboratory blend data. The blending study was incorporated into an economic evaluation. Finally, it is possible to take advantage of the high quality of the Fischer-Tropsch derived distillate by blending a lower value light cycle oil (produced from a refinery FCC unit) representing a high aromatic and low cetane number. The blended stream meets diesel pool specifications (up to 60 wt % LCO addition). The value added to this blending stream further enhances the upgrading complex return. 22 refs., 39 figs., 48 tabs.

  2. SYNTHETIC LUBRICANTS, INC 1411 Callaghan Drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    1 SYNTHETIC LUBRICANTS, INC 1411 Callaghan Drive Greenville, MI 48838 MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET irritating and potentially toxic fumes containing oxides of nitrogen if exposed to extreme heat in air: (Conditions to Avoid) Stable under normal use conditions and in final use concentration. Incompatibility

  3. SYNTHETIC LUBRICANTS, INC 1411 Callaghan Drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    1 SYNTHETIC LUBRICANTS, INC 1411 Callaghan Drive Greenville, MI 48838 MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET. It will produce irritating and potentially toxic fumes containing oxides of nitrogen if exposed to extreme heat: (Conditions to Avoid) Stable under normal use conditions and in final use concentration. Incompatibility

  4. Exploring Low Emission Lubricants for Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, J. M.

    2000-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A workshop to explore the technological issues involved with the removal of sulfur from lubricants and the development of low emission diesel engine oils was held in Scottsdale, Arizona, January 30 through February 1, 2000. It presented an overview of the current technology by means of panel discussions and technical presentations from industry, government, and academia.

  5. Variability in the carbon isotopic composition of foliage carbon pools (soluble carbohydrates, waxes) and respiration fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    , waxes) and respiration fluxes in southeastern U.S. pine forests Behzad Mortazavi,1,2,3 Maureen H. ConteCSC), and waxes (dCW)) and respiratory carbon (foliage (dCFR), soil (dCSR) and ecosystem 13 CO2 (dCER)) for two-alkanoic acid wax molecular cluster was twice that observed for dCOM and the predominant C22­26 compound cluster

  6. Candle and candle wax containing metathesis and metathesis-like products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, Timothy A; Tupy, Michael J; Abraham, Timothy W; Shafer, Andy

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wax comprises a metathesis product and/or a product that resembles, at least in part, a product which may be formed from a metathesis reaction. The wax may be used to form articles, for example, candles (container candles, votive candles, and/or a pillar candles), crayons, fire logs, or tarts. The wax commonly includes other components in addition to the metathesis product.

  7. Candle and candle wax containing metathesis and metathesis-like products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, Timothy A; Tupy, Michael J; Abraham, Timothy W; Shafer, Andy

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A wax comprises a metathesis product and/or a product that resembles, at least in part, a product which may be formed from a metathesis reaction. The wax may be used to form articles for example, candles (container candles, votive candles, and/or a pillar candles), crayons, fire logs or tarts. The wax commonly includes other components in addition to the metathesis product.

  8. Full Life Wind Turbine Gearbox Lubricating Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, Glenn A.; Jungk, Manfred; Bryant, Jonathan J.; Lauer, Rebecca S.; Chobot, Anthony; Mayer, Tyler; Palmer, Shane; Kauffman, Robert E.

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial gear box lubricants typically are hydrocarbon based mineral oils with considerable amounts of additives to overcome the lack of base fluid properties like wear protection, oxidation stability, load carrying capacity, low temperature solidification and drop of viscosity at higher temperatures. For today's wind turbine gearboxes, the requirements are more severe and synthetic hydrocarbon oils are used to improve on this, but all such hydrocarbon based lubricants require significant amounts of Extreme Pressure (EP) additives to meet performance requirements. Perfluoropolyether (PFPE) fluids provide load carrying capacity as an inherent property. During the course of the project with the main tasks of 'Establish a Benchmark', 'Lubricant Evaluation', 'Full Scale Gearbox Trial' and 'Economic Evaluation', the PAO Reference oil exhibited significant changes after laboratory gear testing, in service operation in the field and full scale gearbox trial. Four hydrocarbon base oils were selected for comparison in the benchmarking exercise and showed variation with respect to meeting the requirements for the laboratory micro-pitting tests, while the PFPE fluid exceeded the requirements even with the material taken after the full scale gear box trial. This is remarkable for a lubricant without EP additives. Laboratory bearing tests performed on the PFPE fluids before and after the full scale gear box trial showed the results met requirements for the industry standard. The PFPE fluid successfully completed the full scale gear box test program which included baseline and progressive staged load testing. The evaluation of gears showed no micro-pitting or objectionable wear. By the final stage, lubricant film thickness had been reduced to just 21% of its original value, this was by design and resulted in a lambda ratio of well below 1. This test design scenario of a low lambda ratio is a very undesirable lubrication condition for real world but creates the ability to test the lubricating fluids performance under the most extreme conditions. The PAO Reference oil also passed its testing without any noticeable deterioration of the gear surface. However the PAO Reference oil was replaced midway through the progressive loading, as the lubricant was burned in an attempt to raise the sump temperature to the same levels as for the PFPE. Both materials experienced a decrease of viscosity during their respective run times. The viscosity index decreased for the PAO there while there was a slight increase for the PFPE. FZG laboratory gear tests and measurements of the drive motor's current during the full scale gear box trial were made to characterize the relative efficiency between the PFPE fluid and the PAO Reference oil. In the FZG laboratory efficiency test, the PFPE fluids show much higher churning losses due to their higher viscosity and density. The analysis seems to show that the efficiency correlates better to dynamic viscosity than any other of the measured metrics such as film thickness. In load stages where the load, speed and temperature are similar, the PFPE fluid has a greater film thickness and theoretical gear protection, but requires a larger current for the drive motor than the PAO. However in load stages where the film thickness is the same, the PFPE fluid's reduced dynamic viscosity gives it a slight efficiency advantage relative to the PAO reference oil. Ultimately, many factors such as temperature, rotational speed, and fluid viscosity combine in a complex fashion to influence the results. However, the PFPE's much lower change of viscosity with respect to temperature, allows variations in designing an optimum viscosity to balance efficiency versus gear protection. Economic analysis was done using Cost of Energy calculations. The results vary from 5.3% for a 'Likely Case' to 16.8% for a 'Best Case' scenario as potential cost improvement by using PFPE as the gearbox lubricating fluid. It is important to note the largest portion of savings comes in Levelized Replacement Cost, which is dictated by the assumption on gearb

  9. Evaluation of Wax Deposition and Its Control During Production of Alaska North Slope Oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao Zhu; Jack A. Walker; J. Liang

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to increasing oil demand, oil companies are moving into arctic environments and deep-water areas for oil production. In these regions of lower temperatures, wax deposits begin to form when the temperature in the wellbore falls below wax appearance temperature (WAT). This condition leads to reduced production rates and larger pressure drops. Wax problems in production wells are very costly due to production down time for removal of wax. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a solution to wax deposition. In order to develop a solution to wax deposition, it is essential to characterize the crude oil and study phase behavior properties. The main objective of this project was to characterize Alaskan North Slope crude oil and study the phase behavior, which was further used to develop a dynamic wax deposition model. This report summarizes the results of the various experimental studies. The subtasks completed during this study include measurement of density, molecular weight, viscosity, pour point, wax appearance temperature, wax content, rate of wax deposition using cold finger, compositional characterization of crude oil and wax obtained from wax content, gas-oil ratio, and phase behavior experiments including constant composition expansion and differential liberation. Also, included in this report is the development of a thermodynamic model to predict wax precipitation. From the experimental study of wax appearance temperature, it was found that wax can start to precipitate at temperatures as high as 40.6 C. The WAT obtained from cross-polar microscopy and viscometry was compared, and it was discovered that WAT from viscometry is overestimated. From the pour point experiment it was found that crude oil can cease to flow at a temperature of 12 C. From the experimental results of wax content, it is evident that the wax content in Alaskan North Slope crude oil can be as high as 28.57%. The highest gas-oil ratio for a live oil sample was observed to be 619.26 SCF/STB. The bubblepoint pressure for live oil samples varied between 1600 psi and 2100 psi. Wax precipitation is one of the most important phenomena in wax deposition and, hence, needs to be modeled. There are various models present in the literature. Won's model, which considers the wax phase as a non-ideal solution, and Pedersen's model, which considers the wax phase as an ideal solution, were compared. Comparison indicated that Pedersen's model gives better results, but the assumption of wax phase as an ideal solution is not realistic. Hence, Won's model was modified to consider different precipitation characteristics of the various constituents in the hydrocarbon fraction. The results obtained from the modified Won's model were compared with existing models, and it was found that predictions from the modified model are encouraging.

  10. MHK Projects/Wax Lake Outlet | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK Projects Jump to:Vicksburg Bend <Wavegen <Wax

  11. Canfield waxes poetic about superconductors | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteries BatteriesCAESMission WelcomeforatCanfield waxes

  12. Rubber friction on (apparently) smooth lubricated surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Mofidi; B. Prakash; B. N. J. Persson; O. Albohl

    2007-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study rubber sliding friction on hard lubricated surfaces. We show that even if the hard surface appears smooth to the naked eye, it may exhibit short wavelength roughness, which may give the dominant contribution to rubber friction. That is, the observed sliding friction is mainly due to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber by the substrate surface asperities. The presented results are of great importance for rubber sealing and other rubber applications involving (apparently) smooth surfaces.

  13. Tests show benefits of new polished rod lubricator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, M.R.; Khatib, A. [Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center, Casper, WY (United States)

    1995-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests with beam-pumped oil wells, completed over 7-months at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (Rmotc), indicated that a new lubricator supplying supplementary grease to polished rods lowered operating costs by reducing maintenance, material costs, and electrical requirements. It also minimized polished rod corrosion and enhanced pollution control. The lubricator worked with extremely hot fluids and in adverse weather conditions. The paper describes Rmotc, the new lubrication, the test wells, and cost reduction.

  14. Scaling theory for hydrodynamic lubrication, with application to non-Newtonian lubricants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick B. Warren

    2015-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Scaling arguments are developed for the load balance in hydrodynamic lubrication, and applied to non-Newtonian lubricants with a shear-thinning rheology typical of a structured liquid. It is argued that the shear thinning regime may be mechanically unstable in lubrication flow, and consequently the Stribeck (friction) curve should be discontinuous, with possible hysteresis. Further analysis suggests that normal stress and flow transience (stress overshoot) do not destroy this basic picture, although they may provide stabilising mechanisms at higher shear rates. Extensional viscosity is also expected to be insignificant unless the Trouton ratio is large. A possible application to recent theories of shear thickening in non-Brownian particulate suspensions is indicated.

  15. actively lubricated bearings: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    234 Theory of a Possible Mechanism for Lubrication and Surface Protection by an Electrically Neutral Hydrogels Condensed Matter (arXiv) Summary: It is demonstrated that...

  16. Polyol esters as HFC-134a compressor lubricants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komatsuzaki, S.; Homma, Y.; Itoh, Y. [Hitachi Ltd. (Japan)] [and others

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A polyol ester-based lubricant has been applied to HFC-134a household refrigerator compressors, because of its good miscibility with HFC-134a refrigerant, and there is a possibility that it will be applied to automobile air conditions. For better performance, further improvements are needed regarding miscibility, lubricity and chemical stability of the lubricant, because such systems are often used under extreme conditions. This report discusses the required properties and ways to improve performance of polyol esters as HFC-134a compressor lubricants. 7 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Turkey Marine Lubricants Market is Expected to Reach USD 177...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    base oil production is anticipated to hinder the overall market growth. As, Group I base oil form one of the impeccable raw materials required for manufacturing marine lubricants....

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    subprogram supports fuels and lubricants research and development (R&D) to provide vehicle users with cost-competitive options that enable high fuel economy with low emissions,...

  19. Effects of Fuel Dilution with Biodiesel on Lubricant Acidity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Affecting Fuel Economy and Engine Wear Reducing Lubricant Ash Impact on Exhaust Aftertreatment with a Oil Conditioning Filter Development of High Performance Heavy Duty Engine Oils...

  20. Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on the Effects of LubricantAdditive (Low-Ash, Ashless) Characteristics on DPF Degradation Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime Fuel...

  1. Reducing Lubricant Ash Impact on Exhaust Aftertreatment with...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Filter Effects of Fuel Dilution with Biodiesel on Lubricant Acidity, Oxidation and Corrosion Future Engine Fluids Technologies: Durable, Fuel-Efficient, and Emissions-Friendly...

  2. Lubricants - Pathway to Improving Fuel Efficiency of Legacy Fleet...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Efficiency of Legacy Fleet Vehicles Reviews recent studies on potential for low-viscosity lubricants and low-friction surfaces and additives to reduce fuel consumption, and...

  3. Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CLOSE) Project Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) Project Extensive chemical and physical characterization performed on emissions from normal and high...

  4. Multi component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    zone Designing of active nano particulate lubricant. Size and pressure sensitive architecture capable of delivering stable transfer layer Caterpillar Confidential Yellow...

  5. Examining Effects of Lubricant Composition in Engine Component...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems in Pursuit of Enhanced Efficiency under Environmental Constraints Four lubricant technical themes are presented that aim to work synergistically with advanced engine...

  6. aliphatic hydrocarbons constitute the largest fraction of cuticular wax in bees and cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    aliphatic hydrocarbons constitute the largest fraction of cuticular wax in bees and cover a highly hydrocarbons in the cuticular waxes of bees are widely assumed to func- tion as recognition cues (for nestmate hydrocarbons may label individuals in colonies according to the tasks they under- take and that the compounds

  7. Molecular Characterization of Wax Isolated from a Variety of Crude Oils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilpatrick, Peter K.

    . It can aid emulsification of the crude in the production and refining of crudes, as well as in oil spillsMolecular Characterization of Wax Isolated from a Variety of Crude Oils Barbara J. Musser and Peter Carolina 27695-7905 Received November 5, 1997 Petroleum waxes from sixteen different crude oils were

  8. System and method for the mitigation of paraffin wax deposition from crude oil by using ultrasonic waves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Towler, Brian F. (Laramie, WY)

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for mitigating the deposition of wax on production tubing walls. The method comprises positioning at least one ultrasonic frequency generating device adjacent the production tubing walls and producing at least one ultrasonic frequency thereby disintegrating the wax and inhibiting the wax from attaching to the production tubing walls. A system for mitigating the deposition of wax on production tubing walls is also provided.

  9. Identification of the Wax Ester Synthase/Acyl-Coenzyme A:Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase WSD1 Required for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunst, Ljerka

    Identification of the Wax Ester Synthase/Acyl-Coenzyme A:Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase WSD1 Required for Stem Wax Ester Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis1,2[W][OA] Fengling Li, Xuemin Wu, Patricia Lam Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z1 (R.J.) Wax esters are neutral lipids composed of aliphatic alcohols and acids

  10. Experimental Study on Shear Fatigue Behavior and Stiffness Performance of Warm Mix Asphalt by adding Synthetic Wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by adding Synthetic Wax C. Petita , A. Milliena , F. Canestrarib , V. Pannunziob , A. Virgilib a Université.petit@unilim.fr , Phone : +33555934519 Abstract Synthetic waxes produced by standard and registered processes may be used. The present article serves to compare the mechanical performance of a WMA produced by adding synthetic wax

  11. Wax Inhibition by Comb-like Polymers: Support of the Incorporation-Perturbation Mechanism from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Wax Inhibition by Comb-like Polymers: Support of the Incorporation-Perturbation Mechanism from ReceiVed: April 10, 2007; In Final Form: July 26, 2007 Deposition of wax on a cold surface is a serious problem in oil production. Progress in developing more effective wax inhibitors has been impeded

  12. Leaf epicuticular wax ultrastructure and trichome presence on Russian wheat aphid (Diuraphis noxia) resistant and susceptible leaves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leaf epicuticular wax ultrastructure and trichome presence on Russian wheat aphid (Diuraphis noxia wax ultrastructure and leaf trichomes were examined on two Russian wheat aphid-susceptible wheat. Comparison of the scanning electron micrographs showed that the epicuticular wax structure was similar

  13. Evidence for water use efficiency as an important factor in determining the dD values of tree leaf waxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    leaf waxes Juzhi Hou, William J. D'Andrea, Dana MacDonald, Yongsong Huang * Department of Geological waxes can provide useful information about past climate change. However, factors con- trolling dD values of higher plant leaf waxes (dDwax) are poorly understood. Here we show that dDwax values are negatively

  14. International Journal of Odonatology 12 (2) 2009: 205-221 205 Crystalline wax coverage of the imaginal cuticle in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotiaho, Janne S.

    International Journal of Odonatology 12 (2) 2009: 205-221 205 Crystalline wax coverage words: Odonata, dragonfly, wax coverage, superhydrophobicity, cuticle, lantern. Abstract In this study we use high resolution SEM to describe the diversity of wax crystals and their distribution

  15. Journal of Virological Methods 132 (2006) 174180 A simple wax-embedding method for isolation of aphid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, W. Allen

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Virological Methods 132 (2006) 174­180 A simple wax-embedding method for isolation. This method uses warm melted wax to immobilize the aphid. Following removal of a hind leg, the hemolymph can in the hemolymph of individual aphids was developed. The wax-embedding hemolymph collection technique provides

  16. Significance of the Expression of the CER6 Condensing Enzyme for Cuticular Wax Production in Arabidopsis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunst, Ljerka

    Significance of the Expression of the CER6 Condensing Enzyme for Cuticular Wax Production condensing enzyme in Arabidopsis surface wax production, we determined CER6 transcription domains factors such as light and water deficit, which are known to stimulate wax accumulation, induce CER6

  17. POLISSAR & FREEMAN, EFFECTS OF ARIDITY AND VEGETATION ON PLANT-WAX D EA-1 ,Page 1 of 21

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polissar, Pratigya J.

    POLISSAR & FREEMAN, EFFECTS OF ARIDITY AND VEGETATION ON PLANT-WAX D EA-1 ,Page 1 of 21 Polissar & Freeman (2010) Effects of Aridity and Vegetation on Plant-wax D in Modern Lake Sediments Electronic annex. References 6. Supplemental Figures #12;POLISSAR & FREEMAN, EFFECTS OF ARIDITY AND VEGETATION ON PLANT-WAX D

  18. Microfriction studies of model self-lubricating surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, P.J.; Yust, C.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1993-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-lubricating composites consist of at least one structural (matrix) phase and at least one phase to provide lubrication. Modeling the behavior of such composites involves ascertaining the frictional contributions of each constituent phase under varying conditions of lubricating films coverage. The ORNL friction microprobe (FMP), a specialized microcontact tribometer, was used to investigate the frictional behavior of both matrix and lubricant phases to support the development of self-lubricating, surfaces. Polished CVD-silicon carbide deposits and silicon wafers were used as substrates. The wafers were intended to simulate the thin silica films present on SiC surfaces at elevated temperature. Molybdenum disulfide, in both sputtered and burnished forms, was used as the model lubricant. The effects of CVD-SiC substrate surface roughness and method of lubricant film deposition on the substrate were studied for single passes of a spherical silicon nitride slider (NBD 200 material). In contrast to the smooth sliding exhibit by burnished, films, sputtered MoS{sub 2} surfaces exhibited marked stick-slip behavior, indicating that the frictional behavior of solid lubricating coatings can be quite erratic on a microscale, especially when asperity contacts are elastically compliant.

  19. Tribological Properties of Ionic Liquids Lubricants Containing Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Wei

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and with organic solvents and electrochemical properties [7]. Because of these properties ionic liquids become a new green solvent or lubricant in industrial application. 1.2.2 The application of ionic liquid in tribology 1.2.2.1 Ionic liquids as lubrication...

  20. Offshore Lubricants Market | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns JumpsourceOffshore Lubricants Market Size Home

  1. Lubricant Additives | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lu'an GroupLubricant

  2. High-pressure lubricity at the meso- and nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Vanossi; A. Benassi; N. Varini; E. Tosatti

    2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The increase of sliding friction upon increasing load is a classic in the macroscopic world. Here we discuss the possibility that friction rise might sometimes turn into a drop when, at the mesoscale and nanoscale, a confined lubricant film separating crystalline sliders undergoes strong layering and solidification. Under pressure, transitions from N to N-1 layers may imply a change of lateral periodicity of the crystallized lubricant sufficient to alter the matching of crystal structures, influencing the ensuing friction jump. A pressure-induced friction drop may occur as the shear gradient maximum switches from the lubricant middle, marked by strong stick-slip with or without shear melting, to the crystalline slider-lubricant interface, characterized by smooth superlubric sliding. We present high pressure sliding simulations to display examples of frictional drops, suggesting their possible relevance to the local behavior in boundary lubrication.

  3. Bubble column apparatus for separating wax from catalyst slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neathery, James K.; Davis, Burtron H.

    2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel methods and devices for production of liquid hydrocarbon products from gaseous reactants are disclosed. In one aspect, a method for separating a liquid hydrocarbon, typically a wax, from a catalyst containing slurry is provided, comprising passing the slurry through at least one downcomer extending from an overhead separation chamber and discharging into the bottom of a slurry bubble column reactor. The downcomer includes a cross-flow filtration element for separating a substantially particle-free liquid hydrocarbon for downstream processing. In another aspect, a method for promoting plug-flow movement in a recirculating slurry bubble column reactor is provided, comprising discharging the recirculating slurry into the reactor through at least one downcomer which terminates near the bottom of the reactor. Devices for accomplishing the above methods are also provided.

  4. Gamma irradiation testing of montan wax barrier materials for in-situ waste containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soo, P.; Heiser, J.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A scoping study was carried out to quantify the potential use of a montan wax as a barrier material for subsurface use. If it possesses resistance to chemical and structural change, it could be used in a barrier to minimize the migration of contaminants from their storage or disposal locations. Properties that were evaluated included hardness, melting point, molecular weight, and biodegradation as a function of gamma radiation dose. The main emphasis was to quantify the wax`s long-term ability to withstand radiation-induced mechanical, chemical, and microbial degradation.

  5. An experimental investigation into the dimension-sensitive viscosity of polymer containing lubricant oils in microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, David

    lubricant oils in microchannels David Erickson a , Fuzhi Lu a , Dongqing Li a,*, Tony White b , Jason Gao b lubrication processes, lubricating oils containing polymer additives are subject to high shear rate through of channel height on the effective viscosity of oil lubricants with two different polymer additives (a radial

  6. Analysis of the Compositional Variation in the Epicuticular Wax Layer of Wheat (Triticum aestivum)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beecher, Francis Ward

    2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    identifications were made through comparison of the associated mass with literature and publicly available databases. As a separate test of concept, the ability to distinguish between the epicuticular wax compositions of individual varieties was determined through...

  7. Vacuum/Compression Valving (VCV) Using Parrafin-Wax on a Centrifugal Microfluidic CD Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 8 | Issue 3 | e58523 Vacuum/Compression Valving (VCV)Vacuum/Compression Valving (VCV) Using Parrafin-Wax on aThis paper introduces novel vacuum/compression valves (VCVs)

  8. Low-cost selective deposition of wax onto textured solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Páez, Daýan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The active regions of a solar cell must be inoculated with wax, while leaving the metal fingers and bus bars bare, in preparation for the electroplating step of a new solar panel manufacturing process. Different methods ...

  9. Rheometry and direct flow observations of a model wax-oil system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitriou, Christopher (Christopher J.)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waxy crude oils are a commonly encountered type of crude oil which must be dealt with by oil production companies. They are characterized by a gel-like behavior at temperatures below their wax appearance temperature (Twa) ...

  10. CVD method of forming self-lubricating composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Besmann, T.M.; Blau, P.J.; Lee, W.Y.; Bae, Y.W.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An article having a multiphase composite lubricant coating of a hard refractory matrix phase of titanium nitride dispersed with particles of a solid lubricating phase of molybdenum disulfide is prepared by heating the article to temperatures between 350 and 850 C in a reaction vessel at a reduced pressure and passing a gaseous mixture of Ti((CH{sub 3}){sub 2}N){sub 4}, MoF{sub 6}, H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} over the heated article forming a multiphase composite lubricant coating on the article. 1 fig.

  11. CVD method of forming self-lubricating composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Besmann, Theodore M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Blau, Peter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lee, Woo Y. (Knoxville, TN); Bae, Yong W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An article having a multiphase composite lubricant coating of a hard refractory matrix phase of titanium nitride dispersed with particles of a solid lubricating phase of molybdenum disulfide is prepared by heating the article to temperatures between 350.degree. and 850.degree. C. in a reaction vessel at a reduced pressure and passing a gaseous mixture of Ti((CH.sub.3).sub.2 N).sub.4, MoF.sub.6, H.sub.2 S and NH.sub.3 over the heated article forming a multiphase composite lubricant coating on the article.

  12. Molten wax as a dust control agent for demolition of facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, E.E. [Carter Technologies Co, Sugar Land, TX (United States); Welty, B.D. [Portage, Inc, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molten wax shows considerable promise as a fixative and dust control agent in demolition of radioactively contaminated facilities. Sticky molten wax, modified with special surfactants and wetting agents, is capable of not only coating materials but also penetrating into friable or dusty materials and making them incapable of becoming airborne during demolition. Wax also shows significant promise for stabilization of waste residuals that may be contained in buildings undergoing demolition. Some of the building materials that have been tested to date include concrete, wood, sheet rock, fiber insulation, lime, rock, and paper. Protective clothing, clay, sand, sulfur, and bentonite clay have been tested as surrogates for certain waste materials that may be encountered during building demolition. The paper describes several potential applications of molten wax for dust control in demolition of radioactive contaminated facilities. As a case-study, this paper describes a research test performed for a pipeline closure project being completed by the Idaho Cleanup Project at the Idaho National Laboratory. The project plans to excavate and remove a section of buried Duriron drain piping containing highly radioactive and friable and 'flighty' waste residuals. A full-scale pipeline mockup containing simulated waste was buried in sand to simulate the direct buried subsurface condition of the subject piping. The pipeline was pre-heated by drawing hot air through the line with a HEPA vacuum blower unit. Molten wax was pumped into the line and allowed to cool. The line was then broken apart in various places to evaluate the permeation performance of the wax. The wax fully permeated all the surrogate materials rendering them non-friable with a consistency similar to modeling clay. Based on the performance during the mockup, it is anticipated that the wax will be highly effective in controlling the spread of radiological contamination during pipe demolition activities. (authors)

  13. Development and application of a lubricant composition model to study effects of oil transport, vaporization, fuel dilution, and soot contamination on lubricant rheology and engine friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Grace Xiang

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engine oil lubricants play a critical role in controlling mechanical friction in internal combustion engines by reducing metal-on-metal contact. This implies the importance of understanding lubricant optimization at the ...

  14. Renewable Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Chemistry Laboratory.

  15. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Petro. Feed. Use 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.0 0.4 0.3 Special Naphthas 0.1 0.7 0.1 0.2 0.0 0.3 0.2 Lubricants 0.8 6.9 1.1 0.3 0.0 1.3 0.5 Waxes 0.0 0.5 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.2 0.1 Petroleum Coke...

  16. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Petro. Feed. Use 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.0 0.3 0.3 Special Naphthas 0.1 0.7 0.1 0.2 0.0 0.2 0.2 Lubricants 0.7 6.6 1.0 0.2 0.0 1.2 0.4 Waxes 0.0 0.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.1 Petroleum Coke...

  17. Sulfurized olefin lubricant additives and compositions containing same

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braid, M.

    1980-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Lubricant additives having substantially improved extreme pressure characteristics are provided by modifying certain sulfurized olefins by reacting said olefins with a cyclic polydisulfide under controlled reaction conditions and at a temperature of at least about 130/sup 0/ C.

  18. Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricant Additives for Next-Generation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricant Additives for Next-Generation Fuel-Efficient Engines May 15 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Jun Qu, Materials Science and Technology Division ORNL...

  19. Enhanced engine efficiency through subsystem lubricant viscosity investigations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martins, Tomás V

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study initiates a three-year project to investigate the potential benefits in fuel efficiency, engine emissions, lubricant longevity, and engine durability. Two experimental testing platforms were designed and implemented ...

  20. Tribological Investigation of Mahua Oil Based Lubricant for Maintenance Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amit Suhane; A. Rehman; H. K. Khaira

    Limited crude reserves, consistently rising oil prices, unsafe disposal of the harmful lubricants and its guaranteed adverse aftereffects has increased concern for replenishing the environment. Development of environmental friendly lubricants and its appropriate usage is an option of prime importance which can overcome such problems. This paper investigates the prospects of Mahua oil based lubricant for maintenance applications. Mahua oil is blended with conventional gear oil (90T) in different ratios. Tribo pair used is plain carbon steel cylindrical pin and mild steel disc. Friction and wear parameters have been studied on Pin on Disc Tester under varying conditions. Worn out pins suggests pronounced abrasive and adhesive wear pattern under boundary film lubricated conditions. Experimentation reveals that addition of mahua oil blended with 90 T oil has good wear reducing traits apart from environmental benefits.

  1. Method of removing an immiscible lubricant from a refrigeration system and apparatus for same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spauschus, Hans O. (Stockbridge, GA); Starr, Thomas L. (Roswell, GA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of separating an immiscible lubricant from a liquid refrigerant in a refrigerating system including a compressor, a condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator, wherein the expansion device is connected to the condenser by a liquid refrigerant flow line for liquid refrigerant and immiscible lubricant. The method comprising slowing the rate of flow of the liquid refrigerant and immiscible lubricant between the condenser and the expansion device such that the liquid refrigerant and the immiscible lubricant separate based upon differences in density. The method also comprises collecting the separated immiscible lubricant in a collection chamber in fluid communication with the separated immiscible lubricant. Apparatus for performing the method is also disclosed.

  2. Method to improve lubricity of low-sulfur diesel and gasoline fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdemir, Ali

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for providing lubricity in fuels and lubricants includes adding a boron compound to a fuel or lubricant to provide a boron-containing fuel or lubricant. The fuel or lubricant may contain a boron compound at a concentration between about 30 ppm and about 3,000 ppm and a sulfur concentration of less than about 500 ppm. A method of powering an engine to minimize wear, by burning a fuel containing boron compounds. The boron compounds include compound that provide boric acid and/or BO.sub.3 ions or monomers to the fuel or lubricant.

  3. Rotary seal with enhanced lubrication and contaminant flushing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietle, Lannie L. (Sugar Land, TX)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A resilient, ring shaped interference-type hydrodynamic rotary seal having waves on the lubricant side which provide increased film thickness and flushing action by creating contact pressure induced angulated restrictions formed by abrupt restrictive diverters. The angulated restrictions are defined by projecting ridges, corners at the trailing edge of the waves, or simply by use of a converging shape at the trailing edge of the waves which is more abrupt than the gently converging hydrodynamic inlet shape at the leading edge of the waves. The abrupt restrictive diverter performs two functions; a restricting function and a diverting function. The angulated restrictions cause a local film thickness restriction which produces a damming effect preventing a portion of the lubricant from leaking out of the dynamic sealing interface at the trailing edge of the wave, and results in a much thicker lubricant film thickness under the waves. This contributes to more film thickness in the remainder of the dynamic sealing interface toward the environment because film thickness tends to decay gradually rather than abruptly due to the relative stiffness of the seal material. Because of the angle of the abrupt restrictive diverter relative to the relative rotation direction, in conjunction with the restriction or damming effect, a strong diverting action is produced which pumps lubricant across the dynamic sealing interface toward the environment. The lubricant diversion is caused by the component of the rotational velocity tangent to the abrupt restrictive diverter. The component of rotational velocity normal to the abrupt restrictive diverter causes a portion of the lubricant film to be pumped past the abrupt restrictive diverter, thereby assuring adequate lubrication thereof.

  4. OpenEI Community - Naphtha

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff the GridHomeWrap-up courtesy5/0

  5. An economical route to high quality lubricants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andre, J.P. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Hahn, S.K.; Kwon, S.H.; Min, W.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current rends in the automotive and industrial markets toward more efficient engines, longer drain intervals, and lower emissions all contribute to placing increasingly stringent performance requirements on lubricants. The demand for higher quality synthetic and non-conventional basestocks is expected to grow at a much faster rate than that of conventional lube basestocks to meet these higher performance standards. Yukong Limited has developed a novel technology (the Yukong UCO Lube Process) for the economic production of high quality, high-viscosity-index lube basestocks from a fuels hydrocracker unconverted oil stream. A pilot plant based on this process has been producing oils for testing purposes since May 1994. A commercial facility designed to produce 3,500 BPD of VHVI lube basestocks cane on-stream at Yukong`s Ulsan refinery in October 1995. The Badger Technology Center of Raytheon Engineers and Constructors assisted Yukong during the development of the technology and prepared the basic process design package for the commercial facility. This paper presents process aspects of the technology and comparative data on investment and operating costs. Yukong lube basestock product properties and performance data are compared to basestocks produced by conventional means and by lube hydrocracking.

  6. Process for producing biodiesel, lubricants, and fuel and lubricant additives in a critical fluid medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.

    2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing alkyl esters useful in biofuels and lubricants by transesterifying glyceride- or esterifying free fatty acid-containing substances in a single critical phase medium is disclosed. The critical phase medium provides increased reaction rates, decreases the loss of catalyst or catalyst activity and improves the overall yield of desired product. The process involves the steps of dissolving an input glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substance with an alcohol or water into a critical fluid medium; reacting the glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substance with the alcohol or water input over either a solid or liquid acidic or basic catalyst and sequentially separating the products from each other and from the critical fluid medium, which critical fluid medium can then be recycled back in the process. The process significantly reduces the cost of producing additives or alternatives to automotive fuels and lubricants utilizing inexpensive glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substances, such as animal fats, vegetable oils, rendered fats, and restaurant grease.

  7. Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design Superhard and low-friction coatings and surface...

  8. In situ control of lubricant properties for reduction of power cylinder friction through thermal barrier coating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molewyk, Mark Allen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lowering lubricant viscosity to reduce friction generally carries a side effect of increased metal-metal contact in mixed or boundary lubrication, for example near top ring reversal along the engine cylinder liner. A ...

  9. GAMMA IRRADIATION TESTING OF MONTAN WAX FOR USE IN WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SOO,P.; HEISER,J.; HART,A.

    1996-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A field demonstration was funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to quantify the potential use of montan wax as a subsurface barrier material for nuclear waste management applications. As part of that demonstration, a study was completed to address some of the characteristics of the wax. Of particular interest is its resistance to chemical and structural changes that would influence its integrity as a barrier to minimize the migration of contaminants from their storage or disposal locations. Properties that were evaluated included hardness, melting point, molecular weight, and biodegradation as a function of gamma radiation dose. Based on the data obtained to date the wax is extremely resistant to radiation-induced change. Coupled with low permeability, the material shows promise as a subsurface barrier material.

  10. Volunteering at Research and Cultural Collections From Egyptian shabti figures to nineteenth century medical waxes, from West African Masks to modern British

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    century medical waxes, from West African Masks to modern British landscape paintings, the Research: Basic cleaning and conservation of objects e.g. cleaning and waxing outdoor sculpture Basic remedial

  11. 168 nature neuroscience volume 2 no 2 february 1999 Sleep spindle oscillations consist of waxing-and-waning field poten-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazhenov, Maxim

    of waxing-and-waning field poten- tials of 7 to 14 Hz, which last 1 to 3 seconds and recur every 5 to 15) and thalamocortical (TC) cells1­4. The waxing phase of spindle oscillations is associated with recruitment of neurons

  12. Wax precipitation for gas condensate fluids was studied in detail with a thermodynamic model. It was found that the precipitated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Summary Wax precipitation for gas condensate fluids was studied in detail with a thermodynamic to that in gas condensates. As a result of pressure decrease (at a constant tem- perature), the amount is undesirable. The flowlines may be plugged by wax deposition. For both crude oils and gas condensates, one may

  13. Development of a heat-balance model for the characterization of wax blockage in flowlines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ombu, Ebiaye Valerie

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    -Illustration of a flowline plugged with wax. Extensive research work on the actual mechanisms of blockage precipitation and deposition for wax is reviewed in the literature survey but does not serve as the focus of this study. The deposition models, which... involves considerable risk in the form of the constant threat of a stuck pig and the resulting tremendous cost of downtime to rectify the problem, or in the worst-case scenario, of losing the pipe entirely. The problem of blockages does not have a...

  14. Composition of the wax fraction of bitumen from methylated brown coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.I. Zherebtsov; A.I. Moiseev [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kemerovo (Russian Federation). Institute of Coal and Coal Chemistry

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in the group and individual compositions of the wax fractions of bitumen in the course of brown coal methylation were studied. With the use of IR and NMR spectroscopy and chromatography-mass spectrometry, it was found that the esters of methylated coal waxes consisted of the native esters of fatty acids and the methyl esters of these acids formed as a result of an alkylation treatment. Esterification and transesterification were predominant among the reactions of aliphatic fraction components. A positive effect of methanol alkylation on an increase in the yield of the aliphatic fractions was found.

  15. DFD 2001, November 20 (San Diego) [KQ.1] Lubrication-correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ichiki, Kengo

    APS DFD 2001, November 20 (San Diego) [KQ.1] Lubrication-correction for many-particle systems-correction (APS DFD 2001) What is the lubrication-correction? a method to describe nearly touching particles expansion method" November 20, 2001 Page 2 #12;Introduction ­ Goal Goal of this work formulate a lubrication

  16. Wear 260 (2006) 12951304 On the friction and wear performance of boric acid lubricant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawyer, Wallace

    effective in terms of both friction and wear performance. Based on the success of the combined lubricant experiments, the boric acid was then mixed with canola oil to form a completely natural lubricant combination the undesirable effects of wear, lubricants are generally applied along the interface of contacting materials

  17. Finite-element discretization of a linearized 2 -D model for lubricated oil transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    Finite-element discretization of a linearized 2 - D model for lubricated oil transportation V acts as a lubricant by coating the wall of the pipeline, thus preventing the oil from adhering is devoted to the numerical simulation of a linearized model for the lubricated trans- portation of heavy

  18. Modification of boundary lubrication by oil-soluble friction modifier Yingxi Zhua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granick, Steve

    Modification of boundary lubrication by oil-soluble friction modifier additives Yingxi Zhua in lubricants of the type used at the wet clutch interface in automatic transmissions has been studied using in the boundary lubrication regime and compared to a fully-formulated automatic transmission fluid (ATF). 1

  19. Development of a drop-on-demand inkjet system for stroboscopic SAXS/WAXS experiments tel-00446582,version1-13Jan2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Development of a drop-on-demand inkjet system for stroboscopic SAXS/WAXS experiments 1 FOURIER SAXS/WAXS experiments 2 The cover picture rapresents two inkjet heads working at a frequency of 2k for stroboscopic SAXS/WAXS experiments 3 FOURIER tel-00446582,version1-13Jan2010 #12

  20. By studying the mechanisms of wax and oil production in plants and genetically manipulating their fatty acids chains, Ljerka Kunst hopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karczmarek, Joanna

    By studying the mechanisms of wax and oil production in plants and genetically manipulating, locally- produced seed oils for industrial applications. All land plants produce a thin wax coating and altering the complex array of enzy- matic reactions involved in wax production is an integral part of plant

  1. Water as a lubricant for Stirling air engines: design considerations and operating experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fauvel, O.R.; van Benthem, J.; Walker, G.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air is favoured as the working fluid for large, slow-running Stirling engines. Lubricating oil entering the working space could combine with compressed, heated air to form a mixture capable of spontaneous combustion. To preclude this possibility, water may be used as the lubricant in Stirling air engines. This paper reviews the lubrication requirements of Stirling air engines and the potential of water to fulfil these requirements. Some bearing and seal materials suitable for water-lubricated Stirling engines are reviewed in terms of a design case study for a 20 kW water lubricated Ringbom-Stirling air engine. Early operating experience with this engine is reported.

  2. Mathematical formulation and numerical modeling of wax deposition in pipelines from enthalpyporosity approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    the solution of the coupled momentum, energy and, species balance equations, and a thermodynamic wax., Building 2, Houston, TX 77042, United States. 2 Now with Conocophillips, 600 North Dairy Ashford (77079-1175), Houston, TX 77252, United States. www.elsevier.com/locate/ijhmt Available online at www

  3. Wax barrier for use with in situ processes for treating formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Carter, Ernest E.; Son, Jaime Santos; Bai, Taixu; Khoda Verdian, Mohamad Fereydoon

    2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for forming a barrier around at least a portion of a treatment area in a subsurface formation are described herein. A material including wax may be introduced into one or more wellbores. The material introduced into two or more wells may mix in the formation and congeal to form a barrier to fluid flow.

  4. Heat and mass transport in non-isothermal partially saturated oil-wax Antonio Fasano1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Primicerio, Mario

    Heat and mass transport in non-isothermal partially saturated oil-wax solutions Antonio Fasano1 of deposition on a cold wall. Here we want to investigate the specific problem of diffusion-driven migration of desaturation. Our approach will be mainly focussed on the mass transport process, in the sense that the (rather

  5. The Role of Leaf Epicuticular Wax an Improved Adaptation to Moisture Deficit Environments in Wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammed, Suheb

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    regions for cooler canopies, heat susceptible index, and grain yield components in winter wheat. This project aims to define the role that leaf epicuticular wax (EW) plays as a drought adaptive trait in terms of yield stability. A spring wheat Len...

  6. Film Formation Mechanism in Glass Lubrication by Polymer Latex Dispersions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    coatings by tin dioxide resulting in glass bottle lubrication was investigated on flat glass. The anchoring contacts between glass bottles on production lines and transport affect both their mechanical strength and visual aspect. To improve their scratch resistance and prevent surface damage, glass bottles

  7. Lubricating Oil Dominates Primary Organic Aerosol Emissions from Motor Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Lubricating Oil Dominates Primary Organic Aerosol Emissions from Motor Vehicles David R. Worton, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Motor vehicles are major sources of primary organic characterization of motor vehicle POA emissions in a roadway tunnel with a mass closure of >60%. The observed POA

  8. Use of Textured Surfaces to Mitigate Sliding Friction and Wear of Lubricated and Non-Lubricated Contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If properly employed, the placement of three-dimensional feature patterns, also referred to as textures, on relatively-moving, load-bearing surfaces can be beneficial to their friction and wear characteristics. For example, geometric patterns can function as lubricant supply channels or depressions in which to trap debris. They can also alter lubricant flow in a manner that produces thicker load-bearing films locally. Considering the area occupied by solid areas and spaces, textures also change the load distribution on surfaces. At least ten different attributes of textures can be specified, and their combinations offer wide latitude in surface engineering. By employing directional machining and grinding procedures, texturing has been used on bearings and seals for well over a half century, and the size scales of texturing vary widely. This report summarizes past work on the texturing of load-bearing surfaces, including past research on laser surface dimpling of ceramics done at ORNL. Textured surfaces generally show most pronounced effects when they are used in conformal or nearly conformal contacts, like that in face seals. Combining textures with other forms of surface modification and lubrication methods can offer additional benefits in surface engineering for tribology. As the literature and past work at ORNL shows, texturing does not always provide benefits. Rather, the selected pattern and arrangement of features must be matched to characteristics of the proposed application, bearing materials, and lubricants.

  9. Lubrication Oil Condition Monitoring and Remaining Useful Life Prediction with Particle Filtering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junda Zhu; Jae M. Yoon; David He; Yongzhi Qu; Eric Bechhoefer

    In order to reduce the costs of wind energy, it is necessary to improve the wind turbine availability and reduce the operational and maintenance costs. The reliability and availability of a functioning wind turbine depend largely on the protective properties of the lubrication oil for its drive train subassemblies such as the gearbox and means for lubrication oil condition monitoring and degradation detection. The wind industry currently uses lubrication oil analysis for detecting gearbox and bearing wear but cannot detect the functional failures of the lubrication oils. The main purpose of lubrication oil condition monitoring and degradation detection is to determine whether the oils have deteriorated to such a degree that they no longer fulfill their functions. This paper describes a research on developing online lubrication oil condition monitoring and remaining useful life prediction using particle filtering technique and commercially available online sensors. It first introduces the lubrication oil condition monitoring and degradation detection for wind turbines. Viscosity and dielectric constant are selected as the performance parameters to model the degradation of lubricants. In particular, the lubricant performance evaluation and remaining useful life prediction of degraded lubrication oil with viscosity and dielectric constant data using particle filtering are presented. A simulation study based on lab verified models is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed technique. 1.

  10. Gas film lubrication equations for very small clearances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobehart, J.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Reyna, L.G. [International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (United States). Thomas J. Watson Research Center

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the hard disk magnetic recording technology, the slider carrying the magnetic elements is supported above the magnetic disk by a self-acting air bearing, which produces the load support. A lubricating film must support a required load with suitably small frictional energy losses and without introducing undesirable instabilities. Under submicron clearance conditions, gas film flow can not be described with continuum models since the molecular mean free path is not negligible compared with the clearance. Accurate results for the load-carrying capacity of gas films for arbitrary Knudsen number are very important since they strongly influence the design of the flying head slider and, consequently, the performance of the magnetic disk storage unit. Here we generalize the previous lubrication equations for arbitrary Knudsen number, accommodation coefficient and a small inclination of the slider relative to the magnetic disk surface.

  11. Two Approaches to Evaluate Drought Tolerance in Maize: Seedling Stress Response and Epicuticular Wax Accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meeks, Meghyn

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Drought Tolerance in Maize: Seedling Stress Response and Epicuticular Wax Accumulation. (December 2010) Meghyn Brianne Meeks, B.S., Tarleton State University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Seth Murray We wanted to develop rapid and cost... Texas the epicenter of drought in the US (National Climatic Data Center, 2010). National losses in 2008 were an estimated $2.0 billion and more than $5.0 billion in 2009 (National Climatic Data Center, 2010b). Since national agriculture production...

  12. Method of removing an immiscible lubricant from a refrigeration system and apparatus for same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spauschus, H.O.; Starr, T.L.

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for separating an immiscible lubricant from a liquid refrigerant in a refrigerating system including a compressor, a condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator, wherein the expansion device is connected to the condenser by a liquid refrigerant flow line for liquid refrigerant and immiscible lubricant. The method comprising slowing the rate of flow of the liquid refrigerant and immiscible lubricant between the condenser and the expansion device such that the liquid refrigerant and the immiscible lubricant separate based upon differences in density. The method also comprises collecting the separated immiscible lubricant in a collection chamber in fluid communication with the separated immiscible lubricant. Apparatus for performing the method is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  13. Notes 01. The fundamental assumptions and equations of lubrication theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for unsteady or transient motions ? Journal angular speed (rad/s) NOTES 1. THE FUNDAMENTAL ASSUMPTIONS IN HYDRODYNAMIC LUBRICATION ? Dr. Luis San Andr?s (2009) 2 Fluid flow in a general physical domain is governed by the principles of: a) conservation... of the runner surface. For example, in journal bearings U * =?R J where ? is the journal angular speed in rad/s. Substitution of the dimensionless variables into the continuity equation (1) renders the following expression 0...

  14. Low Voltage Reversible Electrowetting Exploiting Lubricated Polymer Honeycomb Substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward Bormashenko; Roman Pogreb; Yelena Bormashenko; Roman Grynyov; Oleg Gendelman

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-voltage electrowetting-on-dielectric scheme realized with lubricated honeycomb polymer surfaces is reported. Polycarbonate honeycomb reliefs manufactured with the breath-figures self-assembly were impregnated with silicone and castor oils. The onset of the reversible electrowetting for silicone oil impregnated substrates occurred at 35 V, whereas for castor oil impregnated ones it took place at 80 V. The semi-quantitative analysis of electrowetting of impregnated surfaces is proposed.

  15. Relationship of Viscosity, Surface Tensions, and Coefficient of Friction of Lubricating Oils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carson, Earl

    1914-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oils, is easily accounted for. Ilineral lubricating oils are not affected by high pressure steam or alkalies and these character- istics enable them to be used where other lubricants would be quite unfitted for the work. Animal Oils:-- These oils...RELATI01ISHII OF VISCOSITY, SUHFACE TEUSIOUS, A3D COEFFICIENT O? FlilCTIOB 0? LUBRICATING OILS. A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School, University of Kansas, Lawrence. For The Degree of Master of Science ilechanioal...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: A Novel Lubricant Formulation Scheme for 2% Fuel Efficiency Improvement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Northwestern University at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and vehicle technologies office annual merit review and peer evaluation meeting about a novel lubricant...

  17. Chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures with metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huttenlocher, D.F.

    1992-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a sealed tube stability study on twenty-one refrigerant-lubricant mixtures selected from the following groupings: HFCs R-32, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-143a, and R-152a with one or more lubricants selected from among three pentaerythritol esters and three polyalkylene glycols. All lubricants were carefully predried to 25 ppm or less moisture content. HCFCs R-22, R-123, R-124, and R-142b, as well as CFC R-11, with one or more lubricants selected from among two mineral oils and one alkylbenzene fluid. Bach test mixture was aged at three temperature levels.

  18. Chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures with metals. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huttenlocher, D.F.

    1992-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a sealed tube stability study on twenty-one refrigerant-lubricant mixtures selected from the following groupings: HFCs R-32, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-143a, and R-152a with one or more lubricants selected from among three pentaerythritol esters and three polyalkylene glycols. All lubricants were carefully predried to 25 ppm or less moisture content. HCFCs R-22, R-123, R-124, and R-142b, as well as CFC R-11, with one or more lubricants selected from among two mineral oils and one alkylbenzene fluid. Bach test mixture was aged at three temperature levels.

  19. Lubrication for high and extreme pressures. January 1974-September 1989 (Citations from Fluidex data base). Report for January 1974-September 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography contains citations concerning extreme-pressure lubricants. Coverage includes methods and results of testing of extreme-pressure (EP) lubricants, measurement of properties and changes to these properties when EP lubricants are subjected to extreme pressures, additives and effects of additives to EP lubricants, and applications of EP lubricants. Some abstracts pertain to the sealing of lubricants and hydraulic fluids under extreme pressure conditions. Other citations refer to analysis of machine parts as part of the testing of EP lubricants, and effects of lubricant failure. (This updated bibliography contains 347 citations, 45 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  20. Lubricant oil consumption effects on diesel exhaust ash emissions using a sulfur dioxide trace technique and thermogravimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plumley, Michael J

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed experimental study was conducted targeting lubricant consumption effects on ,diesel exhaust ash levels using a model year 2002 5.9L diesel engine, high and low Sulfur commercial lubricants, and clean diesel ...

  1. Adsorption and onset of lubrication by a double-chained cationic surfactant on silica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Adsorption and onset of lubrication by a double-chained cationic surfactant on silica surfaces cationic surfactant has been investigated at high normal contact pressures. Comparison with adsorption to this dispersion to7 participate in lubrication. However, it is well known that adsorption of sur-8 factants

  2. Aging of HDPE Pipes Exposed to Diesel Lubricant Amelia H. U. Torres1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Aging of HDPE Pipes Exposed to Diesel Lubricant Amelia H. U. Torres1 , José R. M. d'Almeida1 behavior of high-density polyethylene pipes by exposure to a diesel lubricant were investigated that diesel, which can be regarded as a model fluid to analyze the effects caused by aromatic unities present

  3. Tribology Letters Vol. 10, No. 3, 2001 179 Activation of the SiC surface for vapor phase lubrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gellman, Andrew J.

    above 500 C [2,3,11,12]. Since liquid lubricants cannot withstand such extreme conditions, a number deposition 1. Introduction The lubrication of ceramic surfaces working at extremely high temperatures has lubrication by Fe chemical vapor deposition from Fe(CO)5 Daxing Ren, Dougyong Sung and Andrew J. Gellman

  4. Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and Additives | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report: I11IG002RTC3 | 12/1/2014 | © 2014Lubricants and

  5. Offshore Lubricants Market Size | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns JumpsourceOffshore Lubricants Market Size Home John55364's

  6. Offshore Lubricants Market Trends | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns JumpsourceOffshore Lubricants Market Size Home

  7. Evaluation of Wax Deposition and its Control during Production of Alaska North Slope Oils

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13Evacuation248 Evaluation of Wax Deposition and

  8. Experimental Study on Shear Fatigue Behavior and Stiffness Performance of Warm Mix Asphalt by adding Synthetic Wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petit, Christophe; Canestrari, Francesco; Pannunzio, Valter; Virgili, Amadeo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic waxes produced by standard and registered processes may be used to manufacture Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA), which is a modified asphalt concrete produced, applied and compacted at temperatures below those typically required. This feature leads to environmental benefits, such as reduced energy consumption, gas and fume emissions, as well as to economic/operational advantages, such as lower production costs and greater hauling distances for extended construction seasons with tighter schedules. The present article serves to compare the mechanical performance of a WMA produced by adding synthetic wax with a traditional Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) specimen, in terms of shear fatigue response and both complex and stiffness moduli. The experimental results and related modeling work demonstrate that adding synthetic wax into the WMA composition does not hinder either the destructive or non-destructive performance of an HMA, and this finding is corroborated by respectively measuring fatigue life and stiffness.

  9. Experimental Study on Shear Fatigue Behavior and Stiffness Performance of Warm Mix Asphalt by adding Synthetic Wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christophe Petit; Anne Millien; Francesco Canestrari; Valter Pannunzio; Amadeo Virgili

    2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic waxes produced by standard and registered processes may be used to manufacture Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA), which is a modified asphalt concrete produced, applied and compacted at temperatures below those typically required. This feature leads to environmental benefits, such as reduced energy consumption, gas and fume emissions, as well as to economic/operational advantages, such as lower production costs and greater hauling distances for extended construction seasons with tighter schedules. The present article serves to compare the mechanical performance of a WMA produced by adding synthetic wax with a traditional Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) specimen, in terms of shear fatigue response and both complex and stiffness moduli. The experimental results and related modeling work demonstrate that adding synthetic wax into the WMA composition does not hinder either the destructive or non-destructive performance of an HMA, and this finding is corroborated by respectively measuring fatigue life and stiffness.

  10. A multiblob approach to colloidal hydrodynamics with inherent lubrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adolfo Vázquez-Quesada; Florencio Balboa Usabiaga; Rafael Delgado-Buscalioni

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents an intermediate resolution model of the hydrodynamics of colloidal particles based on a mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation. The particle is constructed with a small set of overlapping Peskin's Immersed Boundary kernels (blobs) which are held together by springs to build up a particle impenetrable core. Here, we used 12 blobs placed in the vertexes of an icosahedron with an extra one in its center. Although the particle surface is not explicitly resolved, we show that the short-distance hydrodynamic responses (flow profiles, translational and rotational mobilities, lubrication, etc) agree with spherical colloids and provide consistent effective radii. A remarkable property of the present multiblob model is that it naturally presents a "divergent" lubrication force at finite inter-particle distance. This permits to resolve the large viscosity increase at dense colloidal volume fractions. The intermediate resolution model is able to recover highly non-trivial (many-body) hydrodynamics using small particles whose radii are similar to the grid size $h$ (in the range $[1.6-3.2]\\,h$). Considering that the cost of the embedding fluid phase scales like the cube of the particle radius, this result brings about a significant computational speed-up. Our code Fluam works in Graphics Processor Units (GPU's) and uses Fast Fourier Transform for the Poisson solver, which further improves its efficiency.

  11. Cryogenic friction behavior of PTFE based solid lubricant composites N.L. McCook, D.L. Burris, P.L. Dickrell and W.G. Sawyer*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawyer, Wallace

    of fluid lubricants is precluded. Such conditions are typically considered extreme, often existing lubrication 1. Introduction Solid lubricants are frequently used under opera- tional conditions where the useCryogenic friction behavior of PTFE based solid lubricant composites N.L. McCook, D.L. Burris, P

  12. SAXS/WAXS/DSC Study of Temperature Evolution in Nanopolymer Electrolyte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksandra Turkovic; Mario Rakic; Pavo Dubcek; Magdy Lucic-Lavcevic; Sigrid Bernstorff

    2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolytes as nanostructured materials are very attractive for batteries or other types of electronic devices. (PEO)8ZnCl2 polymer electrolytes and nanocomposites (PEO)8ZnCl2/TiO2 were prepared from PEO and ZnCl2 and with addition of TiO2 nanograins. The influence of TiO2 nanograins was studied by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) simultaneously recorded with wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at the synchrotron ELETTRA. It was shown by previous impedance spectroscopy (IS) that the room temperature conductivity of nanocomposite polymer electrolyte increased more than two times above 65oC, relative to pure composites of PEO and salts. The SAXS/DSC measurements yielded insight into the temperature-dependent changes of the grains of the electrolyte as well as to differences due to different heating and cooling rates. The crystal structure and temperatures of melting and crystallization of the nanosize grains was revealed by the simultaneous WAXS measurements.

  13. Patel S. et al. 2001. Chemical and Physical Analyses of Wax Ester Properties. 8 pp. Journal of Insect Science, 1.4. Available online: insectscience.org/1.4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Patel S. et al. 2001. Chemical and Physical Analyses of Wax Ester Properties. 8 pp. Journal.org Chemical and Physical Analyses of Wax Ester Properties Sejal Patel1 , Dennis R. Nelson2 and Allen G. Gibbs3 Abstract Wax esters are major constituents of the surface lipids in many terrestrial arthropods

  14. 1. c) For all five types, the distribution is quite symmetric. Hearthlog typically burns the longest, with a mean of about 2:40. Wax Logs and Duraflame have a mean about 10 minutes lower. Hot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preston, Scott

    the longest, with a mean of about 2:40. Wax Logs and Duraflame have a mean about 10 minutes lower. Hot Logs:15. For all but Wax Logs, the distributions have similar variability ­ each has a standard deviation around 9 minutes. Wax Logs burn more consistently near the mean time ­ the standard deviation is just over 5

  15. Defining the Molecular and Physiological Role of Leaf Cuticular Waxes in Reproductive Stage Heat Tolerane in Wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mondal, Suchismita

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    high temperature stress. At maturity the percent reduction in yield components in each cultivar was calculated. The wheat cultivars 'Kauz' and 'Halberd' had significantly high leaf cuticular wax content of 2.91mg/dm^-2 and 2.36mg/dm^-2 respectively...

  16. Hysteresis and Lubrication in Shear Thickening of Cornstarch Suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarence E. Chu; Joel A. Groman; Hannah L. Sieber; James G. Miller; Ruth J. Okamoto; Jonathan I. Katz

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous and brine suspensions of corn starch show striking discontinuous shear thickening. We have found that a suspension shear-thickened throughout may remain in the jammed thickened state as the strain rate is reduced, but an unjamming front may propagate from any unjammed regions. Transient shear thickening is observed at strain rates below the thickening threshold, and above it the stress fluctuates. The jammed shear-thickened state may persist to low strain rates, with stresses resembling sliding friction and effective viscosity inversely proportional to the strain rate. At the thickening threshold fluid pressure depins the suspension's contact lines on solid boundaries so that it slides, shears, dilates and jams. In oil suspensions lubrication and complete wetting of confining surfaces eliminate contact line forces and prevent jamming and shear thickening, as does addition of immiscible liquid surfactant to brine suspensions. Starch suspensions in glycerin-water solutions, viscous but incompletely wetting, have intermediate properties.

  17. Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Chemistry Laboratory.

  18. Evaluation of replacement thread lubricants for red lead and graphite in mineral oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jungling, T.L.; Rauth, D.R.; Goldberg, D.

    1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Eight commercially available thread lubricants were evaluated to determine the best replacement for Red Lead and Graphite in Mineral Oil (RLGMO). The evaluation included coefficient of friction testing, high temperature anti-seizing testing, room temperature anti-galling testing, chemical analysis for detrimental impurities, corrosion testing, off-gas testing, and a review of health and environmental factors. The coefficient of friction testing covered a wide variety of factors including stud, nut, and washer materials, sizes, manufacturing methods, surface coatings, surface finishes, applied loads, run-in cycles, and relubrication. Only one lubricant, Dow Corning Molykote P37, met all the criteria established for a replacement lubricant. It has a coefficient of friction range similar to RLGMO. Therefore, it can be substituted directly for RLGMO without changing the currently specified fastener torque values for the sizes, materials and conditions evaluated. Other lubricants did not perform as well as Molykote P37 in one or more test or evaluation categories.

  19. Nano-elastohydrodynamics: Structure, dynamics, and flow in nonuniform lubricated junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, J.; Luedtke, W.D.; Landman, U. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Structure, flow, and response characteristics of molecularly thin films of hexadecane, sheared by topographically nonuniform solid gold surfaces sliding at a relative velocity of 10 meters per second, were investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations reveal three characteristics: spatial and temporal variations in the density and pressure of the lubricant in the region confined by the approaching asperities, accompanied by asperity-induced molecular layering transitions that are reflected in oscillatory patterns in the friction force; asperity deformations and microstructural transformations mediated by the lubricant; and an onset of cavitated zones in the lubricant after the asperity-asperity collision process. The simulations extend micrometer-scale elastohydrodynamic investigations into the nanometer-scale regime and provide molecular-scale insights into the fundamental mechanisms of ultrathin film lubrication phenomena under extreme conditions. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Modeling the lubrication of the piston ring pack in internal combustion engines using the deterministic method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Haijie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Piston ring packs are used in internal combustion engines to seal both the high pressure gas in the combustion chamber and the lubricant oil in the crank case. The interaction between the piston ring pack and the cylinder ...

  1. High temperature solid lubricant materials for heavy duty and advanced heat engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DellaCorte, C.; Wood, J.C.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature sterling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. The following paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis to heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

  2. Application of the Adaptive Discontinuous Galerkin Method to Problems in Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    for example. However, sometimes friction is not welcome: it can cause power loss in engines or reduce is such an effective way to reduce power loss and prevent wear, and since the behaviour of the lubricant film between

  3. Few-Layer Graphene as a Dry Lubricant | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Few-Layer Graphene as a Dry Lubricant Technology available for licensing: Graphene layers act as a two-dimensional nanomaterial and form a conformal protective coating on sliding...

  4. Effects of lubricant viscosity and surface texturing on ring-pack performance in internal combustion engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takata, Rosalind (Rosalind Kazuko), 1978-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The piston ring-pack contributes approximately 25% of the mechanical losses in an internal combustion engine. Both lubricant viscosity and surface texturing were investigated in an effort to reduce this ring-pack friction ...

  5. A tribological study of the interaction between surface micro texturing and viscoelastic lubricants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hupp, Sara J. (Sara Jean), 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study is performed on micro textured surfaces using both elastic and Newtonian fluids in order to understand the effect of surface texturing and fluid rheology on sliding friction under lubricated conditions. ...

  6. Proper initial conditions for the lubrication model of the flow of a thin film of fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Suslov; A. J. Roberts

    1998-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A lubrication model describes the dynamics of a thin layer of fluid spreading over a solid substrate. But to make forecasts we need to supply correct initial conditions to the model. Remarkably, the initial fluid thickness is not the correct initial thickness for the lubrication model. Theory recently developed in \\cite{Roberts89b,Roberts97b} provides the correct projection of initial conditions onto a model of a dynamical system. The correct projection is determined by requiring that the model's solution exponentially quickly approaches that of the actual fluid dynamics. For lubrication we show that although the initial free surface shape contributes the most to the model's initial conditions, the initial velocity field is also an influence. The projection also gives a rationale for incorporating miscellaneous small forcing effects into the lubrication model; gravitational forcing is given as one example.

  7. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Amitava Sarkar; Burtron H. Davis

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this reporting period, a study of ultra-fine iron catalyst filtration was initiated to study the behavior of ultra-fine particles during the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids filtration. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. The change of particle size during the slurry-phase FTS has monitored by withdrawing catalyst sample at different TOS. The measurement of dimension of the HRTEM images of samples showed a tremendous growth of the particles. Carbon rims of thickness 3-6 nm around the particles were observed. This growth in particle size was not due to carbon deposition on the catalyst. A conceptual design and operating philosophy was developed for an integrated wax filtration system for a 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor to be used in Phase II of this research program. The system will utilize a primary inertial hydroclone followed by a Pall Accusep cross-flow membrane. Provisions for cleaned permeate back-pulsing will be included to as a flux maintenance measure.

  8. Design, fabrication and testing of a bearing test rig and preliminary studies on oil mist lubrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamim, Abdus

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DESIGN, FABRICATION AND TESTING OF A BEARING TEST RIG AND PRELIMINARY STUDIES ON OIL MIST LUBRICATION A Thesis by ABDUS SHAMIM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DESIGN, FABRICATION AND TESTING OF A BEARING TEST RIG AND PRELIMINARY STUDIES ON OIL MIST LUBRICATION A Thesis by ABDUS SHAMIM Approved as to style and content by: C...

  9. Thermal reactivity of mixtures of VDDT lubricant and simulated Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheele, R.D.; Panisko, F.E.; Sell, R.L.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To predict whether the Polywater G lubricant residue remaining in the velocity, density, and temperature tree (VDTT) and the waste in Tank 241-SY-101 (101SY) will be chemically compatible with wastes in 101SY when two VDTTs are removed from 101SY, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory measured the thermal reaction sensitivity of the lubricant residue. This residue is a simulated 101SY waste containing the organic surrogate trisodium hydroxyethyl-ethylenediaminetriacetate (Na{sub 3}HEDTA) and two simulated potential waste and lubricant residue mixtures containing 10 and 90 percent lubricant residue. These studies using accelerating rate calorimetry found that the residue did not react at a rate exceeding 0.1 J/min/g mixture up to 190 degrees C with simulated 101SY waste containing Na{sub 3}HEDTA as the organic surrogate. Also, the dried lubricant residue did not decompose exothermically at a rate exceeding 0.1 J/min/g. Using guidelines used by the chemical industry, these results indicate that the lubricant residue should not react as a significant rate with the waste in 101SY when added to the waste at 60 degrees C or when the mixture cools to the waste`s temperature of 48 degrees C.

  10. Understanding the Genetic Interactions that Regulate Heat and Drought Tolerance in Relation to Wax Deposition and Yield Stability in Wheat (Tricticum Aestivum L.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huggins, Trevis D

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    .......................................................................................................... 94 ix CHAPTER IV QTL MAPPING OF LEAF EPICUTICULAR WAX LOAD, AND ITS INFLUENCE ON CANOPY TEMPERATURE AND YIELD STABILITY IN A RECOMBINANT INBRED LINE POPULATION OF HALBERD/LEN IN TRITICUM AESTIVUM L. UNDER WATER DEFICIT AND HIGH TEMPERATURE...

  11. Friction of different monolayer lubricants in MEMs interfaces.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpick, Robert W. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Street, Mark D. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Ashurst, William Robert (Auburn University, Auburn, AL); Corwin, Alex David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details results from our last year of work (FY2005) on friction in MEMS as funded by the Campaign 6 program for the Microscale Friction project. We have applied different monolayers to a sensitive MEMS friction tester called the nanotractor. The nanotractor is also a useful actuator that can travel {+-}100 {micro}m in 40 nm steps, and is being considered for several MEMS applications. With this tester, we can find static and dynamic coefficients of friction. We can also quantify deviations from Amontons' and Coulomb's friction laws. Because of the huge surface-to-volume ratio at the microscale, surface properties such as adhesion and friction can dominate device performance, and therefore such deviations are important to quantify and understand. We find that static and dynamic friction depend on the monolayer lubricant applied. The friction data can be modeled with a non-zero adhesion force, which represents a deviation from Amontons' Law. Further, we show preliminary data indicating that the adhesion force depends not only on the monolayer, but also on the normal load applied. Finally, we also observe slip deflections before the transition from static to dynamic friction, and find that they depend on the monolayer.

  12. Z .Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part B 128 2001 575 595 Novel wax esters and hydrocarbons in the cuticular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Deborah

    and hydrocarbons in the cuticular surface lipids of the red harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex barbatus Dennis R. Nelsona, hydrocarbons. The wax esters ranged in carbon number from C19 to C31 and consisted of esters of both odd. The hydrocarbons consisted of: n-alkanes, C23 to C33; odd-numbered n-alkenes, C27 to C35; and the major components

  13. Clean and cost-effective dry boundary lubricants for aluminum forming.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

    1997-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary research in our laboratory has demonstrated that boric acid is an effective lubricant with an unusual capacity to reduce sliding fiction (providing friction coefficients as low as 0.02) and wear of metallic and ceramic materials. More recent studies have revealed that water or methanol solutions of boric acid can be used to prepare strongly bonded layers of boric acid on aluminum surfaces. It appears that boric acid molecules have a strong tendency to bond chemically to the naturally oxidized surfaces of aluminum and its alloys and to make these surfaces very slippery. Recent metal formability tests indicated that the boric acid films formed on aluminum surfaces by spraying or dipping worked quite well; improving draw scale performance by 58 to 75%. These findings have increased the prospect that boric acid can be formulated and optimized as an effective boundary lubricant and used to solve the friction, galling, and severe wear problems currently encountered in cold-forming of aluminum products. Accordingly, the major goal of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness and lubrication capacity of thin boric acid films formed on aluminum surfaces by simple dipping or spraying processes and to describe the lubrication mechanisms under typical metal forming conditions. We will also examine the nature of chemical bonding between boric acid and aluminum surfaces and develop new ways to optimize its performance as an effective boundary lubricant.

  14. MIL-L-87177 and CLT:X-10 Lubricants Improve Electrical Connector Fretting Corrosion Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AUKLAND,NEIL R.; HANLON,JAMES T.

    1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted a fretting research project using MIL-L-87177 and CLT: X-10 lubricants on Nano-miniature connectors. When they were fretted without lubricant, individual connectors first exceeded our 0.5 ohm failure criteria from 2,341 to 45,238 fretting cycles. With additional fretting, their contact resistance increased to more than 100,000 ohms. Unmodified MIL-L-87177 lubricant delayed the onset of first failure to between 430,000 and over 20,000,000 fretting cycles. MIL-L-87177 modified by addition of Teflon powder delayed first failure to beyond 5 million fretting cycles. Best results were obtained when Teflon was used and also when both the straight and modified lubricants were poured into and then out of the connector. CLT: X-10 lubricant delayed the onset of first failure to beyond 55 million cycles in one test where a failure was actually observed and to beyond 20 million cycles in another that was terminated without failure. CLT: X-10 recovered an unlubricated connector driven deeply into failure, with six failed pins recovering immediately and four more recovering during an additional 420 thousand fretting cycles. MIL-L-87177 was not able to recover a connector under similar conditions.

  15. Sweeney LUBRICATION OF STEAM, GAS AND WATER TURBINES IN POWER GENERATION- A CHEVRONTEXACO EXPERIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter James Sweeney

    On 9 October 2001 two US oil companies Chevron and Texaco merged. Their long-term joint venture operation, known as Caltex (formed in 1936 and operating in East and Southern Africa, Middle East, Asia and Australasia), was incorporated into the one global energy company. This global enterprise will be highly competitive across all energy sectors, as the new company brings together a wealth of talents, shared values and a strong commitment to developing vital energy resources around the globe. Worldwide, ChevronTexaco is the third largest publicly traded company in terms of oil and gas reserves, with some 11.8 billion barrels of oil and gas equivalent. It is the fourth largest producer, with daily production of 2.7 million barrels. The company also has 22 refineries and more than 21,000 branded service stations worldwide. This paper will review the fundamentals of lubrication as they apply to the components of turbines. It will then look at three turbine types, steam, gas and water, to address the different needs of lubricating oils and the appropriate specifications for each. The significance of oil testing both for product development and in-service oil monitoring will be reviewed, together with the supporting field experience of ChevronTexaco. The environmental emissions controls on turbines and any impact on the lubricants will be discussed. Finally, the trends in specifications for lubricating oils to address the modern turbines designs will be reviewed. Key Words: geothermal, lubrication, turbines, in-service testing 1.

  16. Shape stabilised phase change materials (SSPCMs): High density polyethylene and hydrocarbon waxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mu, Mulan, E-mail: mmu01@qub.ac.uk, E-mail: m.basheer@qub.ac.uk; Basheer, P. A. M., E-mail: mmu01@qub.ac.uk, E-mail: m.basheer@qub.ac.uk [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen's University Belfast, BT9 5AG (United Kingdom); Bai, Yun, E-mail: yun.bai@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, University College London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); McNally, Tony, E-mail: t.mcnally@warwick.ac.uk [WMG, University of Warwick, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Shape stabilised phase change materials (SSPCMs) based on high density polyethylene (HDPE) with high (HPW, T{sub m}=56-58 °C) and low (L-PW, T{sub m}=18-23 °C) melting point waxes were prepared by melt-mixing in a twin-screw extruder and their potential in latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) applications for housing assessed. The structure and morphology of these blends were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both H-PW and L-PW were uniformly distributed throughout the HDPE matrix. The melting point and latent heat of the SSPCMs were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results demonstrated that both H-PW and L-PW have a plasticisation effect on the HDPE matrix. The tensile and flexural properties of the samples were measured at room temperature (RT, 20±2 °C) and 70 °C, respectively. All mechanical properties of HDPE/H-PW and HDPE/L-PW blends decreased from RT to 70 °C. In all instances at RT, modulus and stress, irrespective of the mode of deformation was greater for the HDPE/H-PW blends. However, at 70 °C, there was no significant difference in mechanical properties between the HDPE/H-PW and HDPE/L-PW blends.

  17. On the presence of ultra-fast outflows in the WAX sample of Seyfert galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tombesi, Francesco

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of winds in active galactic nuclei (AGN) is of utmost importance as they may provide the long sought-after link between the central black hole and the host galaxy, establishing the AGN feedback. Recently, Laha et al. (2014) reported the X-ray analysis of a sample of 26 Seyferts observed with XMM-Newton, which are part of the so-called warm absorbers in X-rays (WAX) sample. They claim the non-detection of Fe K absorbers indicative of ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) in four observations previously analyzed by Tombesi et al. (2010). They mainly impute the Tombesi et al. detections to an improper modeling of the underlying continuum in the E=4-10 keV band. We therefore re-address here the robustness of these detections and we find that the main reason for the claimed non-detections is likely due to their use of single events only spectra, which reduces the total counts by 40%. Performing a re-analysis of the data in the whole E=0.3-10 keV energy band using their models and spectra including also double event...

  18. WAXS fat subtraction model to estimate differential linear scattering coefficients of fatless breast tissue: Phantom materials evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Robert Y., E-mail: rx-tang@laurentian.ca [Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); Laamanen, Curtis, E-mail: cx-laamanen@laurentian.ca; McDonald, Nancy, E-mail: mcdnancye@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); LeClair, Robert J., E-mail: rleclair@laurentian.ca [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6, Canada and Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Develop a method to subtract fat tissue contributions to wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) signals of breast biopsies in order to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficients ?{sub s} of fatless tissue. Cancerous and fibroglandular tissue can then be compared independent of fat content. In this work phantom materials with known compositions were used to test the efficacy of the WAXS subtraction model. Methods: Each sample 5 mm in diameter and 5 mm thick was interrogated by a 50 kV 2.7 mm diameter beam for 3 min. A 25 mm{sup 2} by 1 mm thick CdTe detector allowed measurements of a portion of the ? = 6° scattered field. A scatter technique provided means to estimate the incident spectrum N{sub 0}(E) needed in the calculations of ?{sub s}[x(E, ?)] where x is the momentum transfer argument. Values of ?{sup ¯}{sub s} for composite phantoms consisting of three plastic layers were estimated and compared to the values obtained via the sum ?{sup ¯}{sub s}{sup ?}(x)=?{sub 1}?{sub s1}(x)+?{sub 2}?{sub s2}(x)+?{sub 3}?{sub s3}(x), where ?{sub i} is the fractional volume of the ith plastic component. Water, polystyrene, and a volume mixture of 0.6 water + 0.4 polystyrene labelled as fibphan were chosen to mimic cancer, fat, and fibroglandular tissue, respectively. A WAXS subtraction model was used to remove the polystyrene signal from tissue composite phantoms so that the ?{sub s} of water and fibphan could be estimated. Although the composite samples were layered, simulations were performed to test the models under nonlayered conditions. Results: The well known ?{sub s} signal of water was reproduced effectively between 0.5 < x < 1.6 nm{sup ?1}. The ?{sup ¯}{sub s} obtained for the heterogeneous samples agreed with ?{sup ¯}{sub s}{sup ?}. Polystyrene signals were subtracted successfully from composite phantoms. The simulations validated the usefulness of the WAXS models for nonlayered biopsies. Conclusions: The methodology to measure ?{sub s} of homogeneous samples was quantitatively accurate. Simple WAXS models predicted the probabilities for specific x-ray scattering to occur from heterogeneous biopsies. The fat subtraction model can allow ?{sub s} signals of breast cancer and fibroglandular tissue to be compared without the effects of fat provided there is an independent measurement of the fat volume fraction ?{sub f}. Future work will consist of devising a quantitative x-ray digital imaging method to estimate ?{sub f} in ex vivo breast samples.

  19. In any gearbox, lubrication is just as important as the hardware. In wind turbine gearboxes, it is imperative that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Clark R.

    . Wind turbines are also subject to conditions that range from extremely low temperatures to contaminantsIn any gearbox, lubrication is just as important as the hardware. In wind turbine gearboxes, it is imperative that the lubricant not only protects gearbox components, but also maintains a significant design

  20. Poiseuille flow past a nanoscale cylinder in a slit channel: Lubrication theory versus molecular dynamics analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahmani, Amir M; Jupiterwala, Mehlam; Colosqui, Carlos E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plane Poiseuille flow past a nanoscale cylinder that is arbitrarily confined (i.e., symmetrically or asymmetrically confined) in a slit channel is studied via hydrodynamic lubrication theory and molecular dynamics simulations, considering cases where the cylinder remains static or undergoes thermal motion. Lubrication theory predictions for the drag force and volumetric flow rate are in close agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of flows having molecularly thin lubrication gaps, despite the presence of significant structural forces induced by the crystalline structure of the modeled solid. While the maximum drag force is observed in symmetric confinement, i.e., when the cylinder is equidistant from both channel walls, the drag decays significantly as the cylinder moves away from the channel centerline and approaches a wall. Hence, significant reductions in the mean drag force on the cylinder and hydraulic resistance of the channel can be observed when thermal motion induces random off-center displace...

  1. Identification of tribological research and development needs for lubrication of advanced heat engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehrenbacher, L.L.; Levinson, T.M.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The continuous evolution of higher power density propulsion systems has always fueled the search for materials and lubricants with improved thermal and/or durability characteristics. Tribology of the upper cylinder region is the major technology roadblock in the path of the adiabatic diesel engine which has an energy reduction potential that exceeds that of all other engine development types. This tribology assessment resulted in the following major conclusions: a low friction and a low wear seal between the ring belt and cylinder bore are the most critical tribology functions in the diesel combustion chamber; development of solid lubrication systems will not satisfy the simultaneous low friction and low wear requirements in the upper cylinder area; development of separate upper cylinder liquid lubrication systems offers the most attractive design alternative for meeting the operational goals of future ''minimum cooled'' diesel engines.

  2. Ratchel U., Investigation on the use of palm olein as lubrication oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Hassan; M. S. Abolarin; A. Nasir; U. Ratchel

    The research work is on the possibility of producing lubricating oil from vegetable oil with palm olein as a case study. The sample analysed was obtained from Vandeikya Local Government Area of Benue State. Some of the physical and chemical properties such as viscosity, flash/fire point, pour point and specific gravity were analysed. This sample was bleached to remove the red colour (carotene) and gummy materials. The bleached sample was tested to determine the above mentioned properties. Comparison of the crude palm olein and the bleached sample with the conventional lubricants obtained from Elf Plc, Kaduna and Unipetrol Plc, Kaduna was made. Finally, it was discovered that the crude palm olein and the bleached sample exhibit a good base as a lubricant.

  3. COASTAL HOUSEHOLD AIR TRAVEL SPORTS & RECREATION MANUFACTURING AUTOMOTIVE PUBLIC SAFETY MEDICAL GROCERY Search and Rescue at Sea Infrared Ear Thermometers Collision Avoidance Systems Shock-Absorbing Athletic Shoes Powdered Lubricants Improved Radial Tires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Absorbing Athletic Shoes Powdered Lubricants Improved Radial Tires Fire-Resistant Reinforcement Light-Emitting Diodes

  4. MEMS Lubrication by In-Situ Tribochemical Reactions From the Vapor Phase.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dugger, Michael T.; Asay, David B.; Kim, Seong H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor Phase Lubrication (VPL) of silicon surfaces with pentanol has been demonstrated. Two potential show stoppers with respect to application of this approach to real MEMS devices have been investigated. Water vapor was found to reduce the effectiveness of VPL with alcohol for a given alcohol concentration, but the basic reaction mechanism observed in water-free environments is still active, and devices operated much longer in mixed alcohol and water vapor environments than with chemisorbed monolayer lubricants alone. Complex MEMS gear trains were successfully lubricated with alcohol vapors, resulting in a factor of 104 improvement in operating life without failure. Complex devices could be made to fail if operated at much higher frequencies than previously used, and there is some evidence that the observed failure is due to accumulation of reaction products at deeply buried interfaces. However, if hypothetical reaction mechanisms involving heated surfaces are valid, then the failures observed at high frequency may not be relevant to operation at normal frequencies. Therefore, this work demonstrates that VPL is a viable approach for complex MEMS devices in conventional packages. Further study of the VPL reaction mechanisms are recommended so that the vapor composition may be optimized for low friction and for different substrate materials with potential application to conventionally fabricated, metal alloy parts in weapons systems. Reaction kinetics should be studied to define effective lubrication regimes as a function of the partial pressure of the vapor phase constituent, interfacial shear rate, substrate composition, and temperature.

  5. Mechanics of Contact and Lubrication, MTM G230 Department of Mechanical & Industrial Enineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müftü, Sinan

    is a fiber reinforced polymer. Due to its light weight and strength, it is used in many applications, fromMechanics of Contact and Lubrication, MTM G230 Department of Mechanical & Industrial Enineering on the same machine in the same environmental conditions for comparison. The machine to be used is the Umax

  6. Gas-lubricated seal for sealing between a piston and a cylinder wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoult, D.P.

    1985-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A piston-cylinder seal uses gas for a lubricant and has a runner supported on a gapless structure and placed in the space between the piston and the cylinder wall. The runner is deformed elastically under the influence of the operating pressures to follow and compensate for variations in the piston-cylinder fit and maintain a seal. 4 figs.

  7. Surface Engineering to Improve the Durability and Lubricity of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bansal, Dinesh G [ORNL; Eryilmaz, Osman L [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanium alloys offer high strength, high corrosion resistance, and the opportunity to reduce the weight of heavy vehicle engine components, but they do not perform well as bearing surfaces without further treatments or coatings. This paper explores a series of surface engineering treatments to improve the friction and wear behavior of Ti-6Al-4V alloy under diesel engine oil-lubricated conditions.

  8. Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions: November 28, 2006 - March 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, J. N.; Khalek, I. A.; Smith, L. R.; Fujita, E.; Zielinska, B.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) project was a pilot investigation of how fuels and crankcase lubricants contribute to the formation of particulate matter (PM) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) in vehicle exhaust. As limited vehicles were tested, results are not representative of the whole on-road fleet. Long-term effects were not investigated. Pairs of vehicles (one normal PM emitting, one high-PM emitting) from four categories were selected: light-duty (LD) gasoline cars, medium-duty (MD) diesel trucks, heavy-duty (HD) natural-gas-fueled buses, and HD diesel buses. HD vehicles procured did not exhibit higher PM emissions, and thus were labeled high mileage (HM). Fuels evaluated were non-ethanol gasoline (E0), 10 percent ethanol (E10), conventional low-sulfur TxLED diesel, 20% biodiesel (B20), and natural gas. Temperature effects (20 degrees F, 72 degrees F) were evaluated on LD and MD vehicles. Lubricating oil vintage effects (fresh and aged) were evaluated on all vehicles. LD and MD vehicles were operated on a dynamometer over the California Unified Driving Cycle, while HD vehicles followed the Heavy Duty Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule. Regulated and unregulated emissions were measured. Chemical markers from the unregulated emissions measurements and a tracer were utilized to estimate the lubricant contribution to PM.

  9. Substitutes for ozone depleting aerosol electrical contact cleaners and cleaner/lubricants. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevilacqua, P.; Clark, K.G.

    1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    With the production of Class I Ozone Depleting Substances discontinued as of January 1996, it became necessary to identify suitable replacements for chlorofluorocarbon (CFC-113) and trichloroethane (TCA) based electrical contact cleaners and cleaner/lubricant products. Two hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC-141b) blends were identified as substitutes and recommended for interim use.

  10. DARCY'S FLOW WITH PRESCRIBED CONTACT ANGLE WELL-POSEDNESS AND LUBRICATION APPROXIMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DARCY'S FLOW WITH PRESCRIBED CONTACT ANGLE ­ WELL-POSEDNESS AND LUBRICATION APPROXIMATION HANS KN on a solid sub- strate. We use a model for viscous fluids where evolution is governed by Darcy's Law converge to the solutions of a one-dimensional degenerate parabolic fourth order equation which belongs

  11. Engine having a high pressure hydraulic system and low pressure lubricating system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bartley, Bradley E. (Manito, IL); Blass, James R. (Bloomington, IL); Gibson, Dennis H. (Chillicothe, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An engine includes a high pressure hydraulic system having a high pressure pump and at least one hydraulically-actuated device attached to an engine housing. A low pressure engine lubricating system is attached to the engine housing and includes a circulation conduit fluidly connected to an outlet from the high pressure pump.

  12. Adhesion, Lubrication, and Wear on the Atomic Scale James B. Adams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, James B

    , lubrication and wear) of tribology on the atomic Scale with a focus on our group's work on Aluminum. Adhesion are processes that affect many industries, including metal forming, aerospace, automotive, and microelectronics. Adhesion is critical to the success of many applications, from automotive tires (the infamous Firestone

  13. References and Notes 1. W. J. Bartz, Ed., Engines and Automotive Lubrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Nikolai

    References and Notes 1. W. J. Bartz, Ed., Engines and Automotive Lubrication (Marcel Dekker, New formulations. 13. The replacement of steel by aluminum is motivated by efforts to reduce vehicle weight to adequately protect aluminum surfaces, automobile manufacturers have had to resort to engines com- posed

  14. Influence of EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) on Engine Components Durability & Lubricating Oil Condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mrs Rita; S. Pimpalkar

    Abstract––Diesel engines are extensively used in automotive systems due to their low fuel consumption and very low CO emissions. Despite of these advantages, diesel engines suffer from environmental and health drawbacks such as high levels of NOx and particulate matter. Exhaust Gas Recirculation ( EGR) is an effective technique which is being used widely to control the NOx emissions from diesel engines. However, the use of EGR leads to rise in soot emission and it causes the problems inside the engine like degradation of lubricating oil, enhanced engine component wear etc. Therefore, it requires a study of influence of EGR on engine components and lubricating oil. This can be achieved only with different experimental investigation. In the present work, Engine test and Tribology test with lubricants ( Without EGR and With EGR) have been carried out to evaluate the effect of EGR on tribo- characteristics of engine components and lubricating oil condition. Influencing parameters like load, speed, temperature were selected as per the engine components operating condition. Friction and wear characteristics were measured and compared with the actual engine wear results to validate the test parameters. I.

  15. Conservative one-dimensional finite volume discretization of a new cavitation model for pistonring lubrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buscaglia, Gustavo C.

    Conservative one-dimensional finite volume discretization of a new cavitation model for piston Cavitation Elrod­Adams model Piston­rings a b s t r a c t This paper presents a conservative numerical implementation of a new cavitation model that is well suited for lubrication problems with cavitated regions

  16. Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    authoritative source of oil product data). This studyof China’s products—chemical light oil and naphtha— map to aLubricant base oil Miscellaneous petroleum products Pentanes

  17. Crystal chemistry and self-lubricating properties of monochalcogenides gallium selenide and tin selenide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdemir, A.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the fundamentals of the crystal chemistry and self-lubricating mechanisms of two monochalcogenides; tin selenide and gallium selenide. Specifically, it enumerates their inter-atomic array and bond structure in crystalline states, and correlates this fundamental knowledge with their self-lubricating capacity. Friction tests assessing the self-lubricating performance of gallium and tin selenides were carried out on a pin-on-disk machine. Specifically, large crystalline pieces of gallium selenide and tin selenide were cut and cleaved into flat squares and subsequently rubbed against the sapphire balls. In another case, the fine powders (particle size {approx} 50--100 {mu}m) of gallium selenide and tin selenide were manually fed into the sliding interfaces of 440C pins and 440C disks. For the specific test conditions explored, it was found that the friction coefficients of the sapphire/gallium selenide and sapphire/tin selenide pairs were {approx} 0.23 and {approx} 0.35, respectively. The friction coefficients of 440C pin/440C disk test pairs with gallium selenide and tin selenide powders were on the orders of {approx} 0.22 and {approx} 0.38, respectively. For comparison, a number of parallel friction tests were performed with MoS{sub 2} powders and compacts and the results of these tests were also reported. The friction data together with the crystal-chemical knowledge and the electron microscopic evidence supported the conclusion that the lubricity and self-lubricating mechanisms of these solids are closely related to their crystal chemistry and the nature of interlayer bonding.

  18. A method to estimate the fractional fat volume within a ROI of a breast biopsy for WAXS applications: Animal tissue evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Robert Y., E-mail: rx-tang@laurentian.ca [Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); McDonald, Nancy, E-mail: mcdnancye@gmail.com; Laamanen, Curtis, E-mail: cx-laamanen@laurentian.ca [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); LeClair, Robert J., E-mail: rleclair@laurentian.ca [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6, Canada and Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a method to estimate the mean fractional volume of fat (?{sup ¯}{sub fat}) within a region of interest (ROI) of a tissue sample for wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) applications. A scatter signal from the ROI was obtained and use of ?{sup ¯}{sub fat} in a WAXS fat subtraction model provided a way to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficient ?{sub s} of the remaining fatless tissue. Methods: The efficacy of the method was tested using animal tissue from a local butcher shop. Formalin fixed samples, 5 mm in diameter 4 mm thick, were prepared. The two main tissue types were fat and meat (fibrous). Pure as well as composite samples consisting of a mixture of the two tissue types were analyzed. For the latter samples, ?{sub fat} for the tissue columns of interest were extracted from corresponding pixels in CCD digital x-ray images using a calibration curve. The means ?{sup ¯}{sub fat} were then calculated for use in a WAXS fat subtraction model. For the WAXS measurements, the samples were interrogated with a 2.7 mm diameter 50 kV beam and the 6° scattered photons were detected with a CdTe detector subtending a solid angle of 7.75 × 10{sup ?5} sr. Using the scatter spectrum, an estimate of the incident spectrum, and a scatter model, ?{sub s} was determined for the tissue in the ROI. For the composite samples, a WAXS fat subtraction model was used to estimate the ?{sub s} of the fibrous tissue in the ROI. This signal was compared to ?{sub s} of fibrous tissue obtained using a pure fibrous sample. Results: For chicken and beef composites, ?{sup ¯}{sub fat}=0.33±0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.05, respectively. The subtractions of these fat components from the WAXS composite signals provided estimates of ?{sub s} for chicken and beef fibrous tissue. The differences between the estimates and ?{sub s} of fibrous obtained with a pure sample were calculated as a function of the momentum transfer x. A t-test showed that the mean of the differences did not vary from zero in a statistically significant way thereby validating the methods. Conclusions: The methodology to estimate ?{sup ¯}{sub fat} in a ROI of a tissue sample via CCD x-ray imaging was quantitatively accurate. The WAXS fat subtraction model allowed ?{sub s} of fibrous tissue to be obtained from a ROI which had some fat. The fat estimation method coupled with the WAXS models can be used to compare ?{sub s} coefficients of fibroglandular and cancerous breast tissue.

  19. Design of a dry sump lubrication system for a Honda® CBR 600 F4i engine for Formula SAE applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farkhondeh, Ehsan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dry sump lubrication system for a Formula SAE race car was designed and manufactured in order to gain the various advantages this type of system affords. A dry sump system stores oil in an external tank and pumps it ...

  20. Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels -- Diesel Emissions Control Project (APBF-DEC): Lubricants Project, Phase 2 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of the second phase of a lubricants project, which investigated the impact of engine oil formulation on diesel vehicle emissions and the performance of a nitrogen oxide adsorber catalyst (NAC).

  1. The Plant Cell, Vol. 11, 825838, May 1999, www.plantcell.org 1999 American Society of Plant Physiologists CUT1, an Arabidopsis Gene Required for Cuticular Wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunst, Ljerka

    Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada b National Research Council of Canada, Plant. Michael Giblin,b David C. Taylor,b and Ljerka Kunsta,2 a Department of Botany, University of British is species dependent, but typically they are 26 to 34 carbons long. VLCFAs, the precursors for wax

  2. 752 MRS BULLETIN VOLUME 33 AUGUST 2008 www.mrs.org/bulletin Recent experiments have revealed that the wax on the lotus leaf surface, by itself,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    texture" (that is, a multivalued surface topography) on the surface of the lotus leaf. We exploit revealed that the wax on the lotus leaf surface, by itself, is weakly hydrophilic, even though the lotus leaf is known to be superhydrophobic. Conventional understanding suggests that a surface of such waxy

  3. Effects of Water in Synthetic Lubricant Systems and Clathrate Formation: A Literature Search and Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohatgi, Ngoc Dung T.

    2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An extensive literature search and a confidential survey were critically analyzed to determine the effects of water on the stability of hydrofluorocarbon/synthetic lubricant systems and to identify key areas requiring further investigation. Following are highlights from the analysis: Clathrate hydrates are solid solutions formed when water molecules are linked through hydrogen bonding creating cavities that can enclose various guest molecules from hydrate formers, such as hydrofluorocarbons R-32, R-125, R-134a, R-407C and R-410A. The four methods for preventing clathrate formation were drying the gas, heating it, reducing its pressure, or using inhibitors. The hydrolysis of polyolester lubricants was mostly acid-catalyzed and its reaction rate constant typically followed the Arrhenius equation of an activated process. Hydrolytic stability improved with hindered molecular structures, and with the presence of acid catcher additives and desiccants. Water vapor can effect the adsorption of long-chain fatty acids and the chemistry of formation of protective oxide film. However, these effects on lubrication can be either positive or negative. Fifty to sixty percent of the moisture injected into an air-conditioning system remained in the refrigerant and the rest mixed with the compressor oil. In an automotive air-conditioning system using R-134a, ice would form at 0 C evaporating temperature when the water content in the vapor refrigerant on the low-pressure side was more than 350 ppm. Moisture would cause the embrittlement of polyethylene terephthalate and the hydrolysis of polyesters, but would reduce the effect of amine additives on fluoroelastomer rubbers. The reactions of water with refrigerants and lubricants would cause formicary and large-pit corrosion in copper tubes, as well as copper plating and sludge formation. Moreover, blockage of capillary tubes increased rapidly in the presence of water. Twenty-four companies responded to the survey. From the responses, the water concentrations specified and expected for different refrigerant/lubricant systems varied depending on the products, their capacities and applications, and also on the companies. Among the problems associated with high moisture level, lubricant breakdown was of greatest concern, followed by acid formation, compressor failure and expansion valve sticking. The following research topics are suggested: 1. The air-conditioning and refrigeration industry needs to measure and record the water content and total acid number of the lubricant of newly installed systems as well as operating systems that are shutdown for service or repair. The reason for the shutdown needs to be documented. A database can then be established to correlate water content with type and cause of breakdown. 2. Detailed studies on the distribution of water in refrigeration and air-conditioning systems should be conducted to pinpoint problem areas associated with free water. 3. Research is needed to validate the current theories and mechanisms of formicary corrosion. Corrosion inhibitors need to be developed. 4. The conditions for clathrate formation and decomposition of other alternative refrigerants, such as R-23, R-41, R-116, R-125, R-143a, R-404A and R-507C, and water should be determined to avoid possible problems associated with tube plugging. The mechanism by which water facilitates or hinders lubrication needs to be studied.

  4. Stick-Slip Control in Nanoscale Boundary Lubrication by Surface Wettability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Chen; Adam S. Foster; Mikko J. Alava; Lasse Laurson

    2015-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of atomic scale surface-lubricant interactions on nanoscale boundary-lubricated friction, by considering two example surfaces - hydrophilic mica and hydrophobic graphene - confining thin layers of water in molecular dynamics simulations. We observe stick-slip dynamics for thin water films confined by mica sheets, involving periodic breaking-reforming transitions of atomic scale capillary water bridges formed around the potassium ions of mica. However, only smooth sliding without stick-slip events is observed for water confined by graphene, as well as for thicker water layers confined by mica. Thus, our results illustrate how atomic scale details affect the wettability of the confining surfaces, and consequently control the presence or absence of stick-slip dynamics in nanoscale friction.

  5. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS IN AN INSULATED DI DIESEL ENGINE WITH NEWLY DEVELOPED LUBRICANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rob Res; S Sunil; Kumar Reddy; S P Akbar Hussain

    Ever since the rise of fuel cost and rapidly depleting conventional energy sources the diesel engine manufacturers have been allocating a great deal of research for the improvement of the engine thermal efficiency and developing of alternative fuels. The alternative fuels developed should be renewable with low emissions. This recognizes alcohol as a preferable replacement because these are derived from indigenous sources and are renewable. But the alcohols by their nature do not make a good C.I Engine fuels and this can be ignited in the high temperature combustion chambers. So in the present work a thermally insulated (PSZ coated cylinder head, valves and air gap liner and air gap piston) engine is developed for improving fuel efficiency and to reduce the emissions. The low viscosity of alcohols leads to the problem of injection and equipment wear and tear. In order to compensate this, the fuel injection pressure has been reduced to 165 bar for the experimentation. Tests are conducted on a single cylinder 4-stroke, water-cooled 3.68 KW Kirloskar C.I. engine. Performance of lubricating oil plays an important role in determining the amount of power output and the improvement in the efficiency of the engine. At present first we tried the commercial lubricant for the experimentation. But the performance of this lubricant is inadequate at escalated thermal environment and the frictional losses are found to be higher. So in the present work new lubricants are developed and are further blended with different additives and analyzed the frictional losses to find the best oil.

  6. Poiseuille flow past a nanoscale cylinder in a slit channel: Lubrication theory versus molecular dynamics analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir M. Rahmani; Yang Shao; Mehlam Jupiterwala; Carlos E. Colosqui

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Plane Poiseuille flow past a nanoscale cylinder that is arbitrarily confined (i.e., symmetrically or asymmetrically confined) in a slit channel is studied via hydrodynamic lubrication theory and molecular dynamics simulations, considering cases where the cylinder remains static or undergoes thermal motion. Lubrication theory predictions for the drag force and volumetric flow rate are in close agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of flows having molecularly thin lubrication gaps, despite the presence of significant structural forces induced by the crystalline structure of the modeled solid. While the maximum drag force is observed in symmetric confinement, i.e., when the cylinder is equidistant from both channel walls, the drag decays significantly as the cylinder moves away from the channel centerline and approaches a wall. Hence, significant reductions in the mean drag force on the cylinder and hydraulic resistance of the channel can be observed when thermal motion induces random off-center displacements. Analytical expressions and numerical results in this work provide useful insights into the hydrodynamics of colloidal solids and macromolecules in confinement.

  7. The role of polymer formation during vapor phase lubrication of silicon.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dugger, Michael Thomas; Dirk, Shawn M.; Ohlhausen, James Anthony

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lubrication of silicon surfaces with alcohol vapors has recently been demonstrated. With a sufficient concentration of pentanol vapor present, sliding of a silica ball on an oxidized silicon wafer can proceed with no measurable wear. The initial results of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) analysis of wear surfaces revealed a reaction product having thickness on the order of a monolayer, and with an ion spectrum that included fragments having molecular weights of 200 or more that occurred only inside the wear tracks. The parent alcohol molecule pentanol, has molecular weight of 88amu, suggesting that reactions of adsorbed alcohols on the wearing surfaces allowed polymerization of the alcohols to form higher molecular weight species. In addition to pin-on-disk studies, lubrication of silicon surfaces with pentanol vapors has also been demonstrated using MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) devices. Recent investigations of the reaction mechanisms of the alcohol molecules with the oxidized silicon surfaces have shown that wearless sliding requires a concentration of the alcohol vapor that is dependent upon the contact stress during sliding, with higher stress requiring a greater concentration of alcohol. Different vapor precursors including those with acid functionality, olefins, and methyl termination also produce polymeric reaction products, and can lubricate the silica surfaces. Doping the operating environment with oxygen was found to quench the formation of the polymeric reaction product, and demonstrates that polymer formation is not necessary for wearless sliding.

  8. Time-Resolved SAXS/WAXS Study of the Phase Behavior and Microstructural Evolution of Drug/PEG Solid Dispersions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Qing; Harris, Michael T.; Taylor, Lynne S. (Purdue)

    2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous small-angle X-ray scattering/wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) was employed to elucidate the physical state and location of various small molecule drugs blended with polyethylene glycol (PEG), as well as the time dependent microstructural evolution of the systems. Samples were prepared by comelting physical mixtures of the drug and PEG, followed by solidification at 25 C. The model drugs selected encompassed a wide variety of physicochemical properties in terms of crystallization tendency and potential for interaction with PEG. It was observed that compounds which crystallized rapidly and had weak interactions with PEG tended to be excluded from the interlamellar region of the PEG matrix. In contrast, drugs which had favorable interactions with PEG were incorporated into the interlamellar regions of the polymer up until the point at which the drug crystallized whereby phase separation occurred. These factors are likely to impact the effectiveness of drug/PEG systems as drug delivery systems.

  9. US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component)- The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component) - The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

  10. Harold and Inge Marcus Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Fall 2010 Lubrication and Tool Wear in the Turning of Powdered Metal M2 Steel Valve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    Lubrication and Tool Wear in the Turning of Powdered Metal M2 Steel Valve Seats Final Report Overview) cutting insert on M2 steel valve seats. Two parameters were collected in order to perform a statistical was to analyze tool wear and the effect of select lubricants in the turning operation of powdered M2 metal valve

  11. The Standard Test Method for Measurement of Extreme Pressure Properties of Various Lubricating oils by Using Four Ball Extreme Pressure oil Testing Machine.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prof A. D. Dongare

    Abstract:––As per the American Society of Testing Materials (ASTM-D-2783), the standard test method for measurement of Extreme Pressure (E.P.) properties of lubricating oils by using Four Ball Extreme Pressure Oil Testing Machine (F.B.E.P.O.T.M.) plays an important role in oil industry while selecting such oils as a lubricating media for testing various types of E.P. lubricating oils. Lubricating oils are needed to reduce frictional losses as well as to support working load and avoid metal to metal contact between the components working together for obtaining desired functions in machines.This F.B.E.P.O.T.M is utilized for finding the load carrying capacity and weld point of different types of lubricants/Oils fluids. Extreme Pressure (E.P.) properties like-Load wear Index,Weld Point, Non load are the basis of differentiation of Lubricating oils having low, medium and high level of extreme pressure properties. In this paper we find out or Evaluate Tribological (E.P.) properties i e. of load carrying capacity and weld point or various oils or lubricants used for various purposes. It?s necessary to form a lubricating fluid film of low shear strength, then it is possible to decide the film breaking strength in other words load carrying capacity of oil can be calculated.

  12. A NEW CAVITATION MODEL IN LUBRICATION: THE CASE OF TWOZONE CAVITATION GUSTAVO C. BUSCAGLIA, IONEL CIUPERCA, ERIC DALISSIER, AND MOHAMMED JAI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buscaglia, Gustavo C.

    A NEW CAVITATION MODEL IN LUBRICATION: THE CASE OF TWO­ZONE CAVITATION GUSTAVO C. BUSCAGLIA, IONEL of cavitation in lubricated devices is proposed, such that the translation velocity V for the saturation field of course the cavitation boundary leaves the domain or disappears. A few preliminary numerical examples

  13. The determination of performance characteristics of a small two-stroke-cycle engine operated with various fuel-lubricant mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doolittle, James Harold

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for nitrated fuels with glow and spark ignition. 30 the engine during these tests because of the fact that the engine's only source of lubricant is that carried in by the fuel. The piston and connecting rod were removed and a similar test carried out...THE DETERMINATION OF PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF A SMALL TWO-STROKE-CYCLE ENGINE OPERATED WITH VARIOUS FUEL-LUBRICANT MIXTURES A Thesis by JAMES HAROLD DOOLITTLE III Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas AFM University in partial...

  14. Inferring orientation distributions in anisotropic powders of nano-layered crystallites from a single two-dimensional WAXS image

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yves Meheust; Kenneth Dahl Knudsen; Jon Otto Fossum

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wide-angle scattering of X-rays by anisotropic powders of nano-layered crystallites (nano-stacks) is addressed. Assuming that the orientation distribution probability function f of the nano-stacks only depends on the deviation of the crystallites' orientation from a fixed reference direction, we derive a relation providing f from the dependence of a given diffraction peak's amplitude on the azimuthal angle. The method is applied to two systems of Na-fluorohectorite (NaFH) clay particles, using synchrotron radiation and a WAXS setup with a two-dimensional detector. In the first system, which consists of dry-pressed NaFH samples, the orientation distribution probability function corresponds to a classical uniaxial nematic order. The second system is observed in bundles of polarized NaFH particles in silicon oil; in this case, the nanostacks have their directors on average in a plane normal to the reference direction, and f is a function of the angle between a nano-stack's director and that plane. In both cases, a suitable Maier-Saupe function is obtained for the distributions, and the reference direction is determined with respect to the laboratory frame. The method only requires one scattering image. Besides, consistency can be checked by determining the orientation distribution from several diffraction peaks independently.

  15. Diesel Generator Fuel Oil, Diesel Generator Lubricating Oil, and Diesel Generator Starting Air Requirements"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omaha Public; Power Distrct

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (ISTS) and adds requirements for DG Lubricating Oil, and DG Starting Air. The proposed changes will assure that required quality and quantity of DG Fuel Oil is maintained and also will assure that sufficient DG Lubricating Oil and DG Starting Air is maintained. This proposed amendment imposes limits on DG support system parameters to ensure the DGs will be able to perform their design function. This proposed amendment also brings the current TS on DG Fuel Oil into alignment with the ISTS. This amendment is modeled after the ISTS, Section 3.8.3. This amendment also incorporates into the FCS TS improvements to ISTS Sections 3.8.3 and 5.5 consistent with those provided in Technical Specification Task Force (TSTF) travelers TSTF-254, Rev. 2 and TSTF-374, Rev. 0. FCS also requests approval of reduction in commitments with respect to the FCS Quality Assurance (QA) Program associated with this License Amendment Request. This License Amendment Request adds a Surveillance [Table 3-5, Item 9c] stating that the DG Fuel Oil Properties are required to be verified within limits in accordance with the Diesel Fuel Oil Testing Program. These tests are to be conducted prior to adding the new fuel to the storage tank(s), but in no case is the time between receipt of new fuel and conducting the tests to exceed 31 days.

  16. Lubrication and Tool-wear in the Turning of Hard Powdered Metals By: Edward Chow and Anastasia Linuwih

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    Lubrication and Tool-wear in the Turning of Hard Powdered Metals By: Edward Chow and Anastasia Linuwih Background A current target and need in the auto industry is to achieve improved tool life in machining powered metal valve seats for an engine block. The tools required are specialized and expensive

  17. Effect of lubricant on spray evaporation heat transfer performance of R-134a and R-22 in tube bundles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeykens, S.A. [Trane Co., La Crosse, WI (United States); Pate, M.B. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the effects of lubricant on spray evaporation heat transfer performance. Tests were conducted with refrigerant R-134a and triangular-pitch tube bundles made from enhanced-condensation, enhanced-boiling, low-finned, and plain-surface tubes. A 340-SUS polyol-ester (POE) oil was used for the R-134a testing because this lubricant is being integrated into industry for use with this refrigerant. Refrigerant was sprayed onto the tube bundles with low-pressure-drop, wide-angle nozzles located directly above the bundle. Collector testing was conducted with both R-134a and R-22 to determine the percentage of refrigerant contacting the tue bundle. It was found that small concentrations of the polyol-ester lubricant yielded significant improvement in the heat transfer performance of R-134a. The shell-side heat transfer coefficient was more dependent on lubricant concentration than on film-feed supply rate within the range of the respective parameters evaluated in this study. As expected, pure R-22 results show higher heat transfer coefficients than those obtained with pure R-134a at the same saturation temperature of 2.0 C (35.6 F).

  18. Effect of Magnetic Field on The Friction and Wear Displayed by The Scratch of Oil Lubricated Steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Abstract — The present work discusses the effect of magnetic field on the friction and wear of steel scratched by TiC insert. The steel was lubricated by oil and dispersed by iron, copper and aluminium powders as well as polymeric powders such as high density polyethylene (PE), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polyamide (PA6). Molybdenum disulphide (MoS 2) and graphite (C) were added to the oil as dispersant. Paraffin oil was used as lubricant. Friction coefficient and wear of the tested composites were investigated using a tribometer designed and manufactured for that purpose. It was found that application of induction magnetic field decreased friction coefficient. The decrease was significant for oil lubricated steel and oil dispersed by aluminium, copper, PMMA and PA6 + 10 wt. % C, while addition of iron, PE and MoS 2 particles showed slight friction decrease. At no magnetic field friction coefficient for oil dispersed by aluminium and copper particles showed values lower than that observed for oil dispersed by iron particles. The lowest values of friction coefficient were displayed by oil dispersed by PE particles. Magnetic field caused significant wear increase for oil lubricated steel, where aluminium, copper and PA6 + C particles displayed relatively higher wear, while addition of iron, PE, PMMA and MoS 2 particles showed slight wear increase. At no magnetic field wear decreased due to the action of aluminium particles which formed a continuous layer on the steel surface and consequently decreased wear. Wear of oil lubricated steel dispersed by PE particles displayed relatively low values. Magnetic field showed no significant change on wear of the steel surface. Index Term-- Induction, magnetic field, scratch, friction coefficient, wear, iron, copper, aluminium polymethyl methacrylate, polyethylene, polyamide, molybdenum disulphide, paraffin oil. I.

  19. Lubricant-infused micro/nano-structured surfaces with tunable dynamic omniphobicity at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Daniel; Max, Mankin N.; Belisle, Rebecca A.; Wong, Tak-Sing; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Omniphobic surfaces that can repel fluids at temperatures higher than 100 #2;°C are rare. Most stateof- the-art liquid-repellent materials are based on the lotus effect, where a thin air layer is maintained throughout micro/nanotextures leading to high mobility of liquids. However, such behavior eventually fails at elevated temperatures when the surface tension of test liquids decreases significantly. Here, we demonstrate a class of lubricant-infused structured surfaces that can maintain a robust omniphobic state even for low-surface-tension liquids at temperatures up to at least 200 °#2;C. We also demonstrate how liquid mobility on such surfaces can be tuned by a factor of 1000.

  20. Synchronized molecular-dynamics simulation for the thermal lubrication of a polymeric liquid between parallel plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasuda, Shugo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Synchronized Molecular-Dynamics simulation which was recently proposed by authors [Phys. Rev. X {\\bf 4}, 041011 (2014)] is applied to the analysis of polymer lubrication between parallel plates. The rheological properties, conformational change of polymer chains, and temperature rise due to the viscous heating are investigated with changing the values of thermal conductivity of the polymeric liquid. It is found that at a small applied shear stress on the plate, the temperature of polymeric liquid only slightly increases in inverse proportion to the thermal conductivity and the apparent viscosity of polymeric liquid is not much affected by changing the thermal conductivity. However, at a large shear stress, the transitional behaviors of the polymeric liquid occur due to the interplay of the shear deformation and viscous heating by changing the thermal conductivity. This transition is characterized by the Nahme-Griffith number $Na$ which is defined as the ratio of the viscous heating to the thermal conducti...

  1. Lubricating system for thermal medium delivery parts in a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashey, Thomas Charles (Coxsackie, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling steam delivery tubes extend axially along the outer rim of a gas turbine rotor for supplying cooling steam to and returning spent cooling steam from the turbine buckets. Because of the high friction forces at the interface of the tubes and supporting elements due to rotor rotation, a low coefficient of friction coating is provided at the interface of the tubes and support elements. On each surface, a first coating of a cobalt-based alloy is sprayed onto the surface at high temperature. A portion of the first coating is machined off to provide a smooth, hard surface. A second ceramic-based solid film lubricant is sprayed onto the first coating. By reducing the resistance to axial displacement of the tubes relative to the supporting elements due to thermal expansion, the service life of the tubes is substantially extended.

  2. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and power via biomass gasification. Biomass and Bioenergyrenewables Integrated coal gasification combined cycle withLubricants Waxes Naptha Gasification Ethane, Benzene, and

  3. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and power via biomass gasification. Biomass and Bioenergyrenewables Integrated coal gasification combined cycle withLubricants Waxes Naptha Gasification Ethane, Benzene, and

  4. REACTOR ENGINEERING DIVISION QUARTERLY REPORT FOR DECEMBER 1...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    reactor (physics, thermal analysis, and experimental and development program); corrosion of Al coating: irradiation of wax and lubricants; effect of long-term irradiation on...

  5. Performance Evaluation of A Household Refrigerator Using Cuo Nanoparticle Lubricant Mixture and Various Other Compressor Oils with Different Condenser Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sreejith. K

    Abstract:- The objective of this paper was to study the performance of household refrigerator having both air and water-cooled condenser, with 0.06 % mass fraction CuO nanoparticle-lubricant mixture and different types of compressor oils. The experiment was done using HFC134a as the refrigerant, CuO nanoparticles, Polyol-ester oil (POE) oil which is used as the conventional lubricant in the household refrigerator and SUNISO 3GS mineral oil as the lubricant alternatively. The result indicates that the refrigerator performance had improved while using CuO nanoparticle-lubricant mixture. The performance was also improved when HFC134a/SUNISO 3GS mineral oil system was used instead of HFC134a/POE oil system and there was also an enhancement when water-cooled condenser was used instead of the conventional air-cooled condenser on all load conditions. The HFC134a/CuO/SUNISO 3GS mineral oil system works normally and safely in the refrigerator. HFC134a/CuO/SUNISO 3GS mineral oil system reduced the energy consumption between 12 % and 19 % when compared with the HFC134a/POE oil system and between 9 % and 14 % while working with water-cooled condenser on various load conditions. There was also an enhancement in coefficient of performance (COP) when CuO nanoparticle-lubricant mixture was used instead of POE oil as the lubricant. The water cooled heat exchanger was designed and the system was modified by retrofitting it, along with the conventional air-cooled condenser by making a bypass line and thus the system can be utilized as a waste heat recovery unit. Experimental result shows that about 200 litres of hot water at a temperature of about 58ºC over a day can be generated. Techno economic analysis shows that the installation cost and running cost of the waste heat recovery system for a day is much lower than that of a conventional

  6. Synchronized molecular-dynamics simulation for the thermal lubrication of a polymeric liquid between parallel plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shugo Yasuda; Ryoichi Yamamoto

    2015-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Synchronized Molecular-Dynamics simulation which was recently proposed by authors [Phys. Rev. X {\\bf 4}, 041011 (2014)] is applied to the analysis of polymer lubrication between parallel plates. The rheological properties, conformational change of polymer chains, and temperature rise due to the viscous heating are investigated with changing the values of thermal conductivity of the polymeric liquid. It is found that at a small applied shear stress on the plate, the temperature of polymeric liquid only slightly increases in inverse proportion to the thermal conductivity and the apparent viscosity of polymeric liquid is not much affected by changing the thermal conductivity. However, at a large shear stress, the transitional behaviors of the polymeric liquid occur due to the interplay of the shear deformation and viscous heating by changing the thermal conductivity. This transition is characterized by the Nahme-Griffith number $Na$ which is defined as the ratio of the viscous heating to the thermal conduction at a characteristic temperature. When the Nahme-Griffith number exceeds the unity, the temperature of polymeric liquid increases rapidly and the apparent viscosity also exponentially decreases as the thermal conductivity decreases. The conformation of polymer chains is stretched and aligned by the shear flow for $Na1$.

  7. Synchronized molecular dynamics simulation via macroscopic heat and momentum transfer: an application to polymer lubrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shugo Yasuda; Ryoichi Yamamoto

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The synchronized molecular dynamics simulation via macroscopic heat and momentum transfer is proposed for the non-isothermal flow behaviors of complex fluids. In this method, the molecular dynamics simulations are assigned to small fluid elements to calculate the local stresses and temperatures and are synchronized at certain time intervals to satisfy the macroscopic heat- and momentum- transport equations. This method is applied to the lubrication of a polymeric liquid composed of short chains with ten beads between parallel plates. The rheological properties and conformation of polymer chains coupled with the local viscous heating are investigated with a non-dimensional parameter, i.e., the Nahme-Griffith number, which is defined by the ratio of the viscous heating to the thermal conduction at the characteristic temperature required to sufficiently change the viscosity. The present simulation demonstrates that strong shear thinning and transitional behavior of the conformation of the polymer chains occur with a rapid temperature rise when the Nahme-Griffith number exceeds unity. The results also clarify that the reentrant transition of the linear stress-optical relation occurs for large shear stresses due to the coupling of the conformation of polymer chains and heat generation under shear flows.

  8. Economic incentives for hazardous-waste management: Deposit-refunded systems and used lubricating oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belzer, R.B.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic incentives have been widely advocated for controlling environmental externalities. There has been increasing interest in devising such incentives to reduce the generation of hazardous waste. It is demonstrated that since firms comply with existing disposal rules, there is no efficiency basis for additional incentives. In contrast, incentives may be appropriate for firms that do not comply with existing rules. A range of regulatory instruments is compared, including taxes on inputs and waste generation, and subsidies for safe disposal and waste minimization. Each instrument has undesirable properties. Waste-end taxes encourage illegal disposal; safe-disposal subsides stimulate waste generation; and waste-minimization subsidies cannot be effectively targeted. The economic incentive instrument proposed is a combination of input taxes and safe-disposal subsidies, sometime manifest in the deposit-refund system. This instrument is efficiency-enhancing under plausible real-world conditions. The theoretical results are applied to the case of used lubricating oil, a large-volume waste stream that has vexed regulators for many years. An empirical model is developed that enables the simulation of prices, quantities, and net social benefits resulting from the establishment of a tax-subsidy or deposit-refund system. This model accounts for variations in: price-responsiveness; residual external damage from disposal; ex ante rates of regulatory compliance; and the level of transactions costs implied by the program. The instrument offers positive net social benefits, but only under a narrow range of conditions. The model is modified to apply to a generic hazardous waste problem that emphasizes illegal dumping. The existence of positive net social benefits depends on differences in risk across disposal options, the ex ante level of regulatory compliance, and the magnitude of unit transactions costs.

  9. Case History of Reapplication of a 2500 KW Steam Turbine/Gear Drive Generator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, S.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that extracts landfill gas and converts it to diesel fuel, naphtha and a high grade of wax. The plant requires a steam turbine generator set to produce electrical power for its base load operation. This paper covers the history of how the turbine, gear...

  10. Accelerated screening methods for determining chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures, Part 1: Method assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kauffman, R.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results of a literature search performed to identify analytical techniques suitable for accelerated screening of chemical and thermal stabilities of different refrigerant/lubricant combinations. Search focused on three areas: Chemical stability data of HFC-134a and other non-chlorine containing refrigerant candidates; chemical stability data of CFC-12, HCFC-22, and other chlorine containing refrigerants; and accelerated thermal analytical techniques. Literature was catalogued and an abstract was written for each journal article or technical report. Several thermal analytical techniques were identified as candidates for development into accelerated screening tests. They are easy to operate, are common to most laboratories, and are expected to produce refrigerant/lubricant stability evaluations which agree with the current stability test ANSI/ASHRAE (American National Standards Institute/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers) Standard 97-1989, ``Sealed Glass Tube Method to Test the Chemical Stability of Material for Use Within Refrigerant Systems.`` Initial results of one accelerated thermal analytical candidate, DTA, are presented for CFC-12/mineral oil and HCFC-22/mineral oil combinations. Also described is research which will be performed in Part II to optimize the selected candidate.

  11. Biodiesel Impact on Engine Lubricant Dilution During Active Regeneration of Aftertreatment Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, X.; Williams, A.; Christensen, E.; Burton, J.; McCormick, R.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted with ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and 20% biodiesel blends (B20) to compare lube oil dilution levels and lubricant properties for systems using late in-cylinder fuel injection for aftertreatment regeneration. Lube oil dilution was measured by gas chromatography (GC) following ASTM method D3524 to measure diesel content, by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry following a modified ASTM method D7371 to measure biodiesel content, and by a newly developed back-flush GC method that simultaneously measures both diesel and biodiesel. Heavy-duty (HD) engine testing was conducted on a 2008 6.7L Cummins ISB equipped with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and diesel particle filter (DPF). Stage one of engine testing consisted of 10 consecutive repeats of a forced DPF regeneration event. This continuous operation with late in-cylinder fuel injection served as a method to accelerate lube-oil dilution. Stage two consisted of 16 hours of normal engine operation over a transient test cycle, which created an opportunity for any accumulated fuel in the oil sump to evaporate. Light duty (LD) vehicle testing was conducted on a 2010 VW Jetta equipped with DOC, DPF and a NOx storage catalyst (NSC). Vehicle testing comprised approximately 4,000 miles of operation on a mileage-accumulation dynamometer (MAD) using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Highway Fuel Economy Cycle because of the relatively low engine oil and exhaust temperatures, and high DPF regeneration frequency of this cycle relative to other cycles examined. Comparison of the lube oil dilution analysis methods suggests that D3524 does not measure dilution by biodiesel. The new back-flush GC method provided analysis for both diesel and biodiesel, in a shorter time and with lower detection limit. Thus all lube oil dilution results in this paper are based on this method. Analysis of the HD lube-oil samples showed only 1.5% to 1.6% fuel dilution for both fuels during continuous operation under DPF regeneration events. During the second stage of HD testing, the ULSD lube-oil dilution levels fell from 1.5% to 0.8%, while for B20, lube-oil dilution levels fell from 1.6% to 1.0%, but the fuel in the oil was 36% biodiesel. For the LD vehicle tests, the frequency of DPF regeneration events was observed to be the same for both ULSD and B20. No significant difference between the two fuels' estimated soot loading was detected by the engine control unit (ECU), although a 23% slower rate of increase in differential pressure across DPF was observed with B20. It appears that the ECU estimated soot loading is based on the engine map, not taking advantage of the lower engine-out particulate matter from the use of biodiesel. After 4,000 miles of LD vehicle operation with ULSD, fuel dilution in the lube-oil samples showed total dilution levels of 4.1% diesel. After 4,000 miles of operation with B20, total fuel in oil dilution levels were 6.7% consisting of 3.6% diesel fuel and 3.1% biodiesel. Extrapolation to the 10,000-mile oil drain interval with B20 suggests that the total fuel content in the oil could reach 12%, compared to 5% for operation on ULSD. Analysis of the oil samples also included measurement of total acid number, total base number, viscosity, soot, metals and wear scar; however, little difference in these parameters was noted.

  12. Composition optimization of self-lubricating chromium carbide-based composite coatings for use to 760/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DellaCorte, C.; Sliney, H.E.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes new compositions of self-lubricating coatings that contain chromium carbide. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the ''base stock'' because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. ''Additives'' were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The coating constituents were treated as a termary system consisting of: (1) the bonded carbide base material, (2) silver, and (3) the eutectic. A study to determine the optimum amounts of each constituent was performed. The various compositions were prepared by powder blending. The blended powders were then plasma sprayed onto a superalloy substrates and diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. Friction and wear studies were performed at temperatures from 25 to 760/sup 0/C in helium and hydrogen. A variety of counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines.

  13. The Development of Open Water-lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Thrust Bearings for Use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, Craig, H.; Khonsari, Michael,, M; Lingwall, Brent

    2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycrstalline diamond (PCD) bearings were designed, fabricated and tested for marine-hydro-kinetic (MHK) application. Bearing efficiency and life were evaluated using the US Synthetic bearing test facility. Three iterations of design, build and test were conducted to arrive at the best bearing design. In addition life testing that simulated the starting and stopping and the loading of real MHK applications were performed. Results showed polycrystalline diamond bearings are well suited for MHK applications and that diamond bearing technology is TRL4 ready. Based on life tests results bearing life is estimated to be at least 11.5 years. A calculation method for evaluating the performance of diamond bearings of round geometry was also investigated and developed. Finally, as part of this effort test bearings were supplied free of charge to the University of Alaska for further evaluation. The University of Alaska test program will subject the diamond bearings to sediment laden lubricating fluid.

  14. Third-Party Evaluation of Petro Tex Hydrocarbons, LLC, ReGen Lubricating Oil Re-refining Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compere, A L [ORNL; Griffith, William {Bill} L [ORNL

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an assessment of market, energy impact, and utility of the PetroTex Hydrocarbons, LLC., ReGen process for re-refining used lubricating oil to produce Group I, II, and III base oils, diesel fuel, and asphalt. PetroTex Hydrocarbons, LLC., has performed extensive pilot scale evaluations, computer simulations, and market studies of this process and is presently evaluating construction of a 23 million gallon per year industrial-scale plant. PetroTex has obtained a 30 acre site in the Texas Industries RailPark in Midlothian Texas. The environmental and civil engineering assessments of the site are completed, and the company has been granted a special use permit from the City of Midlothian and air emissions permits for the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

  15. Large-scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticulate-based Lubrication Additives for Improved Energy Efficiency and Reduced Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdemir, Ali [Argonne National Laboratory] [Argonne National Laboratory

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was funded under the Department of Energy (DOE) Lab Call on Nanomanufacturing for Energy Efficiency and was directed toward the development of novel boron-based nanocolloidal lubrication additives for improving the friction and wear performance of machine components in a wide range of industrial and transportation applications. Argonne?s research team concentrated on the scientific and technical aspects of the project, using a range of state-of-the art analytical and tribological test facilities. Argonne has extensive past experience and expertise in working with boron-based solid and liquid lubrication additives, and has intellectual property ownership of several. There were two industrial collaborators in this project: Ashland Oil (represented by its Valvoline subsidiary) and Primet Precision Materials, Inc. (a leading nanomaterials company). There was also a sub-contract with the University of Arkansas. The major objectives of the project were to develop novel boron-based nanocolloidal lubrication additives and to optimize and verify their performance under boundary-lubricated sliding conditions. The project also tackled problems related to colloidal dispersion, larger-scale manufacturing and blending of nano-additives with base carrier oils. Other important issues dealt with in the project were determination of the optimum size and concentration of the particles and compatibility with various base fluids and/or additives. Boron-based particulate additives considered in this project included boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}), hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), boron oxide, and borax. As part of this project, we also explored a hybrid MoS{sub 2} + boric acid formulation approach for more effective lubrication and reported the results. The major motivation behind this work was to reduce energy losses related to friction and wear in a wide spectrum of mechanical systems and thereby reduce our dependence on imported oil. Growing concern over greenhouse gas emissions was also a major reason. The transportation sector alone consumes about 13 million barrels of crude oil per day (nearly 60% of which is imported) and is responsible for about 30% of the CO{sub 2} emission. When we consider manufacturing and other energy-intensive industrial processes, the amount of petroleum being consumed due to friction and wear reaches more than 20 million barrels per day (from official energy statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration). Frequent remanufacturing and/or replacement of worn parts due to friction-, wear-, and scuffing-related degradations also consume significant amounts of energy and give rise to additional CO{sub 2} emission. Overall, the total annual cost of friction- and wear-related energy and material losses is estimated to be rather significant (i.e., as much as 5% of the gross national products of highly industrialized nations). It is projected that more than half of the total friction- and wear-related energy losses can be recovered by developing and implementing advanced friction and wear control technologies. In transportation vehicles alone, 10% to 15% of the fuel energy is spent to overcome friction. If we can cut down the friction- and wear-related energy losses by half, then we can potentially save up to 1.5 million barrels of petroleum per day. Also, less friction and wear would mean less energy consumption as well as less carbon emissions and hazardous byproducts being generated and released to the environment. New and more robust anti-friction and -wear control technologies may thus have a significant positive impact on improving the efficiency and environmental cleanliness of the current legacy fleet and future transportation systems. Effective control of friction in other industrial sectors such as manufacturing, power generation, mining and oil exploration, and agricultural and earthmoving machinery may bring more energy savings. Therefore, this project was timely and responsive to the energy and environmental objectives of DOE and our nation. In this project, most of the boron-based mater

  16. The effect of counterface on the tribological performance of a high temperature solid lubricant composite from 25 to 650{degree}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DellaCorte, C.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of counterface selection on the tribological performance of a Ag/BaF{sub 2}-CaF{sub 2} containing composite coating is studied. Ceramic (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and metal (Inconel X-750) pins are slid against PS300 (a metal bonded chrome oxide coating with Ag and BaF{sub 2}/CaF{sub 2} lubricant additives) in a pin-on-disk tribometer at 25, 500 and 650 C. Compared to the ceramic counterface, the metal counterface generally exhibited lower friction and wear at 25 C but higher friction and wear at 650 C. Friction coefficients, for example, for the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PS300 combination at 25 C were 0.64 compared to 0.23 for the Inconel/PS300 sliding couple. At 650 C the ranking was reversed. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PS300 combination gave a friction coefficient of 0.19 while the friction for the metal counterface increased slightly to about 0.3. Based upon these tribological results and other information found in the literature, it appears that the performance of each counterface/PS300 combination is affected by the ability of the solid lubricant additives to form an adequate transfer film. The effects of surface wettability and tribological compatibility are discussed in relation to the observed tribological results.

  17. Lubricated boride surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdemir, A.; Bindal, C.; Fenske, G.R.

    1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultralow friction properties are available through the annealation and subsequent cooling of various boron-containing substrates, articles and/or components. 16 figs.

  18. Boundary Layer Lubrication

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    refinement of scuffing model to include all classes of materials, especially ceramics and thin-film coatings. Redesign and refine the x-ray accessible tribometer for in-situ study...

  19. Lubricated boride surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL); Bindal, Cuma (Sakarya, TR); Fenske, G. R. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultralow friction properties available through the annealation and subsequent cooling of various boron-containing substrates, articles and/or components.

  20. Reaction kinetics of olefin saturation in the hydrodesulfurization of fluid catalytic cracked naphtha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumann, Brian Herbert

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . 30 . . . 3 I . . . 3 I 13. Run 222-92-70--Comparison ofkw/rto Carbon Number forNormalOlefin . . . . 32 14. Run 222-92-70 ? -Comparison of k w/r to Carbon Number for Iso Olefins . . . . . . . . . . . 32 15. Run 222-92-70 ? -Comparison of k w.../r to Carbon Number for Cycfic Olefins . . . . . . 33 16. Run 963-94-24 ? -Comparison of k w/r to Carbon Number for Normal Olefins . . . . 33 17. Run 963-94-24 ? -Comparison of k w/r to Carbon Number for Iso Olefins . . . . . . . . . . . 34 18. Run 963...

  1. Ionic Liquids as Novel Engine Lubricants or Lubricant Additives |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report: I11IG002RTC3 | 12/1/2014 | © 2014

  2. Process for producing biodiesel, lubricants, and fuel and lubricant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News, informationPriority FirmTechxx by ASME 31additives

  3. Factors Affecting Biodefluorination of Fluorotelomer Alcohols (FTOHs): Degradative Microorganisms, Transformation Metabolites and Pathways, and Effects of Co-substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Myung Hee 1982-

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    , adhesives, waxes, polishes, metals, electronics, caulks, agrochemicals, blood substitutes, cookware coatings, refrigerants, fire-fighting foams, and lubricants [1]. From 2000 to 2002, the production of FTOHs was estimated to be 5,000 tons...]. The unique properties of FTOH-based products have led to a wide variety of applications including paints, adhesives, waxes, polishes, metals, electronics, caulks, agrochemicals, * Reprinted with permission from ?Biodefluorination and Biotransformation...

  4. Mechanisms of mesothelial tissue lubrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Judy Li-Wen

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the pleural space, sliding between the lung and chest wall induces shear stress that could damage the delicate mesothelial cells covering the tissue surfaces. Normally, the pleural space, which is filled with fluid, is ...

  5. OpenEI Community - Lubricants

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff the GridHomeWrap-up courtesy of

  6. Lubricants Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy andTermsDepartment1| Department of Energy

  7. Lubricants | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lu'an

  8. Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Xiaoming

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power generation (MW) Gas turbine Steam turbine Total Naphtha DieselPower generation (MW) CERT-1 Gas turbine Steam turbine Total Naphtha DieselPower generation (MW) Gas turbine CERT-2 CERT-2B Steam turbine Total Naphtha Diesel

  9. a buyer's guide Trees for Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..................................................................................9 Wax currant..............................................................................10 Green

  10. Florida Wax Scales: Control Measures in Texas for Hollies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drees, Bastiaan M.; Reinert, James; Williams, Michael L.

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    treatments on other landscape plants may help control other pests such as azalea lace bugs and crape myrtle aphids, but check the timing of ap- plications because they vary for different pests and plants. Systemic soil treatments: Because systemic... or any other drain. Acknowledgments The authors are grateful to Carlos Bogran and Scott Ludwig for review comments; to Gary Plaia of Katy, TX, for monitoring scale crawler hatches and reporting success in treating infested hollies in southeast Texas...

  11. Wear modeling with sensitivity to lubricant chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Benjamin C. (Benjamin Carl)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The life of an automotive engine is often limited by the ability of its components to resist wear. Zinc dialkyl-dithiophosphate (ZDDP) is an engine oil additive that reduces wear in an engine by forming solid antiwear films ...

  12. National Agricultural-Based Lubricants (NABL) Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honary, Lou

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project, while defined as a one year project from September 30, 2012 – September 30, 2013, was a continuation of a number of tasks that were defined in previous years. Those tasks were performed and were finalized in this period. The UNI-NABL Center, which has been in operation in various forms since 1991, has closed its facilities since September 2013 and will be phasing out in June 2014. This report covers the individual tasks that were identified in the previous reports and provides closure to each task in its final stage.

  13. Fuel & Lubricant Technologies R&D

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  14. Lubrication Systems Market : Mining & Mineral Processing Industry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Concerns to Push Global Market to Grow at 8.1% CAGR from 2013 to 2019 Oil Shale Market is Estimated to Reach USD 7,400.70 Million by 2022 more Group members (32)...

  15. Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and compressed natural gas. Contract Number: 50006043 Contractor: California Air Resources Board Contract

  16. Notes 00. Introduction to Hydrodynamic Lubrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /product/448_448.htm Portable Generator http://www.notebookre view.com/ http://www.wir efly.com/ Mobile electronic equipment Large Scale Combustor http://www.uavpayloads.com/pr oducts.php4 UAV Micro Gas Turbine http://www.m-dot.com/page8.html Application... hpcompressozr.pdf ASME Paper No. GT2002-30404 Honeywell, Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Merit Review Auto engine and part / Industrial compressor Distribute power (Gas turbine &Fuel Cell Hybrid) MICRO GAS TURBINES 100 Turbec, ABB & Volvo 70, 250 Ingersoll Rand...

  17. Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fuel Economy (CJ-4) FEP estimate assumes adiabatic expansion of ideal gas through turbo Model inputs from experimental data Soot + ash results in largest increase in...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuels Data Center provides basic information on alternative fuels, including Biodiesel, Ethanol, Natural Gas, Propane, and Hydrogen. The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO)...

  19. Boundary Layer Lubrication Mechanisms | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximatelyBoostingand Capacity Concerns inStudy1

  20. Boundary Layer Lubrication Mechanisms | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximatelyBoostingand Capacity Concerns

  1. Boundary Layer Lubrication | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximatelyBoostingand Capacity

  2. Boundary Layer Lubrication | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximatelyBoostingand Capacity2009 DOE Hydrogen

  3. fuels and lubricants | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., December 8,JohnResolving7 A Study ofWaterFuels

  4. Fuel & Lubricant Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2JessiNicholasRE:Energy Frozen

  5. Fuel & Lubricant Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2JessiNicholasRE:Energy

  6. Fuel and Lubricant Effects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies Program (FCTP)OverviewgreenLifeDepartmentand

  7. OpenEI Community - Lubricant Additives

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff the GridHomeWrap-up courtesy of

  8. OpenEI Community - Lubricant Additives Market

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff the GridHomeWrap-up courtesy of

  9. OpenEI Community - Lubricants Market

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff the GridHomeWrap-up courtesy of

  10. OpenEI Community - Lubrication Systems

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff the GridHomeWrap-up courtesy of

  11. OpenEI Community - Lubrication Systems Market

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff the GridHomeWrap-up courtesy of

  12. OpenEI Community - Marine Lubricants

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff the GridHomeWrap-up courtesy

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office: Lubricants | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 -Helicopter-JapanEnergy AlternativeEnergy Key Activities in

  14. NOVEL LUBRICANT ADDITIVES - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif Directorate1,Stewardship now661NONLINEARRPSEA~ ~ . _NOVA

  15. OpenEI Community - Offshore Lubricants Market

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio: Energy Resourcesen)5/0 en Global8/0

  16. Lubricant Additives Market | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lu'an Group

  17. Lubricants Market | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lu'an

  18. Lubrication Systems Market | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lu'an

  19. Lubrication Systems | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lu'an

  20. Marine Lubricants | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  1. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; J. Erwin; Matthew G. Banks; Terry L. Ullman

    2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 identified as potential technical risks to the EECP the fuel/engine performance and emissions of the F-T diesel fuel products. Hydrotreating the neat F-T diesel product reduces potentially reactive olefins, oxygenates, and acids levels and alleviates corrosion and fuel stability concerns. Future coproduction plants can maximize valuable transportation diesel by hydrocracking the F-T Synthesis wax product to diesel and naphtha. The upgraded neat F-T diesel, hydrotreater F-T diesel, and hydrocracker F-T diesel products would be final blending components in transportation diesel fuel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully carried out fuel lubricity property testing, fuel response to lubricity additives, and hot-start transient emission tests on a neat F-T diesel product, a hydrocracker F-T diesel product, a blend of hydrotreater and hydrocracker F-T diesel products, and a Tier II California Air Resources Board (CARB)-like diesel reference fuel. Only the neat F-T diesel passed lubricity inspection without additive while the remaining three fuel candidates passed with conventional additive treatment. Hot-start transient emission tests were conducted on the four fuels in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Federal Test Procedure (FTP) specified in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 86, and Subpart N on a rebuilt 1991 Detroit Diesel Corporation Series 60 heavy-duty diesel engine. Neat F-T diesel fuel reduced oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), total particulate (PM), hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and the Soluble Organic Fraction (SOF) by 4.5%, 31%, 50%, 29%, and 35%, respectively, compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The hydrocracker F-T diesel product and a blend of hydrocracker and hydrotreater F-T diesel products also reduced NO{sub x}, PM, HC, CO and SOF by 13%, 16% to 17%, 38% to 63%, 17% to 21% and 21% to 39% compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The fuel/engine performance and emissions of the three F-T diesel fuels exceed the performance of a Tier II CARB-like diesel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully met the lubricity property testing and F-T diesel fuel hot-start transient emissions test objectives. The results of the testing help mitigate potential economic risks on obtaining a premium price for the F-T diesel fuel

  2. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Aviation | Naphtha- | Kerosene- | Propane Month | Gasoline | Type | Type | (Consumer | | Jet Fuel | Jet Fuel | Grade) | | | | | | | | ||...

  3. EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; Ming He; James F. Stevens; Centha A. Davis; Michael Henley; Jerome Mayer; Harry Tsang; Jimell Erwin; Jennifer Adams; Michael Tillman; Chris Taylor; Marjan J. Roos; Robert F. Earhart

    2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The potential technical and economic risks to the EECP from Task 2.5 can be mitigated by demonstrating that the end-use products derived from the upgrading of the F-T synthesis total liquid product can meet or exceed current specifications for the manufacture of ethylene and propylene chemicals from F-T naphtha, for the generation of hydrogen from F-T naphtha to power fuel cells, for direct blending of F-T diesels into transportation fuels, for the conversion of F-T heavy product wax to transportation fuels, and the conversion of F-T Heavy product wax to a valuable high melting point food-grade specialty wax product. Product evaluations conducted under Task 2.5 of Phase II successfully mitigated the above technical and economic risks to the EECP with the development of product yields and product qualities for the production of chemicals, transportation fuels, and specialty food-grade waxes from the F-T synthesis products.

  4. Vyacheslav Solovyov, Harold Wiesmann and Masaki Department of Condensed Matter Physics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    waxClear wax Exposed filmExposed film SubstrateSubstrate Clear waxClear wax Film wedgeFilm wedge SubstrateSubstrate YBCOYBCO Clear waxClear wax 200200 µµµµµµµµmm InterferometryInterferometry:: Linear

  5. unknown title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David C. Kramer; Brent K. Lok; Russ R. Krug

    seen many phases of evolution. As it continues to evolve at an ever-increasing rate, base oil performance is making a larger contribution to finished lubricant performance. Turbine oils are perhaps the most dramatic example because they typically contain over 99 % base oil. Early lubrication began with animal fats and oils and slowly evolved to petroleum-based oils. Many generations of refining processes have since improved on Mother Nature. Early processes such as acid treating and solvent extraction improved the quality of base oils by removing some or most of the worst molecules from the oil. Later processes like hydrotreating, catalytic hydrocracking, catalytic dewaxing, and modern wax hydroisomerization transformed feed molecules into molecules with improved lubricating qualities. Modern wax hydroisomerization, in particular, makes base oils with very low impurities and typically water-white appearance. Now, about one third of all base oils manufactured in North America are of such high quality. Looking to the future, the trend is toward even higher base oil purity, higher viscosity index (V.I.), lower volatility, and longer life. The distinction between heavily processed mineral oils and traditional “synthetic ” oils will continue to blur. The evolution and future of base oil technology will be discussed in more detail in this paper.

  6. Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Xiaoming

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MW) CERT-1 Gas turbine Steam turbine Total Naphtha DieselMW) CERT-3 CERT-3B Gas turbine Steam turbine Total Naphthageneration (MW) Gas turbine Steam turbine Total Naphtha

  7. advanced lubrication systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    51 An Overview on Advance Metering System CiteSeer Summary: Abstract The term "Smart meter " typically refers to an electrical meter, but the term is also starting to be...

  8. Synovial fluid homeostasis : bulk flow, lubricant transport, and biophysical restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarty, William Joseph

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4 for a biomimetic bioreactor. Biotechnol Bioeng. 106:149-4 for a biomimetic bioreactor. Biotechnol Bioeng Blom AM,affixed to the lid of a bioreactor, and suspended in media.

  9. Lubrication in a corner Roman Stocker and A. E. Hosoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosoi, Anette "Peko"

    ). In agriculture, they play an important role in determining the effectiveness of agrochemicals like insecticides

  10. Engine lubrication circuit including two pumps | OSTI, US Dept...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    predetermined flow volume as soon as the engine reaches a peak torque engine speed. In engines that operate predominately at speeds above the peak torque engine speed, the...

  11. Synovial fluid homeostasis : bulk flow, lubricant transport, and biophysical restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarty, William Joseph

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    biosynthesis with cycloheximide (CX) diminishes both theC) and cellular biosynthesis (±CX) on matrix depletion (sGAG3) 28d (n=5) at 37ºC without CX, for (4) 28d (n=4) at 4ºC

  12. Correlations Between Metallic Lubricant Additive Species in the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006deerwatson.pdf More Documents & Publications Examining Effects of...

  13. Proteoglycan 4 metabolism and boundary lubrication of articular cartilage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Tannin A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    occurs. Pressure, surface roughness, and relative slidinga sliding friction machine. Although fluid pressure effectspressure in the viscous film separating the surfaces cause significant elastic deformation of the sliding

  14. Force Field Parameter Estimation of Functional Perfluoropolyether Lubricants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.; Chung, P.S.; Steckel, J; Jhon, M.S.; Biegler, L.T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The head disk interface in a hard disk drive can be considered to be one of the hierarchical multiscale systems, which require the hybridization of multiscale modeling methods with coarse-graining procedure. However, the fundamental force field parameters are required to enable the coarse-graining procedure from atomistic/molecular scale to mesoscale models. In this paper, we investigate beyond molecular level and perform ab initio calculations to obtain the force field parameters. Intramolecular force field parameters for Zdol and Ztetraol were evaluated with truncated PFPE molecules to allow for feasible quantum calculations while still maintaining the characteristic chemical structure of the end groups. Using the harmonic approximation to the bond and angle potentials, the parameters were derived from the Hessian matrix, and the dihedral force constants are fit to the torsional energy profiles generated by a series of constrained molecular geometry optimization.

  15. Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ace046lawson2011...

  16. Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. ace046lawson2010...

  17. Project Report Friction Measurement and Lubricating of Rotary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müftü, Sinan

    -sensor. Among the versatile material foundation to build up the MEMS device, silicon wafer is preferred to due contributions to the contemporary micro-scale instruments especially for the micro-actuator and micro Understanding the micro-tribology in normal-scale existing theory Invalidation of micro-tribology by normal-scale

  18. Lubricant Formulation and Consumption Effects on Diesel Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Exhaust Particle Size Distributions and Detailed Exhaust Chemical Composition Unraveling DPF Degradation using Chemical Tracers and Opportunities for Extending Filter Life...

  19. Detailed Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Species in the Ring Pack and Ash Emissions and Their Dependence on Crankcase Oil Properties Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime Fuel Economy...

  20. Tribological Properties of Nanoparticle-Based Lubrication Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kheireddin, Bassem

    2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    and wear. A system consisting of silica nanoparticles dispersed in ionic liquids was examined at various concentrations. It was found that an optimum concentration of nanoparticles exists and yields the best tribological properties. Such work represents...

  1. Smart Surface and Lubrication Engineering show Promise for Gearbox...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    bearings, fatigue cracking, and scuffing, as well as hydrogen embrittlement and tribo-corrosion. The approach proved successful as the team's application of the ultra-fast boriding...

  2. Synovial fluid homeostasis : bulk flow, lubricant transport, and biophysical restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarty, William Joseph

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    76 Figure 3.4: Torque Traces from TEG-likeand thromboelastography (TEG). An aPTT test indicates thesuch as kaolin or silica [17]. TEG testing is typically used

  3. Friction of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by reducing parasitic boundary regime friction losses and enable operation with lower viscosity oils while maintaining engine durability. deer08erck.pdf More Documents &...

  4. Modeling piston skirt lubrication in internal combustion engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Dongfang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ever-increasing demand for reduction of the undesirable emissions from the internal combustion engines propels broader effort in auto industry to design more fuel efficient engines. One of the major focuses is the reduction ...

  5. Tribological Properties of Ionic Liquids Lubricants Containing Nanoparticles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Wei

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    O_(2) nanoparticles, and shown that functionalized SiO_(2) nanoparticles led to improved colloidal stability. Friction force profiles, friction coefficients, viscosity behavior, wear behavior of these mixtures at various nanoparticles concentrations...

  6. Large-Scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticle-Based Lubrication Additives...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    nanoparticulate-basedlubrication.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Nanolubricants for Improved Energy Efficiency and...

  7. Unburned lubricant produces 60%90% of organic carbon emissions.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fuel, biodiesel, and CNG The study confirmed that normally functioning emission control systems These findings will help focus future research and development efforts on technology improvements

  8. Proteoglycan 4 metabolism and boundary lubrication of articular cartilage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Tannin A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    test parameters, which may be due to continuous rotation during the relatively short time allowed for creep (creep. Samples were then compressed to 1-? Z = 18% again, and the test

  9. Proteoglycan 4 metabolism and boundary lubrication of articular cartilage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Tannin A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coupling processes is critical for understanding the dynamic processesdynamic processes of cartilage, such as growth, maturation, homeostasis, and degeneration, is elucidating at various levels of detail the chemomechanical coupling

  10. Force Field Parameter Estimation of Functional Perfluoropolyether Lubricants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.; Chung, P.S.; Steckel, J; Jhon, M.S.; Biegler, L.T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The head disk interface in hard disk drive can be considered one of the hierarchical multiscale systems, which require the hybridization of multiscale modeling methods with coarse-graining procedure. However, the fundamental force field parameters are required to enable the coarse-graining procedure from atomistic/molecular scale to mesoscale models .In this paper, we investigate beyond molecular level and perform ab-initio calculations to obtain the force field parameters. Intramolecular force field parameters for the Zdol and Ztetraol were evaluated with truncated PFPE molecules to allow for feasible quantum calculations while still maintaining the characteristic chemical structure of the end groups. Using the harmonic approximation to the bond and angle potentials, the parameters were derived from the Hessian matrix, and the dihedral force constants are fit to the torsional energy profiles generated by a series of constrained molecular geometry optimization.

  11. Tribological Properties of Nanoparticle-Based Lubrication Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kheireddin, Bassem

    2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    properties of these materials in relation to surface topography. Chemical etching and metal evaporation methods were employed to prepare surfaces with various topographies. Surfaces were sheared with the use of a nanotribometer and characterized...

  12. Biodiesel Impact on Engine Lubricant Oil Dilution | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand SustainedBio-Oil Deployment in

  13. Global Offshore Lubricants Market | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAddInformation Livestock Production andGlobal

  14. automotive lubricants astm: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in cartilaginous joints. J. M. Skotheim; L. Mahadevan 2004-04-04 3 COASTAL HOUSEHOLD AIR TRAVEL SPORTS & RECREATION MANUFACTURING AUTOMOTIVE PUBLIC SAFETY MEDICAL...

  15. Friction Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOE March, 20152LLC andActivities

  16. Friction of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in Commercial

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOE March, 20152LLCDepartment ofDepartmentGear

  17. Fuels and Lubricants to Support Advanced Diesel Engine Technology |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies ProgramOutfitted with SCREngines | Department

  18. Fuels & Lubricants R&D | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 Budget Fossil Energy FYWednesday,NewsletterFuelFuelingFuels

  19. Ionic Liquids as Multifunctional Ashless Additives for Engine Lubrication |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report: I11IG002RTC3 | 12/1/2014 | © 2014 Robert

  20. Large-Scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticle-Based Lubrication Additives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLEDControl

  1. Large-Scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticle-Based Lubrication Additives |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLEDControlDepartment of Energy

  2. Natural Oils - The Next Generation of Diesel Engine Lubricants?

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDyn NOPRNancyNationalNatural GasImports3

  3. FY 2012 Progress Report for Fuel & Lubricant Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartment of Energy 1. RecyclingEnergy12Energy FY911

  4. Correlations Between Metallic Lubricant Additive Species in the Ring Pack

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30, 2013Department of EnergyCore Measure5and Ash

  5. Offshore Lubricants Market Analysis | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jumpsource HistoryFracturesOceano,InfrastructureOffshore

  6. Offshore Lubricants Market Forecast | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jumpsource

  7. Large-Scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticle-Based Lubrication Additives |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas » MethaneJohnsonKristinaLandscape2014) |Department

  8. 2011 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Fuels & Lubricants | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHE U.S.Energy Two0225145750414.pdf1 ARRAAcronymsof

  9. 2011 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Fuels & Lubricants | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHE U.S.Energy Two0225145750414.pdf1 ARRAAcronymsofof

  10. 2013 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Fuels & Lubricants | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHE U.S.Energy19.xlsx2EnergySmartof Energy Fuels

  11. 2014 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Fuels & Lubricants Technologies |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHEEnergy VehicleSession | DepartmentDepartment of Energy

  12. Lubrication Systems Market : Mining & Mineral Processing Industry Dominated

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other4Q07) WindLow Voltage CablesWellsIGrowingthe

  13. Characteristics and Effects of Lubricant Additive Chemistry and Exhaust

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof EnergyAdministration-Desertof Energy018-891:QER9 TechnicalConditions

  14. Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE Project) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the White Flag"Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and

  15. Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE Project) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the White Flag"Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen

  16. Collaborative Lubricating Oil Study on Emissions (CLOSE) Project |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the White Flag"Department of Energy 1 DOE

  17. Reducing Lubricant Ash Impact on Exhaust Aftertreatment with a Oil

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010InJanuary 29, 2013Redbird RedcombinationConditioning

  18. Low Reactivity SI Engine Lubricant Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy andTerms LoanLos AngelesGuillermo10Reactivity SI

  19. Lubricant Formulation and Consumption Effects on Diesel Exhaust Ash

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy andTermsDepartment1 DOEEmissionLowell,2Watts6

  20. Lubricants - Pathway to Improving Fuel Efficiency of Legacy Fleet Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy andTermsDepartment1| Department of Energy -

  1. OpenEI Community - Global Offshore Lubricants Market

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio: Energy Resourcesen)5/0 en Global8/0 en

  2. OpenEI Community - Offshore Lubricants Market Analysis

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio: Energy Resourcesen)5/0 en Global8/0

  3. OpenEI Community - Offshore Lubricants Market Forecast

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio: Energy Resourcesen)5/0 en Global8/0

  4. OpenEI Community - Offshore Lubricants Market Size

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio: Energy Resourcesen)5/0 en Global8/0

  5. OpenEI Community - Offshore Lubricants Market Trends

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio: Energy Resourcesen)5/0 en Global8/0

  6. Auto/Steel Partnership: Hydroforming Materials and Lubricant Lightweight

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments from TarasaName4ServicesTribal RenewableAustinAutoDepartment

  7. Natural Oils - The Next Generation of Diesel Engine Lubricants? |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T en Y ear R enewable E nergy P

  8. Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission Aftertreatment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311,Official FileEnergy Midsize9 Suggested Actions â–  â– 63

  9. Engine Lubricants: Trends and Challenges | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |inHVACEnforcementEngaging Students in

  10. Examining Effects of Lubricant Composition in Engine Component Systems in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandardGeneration |10Examination Report:ExaminationDepartment

  11. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of Lubricant and Additive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in Representative Geologic Media | Department of Energy Experimental

  12. Lubrication Behavior of Biolubricants and Antiwear Performance of Ionic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home and It'll Love You Back Love Your PrincipalLiquids

  13. Ionic Liquids as Lubricants or Additives - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation Peer Review 2012 May20108899

  14. High-Performance Renewable Base Oils for Industrial Lubricants | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e p p a a r r tEnergyAmerica Topbyof

  15. Smart Surface and Lubrication Engineering show Promise for Gearbox

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary ofSmall BusinessSecondarySmarttheSmart

  16. Multi component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311,OfficialProductsUptake andUser ManualTowardMulti MaterialAnd

  17. Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311,OfficialProductsUptake andUserBattelle for

  18. Natural Oils - The Next Generation of Diesel Engine Lubricants? |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked QuestionsDepartment of EnergyofPROTECTINGof November 12-13,VehiclesOils -

  19. Impact of Biodiesel on Ash Emissions and Lubricant Properties Affecting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  20. Research on Fuels & Lubricants | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy using FuesInterconnection-LevelRefueling FacilityResearch

  1. Removing Stains from Washable Fabrics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beard, Ann Vanderpoorten

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Page Numbers Stain Page Numbers Acne medicine Blueberry Special 9 Wet 8 Adhesive tape Dye 8 Special 9 Butter Alcoholic beverages Dry 8 Wet 8 Oil 8 Tannin 8 Calamine lotion Asphalt Combination 8 Combination 8 Dye 8 Dye 8 Candle wax Automotive... the most gentle to the most harsh, so always stop treatments as soon as the stain has been removed. Dry Type Stains Dissolve the stain with a grease solvent. Lubricate the stain with dry spotter, coconut oil or mineral oil (sold in health food...

  2. Determining Genetic Overlap between Staygreen, Leaf Wax and Canopy Temperature Depression in Sorghum RILs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awika, Henry

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -CTD wl-EWL w-lFT cx-CTD cx-EWL cx-FT gh-CTD 1.00 0.86* -0.09 0.30* 0.58* 0.22* 0.04 0.80* -0.12 0.28* 0.40* -0.10 gh-EWL 1.00 -0.04 0.38* 0.65* 0.12 0.19 0.87* -0.02 0.24* 0.49* -0.07 gh-FT 1.00 -0.10 -0.06 0.07 -0.24* -0.01 0.39* 0.25* 0.06 0...-EWL 1.00 -0.07 0.35* 0.62* -0.16 wl-FT 1.00 0.38* -0.21* 0.60* cx-CTD 1.00 0.57* 0.56* cx-EWL 1.00 0.29* cxFT 1.00 ? 3 phenotypic values are represented in columns...

  3. Effects of Sugars on Lipid Bilayers during Dehydration ? SAXS/WAXS Measurements and Quantitative Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenne, Thomas; Garvey, Christopher J.; Koster, Karen L.; Bryant, Gary; (ANSTO); (USD); (RMIT)

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an X-ray scattering study of the effects of dehydration on the bilayer and chain-chain repeat spacings of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers in the presence of sugars. The presence of sugars has no effect on the average spacing between the phospholipid chains in either the fluid or gel phase. Using this finding, we establish that for low sugar concentrations only a small amount of sugar exclusion occurs. Under these conditions, the effects of sugars on the membrane transition temperatures can be explained quantitatively by the reduction in hydration repulsion between bilayers due to the presence of the sugars. Specific bonding of sugars to lipid headgroups is not required to explain this effect.

  4. A new thermodynamic model to predict wax deposition from crude oils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loganathan, Narayanan

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of enthalpy, entropy and heat capacities from the ideal gas state. The compressibility factor of both the simple fluid Z and the reference fluid Z ' have been represented by the following reduced form of a modified BWR equation of state P, V, B C 0 Z= ' =1... for other thermodynamic properties, and Eqn. 66 with the constants for Z(' deter- mined from n-octane data. The value of w(' was determined to be equal to 0. 3978. To calculate Z for the fluid of interest, given a T and P: l. The reduced properties, T...

  5. Broken bracelets, Molien series, paraffin wax and an elliptic curve of conductor 48

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amdeberhan, Tewodros; Moll, Victor H

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces the concept of necklace binomial coefficients motivated by the enumeration of a special type of sequences. Several properties of these coefficients are described, including a connection between their roots and an elliptic curve. Further links are given to a physical model from quantum mechanical supersymmetry as well as properties of alkane molecules in chemistry.

  6. Using cuticular wax alkanes to estimate herbage intake in animals fed supplements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ) were offered diets of lucerne chaff : oat grain in the ratios 593 : 107, 488 : 214 and 378 : 322 g DM Res, 43, 1711-1724). Intakes of lucerne chaff were then calculated from the concentrations of adjacent and the diet components. Three estimates of lucerne intake were thus possible, based on the alkane pairs C28/C

  7. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax from Catalyst by Supercritical Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark C. Thies; Patrick C. Joyce

    1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of January I to March 31, 1998. The direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows was completed. Variations of particle trajectories are studied. It is shown that the near wall vortices profoundly affect the particle removal process in turbulent boundary layer flows. Experimental data for transport and deposition of fibrous particles in the aerosol wind tunnel was obtained. The measured deposition velocity for irregular fibrous particles is compared with the empirical correlation and the available data for glass fibers and discussed. Additional progress on the sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition and resuspension in turbulent flows was made.

  8. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax from Catalyst by Supercritical Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark C. Thies; Patrick C. Joyce

    1998-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of January I to March 31, 1998. The direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows was completed. Variations of particle trajectories are studied. It is shown that the near wall vortices profoundly affect the particle removal process in turbulent boundary layer flows. Experimental data for transport and deposition of fibrous particles in the aerosol wind tunnel was obtained. The measured deposition velocity for irregular fibrous particles is compared with the empirical correlation and the available data for glass fibers and discussed. Additional progress on the sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition and resuspension in turbulent flows was made.

  9. Determining Genetic Overlap between Staygreen, Leaf Wax and Canopy Temperature Depression in Sorghum RILs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awika, Henry

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    in this project. The support from the department colleagues, faculty and staff has been an integral part of my wholesome experience at Texas A&M University. Special thanks also go to the Institute of Plant Genomics and Biotechnology, the Texas A&M Agri... length polymorphism SS Sum of squares SSR Single sequence repeats Stg Staygreen TD Temperature depression vii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT?????????????????????????????????????? iii DEDICATION...

  10. Behavioral Ecology Vol. 13 No. 3: 375380 Female greater wax moths reduce sexual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auckland, University of

    , and Stuart Parsons School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UG, UK in the evolution of audition (Faure and Hoy, 2000) and will present the greatest challeng- es when conspecifics) with peak energy between 80 and 100 kHz, and they are emitted in ap- proximatley 0.5-s bursts

  11. Proteomic profiling of intact proteins using WAX-RPLC 2-D separations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    also detected for S. oneidensis lysates obtained from cells grown on 13C, 15N depleted media under aerobic and sub-oxic conditions. This work aimed at optimizing intact protein...

  12. MODELLING WAX DIFFUSION IN CRUDE OILS: THE COLD FINGER , A. Fasano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Primicerio, Mario

    to simulate deposition in static and dynamic conditions, see [3], [4], [6], [5]) are set up in order]). Of course, the phenomenon differs from the one observed in the static case (see [3], [4]). This is basi-axially inserted in the bath. Simultaneously a mixer placed at the bottom begins to stir the oil. When the vicinity

  13. An Emotive Mechanism: Phonographic Wonders and Possibilities at the Turn of the 20th Century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garza, Gustavo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    345- Rehding, Alexander. “Wax Cylinder Revolutions. ” Theability to inscribe onto a wax cylinder whatever sounds wereset down in the wax. ” 55 With these improvements, the

  14. Part IB Metals Course A: Worked Examples (20-22)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    -resistant nickel base alloy cast using the lost wax process in which a wax model is surrounded by ceramic, the wax

  15. Sparse gallium arsenide to silicon metal waferbonding for heterogeneous monolithic microwave integrated circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bickford, Justin Robert

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    process: after sample pair wax wetting. .. 311 Figureprocess: after PMGI and wax dissolution and composite1. Picture of an example wax wetting two microscope slide

  16. Absorption of Foliar-Applied Nitrogen by Cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oosterhuis, Derrick M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the epicuticular wax composition and ultrastructure ofleaf age, epicuticular wax, and nitrogen-15 absorption. Cropleaf cuticle and epicuticular wax as described by Oosterhuis

  17. Case Discussions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Robin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    racks, cotton, pins, mica, wax, rubber, ink jet prints onracks, cotton, pins, mica, wax, rubber, ink jet prints onfloor juxtaposed with large wax and pigment drawings on the

  18. A method for three-dimensional interfacial particle image velocimetry (3D-IPIV) of an air–water interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turney, D E; Anderer, A; Banerjee, S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This led us to the molten wax dispersion technique, which wethat could keep the wax dispersion stable, especially duringthe phase transition when the wax becomes a polycrystalline

  19. Staging Display in the Sculptural Work of Yinka Shonibare MBE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilder, Courtney Tanner

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    life-size mannequins, Dutch wax printed cotton, accessories.life-size mannequins, Dutch wax printed cotton, accessories.life-size mannequins, Dutch wax printed cotton, accessories.

  20. Experimental validation of flow properties in a novel Y- graft for the Fontan surgery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermeyen, Craig

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using the lost-wax technique. .. 78 Figure 6. Resin model with wax model13 Figure 10. Silicone model prepared for wax-

  1. Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortman, J. L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Escherichia coli: jojoba oil-like wax esters and fatty acidof isoprenoid wax ester in Marinobacterhydrocarbonoclasticuscoenzyme A synthetase and wax ester synthases. J. Bacteriol.

  2. Study of the Electrochemical System of Antimony-Tellurium in Dimethyl Sulfoxide for Growth of Nanowire Arrays, and an Innovative Method for Single Nanowire Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalisman, Philip Taubman

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pores blocked with wax . . . . . . . . . . . Tellurium andwire embedded in paraffin wax (figure 2.3c). Each isneedle was mounted in wax, in the same way as the platinum

  3. Vacuum pyrolysis of used tires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, C.; Darmstadt, H.; Benallal, B.; Chaala, A.; Schwerdtfeger, A.E. [Univ. Laval, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada). Dept. de Geneie Chimique

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vacuum pyrolysis of used tires enables the recovery of useful products, such as pyrolytic oil and pyrolytic carbon black (CB{sub P}). The light part of the pyrolytic oil contains dl-limonene which has a high price on the market. The naphtha fraction can be used as a high octane number component for gasoline. The middle distillate demonstrated mechanical and lubricating properties similar to those of the commercial aromatic oil Dutrex R 729. The heavy oil was tested as a feedstock for the production of needle coke. It was found that the surface morphology of CB{sub P} produced by vacuum pyrolysis resembles that of commercial carbon black. The CB{sub P} contains a higher concentration of inorganic compounds (especially ZnO and S) than commercial carbon black. The pyrolysis process feasibility looks promising. One old tire can generate upon vacuum pyrolysis, incomes of at least $2.25 US with a potential of up to $4.83 US/tire upon further product improvement. The process has been licensed to McDermott Marketing Servicing Inc. (Houston) for its exploitation in the US.

  4. Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Xiaoming

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diesel/Naphtha Heating Value + Electrical Power Equivalent)/ Fuel Heating Value,diesel produced (36/64) here has the same heating value as corresponding petroleum derived fuel (

  5. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diesel Fuel and Naphtha Crude Oil Production/ Transportationwith crude oil and natural gas production respectively toEmissions from Production and Refining Crude Oil into Low-

  6. HCCI in a Variable Compression Ratio Engine: Effects of Engine...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Dv,0.5 Combustion Chamber Photo Combustion Chamber Photo Test Fuels Test Fuels Diesel Fuel (Typical US) Gasoline (Pump Grade 87 RON) Fischer Tropsch Naphtha Blends of...

  7. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gallons per Day) - Continued Geographic Area Month Aviation Gasoline Naphtha- Type Jet Fuel Kerosene- Type Jet Fuel Propane (Consumer Grade) Residual Fuel Oil Sulfur Less...

  8. X:\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma00.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gallons per Day) - Continued Geographic Area Month Aviation Gasoline Naphtha- Type Jet Fuel Kerosene- Type Jet Fuel Propane (Consumer Grade) Residual Fuel Oil Sulfur Less...

  9. HOSPITAL VENTILATION STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: A SUMMARY OF THE LITERATURE WITH CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS, FY 78 FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeRoos, R.L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur Trioxide -l-Sulfuric Acid 4-Tar 3-Tarnishing Gases 4-tar) -l-Naphtha (Petroleum) 4-Naphthalene 4-Nicotine 3-Nitr.ic Acid

  10. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO2 Emissions from Production and Refining Crude Oil into Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel and Naphtha Crude Oil Production/ Transportation Refining Refining – Non- Combustion

  11. alkane dehydrogenation catalyst: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1462, United States b Oak Ridge National is steam cracking of alkanes, naphtha, or gas oil. This process is typically...

  12. Microsoft Word - Jeff_Miller_IACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    responsible for development of new refining catalysts: areas of expertise include syngas conversion to alcohols and hydrocarbons, synthetic fuels hydroprocessing, naphtha...

  13. Summary and perspectives Chapter 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van den Brink, Jeroen

    , sterol esters/wax esters (SE/WE), triglycerides (TG) and dihydroxy wax esters (DIOL). All SC barrier

  14. Painted Funerary Portraits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borg, Barbara E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    largest group is painted in wax color, possibly sometimesmixed in with the molten wax, which was either painted onto

  15. STUDIES ON THE BIOLOGY OF RHYSSA PERSUASORZA (L.) (HYMENOPTERA: ICHNEUMONIDAE) INCORPORATING AN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with several layers of microcrystalline wax or a mixture of equal parts of petroleum jelly and paraffin wax

  16. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax from Catalyst Using Near-Critical Fluid Extraction: Analysis of Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilpatrick, Peter K.

    the flowsheet contained only one product recovery unit. Self-sufficiency was obtained with multiple recovery for the recovery of heavy normal paraffins from a Fischer-Tropsch slurry reactor has been analyzed. Process extraction temperatures and higher slurry flowrates, but had several attractive features such as lower vapor

  17. NATURE PHYSICS | VOL 10 | FEBRUARY 2014 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 81 String and sealing wax --although probably

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    , the Japanese space agency, JAXA, launched Hayabusa: the spacecraft made its rendezvous with the asteroid knife-edge moments that characterize so many missions in space. After three years of hibernation out, California. Rosetta launched in 2004 and has executed a series of slingshot manoeuvres, plus its period of no-solar

  18. Hydrocarbon Separations in Metal-Organic Frameworks Zoey R. Herm, Eric D. Bloch, and Je rey R. Long*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    * Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California, 94720, United States *S Supporting, gasoline, naphtha, kerosene, gas oil, and residue. Compositions among these fractions vary widely.22 The liquids and gases discussed in this review mostly fall into the light gas, gasoline, or naphtha fractions

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Fuel and Lubricant Effects on Emissions Control Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about fuel and...

  20. BERTOZZI,A.L. Lubrication Approximations for Surface Tension Driven Interfaces: Some

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ball, John M.

    the 3D NAVIER-STOKESequations to the free surface condition. This is a difficult set of equations and the design of inkjet printers. Solving the full system of equations is often an extremely difficult task both

  1. The effect of lubricant derived ash on the catalytic activity of diesel particulate filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Timothy Quinn

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A diesel particulate filter (DPF) is an aftertreatment device used to remove hazardous particulate matter (PM) from diesel engine exhaust. Modem emission restrictions have limited the acceptable amount of PM output by ...

  2. April 24, 2006 Mechanics of Contact and Lubrication, MTM G230

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müftü, Sinan

    in this paper has Inconel 783 compressor and combustor parts. Tribaloy T-800 has the coefficient of friction .04 in the combustor module. A leaf seal is used 1 #12;Sam Rulli April 24, 2006 to block air from escaping the flow path and allow relative motion between the two modules. Both mating parts are thermally sprayed

  3. Ionic Liquids as Multi-Functional Lubricant Additives to Enhance Engine Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  4. Effects of piston design and lubricant selection on reciprocating engine friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moughon, Luke (Luke Frank)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction between the piston and the liner in a reciprocating engine is of much interest because it affects reliability, noise, and efficiency. This study evaluated various changes to the piston skirt with the specific ...

  5. Tribology Transactions, 51: 247-253, 2008 Copyright C Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawyer, Wallace

    ) polymer is well known for the low friction it can provide in dry sliding. The hypothesis for the low a low coefficient of friction. This study attempts to further elucidate the mechanisms leading effect on the friction coefficient, with values for all composites tested additionally falling near

  6. ME 379M Lubrication, Wear, and Bearing Technology ABET EC2000 syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Yakar, Adela

    . Contact & Contact Mechanics 8. Friction, Wear & Third Bodies 9. Dry Friction & Wear 10. Roller Bearings

  7. Lubricants Market to Record 44,165.11 Kilo Tons Volume by 2020...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Automotive oils sector is further segmented into hydraulic oil, engine oil, and gear oil. Improving GDP in developing nations such as India and China has significantly spurred...

  8. Lubricant-derived ash : in-engine sources and opportunities for reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Simon A. G. (Simon Andrew Glean)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diesel particulate filters (DPF) are an effective means for meeting increasingly stringent emissions regulations that limit particulate matter. Over time, ash primarily derived from metallic additives in the engine oil ...

  9. Hazard Evaluation for a Salt Well Centrifugal Pump Design Using Service Water for Lubrication and Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRAMS, W.H.

    2000-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of a preliminary hazard analysis (PHA) covering the new salt well pump design. The PHA identified ten hazardous conditions mapped to four analyzed accidents: flammable gas deflagrations, fire in contaminated area, tank failure due to excessive loads, and waste transfer leaks. This document also presents the results of the control decision/allocation process. A backflow preventer and associated limiting condition were assigned.

  10. Boundary lubrication of articular cartilage : contribution of hyaluronan in health and injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonacci, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J Vet Res 43:1096-9, 1982. Saari H, Konttinen YT, Tulamo RM,J Vet Res 43:1096-9, 1982. Saari H, Konttinen YT, Tulamo RM,

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Fuel and Lubricant Effects on Emissions Control Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and vehicle technologies office annual merit review and peer evaluation meeting about fuel and...

  12. Lubricating-oil basestock data and analysis: based on the ASTM-NBS basestock consistency study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, D.A.; Hsu, S.M.; Weeks, S.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this 13-month study, four virgin oil and six re-refined oil companies submitted monthly production samples to National Bureau of Standards (NBS). There, the samples were subdivided, coded, and sent to 14 participating laboratories for analysis of the physical and chemical properties as well as for evaluation in various bench tests. An eleventh control sample was sent monthly for reference. Various re-refining processes included in the study are: acid/clay; clay treatment; short path distillation; pretreat/vacuum distillation/clay finish; pretreat/hydrogenation. The processes for the virgin base oils are mainly solvent extraction/distillation with and without the hydro-finishing step. In this report the data are grouped into six main categories: (1) theology; (2) physical properties; (3) chemical properties; (4) hydrocarbon type analysis; (5) general performance tests; and (6) oxidation and wear bench tests. Within each category, test results are arranged according to the similarity of the tests or test properties.

  13. Boundary lubrication of articular cartilage : contribution of hyaluronan in health and injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonacci, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sliding speed, and applied normal load (or mean pressure).pressure dissipates. Also, with the use of an annular geometry, the variation in sliding

  14. Advances in hybrid water-lubricated journal bearings for use in ocean vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heberley, Brian Douglas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The outboard bearings that support shafts in naval ships and submarines present unique challenges to designers, shipbuilders, and operators. Such bearings must operate continuously and reliably in demanding environments ...

  15. Numerical modeling of piston secondary motion and skirt lubrication in internal combustion engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClure, Fiona

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Internal combustion engines dominate transportation of people and goods, contributing significantly to air pollution, and requiring large amounts of fossil fuels. With increasing public concern about the environment and ...

  16. Effects of Y_(2)O_(3) and ?-ZrP Additives on Lubrication of Grease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chung Jwa

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    of worn surfaces will be conducted. Characterization includes optical microscope, interferometer, and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results showed that the addition of nanoparticles induced reduction of coefficient of friction. In addition, the wear...

  17. Mechanics of Contact and Lubrication, ME5656 Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müftü, Sinan

    , the concept and theory of tribology is already widely applied in research and design processes to repel any o o very long. stator of the als, undesira ne kind of a of the low l o the high sp urface

  18. Effects of Y_(2)O_(3) and ?-ZrP Additives on Lubrication of Grease 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chung Jwa

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    of worn surfaces will be conducted. Characterization includes optical microscope, interferometer, and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results showed that the addition of nanoparticles induced reduction of coefficient of friction. In addition, the wear...

  19. TiN-Coating Effects on Stainless Steel Tribological Behavior Under Dry and Lubricated Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    properties of magnetron sputtered titanium nitride coating on 316L steel, sliding against Si3N4 ceramic ball microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. TiN coatings and 316L stainless steel had better tribological, titanium nitride coating 1. Introduction Titanium nitride (TiN) coatings deposited by physical vapor

  20. Simulation of Thermal Stability and Friction: A lubricant confined between Monolayers of Wear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Çagin, Tahir

    , California 94802 3) Chevron Petroleum Technology Company, 1300 each Boulevard, La Habra, California 90631 using molecular dynamics. The interactions for DTP, DTC and Fe2O3 are evaluated based on a force field levels in modern engines. Although DTP is the most effective and economic antiwear agent used